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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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1

Electrical characterization and modelling of round spiral supercapacitors for high power applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electrical characterization and modelling of round spiral supercapacitors for high power of supercapacitors under railway and electrical traction constraints. Electrical model parameters according of supercapacitors and give precious information on its state of health. These kinds of studies need a powerful

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

2

EPRI Electric GSE Market Penetration Issues Round Table Proceedings: September 2001  

SciTech Connect

Due to the unfortunate incidents of September 11, 2001, the EPRI Electric GSE Market Penetration Issues Round Table Meeting scheduled to be held in Washington, D.C. was canceled. However, these meetings are vital to bring together the players in the electric ground support equipment industry that identify and address key issues surrounding the deployment of electric GSE. These meeting proceedings are the presentations that were to be used by the speakers of this meeting.

None

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Compact portable electric power sources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report provides an overview of recent advances in portable electric power source (PEPS) technology and an assessment of emerging PEPS technologies that may meet US Special Operations Command`s (SOCOM) needs in the next 1--2- and 3--5-year time frames. The assessment was performed through a literature search and interviews with experts in various laboratories and companies. Nineteen PEPS technologies were reviewed and characterized as (1) PEPSs that meet SOCOM requirements; (2) PEPSs that could fulfill requirements for special field conditions and locations; (3) potentially high-payoff sources that require additional R and D; and (4) sources unlikely to meet present SOCOM requirements. 6 figs., 10 tabs.

Fry, D.N.; Holcomb, D.E.; Munro, J.K.; Oakes, L.C.; Matson, M.J.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Prestressed glass, aezoelectric electrical power source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrical power source which comprises a body of prestressed glass having a piezoelectric transducer supported on the body in direct mechanical coupling therewith.

Newson, Melvin M. (Albuquerque, NM)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Transport Properties of Bulk Thermoelectrics An International Round-Robin Study, Part I: Seebeck Coefficient and Electrical Resistivity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent research and development of high temperature thermoelectric materials has demonstrated great potential of converting automobile exhaust heat directly into electricity. Thermoelectrics based on classic bismuth telluride have also started to impact the automotive industry by enhancing air conditioning efficiency and integrated cabin climate control. In addition to engineering challenges of making reliable and efficient devices to withstand thermal and mechanical cycling, the remaining issues in thermoelectric power generation and refrigeration are mostly materials related. The figure-of-merit, ZT, still needs to improve from the current value of 1.0 - 1.5 to above 2 to be competitive to other alternative technologies. In the meantime, the thermoelectric community could greatly benefit from the development of international test standards, improved test methods and better characterization tools. Internationally, thermoelectrics have been recognized by many countries as an important area for improving energy efficiency. The International Energy Agency (IEA) group under the implementing agreement for Advanced Materials for Transportation (AMT) identified thermoelectric materials as an important area in 2009. This paper is Part I of the international round-robin testing of transport properties of bulk thermoelectrics. The main focuses in Part I are on two electronic transport properties: Seebeck coefficient and electrical resistivity.

Wang, Hsin [ORNL; Porter, Wallace D [ORNL; Bottner, Harold [Fraunhofer-Institute, Freiburg, Germany; Konig, Jan [Fraunhofer-Institute, Freiburg, Germany; Chen, Lidong [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Bai, Shengqiang [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Tritt, Terry M. [Clemson University; Mayolett, Alex [Corning, Inc; Senawiratne, Jayantha [Corning, Inc; Smith, Charlene [Corning, Inc; Harris, Fred [ZT-Plus; Gilbert, Partricia [Marlow Industries, Inc; Sharp, Jeff [Marlow Industries, Inc; Lo, Jason [CANMET - Materials Technology Laboratory, Natural Resources of Canada; Keinke, Holger [University of Waterloo, Canada; Kiss, Laszlo I. [University of Quebec at Chicoutimi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Extreme-UV electrical discharge source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An extreme ultraviolet and soft x-ray radiation electric capillary discharge source that includes a boron nitride housing defining a capillary bore that is positioned between two electrodes one of which is connected to a source of electric potential can generate a high EUV and soft x-ray radiation flux from the capillary bore outlet with minimal debris. The electrode that is positioned adjacent the capillary bore outlet is typically grounded. Pyrolytic boron nitride, highly oriented pyrolytic boron nitride, and cubic boron nitride are particularly suited. The boron nitride capillary bore can be configured as an insert that is encased in an exterior housing that is constructed of a thermally conductive material. Positioning the ground electrode sufficiently close to the capillary bore outlet also reduces bore erosion.

Fornaciari, Neal R. (Tracey, CA); Nygren, Richard E. (Los Ranchos de Albuquerque, NM); Ulrickson, Michael A. (Albuquerque, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Electric Power From Ambient Energy Sources  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes research on opportunities to produce electric power from ambient sources as an alternative to using portable battery packs or hydrocarbon-fueled systems in remote areas. The work was an activity in the Advanced Concepts Project conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the Office of Research and Development in the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nonproliferation and National Security.

DeSteese, John G.; Hammerstrom, Donald J.; Schienbein, Lawrence A.

2000-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

8

What is U.S. electricity generation by energy source ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

What is U.S. electricity generation by energy source? In 2012, the United States generated about 4,054 billion kilowatthours of electricity. About 68% ...

9

Electricity generation from non-hydro renewable sources varies ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

May 2, 2012 Electricity generation from non-hydro renewable sources varies by state. Wind accounted for most non-hydro renewable generation in 2011, but sources of ...

10

Combined Electric Machine and Current Source Inverter Drive System ...  

Wind power generators ; Industrial power generators; More Information John S. Hsu. Combined Electric Machine and Current Source Invertor Drive System, U.S ...

11

,,"Electricity Receipts(b)",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(c)...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Standard Errors for Table 10.7;" " Unit: Percents." ,,"Electricity Receipts(b)",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(c)" ,,,"Coal Coke" "NAICS"," ","Total","...

12

Wind energy as a significant source of electricity  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Wind energy is a commercially available renewable energy source, with state-of-the-art wind plants producing electricity at about $0.05 per kWh. However, even at that production cost, wind-generated electricity is not yet fully cost-competitive with coal- or natural-gas-produced electricity for the bulk electricity market. The wind is a proven energy source; it is not resource-limited in the US, and there are no insolvable technical constraints. This paper describes current and historical technology, characterizes existing trends, and describes the research and development required to reduce the cost of wind-generated electricity to full competitiveness with fossil-fuel-generated electricity for the bulk electricity market. Potential markets are described.

Nix, R.G.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Promoting electricity from renewable energy sources -- lessons learned from the EU, U.S. and Japan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

schemes in the European electricity market. Scheer H. , ThePromoting electricity from renewable energy sources –2001 on the promotion of electricity produced from renewable

Haas, Reinhard

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Backl!round  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Backl!round Backl!round Policy Flashes 2003-05, 2003-12, and 2003-27 provided infonnation on the new requirement for contractors to register in the CCR (with limited exceptions). This requirement became effective on October 1,2003. The CCR eliminates the need to maintain paper-based sources of contract infonnation and provides contracting officers and financial office personnel access to contractor data and industry infonnation via the internet. This Flash provides guidance on including CCR requirements in solicitations and contracts. The contracting officer shall not award a contract to an offeror not registered in the CCR unless the acquisition is exempt under FAR 4.1102. Requirement CCR requirements are found in FAR Part 4, with a corresponding clause at FAR 52.204-

15

Analysis of Hydrogen Production from Renewable Electricity Sources: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To determine the potential for hydrogen production via renewable electricity sources, three aspects of the system are analyzed: a renewable hydrogen resource assessment, a cost analysis of hydrogen production via electrolysis, and the annual energy requirements of producing hydrogen for refueling. The results indicate that ample resources exist to produce transportation fuel from wind and solar power. However, hydrogen prices are highly dependent on electricity prices.

Levene, J. I.; Mann, M. K.; Margolis, R.; Milbrandt, A.

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Managing Electricity Sourcing in Europe's Energy Intensive Industry: A Methodology to Develop an Electricity Sourcing Strategy.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Several regulatory changes in Europe's electricity sector have stimulated competition in the market. National power companies, with monopolistic structures, have evolved into competitive entities, creating… (more)

Treviño Villarreal, Luis

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Overview of electrochemical power sources for electric and hybrid-electric vehicles.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Electric and hybrid-electric vehicles are being developed and commercialized around the world at a rate never before seen. These efforts are driven by the prospect of vehicles with lower emissions and higher fuel efficiencies. The widespread adaptation of such vehicles promises a cleaner environment and a reduction in the rate of accumulation of greenhouse gases, Critical to the success of this technology is the use of electrochemical power sources such as batteries and fuel cells, which can convert chemical energy to electrical energy more efficiently and quietly than internal combustion engines. This overview will concentrate on the work being conducted in the US to develop advanced propulsion systems for the electric and hybrid vehicles, This work is spearheaded by the US Advanced Battery Consortium (USABC) for electric vehicles and the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicle (PNGV) for hybrid-electric vehicles, both of which can be read about on the world wide web (www.uscar.tom). As is commonly known, electric vehicles rely strictly on batteries as their source of power. Hybrid-electric vehicles, however, have a dual source of power. An internal combustion engine or eventually a fuel cell supplies the vehicle with power at a relatively constant rate. A battery pack (much smaller than a typical electric-vehicle battery pack) provides the vehicle with its fast transient power requirements such as during acceleration. This hybrid arrangement maximizes vehicle fuel efficiency. Electric and hybrid-electric vehicles will also be able to convert the vehicle's change in momentum during braking into electrical energy and store it in its battery pack (instead of lose the energy as heat). This process, known as regenerative braking, will add to the vehicle's fuel efficiency in an urban environment.

Dees, D. W.

1999-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

18

Middle School Academic Competition - Round Robin | U.S. DOE Office...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Middle School Round Robin Middle School Double Elimination Middle School Electric Car High School Round Robin High School Double Elimination News Media WDTS Home Contact...

19

Semiconductor light source with electrically tunable emission wavelength  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A semiconductor light source comprises a substrate, lower and upper claddings, a waveguide region with imbedded active area, and electrical contacts to provide voltage necessary for the wavelength tuning. The active region includes single or several heterojunction periods sandwiched between charge accumulation layers. Each of the active region periods comprises higher and lower affinity semiconductor layers with type-II band alignment. The charge carrier accumulation in the charge accumulation layers results in electric field build-up and leads to the formation of generally triangular electron and hole potential wells in the higher and lower affinity layers. Nonequillibrium carriers can be created in the active region by means of electrical injection or optical pumping. The ground state energy in the triangular wells and the radiation wavelength can be tuned by changing the voltage drop across the active region.

Belenky, Gregory (Port Jefferson, NY); Bruno, John D. (Bowie, MD); Kisin, Mikhail V. (Centereach, NY); Luryi, Serge (Setauket, NY); Shterengas, Leon (Centereach, NY); Suchalkin, Sergey (Centereach, NY); Tober, Richard L. (Elkridge, MD)

2011-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

20

Electrode configuration for extreme-UV electrical discharge source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

It has been demonstrated that debris generation within an electric capillary discharge source, for generating extreme ultraviolet and soft x-ray, is dependent on the magnitude and profile of the electric field that is established along the surfaces of the electrodes. An electrode shape that results in uniform electric field strength along its surface has been developed to minimize sputtering and debris generation. The electric discharge plasma source includes: (a) a body that defines a circular capillary bore that has a proximal end and a distal end; (b) a back electrode positioned around and adjacent to the distal end of the capillary bore wherein the back electrode has a channel that is in communication with the distal end and that is defined by a non-uniform inner surface which exhibits a first region which is convex, a second region which is concave, and a third region which is convex wherein the regions are viewed outwardly from the inner surface of the channel that is adjacent the distal end of the capillary bore so that the first region is closest to the distal end; (c) a front electrode positioned around and adjacent to the proximal end of the capillary bore wherein the front electrode has an opening that is communication with the proximal end and that is defined by a non-uniform inner surface which exhibits a first region which is convex, a second region which is substantially linear, and third region which is convex wherein the regions are viewed outwardly from the inner surface of the opening that is adjacent the proximal end of the capillary bore so that the first region is closest to the proximal end; and (d) a source of electric potential that is connected across the front and back electrodes.

Spence, Paul Andrew (Pleasanton, CA); Fornaciari, Neal Robert (Tracey, CA); Chang, Jim Jihchyun (San Ramon, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rounding sources electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

THE IMPACTS OF RENEWABLE ENERGY POLICIES ON RENEWABLE ENERGY SOURCES FOR ELECTRICITY GENERATING CAPACITY .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Electricity generation from non-hydro renewable sources has increased rapidly in the last decade. For example, Renewable Energy Sources for Electricity (RES-E) generating capacity in the… (more)

[No author

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

CCPI Round 2 Selections | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CCPI Round 2 Selections CCPI Round 2 Selections CCPI Round 2 Selections In October 2004, the U.S. Department of Energy announced its second round of project selections in the Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI). CCPI is a $2 billion, 10-year program to develop and demonstrate a new generation of power plant technologies. These power plants will be fueled by coal, the nation's most used fuel for electric power generation, but will achieve substantially reduced emissions of sulfur, nitrogen and mercury compounds. Some of the projects also will significantly lessen the release of carbon dioxide, a greenhouse gas. The following projects were selected from 13 proposals in the 2nd round of competition for joint government-industry financing: Location of Peabody Mustang Clean Coal Project Peabody Mustang Clean Coal

23

An Analysis of Hydrogen Production from Renewable Electricity Sources: Preprint  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

An Analysis of Hydrogen An Analysis of Hydrogen Production from Renewable Electricity Sources Preprint J.I. Levene, M.K. Mann, R. Margolis, and A. Milbrandt National Renewable Energy Laboratory Prepared for ISES 2005 Solar World Congress Orlando, Florida August 6-12, 2005 Conference Paper NREL/CP-560-37612 September 2005 NOTICE The submitted manuscript has been offered by an employee of the Midwest Research Institute (MRI), a contractor of the US Government under Contract No. DE-AC36-99GO10337. Accordingly, the US Government and MRI retain a nonexclusive royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or allow others to do so, for US Government purposes. This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

24

Electrical signal measurement in plants using blind source separation with independent component analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electrical signals of a plant leaf measured using surface recording are mixed signals which involve the electrical activities of the epidermis cells, guard cells, and mesophyll cells. Blind source separation (BSS) is a general signal processing approach, ... Keywords: Blind source separation, Electrical signal in plant, Independent component analysis

Lan Huang; Zhong-Yi Wang; Long-Lian Zhao; Dong-jie Zhao; Cheng Wang; Zhi-Long Xu; Rui-Feng Hou; Xiao-Jun Qiao

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Electric-Drive Vehicles: A Source of Power and Reliability to...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electric-Drive Vehicles: A Source of Power and Reliability to the California Electric Grid Speaker(s): Willett M. Kempton Date: April 30, 2001 - 3:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar...

26

Roundness calibration standard  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A roundness calibration standard is provided with a first arc constituting the major portion of a circle and a second arc lying between the remainder of the circle and the chord extending between the ends of said first arc.

Burrus, B.M.

1982-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

27

Roundness calibration standard  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A roundness calibration standard is provided with a first arc constituting the major portion of a circle and a second arc lying between the remainder of the circle and the chord extending between the ends of said first arc.

Burrus, Brice M. (6620 Wachese La., Knoxville, TN 37912)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Economic implications for the generation of electricity from biomass fuel sources.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study examines the economic theory, geographical implications, and relevant legislative history impacting the use of biomass fuel sources within the electric utility industry. Research… (more)

Curtis, Thomas Wayne

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

What is U.S. electricity generation by energy source? - FAQ - U.S ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sales, revenue and prices, power plants, fuel use, stocks, generation, trade, ... Energy sources and percent share of total electricity generation in 2012 were:

30

Shares of electricity generation from renewable energy sources up ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration - EIA - Official Energy Statistics from the U.S. Government ... imports and exports, production, prices, sales. Electricity.

31

Solar Energy Sources SES Solar Inc formerly Electric Network com | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sources SES Solar Inc formerly Electric Network com Sources SES Solar Inc formerly Electric Network com Jump to: navigation, search Name Solar Energy Sources - SES Solar Inc (formerly Electric Network.com) Place Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada Zip V6G 2Z6 Sector Solar Product Intends to design, engineer, produce and install PV modules, and has developed a new assembly technology for solar panels that it believes will allow for higher quality electrical contacts. References Solar Energy Sources - SES Solar Inc (formerly Electric Network.com)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Solar Energy Sources - SES Solar Inc (formerly Electric Network.com) is a company located in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada .

32

Influence of voltage drop to electric drive with induction motor and voltage sourced inverter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper solves problematic of immunity from the voltage drop of the power supply of the electric drive with induction motor with Voltage-Fed inverter. There are reflected opportune control algorithms for the quickly to change of working regime from ... Keywords: electric drive with induction motor, electric drive with voltage sourced inverter, voltage drop

P. Beneš; J. Fo?t; M. Pittermann

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Title 20, California Code of Regulations Article 5. Electricity Generation Source Disclosure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Commission. (e) "Facility" means one or all generating units at an electric generating station. (f) "Fuel (b)(3)(C) of section 1392. (g) "Generating facility output" means the electrical energy and/or fuel1 Title 20, California Code of Regulations Article 5. Electricity Generation Source Disclosure

34

Table A67. Capability to Switch from Electricity to Alternative Energy Source  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7. Capability to Switch from Electricity to Alternative Energy Sources" 7. Capability to Switch from Electricity to Alternative Energy Sources" " by Industry Group, Selected Industries, and Selected Characteristics," " 1994: Part 1" " (Estimates in Million Kilowatthours)" ,,,"Electricity Receipts",,,," Alternative Types of Energy(b)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke",,"RSE" "SIC"," ","Total"," ","Not","Natural","Distillate","Residual",,,"and",,"Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","Receipts(c)","Switchable","Switchable","Gas","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil","Coal","LPG","Breeze","Other(d)","Factors"," "

35

Gas Explosion Tests on Pacific Gas and Electric Company Round Manhole Covers with the Swiveloc CPR-II - Controlled Pressure Release Manhole Cover Restraint System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents findings from the continuing research and development effort to manage and mitigate the effects of underground distribution manhole events. Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E) approached the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) to investigate the performance of several manhole covers, including the native PG&E solid and vented covers and new covers built by Swiveloc, LLC and designated as CPR-II. The tests were conducted at the EPRI-Lenox manhole research facility in Lenox, Massachus...

2010-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

36

Promotion of electricity from renewable energy sources in Finland.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The main purpose of this case was to study the development of energy projects from renewable energy sources and green energy promotion in Finland. A… (more)

Pozdnyakova, Liudmila

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Table 8.4a Consumption for Electricity Generation by Energy Source ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

8 Solar thermal and photovoltaic (PV) energy. Sources: - 1949-1988-Table 8.4b for electric power sector, and Tables 8.1 and A6 for industrial sector.

38

International Technical Working Group Round Robin Tests  

SciTech Connect

The goal of nuclear forensics is to develop a preferred approach to support illicit trafficking investigations. This approach must be widely understood and accepted as credible. The principal objectives of the Round Robin Tests are to prioritize forensic techniques and methods, evaluate attribution capabilities, and examine the utility of database. The HEU (Highly Enriched Uranium) Round Robin, and previous Plutonium Round Robin, have made tremendous contributions to fulfilling these goals through a collaborative learning experience that resulted from the outstanding efforts of the nine participating internal laboratories. A prioritized list of techniques and methods has been developed based on this exercise. Current work is focused on the extent to which the techniques and methods can be generalized. The HEU Round Robin demonstrated a rather high level of capability to determine the important characteristics of the materials and processes using analytical methods. When this capability is combined with the appropriate knowledge/database, it results in a significant capability to attribute the source of the materials to a specific process or facility. A number of shortfalls were also identified in the current capabilities including procedures for non-nuclear forensics and the lack of a comprehensive network of data/knowledge bases. The results of the Round Robin will be used to develop guidelines or a ''recommended protocol'' to be made available to the interested authorities and countries to use in real cases.

Dudder, Gordon B.; Hanlen, Richard C.; Herbillion, Georges M.

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Method and apparatus for debris mitigation for an electrical discharge source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method and apparatus for mitigating the transport of debris generated and dispersed from electric discharge sources by thermophoretic and electrostatic deposition. A member is positioned adjacent the front electrode of an electric discharge source and used to establish a temperature difference between it and the front electrode. By flowing a gas between the member and the front electrode a temperature gradient is established that can be used for thermophoretic deposition of particulate debris on either the member or front electrode depending upon the direction of the thermal gradient. Establishing an electric field between the member and front electrode can aid in particle deposition by electrostatic deposition.

Klebanoff, Leonard E. (San Clemente, CA); Rader, Daniel J. (Albuquerque, NM); Silfvast, William T. (Helena, CA)

2006-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

40

Metod And Apparatus For Debris Mitigation For An Electrical Discharge Source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method and apparatus for mitigating the transport of debris generated and dispersed from electric discharge sources by thermophoretic and electrostatic deposition. A member is positioned adjacent the front electrode of an electric discharge source and used to establish a temperature difference between it and the front electrode. By flowing a gas between the member and the front electrode a temperature gradient is established that can be used for thermophoretic deposition of particulate debris on either the member or front electrode depending upon the direction of the thermal gradient. Establishing an electric field between the member and front electrode can aid in particle deposition by electrostatic deposition.

Klebanoff, Leonard E. (San Clemente, CA); Silfvast, William T. (St. Helena, CA); Rader, Daniel J. (Albuquerque, NM)

2005-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rounding sources electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Small Modular Reactors and U.S. Clean Energy Sources for Electricity |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Small Modular Reactors and U.S. Clean Energy Sources for Small Modular Reactors and U.S. Clean Energy Sources for Electricity Small Modular Reactors and U.S. Clean Energy Sources for Electricity For the clean energy goal to be met, then, the non-carbon emitting sources must provide some 2900 TWhr. Hydropower is generally assumed to have reached a maximum of 250 TWhr, so if we assume renewables reach 650 TWhr, (double the EIA estimate) that leaves 2000 TWhr for nuclear power. If the Administration's loan guarantee program for current large reactors is successful, then one might expect the large reactors to reach 1000 TWhr by 2035. This leaves some 1000 TWhr for SMR - that is a lot of electricity. SMR and Clean Energy.pdf More Documents & Publications Slide 1 Small Modular Reactor Report (SEAB) A Strategic Framework for SMR Deployment

42

Combined Operation of Solar Energy Source Heat Pump, Low-vale Electricity and Floor Radiant System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Today energy sources are decreasing and saving energy conservation becomes more important. Therefore, it becomes an important investigative direction how to use reproducible energy sources in the HVAC field. The feasibility and necessity of using solar energy, low-vale electricity as heat sources in a floor radiant system are analyzed. This paper presents a new heat pump system and discusses its operational modes in winter.

Liu, G.; Guo, Z.; Hu, S.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Piping inspection round robin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The piping inspection round robin was conducted in 1981 at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to quantify the capability of ultrasonics for inservice inspection and to address some aspects of reliability for this type of nondestructive evaluation (NDE). The round robin measured the crack detection capabilities of seven field inspection teams who employed procedures that met or exceeded the 1977 edition through the 1978 addenda of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Section 11 Code requirements. Three different types of materials were employed in the study (cast stainless steel, clad ferritic, and wrought stainless steel), and two different types of flaws were implanted into the specimens (intergranular stress corrosion cracks (IGSCCs) and thermal fatigue cracks (TFCs)). When considering near-side inspection, far-side inspection, and false call rate, the overall performance was found to be best in clad ferritic, less effective in wrought stainless steel and the worst in cast stainless steel. Depth sizing performance showed little correlation with the true crack depths.

Heasler, P.G.; Doctor, S.R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Performance Analysis of Air-Source Variable Speed Heat Pumps and Various Electric Water Heating Options  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Analysis of Air- Analysis of Air- Source Variable Speed Heat Pumps and Various Electric Water Heating Options Jeffrey Munk Oak Ridge National Laboratory 2 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy Presentation_name Acknowledgements * Tennessee Valley Authority - David Dinse * U.S. Department of Energy * Roderick Jackson * Tony Gehl * Philip Boudreaux * ZEBRAlliance 3 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy Presentation_name Overview * Electric Water Heating Options - Conventional Electric Water Heaters - Heat Pump Water Heaters * Air-Source * Ground-Source - Solar Thermal Water Heater * Variable Speed Heat Pumps - Energy Use Analysis - Measured Performance - Operational Characteristics 4 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy Presentation_name Water Heating Options

45

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal"," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural Gas(c)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)"," " " ","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","(billion","NGL(d)","(million","Other(e)"

46

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," "," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural ","LPG and","(excluding Coal"," ","RSE" " ","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(e)","Row"

47

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal"," " "End Use","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(e)"

48

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," "," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal",,"RSE" " "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural ","LPG and","(excluding Coal"," ","Row" "End Use","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(e)","Factors"

49

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal"," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural Gas(c)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)"," " " ","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","(billion","NGL(d)","(million","Other(e)"

50

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal"," " "End Use","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(e)"

51

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 1. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal"," "," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural Gas(c)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)"," ","RSE" " ","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","(billion","NGL(d)","(million","Other(e)","Row"

52

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 2. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," "," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal",,"RSE" " "," ","Net","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal"," ","Row" "End Use","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(e)","Factors"

53

Snap rounding of Bézier curves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present an extension of snap roundingfrom straight-line segments (see Guibas and Marimont, 1998)to Bézier curves of arbitrary degree, and thus the first method for geometric roundingof curvilinear arrangements.Our algorithm takes a set of intersecting ... Keywords: Bézier curves, arrangement, geometric rounding, intersection computation, robustness, snap rounding, splines

Arno Eigenwillig; Lutz Kettner; Nicola Wolpert

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Source of electrical power for an electric vehicle and other purposes, and related methods  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Microthin sheet technology is disclosed by which superior batteries are constructed which, among other things, accommodate the requirements for high load rapid discharge and recharge, mandated by electric vehicle criteria. The microthin sheet technology has process and article overtones and can be used to form corrugated thin electrodes used in batteries of various kinds and types, such as spirally-wound batteries, bipolar batteries, lead acid batteries, silver/zinc batteries, and others. Superior high performance battery features include: (a) minimal ionic resistance; (b) minimal electronic resistance; (c) minimal polarization resistance to both charging and discharging; (d) improved current accessibility to active material of the electrodes; (e) a high surface area to volume ratio; (f) high electrode porosity (microporosity); (g) longer life cycle; (h) superior discharge/recharge characteristics; (i) higher capacities (A.multidot.hr); and (j) high specific capacitance.

LaFollette, Rodney M. (Provo, UT)

2002-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

55

Source of electrical power for an electric vehicle and other purposes, and related methods  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Microthin sheet technology is disclosed by which superior batteries are constructed which, among other things, accommodate the requirements for high load rapid discharge and recharge, mandated by electric vehicle criteria. The microthin sheet technology has process and article overtones and can be used to form thin electrodes used in batteries of various kinds and types, such as spirally-wound batteries, bipolar batteries, lead acid batteries, silver/zinc batteries, and others. Superior high performance battery features include: (a) minimal ionic resistance; (b) minimal electronic resistance; (c) minimal polarization resistance to both charging and discharging; (d) improved current accessibility to active material of the electrodes; (e) a high surface area to volume ratio; (f) high electrode porosity (microporosity); (g) longer life cycle; (h) superior discharge/recharge characteristics; (j) higher capacities (A.multidot.hr); and k) high specific capacitance.

