National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for rounding sources electric

  1. Electric Kettle Takes Down Microwave in Final Round of #EnergyFaceoff |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Electric Kettle Takes Down Microwave in Final Round of #EnergyFaceoff Electric Kettle Takes Down Microwave in Final Round of #EnergyFaceoff November 24, 2014 - 12:13pm Addthis The electric kettle wins the final round of #EnergyFaceoff. | Graphic by Stacy Buchanan, National Renewable Energy Laboratory The electric kettle wins the final round of #EnergyFaceoff. | Graphic by Stacy Buchanan, National Renewable Energy Laboratory Allison Casey Senior Communicator, NREL How can

  2. Electric Blanket Delivers K.O. to Space Heater During #EnergyFaceoff Round Three

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    #EnergyFaceoff round three goes to the electric blanket, see how much more money it can save you over a space heater!

  3. Microwave vs. Electric Kettle: Which Appliance Is in Hot Water in #EnergyFaceoff Round 4?

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In the final #EnergyFaceoff round, the electric kettle takes on the microwave for the honor of heating your water.

  4. Fluid jet electric discharge source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bender, Howard A.

    2006-04-25

    A fluid jet or filament source and a pair of coaxial high voltage electrodes, in combination, comprise an electrical discharge system to produce radiation and, in particular, EUV radiation. The fluid jet source is composed of at least two serially connected reservoirs, a first reservoir into which a fluid, that can be either a liquid or a gas, can be fed at some pressure higher than atmospheric and a second reservoir maintained at a lower pressure than the first. The fluid is allowed to expand through an aperture into a high vacuum region between a pair of coaxial electrodes. This second expansion produces a narrow well-directed fluid jet whose size is dependent on the size and configuration of the apertures and the pressure used in the reservoir. At some time during the flow of the fluid filament, a high voltage pulse is applied to the electrodes to excite the fluid to form a plasma which provides the desired radiation; the wavelength of the radiation being determined by the composition of the fluid.

  5. Prestressed glass, aezoelectric electrical power source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Newson, Melvin M.

    1976-01-01

    An electrical power source which comprises a body of prestressed glass having a piezoelectric transducer supported on the body in direct mechanical coupling therewith.

  6. Extreme-UV electrical discharge source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fornaciari, Neal R.; Nygren, Richard E.; Ulrickson, Michael A.

    2002-01-01

    An extreme ultraviolet and soft x-ray radiation electric capillary discharge source that includes a boron nitride housing defining a capillary bore that is positioned between two electrodes one of which is connected to a source of electric potential can generate a high EUV and soft x-ray radiation flux from the capillary bore outlet with minimal debris. The electrode that is positioned adjacent the capillary bore outlet is typically grounded. Pyrolytic boron nitride, highly oriented pyrolytic boron nitride, and cubic boron nitride are particularly suited. The boron nitride capillary bore can be configured as an insert that is encased in an exterior housing that is constructed of a thermally conductive material. Positioning the ground electrode sufficiently close to the capillary bore outlet also reduces bore erosion.

  7. Electric Power From Ambient Energy Sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeSteese, John G.; Hammerstrom, Donald J.; Schienbein, Lawrence A.

    2000-10-03

    This report summarizes research on opportunities to produce electric power from ambient sources as an alternative to using portable battery packs or hydrocarbon-fueled systems in remote areas. The work was an activity in the Advanced Concepts Project conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the Office of Research and Development in the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nonproliferation and National Security.

  8. Solar Energy Sources SES Solar Inc formerly Electric Network...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    SES Solar Inc formerly Electric Network com Jump to: navigation, search Name: Solar Energy Sources - SES Solar Inc (formerly Electric Network.com) Place: Vancouver, British...

  9. Compact portable electric power sources (Technical Report) | SciTech

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Connect Compact portable electric power sources Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Compact portable electric power sources × You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) SciTech Connect. This site is a product of DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) and is provided as a public service. Visit OSTI to utilize additional information resources in energy science and technology. A paper copy of this document is also available for sale to the

  10. Table 8.4b Consumption for Electricity Generation by Energy Source...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    b Consumption for Electricity Generation by Energy Source: Electric Power Sector, ... See Note 3, "Electricity Imports and Exports," at end of section. 3Natural gas, plus a ...

  11. Combined Electric Machine and Current Source Inverter Drive System - Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Innovation Portal Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Energy Analysis Energy Analysis Advanced Materials Advanced Materials Find More Like This Return to Search Combined Electric Machine and Current Source Inverter Drive System Oak Ridge National Laboratory Contact ORNL About This Technology Publications: PDF Document Publication 11-G00249_ID2505.pdf (764 KB) Technology Marketing SummaryThis technology is a drive system that includes a permanent magnet-less (PM-L) electric motor

  12. Fact #753: November 12, 2012 Sources of Electricity by State | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy 3: November 12, 2012 Sources of Electricity by State Fact #753: November 12, 2012 Sources of Electricity by State Electric vehicles do not create emissions from a tailpipe like conventional vehicles do. The electricity used to fuel electric vehicles is generated at power plants all across the nation. Because each plant that generates electricity can use a different mix of energy sources, the emissions associated with electric vehicle charging can vary significantly depending on

  13. Electric machine and current source inverter drive system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hsu, John S

    2014-06-24

    A drive system includes an electric machine and a current source inverter (CSI). This integration of an electric machine and an inverter uses the machine's field excitation coil for not only flux generation in the machine but also for the CSI inductor. This integration of the two technologies, namely the U machine motor and the CSI, opens a new chapter for the component function integration instead of the traditional integration by simply placing separate machine and inverter components in the same housing. Elimination of the CSI inductor adds to the CSI volumetric reduction of the capacitors and the elimination of PMs for the motor further improve the drive system cost, weight, and volume.

  14. Semiconductor light source with electrically tunable emission wavelength

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Belenky, Gregory; Bruno, John D.; Kisin, Mikhail V.; Luryi, Serge; Shterengas, Leon; Suchalkin, Sergey; Tober, Richard L.

    2011-01-25

    A semiconductor light source comprises a substrate, lower and upper claddings, a waveguide region with imbedded active area, and electrical contacts to provide voltage necessary for the wavelength tuning. The active region includes single or several heterojunction periods sandwiched between charge accumulation layers. Each of the active region periods comprises higher and lower affinity semiconductor layers with type-II band alignment. The charge carrier accumulation in the charge accumulation layers results in electric field build-up and leads to the formation of generally triangular electron and hole potential wells in the higher and lower affinity layers. Nonequillibrium carriers can be created in the active region by means of electrical injection or optical pumping. The ground state energy in the triangular wells and the radiation wavelength can be tuned by changing the voltage drop across the active region.

  15. Electrode configuration for extreme-UV electrical discharge source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spence, Paul Andrew; Fornaciari, Neal Robert; Chang, Jim Jihchyun

    2002-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that debris generation within an electric capillary discharge source, for generating extreme ultraviolet and soft x-ray, is dependent on the magnitude and profile of the electric field that is established along the surfaces of the electrodes. An electrode shape that results in uniform electric field strength along its surface has been developed to minimize sputtering and debris generation. The electric discharge plasma source includes: (a) a body that defines a circular capillary bore that has a proximal end and a distal end; (b) a back electrode positioned around and adjacent to the distal end of the capillary bore wherein the back electrode has a channel that is in communication with the distal end and that is defined by a non-uniform inner surface which exhibits a first region which is convex, a second region which is concave, and a third region which is convex wherein the regions are viewed outwardly from the inner surface of the channel that is adjacent the distal end of the capillary bore so that the first region is closest to the distal end; (c) a front electrode positioned around and adjacent to the proximal end of the capillary bore wherein the front electrode has an opening that is communication with the proximal end and that is defined by a non-uniform inner surface which exhibits a first region which is convex, a second region which is substantially linear, and third region which is convex wherein the regions are viewed outwardly from the inner surface of the opening that is adjacent the proximal end of the capillary bore so that the first region is closest to the proximal end; and (d) a source of electric potential that is connected across the front and back electrodes.

  16. Fact #799: September 30, 2013 Electricity Generation by Source, 2003-2012 |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 9: September 30, 2013 Electricity Generation by Source, 2003-2012 Fact #799: September 30, 2013 Electricity Generation by Source, 2003-2012 With the increase in market penetration for electric vehicles, the upstream emissions from electricity generation become important. Those emissions are dependent upon the source of electricity generation. Although the generation of electricity varies greatly by region, the overall use of coal declined by about 24% from 2008 to 2012.

  17. 2015,"AK","Total Electric Power Industry","All Sources",18,8...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Electric Power Industry","All Sources",1,1,12,12 2015,"AR","Total Electric Power Industry","Solar Thermal and Photovoltaic",1,1,12,12 2015,"AZ","Total Electric Power ...

  18. Table 8.4a Consumption for Electricity Generation by Energy Source...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    a Consumption for Electricity Generation by Energy Source: Total (All Sectors), 1949-2011 ... See Note 3, "Electricity Imports and Exports," at end of section. 3Natural gas, plus a ...

  19. Roundness calibration standard

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burrus, Brice M.

    1984-01-01

    A roundness calibration standard is provided with a first arc constituting the major portion of a circle and a second arc lying between the remainder of the circle and the chord extending between the ends of said first arc.

  20. Table 8.4c Consumption for Electricity Generation by Energy Source...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    c Consumption for Electricity Generation by Energy Source: Commercial and Industrial ... Power Plants Into Energy-Use Sectors," at end of section. * Totals may not equal sum of ...

  1. Photovoltaic Supply Chain and Cross-Cutting Technologies Round 1 |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Technology to Market » Photovoltaic Supply Chain and Cross-Cutting Technologies Round 1 Photovoltaic Supply Chain and Cross-Cutting Technologies Round 1 On June 11, 2009, DOE announced the first round of Photovoltaic (PV) Supply Chain and Cross-Cutting Technologies awardees. The funded projects target manufacturing and product cost reduction with the potential to have a near-term impact on a substantial segment of the PV industry. General Electric Global Research

  2. Ultrafast electrical control of a resonantly driven single photon source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cao, Y.; Bennett, A. J. Ellis, D. J. P.; Shields, A. J.; Farrer, I.; Ritchie, D. A.

    2014-08-04

    We demonstrate generation of a pulsed stream of electrically triggered single photons in resonance fluorescence, by applying high frequency electrical pulses to a single quantum dot in a p-i-n diode under resonant laser excitation. Single photon emission was verified, with the probability of multiple photon emission reduced to 2.8%. We show that despite the presence of charge noise in the emission spectrum of the dot, resonant excitation acts as a filter to generate narrow bandwidth photons.

  3. International Technical Working Group Round Robin Tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dudder, Gordon B.; Hanlen, Richard C.; Herbillion, Georges M.

    2003-02-01

    The goal of nuclear forensics is to develop a preferred approach to support illicit trafficking investigations. This approach must be widely understood and accepted as credible. The principal objectives of the Round Robin Tests are to prioritize forensic techniques and methods, evaluate attribution capabilities, and examine the utility of database. The HEU (Highly Enriched Uranium) Round Robin, and previous Plutonium Round Robin, have made tremendous contributions to fulfilling these goals through a collaborative learning experience that resulted from the outstanding efforts of the nine participating internal laboratories. A prioritized list of techniques and methods has been developed based on this exercise. Current work is focused on the extent to which the techniques and methods can be generalized. The HEU Round Robin demonstrated a rather high level of capability to determine the important characteristics of the materials and processes using analytical methods. When this capability is combined with the appropriate knowledge/database, it results in a significant capability to attribute the source of the materials to a specific process or facility. A number of shortfalls were also identified in the current capabilities including procedures for non-nuclear forensics and the lack of a comprehensive network of data/knowledge bases. The results of the Round Robin will be used to develop guidelines or a ''recommended protocol'' to be made available to the interested authorities and countries to use in real cases.

  4. Metod And Apparatus For Debris Mitigation For An Electrical Discharge Source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Klebanoff, Leonard E.; Silfvast, William T.; Rader, Daniel J.

    2005-05-03

    Method and apparatus for mitigating the transport of debris generated and dispersed from electric discharge sources by thermophoretic and electrostatic deposition. A member is positioned adjacent the front electrode of an electric discharge source and used to establish a temperature difference between it and the front electrode. By flowing a gas between the member and the front electrode a temperature gradient is established that can be used for thermophoretic deposition of particulate debris on either the member or front electrode depending upon the direction of the thermal gradient. Establishing an electric field between the member and front electrode can aid in particle deposition by electrostatic deposition.

  5. Method and apparatus for debris mitigation for an electrical discharge source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Klebanoff, Leonard E.; Rader, Daniel J.; Silfvast, William T.

    2006-01-24

    Method and apparatus for mitigating the transport of debris generated and dispersed from electric discharge sources by thermophoretic and electrostatic deposition. A member is positioned adjacent the front electrode of an electric discharge source and used to establish a temperature difference between it and the front electrode. By flowing a gas between the member and the front electrode a temperature gradient is established that can be used for thermophoretic deposition of particulate debris on either the member or front electrode depending upon the direction of the thermal gradient. Establishing an electric field between the member and front electrode can aid in particle deposition by electrostatic deposition.

  6. Piping inspection round robin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heasler, P.G.; Doctor, S.R.

    1996-04-01

    The piping inspection round robin was conducted in 1981 at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to quantify the capability of ultrasonics for inservice inspection and to address some aspects of reliability for this type of nondestructive evaluation (NDE). The round robin measured the crack detection capabilities of seven field inspection teams who employed procedures that met or exceeded the 1977 edition through the 1978 addenda of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Section 11 Code requirements. Three different types of materials were employed in the study (cast stainless steel, clad ferritic, and wrought stainless steel), and two different types of flaws were implanted into the specimens (intergranular stress corrosion cracks (IGSCCs) and thermal fatigue cracks (TFCs)). When considering near-side inspection, far-side inspection, and false call rate, the overall performance was found to be best in clad ferritic, less effective in wrought stainless steel and the worst in cast stainless steel. Depth sizing performance showed little correlation with the true crack depths.

  7. Alabama Renewable Electric Power Industry Net Generation, by Energy Source

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Alabama" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Geothermal","-","-","-","-","-" "Hydro Conventional",7252,4136,6136,12535,8704 "Solar","-","-","-","-","-" "Wind","-","-","-","-","-" "Wood/Wood Waste",3865,3784,3324,3035,2365 "MSW Biogenic/Landfill

  8. Alabama Total Electric Power Industry Net Generation, by Energy Source

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Alabama" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Fossil",97827,101561,97376,87580,102762 " Coal",78109,77994,74605,55609,63050 " Petroleum",180,157,204,219,200 " Natural Gas",19407,23232,22363,31617,39235 " Other Gases",131,178,204,135,277 "Nuclear",31911,34325,38993,39716,37941 "Renewables",11136,7937,9493,15585,11081 "Pumped

  9. Kentucky Total Electric Power Industry Net Generation, by Energy Source

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Kentucky" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Fossil",95720,95075,95478,86937,95182 " Coal",91198,90483,91621,84038,91054 " Petroleum",3341,2791,2874,2016,2285 " Natural Gas",1177,1796,979,878,1841 " Other Gases",4,5,4,4,3 "Nuclear","-","-","-","-","-" "Renewables",3050,2134,2377,3681,3020 "Pumped

  10. Louisiana Total Electric Power Industry Net Generation, by Energy Source

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Louisiana" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Fossil",69795,71028,72850,70155,80110 " Coal",24395,23051,24100,23067,23924 " Petroleum",1872,2251,2305,1858,3281 " Natural Gas",41933,43915,45344,44003,51344 " Other Gases",1595,1811,1101,1227,1561 "Nuclear",16735,17078,15371,16782,18639 "Renewables",3676,3807,3774,3600,3577 "Pumped

  11. Maine Total Electric Power Industry Net Generation, by Energy Source

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Maine" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Fossil",8214,7869,8264,7861,8733 " Coal",321,376,352,72,87 " Petroleum",595,818,533,433,272 " Natural Gas",7298,6675,7380,7355,8374 " Other Gases","-","-","-","-","-" "Nuclear","-","-","-","-","-" "Renewables",8246,7945,8515,8150,7963 "Pumped

  12. Maryland Total Electric Power Industry Net Generation, by Energy Source

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Maryland" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Fossil",32091,33303,29810,26529,27102 " Coal",29408,29699,27218,24162,23668 " Petroleum",581,985,406,330,322 " Natural Gas",1770,2241,1848,1768,2897 " Other Gases",332,378,338,269,215 "Nuclear",13830,14353,14679,14550,13994 "Renewables",2730,2256,2587,2440,2241 "Pumped Storage","-","-","-","-","-"

  13. Massachusetts Total Electric Power Industry Net Generation, by Energy Source

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Massachusetts" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Fossil",36773,40001,34251,30913,34183 " Coal",11138,12024,10629,9028,8306 " Petroleum",2328,3052,2108,897,296 " Natural Gas",23307,24925,21514,20988,25582 " Other Gases","-","-","-","-","-" "Nuclear",5830,5120,5869,5396,5918 "Renewables",2791,2038,2411,2430,2270 "Pumped

  14. Michigan Total Electric Power Industry Net Generation, by Energy Source

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Michigan" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Fossil",80004,84933,80179,75869,78535 " Coal",67780,70811,69855,66848,65604 " Petroleum",402,699,458,399,382 " Natural Gas",11410,13141,9602,8420,12249 " Other Gases",412,282,264,203,299 "Nuclear",29066,31517,31484,21851,29625 "Renewables",3963,3687,3956,3995,4083 "Pumped Storage",-1039,-1129,-916,-857,-1023 "Other",563,303,286,344,332

  15. Oklahoma Renewable Electric Power Industry Net Generation, by Energy Source

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oklahoma" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Geothermal","-","-","-","-","-" "Hydro Conventional",624,3066,3811,3553,2809 "Solar","-","-","-","-","-" "Wind",1712,1849,2358,2698,3808 "Wood/Wood Waste",297,276,23,68,255 "MSW Biogenic/Landfill Gas","-",4,5,"-","-" "Other

  16. Oregon Renewable Electric Power Industry Net Generation, by Energy Source

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oregon" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Geothermal","-","-","-","-","-" "Hydro Conventional",37850,33587,33805,33034,30542 "Solar","-","-","-","-","-" "Wind",931,1247,2575,3470,3920 "Wood/Wood Waste",799,843,717,674,632 "MSW Biogenic/Landfill Gas",71,100,131,128,205 "Other

  17. Pennsylvania Renewable Electric Power Industry Net Generation, by Energy Source

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Pennsylvania" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Geothermal","-","-","-","-","-" "Hydro Conventional",2844,2236,2549,2683,2332 "Solar","-","-","s",4,8 "Wind",361,470,729,1075,1854 "Wood/Wood Waste",683,620,658,694,675 "MSW Biogenic/Landfill Gas",1411,1441,1414,1577,1706 "Other Biomass",18,16,2,3,3

  18. Ohio Renewable Electric Power Industry Net Generation, by Energy Source

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Ohio" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Geothermal","-","-","-","-","-" "Hydro Conventional",632,410,386,528,429 "Solar","-","-","-","-",13 "Wind",14,15,15,14,13 "Wood/Wood Waste",410,399,418,410,399 "MSW Biogenic/Landfill Gas",24,11,183,198,264 "Other Biomass",10,10,8,11,12 "Total",1091,846,1010,1161,1

  19. Source of electrical power for an electric vehicle and other purposes, and related methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    LaFollette, Rodney M.

    2000-05-16

    Microthin sheet technology is disclosed by which superior batteries are constructed which, among other things, accommodate the requirements for high load rapid discharge and recharge, mandated by electric vehicle criteria. The microthin sheet technology has process and article overtones and can be used to form thin electrodes used in batteries of various kinds and types, such as spirally-wound batteries, bipolar batteries, lead acid batteries, silver/zinc batteries, and others. Superior high performance battery features include: (a) minimal ionic resistance; (b) minimal electronic resistance; (c) minimal polarization resistance to both charging and discharging; (d) improved current accessibility to active material of the electrodes; (e) a high surface area to volume ratio; (f) high electrode porosity (microporosity); (g) longer life cycle; (h) superior discharge/recharge characteristics; (j) higher capacities (A.multidot.hr); and k) high specific capacitance.

  20. Source of electrical power for an electric vehicle and other purposes, and related methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    LaFollette, Rodney M.

    2002-11-12

    Microthin sheet technology is disclosed by which superior batteries are constructed which, among other things, accommodate the requirements for high load rapid discharge and recharge, mandated by electric vehicle criteria. The microthin sheet technology has process and article overtones and can be used to form corrugated thin electrodes used in batteries of various kinds and types, such as spirally-wound batteries, bipolar batteries, lead acid batteries, silver/zinc batteries, and others. Superior high performance battery features include: (a) minimal ionic resistance; (b) minimal electronic resistance; (c) minimal polarization resistance to both charging and discharging; (d) improved current accessibility to active material of the electrodes; (e) a high surface area to volume ratio; (f) high electrode porosity (microporosity); (g) longer life cycle; (h) superior discharge/recharge characteristics; (i) higher capacities (A.multidot.hr); and (j) high specific capacitance.