LaFollette, Rodney M. (Provo, UT)

2000-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

56

Software system for calculation and analysis of electrical power, derived from renewable energy sources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The software system for modeling and analysis of the processes of electric power conversion of renewable energy sources (solar radiation and wind velocity) is described. The characteristics of the generators and specific climatic conditions of the geographical ... Keywords: graphical dependences, photovoltaics and wind turbine generators, programme models

Katerina Gabrovska; Nicolay Mihailov

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

The Integration of Renewable Energy Sources into Electric Power Distribution Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Renewable energy technologies such as photovoltaic, solar thermal electricity, and wind turbine power are environmentally beneficial sources of electric power generation. The integration of renewable energy sources into electric power distribution systems can provide additional economic benefits because of a reduction in the losses associated with transmission and distribution lines. Benefits associated with the deferment of transmission and distribution investment may also be possible for cases where there is a high correlation between peak circuit load and renewable energy electric generation, such as photovoltaic systems in the Southwest. Case studies were conducted with actual power distribution system data for seven electric utilities with the participation of those utilities. Integrating renewable energy systems into electric power distribution systems increased the value of the benefits by about 20 to 55% above central station benefits in the national regional assessment. In the case studies presented in Vol. II, the range was larger: from a few percent to near 80% for a case where costly investments were deferred. In general, additional savings of at least 10 to 20% can be expected by integrating at the distribution level. Wind energy systems were found to be economical in good wind resource regions, whereas photovoltaic systems costs are presently a factor of 2.5 too expensive under the most favorable conditions.

Barnes, P.R.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

The integration of renewable energy sources into electric power transmission systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Renewable energy technologies such as photovoltaics, solar thermal power plants, and wind turbines are nonconventional, environmentally attractive sources of energy that can be considered for electric power generation. Many of the areas with abundant renewable energy resources (very sunny or windy areas) are far removed from major load centers. Although electrical power can be transmitted over long distances of many hundreds of miles through high-voltage transmission lines, power transmission systems often operate near their limits with little excess capacity for new generation sources. This study assesses the available capacity of transmission systems in designated abundant renewable energy resource regions and identifies the requirements for high-capacity plant integration in selected cases. In general, about 50 MW of power from renewable sources can be integrated into existing transmission systems to supply local loads without transmission upgrades beyond the construction of a substation to connect to the grid. Except in the Southwest, significant investment to strengthen transmission systems will be required to support the development of high-capacity renewable sources of 1000 MW or greater in areas remote from major load centers. Cost estimates for new transmission facilities to integrate and dispatch some of these high-capacity renewable sources ranged from several million dollars to approximately one billion dollars, with the latter figure an increase in total investment of 35%, assuming that the renewable source is the only user of the transmission facility.

Barnes, P.R.; Dykas, W.P.; Kirby, B.J.; Purucker, S.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Lawler, J.S. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Clean Coal Power Initiative Round III | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Clean Coal Power Initiative Round III Clean Coal Power Initiative Round III Clean Coal Power Initiative Round III In December 2009, the U.S. Department of Energy announced the selection of three new projects with a value of $3.18 billion to accelerate the development of advanced coal technologies with carbon capture and storage at commercial-scale. These projects will help to enable commercial deployment to ensure the United States has clean, reliable, and affordable electricity and power. An investment of up to $979 million, including funds from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, will be leveraged by more than $2.2 billion in private capital cost share as part of the third round of the Department's Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI). The selections demonstrate technologies that: make progress toward a target CO2 capture efficiency of 90 percent;

60

Roundness of Molded Detonator Heads  

SciTech Connect

The magnitude of the deviations from roundness of molded detonator heads, caused by the geometry of the part and by different materials, was investigated to provide a scientific basis which can be used to predict dimensions and tolerances of size and roundness for new heads. Injection presses were used to mold detonator heads to precision tolerances. Twenty parts were molded under optimum conditions in two different molds using both DAP filled with long glass fibers and DAP filled with asbestos. Each of the parts was analyzed for size and roundness, and the data were analyzed statistically. The results indicate: 1. Geometry is highly significant. 2. Material is highly significant. 3. Geometry and material do not interact. 4. Geometry affects magnitude of deviation from roundness. 5. Geometry affects magnitude of shrinkage.

Wendeln, D. E.; Waldfogle, E. A.

1968-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rounding sources electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Control system for electric water heater with heat pump external heat source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A control system for an electric water heater operatively associated with an external heat source, such as a heat pump. The water heater includes a water storage tank provided with an electric tank heating unit having a tank thermostat which closes in response to water temperature in the tank, allowing a flow of current through the tank heating unit so as to turn it on to heat the water, and which opens when the tank thermostat has been satisfied, interrupting the current flow so as to turn the tank heating unit off. The control system as responsive to the initial current surge through the tank heating unit when the tank thermostat closes to interrupt the current flow to the tank heating unit so as to maintain the heating unit off and to turn on the external heat source and maintain it on until the tank thermostat opens. The initial current surge cleans the contacts of the tank thermostat by burning off any insulating oxide residues which may have formed on them. The control system includes means responsive to abnormal conditions which would prevent the external heat source from heating water effectively for turning off the external heat source and turning on the tank heating unit and maintaining the external heat source off and the tank heating unit on until the tank thermostat is satisfied.

Shaffer Jr., J. E.; Picarello, J. F.

1985-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

62

Non-powered Dams: An untapped source of renewable electricity in the USA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydropower has been a source of clean, renewable electricity in the USA for more than 100 years. Today, approximately 2500 US dams provide 78 GW of conventional and 22 GW of pumped-storage hydropower. In contrast, another approximately 80 000 dams in the USA do not include hydraulic turbine equipment and provide non-energy related services, such as flood control, water supply, navigation, and recreation.

Hadjerioua, Boualem [ORNL; Kao, Shih-Chieh [ORNL; Wei, Yaxing [ORNL; Battey, Hoyt [Department of Energy; Smith, Brennan T [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

" Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Supplier Sources of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Number of Establishments by Quantity of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam, 2002;" 8 Number of Establishments by Quantity of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Supplier Sources of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,,"Electricity","Components",,,"Natural","Gas","Components",,"Steam","Components" ,,,,"Electricity","Electricity",,,"Natural Gas","Natural Gas",,,"Steam","Steam" " "," ",,,"from Only","from Both",,,"from Only","from Both",,,"from Only","from Both"," ",," "

64

Vampire Power Is Scary All Year Round | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Vampire Power Is Scary All Year Round Vampire Power Is Scary All Year Round Vampire Power Is Scary All Year Round November 8, 2010 - 12:46pm Addthis Chris Stewart Senior Communicator at DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory Last week, U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Steven Chu posted information about slaying energy vampires on his Facebook page. (He also posted a picture of himself as a zombie, which is also is very scary!) Energy vampires are appliances that even when turned off utilize a small amount of electricity, called phantom loads. According to this YouTube video posted by GOOD, Americans waste approximately one month's electricity bill each year on vampire energy. Some estimates suggest that Americans have anywhere between 20-40 vampire devices throughout their homes. I recently surveyed my apartment and found

65

DOE's Round Robin Test Program FAQ Sheet  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Frequently Asked Questions for: DOE's Round Robin Test Program May 2011 i Table of Contents Introduction ......

66

The integration of renewable energy sources into electric power distribution systems. Volume 2, Utility case assessments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric utility distribution system impacts associated with the integration of renewable energy sources such as photovoltaics (PV) and wind turbines (WT) are considered in this project. The impacts are expected to vary from site to site according to the following characteristics: (1) The local solar insolation and/or wind characteristics; (2) renewable energy source penetration level; (3) whether battery or other energy storage systems are applied; and (4) local utility distribution design standards and planning practices. Small, distributed renewable energy sources are connected to the utility distribution system like other, similar kW- and MW-scale equipment and loads. Residential applications are expected to be connected to single-phase 120/240-V secondaries. Larger kw-scale applications may be connected to three-phase secondaries, and larger hundred-kW and MW-scale applications, such as MW-scale windfarms or PV plants, may be connected to electric utility primary systems via customer-owned primary and secondary collection systems. Small, distributed renewable energy sources installed on utility distribution systems will also produce nonsite-specific utility generation system benefits such as energy and capacity displacement benefits, in addition to the local site-specific distribution system benefits. Although generation system benefits are not site-specific, they are utility-specific, and they vary significantly among utilities in different regions. In addition, transmission system benefits, environmental benefits and other benefits may apply. These benefits also vary significantly among utilities and regions. Seven utility case studies considering PV, WT, and battery storage were conducted to identify a range of potential renewable energy source distribution system applications.

Zaininger, H.W.; Ellis, P.R.; Schaefer, J.C. [Zaininger Engineering Co., San Jose, CA (United States)

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Demand Residual and Natural Gas(c) LPG and Coke and Breeze) for Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) (billion NGL(d) (million End Use (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 977,338 40 22 5,357 21 46 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 24,584 21 4 2,059 2 25 Conventional Boiler Use 24,584 11 3 1,245 2 6 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process 0 10 1 814 * 19 Direct Uses-Total Process 773,574 10 9 2,709 10 19 Process Heating

68

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Residual and Natural Gas(c) LPG and Coke and Breeze) Total Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) (billion NGL(d) (million Other(e) End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 15,658 835,382 40 22 5,357 21 46 5,820 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 12,109 21 4 2,059 2 25 -- Conventional Boiler Use 12,109 11 3 1,245 2 6 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process 0 10 1 814 * 19 Direct Uses-Total Process

69

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal Net Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal End Use Total Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) Natural Gas(c) NGL(d) Coke and Breeze) Other(e) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 15,658 2,850 251 129 5,512 79 1,016 5,820 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fue -- 41 133 23 2,119 8 547 -- Conventional Boiler Use 41 71 17 1,281 8 129 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process 0 62 6 838 1 417 Direct Uses-Total Process -- 2,244 62 52 2,788 39 412 -- Process Heating -- 346 59 19 2,487 32 345 -- Process Cooling and Refrigeration -- 206 * 1 32 * * -- Machine Drive

70

Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal NAICS Net Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal Code(a) End Use Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coke and Breeze) Other(f) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 15,658 2,850 251 129 5,512 79 1,016 5,820 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 41 133 23 2,119 8 547 -- Conventional Boiler Use -- 41 71 17 1,281 8 129 -- CHP and/or Cogeneration Process -- -- 62 6 838 1 417 -- Direct Uses-Total Process -- 2,244 62 52 2,788 39 412 -- Process Heating -- 346 59 19 2,487

71

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Table 5.8 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal Net Demand Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal End Use for Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) Natural Gas(c) NGL(d) Coke and Breeze) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 3,335 251 129 5,512 79 1,016 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 84 133 23 2,119 8 547 Conventional Boiler Use 84 71 17 1,281 8 129 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process 0 62 6 838 1 417 Direct Uses-Total Process 2,639 62 52 2,788 39 412 Process Heating 379 59 19 2,487 32 345 Process Cooling and Refrigeration

72

Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Residual and Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coke and Breeze) NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) (billion NGL(e) (million Other(f) Code(a) End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 15,658 835,382 40 22 5,357 21 46 5,820 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 12,109 21 4 2,059 2 25 -- Conventional Boiler Use -- 12,109 11 3 1,245 2 6 -- CHP and/or Cogeneration Process

73

Source book for planning nuclear dual-purpose electric/distillation desalination plants  

SciTech Connect

A source book on nuclear dual-purpose electric/distillation desalination plants was prepared to assist government and other planners in preparing broad evaluations of proposed applications of dual-purpose plants. The document is divided into five major sections. Section 1 presents general discussions relating to the benefits of dual-purpose plants, and spectrum for water-to-power ratios. Section 2 presents information on commercial nuclear plants manufactured by US manufacturers. Section 3 gives information on distillation desalting processes and equipment. Section 4 presents a discussion on feedwater pretreatment and scale control. Section 5 deals with methods for coupling the distillation and electrical generating plants to operate in the dual mode.

Reed, S.A.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Wyoming" Wyoming" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",39378154,38667162,41852352,40154595,42337169,39683722,40851631,40765087,44699071,42951057,44585709,43764015,42532420,42261405,43059537,44031568,42905244,43144350,43909400,43182207,44738543,98,93 " Coal",38681220,37862584,41153537,39301199,41380267,38804539,39551555,39315335,43287140,41718548,43355361,42560578,41685278,41490825,42372775,43112061,41948761,42204359,42900080,41040274,42126910,95.3,87.5 " Petroleum",45561,60850,54839,56970,47029,67673,59443,58765,42871,46197,35159,33744,38686,41567,43450,40311,44240,46116,43765,49958,55973,0.1,0.1

75

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Idaho" Idaho" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",8617977,8281502,6260025,9022654,7303193,10062854,12230805,13511823,11978079,12456120,10114257,6666589,8164140,7732812,7765655,8032438,10495090,8611890,8893983,9977502,8589208,84.9,71.4 " Petroleum",615,311,475,103,31,311,245,95,253,155,2792,3723,65,116,136,5,144,134,120,41,74,"*","*" " Natural Gas","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-",76168,61229,27775,73353,94504,240504,230189,286865,170231,"-",1.4

76

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oklahoma" Oklahoma" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",45063182,44850089,45942891,48810720,45380625,47955288,47544649,48380102,51454036,50278792,51403249,50413729,51218320,49776514,48298390,54250814,51917155,54177692,60074823,57516914,57421195,92.5,79.5 " Coal",25188557,26027968,27666494,28990113,27453911,29714368,31876730,33036688,31026837,30588375,32852645,32164601,33444114,34200128,31240478,33604628,32324391,31610751,33625415,31645255,29102532,59.1,40.3 " Petroleum",49422,18533,15180,14027,11456,77528,124951,12568,7541,7622,46637,146375,10311,111555,21008,13181,24187,139391,12600,12433,12606,0.1,"*"

77

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Michigan" Michigan" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",89058681,94567383,82679444,92250107,83720636,92478772,95155261,89564616,85146307,87874695,89572141,97067330,100451718,96634055,99608512,104830689,97373706,96785842,94503953,82787341,89666874,86,80.4 " Coal",65295742,65138291,61434530,61558991,67538611,65425002,66097259,65552021,69142807,69118017,66980252,66931691,65389899,66448916,67253690,69158736,66654737,69406550,68421489,65867455,64766712,64.3,58.1 " Petroleum",689461,553863,498159,619777,655860,687264,651860,602053,1005170,1282696,993932,724313,1090767,883847,714881,788563,272106,445915,281604,215189,195180,1,0.2

78

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Maryland" Maryland" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",31497406,38215120,39586558,43488284,43765565,44658945,44380543,44552905,48513503,49323828,31783195,88150,30734,51722,30023,44235,11941,23712,5856,2294,2996,62.1,"*" " Coal",23299412,22622989,23625314,24890670,25394481,27369905,27780141,27394342,29077013,29352347,20353004,"-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-",39.8,"-" " Petroleum",3328080,3935221,2611820,3953777,4133533,1407598,1401195,1478623,3311978,3897208,1507860,87790,30734,51722,30023,44235,11941,23712,5856,2294,2832,2.9,"*"

79

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Massachusetts" Massachusetts" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",36478610,35802358,32838301,28163544,27466049,26971667,27758877,33898697,26036881,4359511,1704653,1566491,1156651,2055622,1524169,1622208,942917,493885,507254,447912,802906,4.4,1.9 " Coal",11273069,11861344,10949228,9815909,10209727,10586608,11500536,12488802,8168608,1073628,1094848,1096681,"-",1074514,903789,1025141,"-","-","-","-","-",2.8,"-" " Petroleum",14556403,15612257,13282101,11112574,9561302,5848663,6221378,11586081,10019730,300040,123931,131797,220435,517767,290865,189211,29031,58456,57639,32698,42546,0.3,0.1

80

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oregon" Oregon" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",49171999,46298021,41220343,40743085,37490089,44031261,47883913,49068279,46352310,51698318,46059938,38059649,39731986,38577937,39092958,37407039,43068822,43202516,44590530,42703218,41142684,88.9,74.6 " Coal",1297978,2814199,3682715,3502742,3814009,1527874,1727583,1500879,3348089,3697900,3785462,4423843,3768531,4285697,3535764,3463644,2370628,4351624,4044319,3196902,4126435,7.3,7.5 " Petroleum",26809,9648,9212,32365,5398,4346,6631,10942,33127,7699,52038,92767,5893,44035,20305,47427,4323,5044,9974,2825,3330,0.1,"*"

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81

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Delaware" Delaware" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",7099663,7603723,6267492,8306462,8501043,8324101,8121853,6578599,6317738,6239372,4137127,1872053,170994,31107,23751,25989,16558,47830,19068,12768,30059,69.1,0.5 " Coal",4904473,4598301,3813594,5185396,4754309,4226615,4225125,3925643,3811669,2762460,3319195,1626254,"-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-",55.4,"-" " Petroleum",1436186,1899201,1829938,2094383,1619659,917065,1188294,832577,1234464,1234121,398100,209088,154118,9863,10083,6442,113,4132,512,457,843,6.6,"*"

82

Table 4. Electric Power Industry Capability by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Pennsylvania" Pennsylvania" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",33440,33337,33446,33423,33675,33699,33723,33825,33781,25251,13394,4978,4887,4921,4968,455,455,455,455,455,455,36.3,1 " Coal",17543,16894,17515,17480,17492,17503,17463,17386,17386,10108,3133,2407,2360,2360,2407,"-","-","-","-","-","-",8.5,"-" " Petroleum",5031,5031,4845,4875,4881,4860,4881,3208,3374,3022,1999,3,3,"-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-",5.4,"-"

83

Table 4. Electric Power Industry Capability by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Maine" Maine" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",2407,2417,2405,2402,2433,2432,2387,1498,1457,88,21,17,16,19,19,19,19,19,19,19,19,0.5,0.4 " Petroleum",1126,1126,1115,1111,1109,1109,1069,1064,1025,54,18,17,16,19,19,19,19,19,19,19,19,0.4,0.4 " Nuclear",860,870,870,870,870,870,870,"-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-" " Hydroelectric",420,420,420,421,422,421,416,404,402,34,3,"-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-",0.1,"-"

84

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Rhode Island" Rhode Island" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",591756,171457,109308,53740,68641,653076,3301111,3562833,2061351,9436,10823,"-",11836,11771,12402,10805,11008,11075,10612,10612,10827,0.2,0.1 " Petroleum",158154,54218,74715,28582,33836,50334,61675,16609,8827,9436,10823,"-",11836,11771,12402,10805,11008,11075,10612,10612,10827,0.2,0.1 " Natural Gas",433602,117239,34593,25158,34805,602742,3239436,3546224,2052524,"-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-"

85

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Pennsylvania" Pennsylvania" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",165682846,162366875,166034292,166200686,169029050,168941707,175022081,177166516,173903236,161595988,97075771,27633966,30537243,30099444,33900004,1058313,1311434,1077389,1224597,1159659,1086500,48.1,0.5 " Coal",101996271,100359157,102198817,100390066,93951561,96799645,100857561,105445514,106516740,85580341,36704124,13863092,15935860,15944113,18396944,"-","-","-","-","-","-",18.2,"-" " Petroleum",4013814,3713606,2220932,4559186,5182491,3072153,3212502,2307411,4097006,3063268,1656505,21609,39420,34944,32129,7717,2942,"-",873,710,525,0.8,"*"

86

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nevada" Nevada" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",19286260,20922439,20962974,19820333,20519076,19997354,21362057,22869773,26552567,26485602,29341675,27896065,25008568,24634871,24246391,24112225,19686302,22376989,22979409,26095005,23710917,82.7,67.5 " Coal",15053277,16365730,16443169,15627860,15324714,13971824,14656868,15250606,17161341,16907530,18931521,17736970,16413025,17085959,18257265,18384261,7253521,7090911,6884521,6376887,5584370,53.4,15.9 " Petroleum",284108,238321,327585,246506,166446,26549,93811,31156,50285,35418,64614,911611,25472,16793,95766,20500,17347,11447,9865,8472,7675,0.2,"*"

87

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Minnesota" Minnesota" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",41549628,40427575,37783876,41254101,40917280,42502869,41791506,40302526,43976935,44153826,46615673,44798014,48568719,49576276,47232462,46791349,46710674,47793039,46758314,44442211,45428599,90.7,84.6 " Coal",27587603,26186299,24443013,27110850,26399834,26820765,27329077,27081067,29884402,28366977,31731081,31037544,32200713,33157032,31477117,30514512,30600302,31199099,30771207,28582304,27176478,61.7,50.6 " Petroleum",440740,575916,638979,630166,596987,484708,640427,763764,649866,674398,440264,599557,640129,845239,752362,752774,484235,362765,211633,49502,25870,0.9,"*"

88

Table 4. Electric Power Industry Capability by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Maryland" Maryland" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",9758,10723,10862,10709,10837,10957,10957,11101,10970,10955,753,70,69,70,79,79,79,80,80,80,80,7.2,0.6 " Coal",3975,4617,4617,4628,4631,4636,4636,4647,4647,4647,"-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-" " Petroleum",2479,2427,3040,2717,2648,1394,2618,2631,2516,2673,241,70,69,70,79,79,79,80,80,80,80,2.3,0.6 " Natural Gas",1225,1601,1127,1275,1353,2722,1498,1618,1602,1448,"-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-"

89

Table 4. Electric Power Industry Capability by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Connecticut" Connecticut" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",7141,7060,6988,6754,6733,6722,6321,6294,5616,2919,2204,185,34,210,174,25,37,111,111,111,160,34.2,1.9 " Coal",385,385,385,385,385,385,385,385,385,"-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-" " Petroleum",3335,3263,3191,2957,2738,2728,2831,2801,2744,756,176,176,25,201,165,16,28,30,30,30,76,2.7,0.9 " Natural Gas","-","-","-","-",214,214,338,341,341,"-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-",71,71,71,75,"-",0.9

90

Table 4. Electric Power Industry Capability by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

District of Columbia" District of Columbia" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",806,806,806,806,806,806,806,806,806,806,"-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-" " Petroleum",806,806,806,806,806,806,806,806,806,806,"-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-" "Independent Power Producers and Combined Heat and Power",3,3,3,3,3,3,"-","-","-","-",804,806,806,806,806,806,806,806,790,790,790,100,100

91

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Connecticut" Connecticut" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",32155574,23552082,25153644,28714867,27201416,26931900,15773738,13227766,15122925,20484367,16992594,2816826,21463,59812,45095,41709,47612,37217,52334,47137,65570,51.5,0.2 " Coal",2351049,2117781,2148078,1907826,2104045,2269352,2367889,2557934,1482608,"-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-" " Petroleum",8632571,7890483,5297424,4206354,3353897,3397400,5255050,8431425,8608001,5793975,7726,11032,928,13955,9253,695,1282,3325,2597,2465,2604,"*","*"

92

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Colorado" Colorado" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",31312872,31038231,31899303,32687317,33324413,32673972,33971688,34375573,35471294,36167349,40108260,41957723,41509933,41226252,40436218,41014609,42055989,42353281,41176711,37467527,39584166,90.8,78 " Coal",29602738,28922906,30001882,30456351,31401250,30276010,31952337,32002082,33079201,32605202,35101982,35654162,35135198,35807527,35570358,35285966,36003331,35722617,34639561,31454143,34386818,79.5,67.8 " Petroleum",25129,37883,39164,8898,8913,10136,15539,14623,36736,32430,91320,158742,22519,33927,11797,15464,17646,14748,18092,12583,17424,0.2,"*"

93

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

District of Columbia" District of Columbia" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",361043,179814,73991,188452,274252,188862,109809,70661,243975,230003,97423,"-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-",67.5,"-" " Petroleum",361043,179814,73991,188452,274252,188862,109809,70661,243975,230003,97423,"-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-",67.5,"-" "Independent Power Producers and Combined Heat and Power","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-",46951,123239,261980,74144,36487,226042,81467,75251,72316,35499,199858,32.5,100

94

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

California" California" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",114528000,104967938,119309725,125782063,126749186,121881402,114706047,112183063,114926213,87874809,85856285,70132656,74588271,81728209,75177122,89348213,100338454,87348589,83346844,85123706,96939535,41.3,47.5 " Petroleum",4385235,598489,325424,2007674,1862719,488530,674899,141872,121385,51769,144590,316691,43933,50996,51482,57974,58991,65296,58187,50625,40819,0.1,"*" " Natural Gas",45221848,43940427,56609607,46499103,61530357,39089723,30768135,36300778,26385452,13917748,12411961,11918703,8808012,9873371,10759580,12982348,19805412,22896497,26129803,25237449,31251994,6,15.3

95

The Integration of Renewable Energy Sources into Electric Power Distribution Systems, Vol. II Utility Case Assessments  

SciTech Connect

Electric utility distribution system impacts associated with the integration of renewable energy sources such as photovoltaics (PV) and wind turbines (WT) are considered in this project. The impacts are expected to vary from site to site according to the following characteristics: the local solar insolation and/or wind characteristics, renewable energy source penetration level, whether battery or other energy storage systems are applied, and local utility distribution design standards and planning practices. Small, distributed renewable energy sources are connected to the utility distribution system like other, similar kW- and MW-scale equipment and loads. Residential applications are expected to be connected to single-phase 120/240-V secondaries. Larger kW-scale applications may be connected to three+phase secondaries, and larger hundred-kW and y-scale applications, such as MW-scale windfarms, or PV plants, may be connected to electric utility primary systems via customer-owned primary and secondary collection systems. In any case, the installation of small, distributed renewable energy sources is expected to have a significant impact on local utility distribution primary and secondary system economics. Small, distributed renewable energy sources installed on utility distribution systems will also produce nonsite-specific utility generation system benefits such as energy and capacity displacement benefits, in addition to the local site-specific distribution system benefits. Although generation system benefits are not site-specific, they are utility-specific, and they vary significantly among utilities in different regions. In addition, transmission system benefits, environmental benefits and other benefits may apply. These benefits also vary significantly among utilities and regions. Seven utility case studies considering PV, WT, and battery storage were conducted to identify a range of potential renewable energy source distribution system applications. The following utility- and site-specific conditions that may affect the economic viability of distributed renewable energy sources were considered: distribution system characteristics, and design standards, and voltage levels; load density, reliability, and power quality; solar insolation and wind resource levels; utility generation characteristics and load profiles; and investor-owned and publicly owned utilities, size, and financial assumptions.

Zaininger, H.W.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

High School Academic Competition - Round Robin | U.S. DOE Office of Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Round Robin Round Robin National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results Middle School Round Robin Middle School Double Elimination Middle School Electric Car High School Round Robin High School Double Elimination News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov 2013 Competition Results High School Academic Competition - Round Robin Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Welcome to the National Science Bowl Score Center! Looking for Round Robin Updates? Click on the division to go straight to the bracket - otherwise, scroll down the page and browse all the scores.

97

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Vermont" Vermont" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",4992578,5258829,4698045,4300537,5293892,4839820,5004219,5323432,4393537,4734555,5307016,4734002,2971224,626337,643426,673607,802680,701474,752800,711507,720853,84.2,10.9 " Petroleum",2543,5244,2581,4805,5764,13357,3428,9816,41265,22392,60660,31740,9406,22607,17800,10179,7371,7811,4266,2439,4509,1,0.1 " Natural Gas",65281,95341,63120,20558,5806,6593,97,93,827,18291,90790,11000,3275,2029,3224,2240,1875,1889,2655,4431,3783,1.4,0.1 " Nuclear",3616268,4108314,3734594,3372148,4315544,3858509,3798790,4266866,3357696,4059107,4548065,4171120,2367209,"-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-",72.2,"-"

98

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Tennessee" Tennessee" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",73902614,73931670,75396209,71614268,74853548,82277534,88647111,93293232,94142638,89682569,92311813,92937315,92570929,88678127,94371964,93942273,90960035,92474664,88262641,77432806,79816049,96.3,96.9 " Coal",50186951,46671234,49995747,59559596,52132070,57971909,55504189,58899058,55120297,55220519,60675314,58166973,58080553,53376149,56583558,57560600,59146323,58849255,55752210,40426487,42259569,63.3,51.3 " Petroleum",134397,160072,127282,234545,295961,252611,257586,192880,699233,502286,539784,379703,250325,379007,166943,201121,137187,155646,207233,182291,211654,0.6,0.3

99

Table 4. Electric Power Industry Capability by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oregon" Oregon" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",11236,11236,11237,10133,10166,10446,10526,10537,10449,10293,10337,10354,10348,10338,9555,9839,9971,10502,10491,10683,10846,91.7,76.1 " Coal",530,530,508,508,508,508,508,508,528,530,557,557,557,556,556,585,585,585,585,585,585,4.9,4.1 " Petroleum",109,109,109,109,106,103,103,103,"-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-" " Natural Gas",493,493,493,493,493,767,849,849,849,706,706,729,753,725,725,967,962,1354,1364,1341,1337,6.3,9.4

100

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Wisconsin" Wisconsin" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",45550958,47148818,46463756,47762861,49437481,51012390,51651435,48560127,52529065,54704370,55665471,54959426,54773666,56068698,56142364,55169108,51914755,44284480,45536712,41375366,45579970,93.3,70.9 " Coal",32144557,33489286,32740540,33558049,35282695,36863872,38144842,40819517,39785759,39899142,41057919,40185649,38583501,40579973,40981609,40506086,38866178,38719363,40452933,36238643,39185565,68.8,60.9 " Petroleum",47444,62162,54332,105173,171563,147493,124088,169863,200225,220944,191091,170443,162990,185625,494535,470219,591486,725019,647602,458848,478866,0.3,0.7

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101

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Dakota" Dakota" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",26824491,27535034,28592323,28499824,29003713,28842021,30769712,29719764,30518976,31259830,31122917,30135733,31147221,31075012,29526814,31512768,30328375,30402807,30852784,31375152,31343796,99.4,90.2 " Coal",25092696,25750792,26864520,27048924,27099914,26336456,27529906,26314471,28176015,28610457,28952976,28769721,29518865,29298347,27938264,30133242,28761820,29041826,29551647,29486194,28349079,92.5,81.6 " Petroleum",20682,27636,28951,35795,47340,49107,88834,85698,47091,40300,47457,33850,35728,45648,36565,32480,39269,47332,40977,41475,35855,0.2,0.1

102

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Kentucky" Kentucky" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",73807286,75505081,77351259,84997718,84097034,86161578,88438224,91558046,86151121,81658150,81349922,83677982,80161524,80696982,82921402,85679912,86816479,85259079,86012151,90029962,97472144,87.5,99.2 " Coal",70500461,71713851,73476309,81722246,79897442,82539467,84659818,87875331,82412216,78544604,78598836,79381504,75308162,76367048,78574428,81188722,83068626,81877334,83197690,84037596,91053858,84.5,92.7 " Petroleum",118646,111558,83886,96727,154819,130598,135437,125625,127062,103755,118876,120418,135412,130280,93651,96557,79520,96733,106853,2016282,2284852,0.1,2.3

103

Table 4. Electric Power Industry Capability by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Washington" Washington" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",24173,24243,24221,24259,24255,24277,24276,25273,25235,25189,23840,24055,24141,24216,23878,24065,24303,24511,26243,26322,26498,91.5,86.9 " Coal",1310,1360,1360,1390,1390,1340,1390,1390,1390,1340,"-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-" " Petroleum",173,173,173,173,88,88,87,62,62,4,4,133,40,39,39,39,39,3,3,3,3,"*","*" " Natural Gas",590,590,590,590,590,590,590,838,838,955,955,987,1146,1153,1184,1141,1138,1111,2768,2782,2849,3.7,9.3

104

Table 4. Electric Power Industry Capability by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Jersey" Jersey" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",13730,13725,13824,13850,13500,13817,13645,13684,13390,12085,1244,1244,1244,1244,1005,1005,1005,558,477,466,460,7.5,2.5 " Coal",1652,1652,1629,1644,1634,1629,1629,1635,1658,1643,387,387,387,387,307,307,307,23,23,23,"-",2.3,"-" " Petroleum",3784,3480,3548,3212,2967,2890,2842,3915,3573,2373,286,286,286,286,232,232,232,69,54,43,49,1.7,0.3 " Natural Gas",4101,4410,4434,4761,4657,5056,4912,3872,3897,3807,171,171,171,171,66,66,66,66,"-","-","-",1,"-"

105

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Florida" Florida" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",123623905,130743964,133976775,140066943,141790885,147156684,145140217,147983676,169447167,166914264,169888638,170966177,182346629,188034719,193383664,196096285,200015227,200533885,196524348,195063261,206062185,88.6,89.9 " Coal",59073203,61122819,61631012,61889050,60770030,61864438,65782399,66034628,65470151,62680522,67143257,63090794,60997142,62094661,60013823,57559411,60413597,62633944,59731231,49942611,56074369,35,24.5 " Petroleum",25092296,30115618,28176184,34277523,33330039,21583186,22890565,25742149,40952580,36697343,34337080,39075398,32449236,35545897,35824155,36122039,22508349,19841026,11830552,9028865,8867397,17.9,3.9

106

Table 4. Electric Power Industry Capability by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Carolina" Carolina" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",14908,16162,16314,16131,16691,16701,17173,17431,17627,17681,17716,18246,19101,19402,20406,20787,21019,21730,22152,22190,22172,94.8,92.5 " Coal",4818,4812,4812,4812,5352,5352,5471,5794,6007,6055,6054,6077,5925,5925,5968,5968,5984,6460,7060,7028,7048,32.4,29.4 " Petroleum",897,894,894,816,828,1192,1488,1192,1163,1163,957,955,955,970,684,689,682,682,699,663,664,5.1,2.8 " Natural Gas",301,396,396,328,336,345,345,585,576,576,779,1279,2150,2437,3712,3708,3923,3956,3919,3964,3966,4.2,16.5

107

Table 4. Electric Power Industry Capability by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Rhode Island" Rhode Island" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",263,261,156,153,148,442,441,441,7,7,6,7,9,9,9,6,8,8,7,7,7,0.5,0.4 " Petroleum",262,161,155,152,146,20,20,20,5,5,5,6,7,7,7,5,7,7,7,7,7,0.4,0.4 " Natural Gas","-",99,"-","-","-",420,420,420,"-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-" " Hydroelectric",1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,"-","-","-",0.1,"-"

108

Table 4. Electric Power Industry Capability by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Tennessee" Tennessee" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",16996,16269,16294,16224,16482,16144,17253,17361,17546,17253,17893,18600,19137,19235,19239,19120,19768,19977,20456,20418,20968,92,97.9 " Coal",9289,8702,8683,8691,8615,8615,8615,8604,8604,8618,8618,8618,8602,8609,8623,8618,8585,8599,8624,8589,8589,44.3,40.1 " Petroleum",1152,1100,1080,1080,1982,1096,1096,1135,1252,784,800,836,56,56,56,58,58,58,58,58,58,4.1,0.3 " Natural Gas",516,480,488,488,"-",472,472,514,571,732,1344,1960,3116,3128,3137,3032,3659,3632,4082,4099,4639,6.9,21.7

109

Table 4. Electric Power Industry Capability by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Georgia" Georgia" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",20731,20752,21399,21504,22039,22290,22782,23147,23390,23329,24860,24099,25821,24804,25404,26538,26542,26432,26462,26558,26639,89.6,72.7 " Coal",12952,12972,13104,13115,13164,12551,13234,13222,13540,13095,13470,13503,13498,13331,13215,13192,13192,13192,13129,13084,13103,48.5,35.8 " Petroleum",1488,1493,1635,1351,1341,1231,1228,1228,1172,1145,1145,1145,1145,1055,991,991,991,973,991,991,991,4.1,2.7 " Natural Gas",96,103,103,362,841,1274,1276,1281,1273,1564,2647,1974,3386,2827,3470,4618,4609,4577,4577,4652,4646,9.5,12.7

110

Table 4. Electric Power Industry Capability by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

York" York" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",31224,31349,31108,32731,32824,32147,30060,29985,29585,17679,15806,11572,11675,11902,11386,11927,12046,12056,11784,11871,11032,44.4,28 " Coal",3887,3897,3897,3879,3879,3870,3891,3880,3891,668,668,302,302,302,297,297,297,297,45,45,"-",1.9,"-" " Petroleum",12349,9869,8992,8885,7684,7637,11500,12759,12530,4991,5035,3638,3638,3688,2642,2450,2468,2465,2467,2465,1607,14.1,4.1 " Natural Gas",5065,7634,8304,7895,9194,8469,4718,3249,3131,2600,2227,2682,2783,2908,3894,4628,4628,4644,4623,4629,4619,6.3,11.7

111

Table 4. Electric Power Industry Capability by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Massachusetts" Massachusetts" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",9910,9771,9494,9461,9287,9288,9365,9442,3385,2214,996,993,1090,981,981,983,837,827,829,930,937,8.1,6.8 " Coal",1723,1692,1684,1679,1675,1707,1730,1737,328,146,145,145,145,145,145,144,"-","-","-","-","-",1.2,"-" " Petroleum",5216,5070,4913,5041,4132,4058,4030,4094,787,547,475,474,771,663,661,661,659,648,624,624,528,3.8,3.9 " Natural Gas",289,330,378,219,953,993,1082,1086,333,302,330,329,130,130,131,131,131,131,157,257,353,2.7,2.6

112

Table 4. Electric Power Industry Capability by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alabama" Alabama" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",20023,19902,19930,19972,19878,20463,20692,20840,21292,21462,22366,22532,23429,23007,23186,23252,23218,23182,23144,23285,23642,95,72.9 " Coal",11777,11589,11599,11579,11494,11669,11515,11286,11349,11349,11301,11362,11246,11217,11238,11500,11465,11452,11414,11401,11356,48,35 " Petroleum",65,18,18,18,388,18,20,16,16,30,34,34,34,34,34,34,34,34,34,34,34,0.1,0.1 " Natural Gas",400,530,544,586,202,987,1437,1706,1971,2076,3041,3157,4182,3550,3627,3471,3440,3440,3440,3593,3937,12.9,12.1

113

Table 4. Electric Power Industry Capability by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Ohio" Ohio" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",26996,27540,27130,27186,27192,27365,27278,26630,26768,27083,26302,27081,27885,27694,27684,19312,20147,20012,20340,20356,20179,92.3,61 " Coal",23086,23317,23060,23043,23058,23123,23033,22415,22456,22626,21675,21675,21599,21258,21366,16272,16296,16204,15909,15932,15733,76.1,47.6 " Petroleum",1151,1148,907,907,907,853,856,805,824,891,1031,1381,1000,1017,1008,588,588,596,575,575,577,3.6,1.7 " Natural Gas",501,817,902,980,976,1140,1140,1154,1232,1271,1300,1661,2921,3056,3074,2346,3156,3105,3749,3741,3760,4.6,11.4

114

Table 4. Electric Power Industry Capability by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Louisiana" Louisiana" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",16751,16795,16699,16885,16873,17019,17150,17079,17014,16339,14317,14165,14233,14090,14176,15137,15176,14756,15755,15615,16471,67.8,61.6 " Coal",3343,3343,3343,3343,3343,2843,3453,3453,3448,3453,1723,1723,1723,1723,1723,1723,1723,1739,1739,1739,1674,8.2,6.3 " Petroleum",17,17,228,212,231,35,35,16,16,11,16,20,16,16,26,239,239,240,240,240,775,0.1,2.9 " Natural Gas",11380,11424,11122,11324,11293,12130,11651,11599,11539,10864,10566,10350,10423,10284,10372,11051,11095,10650,11622,11494,11880,50,44.4

115

Table 4. Electric Power Industry Capability by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Florida" Florida" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",32714,32708,33411,34814,35487,35857,36898,36727,36472,36536,37264,38240,40313,41996,42619,45196,45184,47224,47222,50781,50853,89.7,86 " Coal",9971,10001,10034,10030,10037,10069,10763,10823,10676,10770,10783,10783,11301,10223,9653,9634,9564,9528,9499,9495,9210,26,15.6 " Petroleum",11107,11117,11590,11598,14724,13478,13653,13493,12222,12153,12431,12552,10650,10063,10715,10611,10593,10586,12043,11549,10980,29.9,18.6 " Natural Gas",7775,7712,7909,9313,6857,8447,8560,8485,9655,9665,10102,10955,14401,17751,18290,20990,21065,23148,21698,25731,26424,24.3,44.7

116

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Arizona" Arizona" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",62288980,66767347,70108979,68025039,71203728,68966538,70877043,78060498,81299241,83095924,88149792,85807868,81710063,80348246,81351521,82914964,84355976,88825573,94452931,89640192,91232664,99.1,81.6 " Coal",31636037,32306088,34602347,37020817,38072165,31710476,30780575,34219281,36225373,37994159,40662627,39731623,37957468,37739559,39419177,39750729,40056468,40911234,43505012,39464060,43347748,45.7,38.8 " Petroleum",116407,88935,72838,59875,128437,63610,65097,60927,61227,46287,189396,311787,51061,46706,39414,41127,71761,46137,48324,61381,63439,0.2,0.1

117

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Hawaii" Hawaii" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",7996096,7333192,6861255,6083815,6055087,6190584,6420195,6212643,6301169,6452068,6534692,6383088,7513051,6493205,6982469,6915159,7040473,6928397,6700636,6509550,6416068,61.7,59.2 " Petroleum",7967354,7312791,6851432,6070063,6036282,6174627,6402329,6193852,6287107,6429429,6516929,6362846,7502913,6489565,6971259,6904293,7015977,6913231,6682593,6262182,6178666,61.5,57 " Hydroelectric",22743,20401,9823,13752,18805,15957,17866,18791,13750,18844,15114,18132,8533,2078,9724,9169,23656,14729,17872,28608,16719,0.1,0.2

118

Table 4. Electric Power Industry Capability by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

United States" United States" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",690465,693016,695059,699971,702229,706111,709942,711889,686692,639324,604319,549920,561074,547249,550550,556235,567523,571200,584908,596769,602076,74.4,57.9 " Coal",299781,299444,300385,300634,300941,300569,302420,302866,299739,277780,260990,244451,244056,236473,235976,229705,230644,231289,231857,234397,235707,32.2,22.7 " Petroleum",76390,72393,71266,69046,69549,64451,70421,69557,62704,49020,41032,38456,33876,32570,31415,30867,30419,29115,30657,30174,28972,5.1,2.8 " Natural Gas",121300,126837,128149,132427,133620,142295,139936,141713,130404,123192,123665,112841,127692,125612,131734,147752,157742,162756,173106,180571,184231,15.2,17.7

119

Table 4. Electric Power Industry Capability by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Hawaii" Hawaii" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",1487,1521,1560,1602,1602,1602,1610,1595,1616,1608,1626,1622,1622,1624,1691,1705,1730,1730,1730,1859,1828,68.1,72.1 " Petroleum",1483,1518,1556,1598,1598,1598,1607,1592,1612,1605,1621,1616,1618,1620,1687,1699,1724,1724,1724,1740,1711,67.9,67.5 " Hydroelectric",3,3,3,3,3,3,3,3,4,4,4,3,2,2,2,4,4,4,4,4,4,0.1,0.2 " Other Renewables1","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-",2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,115,113,0.1,4.5

120

Table 4. Electric Power Industry Capability by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Arizona" Arizona" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",14906,14910,14973,15034,15098,15222,15147,15164,15084,15091,15140,15284,15699,16193,16141,18860,19566,19551,19717,20127,20115,98.9,76.2 " Coal",5116,5070,5070,5108,5119,5159,5201,5256,5286,5311,5336,5336,5336,5336,5336,5362,5762,5750,5750,6159,6165,34.9,23.4 " Petroleum",78,78,78,100,100,95,184,248,248,240,244,243,263,191,108,108,86,89,89,89,89,1.6,0.3 " Natural Gas",3306,3236,3236,3236,3236,3273,3126,2989,2924,2919,2939,3080,3444,3908,3955,6566,6897,6891,6987,6987,6969,19.2,26.4

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rounding sources electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nebraska" Nebraska" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",21630677,22971934,22387247,22724286,21945525,25279277,27322697,28388030,28720209,29980967,29045739,30411669,31550226,30367879,31944127,31391643,31599046,32403289,32355676,33776062,36242921,99.8,98.9 " Coal",12658464,13562815,12402148,14739783,14002015,16079519,16040775,17209080,18335965,17794136,18424799,20193542,19899803,20907970,20414960,20772590,20632855,19611849,21479723,23307746,23214616,63.3,63.4 " Petroleum",12981,13459,9482,19035,18201,26679,19973,31059,41892,28807,53715,25154,18410,47971,21004,30026,18914,35552,34655,22869,30849,0.2,0.1

122

Table 4. Electric Power Industry Capability by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Iowa" Iowa" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",7952,8090,8092,8074,8217,8237,8161,8238,8368,8435,8508,8352,8407,9093,9895,10090,9562,10669,11274,11479,11282,93.5,77.3 " Coal",5860,5912,5909,5818,5975,5995,5807,5573,5717,5702,5920,5668,5620,5666,5741,5705,5666,6535,6528,6529,6389,65.1,43.8 " Petroleum",659,723,714,746,755,755,861,872,877,932,1001,1012,980,912,908,936,935,930,924,921,915,11,6.3 " Natural Gas",779,816,829,870,847,825,835,913,906,938,932,916,1007,1710,2381,2376,2370,2401,2394,2345,2296,10.2,15.7 " Nuclear",530,515,515,515,515,528,520,535,520,520,520,520,566,562,563,581,"-","-","-","-","-",5.7,"-"

123

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

South Carolina" South Carolina" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",69259815,69837984,71478648,75588386,74193685,78439814,76325556,78374450,84396897,87347364,90421081,86734778,93689257,91544429,94406828,99104373,95872763,99997011,97921204,97336653,100610887,96.9,96.6 " Coal",22874805,23165807,23013743,26532193,26993543,25801600,30307236,31042658,32377814,35246389,38664405,36302690,36490769,37065509,38516633,39352428,39140908,41270230,41184319,34146526,37340392,41.4,35.9 " Petroleum",71997,83385,68375,95193,108250,129854,125657,188326,331357,300739,265931,225008,205664,289474,690071,484181,135522,174663,160102,490911,178378,0.3,0.2

124

Table 4. Electric Power Industry Capability by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mexico" Mexico" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",5042,5045,5062,5062,5078,5078,5077,5183,5294,5299,5250,5250,5463,5398,5393,5692,6223,6324,6324,6344,6345,93.8,78 " Coal",3899,3901,3901,3901,3901,3901,3901,3901,3913,3942,3942,3942,3942,3942,3937,3957,3957,3957,3957,3977,3990,70.4,49.1 " Petroleum",24,24,24,24,24,44,24,23,15,"-","-","-",15,35,35,35,26,26,26,26,20,"-",0.2 " Natural Gas",1063,1063,1079,1079,1096,1076,1094,1200,1285,1275,1226,1226,1425,1339,1339,1619,2158,2259,2259,2259,2253,21.9,27.7

125

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Georgia" Georgia" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",97565058,90809416,91779352,95737505,98752712,102015724,98729242,101780433,108716930,110536794,116176834,110564676,111855967,115755114,117918895,126444777,127367613,132831987,126031263,115074702,120425913,93.8,87.5 " Coal",67564750,59985395,58235454,63295811,64727519,65880095,63230856,66179551,69871150,74067633,79007166,73443695,77288328,77858022,79185166,86358096,85700960,89532913,84652246,68863420,72550375,63.8,52.7 " Petroleum",164987,107662,128485,237473,161235,218515,292018,200873,670924,662699,641415,275630,233940,278618,156672,189819,86798,82380,67971,64833,70781,0.5,0.1

126

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mexico" Mexico" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",28491171,25064613,27707513,28364368,30018011,29431903,29364389,30568142,31428332,31654480,32855587,32210683,29926241,31770151,32242728,33561875,35411074,34033374,33844547,34245148,30848406,96.6,85.1 " Coal",25826928,22129312,25348413,25507029,26752349,26121447,26357179,27078660,27537426,28067704,29065954,28402187,26902880,28812844,29263899,29947248,29859008,27603647,27014233,29117308,25617789,85.4,70.7 " Petroleum",34081,32240,35614,35337,22929,23073,22452,21075,23020,40133,29529,30210,30710,47860,30321,32528,40634,42969,52012,44599,49394,0.1,0.1

127

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

United States" United States" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",2808151009,2825022865,2797219151,2882524766,2910712079,2994528592,3077442152,3122523144,3212170791,3173673550,3015383376,2629945673,2549457170,2462280615,2505231152,2474845558,2483655548,2504130899,2475366697,2372775997,2471632103,79.3,59.9 " Coal",1559605707,1551166838,1575895394,1639151186,1635492971,1652914466,1737453477,1787806344,1807479829,1767679446,1696619307,1560145542,1514669950,1500281112,1513640806,1484855188,1471421060,1490984698,1466395192,1322092036,1378028414,44.6,33.4 " Petroleum",117016961,111462979,88916308,99538857,91038583,60844256,67346095,77752652,110157895,86929098,72179917,78907846,59124871,69930457,73693695,69722196,40902849,40719414,28123785,25216814,26064909,1.9,0.6

128

Table 4. Electric Power Industry Capability by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oklahoma" Oklahoma" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",12769,12848,12881,12859,12898,12928,13091,12931,12622,12861,13438,13436,13387,13463,13550,13992,14648,14495,15913,16187,16015,94.6,76.2 " Coal",4850,4865,4874,4874,4868,4831,4848,4848,4837,4808,4856,4856,4896,4941,4949,4964,4981,4975,4912,4940,4940,34.2,23.5 " Petroleum",58,58,58,58,58,58,64,62,61,61,61,60,60,62,68,68,72,68,69,69,67,0.4,0.3 " Natural Gas",6858,6870,6888,6866,6885,6952,7007,6934,6634,6887,7411,7410,7314,7340,7427,7899,8364,8221,9701,9842,9669,52.2,46 " Other Gases1","-",52,52,52,52,52,52,52,55,63,57,57,61,61,58,"-","-","-","-","-","-",0.4,"-"

129

Table 4. Electric Power Industry Capability by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Michigan" Michigan" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",22315,22275,22374,22412,22413,21981,21985,21909,21943,22374,22752,22831,23279,23345,23314,23029,22734,21894,21885,21759,21639,88.3,72.5 " Coal",11931,11960,11976,11929,11928,11794,11793,11796,11840,11573,11636,11638,11627,11636,11623,11633,11534,11533,11543,11431,11218,45.1,37.6 " Petroleum",3460,3171,3184,3235,3235,2618,2620,2617,2632,2634,1831,1860,1654,1685,1649,1647,1397,616,610,612,568,7.1,1.9 " Natural Gas",702,727,798,800,800,1434,1436,1435,1439,2131,3244,3302,3958,3964,3982,3669,3695,4461,4447,4446,4618,12.6,15.5

130

Table 4. Electric Power Industry Capability by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Vermont" Vermont" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",1065,1091,1094,1094,1093,1090,1092,1094,774,782,777,262,261,260,251,258,259,258,259,257,260,79,23 " Petroleum",117,117,120,120,120,118,119,119,117,117,112,111,107,107,101,100,101,101,101,100,100,11.4,8.9 " Nuclear",496,496,496,496,496,496,496,496,500,506,506,"-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-",51.4,"-" " Hydroelectric",404,430,430,430,430,426,427,423,103,107,106,99,102,96,93,100,101,99,100,100,103,10.8,9.1

131

Table 4. Electric Power Industry Capability by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Wyoming" Wyoming" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",5809,5826,5847,5869,5874,5970,5966,6044,6018,6011,6048,6052,6122,6088,6086,6241,6137,6142,6450,6713,6931,97.1,86.8 " Coal",5525,5545,5545,5567,5567,5662,5662,5737,5710,5709,5710,5710,5692,5692,5692,5817,5747,5747,5832,5829,5935,91.6,74.3 " Petroleum",15,15,15,15,15,15,10,10,10,"-","-",5,5,5,5,"-","-",5,5,5,5,"-",0.1 " Natural Gas","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-",34,34,119,85,80,113,79,79,79,79,79,0.5,1

132

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Missouri" Missouri" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",59010858,60120689,56627107,53202268,61519090,65400254,67827241,71073239,74894188,73504882,76283550,78990878,79796801,86102107,86419717,90159045,91118304,89925724,89178555,86704766,90176805,99.6,97.7 " Coal",48501751,47907503,46829678,40688696,48592766,53582211,57176084,59903073,62488551,61249846,62624807,65445161,67147996,73904272,74711159,77123580,77113165,74745712,73246599,71401581,74829029,81.8,81.1 " Petroleum",89342,118645,80522,634432,730820,682321,95980,125449,309734,280945,247622,637504,528353,155968,195098,168258,59958,59611,56620,87081,124866,0.3,0.1

133

Table 4. Electric Power Industry Capability by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

California" California" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",43681,43599,43763,44313,43297,43302,43934,43709,30663,24323,24319,24405,24609,23223,23867,25248,26346,26334,26467,28021,28689,46.5,42.6 " Petroleum",2800,2473,1759,1553,1553,1692,1692,1072,737,526,526,524,296,297,297,297,245,226,222,204,174,1,0.3 " Natural Gas",21815,22074,22810,23285,22208,22040,22365,23193,10581,5671,5670,5733,5954,5042,5567,6850,7917,8188,8134,9629,10333,10.8,15.3 " Nuclear",4746,4746,4310,4310,4310,4310,4746,4310,4310,4310,4310,4324,4324,4324,4324,4324,4390,4390,4390,4390,4390,8.2,6.5

134

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

North Carolina" North Carolina" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",79845217,83520063,83007307,88753614,91454784,96109819,102786590,107371092,113112235,109882388,114433191,109807278,115597653,118433112,118328694,121674733,117797331,123215621,118778090,112961309,121251138,93.6,94.2 " Coal",46631040,46762330,54011457,59383147,53234497,55698342,64097781,70181392,69000633,68569499,71719489,68775284,71223313,70630278,71956852,74915235,72311023,76611703,72625233,62765545,69274374,58.7,53.8 " Petroleum",186899,174136,147134,165175,199418,234263,259252,211974,285902,284400,468482,412765,376170,459947,250402,231141,219114,236042,232446,232119,245987,0.4,0.2

135

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mississippi" Mississippi" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",22923971,23305127,20487946,23234028,26222313,26395165,28838302,31227619,31991676,32212133,33896003,47550273,35099283,31358938,32838145,30619168,34158706,34426533,33796221,34759024,40841436,90.1,75 " Coal",9445584,8750253,7796112,8819755,8889624,9259980,12010196,12500586,11747963,13037100,13877065,19196065,12483658,13742273,14274786,13389906,14907777,14422788,14033627,9610808,10309709,36.9,18.9 " Petroleum",705474,370130,371568,3545055,1106209,23738,1173503,2633109,5417924,3141934,2970676,5120602,26357,1620395,2763630,1432077,395330,397080,71597,12475,76832,7.9,0.1

136

Table 4. Electric Power Industry Capability by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Kansas" Kansas" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",9578,9609,9693,9706,9715,9675,9694,9786,9915,10020,10086,10223,10244,10731,10705,10734,10829,10944,11246,11733,11732,99.5,93.5 " Coal",5064,5091,5149,5189,5220,5244,5256,5364,5407,5325,5295,5295,5310,5265,5222,5250,5203,5208,5190,5180,5179,52.3,41.3 " Petroleum",622,602,613,611,613,579,578,510,494,520,522,652,546,564,587,583,565,569,564,564,550,5.2,4.4 " Natural Gas",2755,2784,2772,2772,2722,2685,2697,2749,2850,3005,3099,3106,3219,3735,3729,3734,3793,3900,4232,4580,4546,30.6,36.2

137

Table 4. Electric Power Industry Capability by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Carolina" Carolina" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",20190,20131,20148,20182,19767,20597,20923,21054,21020,21182,22015,23478,23652,23726,23671,23822,24553,25500,25558,25529,25553,89.9,92.3 " Coal",12500,12500,12500,12503,12438,12440,12440,12440,12440,12440,12440,12440,12440,12440,12495,12487,12439,12394,12411,12294,12271,50.8,44.3 " Petroleum",760,773,773,804,804,1676,776,791,794,791,791,790,836,836,541,540,509,510,507,509,524,3.2,1.9 " Natural Gas",270,257,274,286,286,314,1514,1511,1511,1676,2509,3931,4010,4010,4035,4200,4975,5597,5660,5749,5773,10.2,20.9