  1. Watching the Nanoparticles Go Round and Round | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Watching the Nanoparticles Go Round and Round Until now, watching the detailed spinning motion of nano-objects within living cells has been impossible. Combining an existing technique, known as Differential Interference Contrast (DIC) Microscopy, with nanotechnology, researchers can now see how nanoparticles spin when they move across the interiors of living cells. Nano-sized rods made of gold are non-toxic to living cells and they scatter light differently depending on their orientation. DIC

  2. The integration of renewable energy sources into electric power transmission systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnes, P.R.; Dykas, W.P.; Kirby, B.J.; Purucker, S.L.; Lawler, J.S.

    1995-07-01

    Renewable energy technologies such as photovoltaics, solar thermal power plants, and wind turbines are nonconventional, environmentally attractive sources of energy that can be considered for electric power generation. Many of the areas with abundant renewable energy resources (very sunny or windy areas) are far removed from major load centers. Although electrical power can be transmitted over long distances of many hundreds of miles through high-voltage transmission lines, power transmission systems often operate near their limits with little excess capacity for new generation sources. This study assesses the available capacity of transmission systems in designated abundant renewable energy resource regions and identifies the requirements for high-capacity plant integration in selected cases. In general, about 50 MW of power from renewable sources can be integrated into existing transmission systems to supply local loads without transmission upgrades beyond the construction of a substation to connect to the grid. Except in the Southwest, significant investment to strengthen transmission systems will be required to support the development of high-capacity renewable sources of 1000 MW or greater in areas remote from major load centers. Cost estimates for new transmission facilities to integrate and dispatch some of these high-capacity renewable sources ranged from several million dollars to approximately one billion dollars, with the latter figure an increase in total investment of 35%, assuming that the renewable source is the only user of the transmission facility.

  3. United States Renewable Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity, by Energy Source

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Renewable Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity, by Energy Source, 2006 - 2010" "(Megawatts)" "United States" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Geothermal",2274,2214,2229,2382,2405 "Hydro Conventional",77821,77885,77930,78518,78825 "Solar",411,502,536,619,941 "Wind",11329,16515,24651,34296,39135 "Wood/Wood Waste",6372,6704,6864,6939,7037 "MSW/Landfill Gas",3166,3536,3644,3645,3690

  4. " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal"," "," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " ","

  5. " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," "," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal",,"RSE" " ","

  6. " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," "," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" " ","

  7. " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," "," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal",,"RSE" " ","

  8. " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal"," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " ","

  9. " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal"," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " ","

  10. High School Academic Competition - Round Robin | U.S. DOE Office of Science

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    (SC) Round Robin National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About Regional Competitions National Finals Attending the National Finals 2016 Competition Results Middle School Round Robin Middle School Double Elimination Middle School Electric Car High School Round Robin High School Double Elimination Top Teams for 2016 Volunteers Key Dates Frequently Asked Questions News Media Contact Us WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000

  11. Middle School Academic Competition - Round Robin | U.S. DOE Office of

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Science (SC) Academic Competition - Round Robin National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About Regional Competitions National Finals Attending the National Finals 2016 Competition Results Middle School Round Robin Middle School Double Elimination Middle School Electric Car High School Round Robin High School Double Elimination Top Teams for 2016 Volunteers Key Dates Frequently Asked Questions News Media Contact Us WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy

  12. Electric Power Generation and Water Use Data

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Department of Energy Electric Kettle Takes Down Microwave in Final Round of #EnergyFaceoff Electric Kettle Takes Down Microwave in Final Round of #EnergyFaceoff November 24, 2014 - 12:13pm Addthis The electric kettle wins the final round of #EnergyFaceoff. | Graphic by Stacy Buchanan, National Renewable Energy Laboratory The electric kettle wins the final round of #EnergyFaceoff. | Graphic by Stacy Buchanan, National Renewable Energy Laboratory Allison Casey Senior Communicator, NREL How can

  13. Source book for planning nuclear dual-purpose electric/distillation desalination plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reed, S.A.

    1981-02-01

    A source book on nuclear dual-purpose electric/distillation desalination plants was prepared to assist government and other planners in preparing broad evaluations of proposed applications of dual-purpose plants. The document is divided into five major sections. Section 1 presents general discussions relating to the benefits of dual-purpose plants, and spectrum for water-to-power ratios. Section 2 presents information on commercial nuclear plants manufactured by US manufacturers. Section 3 gives information on distillation desalting processes and equipment. Section 4 presents a discussion on feedwater pretreatment and scale control. Section 5 deals with methods for coupling the distillation and electrical generating plants to operate in the dual mode.

  14. The integration of renewable energy sources into electric power distribution systems. Volume 2, Utility case assessments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zaininger, H.W.; Ellis, P.R.; Schaefer, J.C.

    1994-06-01

    Electric utility distribution system impacts associated with the integration of renewable energy sources such as photovoltaics (PV) and wind turbines (WT) are considered in this project. The impacts are expected to vary from site to site according to the following characteristics: (1) The local solar insolation and/or wind characteristics; (2) renewable energy source penetration level; (3) whether battery or other energy storage systems are applied; and (4) local utility distribution design standards and planning practices. Small, distributed renewable energy sources are connected to the utility distribution system like other, similar kW- and MW-scale equipment and loads. Residential applications are expected to be connected to single-phase 120/240-V secondaries. Larger kw-scale applications may be connected to three-phase secondaries, and larger hundred-kW and MW-scale applications, such as MW-scale windfarms or PV plants, may be connected to electric utility primary systems via customer-owned primary and secondary collection systems. Small, distributed renewable energy sources installed on utility distribution systems will also produce nonsite-specific utility generation system benefits such as energy and capacity displacement benefits, in addition to the local site-specific distribution system benefits. Although generation system benefits are not site-specific, they are utility-specific, and they vary significantly among utilities in different regions. In addition, transmission system benefits, environmental benefits and other benefits may apply. These benefits also vary significantly among utilities and regions. Seven utility case studies considering PV, WT, and battery storage were conducted to identify a range of potential renewable energy source distribution system applications.

  15. " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and",,"LPG

  16. " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and",,"LPG

  17. " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Supplier Sources of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8 Number of Establishments by Quantity of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Supplier Sources of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,,"Electricity","Components",,,"Natural","Gas","Components",,"Steam","Components"

  18. Inhomogeneities of plasma density and electric field as sources of electrostatic turbulence in the auroral region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ilyasov, Askar A.; Chernyshov, Alexander A. Mogilevsky, Mikhail M.; Golovchanskaya, Irina V. Kozelov, Boris V.

    2015-03-15

    Inhomogeneities of plasma density and non-uniform electric fields are compared as possible sources of a sort of electrostatic ion cyclotron waves that can be identified with broadband extremely low frequency electrostatic turbulence in the topside auroral ionosphere. Such waves are excited by inhomogeneous energy-density-driven instability. To gain a deeper insight in generation of these waves, computational modeling is performed with various plasma parameters. It is demonstrated that inhomogeneities of plasma density can give rise to this instability even in the absence of electric fields. By using both satellite-observed and model spatial distributions of plasma density and electric field in our modeling, we show that specific details of the spatial distributions are of minor importance for the wave generation. The solutions of the nonlocal inhomogeneous energy-density-driven dispersion relation are investigated for various ion-to-electron temperature ratios and directions of wave propagation. The relevance of the solutions to the observed spectra of broadband extremely low frequency emissions is shown.

  19. Causal Analysis of the Inadvertent Contact with an Uncontrolled Electrical Hazardous Energy Source (120 Volts AC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David E. James; Dennis E. Raunig; Sean S. Cunningham

    2014-10-01

    On September 25, 2013, a Health Physics Technician (HPT) was performing preparations to support a pneumatic transfer from the HFEF Decon Cell to the Room 130 Glovebox in HFEF, per HFEF OI 3165 section 3.5, Field Preparations. This activity involves an HPT setting up and climbing a portable ladder to remove the 14-C meter probe from above ball valve HBV-7. The HPT source checks the meter and probe and then replaces the probe above HBV-7, which is located above Hood ID# 130 HP. At approximately 13:20, while reaching past the HBV-7 valve position indicator switches in an attempt to place the 14-C meter probe in the desired location, the HPT’s left forearm came in contact with one of the three sets of exposed terminals on the valve position indication switches for HBV 7. This resulted in the HPT receiving an electrical shock from a 120 Volt AC source. Upon moving the arm, following the electrical shock, the HPT noticed two exposed electrical connections on a switch. The HPT then notified the HFEF HPT Supervisor, who in turn notified the MFC Radiological Controls Manager and HFEF Operations Manager of the situation. Work was stopped in the area and the hazard was roped off and posted to prevent access to the hazard. The HPT was escorted by the HPT Supervisor to the MFC Dispensary and then preceded to CFA medical for further evaluation. The individual was evaluated and released without any medical restrictions. Causal Factor (Root Cause) A3B3C01/A5B2C08: - Knowledge based error/Attention was given to wrong issues - Written Communication content LTA, Incomplete/situation not covered The Causal Factor (root cause) was attention being given to the wrong issues during the creation, reviews, verifications, and actual performance of HFEF OI-3165, which covers the need to perform the weekly source check and ensure placement of the probe prior to performing a “rabbit” transfer. This resulted in the hazard not being identified and mitigated in the procedure. Work activities

  20. OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS AVAILABILITY AND IMPROVEMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cutler, Roy I; Peplov, Vladimir V; Wezensky, Mark W; Norris, Kevin Paul; Barnett, William E; Hicks, Jim; Weaver, Joey T; Moss, John; Rust, Kenneth R; Mize, Jeffery J; Anderson, David E

    2011-01-01

    SNS electrical systems have been operational for 4 years. System availability statistics and improvements are presented for AC electrical systems, DC and pulsed power supplies and klystron modulators.

  1. Microwave vs. Electric Kettle: Which Appliance Is in Hot Water...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Electric Kettle: Which Appliance Is in Hot Water in EnergyFaceoff Round 4? Microwave vs. Electric Kettle: Which Appliance Is in Hot Water in EnergyFaceoff Round 4? November 24, ...

  2. SL(2,R) duality-symmetric action for electromagnetic theory with electric and magnetic sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Choonkyu; Min, Hyunsoo

    2013-12-15

    For the SL(2,R) duality-invariant generalization of Maxwell electrodynamics in the presence of both electric and magnetic sources, we formulate a local, manifestly duality-symmetric, Zwanziger-type action by introducing a pair of four-potentials A{sup μ} and B{sup μ} in a judicious way. On the two potentials A{sup μ} and B{sup μ} the SL(2,R) duality transformation acts in a simple linear manner. In quantum theory including charged source fields, this action can be recast as a SL(2,Z)-invariant action. Also given is a Zwanziger-type action for SL(2,R) duality-invariant Born–Infeld electrodynamics which can be important for D-brane dynamics in string theory. -- Highlights: •We formulate a local, manifestly duality-symmetric, Zwanziger-type action. •Maxwell electrodynamics is generalized to include dilaton and axion fields. •SL(2,R) symmetry is manifest. •We formulate a local, manifestly duality-symmetric, nonlinear Born–Infeld action with SL(2,R) symmetry.

  3. DOE Announces Selections for SSL Core Technology Research (Round 10),

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Product Development (Round 10), and U.S. Manufacturing (Round 6) Funding Opportunities | Department of Energy Announces Selections for SSL Core Technology Research (Round 10), Product Development (Round 10), and U.S. Manufacturing (Round 6) Funding Opportunities DOE Announces Selections for SSL Core Technology Research (Round 10), Product Development (Round 10), and U.S. Manufacturing (Round 6) Funding Opportunities The U.S. Department of Energy has announced the competitive selection of 10

  4. Community Leaders Round Table | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Community Leaders Round Table The Round Table consists of citizens with regional constituencies, including elected officials on the village, city, township, county and state levels; leaders of school districts, environmental boards and other agencies; and officers of labor unions and home owners associations. The Argonne National Laboratory/U.S. Department of Energy Community Leaders Round Table provides an informal and convenient forum for sharing information about Argonne plans and activities

  5. DOE's Round Robin Test Program FAQ Sheet

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Frequently Asked Questions for: DOE's Round Robin Test Program May 2011 i Table of Contents Introduction ........................................................................................................................................ 1 What products will be tested? .......................................................................................................... 1 What is the testing process?

  6. Reverse electrodialysis using bipolar ion-exchange membranes as a source of electric energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pivovarov, N.Ya.; Greben`, V.P.; Kovarskii, N.Ya.

    1994-06-01

    It is established that, in the regime of the H{sup +} and OH{sup {minus}} ions recombination, voltage on the bipolar membranes and the efficiency of the latter, as a transformer of chemical energy into electric, increases in the series of ionogen groups contained in the bipolar region. This is due to an increase in the recombination rate constants in the bipolar contact for the H{sup +} and OH{sup {minus}} ions. As the sodium and chlorine ions penetrate the bipolar transition region, they sharply decrease the membrane potential and the voltage drop on the bipolar membranes, because the ionogen groups turn into salt form, which is catalytically inactive in the H{sup +} and OH{sup {minus}} ions recombination reaction. It is shown that the source of current, containing the MB-24 (bipolar), MF-4sk (cation-exchange), and AMV (anion-exchange) ion-exchange membranes, has a specific power of 0.11 W/dm{sup 2} (calculated in terms of one bipolar membrane) and efficiency of 29% for 0.5 M solution of hydrochloric acid and sodium hydroxide, and 0.5 A/dm{sup 2} current density.

  7. Promoting electricity from renewable energy sources -- lessons learned from the EU, U.S. and Japan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haas, Reinhard; Meyer, Niels I.; Held, Anne; Finon, Dominique; Lorenzoni, Arturo; Wiser, Ryan; Nishio, Ken-ichiro

    2007-06-01

    The promotion of electricity generated from Renewable Energy Sources (RES) has recently gained high priority in the energy policy strategies of many countries in response to concerns about global climate change, energy security and other reasons. This chapter compares and contrasts the experience of a number of countries in Europe, states in the US as well as Japan in promoting RES, identifying what appear to be the most successful policy measures. Clearly, a wide range of policy instruments have been tried and are in place in different parts of the world to promote renewable energy technologies. The design and performance of these schemes varies from place to place, requiring further research to determine their effectiveness in delivering the desired results. The main conclusions that can be drawn from the present analysis are: (1) Generally speaking, promotional schemes that are properly designed within a stable framework and offer long-term investment continuity produce better results. Credibility and continuity reduce risks thus leading to lower profit requirements by investors. (2) Despite their significant growth in absolute terms in a number of key markets, the near-term prognosis for renewables is one of modest success if measured in terms of the percentage of the total energy provided by renewables on a world-wide basis. This is a significant challenge, suggesting that renewables have to grow at an even faster pace if we expect them to contribute on a significant scale to the world's energy mix.

  8. The Mesaba Energy Project: Clean Coal Power Initiative, Round 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stone, Richard; Gray, Gordon; Evans, Robert

    2014-07-31

    The Mesaba Energy Project is a nominal 600 MW integrated gasification combine cycle power project located in Northeastern Minnesota. It was selected to receive financial assistance pursuant to code of federal regulations (?CFR?) 10 CFR 600 through a competitive solicitation under Round 2 of the Department of Energy?s Clean Coal Power Initiative, which had two stated goals: (1) to demonstrate advanced coal-based technologies that can be commercialized at electric utility scale, and (2) to accelerate the likelihood of deploying demonstrated technologies for widespread commercial use in the electric power sector. The Project was selected in 2004 to receive a total of $36 million. The DOE portion that was equally cost shared in Budget Period 1 amounted to about $22.5 million. Budget Period 1 activities focused on the Project Definition Phase and included: project development, preliminary engineering, environmental permitting, regulatory approvals and financing to reach financial close and start of construction. The Project is based on ConocoPhillips? E-Gas? Technology and is designed to be fuel flexible with the ability to process sub-bituminous coal, a blend of sub-bituminous coal and petroleum coke and Illinois # 6 bituminous coal. Major objectives include the establishment of a reference plant design for Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (?IGCC?) technology featuring advanced full slurry quench, multiple train gasification, integration of the air separation unit, and the demonstration of 90% operational availability and improved thermal efficiency relative to previous demonstration projects. In addition, the Project would demonstrate substantial environmental benefits, as compared with conventional technology, through dramatically lower emissions of sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, volatile organic compounds, carbon monoxide, particulate matter and mercury. Major milestones achieved in support of fulfilling the above goals include obtaining Site, High Voltage

  9. Ball mounting fixture for a roundness gage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gauler, A.L.; Pasieka, D.F.

    1983-11-15

    A ball mounting fixture for a roundness gage is disclosed. The fixture includes a pair of chuck assemblies oriented substantially transversely with respect to one another and mounted on a common base. Each chuck assembly preferably includes a rotary stage and a wobble plate affixed thereto. A ball chuck affixed to each wobble plate is operable to selectively support a ball to be measured for roundness, with the wobble plate permitting the ball chuck to be tilted to center the ball on the axis of rotation of the rotary stage. In a preferred embodiment, each chuck assembly includes a vacuum chuck operable to selectively support the ball to be measured for roundness. The mounting fixture enables a series of roundness measurements to be taken with a conventional rotating gagehead roundness instrument, which measurements can be utilized to determine the sphericity of the ball. 6 figs.

  10. Ball mounting fixture for a roundness gage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gauler, Allen L. (Los Alamos, NM); Pasieka, Donald F. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1983-01-01

    A ball mounting fixture for a roundness gage is disclosed. The fixture includes a pair of chuck assemblies oriented substantially transversely with respect to one another and mounted on a common base. Each chuck assembly preferably includes a rotary stage and a wobble plate affixed thereto. A ball chuck affixed to each wobble plate is operable to selectively support a ball to be measured for roundness, with the wobble plate permitting the ball chuck to be tilted to center the ball on the axis of rotation of the rotary stage. In a preferred embodiment, each chuck assembly includes a vacuum chuck operable to selectively support the ball to be measured for roundness. The mounting fixture enables a series of roundness measurements to be taken with a conventional rotating gagehead roundness instrument, which measurements can be utilized to determine the sphericity of the ball.

  11. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Arkansas" "megawatthours" "Total electric industry", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  12. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Arizona" "megawatthours" "Total electric industry", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  13. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    California" "megawatthours" "Total electric industry", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  14. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Connecticut" "megawatthours" "Total electric industry", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  15. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Rhode Island" "megawatthours" "Total electric industry", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  16. International Round-Robin on Transport Properties of Bismuth...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Round-Robin on Transport Properties of Bismuth Telluride International Round-Robin on Transport Properties of Bismuth Telluride IEA-AMT round-robin testing of n- and p-type bismuth ...

  17. First round of NISE awards posted

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    April 13, 2011 by Francesca Verdier The first round of NERSC Initiative for Scientific Exploration (NISE) awards have been posted. 36 projects were awarded 34.77 million hours. ...

  18. ELECTRIC

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ELECTRIC cdrtrokArJclaeT 3 I+ &i, y$ \I &OF I*- j< t j,fci..- ir )(yiT !E-li, ( \-,v? Cl -p/4.4 RESEARCH LABORATORIES EAST PITTSBURGH, PA. 8ay 22, 1947 Mr. J. Carrel Vrilson General ?!!mager Atomic Qxzgy Commission 1901 Constitution Avenue Kashington, D. C. Dear Sir: In the course of OUT nuclenr research we are planning to study the enc:ri;y threshold anti cross section for fission. For thib program we require a s<>piAroted sample of metallic Uranium 258 of high purity. A

  19. DOE Announces Selections for SSL Core Technology Research (Round...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DOE Announces Selections for SSL Core Technology Research (Round 7), Product Development ... Eight projects were chosen in response to the Core Technology (Round 7), Product ...

  20. PDF Study of Round Turbulent Condensing Jet using GPU Hardware...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: PDF Study of Round Turbulent Condensing Jet using GPU Hardware. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: PDF Study of Round Turbulent Condensing Jet using GPU ...

  1. The Mesaba Energy Project: Clean Coal Power Initiative, Round...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The Mesaba Energy Project: Clean Coal Power Initiative, Round 2 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The Mesaba Energy Project: Clean Coal Power Initiative, Round 2 You ...

  2. Second Round of American Energy Data Challenge Winners Announced...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Second Round of American Energy Data Challenge Winners Announced Second Round of American Energy Data Challenge Winners Announced April 29, 2014 - 10:39am Addthis Patricia A. ...

  3. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Alabama" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  4. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Alaska" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  5. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Colorado" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  6. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Florida" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  7. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Georgia" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  8. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Hawaii" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  9. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Idaho" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  10. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Illinois" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  11. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Indiana" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  12. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Iowa" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  13. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Kansas" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  14. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Kentucky" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  15. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Maryland" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  16. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Massachusetts" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  17. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Michigan" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  18. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Minnesota" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  19. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Missouri" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  20. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Montana" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  1. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nebraska" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  2. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nevada" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  3. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Hampshire" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  4. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mexico" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  5. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    York" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  6. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Carolina" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  7. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Dakota" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  8. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Ohio" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  9. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oklahoma" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  10. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oregon" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  11. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Pennsylvania" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  12. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Carolina" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  13. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Dakota" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  14. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Tennessee" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  15. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Texas" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  16. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Utah" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  17. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Vermont" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  18. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Virginia" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  19. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Washington" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  20. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    West Virginia" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  1. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wisconsin" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  2. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wyoming" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  3. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    United States" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  4. Small Modular Reactors and U.S. Clean Energy Sources for Electricity

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    For the clean energy goal to be met, then, the non-carbon emitting sources must provide some 2900 TWhr. Hydropower is generally assumed to have reached a maximum of 250 TWhr, so if we assume...

  5. Venezuela slates second oil field revival round

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-12-07

    This paper reports that Venezuela will accept bids under a second round next year from private foreign and domestic companies for production contracts to operate marginal active as well as inactive oil fields. The first such round came earlier this year, involving about 55 other marginal, inactive fields. It resulted in two contractors signed with domestic and foreign companies. It represented the first time since nationalization of the petroleum industry in Venezuela in 1976 that private companies were allowed to produce oil in the country. A public bid tender was expected at presstime last week.

  6. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Alabama" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",23050,23419,23615,23642,23642,23285,23144,23182,23218,23252,23346,22943,23429,22532,22366,21461,21292,20840,20692,20463,19878,19972,19972,19902,19354,95,72.9,72.1

  7. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Arkansas" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",11526,11559,13131,11464,11488,11456,11459,11467,10669,10434,9769,9774,9551,9615,9330,9279,9619,9688,9639,9639,9168,9033,9000,8996,8944,96,71.9,78.1

  8. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Alaska" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",2313,2205,1946,1891,1889,1868,1847,1820,1736,1769,1722,1752,1740,1770,1775,1725,1702,1763,1739,1737,1740,1715,1679,1551,1547,84,91.4,93.9

  9. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Arizona" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",21311,20668,20277,20168,20115,20127,19717,19551,19566,18860,16854,15542,15516,15284,15140,15091,15084,15164,15147,15222,15067,14990,14970,14911,14906,98.9,76.2,75.4

  10. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    California" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",28201,28165,30294,29011,28685,28021,26467,26334,26346,25248,23739,23171,24390,24347,24321,24324,30665,43711,43936,43303,42329,43140,42673,42780,42822,46.5,42.6,37.8

  11. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Colorado" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",10204,10238,10475,10580,9114,8454,8142,8008,8034,7955,7954,7883,7596,7479,7271,7255,6938,6851,6795,6648,6675,6637,6629,6610,6533,86.6,66.2,68.3

  12. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Connecticut" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",161,152,152,154,160,111,111,111,37,25,174,210,78,185,2204,2454,5617,6295,6321,6723,6579,6600,6600,6764,7079,34.2,1.9,1.8

  13. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Florida" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",51775,50967,51373,51298,50853,50781,47222,47224,45184,45196,42619,41996,40267,38238,37265,36537,36472,39460,36899,35857,34769,33663,33403,32204,32103,89.7,86,87.1

  14. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Georgia" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",28873,28875,29293,27146,26639,26558,26462,26432,26542,26538,25404,24804,25821,24099,24861,23331,23392,23148,22791,22299,21698,21163,21160,20752,20731,89.6,72.7,75.5

  15. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Hawaii" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",1732,1821,1821,1821,1828,1859,1730,1730,1730,1705,1691,1624,1622,1622,1627,1609,1617,1597,1611,1603,1603,1603,1602,1522,1488,68.1,72.1,64.8

  16. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Idaho" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",3413,3394,3394,3035,3035,3029,2686,2547,2558,2558,2394,2439,2674,2521,2585,2571,2576,2576,2553,2559,2500,2300,2308,2282,2282,85.7,76.1,69

  17. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Illinois" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",5263,5269,5274,5280,4789,4819,4680,4630,4731,3976,4233,3007,4151,4420,17497,16817,30367,33550,33169,33143,32951,32770,33644,32644,32597,48.1,10.9,11.8

  18. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Indiana" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",23319,23309,23031,22763,23008,23631,23598,22012,22021,22017,21261,21016,20392,20616,20554,20358,20337,20201,20681,20712,20632,20901,20901,20702,20588,85.9,83.2,84.8

  19. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Iowa" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",12655,12092,12179,11863,11282,11479,11274,10669,9562,10090,9895,9039,8457,8402,8511,8438,8370,8217,8161,8237,8219,8069,8074,8093,7702,93.5,77.3,76.7

  20. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Kansas" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",11468,11485,11593,11746,11732,11733,11246,10944,10829,10734,10705,10729,10244,10223,10089,10023,9918,9789,9697,9678,9525,9525,9518,9507,9475,99.5,93.5,80.6

  1. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Kentucky" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",19473,19599,19681,19601,18945,18763,16759,16819,16878,16234,15860,15349,15419,15229,14781,14708,13995,15660,15686,15425,15397,15297,15297,15333,15511,88,92.6,93.3

  2. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Louisiana" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",18120,17297,16661,15991,16471,15615,15755,14756,15176,15137,14249,12728,14233,14165,14317,16339,17014,17080,17150,17019,16433,16221,16221,15883,15839,67.8,61.6,68

  3. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Maine" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",10,14,19,19,19,19,19,19,19,19,19,19,16,17,21,63,1457,1502,2388,2433,2253,2222,2222,2379,2369,0.5,0.4,0.2

  4. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Maryland" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",85,85,85,81,80,80,80,80,79,79,79,70,70,70,753,10955,10971,11105,10958,10958,10838,10709,10709,10723,9758,7.2,0.6,0.7

  5. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Massachusetts" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",971,969,991,956,936,930,829,827,837,983,981,981,945,993,997,2216,3386,11295,9366,9289,9219,9461,9452,9770,9909,8.1,6.8,7.4

  6. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Michigan" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",22260,22148,22517,22401,21639,21759,21885,21894,22734,23029,23310,23345,23575,22833,22757,22378,21948,21916,21990,21986,22396,22395,22347,22258,22298,88.3,72.6,73.1

  7. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Minnesota" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",11557,11901,11685,11650,11547,11639,11432,10719,10458,10543,10175,10129,10073,9885,9069,8988,9090,9217,9181,8925,8936,8853,8830,8854,8806,88.4,78.5,74

  8. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Missouri" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",20538,20562,20767,20831,20360,19600,19621,19570,19675,18970,18602,18587,18409,18221,17182,16757,16284,16215,15980,15727,15490,15429,15405,15311,15179,99.4,93.7,94.3

  9. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Montana" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",3209,2568,2570,2483,2340,2232,2190,2179,2163,2186,2189,2274,2237,2235,2265,2257,4945,4943,4943,4943,4907,4871,4871,4829,4912,38.7,39.9,50.7

  10. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nebraska" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",7913,7911,7810,7834,7647,7675,7011,6959,7056,7007,6722,6667,6154,6112,6043,5963,5944,5894,5765,5663,5651,5645,5637,5584,5586,99.7,97.3,90.6

  11. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nevada" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",8480,7915,7807,8939,8713,8741,8741,6998,6771,5611,5389,5323,5384,5388,5434,5434,5642,5642,5643,5556,5478,5235,5235,5125,4944,80.9,76.3,80.9

  12. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Hampshire" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",1121,1121,1121,1134,1132,1118,1125,1121,1116,1121,1121,1121,1105,1128,2290,2294,2292,2715,2705,2698,2692,2692,2692,2793,2821,80.2,27.1,25.4

  13. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mexico" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",6094,5912,6359,6321,6345,6344,6324,6324,6223,5692,5348,5398,5463,5250,5250,5299,5294,5183,5077,5078,4940,4967,4967,4950,4947,93.8,78,75.5

  14. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    York" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",10989,10736,10739,11022,11032,11871,11784,12056,12046,11927,11386,11902,11675,11572,15807,17679,29587,29987,30061,32149,31567,32323,30163,31177,31020,44.4,28,27.2

  15. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Carolina" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",26941,26706,27265,26158,25398,25376,25405,25345,24553,23822,23984,24036,23650,23478,22015,21182,21020,21054,20923,20597,19691,20041,20043,19990,20049,89.9,91.8,88.3

  16. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Dakota" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",5516,5292,5217,4908,4912,4852,4691,4668,4634,4622,4673,4561,4659,4677,4679,4676,4657,4733,4208,4485,4487,4476,4476,4497,4476,99.2,79.4,81.2

  17. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Ohio" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",11134,20779,21072,20120,20179,20356,20340,20012,20147,19312,27713,27547,27304,27081,26301,27083,26768,26630,27279,27365,26347,26388,26388,26939,25365,92.3,61,35.3

  18. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oklahoma" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",17045,16951,17148,16487,16015,16187,15913,14495,14648,13992,13460,13463,13387,12941,13438,12861,12622,12931,13092,12928,12546,12348,12348,12308,12284,94.6,76.2,70.9

  19. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oregon" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",11175,10973,10888,10892,10846,10683,10491,10502,9971,9839,9805,10298,10357,10354,10337,10293,10449,10537,10526,10445,10165,10132,10132,11235,11235,91.7,76.1,70.4

  20. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Pennsylvania" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",39,455,455,455,455,455,455,455,455,455,4921,4921,4887,4887,13394,25251,33781,33825,34060,33699,32710,32509,32505,32423,32526,36.3,1,0.1

  1. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Carolina" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",20836,21039,21280,22227,22082,22100,22062,21730,21019,20787,20406,19402,19103,18246,17717,17682,17627,17431,17165,16693,16152,16131,16118,16162,14909,94.8,92.1,91.3

  2. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Dakota" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",3450,3480,3428,3130,2994,3042,2911,2826,2889,2759,2618,2650,2752,2712,2710,2763,2791,2795,2822,2818,2831,2543,2543,2519,2517,100,82.6,87.4

  3. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Tennessee" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",20490,20635,20635,20474,20761,20211,20249,19770,19768,19120,19044,19011,19137,18600,17893,17253,17546,18212,17253,16144,16334,16076,16076,16121,16848,92,96.9,97.6

  4. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Texas" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",29113,28705,28463,27389,26533,25140,25005,24569,24991,24033,23587,22629,38903,38940,65384,65293,65209,64858,64768,64425,63351,63214,63213,61420,61261,79.8,24.5,25.8

  5. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Vermont" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",337,329,329,265,260,257,259,258,259,258,261,260,261,262,778,783,775,904,901,899,902,911,911,908,882,78.9,23,51.8

  6. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Virginia" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",22062,20601,20626,19999,19430,19131,18824,18372,18162,18087,17547,17045,15817,15761,15608,15312,15316,15293,14764,14300,13764,14055,14020,13652,13661,79.5,80.6,83.9

  7. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Washington" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",27376,27070,27037,26375,26498,26322,26243,24511,24303,24046,23828,24166,24132,24191,23841,25190,25236,25274,24277,24278,24254,24243,24242,24243,24173,91.5,86.9,88.5

  8. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    West Virginia" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",11981,10625,10590,11740,11719,11698,11698,11711,11975,10890,10164,10164,10172,10188,14475,14505,14495,14491,14492,14495,14510,14448,14448,14435,14435,95.9,71,73.6

  9. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wisconsin" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",14377,13358,13464,13408,13098,12998,12975,11767,12911,12877,12405,12523,12335,12246,12211,12086,11862,11866,11866,11536,11264,10909,10747,10504,10545,89.8,73.4,83.8

  10. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wyoming" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",7233,7279,7278,7333,6931,6713,6450,6142,6137,6241,6086,6088,6083,6050,6048,6012,6018,6045,5966,5971,5864,5842,5842,5817,5800,97.1,86.8,85.5

  11. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Maine" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",523,597,168,754,1759,867,1080,1317,489,827,1121,1409,865,0,2781,1189273,3549008,3222785,7800149,2668381,9015544,8075919,8334852,9518506,9063595,0,0,0

  12. Contribution of electric energy to the process of elimination of low emission sources in Cracow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lach, J.; Mejer, T.; Wybranski, A.

    1995-12-31

    At present energy supply belongs to the most important global problems. A significant part of energy is consumed for residential heating purposes. Depending on climatic conditions, fuel distribution and the level of technological development, the contribution of these purposes ranges between ca. 50% (Poland) and ca. 12% (Spain). The power engineering structure in Poland is based almost exclusively upon solid fuels, i.e. hard and brown coal. Chemical compounds (carbon dioxide, sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides) produced in combustion process influence negatively the natural environment. The contribution of residential heating in this negative effect is rather significant. Because of the fact, that the resources of fossil fuels (the most important source of energy at present) are limited and their influence on natural environment is negative, efforts are made to find out more effective ways of energy consumption and to reduce the pollutant emission from heating sources. This problem is a topical issue in Cracow, especially during the heating season because the coal-fired stoves situated in the central part of the town remain the most important source of pollutant emission. These sources cause serious menace to the health of inhabitants; furthermore the pollutants destroy Cracow monuments entered in the UNESCO world list of human heritage.

  13. Property-close source separation of hazardous waste and waste electrical and electronic equipment - A Swedish case study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernstad, Anna; Cour Jansen, Jes la; Aspegren, Henrik

    2011-03-15

    Through an agreement with EEE producers, Swedish municipalities are responsible for collection of hazardous waste and waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE). In most Swedish municipalities, collection of these waste fractions is concentrated to waste recycling centres where households can source-separate and deposit hazardous waste and WEEE free of charge. However, the centres are often located on the outskirts of city centres and cars are needed in order to use the facilities in most cases. A full-scale experiment was performed in a residential area in southern Sweden to evaluate effects of a system for property-close source separation of hazardous waste and WEEE. After the system was introduced, results show a clear reduction in the amount of hazardous waste and WEEE disposed of incorrectly amongst residual waste or dry recyclables. The systems resulted in a source separation ratio of 70 wt% for hazardous waste and 76 wt% in the case of WEEE. Results show that households in the study area were willing to increase source separation of hazardous waste and WEEE when accessibility was improved and that this and similar collection systems can play an important role in building up increasingly sustainable solid waste management systems.

  14. District of Columbia Total Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity, by Energy Source

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    District of Columbia" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Fossil",806,806,790,790,790 " Coal","-","-","-","-","-" " Petroleum",806,806,790,790,790 " Natural Gas","-","-","-","-","-" " Other Gases","-","-","-","-","-"

  15. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Rhode Island" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",8,8,8,7,7,7,7,8,8,6,7,9,9,7,6,7,7,441,441,442,148,148,148,162,263,0.5,0.4,0.4 "Hydroelectric",0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,1,1,0,1,1,1,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,1,1,1,0.2,0,0

  16. International Round-Robin Testing of Bulk Thermoelectrics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Hsin; Porter, Wallace D; Bottner, Harold; Konig, Jan; Chen, Lidong; Bai, Shengqiang; Tritt, Terry M.; Mayolett, Alex; Smith, Charlene; Harris, Fred; Sharp, Jeff; Lo, Jason; Keinke, Holger; Kiss, Laszlo I.

    2011-11-01

    Two international round-robin studies were conducted on transport properties measurements of bulk thermoelectric materials. The study discovered current measurement problems. In order to get ZT of a material four separate transport measurements must be taken. The round-robin study showed that among the four properties Seebeck coefficient is the one can be measured consistently. Electrical resistivity has +4-9% scatter. Thermal diffusivity has similar +5-10% scatter. The reliability of the above three properties can be improved by standardizing test procedures and enforcing system calibrations. The worst problem was found in specific heat measurements using DSC. The probability of making measurement error is great due to the fact three separate runs must be taken to determine Cp and the baseline shift is always an issue for commercial DSC. It is suggest the Dulong Petit limit be always used as a guide line for Cp. Procedures have been developed to eliminate operator and system errors. The IEA-AMT annex is developing standard procedures for transport properties testing.

  17. Alabama Renewable Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity, by Energy Source

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Alabama" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Geothermal","-","-","-","-","-" "Hydro Conventional",3271,3272,3272,3272,3272 "Solar","-","-","-","-","-" "Wind","-","-","-","-","-" "Wood/Wood Waste",581,574,593,591,583 "MSW/Landfill

  18. Kansas Total Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity, by Energy Source

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Kansas" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Fossil",9592,9709,10017,10355,10302 " Coal",5203,5208,5190,5180,5179 " Petroleum",565,569,564,564,550 " Natural Gas",3824,3932,4262,4611,4573 " Other Gases","-","-","-","-","-" "Nuclear",1166,1166,1160,1160,1160 "Renewables",366,366,815,1014,1082 "Pumped

  19. Kentucky Total Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity, by Energy Source

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Kentucky" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Fossil",19177,19088,19016,19268,19560 " Coal",14386,14374,14301,14553,14566 " Petroleum",135,77,77,77,70 " Natural Gas",4656,4638,4638,4638,4924 " Other Gases","-","-","-","-","-" "Nuclear","-","-","-","-","-" "Renewables",871,880,886,893,893 "Pumped

  20. Texas Renewable Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity, by Energy Source

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Texas" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Geothermal","-","-","-","-","-" "Hydro Conventional",681,673,673,689,689 "Solar","-","-","-","-",14 "Wind",2738,4490,7427,9378,9952 "Wood/Wood Waste",130,130,180,180,215 "MSW/Landfill Gas",42,72,73,79,88 "Other Biomass",16,21,29,28,28

  1. Utah Renewable Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity, by Energy Source

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Utah" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Geothermal",23,33,34,34,42 "Hydro Conventional",255,255,256,256,255 "Solar","-","-","-","-","-" "Wind","-","-",19,222,222 "Wood/Wood Waste","-","-","-","-","-" "MSW/Landfill Gas",4,5,5,9,9 "Other

  2. Vermont Renewable Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity, by Energy Source

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Vermont" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Geothermal","-","-","-","-","-" "Hydro Conventional",309,308,322,322,324 "Solar","-","-","-","-","-" "Wind",5,5,5,5,5 "Wood/Wood Waste",76,76,76,76,76 "MSW/Landfill Gas","-","-",3,3,3 "Other

  3. Virginia Renewable Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity, by Energy Source

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Virginia" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Geothermal","-","-","-","-","-" "Hydro Conventional",671,675,677,716,866 "Solar","-","-","-","-","-" "Wind","-","-","-","-","-" "Wood/Wood Waste",410,418,422,409,331 "MSW/Landfill Gas",170,254,269,278,290 "Other

  4. Washington Renewable Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity, by Energy Source

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Washington" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Geothermal","-","-","-","-","-" "Hydro Conventional",21156,21333,21203,21088,21181 "Solar","-",1,1,1,1 "Wind",821,1162,1365,2006,2296 "Wood/Wood Waste",326,296,314,369,368 "MSW/Landfill Gas",35,36,36,41,39 "Other Biomass",4,"-","-","-","-"

  5. West Virginia Renewable Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity, by Energy Source

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    West Virginia" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Geothermal","-","-","-","-","-" "Hydro Conventional",264,264,264,264,285 "Solar","-","-","-","-","-" "Wind",66,66,330,330,431 "Wood/Wood Waste","-","-","-","-","-" "MSW/Landfill

  6. Wisconsin Renewable Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity, by Energy Source

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wisconsin" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Geothermal","-","-","-","-","-" "Hydro Conventional",476,488,485,492,492 "Solar","-","-","-","-","-" "Wind",53,44,231,430,449 "Wood/Wood Waste",220,232,208,208,239 "MSW/Landfill Gas",62,71,72,72,76 "Other Biomass",1,1,8,11,12

  7. Wyoming Renewable Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity, by Energy Source

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wyoming" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Geothermal","-","-","-","-","-" "Hydro Conventional",303,303,303,304,307 "Solar","-","-","-","-","-" "Wind",287,287,680,1104,1415 "Wood/Wood Waste","-","-","-","-","-" "MSW/Landfill

  8. Louisiana Total Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity, by Energy Source

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Louisiana" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Fossil",23904,23379,23207,23087,23906 " Coal",3453,3482,3482,3482,3417 " Petroleum",285,346,346,346,881 " Natural Gas",19980,19384,19345,19225,19574 " Other Gases",186,167,34,34,34 "Nuclear",2119,2127,2154,2142,2142 "Renewables",525,586,586,579,517 "Pumped Storage","-","-","-","-","-"

  9. Maine Total Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity, by Energy Source

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Maine" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Fossil",2770,2751,2761,2738,2738 " Coal",85,85,85,85,85 " Petroleum",1030,1031,1031,1008,1008 " Natural Gas",1655,1636,1645,1645,1645 " Other Gases","-","-","-","-","-" "Nuclear","-","-","-","-","-" "Renewables",1418,1462,1478,1606,1692 "Pumped

  10. Maryland Total Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity, by Energy Source

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Maryland" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Fossil",10071,10028,10125,10050,10012 " Coal",4958,4958,4944,4876,4886 " Petroleum",3140,2965,2991,2986,2933 " Natural Gas",1821,1953,2038,2035,2041 " Other Gases",152,152,152,152,152 "Nuclear",1735,1735,1735,1705,1705 "Renewables",693,723,725,727,799 "Pumped Storage","-","-","-","-","-"