138

Table 4. Electric Power Industry Capability by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Missouri" Missouri" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",15180,15308,15385,15433,15488,15724,15978,16212,16282,16755,17180,17726,18409,18587,18606,18970,19675,19570,19621,19600,20360,99.4,93.7 " Coal",10678,10722,10724,10738,10754,10540,10557,10920,10943,10889,11032,11032,11053,11172,11159,11172,11199,11165,11146,11137,11976,63.8,55.1 " Petroleum",1498,1533,1546,1569,1617,1710,1730,1200,1181,1181,1198,1616,1236,1259,1243,1241,1265,1274,1267,1257,1197,6.9,5.5 " Natural Gas",818,817,878,891,892,1240,1444,1839,1815,2359,2607,2736,3778,3806,3853,4158,4809,4728,4790,4790,4771,15.1,21.9

139

Table 4. Electric Power Industry Capability by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Virginia" Virginia" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",13661,13652,13772,14054,13763,14342,14806,15291,15314,15311,15606,15761,15818,17128,17567,18091,18166,18376,18828,19135,19434,80.4,80.6 " Coal",4225,4210,4215,4217,4217,5451,5099,5099,5099,5099,4796,4784,4789,4468,4468,4586,4586,4605,4587,4587,4594,24.7,19.1 " Petroleum",2753,2753,2753,2784,2689,1374,2192,2192,2213,2213,2175,2180,2083,2081,2098,2031,2027,2041,2041,2050,2048,11.2,8.5 " Natural Gas",192,198,377,595,400,995,994,1524,1524,1524,2083,2248,2097,3714,4101,4395,4395,4429,4897,5076,5122,10.7,21.2

140

Table 4. Electric Power Industry Capability by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Illinois" Illinois" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",32602,32643,32636,32769,32952,33139,33164,33549,30367,16992,17495,4420,4151,3007,2994,3987,4742,4642,4691,4830,4800,48.1,10.9 " Coal",14912,14916,14947,15063,15090,14916,14931,15339,14250,5543,5473,2862,2862,1866,1859,1844,1844,1767,1833,1998,1993,15.1,4.5 " Petroleum",4480,4207,3928,2848,2448,2645,2648,2671,1569,989,867,700,406,368,401,399,399,377,381,372,372,2.4,0.8 " Natural Gas",591,901,1143,2236,2792,2963,2963,2917,4006,732,1229,846,871,761,722,1729,2485,2483,2462,2442,2417,3.4,5.5

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rounding sources electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Arkansas" Arkansas" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",37053436,38365135,37369823,38049072,39547768,39526825,43677535,42789637,43198908,44130705,41486451,44728133,42873364,41636514,45055455,40545220,42068467,45522928,45880232,45423149,47108063,94.6,77.2 " Coal",19160989,19573925,20030355,18025615,19780738,21506397,24339185,22760970,23140020,24612079,24073573,24678344,22986650,23422401,25248810,22940659,24095405,25642175,25993257,24986333,26421729,54.9,43.3 " Petroleum",73856,64278,49640,65624,96439,53208,98250,66622,143834,141475,206991,846105,136134,263982,476133,162961,135291,76212,57158,80962,37140,0.5,0.1

142

Table 4. Electric Power Industry Capability by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Montana" Montana" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",4912,4828,4871,4871,4907,4943,4943,4943,4944,2997,3005,2232,2232,2274,2189,2186,2163,2179,2190,2232,2340,58.2,39.9 " Coal",2260,2260,2260,2260,2260,2260,2260,2294,2300,792,792,52,52,52,52,52,52,52,52,52,52,15.4,0.9 " Petroleum","-","-","-","-","-","-",5,5,5,5,5,"-","-","-","-",2,2,2,2,2,2,0.1,"*" " Natural Gas",120,120,120,120,120,120,120,53,52,53,58,58,58,97,98,100,100,100,100,102,186,1.1,3.2

143

Table 4. Electric Power Industry Capability by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Minnesota" Minnesota" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",8834,8884,8880,8864,8951,8923,9180,9216,9089,8987,9067,10110,10329,10162,10179,10543,10458,10719,11432,11639,11547,88.4,78.5 " Coal",5757,5786,5771,5708,5742,5630,5779,5811,5657,5605,5613,5729,5726,5342,5260,5087,5083,5048,5077,4667,4630,54.7,31.5 " Petroleum",1004,1020,1026,1070,1065,1044,1112,1102,1056,1013,1019,1051,1020,669,699,711,718,728,746,759,748,9.9,5.1 " Natural Gas",307,305,305,302,353,454,457,464,461,459,475,1373,1637,2276,2336,2852,2719,2974,3528,4118,3929,4.6,26.7

144

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Indiana" Indiana" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",97738497,98199986,97299582,99951149,103485409,105188892,105557018,110466291,112771878,114182827,119721399,114666355,112029989,112395725,114690471,117373699,117643504,116727908,115887993,103594020,107852560,93.7,86.2 " Coal",96012872,96526976,95745949,98776088,102043025,103774522,104413600,108911799,110696190,112336883,117619535,113135350,109441044,109839659,112899892,115413188,116284183,114974642,114321205,101000267,103204599,92,82.4 " Petroleum",673984,354297,287064,197848,209379,213051,320566,606905,821530,813232,845481,371623,470976,407648,393135,244554,134035,155132,165142,132655,137977,0.7,0.1

145

Table 4. Electric Power Industry Capability by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Indiana" Indiana" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",20588,20773,20821,20901,20710,20712,20681,20200,20337,20358,20554,20616,20802,21016,21126,22017,22021,22012,23598,23631,23008,85.9,83.2 " Coal",19556,19588,19562,19542,19192,18844,19045,18426,18709,18566,18734,18734,18530,18400,18426,18455,18428,18416,18401,18434,17774,78.3,64.3 " Petroleum",492,490,491,491,492,486,487,486,486,486,471,471,473,474,479,479,487,487,487,486,486,2,1.8 " Natural Gas",473,628,700,799,958,1087,1087,1087,1083,1090,1290,1353,1741,2082,2162,3024,3024,3020,4620,4616,4371,5.4,15.8

146

OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS AVAILABILITY AND IMPROVEMENTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

SNS electrical systems have been operational for 4 years. System availability statistics and improvements are presented for AC electrical systems, DC and pulsed power supplies and klystron modulators.

Cutler, Roy I [ORNL; Peplov, Vladimir V [ORNL; Wezensky, Mark W [ORNL; Norris, Kevin Paul [ORNL; Barnett, William E [ORNL; Hicks, Jim [ORNL; Weaver, Joey T [ORNL; Moss, John [ORNL; Rust, Kenneth R [ORNL; Mize, Jeffery J [ORNL; Anderson, David E [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Municipal waste water as a source of cooling water for California electric power plants  

SciTech Connect

The results of an investigation of sources of municipal waste water for potential use as cooling water in California power plants and the major factors which affect this practice are presented. Municipal treatment facilities in California with discharge volumes deemed adequate to supply new power plants are identified. Also included is a summary of the experiences of several utilities in California and other western states with existing or planned applications of municipal waste water in power plant cooling towers. Due to limited supplies of high-quality water, municipal waste water is increasingly viewed as an alternative source of supply for a variety of water uses, including electric power plant evaporative cooling. In California, enough municipal effluent is discharged to the ocean to conceivably supply the total projected cooling water needs of new power plants for the next 20 years or more. A number of existing applications of such waste water for power plant cooling, including several California cases, demonstrate the technical feasibility of its use for this purpose. However, a combination of economic, environmental, and geographic factors reduce the likelihood of widespread use of this alternative for meeting anticipated large increases in power plant water requirements in the state. The most important factors are: the long distances involved; the public health concerns; added costs and environmental effects; and unreliability of supply quality.

McDonald, T.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Evaluation of a Current Source Active Power Filter to Reduce the DC Bus Capacitor in a Hybrid Electric Vehicle Traction Drive  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Science Knoxville, TN, 37996, USA tolbert@utk.edu Abstract ­ In hybrid electric vehicles (HEV), a battery-source inverter, dc bus capacitor, Electric vehicle, Harmonic current, Hybrid electric vehicle. I. INTRODUCTION Electric Vehicle Traction Drive Shengnan Li Student Member, IEEE The University of Tennessee Department

Tolbert, Leon M.

149

Electric  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Average Retail Price of Electricity to ... Period Residential Commercial Industrial ... or usage falling within specified limits by rate ...

150

Table 4. Electric Power Industry Capability by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Dakota" Dakota" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",2708,2710,2744,2733,2965,2950,2954,2927,2923,2895,2812,2814,2854,2650,2618,2759,2889,2826,2911,3042,2994,100,82.6 " Coal",495,484,499,467,488,475,474,467,477,477,477,477,477,476,477,482,492,492,497,497,497,17,13.7 " Petroleum",298,296,293,293,291,291,297,276,276,278,297,296,238,237,228,221,229,223,227,226,225,10.6,6.2 " Natural Gas",93,110,132,153,366,363,363,363,363,333,360,360,459,385,385,553,649,645,722,722,676,12.8,18.7 " Hydroelectric",1821,1821,1821,1820,1820,1820,1820,1820,1806,1806,1678,1678,1678,1549,1526,1500,1516,1463,1463,1594,1594,59.7,44

151

Table 4. Electric Power Industry Capability by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Idaho" Idaho" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",2282,2282,2357,2304,2500,2559,2553,2576,2576,2571,2585,2659,2690,2439,2394,2558,2558,2547,2686,3029,3035,85.7,76.1 " Petroleum",56,56,56,6,6,6,6,6,6,6,6,5,5,5,5,5,5,5,5,5,5,0.2,0.1 " Natural Gas","-","-","-","-",136,136,136,136,136,136,136,212,212,212,212,376,376,376,536,543,543,4.5,13.6 " Hydroelectric",2227,2226,2302,2299,2358,2418,2412,2435,2435,2429,2444,2441,2472,2221,2176,2176,2176,2166,2144,2481,2486,81,62.3 "Independent Power Producers and Combined Heat and Power",314,353,379,404,409,415,434,434,433,433,432,577,574,563,592,602,652,649,692,729,955,14.3,23.9

152

Table 4. Electric Power Industry Capability by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alaska" Alaska" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",1542,1547,1672,1711,1737,1732,1734,1750,1721,1744,1794,1770,1740,1753,1722,1769,1736,1820,1847,1868,1889,85.1,91.4 " Coal",56,56,54,54,54,54,54,54,25,25,25,25,25,25,25,52,25,25,25,25,25,1.2,1.2 " Petroleum",494,498,500,539,570,572,569,575,585,593,610,527,522,529,517,526,527,581,601,604,618,28.9,29.9 " Natural Gas",756,756,766,767,762,754,759,759,752,752,762,819,796,803,785,785,785,814,818,818,825,36.2,39.9 " Hydroelectric",236,237,352,352,352,353,353,362,359,374,396,399,396,396,395,397,397,397,400,414,414,18.8,20.1

153

Table 4. Electric Power Industry Capability by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nebraska" Nebraska" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",5452,5450,5453,5512,5518,5529,5632,5760,5811,5829,5939,6010,6052,6667,6722,7007,7056,6959,7011,7675,7647,99.7,97.3 " Coal",3094,3087,3066,3103,3112,3112,3111,3152,3169,3181,3181,3181,3196,3196,3196,3196,3196,3196,3196,3863,3863,53.4,49.2 " Petroleum",370,311,334,342,342,331,544,547,518,528,636,708,638,637,638,639,641,330,382,387,387,10.7,4.9 " Natural Gas",565,630,631,645,643,666,559,644,712,723,723,721,811,1317,1374,1589,1630,1889,1874,1864,1849,12.1,23.5 " Nuclear",1254,1254,1254,1254,1254,1254,1250,1250,1245,1234,1234,1234,1234,1233,1232,1238,1238,1240,1252,1252,1245,20.7,15.8

154

Table 4. Electric Power Industry Capability by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Utah" Utah" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",4805,4785,4802,4812,4816,4927,4926,4945,5077,5102,5111,5129,5573,5574,5754,6053,6212,6710,6499,6581,6648,97.9,88.7 " Coal",4316,4271,4271,4271,4273,4374,4374,4318,4448,4463,4464,4464,4461,4461,4645,4645,4645,4645,4645,4645,4677,85.5,62.4 " Petroleum",26,28,26,25,25,25,23,33,33,44,44,50,45,46,38,35,35,25,25,25,23,0.8,0.3 " Natural Gas",228,228,228,228,227,231,231,296,296,296,303,332,782,782,796,1098,1257,1755,1542,1624,1660,5.8,22.1 " Hydroelectric",213,236,251,253,257,261,262,263,265,265,265,251,252,252,252,253,253,253,253,253,253,5.1,3.4

155

Table 4. Electric Power Industry Capability by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Dakota" Dakota" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",4525,4546,4476,4478,4488,4485,4207,4733,4656,4675,4678,4677,4659,4562,4673,4625,4636,4668,4691,4852,4912,99.2,79.4 " Coal",3876,3903,3856,3856,3867,3862,3585,4062,4068,4084,4107,4107,4084,4107,4105,4106,4106,4098,4098,4127,4131,87.1,66.8 " Petroleum",94,88,65,66,67,69,68,117,61,63,65,64,69,72,71,75,75,72,72,68,68,1.4,1.1 " Natural Gas",10,10,10,10,10,10,10,9,9,10,10,10,10,10,10,10,10,10,10,15,15,0.2,0.2 " Hydroelectric",545,545,545,545,545,545,545,545,518,518,497,497,497,371,485,432,443,486,486,508,508,10.5,8.2

156

Table 4. Electric Power Industry Capability by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nevada" Nevada" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",4944,5125,5119,5235,5478,5556,5643,5642,5642,5434,5434,5388,5384,5323,5389,5611,6771,6998,8741,8741,8713,80.9,76.3 " Coal",2692,2692,2692,2717,2717,2717,2807,2806,2806,2806,2806,2747,2658,2657,2657,2657,2657,2689,2689,2689,2655,41.8,23.2 " Petroleum",79,260,260,260,260,50,46,46,46,46,46,46,43,45,45,45,45,45,45,45,45,0.7,0.4 " Natural Gas",1142,1142,1136,1227,1455,1743,1743,1743,1743,1533,1533,1547,1636,1576,1642,1862,3023,3217,4964,4964,4970,22.8,43.5 " Hydroelectric",1031,1031,1031,1031,1046,1046,1046,1046,1046,1049,1049,1048,1048,1045,1045,1047,1047,1048,1043,1043,1043,15.6,9.1

157

Table 4. Electric Power Industry Capability by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Colorado" Colorado" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",6633,6610,6642,6648,6675,6647,6794,6850,6937,7254,7269,7479,7603,7883,7954,7955,8034,8008,8142,8454,9114,86.6,66.2 " Coal",4945,4945,4955,4950,4954,4954,4961,4955,4963,4981,4981,4981,4891,4891,4891,4888,4899,4921,4925,4970,5661,59.3,41.1 " Petroleum",221,221,222,222,222,221,177,177,174,180,181,178,193,193,207,181,179,179,181,176,176,2.2,1.3 " Natural Gas",393,387,387,379,369,359,542,541,624,917,917,1142,1333,1612,1662,1684,1752,1704,1832,2105,2078,10.9,15.1 " Hydroelectric",542,524,546,566,598,582,582,615,614,614,614,600,600,601,601,610,609,610,610,610,606,7.3,4.4

158

Table 4. Electric Power Industry Capability by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Arkansas" Arkansas" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",9641,9634,9639,9672,9674,9639,9639,9688,9618,9278,9330,9615,9551,9777,9772,10434,10669,11467,11459,11456,11488,96,71.9 " Coal",3817,3817,3817,3817,3817,3817,3817,3865,3817,3680,3680,3741,3757,3745,3745,3793,3846,3846,3861,3864,3865,37.9,24.2 " Petroleum",221,213,215,216,217,217,217,308,308,29,29,29,25,25,25,23,23,22,22,22,22,0.3,0.1 " Natural Gas",2620,2620,2620,2620,2620,2585,2585,2494,2494,2454,2504,2645,2578,2752,2750,3369,3561,4414,4390,4384,4411,25.8,27.6 " Nuclear",1694,1694,1694,1694,1694,1694,1694,1694,1694,1694,1695,1782,1776,1840,1837,1834,1824,1838,1839,1835,1835,17.4,11.5

159

Table 4. Electric Power Industry Capability by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mississippi" Mississippi" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",7016,7016,7032,7045,7114,7170,7177,7159,7156,6817,7057,7964,8888,9279,9015,8904,9407,9377,10093,10081,10858,78.3,69.2 " Coal",2244,2246,2227,2238,2228,2255,2255,2131,2136,2121,2208,2208,2225,2231,2220,2123,2108,2102,2115,2115,2086,24.5,13.3 " Petroleum",894,894,894,896,125,31,31,31,40,35,60,54,36,36,32,34,36,36,36,35,35,0.7,0.2 " Natural Gas",2736,2733,2768,2769,3619,3711,3712,3797,3776,3456,3579,4492,5396,5749,5493,5481,5997,5971,6683,6680,7486,39.7,47.7 " Nuclear",1142,1143,1143,1143,1143,1173,1179,1200,1204,1204,1210,1210,1231,1263,1270,1266,1266,1268,1259,1251,1251,13.4,8

160

Promoting electricity from renewable energy sources -- lessons learned from the EU, U.S. and Japan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The promotion of electricity generated from Renewable Energy Sources (RES) has recently gained high priority in the energy policy strategies of many countries in response to concerns about global climate change, energy security and other reasons. This chapter compares and contrasts the experience of a number of countries in Europe, states in the US as well as Japan in promoting RES, identifying what appear to be the most successful policy measures. Clearly, a wide range of policy instruments have been tried and are in place in different parts of the world to promote renewable energy technologies. The design and performance of these schemes varies from place to place, requiring further research to determine their effectiveness in delivering the desired results. The main conclusions that can be drawn from the present analysis are: (1) Generally speaking, promotional schemes that are properly designed within a stable framework and offer long-term investment continuity produce better results. Credibility and continuity reduce risks thus leading to lower profit requirements by investors. (2) Despite their significant growth in absolute terms in a number of key markets, the near-term prognosis for renewables is one of modest success if measured in terms of the percentage of the total energy provided by renewables on a world-wide basis. This is a significant challenge, suggesting that renewables have to grow at an even faster pace if we expect them to contribute on a significant scale to the world's energy mix.

Haas, Reinhard; Meyer, Niels I.; Held, Anne; Finon, Dominique; Lorenzoni, Arturo; Wiser, Ryan; Nishio, Ken-ichiro

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rounding sources electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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161

Density estimation for data with rounding errors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rounding of data is common in practice. The problem of estimating the underlying density function based on data with rounding errors is addressed. A parametric maximum likelihood estimator and a nonparametric bootstrap kernel density estimator are proposed. ... Keywords: Bootstrapping, Deconvolution density estimation, Fast Fourier transformation, Kernel density estimation, Measurement error

B. Wang, W. Wertelecki

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Electricity  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Electricity is an essential part of modern life. The Energy Department is working to create technology solutions that will reduce our energy use and save Americans money.

163

Wind energy as a significant source of electricity for the United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper discusses wind energy and its potential to significantly impact the generation of electricity within the US. The principles and the equipment used to convert wind energy to electricity are described, as is the status of current technology. Markets and production projections are given. There is discussion of the advances required to reduce the selling cost of electricity generated from the wind from today`s price of about $0.05 per kilowatt-hour to full cost-competitiveness with gas- and coal-based electricity.

Nix, R.G.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Promoting electricity from renewable energy sources -- lessons learned from the EU, U.S. and Japan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

certification procedure for wind turbines as early as 1978electricity from onshore wind turbines between 2003 and 2005from abroad, may own wind turbines in Denmark. At the end of

Haas, Reinhard

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Promoting electricity from renewable energy sources -- lessons learned from the EU, U.S. and Japan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

biomass fraction of MSW, conventional geothermal). Maximum priceprice. Electricity generation [GWh/year] Wind onshore Hydro small-scale Solid biomassbiomass st Federal: The Royal Decree of 10 July 2002 (operational from 1 of July 2003) sets minimum prices (

Haas, Reinhard

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Promoting electricity from renewable energy sources -- lessons learned from the EU, U.S. and Japan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

encouraging 3,000 MW of new solar PV systems through a long-Wind on- & offshore, PV, Solar thermal electricity, Biomass,38.3 €/MWh (premium); Solar thermal & PV 28 : 229.8-440.4 €/

Haas, Reinhard

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Magnetic field characterization of electrical appliances as point sources through in situ measurements  

SciTech Connect

It is shown that magnetic field exposure from a point source can be studied by characterizing the source with a magnetic dipole. A technique based on in situ measurements of amplitude and phase angle of three orthogonal components of the magnetic field at three points at different distances from the source was developed. The method to determine the center and the real and imaginary components of the dipole moment along the three aces is described. The characterization of the source allows the prediction of the field at any distance and along any direction from the source. The effects of background fields and of the source dimensions and complexity on the accuracy of the results are discussed.

Zaffanella, L.E.; Sullivan, T.P. [Enertech Consultants, Lee, MA (United States); Visintainer, I. [CESI, Milan (Italy)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Reliability in future electricity mixes: the question of distributed and renewables sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

systems, with the development of distributed energy sources and the emergence of the smartgrid, thus encouraging the development of microgrids and smartgrids. With the development of distributed

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

169

The Wheels on the Bus Go Round and Round... | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Wheels on the Bus Go Round and Round... The Wheels on the Bus Go Round and Round... The Wheels on the Bus Go Round and Round... March 9, 2010 - 5:30am Addthis Shannon Brescher Shea Communications Manager, Clean Cities Program I have a love/hate relationship with buses. I love that they save me gasoline, are more efficient than driving a car, and reduce my greenhouse gas emissions. However, I hate them when they're running late! But there is one category of buses that I'm particularly fond of - those that run on alternative fuels. In fact, alternative fuel and advanced technology transit buses offer a number of health, environmental, and social benefits. As anyone who has walked behind a traditional diesel bus knows, the plume of black smoke from its tailpipe is both unpleasant and unhealthy. That

170

The Wheels on the Bus Go Round and Round... | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Wheels on the Bus Go Round and Round... The Wheels on the Bus Go Round and Round... The Wheels on the Bus Go Round and Round... March 9, 2010 - 5:30am Addthis Shannon Brescher Shea Communications Manager, Clean Cities Program I have a love/hate relationship with buses. I love that they save me gasoline, are more efficient than driving a car, and reduce my greenhouse gas emissions. However, I hate them when they're running late! But there is one category of buses that I'm particularly fond of - those that run on alternative fuels. In fact, alternative fuel and advanced technology transit buses offer a number of health, environmental, and social benefits. As anyone who has walked behind a traditional diesel bus knows, the plume of black smoke from its tailpipe is both unpleasant and unhealthy. That

171

Discussion Paper for DOE SEAB/SMR Subcommittee V.H. Reis Small Modular Reactors and U.S. Clean Energy Sources for Electricity  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Discussion Paper for DOE SEAB/SMR Subcommittee Discussion Paper for DOE SEAB/SMR Subcommittee V.H. Reis Small Modular Reactors and U.S. Clean Energy Sources for Electricity In his 2011 State of the Union speech President Obama stated: "By 2035, 80 percent of America's electricity will come from clean energy sources." As yet, there is no official definition of a clean energy source, but a sensible definition is to suggest a "clean energy standard" where sources are weighted with respect to how much CO 2 they emit per unit of electrical energy produced. That is: Where F CE = Fraction of electricity for clean energy sources (multiply by 100 to get percent)

172

Sources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SOURCES Microsoft Corporation. "Gasohol," Microsoft Encarta Online Encyclopedia 2001, http:encarta.msn.com. U.S. Department of Transportation, Federal Highway Administration, A...

173

ELECTRIC  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

ELECTRIC cdrtrokArJclaeT 3 I+ &i, y I &OF I*- j< t j,fci..- ir )(yiT E-li, ( -,v? Cl -p4.4 RESEARCH LABORATORIES EAST PITTSBURGH, PA. 8ay 22, 1947 Mr. J. Carrel Vrilson...

174

A Combinatorial Optimization Approach for the Electrical Energy Management in a Multi-Source System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by an unidirectional converter, a pack of supercapacitors connected in series and in paral- lel to store energy which is also connected to the bus via a bidirectional converter. The supercapacitor pro- vides energy when of the electric motor and changes in voltage of the FCS and the supercapacitor. Its effi- ciency is often very

175

Optimization of the utilization of renewable energy sources in the electricity sector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Emission reduction targets as well as the scarcity of fossil resources make a transition of the energy system towards a carbon free electricity supply necessary. Promising energy resources are solar and wind energy. The challenging characteristics of ... Keywords: energy system model, geographic information system (GIS), linear optimization, power supply, renewable energy, simulation, supergrid

Tino Aboumahboub; Katrin Schaber; Peter Tzscheutschler; Thomas Hamacher

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Table 5.3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Demand Residual and Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coke and Breeze) NAICS for Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) (billion NGL(e) (million Code(a) End Use (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 977,338 40 22 5,357 21 46 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 24,584 21 4 2,059 2 25 Conventional Boiler Use 24,584 11 3

177

Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal NAICS Net Demand Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal Code(a) End Use for Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coke and Breeze) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 3,335 251 129 5,512 79 1,016 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 84 133 23 2,119 8 547 Conventional Boiler Use 84 71 17 1,281 8 129 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process 0 62 6 838 1 417 Direct Uses-Total Process 2,639 62 52 2,788 39 412 Process Heating 379 59 19 2,487 32 345 Process Cooling and Refrigeration

178

Annotated compilation of the sources of information related to the usage of electricity in non-industrial applications. [Includes about 400 abstracts and glossary  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a thorough compilation of the sources of information related to the usage of electricity in non-industrial applications, as available in the open literature and from the U.S. electrical power industry. The report's scope encompasses all aspects of: electric load management; end use; and the various methods of acquisition, analysis and implementation of electricity usage data. There are over 400 abstracts; 156 from the Load Research Committee of Association of Edison Illuminating Companies (LRC/AEIC) reports and 264 from the open literature. The abstracts over references containing over 12,000 pages plus about 2,500 references and 6,200 graphs and tables pertinent to electricity usage in non-industrial applications. In addition to the LRC/AEIC abstracts, this document identifies over 100 sources of directly relevant information (in contrast to general interest sources and material of secondary relevance).

1978-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

An annotated compilation of the sources of information related to the usage of electricity in non-industrial applications. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The report is a thorough compilation of the sources of information related to the usage of electricity in non-industrial applications, as available in the open literature and from the U.S. electrical power industry. The report's scope encompasses all aspects of: electric load management; end-use; and the various methods of acquisition, analysis, and implementation of electricity usage data. There are over 400 abstracts; 156 from LRC/AEIC reports, and 264 from the open literature. The abstracts cover references containing over 12,000 pages plus about 2,500 references and 6,200 graphs and tables pertinent to electricity usage in non-industrial applications. In addition to the LRC/AEIC abstracts, this document identifies over 100 sources of directly relevant information (in contrast to general interest sources and material of secondary relevance).

Reznek, B.