  11. Massachusetts Total Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity, by Energy Source

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Massachusetts" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Fossil",11050,10670,10621,10770,10763 " Coal",1743,1744,1662,1668,1669 " Petroleum",3219,3137,3120,3125,3031 " Natural Gas",6089,5789,5839,5977,6063 " Other Gases","-","-","-","-","-" "Nuclear",685,685,685,685,685 "Renewables",554,560,557,564,566 "Pumped Storage",1643,1643,1643,1680,1680

  12. Michigan Total Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity, by Energy Source

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Michigan" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Fossil",23693,23826,23805,23691,23205 " Coal",11860,11910,11921,11794,11531 " Petroleum",1499,673,667,684,640 " Natural Gas",10322,11242,11218,11214,11033 " Other Gases",12,"-","-","-","-" "Nuclear",4006,3969,3969,3953,3947 "Renewables",618,638,773,792,807 "Pumped Storage",1872,1872,1872,1872,1872

  13. Minnesota Total Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity, by Energy Source

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Minnesota" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Fossil",9714,9550,10548,10752,10519 " Coal",5444,5207,5235,4826,4789 " Petroleum",746,764,782,801,795 " Natural Gas",3524,3579,4531,5126,4936 " Other Gases","-","-","-","-","-" "Nuclear",1668,1668,1668,1668,1594 "Renewables",1259,1658,2008,2192,2588 "Pumped

  14. Nevada Total Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity, by Energy Source

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nevada" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Fossil",8412,8638,9942,9950,9914 " Coal",2657,2689,2916,2916,2873 " Petroleum",45,45,45,45,45 " Natural Gas",5711,5905,6982,6990,6996 " Other Gases","-","-","-","-","-" "Nuclear","-","-","-","-","-" "Renewables",1236,1316,1355,1446,1507 "Pumped

  15. New York Renewable Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity, by Energy Source

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    York" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Geothermal","-","-","-","-","-" "Hydro Conventional",4307,4301,4299,4310,4314 "Solar","-","-","-","-","-" "Wind",370,425,707,1274,1274 "Wood/Wood Waste",37,37,87,86,86 "MSW/Landfill Gas",313,324,340,344,359 "Other

  16. New York Total Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity, by Energy Source

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    York" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Fossil",28071,27582,26726,27022,26653 " Coal",4014,3570,2899,2804,2781 " Petroleum",7241,7286,7273,7335,6421 " Natural Gas",16816,16727,16554,16882,17407 " Other Gases","-","-","-","-",45 "Nuclear",5156,5156,5264,5262,5271 "Renewables",5027,5087,5433,6013,6033 "Pumped Storage",1297,1297,1297,1374,1400

  17. North Carolina Renewable Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity, by Energy Source

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Carolina" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Geothermal","-","-","-","-","-" "Hydro Conventional",1954,1960,1952,1952,1956 "Solar","-","-",3,3,35 "Wind","-","-","-","-","-" "Wood/Wood Waste",324,324,318,318,481 "MSW/Landfill Gas",14,18,20,20,27 "Other

  18. North Carolina Total Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity, by Energy Source

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Carolina" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Fossil",19673,20247,20305,20230,20081 " Coal",13113,13068,13069,12952,12766 " Petroleum",563,564,558,560,573 " Natural Gas",5997,6616,6679,6718,6742 " Other Gases","-","-","-","-","-" "Nuclear",4975,4975,4958,4958,4958 "Renewables",2292,2301,2294,2294,2499 "Pumped Storage",84,84,90,86,86

  19. North Dakota Renewable Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity, by Energy Source

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Dakota" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Geothermal","-","-","-","-","-" "Hydro Conventional",443,486,486,508,508 "Solar","-","-","-","-","-" "Wind",164,383,776,1202,1423 "Wood/Wood Waste","-","-","-","-","-" "MSW/Landfill

  20. North Dakota Total Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity, by Energy Source

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Dakota" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Fossil",4222,4212,4212,4243,4247 " Coal",4127,4119,4119,4148,4153 " Petroleum",77,75,75,71,71 " Natural Gas",10,10,10,15,15 " Other Gases",8,8,8,8,8 "Nuclear","-","-","-","-","-" "Renewables",617,879,1272,1720,1941 "Pumped Storage","-","-","-","-","-"

  1. Ohio Renewable Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity, by Energy Source

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Ohio" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Geothermal","-","-","-","-","-" "Hydro Conventional",101,101,101,101,101 "Solar","-","-","-","-",13 "Wind",7,7,7,7,7 "Wood/Wood Waste",64,64,65,65,60 "MSW/Landfill Gas",4,41,41,41,48 "Other Biomass","-","-","-",1,2

  2. Ohio Total Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity, by Energy Source

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Ohio" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Fossil",31582,31418,31154,31189,30705 " Coal",22264,22074,21815,21858,21360 " Petroleum",1057,1075,1047,1047,1019 " Natural Gas",8161,8169,8192,8184,8203 " Other Gases",100,100,100,100,123 "Nuclear",2120,2124,2124,2134,2134 "Renewables",175,213,214,216,231 "Pumped Storage","-","-","-","-","-"

  3. Oklahoma Renewable Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity, by Energy Source

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oklahoma" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Geothermal","-","-","-","-","-" "Hydro Conventional",851,851,851,854,858 "Solar","-","-","-","-","-" "Wind",594,689,708,1130,1480 "Wood/Wood Waste",63,63,63,58,58 "MSW/Landfill Gas",16,16,16,16,16 "Other

  4. Oklahoma Total Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity, by Energy Source

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oklahoma" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Fossil",18301,18083,18364,18532,18350 " Coal",5372,5364,5302,5330,5330 " Petroleum",75,70,71,71,69 " Natural Gas",12854,12649,12985,13125,12951 " Other Gases","-","-",6,6,"-" "Nuclear","-","-","-","-","-" "Renewables",1524,1618,1637,2057,2412 "Pumped

  5. Oregon Renewable Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity, by Energy Source

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oregon" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Geothermal","-","-","-","-","-" "Hydro Conventional",8374,8385,8364,8430,8425 "Solar","-","-","-","-","-" "Wind",399,885,1059,1659,2004 "Wood/Wood Waste",195,215,230,241,221 "MSW/Landfill Gas",14,20,20,26,31 "Other Biomass",3,18,3,3,3

  6. Oregon Total Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity, by Energy Source

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oregon" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Fossil",3349,3686,3653,3626,3577 " Coal",585,585,585,585,585 " Petroleum","-","-","-","-","-" " Natural Gas",2764,3101,3068,3041,2992 " Other Gases","-","-","-","-","-" "Nuclear","-","-","-","-","-"

  7. Pennsylvania Renewable Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity, by Energy Source

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Pennsylvania" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Geothermal","-","-","-","-","-" "Hydro Conventional",748,748,751,747,747 "Solar","-","-",2,2,9 "Wind",150,293,361,696,696 "Wood/Wood Waste",108,108,108,108,108 "MSW/Landfill Gas",359,379,397,419,424 "Other Biomass","-","-","-","-","-"

  8. Pennsylvania Total Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity, by Energy Source

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Pennsylvania" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Fossil",32893,32751,32654,32663,32530 " Coal",18771,18581,18513,18539,18481 " Petroleum",4664,4660,4540,4533,4534 " Natural Gas",9349,9410,9507,9491,9415 " Other Gases",110,100,94,101,100 "Nuclear",9234,9305,9337,9455,9540 "Renewables",1365,1529,1619,1971,1984 "Pumped Storage",1513,1521,1521,1521,1521

  9. Rhode Island Renewable Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity, by Energy Source

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Rhode Island" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Geothermal","-","-","-","-","-" "Hydro Conventional",4,4,3,3,3 "Solar","-","-","-","-","-" "Wind","-","-","-","-",2 "Wood/Wood Waste","-","-","-","-","-" "MSW/Landfill

  10. Rhode Island Total Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity, by Energy Source

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Rhode Island" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Fossil",1743,1754,1754,1754,1754 " Coal","-","-","-","-","-" " Petroleum",31,29,26,16,16 " Natural Gas",1712,1725,1728,1738,1738 " Other Gases","-","-","-","-","-" "Nuclear","-","-","-","-","-"

  11. South Carolina Renewable Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity, by Energy Source

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Carolina" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Geothermal","-","-","-","-","-" "Hydro Conventional",1345,1337,1337,1337,1340 "Solar","-","-","-","-","-" "Wind","-","-","-","-","-" "Wood/Wood Waste",220,220,220,220,255 "MSW/Landfill Gas",29,29,35,23,29 "Other

  12. South Carolina Total Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity, by Energy Source

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Carolina" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Fossil",12100,12682,13281,13189,13207 " Coal",6088,6641,7242,7210,7230 " Petroleum",685,685,705,669,670 " Natural Gas",5327,5355,5335,5311,5308 " Other Gases","-","-","-","-","-" "Nuclear",6472,6472,6472,6486,6486 "Renewables",1594,1587,1592,1580,1623 "Pumped Storage",2616,2826,2666,2716,2666

  13. South Dakota Renewable Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity, by Energy Source

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Dakota" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Geothermal","-","-","-","-","-" "Hydro Conventional",1516,1463,1463,1594,1594 "Solar","-","-","-","-","-" "Wind",43,43,193,320,629 "Wood/Wood Waste","-","-","-","-","-" "MSW/Landfill

  14. South Dakota Total Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity, by Energy Source

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Dakota" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Fossil",1374,1364,1449,1448,1401 " Coal",492,492,497,497,497 " Petroleum",232,226,230,230,228 " Natural Gas",649,645,722,722,676 " Other Gases","-","-","-","-","-" "Nuclear","-","-","-","-","-" "Renewables",1559,1506,1656,1914,2223 "Pumped

  15. SOURCE?

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    on the direction and maintanence of the core code * The code base is platform- neutral ... Its core function is to allow users to merge multiple sources of building energy data into ...

  16. Electrically powered hand tool

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Myers, Kurt S.; Reed, Teddy R.

    2007-01-16

    An electrically powered hand tool is described and which includes a three phase electrical motor having a plurality of poles; an electrical motor drive electrically coupled with the three phase electrical motor; and a source of electrical power which is converted to greater than about 208 volts three-phase and which is electrically coupled with the electrical motor drive.

  17. Black Friday Savings All Year 'Round | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Black Friday Savings All Year 'Round Black Friday Savings All Year 'Round November 21, 2011 - 3:58pm Addthis Chris Stewart Senior Communicator at DOE's National Renewable Energy ...

  18. DOE ZERH Second Leading Builder Round Table Meeting Report |...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DOE ZERH Second Leading Builder Round Table Meeting Report On October 23rd-24th, 2014, the ZERH program held its Second Leading Production Builder Round Table Meeting in Suwanee, ...

  19. Rooftop Solar Challenge Round 1 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Soft Costs » Rooftop Solar Challenge Round 1 Rooftop Solar Challenge Round 1 -- These projects are inactive -- The first round of the Rooftop Solar Challenge supported 22 teams working to spur solar power deployment by cutting red tape and improving finance options. By streamlining and standardizing permitting, zoning, metering, and connection processes, these teams helped reduce barriers and lower costs for residential and small commercial rooftop solar systems. DOE announced a second round of

  20. Photovoltaic Supply Chain and Cross-Cutting Technologies Round 2 |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Technology to Market » Photovoltaic Supply Chain and Cross-Cutting Technologies Round 2 Photovoltaic Supply Chain and Cross-Cutting Technologies Round 2 Four projects are working to accelerate the development of revolutionary products or processes for the photovoltaic (PV) industry through the High Impact Supply Chain R&D for PV Technologies/Systems program, which represents the second round of PV Supply Chain and Cross-Cutting Technologies funding. These projects

  1. Round Robin Testing of Commercial Hydrogen Sensor Performance...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Round Robin Testing of Commercial Hydrogen Sensor Performance-Observations and Results Preprint W. Buttner, R. Burgess, C. Rivkin, and M. Post National Renewable Energy Laboratory ...

  2. Initial Results of IEC 62804 Draft Round Robin Testing (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hacke, P.; Terwilliger, K.; Koch, S.; Weber, T.; Berghold, J.; Hoffmann, S.; Ambrosi, H.; Koehl, M.; Dietrich, S.; Ebert, M.; Mathiak, G.

    2013-05-01

    This presentation discusses the Initial round robin results of the IEC 62804 system voltage durability qualification test for crystalline silicon modules.

  3. Electric vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-03-01

    Quiet, clean, and efficient, electric vehicles (EVs) may someday become a practical mode of transportation for the general public. Electric vehicles can provide many advantages for the nation's environment and energy supply because they run on electricity, which can be produced from many sources of energy such as coal, natural gas, uranium, and hydropower. These vehicles offer fuel versatility to the transportation sector, which depends almost solely on oil for its energy needs. Electric vehicles are any mode of transportation operated by a motor that receives electricity from a battery or fuel cell. EVs come in all shapes and sizes and may be used for different tasks. Some EVs are small and simple, such as golf carts and electric wheel chairs. Others are larger and more complex, such as automobile and vans. Some EVs, such as fork lifts, are used in industries. In this fact sheet, we will discuss mostly automobiles and vans. There are also variations on electric vehicles, such as hybrid vehicles and solar-powered vehicles. Hybrid vehicles use electricity as their primary source of energy, however, they also use a backup source of energy, such as gasoline, methanol or ethanol. Solar-powered vehicles are electric vehicles that use photovoltaic cells (cells that convert solar energy to electricity) rather than utility-supplied electricity to recharge the batteries. This paper discusses these concepts.

  4. DOE's Round Robin Test Program FAQ Sheet | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DOE's Round Robin Test Program FAQ Sheet DOE's Round Robin Test Program FAQ Sheet This document is the May 2011 version of the Frequently Asked Questions about the US Department of Energy's Round Robin Test Program. roundrobintestprogram_faq_may2011.pdf (177.44 KB) More Documents & Publications 6450-01-P, DOE 10 CFR Parts 430 and 431, Docket No. EERE-2010-BT-CE-0014 RIN 1904-AC23, Draft Submission to Federal Register, Notice of Revisions to Energy Efficiency Enforcement Regulations, Request

  5. The Mesaba Energy Project: Clean Coal Power Initiative, Round...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Mesaba Energy Project: Clean Coal Power Initiative, Round 2 Stone, Richard; Gray, Gordon; Evans, Robert 01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; 20 FOSSIL-FUELED POWER PLANTS The Mesaba Energy...

  6. Carrying Semiautomatic Pistols with a Round in the Chamber

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-10-28

    Sets forth requirements for a DOE security police officer who must carry a round in the chamber of a semiautomatic pistol while on duty. Does not cancel other directives.

  7. International Round-Robin on Transport Properties of Bismuth Telluride

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    IEA-AMT round-robin testing of n- and p-type bismuth telluride transport properties showed significant measurement issues and highlighted need for standardization of measurements of thermoelectric material properties

  8. Next Generation Photovoltaics Round 2 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Photovoltaics » Next Generation Photovoltaics Round 2 Next Generation Photovoltaics Round 2 Twenty-three solar projects are investigating transformational photovoltaic (PV) technologies with the potential to meet SunShot cost targets. The projects' goals are to: Increase efficiency Reduce costs Improve reliability Create more secure and sustainable supply chains. On Sept. 1, 2011, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced $24.5 million to fund the Next Generation Photovoltaics II projects

  9. Solar Foundational Program to Advance Cell Efficiency Round 2 | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy 2 Solar Foundational Program to Advance Cell Efficiency Round 2 The SunShot Foundational Program to Advance Cell Efficiency (F-PACE) aims to increase the efficiency of photovoltaic (PV) cells achieved in the laboratory and on manufacturing lines. Launched in September 2011, the first round of the F-PACE program supported 18 research projects over a 36-month performance period. These efforts laid the technical foundation for significant increases in PV efficiency by identifying cost

  10. 2015 Leading Builder Round Table Report | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Leading Builder Round Table Report 2015 Leading Builder Round Table Report The nation is on the cusp of a dramatic movement to zero energy ready homes. This includes statewide codes, large developments, and a growing amount of commitment to the DOE Zero Energy Ready Home program. Much of this progress can be attributed to a small contingent of our nation's leading builders who are demonstrating the technical, cost, and design feasibility for this level of excellence At the 2015 Leading Builder

  11. 2016 Leading Rater Round Table Report | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Leading Rater Round Table Report 2016 Leading Rater Round Table Report A dramatic movement to zero energy ready homes is just beginning. This includes statewide codes, large developments, and a growing commitment to the DOE Zero Energy Ready Home program. Continued progress will rely on an increasing number of Home Energy Rating System (HERS) raters effectively bringing the business case, technical solutions, and verification services for Zero Energy Ready Home to our nation's builders. At this

  12. Nuclear Waste Analytical Round Robins 1-6 summary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, G.L.; Marschman, S.C.

    1993-12-31

    The MCC has conducted six round robins for the waste management, research, and development community from 1987 to present. The laboratories participating regularly are Ames, Argonne, Catholic University, Lawrence Livermore, Pacific Northwest Laboratory, Savannah River, and West Valley Nuclear. Glass types analyzed in these round robins all have been simulated nuclear waste compositions expected from vitrification of high-level nuclear waste. A wide range of analytical procedures have been used by the participating laboratories including Atomic Absorption spectroscopy, inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy, direct current plasma-emission spectroscopy, and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy techniques. Consensus average relative error for Round Robins 1 through 6 is 5.4%, with values ranging from 9.4 to 1.1%. Trend on the average improved with each round robin. When the laboratories analyzed samples over longer periods of time, the intralaboratory variability increased. Lab-to-lab variation accounts for most of the total variability found in all the round robins. Participation in the radiochemistry portion has been minimal, and analytical results poor compared to nonradiochemistry portion. Additional radiochemical work is needed in future round robins.

  13. EA-1980: Spar Canyon-Round Valley Access Road System Improvements...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    80: Spar Canyon-Round Valley Access Road System Improvements, Custer County, Idaho EA-1980: Spar Canyon-Round Valley Access Road System Improvements, Custer County, Idaho Summary...

  14. EIA - Electricity Generating Capacity

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Electricity Generating Capacity Release Date: January 3, 2013 | Next Release: August 2013 Year Existing Units by Energy Source Unit Additions Unit Retirements 2011 XLS XLS XLS 2010 XLS XLS XLS 2009 XLS XLS XLS 2008 XLS XLS XLS 2007 XLS XLS XLS 2006 XLS XLS XLS 2005 XLS XLS XLS 2004 XLS XLS XLS 2003 XLS XLS XLS Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report." Related links Electric Power Monthly Electric Power Annual Form EIA-860 Source Data

  15. Electrical resistivity change in Al:ZnO thin films dynamically deposited by bipolar pulsed direct-current sputtering and a remote plasma source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Wonkyun; Joo, Junghoon

    2010-07-15

    The Al-doped ZnO (AZO) thin films for a transparent conducting oxide in solar cell devices were deposited by bipolar pulsed dc magnetron sputtering. This work was performed in an in-line type system and investigated AZO films in a static deposition mode and dynamic one, which is more important in the practical fields. Because of this dynamic deposition process, the zigzagged columnar structure was observed. This resulted in the decreasing electrical property, optical properties, and surface roughness. As a deposition in the dynamic mode, the resistivity increased from 1.64x10{sup -3} to 2.50x10{sup -3} {Omega} cm, as compared to that in the static mode, and the transmittance also decreased from 83.9% to 78.3%. To recover the disadvantage, a remote plasma source (RPS) was supported between the substrate and target for reducing zigzagged formation during the deposition. The deposition rate decreased by using RPS, but the electrical and optical properties of films got better than only dynamic mode. The resistivity and transmittance in the dynamic mode using RPS were 2.1x10{sup -3} {Omega} cm and 85.5%, respectively. In this study, the authors found the possibility to advance the electrical and optical properties of AZO thin films in the industry mode.

  16. Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    . Total Electricity Consumption and Expenditures, 2003" ,"All Buildings* Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures" ,"Number of Buildings...