1978-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

ELECTRIC  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

ELECTRIC ELECTRIC cdrtrokArJclaeT 3 I+ &i, y$ \I &OF I*- j< t j,fci..- ir )(yiT !E-li, ( \-,v? Cl -p/4.4 RESEARCH LABORATORIES EAST PITTSBURGH, PA. 8ay 22, 1947 Mr. J. Carrel Vrilson General ?!!mager Atomic Qxzgy Commission 1901 Constitution Avenue Kashington, D. C. Dear Sir: In the course of OUT nuclenr research we are planning to study the enc:ri;y threshold anti cross section for fission. For thib program we require a s<>piAroted sample of metallic Uranium 258 of high purity. A quantity of at lezst 5 grams would probably be sufficient for our purpose, and this was included in our 3@icntion for license to the Atonic Energy Coskqission.. This license has been approved, 2nd rre would Llp!Jreciate informztion as to how to ?r*oceed to obtain thit: m2teria.l.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rounding sources electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Abstract-Coal and hydro will be the main sources of electric energy in Chile for the near future, given that natural gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract- Coal and hydro will be the main sources of electric energy in Chile for the near future and the environmental dilemma faced by the country, where both coal and hydro produce some kind of impact. The role

Rudnick, Hugh

182

First round of NISE awards posted  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

First First round of NISE awards posted First round of NISE awards posted April 13, 2011 by Francesca Verdier The first round of NERSC Initiative for Scientific Exploration (NISE) awards have been posted. 36 projects were awarded 34.77 million hours. See: 2011 NISE Awards. User Announcements Email announcement archive Subscribe via RSS Subscribe Browse by Date January 2014 December 2013 November 2013 October 2013 September 2013 August 2013 July 2013 June 2013 May 2013 April 2013 March 2013 February 2013 January 2013 December 2012 November 2012 October 2012 August 2012 June 2012 May 2012 April 2012 March 2012 February 2012 January 2012 December 2011 November 2011 October 2011 September 2011 August 2011 July 2011 June 2011 May 2011 April 2011 March 2011 February 2011 January 2011 September 2010 Last edited: 2013-11-18 13:33:52

183

Property-close source separation of hazardous waste and waste electrical and electronic equipment - A Swedish case study  

SciTech Connect

Through an agreement with EEE producers, Swedish municipalities are responsible for collection of hazardous waste and waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE). In most Swedish municipalities, collection of these waste fractions is concentrated to waste recycling centres where households can source-separate and deposit hazardous waste and WEEE free of charge. However, the centres are often located on the outskirts of city centres and cars are needed in order to use the facilities in most cases. A full-scale experiment was performed in a residential area in southern Sweden to evaluate effects of a system for property-close source separation of hazardous waste and WEEE. After the system was introduced, results show a clear reduction in the amount of hazardous waste and WEEE disposed of incorrectly amongst residual waste or dry recyclables. The systems resulted in a source separation ratio of 70 wt% for hazardous waste and 76 wt% in the case of WEEE. Results show that households in the study area were willing to increase source separation of hazardous waste and WEEE when accessibility was improved and that this and similar collection systems can play an important role in building up increasingly sustainable solid waste management systems.

Bernstad, Anna, E-mail: anna.bernstad@chemeng.lth.se [Dep. of Chem. Eng., Faculty of Eng., Lund University, Lund (Sweden); Cour Jansen, Jes la [Dep. of Chem. Eng., Faculty of Eng., Lund University, Lund (Sweden); Aspegren, Henrik [VA SYD, City of Malmoe (Sweden)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

184

Municipal waste water as a source of cooling water for California electric power plants. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses sources of municipal waste water for potential use as cooling water in California power plants. It notes the major factors which affect this practice. Municipal treatment facilities in California with discharge volumes deemed adequate to supply new power plants are identified. Also included is a summary of the experiences of several utilities in California and other western states with existing or planned applications of municipal waste water in power plant cooling towers.

MacDonald, T.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

DOE's Round Robin Test Program FAQ Sheet  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Frequently Asked Questions for: Frequently Asked Questions for: DOE's Round Robin Test Program May 2011 i Table of Contents Introduction ........................................................................................................................................ 1 What products will be tested? .......................................................................................................... 1 What is the testing process? .............................................................................................................. 1 What labs can participate in testing? ............................................................................................... 2 Who pays for the testing? ................................................................................................................. 2

186

Solar-assisted electric clothes dryer using a home attic as a heat source  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study was undertaken to determine the suitability of using a southeastern home attic as a means of reducing the energy consumption of an electric clothes dryer. An inexpensive duct (duplicable for $25) was constructed to collect hot attic air from the peak of a south facing roof and introduce it into the dryer inlet. Instrumentation was added to measure inlet temperatures and operating time/energy consumption of the dryer. Standardized test loads, in addition to normal laundry, were observed over the period of one year. The heat-on time of the dryer tested was shown to be reduced .16 to .35 minutes per /sup 0/C rise in inlet temperature. Inlet temperatures produced by the attic duct peaked at 56/sup 0/C(133/sup 9/F) in May/June and 40/sup 0/C(104/sup 0/F) in February. Based on peak temperatures available between 2 and 4 pm each month, a potential 20% yearly average savings could be realized. Economic viability of the system, dependant primarily on dryer usage, can be computed using a formula derived from the test results and included in the report.

Stana, J.M.

187

EERE Roofus' Solar and Efficient Home: Electric Meter  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electric Meter Illustration of a round electric meter with small dials and a digital screen reading 15232.2. If you live in a house, somewhere on it should be an electric meter. It...

188

Round-Up from the Gridwise Global Forum | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Round-Up from the Gridwise Global Forum Round-Up from the Gridwise Global Forum Round-Up from the Gridwise Global Forum September 23, 2010 - 6:13pm Addthis John Schueler John Schueler Former New Media Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What does this mean for me? Secretary Chu announced an investment of more than $30 million for ten projects that will address cybersecurity issues facing the nation's electric grid. These investments will "allow us to better protect the nation's energy delivery systems that keep our lights on and the power flowing," said Secretary Chu. Over the past three days leaders from across industry and government have gathered in Washington, D.C. to discuss how they can work together to develop a smart grid from coast to coast. The forum has given rise to several important developments. During his remarks this morning, Secretary

189

DOE's Round Robin Test Program FAQ Sheet | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE's Round Robin Test Program FAQ Sheet DOE's Round Robin Test Program FAQ Sheet This document is the May 2011 version of the Frequently Asked Questions about the US Department of...

190

Table E3. Electricity Consumption (Btu) by End Use for Non ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Notes: Due to rounding, data may not sum to totals. HVAC = Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning. Source: Energy Information Administration, ...

191

Cryptanalysis of the Reduced-Round RC6  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we propose the efficient and feasible key recovery algorithm against the reduced-round RC6 without whitening, called RC6W. Our attack applies to a rather large number of rounds. RC6W with r rounds can be broken in a success probability ...

Atsuko Miyaji; Masao Nonaka

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Conventional and fuzzy PI control of voltage-source inverter-fed induction motor drive for electric vehicle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Keywords: adaptive control, control algorithm, electric vehicle, fuzzy control, inverter drive system

Tadeusz Stefanski

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

On the energy sources of Mozambican households and the demand-supply curves for domestic electricity in the northern electrical grid in Mozambique.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The development of electrical infrastructure to supply rural households is considered economically unfeasible because of the high cost of capital investment required to expand the… (more)

Arthur, Maria de Fatima Serra Ribeiro

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Deposition of Dense SiO2 Thin Films for Electrical Insulation Applications by Microwave ECR Plasma Source Enhanced RF Reactive Magnetron Sputtering  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Silicon dioxide thin films have been deposited successfully on high speed steel (HSS) cutting tool substrates by means of microwave electron cyclotron resonance (MW-ECR) plasma source enhanced RF reactive magnetron sputtering of a pure silica target ... Keywords: SiO2 thin films, Electrical insulation properties, RF magnetron sputtering, Atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS)

Qiyong Zeng; Xiaofeng Zheng; Zhonghua Yu; Yunxian Cui

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

First Round of American Energy Data Challenge Winners Announced |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

First Round of American Energy Data Challenge Winners Announced First Round of American Energy Data Challenge Winners Announced First Round of American Energy Data Challenge Winners Announced December 19, 2013 - 12:20pm Addthis EIA Administrator Adam Sieminski announces the winners of the first round of the American Energy Data Challenge. Adam Sieminski Administrator of the U.S. Energy Information Administration How can I participate? Learn more about the first round of American Energy Data Challenge winners by following the links to the right. Visit energychallenge.energy.gov to learn how you can participate in the next phase of the Challenge. The American Energy Data Challenge is a year-long effort to amplify open data and citizen data using public innovation, but we're already able to announce our first round of winners.

196

The future role of renewable energy sources in European electricity supply : A model-based analysis for the EU-15.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Ambitious targets for the use of renewable electricity (RES-E) have been formulated by the EU Commission and the EU Member States. Taking into account technical,… (more)

Rosen, Johannes

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Federal-Tribal Partnership on Climate Change Action Rounds Corner...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Federal-Tribal Partnership on Climate Change Action Rounds Corner, Shifts Into High Gear at 2013 Tribal Nations Conference Federal-Tribal Partnership on Climate Change Action...

198

Third-Round Report of the SHA-3 Cryptographic Hash ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. NISTIR 7896 Third-Round Report of the SHA-3 Cryptographic Hash Algorithm Competition Shu-jen Chang Ray ...

2012-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

199

Initial Results of IEC 62804 Draft Round Robin Testing (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This presentation discusses the Initial round robin results of the IEC 62804 system voltage durability qualification test for crystalline silicon modules.

Hacke, P.; Terwilliger, K.; Koch, S.; Weber, T.; Berghold, J.; Hoffmann, S.; Ambrosi, H.; Koehl, M.; Dietrich, S.; Ebert, M.; Mathiak, G.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Winners announced after tense final round competition at Pantex...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Winners announced after tense final round competition at Pantex Science Bowl | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rounding sources electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

State Energy Program Assurances - South Dakota Governor Rounds...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Administration Other Agencies You are here Home State Energy Program Assurances - South Dakota Governor Rounds State Energy Program Assurances - South Dakota Governor...

203

EIA Energy Kids - Electricity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The energy sources we use to make electricity can be renewable or non-renewable, but electricity itself is neither renewable nor non-renewable.

204

FPGA Implementations of the Round Two SHA-3 Candidates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The second round of the NIST-run public competition is underway to find a new hash algorithm(s) for inclusion in the NIST Secure Hash Standard (SHA-3). This paper presents the full implementations of all of the second round candidates in hardware with ... Keywords: SHA-3, HASH, FPGA

Brian Baldwin; Andrew Byrne; Liang Lu; Mark Hamilton; Neil Hanley; Maire O'Neill; William P. Marnane

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

China Energy Efficiency Round Robin Testing Results for Room  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBNL-3502E China Energy Efficiency Round Robin Testing Results for Room Air Conditioners Nan Zhou Round Robin Testing Results and Analysis by China National Institute of Standardization..................................................................................................................... 1 I.1.1 China's Energy Constraint Problem and the Need to Improve the Energy Efficiency of Energy

206

Round Robin Study of Rotational Strain Rheometers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A round robin of testing was performed to compare the performance of rotational dynamic mechanical spectrometers being used within the nuclear weapons complex. Principals from Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico; Lockheed Martin Y12 Plant at Oak Ridge, Tennessee; Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico (polycarbonate only); and Honeywell Federal Manufacturing and Technologies (FM and T), Kansas City, MO, performed identical testing of hydrogen blown polysiloxane S5370 and bisphenol-A polycarbonate. Over an oscillation frequency sweep from 0.01 Hz to 15.9 Hz at 135 C, each site produced shear storage modulus values with standard deviations of less than 5%. The data from Sandia, Y12, and Kansas City agreed to within 4%, while the Los Alamos data differed by as much as 13%. Storage modulus values for a frequency sweep of the S5370 at 35 C had standard deviations between 6% and 8%, and site-to-site agreement averaged 3%. The shear loss modulus values had standard deviations of 5%, 7%, and 52% for the sites participating, while the results differed by 12% on average.

Clifford, M.J.

2000-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

207

Middle School Electric Car Competition | U.S. DOE Office of Science...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electric Car Competition National Science Bowl (NSB) NSB Home About High School Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results Middle School Round...

208

Electric vehicles  

SciTech Connect

Quiet, clean, and efficient, electric vehicles (EVs) may someday become a practical mode of transportation for the general public. Electric vehicles can provide many advantages for the nation's environment and energy supply because they run on electricity, which can be produced from many sources of energy such as coal, natural gas, uranium, and hydropower. These vehicles offer fuel versatility to the transportation sector, which depends almost solely on oil for its energy needs. Electric vehicles are any mode of transportation operated by a motor that receives electricity from a battery or fuel cell. EVs come in all shapes and sizes and may be used for different tasks. Some EVs are small and simple, such as golf carts and electric wheel chairs. Others are larger and more complex, such as automobile and vans. Some EVs, such as fork lifts, are used in industries. In this fact sheet, we will discuss mostly automobiles and vans. There are also variations on electric vehicles, such as hybrid vehicles and solar-powered vehicles. Hybrid vehicles use electricity as their primary source of energy, however, they also use a backup source of energy, such as gasoline, methanol or ethanol. Solar-powered vehicles are electric vehicles that use photovoltaic cells (cells that convert solar energy to electricity) rather than utility-supplied electricity to recharge the batteries. This paper discusses these concepts.

Not Available

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

notice, is given to the source. On the Efficiency of Competitive Electricity Markets With Time-Invariant Retail Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The standard economic model of efficient competitive markets relies on the ability of sellers to charge prices that vary as their costs change. Yet, there is no restructured electricity market in which most retail customers can be charged realtime prices (RTP), prices that can change as frequently as wholesale costs. We analyze the impact of having some share of customers on time-invariant pricing in competitive electricity markets. Not only does time-invariant pricing in competitive markets lead to outcomes (prices and investment) that are not first-best, it even fails to achieve the second-best optimum given the constraint of time-invariant pricing. We then show that attempts to correct the level of investment through taxes or subsidies on electricity or capacity are unlikely to succeed, because these interventions create new inefficiencies. In contrast, increasing the share of customers

Severin Borenstein; Stephen P. Holland; We Thank Jim Bushnell; Joe Farrell; Morten Hviid; Erin Mansur; Michael Riordan; Lawrence White; Severin Borenstein; Stephen P. Holl

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Assessment of Electrical, Efficiency, and Photometric Performance of Advanced Lighting Sources: Dimmable Advanced Lighting Technolog ies -- Electronic Linear Fluorescent Ballasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This EPRI Technical Update is one of four in a series that addresses the basic dimming performance of advanced lighting sources8212linear electronic fluorescent ballasts. Chapter 1 provides a discussion of basic lighting control, the importance of considering power quality in lighting control, lighting control methods and parameters, and the advantages and future of lighting control. Chapter 2 addresses in more depth dimming methods used in advanced lighting sources and controls for incandescent, fluores...

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

211

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

determine marginal generation sources. Although electricity16. Validation of generation by energy source in EDGE-CA (Validation of generation by energy source in EDGE-CA (TWh).

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Bayesian Assessment of Rounding-Based Disclosure Control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we consider how the security of a disclosure control mechanism based on randomised, but uncontrolled, rounding can be assessed by Bayesian methods. We develop a methodology, based on Markov chain Monte Carlo, for estimating the conditional ...

Jon J. Forster; Roger C. Gill

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Black Friday Savings All Year 'Round | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Black Friday Savings All Year 'Round Black Friday Savings All Year 'Round Black Friday Savings All Year 'Round November 21, 2011 - 3:58pm Addthis Chris Stewart Senior Communicator at DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory On Friday, shoppers across the country will flock to stores and retailers seeking the best bargains of the holiday season. Many will scour newspapers and online coupon sites seeking the deepest discounts and greatest deals. In case you'll be among these millions of consumers, don't forget buying energy efficient products will bring you savings all year 'round. When it comes to shopping for and comparing energy-efficient appliances and home electronics, look for the ENERGY STAR® and EnergyGuide labels. ENERGY STAR labels appear on appliances and home electronics that meet strict

214

DOE Issues Amended Funding Opportunity Announcement for Third Round of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Issues Amended Funding Opportunity Announcement for Third Round Issues Amended Funding Opportunity Announcement for Third Round of Clean Coal Power Initiative DOE Issues Amended Funding Opportunity Announcement for Third Round of Clean Coal Power Initiative June 15, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy has issued an amendment to the Funding Opportunity Announcement for Round 3 of the Clean Coal Power Initiative. The amendment, which was issued on June 9, 2009, incorporates special provisions of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. DOE anticipates making multiple awards under this FOA and may be able to provide up to $1.4 billion to be distributed among projects selected under both the previous closing date of January 20, 2009 and the new closing date of August 24, 2009. Of the total amount, approximately $800 million in DOE

215

Winners announced after tense final round competition at Pantex Science  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Winners announced after tense final round competition at Pantex Science Winners announced after tense final round competition at Pantex Science Bowl | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > Winners announced after tense final round competition ... Winners announced after tense final round competition at Pantex Science Bowl Posted By Office of Public Affairs

216

DOE Issues Amended Funding Opportunity Announcement for Third Round of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Issues Amended Funding Opportunity Announcement for Third Round DOE Issues Amended Funding Opportunity Announcement for Third Round of Clean Coal Power Initiative DOE Issues Amended Funding Opportunity Announcement for Third Round of Clean Coal Power Initiative June 15, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy has issued an amendment to the Funding Opportunity Announcement for Round 3 of the Clean Coal Power Initiative. The amendment, which was issued on June 9, 2009, incorporates special provisions of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. DOE anticipates making multiple awards under this FOA and may be able to provide up to $1.4 billion to be distributed among projects selected under both the previous closing date of January 20, 2009 and the new closing date of August 24, 2009. Of the total amount, approximately $800 million in DOE

217

Distributed Generation Dispatch Optimization under Various Electricity Tariffs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

California retail industrial electricity price, as reportedindustrial customers, 2005 source: CAISO (2006) 2005 TOU electricity prices

Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

In-Depth Look at Ground Source Heat Pumps and Other Electric Loads in Two GreenMax Homes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

CARB partnered with WPPI Energy to answer key research questions on in-field performance of ground-source heat pumps and LAMELs through extensive field monitoring at two WPPI GreenMax demonstration homes in Wisconsin. These two test home evaluations provided valuable data on the true in-field performance of various building mechanical systems and lighting, appliances, and miscellaneous loads (LAMELs).

Puttagunta, S.; Shapiro, C.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Application of Spatial Data Modeling and Geographical Information Systems (GIS) for Identification of Potential Siting Options for Various Electrical Generation Sources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) initiated an internal National Electric Generation Siting Study, which is an ongoing multiphase study addressing several key questions related to our national electrical energy supply. This effort has led to the development of a tool, OR-SAGE (Oak Ridge Siting Analysis for power Generation Expansion), to support siting evaluations. The objective in developing OR-SAGE was to use industry-accepted approaches and/or develop appropriate criteria for screening sites and employ an array of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) data sources at ORNL to identify candidate areas for a power generation technology application. The initial phase of the study examined nuclear power generation. These early nuclear phase results were shared with staff from the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), which formed the genesis and support for an expansion of the work to several other power generation forms, including advanced coal with carbon capture and storage (CCS), solar, and compressed air energy storage (CAES). Wind generation was not included in this scope of work for EPRI. The OR-SAGE tool is essentially a dynamic visualization database. The results shown in this report represent a single static set of results using a specific set of input parameters. In this case, the GIS input parameters were optimized to support an economic study conducted by EPRI. A single set of individual results should not be construed as an ultimate energy solution, since US energy policy is very complex. However, the strength of the OR-SAGE tool is that numerous alternative scenarios can be quickly generated to provide additional insight into electrical generation or other GIS-based applications. The screening process divides the contiguous United States into 100 x 100 m (1-hectare) squares (cells), applying successive power generation-appropriate site selection and evaluation criteria (SSEC) to each cell. There are just under 700 million cells representing the contiguous United States. If a cell meets the requirements of each criterion, the cell is deemed a candidate area for siting a specific power generation form relative to a reference plant for that power type. Some SSEC parameters preclude siting a power plant because of an environmental, regulatory, or land-use constraint. Other SSEC assist in identifying less favorable areas, such as proximity to hazardous operations. All of the selected SSEC tend to recommend against sites. The focus of the ORNL electrical generation source siting study is on identifying candidate areas from which potential sites might be selected, stopping short of performing any detailed site evaluations or comparisons. This approach is designed to quickly screen for and characterize candidate areas. Critical assumptions supporting this work include the supply of cooling water to thermoelectric power generation; a methodology to provide an adequate siting footprint for typical power plant applications; a methodology to estimate thermoelectric plant capacity while accounting for available cooling water; and a methodology to account for future ({approx}2035) siting limitations as population increases and demands on freshwater sources change. OR-SAGE algorithms were built to account for these critical assumptions. Stream flow is the primary thermoelectric plant cooling source evaluated in this study. All cooling was assumed to be provided by a closed-cycle cooling (CCC) system requiring makeup water to account for evaporation and blowdown. Limited evaluations of shoreline cooling and the use of municipal processed water (gray) cooling were performed. Using a representative set of SSEC as input to the OR-SAGE tool and employing the accompanying critical assumptions, independent results for the various power generation sources studied were calculated.

Mays, Gary T [ORNL; Belles, Randy [ORNL; Blevins, Brandon R [ORNL; Hadley, Stanton W [ORNL; Harrison, Thomas J [ORNL; Jochem, Warren C [ORNL; Neish, Bradley S [ORNL; Omitaomu, Olufemi A [ORNL; Rose, Amy N [ORNL

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Final Report on Round-Robin Conducted in Support of Standard Test Method for Creep-Fatigue Testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the increased flexible operation of power plants, many components may now be subject to creep-fatigue damage mechanisms. This report covers the findings from a round-robin test program facilitated by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) with broad international participation. The overall goal was to support the development of a new industry standard for addressing creep-fatigue crack initiation.BackgroundCreep-fatigue is a complex material ...

2013-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rounding sources electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

DC source assemblies  

SciTech Connect

Embodiments of DC source assemblies of power inverter systems of the type suitable for deployment in a vehicle having an electrically grounded chassis are provided. An embodiment of a DC source assembly comprises a housing, a DC source disposed within the housing, a first terminal, and a second terminal. The DC source also comprises a first capacitor having a first electrode electrically coupled to the housing, and a second electrode electrically coupled to the first terminal. The DC source assembly further comprises a second capacitor having a first electrode electrically coupled to the housing, and a second electrode electrically coupled to the second terminal.

Campbell, Jeremy B; Newson, Steve

2013-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

222

Prospects of Oxy-Coal Steam-Electric Power Plants Achieving "Minor Source" Status for Air Emissions Permitting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oxy-coal power plants have been proposed for capturing carbon dioxide (CO2) from coal combustion in a relatively concentrated form for storage in geological formations. The particular processes employed for oxy-combustion have the positive side effect of reducing emissions to very low levels. This report assesses the extent to which oxy-coal power plants might meet “near-zero” emissions proposed by several organizations and qualify as a “minor source” for the purposes of air emissions permitting. The rep...

2009-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

223

Round Robin Testing of Commercial Hydrogen Sensor Performance--Observations and Results: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presented observations and results from round robin testing of commercial hydrogen sensor performance.

Buttner, W.; Burgess, R.; Rivkin, C.; Post, M.; Boon-Bret, L.; Black, G.; Harskamp, F.; Moretto, P.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Basic Electrical Safety - Sandia National Laboratories  

What is Electricity? Electricity is a source of energy to power devices (e.g., lights, ... current (VAC) There is a switch controlling the source, a l ...

225

Diagnostics of underwater electrical wire explosion through a time- and space-resolved hard x-ray source  

SciTech Connect

A time- and space-resolved hard x-ray source was developed as a diagnostic tool for imaging underwater exploding wires. A {approx}4 ns width pulse of hard x-rays with energies of up to 100 keV was obtained from the discharge in a vacuum diode consisting of point-shaped tungsten electrodes. To improve contrast and image quality, an external pulsed magnetic field produced by Helmholtz coils was used. High resolution x-ray images of an underwater exploding wire were obtained using a sensitive x-ray CCD detector, and were compared to optical fast framing images. Future developments and application of this diagnostic technique are discussed.

Sheftman, D.; Shafer, D.; Efimov, S.; Gruzinsky, K.; Gleizer, S.; Krasik, Ya. E. [Physics Department, Technion, Haifa 32000 (Israel)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

226

Electric Power Monthly - Monthly Data Tables Monthly electricity...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electric Power Monthly - Monthly Data Tables Monthly electricity generation figures (and the fuel consumed to produce it). Source information available at

227

Electrical engineering Electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

generation Transmission Distribution · Electrical generators · Electric motors · High voltage engineering associated with the systems Electrical engineering · Electric power generation Transmission Distribution The electricity transported to load locations from a power station transmission subsystem The transmission system

Ã?nay, Devrim

228

New findings on leak resistance of API 8-Round connectors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In response to high interest concerning leak resistance in API 8-Round connectors, the API funded projects that have identified and assessed parameters affecting leak. Among these parameters are make-up, diameter, grade, and combined loads. Additional turns during make-up was found to increase leak resistance. Investigations concerning diameter and grade identified larger diameter and higher grade connectors as most susceptible to low leak pressures when compared to pipe body ratings. Finally, combined loads were found to be crucial to leak. Tension lowers the leak resistance of 8-Round connectors in a manner that renders hydrotesting insufficient for defining leak in some service conditions.

Schwind, B.E.; Wooley, G.R.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Assessing the reliability of an automated dose-rounding algorithm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Objective: Pediatric dose rounding is a unique and complex process whose complexity is rarely supported by e-prescribing systems, though amenable to automation and deployment from a central service provider. The goal of this project was to validate an ... Keywords: Biomedical informatics, Clinical practice, Computer software, Electronic prescribing, Medical informatics, Prescriptions

Kevin B. Johnson, Yun-Xian Ho, S. Andrew Spooner, Marvin Palmer, Stuart T. Weinberg

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Roundness and Aspect Ratio of Particles in Ice Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The frequency of occurrence of the aspect ratio and roundness of particles in ice clouds from aircraft observations have been examined. Images of cloud particles were measured by a cloud particle imager (CPI) at 2.3-?m resolution, installed on ...

Alexei Korolev; George Isaac

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

NETL: Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) - Round...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 Advanced Electric Power Generation - Fluidized Bed Combustion McIntosh Unit 4A PCFB Demonstration Project - Project Brief PDF-186KB Lakeland Department of Electric & Water,...

232

NETL: Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) - Round...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 Advanced Electric Power Generation - Integrated GasificationCombined Cycle Tampa Electric Integrated Gasification Combined-Cycle Project - Project Brief PDF-241KB Tampa...

233

Standardization of Solar Mirror Reflectance Measurements - Round Robin Test: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Within the SolarPaces Task III standardization activities, DLR, CIEMAT, and NREL have concentrated on optimizing the procedure to measure the reflectance of solar mirrors. From this work, the laboratories have developed a clear definition of the method and requirements needed of commercial instruments for reliable reflectance results. A round robin test was performed between the three laboratories with samples that represent all of the commercial solar mirrors currently available for concentrating solar power (CSP) applications. The results show surprisingly large differences in hemispherical reflectance (sh) of 0.007 and specular reflectance (ss) of 0.004 between the laboratories. These differences indicate the importance of minimum instrument requirements and standardized procedures. Based on these results, the optimal procedure will be formulated and validated with a new round robin test in which a better accuracy is expected. Improved instruments and reference standards are needed to reach the necessary accuracy for cost and efficiency calculations.

Meyen, S.; Lupfert, E.; Fernandez-Garcia, A.; Kennedy, C.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Round Rock, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Round Rock, Texas: Energy Resources Round Rock, Texas: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 30.5082551°, -97.678896° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":30.5082551,"lon":-97.678896,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

235

Greece licensing round to focus on western sedimentary basins  

SciTech Connect

New opportunities for international oil companies to explore for hydrocarbons in Greece will emerge shortly. Parliament ratified a new petroleum law in January 1995, and DEP-EKY SA will undertake an international licensing round for offshore-onshore areas mainly in western Greece during second half 1995. The paper describes the fold and thrust belt of western Greece; the Katakolon oil field; the tertiary basins of eastern Greece; the Prinos and Prinos North oil fields; and the Epanomi gas field.

Roussos, N.; Marnelis, F. (Public Petroleum Corp. of Greece, Athens (Greece))

1995-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

236

Manipulating Tournaments in Cup and Round Robin Competitions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In sports competitions, teams can manipulate the result by, for instance, throwing games. We show that we can decide how to manipulate round robin and cup competitions, two of the most popular types of sporting competitions in polynomial time. In addition, we show that finding the minimal number of games that need to be thrown to manipulate the result can also be determined in polynomial time. Finally, we show that there are several different variations of standard cup competitions where manipulation remains polynomial.