  17. BAG (Continuous Round Robin Packet Capture)

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2006-03-10

    Bag is a miniature pcap filter which takes pcap input (or input off the wire) using a bpf filter, if specified, and then writes the output to stdout or a file (in pcap format). It depends for some aspects of its functionality on a libpcap library which uses a shared memory packet capture ring bugger. There are two build in modules: chcksum and session. the build in chcksum modules is used to anonymize the ipmore » addresses and repair any checksums in the stream. % bag -r /tmp/*.pcap -Cchucksum, 128.1 65: 10.10 The session module generates sessions which are defined as a series of packets that have two things in common. the first is a unique five-tuple composed oi an IP protocol, IP source address, IP source port, IP destination address, and IP destination port. The second is that if the originating packet is associated with a bi-directional service such as ftpltcp, characteristics and data will be kept for both flows involved with the service. The only protocols evaluated beyond the IP header are ICMP, TCP and UDP. A session can last for as long as bag is running. However, under normal conditions, sessions are generated every time they appear to have closed down. There is a man page included with the distribution which goes into more detail.« less

  18. BAG (Continuous Round Robin Packet Capture)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, C. Philip

    2006-03-10

    Bag is a miniature pcap filter which takes pcap input (or input off the wire) using a bpf filter, if specified, and then writes the output to stdout or a file (in pcap format). It depends for some aspects of its functionality on a libpcap library which uses a shared memory packet capture ring bugger. There are two build in modules: chcksum and session. the build in chcksum modules is used to anonymize the ip addresses and repair any checksums in the stream. % bag -r /tmp/*.pcap -Cchucksum, 128.1 65: 10.10 The session module generates sessions which are defined as a series of packets that have two things in common. the first is a unique five-tuple composed oi an IP protocol, IP source address, IP source port, IP destination address, and IP destination port. The second is that if the originating packet is associated with a bi-directional service such as ftpltcp, characteristics and data will be kept for both flows involved with the service. The only protocols evaluated beyond the IP header are ICMP, TCP and UDP. A session can last for as long as bag is running. However, under normal conditions, sessions are generated every time they appear to have closed down. There is a man page included with the distribution which goes into more detail.

  19. Application of Spatial Data Modeling and Geographical Information Systems (GIS) for Identification of Potential Siting Options for Various Electrical Generation Sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mays, Gary T; Belles, Randy; Blevins, Brandon R; Hadley, Stanton W; Harrison, Thomas J; Jochem, Warren C; Neish, Bradley S; Omitaomu, Olufemi A; Rose, Amy N

    2012-05-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) initiated an internal National Electric Generation Siting Study, which is an ongoing multiphase study addressing several key questions related to our national electrical energy supply. This effort has led to the development of a tool, OR-SAGE (Oak Ridge Siting Analysis for power Generation Expansion), to support siting evaluations. The objective in developing OR-SAGE was to use industry-accepted approaches and/or develop appropriate criteria for screening sites and employ an array of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) data sources at ORNL to identify candidate areas for a power generation technology application. The initial phase of the study examined nuclear power generation. These early nuclear phase results were shared with staff from the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), which formed the genesis and support for an expansion of the work to several other power generation forms, including advanced coal with carbon capture and storage (CCS), solar, and compressed air energy storage (CAES). Wind generation was not included in this scope of work for EPRI. The OR-SAGE tool is essentially a dynamic visualization database. The results shown in this report represent a single static set of results using a specific set of input parameters. In this case, the GIS input parameters were optimized to support an economic study conducted by EPRI. A single set of individual results should not be construed as an ultimate energy solution, since US energy policy is very complex. However, the strength of the OR-SAGE tool is that numerous alternative scenarios can be quickly generated to provide additional insight into electrical generation or other GIS-based applications. The screening process divides the contiguous United States into 100 x 100 m (1-hectare) squares (cells), applying successive power generation-appropriate site selection and evaluation criteria (SSEC) to each cell. There are just under 700 million cells representing the

  20. An In-Depth Look at Ground Source Heat Pumps and Other Electric Loads in Two GreenMax Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Puttagunta, Srikanth; Shapiro, Carl

    2012-04-01

    Building America research team Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) partnered with WPPI Energy to answer key research questions on in-field performance of ground-source heat pumps and lighting, appliance, and miscellaneous loads (LAMELs) through extensive field monitoring at two WPPI GreenMax demonstration homes in Wisconsin. These two test home evaluations provided valuable data on the true in-field performance of various building mechanical systems and LAMELs.

  1. Round Robin Testing of Commercial Hydrogen Sensor Performance--Observations and Results: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buttner, W.; Burgess, R.; Rivkin, C.; Post, M.; Boon-Bret, L.; Black, G.; Harskamp, F.; Moretto, P.

    2010-10-01

    This paper presented observations and results from round robin testing of commercial hydrogen sensor performance.

  2. START Program for Renewable Energy Project Development Assistance – Round Three Application

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Download the application for the START Program for Renewable Energy Project Development Assistance–Round Three.

  3. CDFI Fund 2015 Round of New Markets Tax Credit Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of the Treasury’s Community Development Financial Institutions Fund (CDFI Fund) has opened the calendar year (CY) 2015 Notice of Allocation Availability (NOAA) funding round for the New Markets Tax Credit Program (NMTC Program). The NOAA makes up to $5 billion in tax credit allocation authority available for the CY 2015 round, pending Congressional authorization. Eligible parties must be certified as Community Development Entities (CDEs) by the CDFI Fund. The NMTC Program aims to break this cycle of disinvestment by attracting the private investment necessary to reinvigorate struggling local economies.

  4. Parylene coated microspheres: Operational parameters and round robin results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, J.M.; Foreman, L.R.

    1987-01-01

    Achieving less than 0.1 micrometer defect and close thickness tolerances with parylene coatings has proven a challenge. Los Alamos has investigated how some parameters of coater design and operation affect coating quality. Numerous coater configurations (home-built and commercial) are being used at our Laboratory and elsewhere. In an effort to evaluate the ability of these various types of units to meet desired tolerances, we ran a round robin evaluation involving six coating operations (US and UK). Each participant received an identical and precharacterized set of targets. Results of both the round robin and coater design/operation evaluation are presented.

  5. Green Functions for the Radial Electric Component of the Monopole...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Green Functions for the Radial Electric Component of the Monopole Wake Field in a Round Resistive Chamber Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Green Functions for the Radial...

  6. Pioneer round of translation occurs during serum starvation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oh, Nara; Kim, Kyoung Mi; Cho, Hana; Choe, Junho; Kim, Yoon Ki

    2007-10-12

    The pioneer round of translation plays a role in translation initiation of newly spliced and exon junction complex (EJC)-bound mRNAs. Nuclear cap-binding protein complex CBP80/20 binds to those mRNAs at the 5'-end, recruiting translation initiation complex. As a consequence of the pioneer round of translation, the bound EJCs are dissociated from mRNAs and CBP80/20 is replaced by the cytoplasmic cap-binding protein eIF4E. Steady-state translation directed by eIF4E allows for an immediate and rapid response to changes in physiological conditions. Here, we show that nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD), which restricts only to the pioneer round of translation but not to steady-state translation, efficiently occurs even during serum starvation, in which steady-state translation is drastically abolished. Accordingly, CBP80 remains in the nucleus and processing bodies are unaffected in their abundance and number in serum-starved conditions. These results suggest that mRNAs enter the pioneer round of translation during serum starvation and are targeted for NMD if they contain premature termination codons.

  7. Electricity 101 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Resources » Electricity 101 Electricity 101 FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS Why do other countries use different shaped plugs? Why do outlets have three holes? Why do we have AC electricity? Can we harness lightning as an energy source? Can we have wireless transmission of electricity? SYSTEM What is electricity? Where does electricity come from? What is the "grid"? How much electricity does a typical household use? How did the electric system evolve? What does the future look like? Who

  8. DC source assemblies

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Campbell, Jeremy B; Newson, Steve

    2013-02-26

    Embodiments of DC source assemblies of power inverter systems of the type suitable for deployment in a vehicle having an electrically grounded chassis are provided. An embodiment of a DC source assembly comprises a housing, a DC source disposed within the housing, a first terminal, and a second terminal. The DC source also comprises a first capacitor having a first electrode electrically coupled to the housing, and a second electrode electrically coupled to the first terminal. The DC source assembly further comprises a second capacitor having a first electrode electrically coupled to the housing, and a second electrode electrically coupled to the second terminal.

  9. Electricity Monthly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Methodology and Documentation General The Electricity Monthly Update is prepared by the Electric Power Operations Team, Office of Electricity, Renewables and Uranium Statistics, U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), U.S. Department of Energy. Data published in the Electricity Monthly Update are compiled from the following sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-826,"Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenues with State Distributions Report," U.S. Energy

  10. Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A. Total Electricity Consumption and Expenditures for All Buildings, 2003" ,"All Buildings Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures" ,"Number of...

  11. Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    C9. Total Electricity Consumption and Expenditures, 1999" ,"All Buildings Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures" ,"Number of Buildings...

  12. Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    DIV. Total Electricity Consumption and Expenditures by Census Division, 1999" ,"All Buildings Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures" ,"Number...

  13. Optimized Hydrogen and Electricity Generation from Wind

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Several optimizations can be employed to create hydrogen and electricity from a wind energy source. The key element in hydrogen production from an electrical source is an electrolyzer to convert water and electricity into hydrogen and oxygen.

  14. Electrical system architecture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Algrain, Marcelo C.; Johnson, Kris W.; Akasam, Sivaprasad; Hoff, Brian D.

    2008-07-15

    An electrical system for a vehicle includes a first power source generating a first voltage level, the first power source being in electrical communication with a first bus. A second power source generates a second voltage level greater than the first voltage level, the second power source being in electrical communication with a second bus. A starter generator may be configured to provide power to at least one of the first bus and the second bus, and at least one additional power source may be configured to provide power to at least one of the first bus and the second bus. The electrical system also includes at least one power consumer in electrical communication with the first bus and at least one power consumer in electrical communication with the second bus.

  15. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Second Production Builder Round Table

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Home Second Production Builder Round Table January 2015 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, subcontractors, or affliated partners, make any warranty, express or implied, or assume any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or

  16. Microsoft Word - HERS Round-Table February 2016.docx

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    First Leading Rater Round Table Summary March 2016 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, subcontractors, or affiliated partners, make any warranty, express or implied, or assume any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represent

  17. Computer Defeats Video Game System in #EnergyFaceoff Round One | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Defeats Video Game System in #EnergyFaceoff Round One Computer Defeats Video Game System in #EnergyFaceoff Round One November 5, 2014 - 3:30pm Addthis The computer takes the efficiency title in round one of #EnergyFaceoff. | Graphic courtesy of Stacy Buchanan, National Renewable Energy Laboratory The computer takes the efficiency title in round one of #EnergyFaceoff. | Graphic courtesy of Stacy Buchanan, National Renewable Energy Laboratory Allison Casey Senior Communicator, NREL

  18. Firearm equipped with live round inhibiting means and method of making same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baehr, Donald G. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1990-01-01

    A firearm is disclosed having live round inhibiting means mounted in the barrel of the firearm which permits a blank cartridge to be loaded into a firearm and fired while preventing the loading and firing of a live round. The live round inhibiting means comprise shaft means mounted in the barrel of the firearm and which extends a sufficient length into the barrel at a point just beyond the chamber portion of the firearm to engage the bullet portion of a live round to prevent it from properly chambering, while permitting a blank cartridge to be loaded into the firearm and fired without engaging the live round-inhibiting shaft means.

  19. Firearm equipped with live round inhibiting means and method of making same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baehr, D.G.

    1990-11-13

    A firearm is disclosed having live round inhibiting means mounted in the barrel of the firearm which permits a blank cartridge to be loaded into a firearm and fired while preventing the loading and firing of a live round. The live round inhibiting means comprise shaft means mounted in the barrel of the firearm and which extends a sufficient length into the barrel at a point just beyond the chamber portion of the firearm to engage the bullet portion of a live round to prevent it from properly chambering, while permitting a blank cartridge to be loaded into the firearm and fired without engaging the live round-inhibiting shaft means. 9 figs.

  20. Wind Turbine Gearbox Condition Monitoring Round Robin Study - Vibration Analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Turbine Gearbox Condition Monitoring Round Robin Study - Vibration Analysis S. Sheng, Editor National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technical Report NREL/TP-5000-54530 July 2012 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Wind

  1. Recycling, Source Reduction,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... Recovery and Electricity Generation" "(d)","Relative to National Average Landfill" "GREENHOUSE GAS EFFECTS OF RECYCLING, SOURCE REDUCING, AND COMPOSTING VARIOUS WASTE MATERIALS ...

  2. East Central Electric Cooperative- Residential Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    East Central Electric Cooperative offers rebates to residential customers to install energy-efficient ground source heat pumps, electric water heaters, and air conditioners. To qualify for the...

  3. Aiken Electric Cooperative Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Aiken Electric Cooperative Inc Place: Aiken, South Carolina Zip: 29802 Sector: Hydro, Hydrogen, Renewable Energy Product: A utility that provides electricity from renewable sources...

  4. Electricity Monthly Update - Energy Information Administration

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Rural electric customers are the most vulnerable to power outages Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Annual Electric Power Industry Report (Form EIA-861) 2015 early ...

  5. Electric Kettle Takes Down Microwave in Final Round of #EnergyFaceoff...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Residential microwaves vary in their wattages; the higher the wattage, the faster your ... Saver (note that we used weekly energy consumption instead of daily): Microwave Time used: ...

  6. Electric Blanket vs. Space Heater: #EnergyFaceoff Round 3 Heats...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Tell us which appliance you think is more energy efficient by using EnergyFaceoff or commenting on Energy Saver social media. We will announce the winner on Wednesday Colder ...

  7. Energy Sources | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sources Energy Sources Renewable Energy Renewable Energy Learn more about energy from solar, wind, water, geothermal and biomass. Read more Nuclear Nuclear Learn more about how we use nuclear energy. Read more Electricity Electricity Learn more about how we use electricity as an energy source. Read more Fossil Fossil Learn more about our fossil energy sources: coal, oil and natural gas. Read more Primary energy sources take many forms, including nuclear energy, fossil energy -- like oil, coal

  8. PARENT Quick Blind Round-Robin Test Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Braatz, Brett G.; Heasler, Patrick G.; Meyer, Ryan M.

    2014-09-30

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has established the Program to Assess the Reliability of Emerging Nondestructive Techniques (PARENT) whose goal is to investigate the effectiveness of current and novel nondestructive examination procedures and techniques to find flaws in nickel-alloy welds and base materials. This is to be done by conducting a series of open and blind international round-robin tests on a set of piping components that include large-bore dissimilar metal welds, small-bore dissimilar metal welds, and bottom-mounted instrumentation penetration welds. The blind testing is being conducted in two segments, one is called Quick-Blind and the other is called Blind. The Quick-Blind testing and destructive analysis of the test blocks has been completed. This report describes the four Quick-Blind test blocks used, summarizes their destructive analysis, gives an overview of the nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques applied, provides an analysis inspection data, and presents the conclusions drawn.

  9. ION SOURCE

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martina, E.F.

    1958-04-22

    An improved ion source particularly adapted to provide an intense beam of ions with minimum neutral molecule egress from the source is described. The ion source structure includes means for establishing an oscillating electron discharge, including an apertured cathode at one end of the discharge. The egress of ions from the source is in a pencil like beam. This desirable form of withdrawal of the ions from the plasma created by the discharge is achieved by shaping the field at the aperture of the cathode. A tubular insulator is extended into the plasma from the aperture and in cooperation with the electric fields at the cathode end of the discharge focuses the ions from the source,

  10. Power Conversion Apparatus and Method for Hybrid Electric and Electric

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Vehicle Engines - Energy Innovation Portal Power Conversion Apparatus and Method for Hybrid Electric and Electric Vehicle Engines Oak Ridge National Laboratory Contact ORNL About This Technology Technology Marketing SummaryORNL researchers developed a solution to power source problems in hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) and electric vehicle (EV) engines. These engines typically use voltage source inverters. The conventional type of converter requires costly capacitors, has trouble with high

  11. Middle School Electric Car Competition | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Electric Car Competition National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About Regional Competitions National Finals Attending the National Finals 2016 Competition Results Middle School Round Robin Middle School Double Elimination Middle School Electric Car High School Round Robin High School Double Elimination Top Teams for 2016 Volunteers Key Dates Frequently Asked Questions News Media Contact Us WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building

  12. Federal-Tribal Partnership on Climate Change Action Rounds Corner, Shifts

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Into High Gear at 2013 Tribal Nations Conference | Department of Energy Federal-Tribal Partnership on Climate Change Action Rounds Corner, Shifts Into High Gear at 2013 Tribal Nations Conference Federal-Tribal Partnership on Climate Change Action Rounds Corner, Shifts Into High Gear at 2013 Tribal Nations Conference November 19, 2013 - 5:12pm Addthis Federal-Tribal Partnership on Climate Change Action Rounds Corner, Shifts Into High Gear at 2013 Tribal Nations Conference David F. Conrad

  13. DOE Seeks Applications for Third Round of Clean Coal Power Initiative |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy for Third Round of Clean Coal Power Initiative DOE Seeks Applications for Third Round of Clean Coal Power Initiative August 11, 2008 - 2:40pm Addthis Funding Opportunity Announcement Solicits Applications for Carbon Capture and Sequestration WASHINGTON, DC -The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today issued the final Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) for Round 3 of the Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI) which seeks to accelerate the commercial deployment of advanced

  14. DOE ZERH Second Leading Builder Round Table Meeting Report | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Second Leading Builder Round Table Meeting Report DOE ZERH Second Leading Builder Round Table Meeting Report On October 23rd-24th, 2014, the ZERH program held its Second Leading Production Builder Round Table Meeting in Suwanee, GA. The purpose was to provide top executives from leading builders with a forum to share business and technical lessons learned, identify a list of common challenges delivering DOE ZERHs, and identify new solutions to bring back to their individual

  15. The Mesaba Energy Project: Clean Coal Power Initiative, Round 2 (Technical

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Report) | SciTech Connect The Mesaba Energy Project: Clean Coal Power Initiative, Round 2 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The Mesaba Energy Project: Clean Coal Power Initiative, Round 2 The Mesaba Energy Project is a nominal 600 MW integrated gasification combine cycle power project located in Northeastern Minnesota. It was selected to receive financial assistance pursuant to code of federal regulations (?CFR?) 10 CFR 600 through a competitive solicitation under Round 2 of the

  16. CALiPER Round 11 Test Results Webcast | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    11 Test Results Webcast CALiPER Round 11 Test Results Webcast In this February 8, 2011 webcast, Mia Paget of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory provided the results of each CALiPER round with a "snapshot" of SSL technology status, identifying market trends and issues related to SSL product performance. Round 11 looked at five applications: arm-mounted roadway luminaires, post-top roadway luminaires, linear replacement lamps, high-bay luminaires, and small replacement lamps. View

  17. High School Academic Competition - Round Robin | U.S. DOE Office...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Round Robin National Science Bowl (NSB) NSB Home About National Science Bowl Contacts Regional Science Bowl Coordinators National Science Bowl FAQ's Alumni Past National Science ...

  18. MaRIE: A Presentation to the Science Campaigns Round Robin (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Resource Relation: Conference: 2014 NNSA Science Campaigns Round Robin ; 2014-09-30 - 2014-10-01 ; Los Alamos, New Mexico, United States Research Org: Los Alamos National ...

  19. Summary of Results: Round 9 of CALiPER Product Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2009-10-01

    The Round 9 Summary Report from the U.S. Department of Energy's Solid-State Lighting CALiPER Testing Program.

  20. CALiPER Round 7 Testing Results and SSL Product Life Issues ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Heidi Steward of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) highlighted the testing results from CALiPER Round 7, including featured product categories outdoor lighting, ...

  1. Text-Alternative Version: CALiPER Round 7 Testing Results and SSL Product Life Issues

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Below is the text-alternative version of the CALiPER Round 7 Testing Results and SSL Product Life Issues webcast.

  2. Alaska Energy Authority Renewable Energy Fund Round IV Grant...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... The estimated annual electricity savings, based on the use of a couple 10KW turbines will be 27,120kWh. This will ... for current and predicted usage 10112 to 113012 * ...

  3. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    538,800 35 Average retail price (centskWh) 33.43 1 kWh Kilowatthours. Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report." ...

  4. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    684,481 33 Average retail price (centskWh) 8.68 39 kWh Kilowatthours. Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report." ...

  5. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    20,316,681 2 Average retail price (centskWh) 8.09 46 kWh Kilowatthours. Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report." ...

  6. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    28,310 49 Average retail price (centskWh) 15.41 5 kWh Kilowatthours. Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report." ...

  7. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    1,576,943 20 Average retail price (centskWh) 9.17 33 kWh Kilowatthours. Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report." ...

  8. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    34,883,315 1 Average retail price (centskWh) 8.94 37 kWh Kilowatthours. Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report." ...

  9. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    1,255,974 22 Average retail price (centskWh) 8.18 43 kWh Kilowatthours. Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report." ...

  10. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3,151,592 10 Average retail price (centskWh) 12.65 11 kWh Kilowatthours. Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report." ...

  11. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    33,870 48 Average retail price (centskWh) 12.11 12 kWh Kilowatthours. Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report." ...

  12. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    696,6330 32 Average retail price (centskWh) 7.65 50 kWh Kilowatthours. Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report." ...

  13. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    1,763,652 19 Average retail price (centskWh) 9.60 27 kWh Kilowatthours. Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report." ...

  14. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    2,364,746 13 Average retail price (centskWh) 8.15 44 kWh Kilowatthours. Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report." ...

  15. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1,181,447 24 Average retail price (centskWh) 9.73 23 kWh Kilowatthours. Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report." ...

  16. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    138,573,884 Average retail price (centskWh) 10.44 kWh Kilowatthours. Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report." ...

  17. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    1,227,421 23 Average retail price (centskWh) 8.35 42 kWh Kilowatthours. Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report." ...

  18. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    253,513 39 Average retail price (centskWh) 17.46 2 kWh Kilowatthours. Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report." ...

  19. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    201,071 40 Average retail price (centskWh) 10.18 19 kWh Kilowatthours. Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report." ...

  20. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    11,180,448 3 Average retail price (centskWh) 15.15 8 kWh Kilowatthours. Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report." ...

  1. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    60,865 47 Average retail price (centskWh) 10.16 20 kWh Kilowatthours. Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report." ...

  2. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1,388,386 21 Average retail price (centskWh) 7.76 49 kWh Kilowatthours. Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report." ...

  3. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    844,760 29 Average retail price (centskWh) 12.10 13 kWh Kilowatthours. Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report." ...

  4. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2,463,339 11 Average retail price (centskWh) 9.40 29 kWh Kilowatthours. Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report." ...

  5. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    944,590 27 Average retail price (centskWh) 7.13 51 kWh Kilowatthours. Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report." ...

  6. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1,123,692 25 Average retail price (centskWh) 9.52 28 kWh Kilowatthours. Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report." ...

  7. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    use 7,958,621 4 Average retail price (centskWh) 9.06 35 kWh Kilowatthours. Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report." ...

  8. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    89 51 Average retail price (centskWh) 9.05 36 kWh Kilowatthours. Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report." ...

  9. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    4,565,846 8 Average retail price (centskWh) 10.03 22 kWh Kilowatthours. Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report." ...

  10. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    2,117,420 17 Average retail price (centskWh) 10.57 17 kWh Kilowatthours. Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report." ...

  11. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    83,636 46 Average retail price (centskWh) 10.06 21 kWh Kilowatthours. Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report." ...

  12. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    391,720 37 Average retail price (centskWh) 8.15 45 kWh Kilowatthours. Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report." ...

  13. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    5,462 50 Average retail price (centskWh) 14.57 9 kWh Kilowatthours. Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report." ...

  14. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    5,375,185 5 Average retail price (centskWh) 10.77 16 kWh Kilowatthours. Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report." ...

  15. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    3,439,427 9 Average retail price (centskWh) 9.36 30 kWh Kilowatthours. Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report." ...

  16. Electric Vehicles

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This album contains a variety of all-electric, plug-in hybrid electric and fuel cell electric vehicles. For a full list of all electric vehicles visit the EV Everywhere website.

  17. November 2011 Electrical Safety Occurrences

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    tagout) or disturbance of a previously unknown or mislocated hazardous energy source (e.g., live electrical power circuit, steam line, pressurized gas) resulting in a person...

  18. Small Business Vouchers Pilot: 33 Businesses Selected for Lab Collaboration, Round 2 Now Open

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Thirty-three small businesses were awarded vouchers in the first round of the Small Business Vouchers (SBV) pilot, a collaborative effort between the Energy Department's national labs and EERE to create public-private partnerships designed to help small businesses solve their most pressing technical challenges. Requests for assistance for the second round of SBV funding will be accepted through April 10.

  19. Wind Turbine Gearbox Condition Monitoring Round Robin Study - Vibration Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheng, S.

    2012-07-01

    The Gearbox Reliability Collaborative (GRC) at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) tested two identical gearboxes. One was tested on the NWTCs 2.5 MW dynamometer and the other was field tested in a turbine in a nearby wind plant. In the field, the test gearbox experienced two oil loss events that resulted in damage to its internal bearings and gears. Since the damage was not severe, the test gearbox was removed from the field and retested in the NWTCs dynamometer before it was disassembled. During the dynamometer retest, some vibration data along with testing condition information were collected. These data enabled NREL to launch a Wind Turbine Gearbox Condition Monitoring Round Robin project, as described in this report. The main objective of this project was to evaluate different vibration analysis algorithms used in wind turbine condition monitoring (CM) and find out whether the typical practices are effective. With involvement of both academic researchers and industrial partners, the project sets an example on providing cutting edge research results back to industry.

  20. The Mesaba Energy Project: Clean Coal Power Initiative, Round...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... source in compliance with regulations established to protect public health and welfare, and iii) physically alter the geographical setting to accommodate its construction. ...

  1. EPA programs to reduce NO{sub x} and particulate matter emissions from electric utility sources and the possible impact of deregulation on those EPA programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Field, A.B.

    1997-12-31

    At the same time that the electric utility industry is in the midst of deregulation, it could be hit with numerous additional regulatory burdens. For example, EPA now plans to decide by July 1997 whether to make major changes to the current ozone and particulate matter ambient standards -- changes which could force utilities to reduce significantly both their nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) and sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) emissions. Even if EPA does not adopt new ambient standards, though, many electric utilities still face the prospect of making additional NO{sub x} reductions if they are found to be contributing to ozone levels in areas that are not meeting the current ozone ambient standards. Several multi-state groups -- notably the Ozone Transport Assessment Group (OTAG) and the Northeast Ozone Transport Commission (OTC) -- are evaluating programs that could lead to calls for additional NO{sub x} reductions from power plants in ozone nonattainment areas and from plants located outside the nonattainment areas but found to be contributing to ozone levels in those areas. And these multi-state groups are motivated not only by pollution levels they see now, but also by what they fear will be increased pollution levels as a result of deregulation. This paper examines the status of the major rulemakings now underway that could force substantial additional reductions in electric utility NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2} emissions. It also discusses the impacts that deregulation could have in those rulemakings.

  2. Nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEFs) low cost generator design using power MOSFET and Cockcroft-Walton multiplier circuit as high voltage DC source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sulaeman, M. Y.; Widita, R.

    2014-09-30

    Purpose: Non-ionizing radiation therapy for cancer using pulsed electric field with high intensity field has become an interesting field new research topic. A new method using nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEFs) offers a novel means to treat cancer. Not like the conventional electroporation, nsPEFs able to create nanopores in all membranes of the cell, including membrane in cell organelles, like mitochondria and nucleus. NsPEFs will promote cell death in several cell types, including cancer cell by apoptosis mechanism. NsPEFs will use pulse with intensity of electric field higher than conventional electroporation, between 20100 kV/cm and with shorter duration of pulse than conventional electroporation. NsPEFs requires a generator to produce high voltage pulse and to achieve high intensity electric field with proper pulse width. However, manufacturing cost for creating generator that generates a high voltage with short duration for nsPEFs purposes is highly expensive. Hence, the aim of this research is to obtain the low cost generator design that is able to produce a high voltage pulse with nanosecond width and will be used for nsPEFs purposes. Method: Cockcroft-Walton multiplier circuit will boost the input of 220 volt AC into high voltage DC around 1500 volt and it will be combined by a series of power MOSFET as a fast switch to obtain a high voltage with nanosecond pulse width. The motivation using Cockcroft-Walton multiplier is to acquire a low-cost high voltage DC generator; it will use capacitors and diodes arranged like a step. Power MOSFET connected in series is used as voltage divider to share the high voltage in order not to damage them. Results: This design is expected to acquire a low-cost generator that can achieve the high voltage pulse in amount of ?1.5 kV with falltime 3 ns and risetime 15 ns into a 50? load that will be used for nsPEFs purposes. Further detailed on the circuit design will be explained at presentation.

  3. Electric power monthly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-08-01

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares the Electric Power Monthly (EPM) for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. This publication provides monthly statistics for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source, consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead.

  4. Lab-Corps Program Announces Second Round of Training for Entrepreneurial

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Teams at National Labs | Department of Energy Program Announces Second Round of Training for Entrepreneurial Teams at National Labs Lab-Corps Program Announces Second Round of Training for Entrepreneurial Teams at National Labs March 17, 2016 - 4:00pm Addthis The Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's Lab-Corps program today launched its second round of clean energy entrepreneurship trainings this week in Golden, Colorado. The $2.3 million pilot, started in 2014, is based on the

  5. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Alaska Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Alaska profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 2,067 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 422 20.4 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 414 20.1 Solar - - Wind 7 0.4 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas - -

  6. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Arizona Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Arizona profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 26,392 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 2,901 11.9 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 2,720 10.1 Solar 20 - Wind 128 - Wood/Wood Waste 583 1.8

  7. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Connecticut Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 8,284 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 281 3.4 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 122 1.5 Solar - - Wind - -

  8. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Delaware Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Delaware profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 3,389 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 10 0.3 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional - - Solar - - Wind 2 0.1 Wood/Wood

  9. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    District of Columbia Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 District of Columbia profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source - Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source - Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 790 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity - - Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional - - Solar - - Wind - - Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas - - Other Biomass - -

  10. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Georgia Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Georgia profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 36,636 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 2,689 7.3 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 2,052 5.6 Solar - - Wind - - Wood/Wood Waste 617 1.7 MSW/Landfill Gas

  11. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Kansas Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Kansas profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wind Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 12,543 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 1,082 8.6 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 3 * Solar - - Wind 1,072 8.5 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas 7 0.1 Other Biomass - -

  12. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Louisiana Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Louisiana profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wood/Wood Waste Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wood/Wood Waste Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 26,744 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 517 1.9 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 192 0.7 Solar - - Wind - - Wood/Wood Waste 311 1.2 MSW/Landfill Gas - -

  13. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Maryland Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Maryland profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 12,516 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 799 6.4 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 590 4.7 Solar 1 * Wind 70 0.6 Wood/Wood Waste 3 * MSW/Landfill Gas

  14. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Massachusetts Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Massachusetts profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 13,697 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 566 4.1 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 262 1.9 Solar 4 * Wind 10 0.1 Wood/Wood

  15. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Mississippi Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Mississippi profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wood/Wood Waste Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wood/Wood Waste Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 15,691 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 235 1.5 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional - - Solar - - Wind - - Wood/Wood Waste 235 1.5 MSW/Landfill Gas - -

  16. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Missouri Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Missouri profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 21,739 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 1,030 4.7 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 564 2.6 Solar - - Wind 459 2.1 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas

  17. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Montana Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Montana profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 5,866 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 3,085 52.6 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 2,705 46.1 Solar - - Wind 379 6.5 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill

  18. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Nebraska Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Nebraska profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 7,857 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 443 5.6 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 278 3.5 Solar - - Wind 154 2.0 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas 6

  19. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Hampshire Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 4,180 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 671 16.1 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 489 11.7 Solar - - Wind 24 0.6 Wood/Wood Waste 129 3.1

  20. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Jersey Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 New Jersey profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 18,424 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 230 1.2 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 4 * Solar 28 0.2 Wind 8 * Wood/Wood

  1. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Carolina Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 North Carolina profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 27,674 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 2,499 9.0 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 1,956 7.1 Solar 35 0.1 Wind - - Wood/Wood Waste 481 1.7

  2. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Pennsylvania Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Pennsylvania profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 45,575 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 1,984 4.4 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 747 1.6 Solar 9 * Wind 696 1.5 Wood/Wood Waste 108 0.2

  3. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Rhode Island Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Rhode Island profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 1,782 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 28 1.6 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 3 0.2 Solar - - Wind 2 0.1

  4. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Carolina Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 South Carolina profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 23,982 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 1,623 6.8 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 1,340 5.6 Solar - - Wind - - Wood/Wood Waste 255 1.1

  5. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Dakota Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 South Dakota profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 3,623 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 2,223 61.3 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 1,594 44.0 Solar - - Wind 629 17.3 Wood/Wood Waste - -

  6. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Tennessee Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Tennessee profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 21,417 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 2,847 13.3 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 2,624 12.3 Solar - - Wind 29 0.1 Wood/Wood Waste 185 0.9

  7. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Vermont Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Vermont profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 1,128 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 408 36.2 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 324 28.7 Solar - - Wind 5 0.5 Wood/Wood Waste 76 6.7 MSW/Landfill Gas 3

  8. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Virginia Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Virginia profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 24,109 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 1,487 6.2 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 866 3.6 Solar - - Wind - - Wood/Wood Waste 331 1.4 MSW/Landfill Gas

  9. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    West Virginia Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 West Virginia profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 16,495 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 715 4.3 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 285 1.7 Solar - - Wind 431 2.6 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas - -

  10. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Wisconsin Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Wisconsin profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 17,836 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 1,267 7.1 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 492 2.8 Solar - - Wind 449 2.5 Wood/Wood Waste 239 1.3

  11. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Wyoming Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Wyoming profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wind Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 7,986 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 1,722 21.6 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 307 3.8 Solar - - Wind 1,415 17.7 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas - - Other Biomass - -

  12. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Alabama Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Alabama profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 32,417 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 3,855 11.9 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 3,272 10.1 Solar - - Wind - - Wood/Wood Waste 583 1.8 MSW/Landfill

  13. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Alaska Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Alaska profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 2,067 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 422 20.4 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 414 20.1 Solar - - Wind 7 0.4 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas - -

  14. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Arizona Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Arizona profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 26,392 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 2,901 11.9 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 2,720 10.1 Solar 20 - Wind 128 - Wood/Wood Waste 583 1.8

  15. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Connecticut Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 8,284 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 281 3.4 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 122 1.5 Solar - - Wind - -

  16. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Delaware Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Delaware profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 3,389 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 10 0.3 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional - - Solar - - Wind 2 0.1 Wood/Wood

  17. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    District of Columbia Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 District of Columbia profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source - Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source - Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 790 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity - - Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional - - Solar - - Wind - - Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas - - Other Biomass - -

  18. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Georgia Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Georgia profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 36,636 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 2,689 7.3 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 2,052 5.6 Solar - - Wind - - Wood/Wood Waste 617 1.7 MSW/Landfill Gas

  19. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Kansas Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Kansas profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wind Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 12,543 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 1,082 8.6 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 3 * Solar - - Wind 1,072 8.5 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas 7 0.1 Other Biomass - -

  20. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Louisiana Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Louisiana profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wood/Wood Waste Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wood/Wood Waste Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 26,744 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 517 1.9 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 192 0.7 Solar - - Wind - - Wood/Wood Waste 311 1.2 MSW/Landfill Gas - -

  1. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Maryland Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Maryland profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 12,516 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 799 6.4 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 590 4.7 Solar 1 * Wind 70 0.6 Wood/Wood Waste 3 * MSW/Landfill Gas

  2. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Massachusetts Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Massachusetts profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 13,697 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 566 4.1 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 262 1.9 Solar 4 * Wind 10 0.1 Wood/Wood

  3. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mississippi Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Mississippi profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wood/Wood Waste Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wood/Wood Waste Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 15,691 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 235 1.5 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional - - Solar - - Wind - - Wood/Wood Waste 235 1.5 MSW/Landfill Gas - -

  4. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Missouri Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Missouri profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 21,739 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 1,030 4.7 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 564 2.6 Solar - - Wind 459 2.1 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas

  5. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Montana Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Montana profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 5,866 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 3,085 52.6 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 2,705 46.1 Solar - - Wind 379 6.5 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill

  6. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nebraska Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Nebraska profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 7,857 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 443 5.6 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 278 3.5 Solar - - Wind 154 2.0 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas 6

  7. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Hampshire Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 4,180 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 671 16.1 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 489 11.7 Solar - - Wind 24 0.6 Wood/Wood Waste 129 3.1

  8. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Jersey Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 New Jersey profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 18,424 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 230 1.2 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 4 * Solar 28 0.2 Wind 8 * Wood/Wood

  9. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Carolina Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 North Carolina profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 27,674 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 2,499 9.0 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 1,956 7.1 Solar 35 0.1 Wind - - Wood/Wood Waste 481 1.7

  10. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Pennsylvania Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Pennsylvania profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 45,575 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 1,984 4.4 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 747 1.6 Solar 9 * Wind 696 1.5 Wood/Wood Waste 108 0.2

  11. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Rhode Island Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Rhode Island profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 1,782 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 28 1.6 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 3 0.2 Solar - - Wind 2 0.1

  12. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Carolina Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 South Carolina profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 23,982 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 1,623 6.8 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 1,340 5.6 Solar - - Wind - - Wood/Wood Waste 255 1.1

  13. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Dakota Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 South Dakota profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 3,623 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 2,223 61.3 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 1,594 44.0 Solar - - Wind 629 17.3 Wood/Wood Waste - -

  14. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Tennessee Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Tennessee profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 21,417 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 2,847 13.3 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 2,624 12.3 Solar - - Wind 29 0.1 Wood/Wood Waste 185 0.9

  15. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Vermont Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Vermont profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 1,128 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 408 36.2 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 324 28.7 Solar - - Wind 5 0.5 Wood/Wood Waste 76 6.7 MSW/Landfill Gas 3

  16. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Virginia Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Virginia profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 24,109 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 1,487 6.2 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 866 3.6 Solar - - Wind - - Wood/Wood Waste 331 1.4 MSW/Landfill Gas

  17. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    West Virginia Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 West Virginia profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 16,495 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 715 4.3 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 285 1.7 Solar - - Wind 431 2.6 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas - -

  18. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wisconsin Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Wisconsin profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 17,836 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 1,267 7.1 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 492 2.8 Solar - - Wind 449 2.5 Wood/Wood Waste 239 1.3

  19. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wyoming Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Wyoming profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wind Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 7,986 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 1,722 21.6 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 307 3.8 Solar - - Wind 1,415 17.7 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas - - Other Biomass - -

  20. Status of Tampa Electric Company IGCC Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jenkins, S.D.

    1992-01-01

    Tampa Electric Company will utilize Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle technology for its new Polk Power Station Unit [number sign]1. The project is partially funded under the Department of Energy Clean Coal Technology Program Round III. This paper describes the technology to be used, process details, demonstration of a new hot gas clean-up system, and the schedule, leading to commercial operation in July 1996.

  1. Status of Tampa Electric Company IGCC Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jenkins, S.D.

    1992-10-01

    Tampa Electric Company will utilize Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle technology for its new Polk Power Station Unit {number_sign}1. The project is partially funded under the Department of Energy Clean Coal Technology Program Round III. This paper describes the technology to be used, process details, demonstration of a new hot gas clean-up system, and the schedule, leading to commercial operation in July 1996.

  2. Electricity Generation | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electricity Generation Electricity Generation The United States of America continues to generate the most geothermal electricity in the world: more than 3.5 gigawatts, predominantly from the western United States. That's enough to power about three and half million homes! Pictured above, the Raft River geothermal plant is located in Idaho. Source: Geothermal Resources Council The United States of America continues to generate the most geothermal electricity in the world: more than 3.5 gigawatts,

  3. A premium price electricity market for the emerging biomass industry in the UK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kettle, R.

    1995-11-01

    The Non-Fossil Fuel Obligation (NFFO) is the means by which the UK Government creates an initial market for renewable sources of electricity. For the first time the third round of the competition for NFFO contracts included a band for {open_quote}energy crops and agricultural and forestry wastes{close_quote}. The NFFO Order which obliges the Regional Electricity Companies (RECs) in England and Wales to contract for a specified electricity generating capacity from renewable resources was made in December 1994. It required 19.06 MW of wood gasification capacity and 103.81 MW from other energy crops and agricultural and forestry wastes. The purpose of these Orders is to create an initial market so that in the not too distant future the most promising renewables can compete without financial support. This paper describes how these projects are expected to contribute to this policy. It also considers how the policy objective of convergence under successive Orders between the price paid under the NFFO and the market price for electricity might be accomplished.

  4. An apparatus for studying electrical breakdown in liquid helium at 0.4 K and testing electrode materials for the neutron electric dipole moment experiment at the Spallation Neutron Source

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ito, T. M.; Ramsey, J. C.; Yao, W.; Beck, D. H.; Cianciolo, V.; Clayton, S. M.; Crawford, C.; Currie, S. A.; Filippone, B. W.; Griffith, W. C.; et al

    2016-04-25

    In this study, we have constructed an apparatus to study DC electrical breakdown in liquid helium at temperatures as low as 0.4 K and at pressures between the saturated vapor pressure and ~600 Torr. The apparatus can house a set of electrodes that are 12 cm in diameter with a gap of 1–2 cm between them, and a potential up to ±50 kV can be applied to each electrode. Initial results demonstrated that it is possible to apply fields exceeding 100 kV/cm in a 1 cm gap between two electropolished stainless steel electrodes 12 cm in diameter for a widemore » range of pressures at 0.4 K. We also measured the current between two electrodes. Our initial results, I < 1 pA at 45 kV, correspond to a lower bound on the effective volume resistivity of liquid helium of ρV > 5 × 1018 Ω cm. This lower bound is 5 times larger than the bound previously measured. Finally, we report the design, construction, and operational experience of the apparatus, as well as initial results« less

  5. Text-Alternative Version: CALiPER Round 11 Test Results | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    11 Test Results Text-Alternative Version: CALiPER Round 11 Test Results Below is the text-alternative version of the "U.S. DOE CALiPER Program Summary of Most Recent Testing" ...