Russell, Tyrel; 10.1007/978-3-642-04428-1_3

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Electrical system architecture  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrical system for a vehicle includes a first power source generating a first voltage level, the first power source being in electrical communication with a first bus. A second power source generates a second voltage level greater than the first voltage level, the second power source being in electrical communication with a second bus. A starter generator may be configured to provide power to at least one of the first bus and the second bus, and at least one additional power source may be configured to provide power to at least one of the first bus and the second bus. The electrical system also includes at least one power consumer in electrical communication with the first bus and at least one power consumer in electrical communication with the second bus.

Algrain, Marcelo C. (Peoria, IL); Johnson, Kris W. (Washington, IL); Akasam, Sivaprasad (Peoria, IL); Hoff, Brian D. (East Peoria, IL)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

238

The effect of multiple entrances on the elevator round trip time under up-peak traffic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The design of vertical transportation systems relies on the calculation of the interval as an indicator of the quality of service. This in turn involves the accurate calculation of the round trip time of a single elevator. The calculation of the round ... Keywords: Basement, Elevator, Interval, Lift, Round trip time, Up peak traffic

Lutfi Al-Sharif

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Figure 10.1 Renewable Energy Consumption by Major Source  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

4 Geothermal, solar/PV, and waste. Notes: Sum of components may not equal 100 percent due to independent rounding. Sources: Tables 1.3 and 10.1. – Wood 22%

240

Solid-State Lighting: Text-Alternative Version: CALiPER Round 7 Testing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Round 7 Testing Results and SSL Product Life Issues to someone by Round 7 Testing Results and SSL Product Life Issues to someone by E-mail Share Solid-State Lighting: Text-Alternative Version: CALiPER Round 7 Testing Results and SSL Product Life Issues on Facebook Tweet about Solid-State Lighting: Text-Alternative Version: CALiPER Round 7 Testing Results and SSL Product Life Issues on Twitter Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: Text-Alternative Version: CALiPER Round 7 Testing Results and SSL Product Life Issues on Google Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: Text-Alternative Version: CALiPER Round 7 Testing Results and SSL Product Life Issues on Delicious Rank Solid-State Lighting: Text-Alternative Version: CALiPER Round 7 Testing Results and SSL Product Life Issues on Digg Find More places to share Solid-State Lighting: Text-Alternative

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rounding sources electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

EIA - AEO2010 - Electricity Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Demand Electricity Demand Annual Energy Outlook 2010 with Projections to 2035 Electricity Demand Figure 69. U.S. electricity demand growth 1950-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 60. Average annual U.S. retail electricity prices in three cases, 1970-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 61. Electricity generation by fuel in three cases, 2008 and 2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 62. Electricity generation capacity additions by fuel type, 2008-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 63. Levelized electricity costs for new power plants, 2020 and 2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 64. Electricity generating capacity at U.S. nuclear power plants in three cases, 2008, 2020, and 2035

242

DOE HANDBOOK ELECTRICAL SAFETY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DOE HANDBOOK ELECTRICAL SAFETY U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 of 139 3.0 HAZARD ANALYSIS 3.1 INTRODUCTION This chapter provides tools for assessing electrical hazards error. This chapter does not provide an exhaustive list of sources of electrical energy

243

Advanced system demonstration for utilization of biomass as an energy source. Volume V. Electrical and instrumentation elementary diagrams and instrument indexes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This volume contains detailed drawings and diagrams of electrical systems and instruments which will be included in a biomass cogeneration facility in Maine. (DMC)

None

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

EIA - State Electricity Profiles - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Through 2010: ... Supply and Disposition of Electricity, 1990 Through 2010 (Million ...

245

Recharging Energy Storage Devices and/or Supplying Electric Power  

sources for emergency and other uses. Patent Gui-Jia Su. Electric Vehicle Recharging and or Supplying Electrical Power,

246

Saving Electricity | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Saving Electricity Saving Electricity Saving Electricity Reducing energy use in your home saves you money, increases our energy security and reduces the pollution that is emitted from non-renewable sources of energy. Learn more about reducing your electricity use. Reducing energy use in your home saves you money, increases our energy security and reduces the pollution that is emitted from non-renewable sources of energy. Learn more about reducing your electricity use. We rely on electricity to power our lights, appliances, and electronics in our homes. Many of us also use electricity to provide our homes with hot water, heat, and air conditioning. As we use more electricity in our homes,

247

Heavy ion fusion--Using heavy ions to make electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as a source of commercial electrical power has been pursuedfusion to produce commercial electrical power has been anpower plant output would be high– ? 2 GW); high electrical

Celata, C.M.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

On Minimizing the Energy Consumption of an Electrical Vehicle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. The electrical vehicle energy management can be expressed ... Electrical vehicle uses an electrical energy source for its displacement which can.

249

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #799: September 30, 2013Electricity...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fact 799: September 30, 2013 Electricity Generation by Source, 2003-2012 With the increase in market penetration for electric vehicles, the upstream emissions from electricity...

250

ION SOURCE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ion source is described and comprises an arc discharge parallel to the direction of and inside of a magnetic field. an accelerating electrode surrounding substantially all of the discharge except for ion exit apertures, and means for establishing an electric field between that electrode and the arc discharge. the electric field being oriented at an acute angle to the magnetic field. Ions are drawn through the exit apertures in the accelrating electrcde in a direction substantially divergent to the direction of the magnetic field and so will travel in a spiral orbit along the magnetic field such that the ions will not strike the source at any point in their orbit within the magnetic field.

Blue, C.W.; Luce, J.S.

1960-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

251

Project Brief: General Electric, GE Global Research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... for rapidly routing electrical energy to customers from diverse sources such as wind and solar powered devices. RECIPIENT: General Electric, GE ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

252

EIA - State Electricity Profiles - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Through 2010: Table 6. Electric Power Delivered Fuel Prices and Quality for Coal, Petroleum, ...

253

EIA Energy Kids - Electricity - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The energy sources we use to make electricity can be renewable or non-renewable, but electricity itself is neither renewable nor non-renewable.

254

EIA - State Electricity Profiles - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Top Five Retailers of Electricity, with End Use Sectors, 2010: Table 4. Electric Power Industry Capability by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Through 2010: Table 5.

255

Activity: Conserving Electric Energy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

for their dependency on electricity and (2) learn how regulating the rate of energy consumption makes the energy source last longer. Activity: Conserving Electric Energy More...

256

Conserving Electric Energy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

for their dependency on electricity, and learn how regulating the rate of energy consumption makes the energy source last longer. Conserving Electric Energy - Elementary...

257

Department of Energy Electrical Safety, Operating Experience...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

source). The majority of the events occurred while cutting conduit with saws or core drilling with electric drills. One worker received an electrical shock while cutting...

258

NETL: Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) - Round 3  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 Advanced Electric Power Generation - Integrated Gasification/Combined Cycle Tampa Electric Integrated Gasification Combined-Cycle Project - Project Brief [PDF-241KB] Tampa Electric Co., Tampa, FL Program Publications Final Reports Tampa Electric Polk Power Station Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Project, Final Technical Report [PDF-5MB] (Aug 2002) Annual/Quarterly Technical Reports Tampa Electric Company - IGCC Project, Quarterly Reports April - June 1997 [PDF-698KB] January - March 1997 [PDF-465KB] October - December 1996 [PDF-1.04MB] July - September 1996 [PDF-863KB] April - June 1996 [PDF-544KB] January - March 1996 [PDF-2.2MB] October - December 1995 [PDF-684KB] July - September 1995 [PDF-307KB] April - June 1995 [PDF-150KB] Tampa Electric Company Polk Power Station Unit No. 1, Annual Reports

259

NETL: Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) - Round...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 Advanced Electric Power Generation - Advanced Combustion Systems Healy Clean Coal Project - Project Brief PDF-226KB Alaska Industrial Development and Export Authority, Healy,...

260

NETL: Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) - Round...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Control Technologies - Combined SO2 NOx Control Technologies Milliken Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Project - Project Brief PDF-342KB New York State Electric &...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rounding sources electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

NETL: Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) - Round...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 Environmental Control Technologies - NOx Control Technologies Micronized Coal Reburning Demonstration for NOx Control - Project Brief PDF-245KB New York State Electric & Gas...

262

NETL: Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) - Round...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 Advanced Electric Power Generation - Advanced Combustion Systems Clean Coal Diesel Demonstration Project - Project Brief PDF-57KB Arthur D. Little, Inc., Fairbanks, AK PROGRAM...

263

Technology R&D Needs for Integrating High Penetrations of Variable Utility-Scale Renewable Power Sources into the Electric Power Inf rastructure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While the North American electric energy resource portfolio continues to evolve, integrating large-scale renewable resources into the electric power infrastructure presents significant challenges. This is particularly true of variable renewable resources, such as wind and solar, which represent two of the most rapidly growing renewable resources being deployed. The root of this challenge lies in the inherent variability of wind and solar resources, which differentiates these from other renewable resource...

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

264

Development of production drill bits and blast rounds  

SciTech Connect

In recent years there has been considerable interest in the development of computer models to describe rock fragmentation by blasting. The interest for this work has come primarily for application to large scale coal or mineral surface mines. However, the basic models developed for these applications are equally applicable for examining typical underground oil shale operations. Models that can predict blasting results starting from first principles can impact room and pillar mining in a number of ways including optimizing round design, control of particle size, evaluation of new explosives, minimizing pillar damage, and developing blasting schemes that can be used in conjunction with continuous miners. In this study, the authors explore how these codes can be used to model the blasting geometry encountered in room and pillar mining operations.

Baloo, G.L. (Energy Mining Div., UNOCAL Corp., Parachute, CO (US))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

China Energy Efficiency Round Robin Testing Results for Room Air Conditioners  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

L ABORATORY China Energy Efficiency Round Robin TestingNeed to Improve the Energy Efficiency of Energy Consumingfor Implementing the China Energy Efficiency Label System (

Zhou, Nan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Electricity | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electricity Electricity Jump to: navigation, search Click to return to AEO2011 page AEO2011 Data From AEO2011 report Full figure data for Figure 76. Reference Case Tables Table 1. Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - New England Table 2. Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - Middle Atlantic Table 3. Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - East North Central Table 4. Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - West North Central Table 5. Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - South Atlantic Table 6. Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - East South Central Table 7. Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - West South Central Table 8. Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - Mountain Table 9. Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - Pacific Table 9. Electricy Generating Capacity

267

AEOP2011:Electricity Generation Capacity by Electricity Market...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AEOP2011:Electricity Generation Capacity by Electricity Market Module Region and Source

268

Electrical Energy Storage: Stan Whittingham  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is inherently cleaner - Need source of electricity, ideally renewable · Solar, wave, hydro, wind may supplement Combustion Engine to recharge batteries (same range as present-day cars) · EV - All electric - charge them

Suzuki, Masatsugu

269

Electric Power Monthly - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Net Generation; by; 1.1 Energy Source: Total - All Sectors: 1.1.A Other Renewables: Total - All Sectors: 1.2 Energy Source: Electric Utilities:

270

Electric vehicle system for charging and supplying electrical ...  

A power system that provides power between an energy storage device, an external charging-source/load, an onboard electrical power generator, and a vehicle drive shaft.

271

Study of Machine Round-Off response on Weather Forecasting Simulations Using High Performance Computing Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The weather forecasting model T80L18 is found to be sensitive to variations in the computing platform. The global spectral model simulation variation due to machine round off is examined using rounding mode analysis and the perturbation methods. The ...

S. Janakiraman; J. V. Ratnam; Akshara Kaginalkar

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Response of model simulated weather parameters to round-off-errors on different systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, the weather forecasting model of the National Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasting (NCMRWF) is used for examining the characteristics of round-off-errors on three different computer architectures - PARAM 10K, SUNFIRE 6800 and Dec ... Keywords: Floating-point arithmetic, General Circulation Model (GCM), Iterative process, Model simulation, Round-off-errors, Spectral method

S. Goel; S. K. Dash

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Assessment of Electrical, Efficiency, and Photometric Performance of Advanced Lighting Sources: Dimmable Advanced Lighting Technolog ies -- Electronic Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Fixtures, Lamps, and Drivers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This EPRI Technical Update addresses the dimming performance of light-emitting diode (LED) lighting. Chapter 1 provides a discussion of basic lighting control, the importance of considering power quality in lighting control, lighting control methods and parameters, and the advantages and future of lighting control. Chapter 2 addresses in more depth the dimming methods used in advanced lighting sources and controls for incandescent, fluorescent, high-intensity discharge (HID) and LED sources. Chapter 3 ad...

2008-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

274

Energy 101: Electric Vehicles | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electric Vehicles Electric Vehicles Energy 101: Electric Vehicles Addthis Below is the text version for the Energy 101: Electric Vehicles video. The video opens with "Energy 101: Electric Vehicles." This is followed by various shots of different electric vehicles on the road. Wouldn't it be pretty cool to do all of your daily driving without ever having to fill up at a gas station? Well, that's quickly becoming a reality for people who drive electric vehicles-sometimes called EVs. EVs are gaining popularity. And with good reason-they're convenient; they're sleek and quiet; they keep our air clean. And for most of the short-distance driving we do, they're the perfect way to get from point A to point B safely, reliably, and comfortably. Text appears onscreen: "80% of Americans drive less than 40 miles round

275

EIA - State Electricity Profiles - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Maps. Maps by energy source and topic, ... Solar › Energy in Brief. ... More Tables on United States's Electricity Profile: Formats;

276

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Vermont Electricity Profile 2010 Vermont profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Vermont) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer...

277

Wind Turbine Gearbox Condition Monitoring Round Robin Study - Vibration Analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Gearbox Reliability Collaborative (GRC) at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) tested two identical gearboxes. One was tested on the NWTCs 2.5 MW dynamometer and the other was field tested in a turbine in a nearby wind plant. In the field, the test gearbox experienced two oil loss events that resulted in damage to its internal bearings and gears. Since the damage was not severe, the test gearbox was removed from the field and retested in the NWTCs dynamometer before it was disassembled. During the dynamometer retest, some vibration data along with testing condition information were collected. These data enabled NREL to launch a Wind Turbine Gearbox Condition Monitoring Round Robin project, as described in this report. The main objective of this project was to evaluate different vibration analysis algorithms used in wind turbine condition monitoring (CM) and find out whether the typical practices are effective. With involvement of both academic researchers and industrial partners, the project sets an example on providing cutting edge research results back to industry.

Sheng, S.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Electricity 101 | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Resources » Electricity 101 Resources » Electricity 101 Electricity 101 FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS: Why do other countries use different shaped plugs? Why do outlets have three holes? Why do we have AC electricity? Can we harness lightning as an energy source? Can we have wireless transmission of electricity? SYSTEM: What is electricity? Where does electricity come from? What is the "grid"? How much electricity does a typical household use? How did the electric system evolve? What does the future look like? PEOPLE: Who owns the electric system? Who runs the grid? Who uses electricity? Where can I find out more about potential careers? How can I improve my energy use? POLICY: How is electricity regulated? Where can I find out about State incentives for renewables? What is a national corridor?

279

AEOP2011:Electricity Generation Capacity by Electricity Market Module  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AEOP2011:Electricity Generation Capacity by Electricity Market Module AEOP2011:Electricity Generation Capacity by Electricity Market Module Region and Source Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 97, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses billion kilowatthours. The data is broken down into Texas regional entity, Florida reliability coordinating council, Midwest reliability council and Northeast power coordination council. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords AEO Electricity electricity market module region generation capacity Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Electricity Generation Capacity by Electricity Market Module Region and Source- Reference Case (xls, 10.6 KiB)

280

Alternative fuel information sources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This short document contains a list of more than 200 US sources of information (Name, address, phone number, and sometimes contact) related to the use of alternative fuels in automobiles and trucks. Electric-powered cars are also included.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rounding sources electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Electric Vehicles  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Electricity can be used as a transportation fuel to power battery electric vehicles (EVs). EVs store electricity in an energy storage device, such as a battery.

282

Quantifying the Air Pollution Exposure Consequences of Distributed Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Existing distributed generation sources are more difficultfrom all electricity generation sources using a standarda co-located distributed generation source. It reads in text

Heath, Garvin A.; Granvold, Patrick W.; Hoats, Abigail S.; Nazaroff, William W

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Central Hudson Gas and Electric (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Central Hudson Gas and Electric (Electric) - Residential Energy Central Hudson Gas and Electric (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Central Hudson Gas and Electric (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heat Pumps Manufacturing Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Maximum Rebate Air Sealing: $600 Program Info State New York Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Central AC: $400 - $600, depending on efficiency Air-source Heat Pumps: $400 - $600, depending on efficiency Electronically Commutated Motor (ECM) Furnace Fans: $200 Electric Heat Pump Water Heaters: $400 Programmable Thermostats: $25

284

SERI results from the PEP 1987 Summit Round Robin and a comparison of photovoltaic calibration methods  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The SERI results for the Photovoltaic Solar Energy Project (PEP) 1987 summit round robin are presented and the proposed International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) technical committee TC82 global calibration method is evaluated in this report. The global calibration method has a +-4% uncertainty in the short-circuit current (I/sub sc/) including random and nonrandom error sources. This uncertainty can be reduced +-3% if the global normal method is used and the direct component of the total irradiance is measured with a primary absolute cavity radiometer. Nearly half of the uncertainty for various primary and secondary PV calibration methods is nonrandom. If a +-4% uncertainty in I/sub sc/ under standard reporting conditions is acceptable, then the global calibration method with spectral corrections is suitable for cells or modules. If a primary reference device with an uncertainty less than +-3% is required, then the global method is unsuitable. The SERI primary direct normal calibration method has a +-1% uncertainty in I/sub sc/ as verified by comparison with primary AMO cells. If a +-1% primary reference cell is used for secondary calibrations, then a +-2% uncertainty could be achieved for reference cells or modules. 37 refs., 29 figs., 42 tabs.

Emery, K.A.; Waddington, D.; Rummel, S.; Myers, D.R.; Stoffel, T.L.; Osterwald, C.R.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Methodology and Documentation Methodology and Documentation General The Electricity Monthly Update is prepared by the Electric Power Operations Team, Office of Electricity, Renewables and Uranium Statistics, U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), U.S. Department of Energy. Data published in the Electricity Monthly Update are compiled from the following sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-826,"Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenues with State Distributions Report," U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report," fuel spot prices from Bloomberg Energy, electric power prices from SNL Energy, electric system demand data from Ventyx Energy Velocity Suite, and weather data and imagery from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric

286

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Methodology and Documentation Methodology and Documentation General The Electricity Monthly Update is prepared by the Electric Power Operations Team, Office of Electricity, Renewables and Uranium Statistics, U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), U.S. Department of Energy. Data published in the Electricity Monthly Update are compiled from the following sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-826,"Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenues with State Distributions Report," U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report," fuel spot prices from Bloomberg Energy, electric power prices from SNL Energy, electric system demand data from Ventyx Energy Velocity Suite, and weather data and imagery from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric

287

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Methodology and Documentation Methodology and Documentation General The Electricity Monthly Update is prepared by the Electric Power Operations Team, Office of Electricity, Renewables and Uranium Statistics, U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), U.S. Department of Energy. Data published in the Electricity Monthly Update are compiled from the following sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-826,"Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenues with State Distributions Report," U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report," fuel spot prices from Bloomberg Energy, electric power prices from SNL Energy, electric system demand data from Ventyx Energy Velocity Suite, and weather data and imagery from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric

288

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Methodology and Documentation Methodology and Documentation General The Electricity Monthly Update is prepared by the Electric Power Operations Team, Office of Electricity, Renewables and Uranium Statistics, U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), U.S. Department of Energy. Data published in the Electricity Monthly Update are compiled from the following sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-826,"Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenues with State Distributions Report," U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report," fuel spot prices from Bloomberg Energy, electric power prices from SNL Energy, electric system demand data from Ventyx Energy Velocity Suite, and weather data and imagery from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric

289

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Methodology and Documentation Methodology and Documentation General The Electricity Monthly Update is prepared by the Electric Power Operations Team, Office of Electricity, Renewables and Uranium Statistics, U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), U.S. Department of Energy. Data published in the Electricity Monthly Update are compiled from the following sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-826,"Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenues with State Distributions Report," U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report," fuel spot prices from Bloomberg Energy, electric power prices from SNL Energy, electric system demand data from Ventyx Energy Velocity Suite, and weather data and imagery from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric

290

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Methodology and Documentation Methodology and Documentation General The Electricity Monthly Update is prepared by the Electric Power Operations Team, Office of Electricity, Renewables and Uranium Statistics, U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), U.S. Department of Energy. Data published in the Electricity Monthly Update are compiled from the following sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-826,"Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenues with State Distributions Report," U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report," fuel spot prices from Bloomberg Energy, electric power prices from SNL Energy, electric system demand data from Ventyx Energy Velocity Suite, and weather data and imagery from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric

291

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Methodology and Documentation Methodology and Documentation General The Electricity Monthly Update is prepared by the Electric Power Operations Team, Office of Electricity, Renewables and Uranium Statistics, U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), U.S. Department of Energy. Data published in the Electricity Monthly Update are compiled from the following sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-826,"Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenues with State Distributions Report," U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report," fuel spot prices from Bloomberg Energy, electric power prices from SNL Energy, electric system demand data from Ventyx Energy Velocity Suite, and weather data and imagery from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric

292

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Methodology and Documentation Methodology and Documentation General The Electricity Monthly Update is prepared by the Electric Power Operations Team, Office of Electricity, Renewables and Uranium Statistics, U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), U.S. Department of Energy. Data published in the Electricity Monthly Update are compiled from the following sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-826,"Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenues with State Distributions Report," U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report," fuel spot prices from Bloomberg Energy, electric power prices from SNL Energy, electric system demand data from Ventyx Energy Velocity Suite, and weather data and imagery from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric

293

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Methodology and Documentation Methodology and Documentation General The Electricity Monthly Update is prepared by the Electric Power Operations Team, Office of Electricity, Renewables and Uranium Statistics, U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), U.S. Department of Energy. Data published in the Electricity Monthly Update are compiled from the following sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-826,"Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenues with State Distributions Report," U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report," fuel spot prices from Bloomberg Energy, electric power prices from SNL Energy, electric system demand data from Ventyx Energy Velocity Suite, and weather data and imagery from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric

294

Assessment of Electrical, Efficiency, and Photometric Performance of Advanced Lighting Sources: Dimmable Advanced Lighting Technolog ies -- Electronic High-Intensity Discharge Ballasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This EPRI Technical Update addresses the dimming performance of electronic high-intensity discharge (HID) ballasts. Chapter 1 provides a discussion of basic lighting control, the importance of considering power quality in lighting control, lighting control methods and parameters, and the advantages and future of lighting control. Chapter 2 addresses in more depth the dimming methods used in advanced lighting sources and controls for incandescent, fluorescent, high-intensity discharge (HID) and light-emit...

2008-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

295

Assessment of Electrical, Efficiency, and Photometric Performance of Advanced Lighting Sources: Dimmable Advanced Lighting Technolog ies -- Electronic (Hot and Cold Cathode) Compact Fluorescent Lamps and Ballasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This EPRI Technical Update (EPRI report 1018477) is one of four in a series that addresses basic dimming performance of advanced lighting sourceselectronic (hot and cold cathode) compact fluorescent lamps and ballasts Chapter 1 discusses basic lighting control, the importance of considering power quality in lighting control, lighting control methods and parameters, and the advantages and future of lighting control. Chapter 2 addresses in more depth dimming methods used in advanced lighting sources and co...

2008-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

296

NETL: Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) - Round 3  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 Advanced Electric Power Generation - Fluidized Bed Combustion McIntosh Unit 4A PCFB Demonstration Project - Project Brief [PDF-186KB] Lakeland Department of Electric & Water, Lakeland, FL PROGRAM PUBLICATIONS Annual/Quarterly Technical Reports Pressurized Circulating Fluidized Bed (PCFB) Repowering Project, Annual Report, January - December 1993 (Apr 1994) -- Not Available Pressurized Circulating Fluidized Bed (PCFB) Repowering Project, Annual Report, August 1991 - December 1992 (Apr 1993) -- Not Available Interim Reports Karhula Hot Gas Cleanup Test Results (June 1994) -- Not Available PCFB Repowering Project 80 MW Plant Description (May 1994) -- Not Available Comprehensive Report to Congress Comprehensive Report to Congress on the Clean Coal Technology Progam: Pressurized Circulating Fluidized Bed Demonstration Project (June 1991) -- Not Available

297

EIA - 2010 International Energy Outlook - Electricity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Electricity International Energy Outlook 2010 Electricity World electricity generation increases by 87 percent from 2007 to 2035 in the IEO2010 Reference case. Non-OECD countries account for 61 percent of world electricity use in 2035. Figure 67. Growth in world electric power generation and total energy consumption, 1990-2035. Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 68. World net electricity generation by region, 1990-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 69. Non-OECD net electricity generation by region, 1990-2035. Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 70. World net electricity generation by fuel, 2006-2030. Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 71. World net electricity generation from nuclear power by region, 2007-2030.

298

Electric Vehicle Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electric Vehicle Basics Electric Vehicle Basics Electric Vehicle Basics July 30, 2013 - 4:45pm Addthis Text Version Photo of an electric bus driving up a hill. Electricity can be used as a transportation fuel to power battery electric vehicles (EVs). EVs store electricity in an energy storage device, such as a battery. The electricity powers the vehicle's wheels via an electric motor. EVs have limited energy storage capacity, which must be replenished by plugging into an electrical source. In an electric vehicle, a battery or other energy storage device is used to store the electricity that powers the motor. EV batteries must be replenished by plugging the vehicle to a power source. Some EVs have onboard chargers; others plug into a charger located outside the vehicle. Both types use electricity that comes from the power grid. Although

299

Two-prover one-round proof systems: their power and their problems (extended abstract)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We characterize the power of two-prover one-round (MIP(2,1)) proof systems, showing that MIP(2,1)=NEXPTIME. However, the following intriguing question remains open: Does parallel repetition decrease ...

Uriel Feige; László Lovász

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

High School Academic Competition - Round Robin | U.S. DOE Office of Science  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Round Robin Round Robin National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About National Science Bowl Contacts Regional Science Bowl Coordinators National Science Bowl FAQ's Alumni Past National Science Bowl Winners Past National Science Bowl Photos National Science Bowl Logos High School Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov 2012 Competition Results High School Academic Competition - Round Robin Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Welcome to the National Science Bowl Score Center! Looking for Round Robin Updates? Click on the division to go straight to

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rounding sources electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

DOE Seeks Applications for Third Round of Clean Coal Power Initiative |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Applications for Third Round of Clean Coal Power Applications for Third Round of Clean Coal Power Initiative DOE Seeks Applications for Third Round of Clean Coal Power Initiative August 11, 2008 - 2:40pm Addthis Funding Opportunity Announcement Solicits Applications for Carbon Capture and Sequestration WASHINGTON, DC -The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today issued the final Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) for Round 3 of the Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI) which seeks to accelerate the commercial deployment of advanced coal technologies to help supply the United States with clean, abundant, and affordable energy. DOE anticipates making multiple awards under this FOA and, depending on fiscal year 2009 appropriations, may be able to provide up to $340 million to be distributed among selected recipients. The projects will be cost-shared, with the award recipient(s)

302

Federal-Tribal Partnership on Climate Change Action Rounds Corner, Shifts  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Federal-Tribal Partnership on Climate Change Action Rounds Corner, Federal-Tribal Partnership on Climate Change Action Rounds Corner, Shifts Into High Gear at 2013 Tribal Nations Conference Federal-Tribal Partnership on Climate Change Action Rounds Corner, Shifts Into High Gear at 2013 Tribal Nations Conference November 19, 2013 - 5:12pm Addthis Federal-Tribal Partnership on Climate Change Action Rounds Corner, Shifts Into High Gear at 2013 Tribal Nations Conference David Conrad David Conrad Director, Tribal and Intergovernmental Affairs The 2013 White House Tribal Nations Conference, held Wednesday, November 13 at the Department of the Interior, was a turning point in the federal-tribal partnership to combat climate change and strengthen community resilience. Secretary Moniz spoke of the importance of the relationship between the

303

Middle School Academic Competition - Round Robin | U.S. DOE Office of  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Academic Competition - Round Robin Academic Competition - Round Robin National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About National Science Bowl Contacts Regional Science Bowl Coordinators National Science Bowl FAQ's Alumni Past National Science Bowl Winners Past National Science Bowl Photos National Science Bowl Logos High School Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov 2012 Competition Results Middle School Academic Competition - Round Robin Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Welcome to the National Science Bowl Score Center! Looking for Round Robin Updates? Click on the division to go straight to

304

An overview of the second round of the Mock LISA Data Challenges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. The Mock Data Challenges (MLDCs) have the dual purpose of fostering the development of LISA data-analysis tools and capabilities and of demonstrating the technical readiness already achieved by the gravitational-wave community in distilling a rich science payoff from the LISA data. The first round of MLDCs has just been completed and the second-round data sets are being released shortly after this workshop. The second-round data sets contain radiation from an entire Galactic population of stellar-mass binary systems, from massive– black-hole binaries, and from extreme–mass-ratio inspirals. These data sets are designed to capture much of the complexity that is expected in the actual LISA data, and should provide a fairly realistic setting to test advanced data-analysis techniques, and in particular the global aspect of the analysis. Here we describe the second round of MLDCs and provide details about its implementation. 1.

K A Arnaud; S Babak; J G Baker; M J Benacquista N; J Cornish; C Cutler; L S Finn; S L Larson; E K Porter; B S Sathyaprakash; A Vecchio; J-y Vinet (the Mock Lisa

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Information Resources: CALiPER Round 7 Testing Results and SSL...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 Testing Results and SSL Product Life Issues This April 9, 2009 webcast provided an overview of CALiPER's Round 7 testing results, and an update on the emerging understanding of...

306

Solid-State Lighting: CALiPER Round 7 Testing Results and SSL...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 Testing Results and SSL Product Life Issues to someone by E-mail Share Solid-State Lighting: CALiPER Round 7 Testing Results and SSL Product Life Issues on Facebook Tweet about...

307

Homogenous BSCCO-2212 Round Wires for Very High Field Magnets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The performance demands on modern particle accelerators generate a relentless push towards higher field magnets. In turn, advanced high field magnet development places increased demands on superconducting materials. Nb3Sn conductors have been used to achieve 16 T in a prototype dipole magnet and are thought to have the capability for {approx}18 T for accelerator magnets (primarily dipoles but also higher order multipole magnets). However there have been suggestions and proposals for such magnets higher than 20 T. The High Energy Physics Community (HEP) has identified important new physics opportunities that are enabled by extremely high field magnets: 20 to 50 T solenoids for muon cooling in a muon collider (impact: understanding of neutrinos and dark matter); and 20+ T dipoles and quadrupoles for high energy hadron colliders (impact: discovery reach far beyond present). This proposal addresses the latest SBIR solicitation that calls for grant applications that seek to develop new or improved superconducting wire technologies for magnets that operate at a minimum of 12 Tesla (T) field, with increases up to 15 to 20 T sought in the near future (three to five years). The long-term development of accelerator magnets with fields greater than 20 T will require superconducting wires having significantly better high-field properties than those possessed by current Nb{sub 3}Sn or other A15 based wires. Given the existing materials science base for Bi-2212 wire processing, we believe that Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub y} (Bi-2212) round wires can be produced in km-long piece lengths with properties suitable to meet both the near term and long term needs of the HEP community. The key advance will be the translation of this materials science base into a robust, high-yield wire technology. While the processing and application of A15 materials have advanced to a much higher level than those of the copper oxide-based, high T{sub c} (HTS) counterparts, the HTS materials have the very significant advantage of an extremely high H{sub c2}. For this reason, Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub y} (Bi-2212, or 2212) in the form of a multifilamentary Ag alloy matrix composite is beginning to attract the interest of the magnet community for future extremely high-field magnets or magnet-insert coils for 4.2K operation. Fig. 1 shows an example of excellent JE (engineering current density) in Bi-2212 round wire at fields up to 45 T, demonstrating the potential for high field applications of this material. For comparison, the Nb{sub 3}Sn wires used in magnets in the 16-18 T range typically perform with J{sub E} in the range 200-500 A/mm{sup 2}; the Bi-2212 wire retains this level of performance to fields at least as high as 45 T, and probably significantly higher. Bi-2212 conductors have in fact been used to generate a 25 T field in a superconducting insert magnet. These two factors- the very high field critical current performance of Bi-2212, and the already demonstrated capability of this material for high field magnets up to 25 T, strongly suggest this material as a leading contender for the next generation high field superconducting (HFS) wire. This potential was recognized by the US Academy of Science's Committee on Opportunities in High Magnetic Field Science. Their report of the same name specifically calls out the high field potential for this material, and suggests that 30 T magnets appear feasible based on the performance of 2212. There are several requirements for HFS conductors. The most obvious is J{sub E} (B, T), the engineering current density at the field and temperature of operation. As shown in Fig. 1, Bi-2212 excels in this regard. Stability requirements for magnets dictate that the effective filament diameter should be less than 30 micrometers, something that Bi-2212 multifilamentary wire can uniquely satisfy among the HFS superconducting wire technologies. Additional requirements include mechanical properties that prevent stress limitation of J{sub E} at the operating conditions, resistive transition index (n-value) suffic

Dr. Scott Campbell Dr. Terry Holesinger Dr. Ybing Huang

2012-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

308

Status of Tampa Electric Company IGCC Project  

SciTech Connect

Tampa Electric Company will utilize Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle technology for its new Polk Power Station Unit [number sign]1. The project is partially funded under the Department of Energy Clean Coal Technology Program Round III. This paper describes the technology to be used, process details, demonstration of a new hot gas clean-up system, and the schedule, leading to commercial operation in July 1996.

Jenkins, S.D.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Status of Tampa Electric Company IGCC Project  

SciTech Connect

Tampa Electric Company will utilize Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle technology for its new Polk Power Station Unit {number_sign}1. The project is partially funded under the Department of Energy Clean Coal Technology Program Round III. This paper describes the technology to be used, process details, demonstration of a new hot gas clean-up system, and the schedule, leading to commercial operation in July 1996.

Jenkins, S.D.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Electric power monthly  

SciTech Connect

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares the Electric Power Monthly (EPM) for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. This publication provides monthly statistics for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source, consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Pool heating system on island brings year-round enjoyment  

SciTech Connect

The Bahamas is not generally thought of as a place in need of pool heating. However, the remote Bahamian island of Treasure Cay is actually situated north of Ft. Lauderdale, Florida. Pool temperatures drop during the winter, thus shortening the swimming season. The Beach Villas Homeowners Association of Treasure Cay investigated pool-heating options some time ago. Energy on Treasure Cay is expensive - about 25 cents/kWh - making cost a major concern for the association as they evaluated their choices. An electric heat pump was rule out as it would place too great a burden on the electricity load of the remote island. Heating the pool with propane gas was deemed far too costly. After evaluating each of these heating methods on the basis of economics, energy efficiency, and comfort, the association concluded that solar would be the best method. They selected a solar pool heating system manufactured by FAFCO, Inc. and installed by SUNWORKS in Ft. Lauderdale. The system requires virtually no daily maintenance, and there have been no problems with the system since its installation. In addition to being trouble-free, the FAFCO solar pool heater has saved Treasure Cay a great deal of money. The equipment cost about $9,500; lumber, PVC, and labor brought the total cost to $13,000. By comparison, a propane-gas system would have cost $4,000 but would have generated a yearly gas bill of $12,000. Therefore, payback on the system began immediately upon installation.

Not Available

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

EIA - State Electricity Profiles - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Through 2010: Table 6. Electric Power Delivered Fuel Prices and Quality for Coal, Petroleum, ...

313

Electricity Net Generation From Renewable Energy by Energy Use...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electricity Net Generation From Renewable Energy by Energy Use Sector and Energy Source, 2004 - 2008 Provides annual net electricity generation (thousand kilowatt-hours) from...

314

Industrial Biomass Energy Consumption and Electricity Net Generation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Industrial Biomass Energy Consumption and Electricity Net Generation by Industry and Energy Source, 2008 Biomass energy consumption and electricity net generation in the industrial...

315

Electricity Reliability  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

lines and bar graph Electricity Reliability The Consortium for Electric Reliability Technology Solutions (CERTS) conducts research, develops, and disseminates new methods, tools,...

316

Electric Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

government incentives or subsidies in the near future. Companies active in the electric automobile area There are no companies directly active in the electric automobile...

317

source | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 17, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into marketed renewable energy, residential, commercial, industrial, transportation and electric power. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords Commercial Electric Power Industrial Renewable Energy Consumption Residential sector source transportation Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Consumption by Sector and Source- Reference Case (xls, 105 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment

318

NETL: Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) - Round 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 Advanced Electric Power Generation - Fluidized Bed Combustion JEA Large-Scale CFB Combustion Demonstration Project - Project Brief [PDF-169KB] JEA, Jacksonville, FL PROGRAM PUBLICATIONS Final Reports Final Technical Report for the JEA Large-Scale CFB Combustion Demonstration Project [PDF-438KB](July 2005) CCT Reports: Project Performance Summaries, Post-Project Assessments, & Topical Reports JEA Large-Scale CFB Combustion Demonstration Project: A DOE Assessment [PDF-177KB] (Nov 2005) The JEA Large-Scale CFB Combustion Demonstration Project, Topical Report No.22 [PDF-2.1MB] (Mar 2003) Design Reports Detailed Public Design Report for the JEA Large-Scale CFB Combustion Demonstration Project [PDF-2.5MB] (June 2003) Appendices 4, 5, and 6: Major Equipment List,

319

NETL: Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) - Round 4  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 4 Environmental Control Technologies - Combined SO2 /NOx Control Technologies Milliken Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Project - Project Brief [PDF-342KB] New York State Electric & Gas Corporation, Lansing, NY PROGRAM PUBLICATIONS Final Reports Milliken Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Project, Project Performance and Economics Report, Final Report (Apr 1999) Volume 1 [PDF-12.4MB] Volume 2 [PDF-15.7MB] CCT Reports: Project Performance Summaries, Post-Project Assessments, & Topical Reports Milliken Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Project, Project Performance Summary [PDF-1.4MB] (Nov 2002) Milliken Clean Coal Demonstration Project: A DOE Assessment [PDF-1.1MB] (Aug 2001) Advanced Technologies for the Control of Sulfur Dioxide Emissions from Coal-Fired Boilers, Topical Report No.12 [PDF-1.28MB] (June 1999)

320

NETL: Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) - Round 5  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 Advanced Electric Power Generation - Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Kentucky Pioneer IGCC Demonstration Project - Project Brief [PDF-80KB] Kentucky Pioneer Energy, L.L.C.; Trapp, Clark County, KY PROGRAM PUBLICATIONS Final Report Kentucky Pioneer Energy LLC Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Project: 2 MW Fuel Cell Demonstration [PDF-3.2MB] (Apr 2006) Design Reports Kentucky Pioneer Energy IGCC CCT Demonstration Project, 2 MW Fuel Cell Demonstration, Basis of Design [PDF-696KB] (May 2002) Environmental Reports Kentucky Pioneer Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Demonstration Project: Final Environmental Impact Statement, [PDF-5.7MB] (Nov 2002) Appendices A-C and E [PDF-965KB] Appendix D, Pages 1-40 [PDF-5.2MB] Appendix D, Pages 41-71 [PDF-4.3MB]

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rounding sources electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

NETL: Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) - Round 3  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 Advanced Electric Power Generation - Advanced Combustion Systems Healy Clean Coal Project - Project Brief [PDF-226KB] Alaska Industrial Development and Export Authority, Healy, AK PROGRAM PUBLICATIONS Final Reports Healy Clean Coal Project, Project Performance and Economics Report, Final Report: Volume 2 [PDF-1.2MB] (Apr 2001) Annual/Quarterly Technical Reports Healy Clean Coal Project , Quarterly Technical Progress Reports Numbers 1 and 2, January - June 1991 [PDF-1.3MB] Number 3, July - September 1991 [PDF-579KB] Number 4, October - December 1991 [PDF-862KB] Number 5, January - March 1992 [PDF-668KB] Number 6, April - June 1992 [PDF-1.2MB] Number 14, April - June 1994 [PDF-311KB] Numbers 16-19, October 1994 - September 1995 [PDF-1.3MB] Number 20, October - December 1995 [PDF-653KB]

322

NETL: Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) - Round 5  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 Advanced Electric Power Generation - Advanced Combustion Systems Clean Coal Diesel Demonstration Project - Project Brief [PDF-57KB] Arthur D. Little, Inc., Fairbanks, AK PROGRAM PUBLICATIONS Final Reports Not Available CCT Reports: Project Performance Summaries, Post-Project Assessments, & Topical Reports Clean Coal Diesel Demonstration Project: A DOE Assessment [PDF-590KB] (July 2007) Annual/Quarterly Technical Reports Coal Diesel Combined-Cycle Project, Annual Report [PDF-2.7MB] (June 1998) January 1996 - January 1997 Interim Reports Coal-Fueled Diesel System for Stationary Power Applications - Technology Development Topical Report [PDF-9.5 MB] (Aug 1995) Final Report [PDF-12.4 MB] March 1988 - June 1994 (Oct 1995) Environmental Reports Environmental Assessment - Coal-Fired Diesel Generator [PDF-4.2MB] (May 1997)

323

NETL: Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) - Round 5  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 Reports on Withdrawn & Terminated Projects Warren Station Externally Fired Combined-Cycle Demo. Project - (There is no Project Brief for this project) Pennsylvania Electric Company PROGRAM PUBLICATIONS Comprehensive Report to Congress Comprehensive Report to Congress on the Clean Coal Technology Program: Warren Station EFCC Demonstration Project (June 1994) U.S. Department of Energy report DOE/FE-0316P. (Available from NTIS as DE94017288) PAPERS AND PRESENTATIONS Externally Fired Combined Cycle: An Effective Coal-Fueled Technology for Repowering and New Generation (Mar 1995) L.E. Stoddard et al., (Black and Veatch), 20th International Technical Conference on Coal Utilization and Fuels Systems. U.S. Department of Energy Report CONF-950313-2 and DOE/MC/31327-95/C0451 (Available from NTIS as DE95012295).

324

Firelands Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Firelands Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Firelands Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Firelands Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Program Info State Ohio Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Geothermal Heat Pump: $800 Air Source Heat Pump: $500 Dual Fuel Heat Pump: $250 Electric Water Heater: $100-$300 HVAC Controls: $100 Provider Firelands Electric Cooperative Firelands Electric Cooperative (FEC) is offering rebates on energy efficient equipment to residential customers receiving electric service from FEC. Eligible equipment includes new Geothermal Heat Pumps, Air-Source

325

Composite Toffoli gate with two-round error detection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We introduce a fault-tolerant construction to implement a composite quantum operation of four overlapping Toffoli gates. The same construction can produce two independent Toffoli gates. This result lowers resource overheads in designs for quantum computers by more than an order of magnitude. The procedure uses Clifford operations and 64 copies of the non-Clifford gate $T = \\exp[i \\pi (I - \\sigma^z) /8]$. Quantum codes detect errors in the circuit. When the dominant source of error is $T$-gate failure with probability $p$, then the composite Toffoli circuit has postselected failure rate of $3072p^4$ to lowest order.

Cody Jones

2013-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

326

Electrical generating plant availability  

SciTech Connect

A discussion is given of actions that can improve availability, including the following: the meaning of power plant availability; The organization of the electric power industry; some general considerations of availability; the improvement of power plant availability--design factors, control of shipping and construction, maintenance, operating practices; sources of statistics on generating plant availability; effects of reducing forced outage rates; and comments by electric utilities on generating unit availability.

1975-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Atoms to electricity. [Booklet  

SciTech Connect

This booklet explains the basic technology of nuclear fission power reactors, the nuclear fuel cycle and the role of nuclear energy as one of the domestic energy resources being developed to help meet our national energy demand. Nuclear power accounted for over 16 percent of the US electric energy supply in 1986 and was second only to coal as a source of our electric power. In the 1990s, nuclear energy is expected to provide almost 20 percent of the Nation's electricity. 38 figs., 5 tabs.

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Atoms to electricity. [Booklet  

SciTech Connect

This booklet explains the basic technology of nuclear fission power reactors, the nuclear fuel cycle and the role of nuclear energy as one of the domestic energy resources being developed to help meet our national energy demand. Nuclear power accounted for over 16 percent of the US electric energy supply in 1986 and was second only to coal as a source of our electric power. In the 1990s, nuclear energy is expected to provide almost 20 percent of the Nation's electricity. 38 figs., 5 tabs.

Not Available

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Atoms to electricity  

SciTech Connect

This booklet explains the basic technology of nuclear fission power reactors, the nuclear fuel cycle and the role of nuclear energy as one of the domestic energy resources being developed to help meet our national energy demand. Nuclear power accounted for some 12 percent of the US electric energy supply in 1982. In the 1990's, it is expected to become second only to coal as a source of our electric power, almost doubling its present contribution to our national electricity supply. 14 references, 40 figures, 5 tables.

Not Available

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Carbon Capture and Storage Forum Round-Up | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Carbon Capture and Storage Forum Round-Up Carbon Capture and Storage Forum Round-Up Carbon Capture and Storage Forum Round-Up September 9, 2010 - 12:17pm Addthis Sec. Chu speaks about carbon capture and sequestration. | Energy Department Photo Sec. Chu speaks about carbon capture and sequestration. | Energy Department Photo John Schueler John Schueler Former New Media Specialist, Office of Public Affairs Yesterday, Secretary Chu joined Senator Jay Rockefeller at the University of Charleston in West Virginia for a forum on the future of coal and the case for carbon capture and storage. We were at the event, relaying some of the highlights live via twitter so that people across the nation could follow along and weigh in on the discussion. If you missed it, we've included the entire session below along with the Secretary's power point

331

U.S. Department of Energy Selects First Round of Small-Scale Biorefinery  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

First Round of Small-Scale First Round of Small-Scale Biorefinery Projects for Up to $114 Million in Federal Funding U.S. Department of Energy Selects First Round of Small-Scale Biorefinery Projects for Up to $114 Million in Federal Funding January 29, 2008 - 10:53am Addthis Ten percent commercial-scale biorefineries will help the nation meet new Renewable Fuels Standard WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Secretary Samuel W. Bodman today announced that DOE will invest up to $114 million, over four years, (Fiscal Years 2007-2010) for four small-scale biorefinery projects to be located in Commerce City, Colorado; St. Joseph, Missouri; Boardman, Oregon; and Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin. Building on President Bush's goal of making cellulosic ethanol cost-competitive by 2012, these ten-percent of

332

Carbon Capture and Storage Forum Round-Up | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Storage Forum Round-Up and Storage Forum Round-Up Carbon Capture and Storage Forum Round-Up September 9, 2010 - 12:17pm Addthis Sec. Chu speaks about carbon capture and sequestration. | Energy Department Photo Sec. Chu speaks about carbon capture and sequestration. | Energy Department Photo John Schueler John Schueler Former New Media Specialist, Office of Public Affairs Yesterday, Secretary Chu joined Senator Jay Rockefeller at the University of Charleston in West Virginia for a forum on the future of coal and the case for carbon capture and storage. We were at the event, relaying some of the highlights live via twitter so that people across the nation could follow along and weigh in on the discussion. If you missed it, we've included the entire session below along with the Secretary's power point

333

Secretary Chu Announces Second Round of "America's Next Top Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Second Round of "America's Next Top Second Round of "America's Next Top Energy Innovator" on One Year Anniversary of the White House Startup America Initiative Secretary Chu Announces Second Round of "America's Next Top Energy Innovator" on One Year Anniversary of the White House Startup America Initiative January 31, 2012 - 11:36am Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - Today, on the one year anniversary of the Obama Administration's Startup America Initiative, U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu announced that the Department of Energy (DOE) is kicking off a second year of "America's Next Top Energy Innovator," a program that allows startup companies to license groundbreaking technologies developed by DOE's 17 national laboratories for $1,000 and build successful businesses. As part of this effort, the Department reduces both the cost

334

U.S. Department of Energy Selects First Round of Small-Scale Biorefinery  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.S. Department of Energy Selects First Round of Small-Scale U.S. Department of Energy Selects First Round of Small-Scale Biorefinery Projects for Up to $114 Million in Federal Funding U.S. Department of Energy Selects First Round of Small-Scale Biorefinery Projects for Up to $114 Million in Federal Funding January 29, 2008 - 10:53am Addthis Ten percent commercial-scale biorefineries will help the nation meet new Renewable Fuels Standard WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Secretary Samuel W. Bodman today announced that DOE will invest up to $114 million, over four years, (Fiscal Years 2007-2010) for four small-scale biorefinery projects to be located in Commerce City, Colorado; St. Joseph, Missouri; Boardman, Oregon; and Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin. Building on President Bush's goal of making cellulosic ethanol cost-competitive by 2012, these ten-percent of

335

Lesson 2 - Electricity Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 - Electricity Basics 2 - Electricity Basics Lesson 2 - Electricity Basics It's difficult to imagine life without convenient electricity. You just flip a switch or plug in an appliance, and it's there. But how did it get there? Many steps go into providing the reliable electricity we take for granted. This lesson takes a closer look at electricity. It follows the path of electricity from the fuel source to the home, including the power plant and the electric power grid. It also covers the role of electric utilities in the generation, transmission, and distribution of electricity. Topcis addressed include: Basics of electricity Generating electricity Using steam, turbines, generator Similarities of power plants Distributing Electricity Generation Transmission Distribution Power grid

336

AEO2011: Electricity Generation by Electricity Market Module Region and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Generation by Electricity Market Module Region and Generation by Electricity Market Module Region and Source Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 96, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses billion kilowatthours. The data is broken down into texas regional entity, Florida reliability coordinating council, midwest reliability council and northeast power coordination council. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Electricity generation Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Electricity Generation by Electricity Market Module Region and Source- Reference Case (xls, 400.2 KiB) Quality Metrics

337

PRECISION INTEGRATOR FOR MINUTE ELECTRIC CURRENTS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An integrator is described for measuring the value of integrated minute electrical currents. The device consists of a source capacitor connected in series with the source of such electrical currents, a second capacitor of accurately known capacitance and a source of accurately known and constant potential, means responsive to the potentials developed across the source capacitor for reversibly connecting the second capacitor in series with the source of known potential and with the source capacitor and at a rate proportional to the potential across the source capacitor to maintain the magnitude of the potential across the source capacitor at approximately zero. (AEC)

Hemmendinger, A.; Helmer, R.J.

1961-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

338

Guide to Purchasing Green Power: Renewable Electricity, Renewable...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

generated from a subset of renewable resources, including solar, wind, geothermal, biogas, biomass, and low-impact hydroelectric sources. These electricity sources are derived...

339

Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.2 Electricity Generation, Transmission...  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

Conventional Wind Solar Thermal and Photovoltaic Wood and Wood Derived Fuels Geothermal Other Biomass Pumped Storage Other Total Source(s): EIA, Electric Power Annual 2010,...

340

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Through 2010 (Megawatthours)" "New Jersey" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rounding sources electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Through 2010 (Megawatthours)" "Illinois" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,19...

342

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Through 2010 (Megawatthours)" "Virginia" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,19...

343

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Through 2010 (Megawatthours)" "Texas" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,...

344

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Through 2010 (Megawatthours)" "Washington" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,...

345

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Through 2010 (Megawatthours)" "Montana" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,199...

346

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Through 2010 (Megawatthours)" "Maine" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,...

347

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Through 2010 (Megawatthours)" "South Dakota" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,199...

348

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Through 2010 (Megawatthours)" "Kansas" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999...

349

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Through 2010 (Megawatthours)" "West Virginia" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,19...

350

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Through 2010 (Megawatthours)" "Louisiana" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1...

351

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Through 2010 (Megawatthours)" "New Hampshire" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,19...

352

Magnetron sputtering source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A magnetron sputtering source for sputtering coating substrates includes a high thermal conductivity electrically insulating ceramic and magnetically attached sputter target which can eliminate vacuum sealing and direct fluid cooling of the cathode assembly. The magnetron sputtering source design results in greater compactness, improved operating characteristics, greater versatility, and low fabrication cost. The design easily retrofits most sputtering apparatuses and provides for safe, easy, and cost effective target replacement, installation, and removal.

Makowiecki, Daniel M. (Livermore, WA); McKernan, Mark A. (Livermore, CA); Grabner, R. Fred (Brentwood, CA); Ramsey, Philip B. (Livermore, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Magnetron sputtering source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A magnetron sputtering source for sputtering coating substrates includes a high thermal conductivity electrically insulating ceramic and magnetically attached sputter target which can eliminate vacuum sealing and direct fluid cooling of the cathode assembly. The magnetron sputtering source design results in greater compactness, improved operating characteristics, greater versatility, and low fabrication cost. The design easily retrofits most sputtering apparatuses and provides for safe, easy, and cost effective target replacement, installation, and removal. 12 figs.

Makowiecki, D.M.; McKernan, M.A.; Grabner, R.F.; Ramsey, P.B.

1994-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

354

AEO2011: Electricity Generation by Electricity Market Module...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Generation by Electricity Market Module Region and Source

355

Electricity Markets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electricity Markets Electricity Markets Researchers in the electricity markets area conduct technical, economic, and policy analysis of energy topics centered on the U.S. electricity sector. Current research seeks to inform public and private decision-making on public-interest issues related to energy efficiency and demand response, renewable energy, electricity resource and transmission planning, electricity reliability and distributed generation resources. Research is conducted in the following areas: Energy efficiency research focused on portfolio planning and market assessment, design and implementation of a portfolio of energy efficiency programs that achieve various policy objectives, utility sector energy efficiency business models, options for administering energy efficiency

356

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Source  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Renewable energy sources lead rise in primary energy consumption.... Read full section Coal-fired plants continue to be the largest source of U.S. electricity generation.......

357

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #753: November 12, 2012 Sources...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3: November 12, 2012 Sources of Electricity by State to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact 753: November 12, 2012 Sources of Electricity by State on...

358

NREL: Fleet Test and Evaluation - Electric and Plug-In Hybrid Electric  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electric and Plug-In Hybrid Electric Drive Systems Electric and Plug-In Hybrid Electric Drive Systems NREL's Fleet Test and Evaluation Team conducts performance evaluations of electric and plug-in hybrid electric drive systems in medium-duty trucks operated by fleets. Photo of medium-duty truck with the words "All Electric Vehicle" and "Plug-in" written on its side. NREL evaluates the performance of electric and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles in fleet operation. All-electric vehicles (EVs) use batteries to store the electric energy that powers the motor. EV batteries are charged by plugging the vehicle into an electric power source. Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) are powered by an internal combustion engine that can run on conventional or alternative fuels and an electric motor that uses energy stored in batteries. The vehicle can be

359

,,,"Electricity","from Sources",,"Natural Gas","from Sources...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"X",0,0,0,"X","X","X" 327420," Gypsum",1.6,2.4,1.7,0.1,0.8,0.1,0,"X",0 327993," Mineral Wool",0.5,0.5,1.9,0.2,0.4,0.3,"X","X","X" 331,"Primary Metals",0.7,0.8,1.4,0.7,1.1,0.9,0.1,0...

360

Model documentation: Electricity Market Module, Electricity Fuel Dispatch Submodule  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the National Energy Modeling System Electricity Fuel Dispatch Submodule (EFD), a submodule of the Electricity Market Module (EMM). The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, model source code, and forecast results generated through the synthesis and scenario development based on these components.

Not Available

1994-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rounding sources electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Power Plant Electrical Reference Series, Volume 1: Electric Generators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This comprehensive and practical guide to electric power apparatus and electrical phenomena provides an up-to-date source book for power plant managers, engineers, and operating personnel. Aiding in the recognition and prevention of potential problems, the 16-volume guide can help utilities save staff time and reduce operating expenses.

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Fossil Fuel Prices to Electric Utilities - U.S. Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Fossil Fuel Prices to Electric Utilities. Sources: History: EIA; Projections: Short-Term Energy Outlook, July 2000.

363

EIA - State Electricity Profiles - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

kWh = Kilowatthours. Sources: Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report." Energy Information Administration, Form EIA ...