  6. NREL Announces Round Two Selections for the DOE Small Business Vouchers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Pilot - News Releases | NREL Announces Round Two Selections for the DOE Small Business Vouchers Pilot From testing fuel cell components to modeling software for building technology, NREL experts will help firms reach the next level of success August 18, 2016 The Energy Department's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) will help 12 companies advance their technologies under the second round of DOE's Small Business Vouchers (SBV) pilot. "The Small Business Vouchers Pilot

  7. Initial Results of IEC 62804 Round Robin Testing | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Initial Results of IEC 62804 Round Robin Testing Initial Results of IEC 62804 Round Robin Testing Presented at the PV Module Reliability Workshop, February 26 - 27 2013, Golden, Colorado pvmrw13_ps4_nrel_hacke.pdf (1.04 MB) More Documents & Publications Potential Induced Degradation (PID) Tests for Commercially Available PV Modules PVMRW2013 Wed., Feb. 27, 10:00 Discussion notes: Agenda for the PV Module Reliability Workshop, February 26 - 27 2013, Golden, Colorado

  8. Hybrid and Plug-In Electric Vehicles (Brochure), Vehicle Technologies...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    EV batter- ies are charged by plugging the vehicle into an electric power source. Although electricity production may contribute to air pollution, the U.S. Environmental Protection ...

  9. Advanced Materials and Devices for Stationary Electrical Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    (e.g., the distributed grid and electric vehicles), and the projected increase in renewable energy sources. Advanced Materials and Devices for Stationary Electrical Energy...

  10. Ozark Border Electric Cooperative- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Ozark Border Electric Cooperative has made rebates available to residential members for the installation of energy efficient geothermal and air source heat pumps, electric water heaters, and room...

  11. Plug-In Electric Vehicle Handbook for Fleet Managers (Brochure...

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    ... when their source of electricity comes from nonpolluting resources like wind and sunlight. ... Because PEVs rely in whole or part on electric power, their fuel economy is measured ...

  12. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Arkansas Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Arkansas) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 14,754 30 Electric utilities 11,526 23 IPP & CHP 3,227 29 Net generation (megawatthours) 61,592,137 24 Electric utilities 48,752,895 18 IPP & CHP 12,839,241 28 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 89,528 15 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 47,048 20 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 37,289 23 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.9 9 Nitrogen oxide

  13. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Connecticut Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Connecticut) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Nuclear Net summer capacity (megawatts) 8,832 35 Electric utilities 161 45 IPP & CHP 8,671 12 Net generation (megawatthours) 33,676,980 38 Electric utilities 54,693 45 IPP & CHP 33,622,288 11 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 1,897 47 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 8,910 45 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 7,959 41 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.1 46 Nitrogen oxide

  14. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Delaware Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Delaware) Item Value U.S. rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 3,086 46 Electric utilities 102 46 IPP & CHP 2,984 31 Net generation (megawatthours) 7,703,584 47 Electric utilities 49,050 46 IPP & CHP 7,654,534 35 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 824 48 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 2,836 48 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 4,276 43 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.2 45 Nitrogen oxide

  15. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Idaho Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Idaho) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Hydroelectric Net summer capacity (megawatts) 4,944 42 Electric utilities 3,413 37 IPP & CHP 1,531 39 Net generation (megawatthours) 15,184,417 43 Electric utilities 9,628,016 37 IPP & CHP 5,556,400 39 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 5,777 42 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 20,301 37 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 1,492 49 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.8 36 Nitrogen oxide

  16. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Massachusetts Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Massachusetts) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 13,128 32 Electric utilities 971 42 IPP & CHP 12,157 9 Net generation (megawatthours) 31,118,591 40 Electric utilities 679,986 43 IPP & CHP 30,438,606 12 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 6,748 41 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 13,831 43 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 12,231 39 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.4 40

  17. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Michigan Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Michigan) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 30,435 12 Electric utilities 22,260 9 IPP & CHP 8,175 14 Net generation (megawatthours) 106,816,991 14 Electric utilities 84,075,322 12 IPP & CHP 22,741,669 13 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 173,521 7 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 77,950 9 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 64,062 11 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.2 7 Nitrogen oxide

  18. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Missouri Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Missouri) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 21,790 19 Electric utilities 20,538 13 IPP & CHP 1,252 42 Net generation (megawatthours) 87,834,468 18 Electric utilities 85,271,253 11 IPP & CHP 2,563,215 46 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 149,842 9 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 77,749 10 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 75,735 8 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.4 6 Nitrogen oxide

  19. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Montana Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Montana) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 6,330 41 Electric utilities 3,209 38 IPP & CHP 3,121 30 Net generation (megawatthours) 30,257,616 41 Electric utilities 12,329,411 35 IPP & CHP 17,928,205 16 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 14,426 34 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 20,538 36 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 17,678 36 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 34 Nitrogen oxide

  20. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Nebraska Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Nebraska) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 8,732 36 Electric utilities 7,913 30 IPP & CHP 819 46 Net generation (megawatthours) 39,431,291 34 Electric utilities 36,560,960 30 IPP & CHP 2,870,331 45 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 63,994 22 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 27,045 30 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 26,348 31 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.2 8 Nitrogen oxide

  1. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Nevada Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Nevada) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 10,485 34 Electric utilities 8,480 29 IPP & CHP 2,006 35 Net generation (megawatthours) 36,000,537 37 Electric utilities 27,758,728 33 IPP & CHP 8,241,809 33 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 10,229 40 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 18,606 39 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 16,222 37 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.4 38 Nitrogen

  2. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Hampshire Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (New Hampshire) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Nuclear Net summer capacity (megawatts) 4,413 44 Electric utilities 1,121 41 IPP & CHP 3,292 30 Net generation (megawatthours) 19,778,520 42 Electric utilities 2,266,903 41 IPP & CHP 17,511,617 20 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 3,733 44 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 5,057 47 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 3,447 46 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.4 45 Nitrogen

  3. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Jersey Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (New Jersey) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Nuclear Net summer capacity (megawatts) 19,399 22 Electric utilities 544 43 IPP & CHP 18,852 7 Net generation (megawatthours) 68,051,086 23 Electric utilities -117,003 50 IPP & CHP 68,168,089 7 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 3,369 44 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 15,615 41 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 17,905 35 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.1 47 Nitrogen oxide

  4. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Mexico Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (New Mexico) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 8,072 39 Electric utilities 6,094 33 IPP & CHP 1,978 37 Net generation (megawatthours) 32,306,210 39 Electric utilities 26,422,867 34 IPP & CHP 5,883,343 38 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 12,064 37 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 46,192 22 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 24,712 32 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.7 37 Nitrogen

  5. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    York Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (New York) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural Gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 40,404 6 Electric utilities 10,989 27 IPP & CHP 29,416 5 Net generation (megawatthours) 137,122,202 7 Electric utilities 34,082 31 IPP & CHP 103,039,347 5 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 31,878 28 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 46,971 21 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 33,240 26 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.5 39 Nitrogen oxide

  6. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Carolina Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (North Carolina) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 30,048 12 Electric utilities 26,706 6 IPP & CHP 3,342 29 Net generation (megawatthours) 125,936,293 9 Electric utilities 116,317,050 2 IPP & CHP 9,619,243 31 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 71,293 20 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 62,397 12 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 56,940 14 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.1 32 Nitrogen

  7. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Dakota Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (North Dakota) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 6,566 40 Electric utilities 5,292 34 IPP & CHP 1,274 41 Net generation (megawatthours) 35,021,673 39 Electric utilities 31,044,374 32 IPP & CHP 3,977,299 42 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 56,854 23 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 48,454 22 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 30,274 28 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.2 11 Nitrogen oxide

  8. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Oregon Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Oregon) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Hydroelectric Net summer capacity (megawatts) 15,884 27 Electric utilities 11,175 25 IPP & CHP 4,709 19 Net generation (megawatthours) 60,119,907 26 Electric utilities 44,565,239 24 IPP & CHP 15,554,668 21 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 10,595 39 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 14,313 42 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 8,334 40 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.4 42 Nitrogen

  9. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Pennsylvania Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Pennsylvania) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 42,723 5 Electric utilities 39 48 IPP & CHP 42,685 3 Net generation (megawatthours) 221,058,365 3 Electric utilities 90,994 44 IPP & CHP 220,967,371 2 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 297,598 4 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 141,486 2 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 101,361 4 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.7 11 Nitrogen oxide

  10. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Rhode Island Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Rhode Island) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 1,810 49 Electric utilities 8 50 IPP & CHP 1,803 38 Net generation (megawatthours) 6,281,748 49 Electric utilities 10,670 48 IPP & CHP 6,271,078 36 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 100 49 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 1,224 49 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 2,566 48 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.0 48 Nitrogen oxide

  11. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Carolina Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (South Carolina) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Nuclear Net summer capacity (megawatts) 22,824 18 Electric utilities 20,836 12 IPP & CHP 1,988 36 Net generation (megawatthours) 97,158,465 16 Electric utilities 93,547,004 9 IPP & CHP 3,611,461 43 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 43,659 25 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 21,592 34 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 33,083 27 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 35

  12. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    South Dakota Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (South Dakota) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Hydroelectric Net summer capacity (megawatts) 3,948 45 Electric utilities 3,450 36 IPP & CHP 499 48 Net generation (megawatthours) 10,995,240 45 Electric utilities 9,344,872 38 IPP & CHP 1,650,368 48 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 13,852 35 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 10,638 44 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 3,093 47 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.5 15

  13. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Washington Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Washington) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Hydroelectric Net summer capacity (megawatts) 30,949 10 Electric utilities 27,376 5 IPP & CHP 3,573 26 Net generation (megawatthours) 116,334,363 11 Electric utilities 102,294,256 5 IPP & CHP 14,040,107 24 Emissions Sulfur Dioxide (short tons) 13,716 36 Nitrogen Oxide (short tons) 18,316 40 Carbon Dioxide (thousand metric tons) 12,427 398 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.2 44

  14. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    West Virginia Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (West Virginia) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 16,276 25 Electric utilities 11,981 21 IPP & CHP 4,295 21 Net generation (megawatthours) 81,059,577 19 Electric utilities 63,331,833 15 IPP & CHP 17,727,743 17 Emissions Sulfur Dioxide (short tons) 102,406 12 Nitrogen Oxide (short tons) 72,995 11 Carbon Dioxide (thousand metric tons) 73,606 9 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.5 14

  15. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Alaska Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Alaska) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 2,464 48 Electric utilities 2,313 39 IPP & CHP 151 50 Net generation (megawatthours) 6,042,830 50 Electric utilities 5,509,991 40 IPP & CHP 532,839 50 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 4,129 43 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 19,281 38 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 3,558 44 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.4 28 Nitrogen oxide

  16. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Arizona Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Arizona) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 28,249 13 Electric utilities 21,311 11 IPP & CHP 6,938 17 Net generation (megawatthours) 112,257,187 13 Electric utilities 94,847,135 8 IPP & CHP 17,410,053 19 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 22,597 32 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 56,726 17 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 53,684 16 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.4 41 Nitrogen oxide

  17. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    California Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (California) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 74,646 2 Electric utilities 28,201 4 IPP & CHP 46,446 2 Net generation (megawatthours) 198,807,622 5 Electric utilities 71,037,135 14 IPP & CHP 127,770,487 4 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 3,102 46 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 98,348 5 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 57,223 14 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.0 49

  18. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Colorado Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Colorado) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 14,933 29 Electric utilities 10,204 28 IPP & CHP 4,729 18 Net generation (megawatthours) 53,847,386 30 Electric utilities 43,239,615 26 IPP & CHP 10,607,771 30 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 28,453 30 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 44,349 24 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 38,474 22 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.1 32 Nitrogen

  19. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Connecticut Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Connecticut) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Nuclear Net summer capacity (megawatts) 8,832 35 Electric utilities 161 45 IPP & CHP 8,671 12 Net generation (megawatthours) 33,676,980 38 Electric utilities 54,693 45 IPP & CHP 33,622,288 11 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 1,897 47 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 8,910 45 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 7,959 41 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.1 46 Nitrogen oxide

  20. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Delaware Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Delaware) Item Value U.S. rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 3,086 46 Electric utilities 102 46 IPP & CHP 2,984 31 Net generation (megawatthours) 7,703,584 47 Electric utilities 49,050 46 IPP & CHP 7,654,534 35 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 824 48 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 2,836 48 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 4,276 43 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.2 45 Nitrogen oxide

  1. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    District of Columbia Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (District of Columbia) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 9 51 Electric utilities IPP & CHP 9 51 Net generation (megawatthours) 67,612 51 Electric utilities IPP & CHP 67,612 51 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 0 51 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 147 51 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 48 50 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.0 51 Nitrogen oxide (lbs/MWh) 4.3 3

  2. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Florida Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Florida) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 59,440 3 Electric utilities 51,775 1 IPP & CHP 7,665 15 Net generation (megawatthours) 230,015,937 2 Electric utilities 211,970,587 1 IPP & CHP 18,045,350 15 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 126,600 10 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 91,356 6 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 111,549 2 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.1 30 Nitrogen

  3. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Georgia Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Georgia) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 38,250 7 Electric utilities 28,873 3 IPP & CHP 9,377 10 Net generation (megawatthours) 125,837,224 10 Electric utilities 109,523,336 4 IPP & CHP 16,313,888 20 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 105,998 11 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 58,144 14 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 62,516 12 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.7 24 Nitrogen oxide

  4. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Hawaii Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Hawaii) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Petroleum Net summer capacity (megawatts) 2,672 47 Electric utilities 1,732 40 IPP & CHP 939 45 Net generation (megawatthours) 10,204,158 46 Electric utilities 5,517,389 39 IPP & CHP 4,686,769 40 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 21,670 33 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 26,928 31 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 7,313 42 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 4.2 4 Nitrogen oxide

  5. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Idaho Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Idaho) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Hydroelectric Net summer capacity (megawatts) 4,944 42 Electric utilities 3,413 37 IPP & CHP 1,531 39 Net generation (megawatthours) 15,184,417 43 Electric utilities 9,628,016 37 IPP & CHP 5,556,400 39 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 5,777 42 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 20,301 37 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 1,492 49 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.8 36 Nitrogen oxide

  6. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Illinois Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Illinois) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Nuclear Net summer capacity (megawatts) 44,727 4 Electric utilities 5,263 35 IPP & CHP 39,464 4 Net generation (megawatthours) 202,143,878 4 Electric utilities 10,457,398 36 IPP & CHP 191,686,480 3 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 187,536 6 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 58,076 15 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 96,624 6 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 20 Nitrogen

  7. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Indiana Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Indiana) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 27,499 14 Electric utilities 23,319 7 IPP & CHP 4,180 23 Net generation (megawatthours) 115,395,392 12 Electric utilities 100,983,285 6 IPP & CHP 14,412,107 22 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 332,396 3 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 133,412 3 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 103,391 3 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.8 1 Nitrogen oxide

  8. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Iowa Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Iowa) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 16,507 24 Electric utilities 12,655 20 IPP & CHP 3,852 25 Net generation (megawatthours) 56,853,282 28 Electric utilities 43,021,954 27 IPP & CHP 13,831,328 25 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 74,422 19 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 41,793 25 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 39,312 21 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.6 13 Nitrogen oxide

  9. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Kansas Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Kansas) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 14,227 31 Electric utilities 11,468 24 IPP & CHP 2,759 33 Net generation (megawatthours) 49,728,363 31 Electric utilities 39,669,629 29 IPP & CHP 10,058,734 31 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 31,550 29 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 29,014 29 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 31,794 29 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 29 Nitrogen oxide

  10. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Kentucky Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Kentucky) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 20,878 21 Electric utilities 19,473 15 IPP & CHP 1,405 40 Net generation (megawatthours) 90,896,435 17 Electric utilities 90,133,403 10 IPP & CHP 763,032 49 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 204,873 5 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 89,253 7 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 85,795 7 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 4.5 3 Nitrogen oxide

  11. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Louisiana Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Louisiana) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 26,657 15 Electric utilities 18,120 16 IPP & CHP 8,537 13 Net generation (megawatthours) 104,229,402 15 Electric utilities 58,518,271 17 IPP & CHP 45,711,131 8 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 96,240 14 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 83,112 8 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 57,137 15 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.8 21

  12. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Maine Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Maine) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 4,470 43 Electric utilities 10 49 IPP & CHP 4,460 20 Net generation (megawatthours) 13,248,710 44 Electric utilities 523 49 IPP & CHP 13,248,187 27 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 10,990 38 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 8,622 46 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 3,298 46 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.7 25 Nitrogen oxide (lbs/MWh)

  13. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Maryland Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Maryland) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 12,264 33 Electric utilities 85 47 IPP & CHP 12,179 8 Net generation (megawatthours) 37,833,652 35 Electric utilities 20,260 47 IPP & CHP 37,813,392 9 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 41,370 26 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 20,626 35 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 20,414 34 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.2 18 Nitrogen oxide

  14. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Massachusetts Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Massachusetts) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 13,128 32 Electric utilities 971 42 IPP & CHP 12,157 9 Net generation (megawatthours) 31,118,591 40 Electric utilities 679,986 43 IPP & CHP 30,438,606 12 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 6,748 41 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 13,831 43 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 12,231 39 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.4 40

  15. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Michigan Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Michigan) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 30,435 12 Electric utilities 22,260 9 IPP & CHP 8,175 14 Net generation (megawatthours) 106,816,991 14 Electric utilities 84,075,322 12 IPP & CHP 22,741,669 13 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 173,521 7 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 77,950 9 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 64,062 11 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.2 7 Nitrogen oxide

  16. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Minnesota Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Minnesota) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 15,621 28 Electric utilities 11,557 22 IPP & CHP 4,064 24 Net generation (megawatthours) 56,998,330 27 Electric utilities 45,963,271 22 IPP & CHP 11,035,059 29 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 39,272 27 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 38,373 28 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 32,399 28 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.4 27 Nitrogen

  17. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mississippi Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Mississippi) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 16,090 26 Electric utilities 13,494 19 IPP & CHP 2,597 34 Net generation (megawatthours) 55,127,092 29 Electric utilities 47,084,382 21 IPP & CHP 8,042,710 34 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 101,093 13 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 23,993 32 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 24,037 33 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.7 5

  18. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Missouri Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Missouri) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 21,790 19 Electric utilities 20,538 13 IPP & CHP 1,252 42 Net generation (megawatthours) 87,834,468 18 Electric utilities 85,271,253 11 IPP & CHP 2,563,215 46 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 149,842 9 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 77,749 10 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 75,735 8 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.4 6 Nitrogen oxide

  19. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Montana Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Montana) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 6,330 41 Electric utilities 3,209 38 IPP & CHP 3,121 30 Net generation (megawatthours) 30,257,616 41 Electric utilities 12,329,411 35 IPP & CHP 17,928,205 16 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 14,426 34 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 20,538 36 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 17,678 36 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 34 Nitrogen oxide

  20. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nebraska Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Nebraska) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 8,732 36 Electric utilities 7,913 30 IPP & CHP 819 46 Net generation (megawatthours) 39,431,291 34 Electric utilities 36,560,960 30 IPP & CHP 2,870,331 45 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 63,994 22 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 27,045 30 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 26,348 31 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.2 8 Nitrogen oxide

  1. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nevada Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Nevada) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 10,485 34 Electric utilities 8,480 29 IPP & CHP 2,006 35 Net generation (megawatthours) 36,000,537 37 Electric utilities 27,758,728 33 IPP & CHP 8,241,809 33 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 10,229 40 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 18,606 39 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 16,222 37 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.4 38 Nitrogen

  2. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Hampshire Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (New Hampshire) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Nuclear Net summer capacity (megawatts) 4,413 44 Electric utilities 1,121 41 IPP & CHP 3,292 30 Net generation (megawatthours) 19,778,520 42 Electric utilities 2,266,903 41 IPP & CHP 17,511,617 20 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 3,733 44 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 5,057 47 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 3,447 46 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.4 45 Nitrogen

  3. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Jersey Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (New Jersey) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Nuclear Net summer capacity (megawatts) 19,399 22 Electric utilities 544 43 IPP & CHP 18,852 7 Net generation (megawatthours) 68,051,086 23 Electric utilities -117,003 50 IPP & CHP 68,168,089 7 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 3,369 44 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 15,615 41 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 17,905 35 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.1 47 Nitrogen oxide

  4. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mexico Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (New Mexico) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 8,072 39 Electric utilities 6,094 33 IPP & CHP 1,978 37 Net generation (megawatthours) 32,306,210 39 Electric utilities 26,422,867 34 IPP & CHP 5,883,343 38 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 12,064 37 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 46,192 22 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 24,712 32 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.7 37 Nitrogen

  5. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    York Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (New York) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural Gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 40,404 6 Electric utilities 10,989 27 IPP & CHP 29,416 5 Net generation (megawatthours) 137,122,202 7 Electric utilities 34,082 31 IPP & CHP 103,039,347 5 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 31,878 28 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 46,971 21 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 33,240 26 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.5 39 Nitrogen oxide

  6. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Carolina Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (North Carolina) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 30,048 12 Electric utilities 26,706 6 IPP & CHP 3,342 29 Net generation (megawatthours) 125,936,293 9 Electric utilities 116,317,050 2 IPP & CHP 9,619,243 31 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 71,293 20 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 62,397 12 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 56,940 14 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.1 32 Nitrogen

  7. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Dakota Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (North Dakota) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 6,566 40 Electric utilities 5,292 34 IPP & CHP 1,274 41 Net generation (megawatthours) 35,021,673 39 Electric utilities 31,044,374 32 IPP & CHP 3,977,299 42 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 56,854 23 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 48,454 22 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 30,274 28 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.2 11 Nitrogen oxide

  8. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Ohio Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Ohio) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 31,507 9 Electric utilities 11,134 26 IPP & CHP 20,372 6 Net generation (megawatthours) 134,476,405 8 Electric utilities 43,290,512 25 IPP & CHP 91,185,893 7 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 355,108 1 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 105,688 4 Carbon dioxide (thousand metrictons) 98,650 5 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.3 2 Nitrogen oxide (lbs/MWh)

  9. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oklahoma Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Oklahoma) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 24,048 17 Electric utilities 17,045 17 IPP & CHP 7,003 16 Net generation (megawatthours) 70,155,504 22 Electric utilities 48,096,026 19 IPP & CHP 22,059,478 14 Emissions Sulfur dioxide 78,556 18 Nitrogen oxide 44,874 23 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 43,994 18 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.2 17 Nitrogen oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 26

  10. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Pennsylvania Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Pennsylvania) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 42,723 5 Electric utilities 39 48 IPP & CHP 42,685 3 Net generation (megawatthours) 221,058,365 3 Electric utilities 90,994 44 IPP & CHP 220,967,371 2 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 297,598 4 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 141,486 2 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 101,361 4 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.7 11 Nitrogen oxide

  11. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Carolina Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (South Carolina) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Nuclear Net summer capacity (megawatts) 22,824 18 Electric utilities 20,836 12 IPP & CHP 1,988 36 Net generation (megawatthours) 97,158,465 16 Electric utilities 93,547,004 9 IPP & CHP 3,611,461 43 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 43,659 25 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 21,592 34 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 33,083 27 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 35

  12. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Tennessee Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Tennessee) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 20,998 20 Electric utilities 20,490 14 IPP & CHP 508 47 Net generation (megawatthours) 79,506,886 20 Electric utilities 76,986,629 13 IPP & CHP 2,520,257 47 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 89,357 16 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 23,913 33 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 41,405 20 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.2 16 Nitrogen oxide

  13. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Texas Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Texas) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 112,914 1 Electric utilities 29,113 2 IPP & CHP 83,800 1 Net generation (megawatthours) 437,629,668 1 Electric utilities 94,974,953 7 IPP & CHP 342,654,715 1 Emissions Sulfur Dioxide (short tons) 349,245 2 Nitrogen Oxide short tons) 229,580 1 Carbon Dioxide (thousand metric tons) 254,488 1 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 26 Nitrogen Oxide

  14. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Utah Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Utah) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 8,325 38 Electric utilities 7,296 31 IPP & CHP 1,029 44 Net generation (megawatthours) 43,784,526 33 Electric utilities 40,741,425 28 IPP & CHP 3,043,101 44 Emissions Sulfur Dioxide (short tons) 23,646 31 Nitrogen Oxide (short tons) 57,944 16 Carbon Dioxide (thousand metric tons) 35,179 24 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.1 31 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh)

  15. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Vermont Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Vermont) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Nuclear Net summer capacity (megawatts) 650 50 Electric utilities 337 44 IPP & CHP 313 49 Net generation (megawatthours) 7,031,394 48 Electric utilities 868,079 42 IPP & CHP 6,163,315 37 Emissions Sulfur Dioxide (short tons) 71 50 Nitrogen Oxide (short tons) 737 50 Carbon Dioxide (thousand metric tons) 14 51 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.0 50 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.2 51

  16. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Virginia Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Virginia) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Nuclear Net summer capacity (megawatts) 26,292 16 Electric utilities 22,062 10 IPP & CHP 4,231 22 Net generation (megawatthours) 77,137,438 21 Electric utilities 62,966,914 16 IPP & CHP 14,170,524 23 Emissions Sulfur Dioxide (short tons) 68,550 20 Nitrogen Oxide (short tons) 40,656 26 Carbon Dioxide (thousand metric tons) 33,295 25 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.8 23 Nitrogen

  17. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wisconsin Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Wisconsin) Item Value Rank Primary Energy Source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 17,166 23 Electric utilities 14,377 18 IPP & CHP 2,788 32 Net generation (megawatthours) 61,064,796 25 Electric utilities 47,301,782 20 IPP & CHP 13,763,014 26 Emissions Sulfur Dioxide (short tons) 81,239 17 Nitrogen Oxide (short tons) 39,597 27 Carbon Dioxide (thousand metric tons) 43,750 19 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.7 12 Nitrogen

  18. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wyoming Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Wyoming) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 8,458 37 Electric utilities 7,233 32 IPP & CHP 1,225 43 Net generation (megawatthours) 49,696,183 32 Electric utilities 45,068,982 23 IPP & CHP 4,627,201 41 Emissions Sulfur Dioxide (short tons) 45,704 24 Nitrogen Oxide (short tons) 49,638 18 Carbon Dioxide (thousand metric tons) 47,337 17 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.8 22 Nitrogen Oxide

  19. Electrical and optical properties of carbon-doped GaN grown by MBE on MOCVD GaN templates using a CCl4 dopant source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Armitage, Rob; Yang, Qing; Feick, Henning; Park, Yeonjoon; Weber, Eicke R.

    2002-04-15

    Carbon-doped GaN was grown by plasma-assisted molecular-beam epitaxy using carbon tetrachloride vapor as the dopant source. For moderate doping mainly acceptors were formed, yielding semi-insulating GaN. However at higher concentrations p-type conductivity was not observed, and heavily doped films (>5 x 10{sup 20} cm{sup -3}) were actually n-type rather than semi-insulating. Photoluminescence measurements showed two broad luminescence bands centered at 2.2 and 2.9 eV. The intensity of both bands increased with carbon content, but the 2.2 eV band dominated in n-type samples. Intense, narrow ({approx}6 meV) donor-bound exciton peaks were observed in the semi-insulating samples.

  20. Saving Electricity | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Saving Electricity Saving Electricity Reducing energy use in your home saves you money, increases our energy security and reduces the pollution that is emitted from non-renewable sources of energy. <a href="/node/1265906">Learn more about reducing your electricity use</a>. Reducing energy use in your home saves you money, increases our energy security and reduces the pollution that is emitted from non-renewable sources of energy. Learn more about reducing your electricity

  1. Internal hydraulic analysis of impeller rounding in centrifugal pumps as turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, Punit; Nestmann, Franz [Institute of Water and River Basin Management (IWG), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Kaiser Str. 12, D 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2011-01-15

    The use of pumps as turbines in different applications has been gaining importance in the recent years, but the subject of hydraulic optimization still remains an open research problem. One of these optimization techniques that include rounding of the sharp edges at the impeller periphery (or turbine inlet) has shown tendencies of performance enhancement. In order to understand the effect of this hydraulic optimization, the paper introduces an analytical model in the pump as turbine control volume and brings out the functionalities of the internal variables classified under control variables consisting of the system loss coefficient and exit relative flow direction and under dependent variables consisting of net tangential flow velocity, net head and efficiency. The paper studies the effects of impeller rounding on a combination of radial flow and mixed flow pumps as turbines using experimental data. The impeller rounding is seen to have positive impact on the overall efficiency in different operating regions with an improvement in the range of 1-3%. The behaviour of the two control variables have been elaborately studied in which it is found that the system loss coefficient has reduced drastically due to rounding effects, while the extent of changes to the exit relative flow direction seems to be limited in comparison. The reasons for changes to these control variables have been physically interpreted and attributed to the behaviour of the wake zone at the turbine inlet and circulation within the impeller control volume. The larger picture of impeller rounding has been discussed in comparison with performance prediction models in pumps as turbines. The possible limitations of the analytical model as well as the test setup are also presented. The paper concludes that the impeller rounding technique is very important for performance optimization and recommends its application on all pump as turbine projects. It also recommends the standardization of the rounding

  2. Electric vehicle system for charging and supplying electrical power

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Su, Gui Jia

    2010-06-08

    A power system that provides power between an energy storage device, an external charging-source/load, an onboard electrical power generator, and a vehicle drive shaft. The power system has at least one energy storage device electrically connected across a dc bus, at least one filter capacitor leg having at least one filter capacitor electrically connected across the dc bus, at least one power inverter/converter electrically connected across the dc bus, and at least one multiphase motor/generator having stator windings electrically connected at one end to form a neutral point and electrically connected on the other end to one of the power inverter/converters. A charging-sourcing selection socket is electrically connected to the neutral points and the external charging-source/load. At least one electronics controller is electrically connected to the charging-sourcing selection socket and at least one power inverter/converter. The switch legs in each of the inverter/converters selected by the charging-source/load socket collectively function as a single switch leg. The motor/generators function as an inductor.

  3. Radioisotopic heat source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jones, G.J.; Selle, J.E.; Teaney, P.E.

    1975-09-30

    Disclosed is a radioisotopic heat source and method for a long life electrical generator. The source includes plutonium dioxide shards and yttrium or hafnium in a container of tantalum-tungsten-hafnium alloy, all being in a nickel alloy outer container, and subjected to heat treatment of from about 1570$sup 0$F to about 1720$sup 0$F for about one h. (auth)

  4. Lesson 2 - Electricity Basics | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2 - Electricity Basics Lesson 2 - Electricity Basics It's difficult to imagine life without convenient electricity. You just flip a switch or plug in an appliance, and it's there. But how did it get there? Many steps go into providing the reliable electricity we take for granted. This lesson takes a closer look at electricity. It follows the path of electricity from the fuel source to the home, including the power plant and the electric power grid. It also covers the role of electric utilities

  5. Model documentation: Electricity Market Module, Electricity Fuel Dispatch Submodule

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-04-08

    This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the National Energy Modeling System Electricity Fuel Dispatch Submodule (EFD), a submodule of the Electricity Market Module (EMM). The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, model source code, and forecast results generated through the synthesis and scenario development based on these components.

  6. Preparation of Simulated LBL Defects for Round Robin Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerczak, Tyler J.; Baldwin, Charles A.; Hunn, John D.; Montgomery, Fred C.

    2015-12-01

    A critical characteristic of the TRISO fuel design is its ability to retain fission products. During reactor operation, the TRISO layers act as barriers to release of fission products not stabilized in the kernel. Each component of the TRISO particle and compact construction plays a unique role in retaining select fission products, and layer performance is often interrelated. The IPyC, SiC, and OPyC layers are barriers to the release of fission product gases such as Kr and Xe. The SiC layer provides the primary barrier to release of metallic fission products not retained in the kernel, as transport across the SiC layer is rate limiting due to the greater permeability of the IPyC and OPyC layers to many metallic fission products. These attributes allow intact TRISO coatings to successfully retain most fission products released from the kernel, with the majority of released fission products during operation being due to defective, damaged, or failed coatings. This dominant release of fission products from compromised particles contributes to the overall source term in reactor; causing safety and maintenance concerns and limiting the lifetime of the fuel. Under these considerations, an understanding of the nature and frequency of compromised particles is an important part of predicting the expected fission product release and ensuring safe and efficient operation.

  7. U.S. Department of Energy Selects First Round of Small-Scale Biorefinery

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Projects for Up to $114 Million in Federal Funding | Department of Energy First Round of Small-Scale Biorefinery Projects for Up to $114 Million in Federal Funding U.S. Department of Energy Selects First Round of Small-Scale Biorefinery Projects for Up to $114 Million in Federal Funding January 29, 2008 - 10:53am Addthis Ten percent commercial-scale biorefineries will help the nation meet new Renewable Fuels Standard WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Secretary Samuel W. Bodman

  8. Secretary Chu Announces Second Round of "America's Next Top Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Innovator" on One Year Anniversary of the White House Startup America Initiative | Department of Energy Second Round of "America's Next Top Energy Innovator" on One Year Anniversary of the White House Startup America Initiative Secretary Chu Announces Second Round of "America's Next Top Energy Innovator" on One Year Anniversary of the White House Startup America Initiative January 31, 2012 - 11:36am Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - Today, on the one year anniversary of the

  9. Energy Department Opens New Round of Funding to Reward New Hydropower |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy New Round of Funding to Reward New Hydropower Energy Department Opens New Round of Funding to Reward New Hydropower April 25, 2016 - 1:09pm Addthis The Opekiska Lock and Dam, a non-powered dam on the Monongahela River. Credit: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers The Opekiska Lock and Dam, a non-powered dam on the Monongahela River. Credit: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Timothy J. Welch Hydropower Program Manager, Wind and Water Power Technologies Office Across the country, there

  10. U.S. Department of Energy Wind Program Announces New Round of Funding for

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2016 Collegiate Wind Competition | Department of Energy U.S. Department of Energy Wind Program Announces New Round of Funding for 2016 Collegiate Wind Competition U.S. Department of Energy Wind Program Announces New Round of Funding for 2016 Collegiate Wind Competition October 30, 2014 - 5:30pm Addthis The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Renewable Energy Laboratory today issued a Request for Proposals seeking teams of students to participate in the 2016 U.S. Department of Energy

  11. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oklahoma" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Coal", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",24048,17 " Electric Utilities",17045,17 " IPP & CHP",7003,16 "Net generation (megawatthours)",70155504,22 " Electric Utilities",48096026,19 " IPP & CHP",22059478,14 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur Dioxide (short tons)",78556,18 " Nitrogen

  12. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Dakota" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Hydroelectric", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",3948,45 " Electric Utilities",3450,36 " IPP & CHP",499,48 "Net generation (megawatthours)",10995240,45 " Electric Utilities",9344872,38 " IPP & CHP",1650368,48 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur Dioxide (short tons)",13852,35 " Nitrogen

  13. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Washington" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Hydroelectric", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",30949,10 " Electric Utilities",27376,5 " IPP & CHP",3573,26 "Net generation (megawatthours)",116334363,11 " Electric Utilities",102294256,5 " IPP & CHP",14040107,24 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur Dioxide (short tons)",13716,36 "

  14. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wisconsin" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Coal", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",17166,23 " Electric Utilities",14377,18 " IPP & CHP",2788,32 "Net generation (megawatthours)",61064796,25 " Electric Utilities",47301782,20 " IPP & CHP",13763014,26 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur Dioxide (short tons)",81239,17 " Nitrogen

  15. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Arizona" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Coal", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",28249,13 " Electric utilities",21311,11 " IPP & CHP",6938,17 "Net generation (megawatthours)",112257187,13 " Electric utilities",94847135,8 " IPP & CHP",17410053,19 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",22597,32 " Nitrogen

  16. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    California" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Natural gas", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",74646,2 " Electric utilities",28201,4 " IPP & CHP",46446,2 "Net generation (megawatthours)",198807622,5 " Electric utilities",71037135,14 " IPP & CHP",127770487,4 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",3102,46 "

  17. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Colorado" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Coal", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",14933,29 " Electric utilities",10204,28 " IPP & CHP",4729,18 "Net generation (megawatthours)",53847386,30 " Electric utilities",43239615,26 " IPP & CHP",10607771,30 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",28453,30 " Nitrogen

  18. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Connecticut" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Nuclear", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",8832,35 " Electric utilities",161,45 " IPP & CHP",8671,12 "Net generation (megawatthours)",33676980,38 " Electric utilities",54693,45 " IPP & CHP",33622288,11 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",1897,47 " Nitrogen

  19. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Delaware" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Natural gas", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",3086,46 " Electric utilities",102,46 " IPP & CHP",2984,31 "Net generation (megawatthours)",7703584,47 " Electric utilities",49050,46 " IPP & CHP",7654534,35 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",824,48 " Nitrogen

  20. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    District of Columbia" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Natural gas", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",9,51 " Electric utilities",, " IPP & CHP",9,51 "Net generation (megawatthours)",67612,51 " Electric utilities",, " IPP & CHP",67612,51 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",0,51 " Nitrogen oxide (short

  1. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Florida" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Natural Gas", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",59440,3 " Electric utilities",51775,1 " IPP & CHP",7665,15 "Net generation (megawatthours)",230015937,2 " Electric utilities",211970587,1 " IPP & CHP",18045350,15 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",126600,10 "

  2. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Georgia" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Coal", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",38250,7 " Electric utilities",28873,3 " IPP & CHP",9377,10 "Net generation (megawatthours)",125837224,10 " Electric utilities",109523336,4 " IPP & CHP",16313888,20 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",105998,11 " Nitrogen

  3. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Hawaii" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Petroleum", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",2672,47 " Electric utilities",1732,40 " IPP & CHP",939,45 "Net generation (megawatthours)",10204158,46 " Electric utilities",5517389,39 " IPP & CHP",4686769,40 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",21670,33 " Nitrogen

  4. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Idaho" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Hydroelectric", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",4944,42 " Electric utilities",3413,37 " IPP & CHP",1531,39 "Net generation (megawatthours)",15184417,43 " Electric utilities",9628016,37 " IPP & CHP",5556400,39 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",5777,42 " Nitrogen

  5. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Illinois" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Nuclear", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",44727,4 " Electric utilities",5263,35 " IPP & CHP",39464,4 "Net generation (megawatthours)",202143878,4 " Electric utilities",10457398,36 " IPP & CHP",191686480,3 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",187536,6 " Nitrogen

  6. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Indiana" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Coal", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",27499,14 " Electric utilities",23319,7 " IPP & CHP",4180,23 "Net generation (megawatthours)",115395392,12 " Electric utilities",100983285,6 " IPP & CHP",14412107,22 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",332396,3 " Nitrogen

  7. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Iowa" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Coal", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",16507,24 " Electric utilities",12655,20 " IPP & CHP",3852,25 "Net generation (megawatthours)",56853282,28 " Electric utilities",43021954,27 " IPP & CHP",13831328,25 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",74422,19 " Nitrogen oxide

  8. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Kansas" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Coal", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",14227,31 " Electric utilities",11468,24 " IPP & CHP",2759,33 "Net generation (megawatthours)",49728363,31 " Electric utilities",39669629,29 " IPP & CHP",10058734,31 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",31550,29 " Nitrogen

  9. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Kentucky" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Coal", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",20878,21 " Electric utilities",19473,15 " IPP & CHP",1405,40 "Net generation (megawatthours)",90896435,17 " Electric utilities",90133403,10 " IPP & CHP",763032,49 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",204873,5 " Nitrogen

  10. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Louisiana" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Natural gas", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",26657,15 " Electric utilities",18120,16 " IPP & CHP",8537,13 "Net generation (megawatthours)",104229402,15 " Electric utilities",58518271,17 " IPP & CHP",45711131,8 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",96240,14 "

  11. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Maine" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Natural gas", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",4470,43 " Electric utilities",10,49 " IPP & CHP",4460,20 "Net generation (megawatthours)",13248710,44 " Electric utilities",523,49 " IPP & CHP",13248187,27 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",10990,38 " Nitrogen oxide

  12. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Maryland" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Coal", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",12264,33 " Electric utilities",85,47 " IPP & CHP",12179,8 "Net generation (megawatthours)",37833652,35 " Electric utilities",20260,47 " IPP & CHP",37813392,9 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",41370,26 " Nitrogen oxide

  13. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Massachusetts" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Natural gas", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",13128,32 " Electric utilities",971,42 " IPP & CHP",12157,9 "Net generation (megawatthours)",31118591,40 " Electric utilities",679986,43 " IPP & CHP",30438606,12 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",6748,41 "

  14. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Michigan" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Coal", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",30435,12 " Electric utilities",22260,9 " IPP & CHP",8175,14 "Net generation (megawatthours)",106816991,14 " Electric utilities",84075322,12 " IPP & CHP",22741669,13 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",173521,7 " Nitrogen

  15. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Minnesota" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Coal", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",15621,28 " Electric utilities",11557,22 " IPP & CHP",4064,24 "Net generation (megawatthours)",56998330,27 " Electric utilities",45963271,22 " IPP & CHP",11035059,29 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",39272,27 " Nitrogen

  16. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mississippi" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Natural gas", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",16090,26 " Electric utilities",13494,19 " IPP & CHP",2597,34 "Net generation (megawatthours)",55127092,29 " Electric utilities",47084382,21 " IPP & CHP",8042710,34 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",101093,13 "

  17. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Missouri" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Coal", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",21790,19 " Electric utilities",20538,13 " IPP & CHP",1252,42 "Net generation (megawatthours)",87834468,18 " Electric utilities",85271253,11 " IPP & CHP",2563215,46 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",149842,9 " Nitrogen

  18. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Montana" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Coal", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",6330,41 " Electric utilities",3209,38 " IPP & CHP",3121,30 "Net generation (megawatthours)",30257616,41 " Electric utilities",12329411,35 " IPP & CHP",17928205,16 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",14426,34 " Nitrogen

  19. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nebraska" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Coal", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",8732,36 " Electric utilities",7913,30 " IPP & CHP",819,46 "Net generation (megawatthours)",39431291,34 " Electric utilities",36560960,30 " IPP & CHP",2870331,45 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",63994,22 " Nitrogen oxide

  20. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nevada" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Natural gas", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",10485,34 " Electric utilities",8480,29 " IPP & CHP",2006,35 "Net generation (megawatthours)",36000537,37 " Electric utilities",27758728,33 " IPP & CHP",8241809,33 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",10229,40 "