364

EIA - Electricity Data - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 1.16.A. Net Generation from Other Energy Sources: by State, by Sector, October 2013 and 2012 (Thousand Megawatthours) Electric Power Sector ; ...

365

Electricity Monthly Update - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Renewable generation provides a growing share of California's electricity Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration based on California Independent System ...

366

Electric Power Annual - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Note: Data for 2010 have been revised. Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report"

367

Figure F2. Electricity market module regions  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration Annual Energy Outlook 2013 227 Regional maps Figure F2. Electricity market module regions Source: U.S. Energy Information ...

368

EIA - State Electricity Profiles - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Exploration and reserves, storage, imports and exports, production, prices, sales. ... Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Through 2010:

369

Microsoft Word - Conserving Electric Energy.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

for their dependency on electricity and (2) learn how regulating the rate of energy consumption makes the energy source last longer. Objectives: Students will: * gain an...

370

Clean Electric Power Generation (Canada)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Fossil fuels in Canada account for 27 percent of the electricity generated. The combustion of these fuels is a major source of emissions which affect air quality and climate change. The Government...

371

Category:Electrical Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Category Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Category:Electrical Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Electrical Techniques page? For detailed information on Electrical Techniques as exploration techniques, click here. Category:Electrical Techniques Add.png Add a new Electrical Techniques Technique Subcategories This category has the following 2 subcategories, out of 2 total. D [+] Direct-Current Resistivity Survey‎ (2 categories) 3 pages E [+] Electromagnetic Techniques‎ (1 categories) 2 pages Pages in category "Electrical Techniques"

372

Figure 1.2 Primary Energy Production by Source  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

4 Geothermal, solar/photovoltaic, and wind. Source: Table 1.2. Renewable Energy4 Gas electric Power ...

373

University of California participation in the CIRP round robin of residual-stress measurement  

SciTech Connect

The University of California, Davis, in conjunction with the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has participated in an international round robin testing program for residual stress measurement by x-ray diffraction. The comparative results among five participating laboratories were quite good with scatter in the data being less than +- 10%.

Shackelford, J.F.

1983-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

374

Ellipsoidal model of the rise of a Taylor bubble in a round tube T. Funada a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

November 2004 Abstract The rise velocity of long gas bubbles (Taylor bubbles) in round tubes is modeled in Eo; the composition of these separate power laws emerge as 0301-9322/$ - see front matter Ã? 2005 rising steadily in a li- quid is in a balance of buoyant weight and drag. It is natural to think

Joseph, Daniel D.

375

GENERAL SECRETARIAT Round Table on Sustainable Development LIVESTOCK AND CLIMATE POLICY: LESS MEAT OR LESS CARBON?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper was prepared under the authority of the Chair of the Round Table on Sustainable Development at the OECD. The opinions expressed and the arguments employed herein do not necessarily reflect the official views of the OECD or of the governments of Member countries. For further information please contact John Stephenson, Principal Advisor

English Or. English; Organisation Coopération; John Stephenson

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Milk fat globules are individually sur-rounded by a membrane which maintains  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and renders them compatible with the aqueous environment [7]. Milk fat globules membranes (MFGM) compositionMilk fat globules are individually sur- rounded by a membrane which maintains their integrity, including the main specific butyrophilin, would be 1. INTRODUCTION In milk, fat is predominantly present

Recanati, Catherine

377

Summary of results from the IPIRG-2 round-robin analyses  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a summary of the results from three one-day international round-robin workshops which were organized by Battelle in conjunction with the Second International Piping Integrity Research Group (IPIRG-2) Program. The objective of these workshops was to develop a consensus in handling difficult analytical problems in leak-before-break and pipe flaw evaluations. The workshops, which were held August 5, 1993, March 4, 1994, and October 21, 1994 at Columbus, Ohio, involved various technical presentations on the related research efforts by the IPIRG-2 member organizations and solutions to several round-robin problems. Following review by the IPIRG-2 members, four sets of round-robin problems were developed. They involved: (1) evaluations of fracture properties and pipe loads, (2) crack-opening and leak-rate evaluations, (3) dynamic analysis of cracked pipes, and (4) evaluations of elbows. A total of 18 organizations from the United States, Japan, Korea, and Europe solved these round-robin problems. The analysis techniques employed by the participants included both finite element and engineering methods. Based on the results from these analyses, several important observations were made concerning the predictive capability of the current fracture-mechanics and thermal-hydraulics models for their applications in nuclear piping and piping welds.

Rahman, S.; Olson, R.; Rosenfield, A.; Wilkowski, G. [Battelle, Columbus, OH (United States)

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Industry Group Learns About Light Source Opportunities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

industry over the past 50 years. General Electric's "Durathon" sodium metal halide battery breakthrough required the use of light sources allowing them to understand the...

379

OpenEI - Electricity Generation  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Annual Electricity Annual Electricity Generation (1980 - 2009) http://en.openei.org/datasets/node/878 Total annual electricity generation by country, 1980 to 2009 (available in billion kilowatthours ). Compiled by Energy Information Administration (EIA).

License
Type of License:  Other (please specify below)
Source of

380

OpenEI - Electricity Consumption  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Annual Electricity Annual Electricity Consumption (1980 - 2009) http://en.openei.org/datasets/node/877 Total annual electricity consumption by country, 1980 to 2009 (billion kilowatthours). Compiled by Energy Information Administration (EIA). License

Type of License:  Other (please specify below)
Source of data

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rounding sources electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Nozzle for electric dispersion reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nozzle for an electric dispersion reactor includes two coaxial cylindrical bodies, the inner one of the two delivering disperse phase fluid into a continuous phase fluid. A potential difference generated by a voltage source creates a dispersing electric field at the end of the inner electrode.

Sisson, Warren G. (Oak Ridge, TN); Harris, Michael T. (Knoxville, TN); Scott, Timothy C. (Knoxville, TN); Basaran, Osman A. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Nozzle for electric dispersion reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nozzle for an electric dispersion reactor includes two concentric electrodes, the inner one of the two delivering disperse phase fluid into a continuous phase fluid. A potential difference generated by a voltage source creates a dispersing electric field at the end of the inner electrode.

Sisson, Warren G. (Oak Ridge, TN); Basaran, Osman A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Harris, Michael T. (Knoxville, TN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Nozzle for electric dispersion reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nozzle for an electric dispersion reactor includes two coaxial cylindrical bodies, the inner one of the two delivering disperse phase fluid into a continuous phase fluid. A potential difference generated by a voltage source creates a dispersing electric field at the end of the inner electrode.

Sisson, Warren G. (Oak Ridge, TN); Harris, Michael T. (Knoxville, TN); Scott, Timothy C. (Knoxville, TN); Basaran, Osman A. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Nozzle for electric dispersion reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nozzle for an electric dispersion reactor includes two concentric electrodes, the inner one of the two delivering disperse phase fluid into a continuous phase fluid. A potential difference generated by a voltage source creates a dispersing electric field at the end of the inner electrode.

Sisson, Warren G. (Oak Ridge, TN); Basaran, Osman A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Harris, Michael T. (Knoxville, TN)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Wyoming Electricity Profile 2010 Wyoming profile Wyoming Electricity Profile 2010 Wyoming profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Wyoming) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 7,986 37 Electric Utilities 6,931 31 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,056 41 Net Generation (megawatthours) 48,119,254 31 Electric Utilities 44,738,543 25 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,380,711 42 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 67 23 Nitrogen Oxide 61 15 Carbon Dioxide 45,703 21 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.1 19 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.8 7 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2,094 2 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 17,113,458 40 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 17,113,458 39

386

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Idaho Electricity Profile 2010 Idaho profile Idaho Electricity Profile 2010 Idaho profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Idaho) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Hydroelectric Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 3,990 44 Electric Utilities 3,035 36 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 955 42 Net Generation (megawatthours) 12,024,564 44 Electric Utilities 8,589,208 37 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,435,356 40 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 7 45 Nitrogen Oxide 4 48 Carbon Dioxide 1,213 49 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.2 39 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.8 43 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 222 50 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 22,797,668 38 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 22,797,668 37

387

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

California Electricity Profile 2010 California profile California Electricity Profile 2010 California profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (California) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SPP/WECC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 67,328 2 Electric Utilities 28,689 2 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 38,639 4 Net Generation (megawatthours) 204,125,596 4 Electric Utilities 96,939,535 8 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 107,186,061 4 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 3 47 Nitrogen Oxide 80 9 Carbon Dioxide 55,406 16 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) * 49 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 41 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 598 46 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 258,525,414 2 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 240,948,673 2

388

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Tennessee Electricity Profile 2010 Tennessee full report Tennessee Electricity Profile 2010 Tennessee full report Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Tennessee) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 21,417 19 Electric Utilities 20,968 11 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 450 49 Net Generation (megawatthours) 82,348,625 19 Electric Utilities 79,816,049 15 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,532,576 45 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 138 13 Nitrogen Oxide 33 31 Carbon Dioxide 48,196 18 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.7 14 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 40 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,290 26 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 103,521,537 13 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 103,521,537 10

389

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 South Carolina profile Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 South Carolina profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (South Carolina) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 23,982 17 Electric Utilities 22,172 9 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,810 35 Net Generation (megawatthours) 104,153,133 14 Electric Utilities 100,610,887 6 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,542,246 39 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 106 19 Nitrogen Oxide 30 33 Carbon Dioxide 41,364 23 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.2 30 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 45 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 876 40 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 82,479,293 19 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 82,479,293 17

390

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Virginia Electricity Profile 2010 Virginia profile Virginia Electricity Profile 2010 Virginia profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Virginia) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/SERC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 24,109 16 Electric Utilities 19,434 15 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,676 21 Net Generation (megawatthours) 72,966,456 21 Electric Utilities 58,902,054 16 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 14,064,402 25 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 120 16 Nitrogen Oxide 49 24 Carbon Dioxide 39,719 25 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.6 15 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.5 23 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,200 30 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 113,806,135 10 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 113,806,135 7

391

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Delaware Electricity Profile 2010 Delaware profile Delaware Electricity Profile 2010 Delaware profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Delaware) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 3,389 46 Electric Utilities 55 48 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,334 29 Net Generation (megawatthours) 5,627,645 50 Electric Utilities 30,059 46 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 5,597,586 36 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 13 41 Nitrogen Oxide 5 47 Carbon Dioxide 4,187 45 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.2 7 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 16 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,640 15 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 11,605,932 44 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 7,582,539 46

392

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Colorado Electricity Profile 2010 Colorado profile Colorado Electricity Profile 2010 Colorado profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Colorado) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 13,777 30 Electric Utilities 9,114 28 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,662 22 Net Generation (megawatthours) 50,720,792 30 Electric Utilities 39,584,166 28 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 11,136,626 31 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 45 29 Nitrogen Oxide 55 20 Carbon Dioxide 40,499 24 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.0 32 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.4 10 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,760 12 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 52,917,786 27 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 52,917,786 24

393

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Kansas Electricity Profile 2010 Kansas profile Kansas Electricity Profile 2010 Kansas profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Kansas) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/SPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 12,543 32 Electric Utilities 11,732 20 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 812 45 Net Generation (megawatthours) 47,923,762 32 Electric Utilities 45,270,047 24 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,653,716 44 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 41 30 Nitrogen Oxide 46 26 Carbon Dioxide 36,321 26 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 33 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.1 13 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,671 14 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 40,420,675 32 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 40,420,675 30

394

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Pennsylvania Electricity Profile 2010 Pennsylvania profile Pennsylvania Electricity Profile 2010 Pennsylvania profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Pennsylvania) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 45,575 4 Electric Utilities 455 44 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 45,120 2 Net Generation (megawatthours) 229,752,306 2 Electric Utilities 1,086,500 42 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 228,665,806 2 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 387 3 Nitrogen Oxide 136 2 Carbon Dioxide 122,830 3 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.7 13 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 27 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,179 32 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 148,963,968 5 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 114,787,417 6

395

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Pennsylvania Electricity Profile 2010 Pennsylvania profile Pennsylvania Electricity Profile 2010 Pennsylvania profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Pennsylvania) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 45,575 4 Electric Utilities 455 44 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 45,120 2 Net Generation (megawatthours) 229,752,306 2 Electric Utilities 1,086,500 42 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 228,665,806 2 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 387 3 Nitrogen Oxide 136 2 Carbon Dioxide 122,830 3 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.7 13 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 27 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,179 32 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 148,963,968 5 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 114,787,417 6

396

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Wyoming Electricity Profile 2010 Wyoming profile Wyoming Electricity Profile 2010 Wyoming profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Wyoming) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 7,986 37 Electric Utilities 6,931 31 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,056 41 Net Generation (megawatthours) 48,119,254 31 Electric Utilities 44,738,543 25 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,380,711 42 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 67 23 Nitrogen Oxide 61 15 Carbon Dioxide 45,703 21 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.1 19 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.8 7 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2,094 2 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 17,113,458 40 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 17,113,458 39

397

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Kentucky Electricity Profile 2010 Kentucky profile Kentucky Electricity Profile 2010 Kentucky profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Kentucky) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 20,453 21 Electric Utilities 18,945 16 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,507 38 Net Generation (megawatthours) 98,217,658 17 Electric Utilities 97,472,144 7 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 745,514 48 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 249 7 Nitrogen Oxide 85 7 Carbon Dioxide 93,160 7 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.6 5 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 15 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2,091 3 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 93,569,426 14 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 93,569,426 12

398

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Michigan Electricity Profile 2010 Michigan profile Michigan Electricity Profile 2010 Michigan profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Michigan) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 29,831 11 Electric Utilities 21,639 10 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,192 14 Net Generation (megawatthours) 111,551,371 13 Electric Utilities 89,666,874 13 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 21,884,497 16 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 254 6 Nitrogen Oxide 89 6 Carbon Dioxide 74,480 11 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.0 8 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.8 19 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,472 20 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 103,649,219 12 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 94,565,247 11

399

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Alabama Electricity Profile 2010 Alabama profile Alabama Electricity Profile 2010 Alabama profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Alabama) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 32,417 9 Electric Utilities 23,642 7 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,775 12 Net Generation (megawatthours) 152,150,512 6 Electric Utilities 122,766,490 2 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 29,384,022 12 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 218 10 Nitrogen Oxide 66 14 Carbon Dioxide 79,375 9 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.2 18 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 36 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,150 33 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 90,862,645 15 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 90,862,645 13

400

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Connecticut Electricity Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Connecticut Electricity Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Connecticut) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 8,284 35 Electric Utilities 160 46 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,124 15 Net Generation (megawatthours) 33,349,623 40 Electric Utilities 65,570 45 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 33,284,053 11 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 2 48 Nitrogen Oxide 7 45 Carbon Dioxide 9,201 41 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.1 48 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.5 49 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 608 45 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 30,391,766 35 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 13,714,958 40

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rounding sources electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Utah Electricity Profile 2010 Utah profile Utah Electricity Profile 2010 Utah profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Utah) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 7,497 39 Electric Utilities 6,648 32 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 849 44 Net Generation (megawatthours) 42,249,355 35 Electric Utilities 39,522,124 29 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,727,231 43 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 25 34 Nitrogen Oxide 68 13 Carbon Dioxide 35,519 27 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 38 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 3.6 4 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,853 9 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 28,044,001 37 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 28,044,001 36

402

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 South Carolina profile Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 South Carolina profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (South Carolina) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 23,982 17 Electric Utilities 22,172 9 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,810 35 Net Generation (megawatthours) 104,153,133 14 Electric Utilities 100,610,887 6 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,542,246 39 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 106 19 Nitrogen Oxide 30 33 Carbon Dioxide 41,364 23 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.2 30 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 45 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 876 40 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 82,479,293 19 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 82,479,293 17

403

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alaska Electricity Profile 2010 Alaska profile Alaska Electricity Profile 2010 Alaska profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Alaska) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) -- Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 2,067 48 Electric Utilities 1,889 39 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 178 51 Net Generation (megawatthours) 6,759,576 48 Electric Utilities 6,205,050 40 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 554,526 49 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 3 46 Nitrogen Oxide 16 39 Carbon Dioxide 4,125 46 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 41 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 5.2 1 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,345 23 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 6,247,038 50 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 6,247,038 47

404

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nevada Electricity Profile 2010 Nevada profile Nevada Electricity Profile 2010 Nevada profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Nevada) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 11,421 34 Electric Utilities 8,713 29 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,708 33 Net Generation (megawatthours) 35,146,248 38 Electric Utilities 23,710,917 34 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 11,435,331 29 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 7 44 Nitrogen Oxide 15 40 Carbon Dioxide 17,020 38 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.4 46 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 37 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,068 37 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 33,772,595 33 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 32,348,879 32

405

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Washington Electricity Profile 2010 Washington profile Washington Electricity Profile 2010 Washington profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Washington) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Hydroelectric Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 30,478 10 Electric Utilities 26,498 5 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,979 26 Net Generation (megawatthours) 103,472,729 15 Electric Utilities 88,057,219 14 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 15,415,510 23 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 14 39 Nitrogen Oxide 21 37 Carbon Dioxide 13,984 39 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.3 47 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.4 50 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 298 49 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 90,379,970 16 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 88,116,958 14

406

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Electricity Profile 2010 Oregon profile Oregon Electricity Profile 2010 Oregon profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Oregon) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Hydroelectric Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 14,261 29 Electric Utilities 10,846 27 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,415 28 Net Generation (megawatthours) 55,126,999 27 Electric Utilities 41,142,684 26 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 13,984,316 26 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 16 37 Nitrogen Oxide 15 42 Carbon Dioxide 10,094 40 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 44 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 47 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 404 48 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 46,025,945 30 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 44,525,865 29

407

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Texas Electricity Profile 2010 Texas profile Texas Electricity Profile 2010 Texas profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Texas) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC/SPP/TRE/WECC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 108,258 1 Electric Utilities 26,533 4 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 81,724 1 Net Generation (megawatthours) 411,695,046 1 Electric Utilities 95,099,161 9 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 316,595,885 1 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 430 2 Nitrogen Oxide 204 1 Carbon Dioxide 251,409 1 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.3 28 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.1 32 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,346 22 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 358,457,550 1 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 358,457,550 1

408

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Indiana Electricity Profile 2010 Indiana profile Indiana Electricity Profile 2010 Indiana profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Indiana) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 27,638 13 Electric Utilities 23,008 8 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,630 23 Net Generation (megawatthours) 125,180,739 11 Electric Utilities 107,852,560 5 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 17,328,179 20 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 385 4 Nitrogen Oxide 120 4 Carbon Dioxide 116,283 5 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 6.8 4 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.1 12 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2,048 4 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 105,994,376 11 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 105,994,376 8

409

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oklahoma Electricity Profile 2010 Oklahoma profile Oklahoma Electricity Profile 2010 Oklahoma profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Oklahoma) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SPP Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 21,022 20 Electric Utilities 16,015 18 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 5,006 17 Net Generation (megawatthours) 72,250,733 22 Electric Utilities 57,421,195 17 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 14,829,538 24 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 85 21 Nitrogen Oxide 71 12 Carbon Dioxide 49,536 17 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.6 24 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.2 11 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,512 17 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 57,845,980 25 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 57,845,980 23

410

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Jersey Electricity Profile 2010 New Jersey profile Jersey Electricity Profile 2010 New Jersey profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (New Jersey) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 18,424 22 Electric Utilities 460 43 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 17,964 6 Net Generation (megawatthours) 65,682,494 23 Electric Utilities -186,385 50 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 65,868,878 6 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 14 40 Nitrogen Oxide 15 41 Carbon Dioxide 19,160 37 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.5 45 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.5 48 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 643 43 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 79,179,427 20 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 50,482,035 25

411

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Idaho Electricity Profile 2010 Idaho profile Idaho Electricity Profile 2010 Idaho profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Idaho) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Hydroelectric Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 3,990 44 Electric Utilities 3,035 36 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 955 42 Net Generation (megawatthours) 12,024,564 44 Electric Utilities 8,589,208 37 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,435,356 40 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 7 45 Nitrogen Oxide 4 48 Carbon Dioxide 1,213 49 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.2 39 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.8 43 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 222 50 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 22,797,668 38 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 22,797,668 37

412

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Michigan Electricity Profile 2010 Michigan profile Michigan Electricity Profile 2010 Michigan profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Michigan) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 29,831 11 Electric Utilities 21,639 10 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,192 14 Net Generation (megawatthours) 111,551,371 13 Electric Utilities 89,666,874 13 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 21,884,497 16 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 254 6 Nitrogen Oxide 89 6 Carbon Dioxide 74,480 11 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.0 8 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.8 19 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,472 20 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 103,649,219 12 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 94,565,247 11

413

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Ohio Electricity Profile 2010 Ohio profile Ohio Electricity Profile 2010 Ohio profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Ohio) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 33,071 8 Electric Utilities 20,179 13 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 12,892 7 Net Generation (megawatthours) 143,598,337 7 Electric Utilities 92,198,096 10 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 51,400,241 7 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 610 1 Nitrogen Oxide 122 3 Carbon Dioxide 121,964 4 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 9.4 1 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 17 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,872 8 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 154,145,418 4 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 105,329,797 9

414

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Wisconsin Electricity Profile 2010 Wisconsin profile Wisconsin Electricity Profile 2010 Wisconsin profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Wisconsin) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 17,836 23 Electric Utilities 13,098 19 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,738 20 Net Generation (megawatthours) 64,314,067 24 Electric Utilities 45,579,970 22 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 18,734,097 18 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 145 12 Nitrogen Oxide 49 25 Carbon Dioxide 47,238 19 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.0 9 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.7 20 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,619 16 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 68,752,417 22 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 68,752,417 21

415

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Tennessee Electricity Profile 2010 Tennessee full report Tennessee Electricity Profile 2010 Tennessee full report Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Tennessee) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 21,417 19 Electric Utilities 20,968 11 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 450 49 Net Generation (megawatthours) 82,348,625 19 Electric Utilities 79,816,049 15 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,532,576 45 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 138 13 Nitrogen Oxide 33 31 Carbon Dioxide 48,196 18 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.7 14 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 40 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,290 26 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 103,521,537 13 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 103,521,537 10

416

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Florida Electricity Profile 2010 Florida profile Florida Electricity Profile 2010 Florida profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Florida) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) FRCC/SERC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 59,147 3 Electric Utilities 50,853 1 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,294 13 Net Generation (megawatthours) 229,095,935 3 Electric Utilities 206,062,185 1 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 23,033,750 15 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 160 11 Nitrogen Oxide 101 5 Carbon Dioxide 123,811 2 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.5 37 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 35 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,191 31 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 231,209,614 3 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 231,209,614 3

417

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Arizona Electricity Profile 2010 Arizona profile Arizona Electricity Profile 2010 Arizona profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Arizona) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 26,392 15 Electric Utilities 20,115 14 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 6,277 16 Net Generation (megawatthours) 111,750,957 12 Electric Utilities 91,232,664 11 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 20,518,293 17 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 33 33 Nitrogen Oxide 57 17 Carbon Dioxide 55,683 15 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.7 43 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.1 31 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,099 35 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 72,831,737 21 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 72,831,737 20

418

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Kentucky Electricity Profile 2010 Kentucky profile Kentucky Electricity Profile 2010 Kentucky profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Kentucky) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 20,453 21 Electric Utilities 18,945 16 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,507 38 Net Generation (megawatthours) 98,217,658 17 Electric Utilities 97,472,144 7 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 745,514 48 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 249 7 Nitrogen Oxide 85 7 Carbon Dioxide 93,160 7 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.6 5 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 15 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2,091 3 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 93,569,426 14 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 93,569,426 12

419

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alabama Electricity Profile 2010 Alabama profile Alabama Electricity Profile 2010 Alabama profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Alabama) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 32,417 9 Electric Utilities 23,642 7 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,775 12 Net Generation (megawatthours) 152,150,512 6 Electric Utilities 122,766,490 2 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 29,384,022 12 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 218 10 Nitrogen Oxide 66 14 Carbon Dioxide 79,375 9 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.2 18 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 36 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,150 33 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 90,862,645 15 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 90,862,645 13

420

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Arkansas Electricity Profile 2010 Arkansas profile Arkansas Electricity Profile 2010 Arkansas profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Arkansas) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC/SPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 15,981 25 Electric Utilities 11,488 23 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,493 24 Net Generation (megawatthours) 61,000,185 25 Electric Utilities 47,108,063 20 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 13,892,122 27 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 74 22 Nitrogen Oxide 40 29 Carbon Dioxide 34,018 28 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.7 22 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.5 24 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,229 29 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 48,194,285 29 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 48,194,285 27

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rounding sources electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Maryland Electricity Profile 2010 Maryland profile Maryland Electricity Profile 2010 Maryland profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Maryland) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 12,516 33 Electric Utilities 80 47 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 12,436 9 Net Generation (megawatthours) 43,607,264 33 Electric Utilities 2,996 48 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 43,604,268 9 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 45 28 Nitrogen Oxide 25 34 Carbon Dioxide 26,369 33 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.3 29 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 29 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,333 24 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 65,335,498 24 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 36,082,473 31

422

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Hawaii Electricity Profile 2010 Hawaii profile Hawaii Electricity Profile 2010 Hawaii profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Hawaii) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) -- Primary Energy Source Petroleum Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 2,536 47 Electric Utilities 1,828 40 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 708 47 Net Generation (megawatthours) 10,836,036 45 Electric Utilities 6,416,068 38 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,419,968 38 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 17 36 Nitrogen Oxide 21 36 Carbon Dioxide 8,287 42 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.4 16 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 4.3 2 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,686 13 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 10,016,509 48 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 10,016,509 44

423

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mexico Electricity Profile 2010 New Mexico profile Mexico Electricity Profile 2010 New Mexico profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (New Mexico) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SPP/WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 8,130 36 Electric Utilities 6,345 33 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,785 36 Net Generation (megawatthours) 36,251,542 37 Electric Utilities 30,848,406 33 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 5,403,136 37 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 15 38 Nitrogen Oxide 56 19 Carbon Dioxide 29,379 31 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 42 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 3.4 5 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,787 11 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 22,428,344 39 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 22,428,344 38

424

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Hampshire Electricity Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile Hampshire Electricity Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (New Hampshire) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 4,180 43 Electric Utilities 1,132 41 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,048 32 Net Generation (megawatthours) 22,195,912 42 Electric Utilities 3,979,333 41 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 18,216,579 19 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 34 32 Nitrogen Oxide 6 46 Carbon Dioxide 5,551 43 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.4 17 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 46 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 551 47 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 10,890,074 47 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 7,712,938 45

425

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oregon Electricity Profile 2010 Oregon profile Oregon Electricity Profile 2010 Oregon profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Oregon) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Hydroelectric Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 14,261 29 Electric Utilities 10,846 27 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,415 28 Net Generation (megawatthours) 55,126,999 27 Electric Utilities 41,142,684 26 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 13,984,316 26 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 16 37 Nitrogen Oxide 15 42 Carbon Dioxide 10,094 40 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 44 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 47 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 404 48 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 46,025,945 30 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 44,525,865 29

426

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Maine Electricity Profile 2010 Maine profile Maine Electricity Profile 2010 Maine profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Maine) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 4,430 42 Electric Utilities 19 49 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,410 25 Net Generation (megawatthours) 17,018,660 43 Electric Utilities 1,759 49 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 17,016,901 22 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 12 42 Nitrogen Oxide 8 44 Carbon Dioxide 4,948 44 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 36 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.1 33 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 641 44 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 11,531,568 45 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 151,588 51 Energy-Only Provider Sales (megawatthours) 11,379,980 10

427

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mississippi Electricity Profile 2010 Mississippi profile Mississippi Electricity Profile 2010 Mississippi profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Mississippi) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 15,691 26 Electric Utilities 10,858 26 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,833 18 Net Generation (megawatthours) 54,487,260 28 Electric Utilities 40,841,436 27 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 13,645,824 28 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 59 26 Nitrogen Oxide 31 32 Carbon Dioxide 26,845 32 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.4 26 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.2 30 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,086 36 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 49,687,166 28 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 49,687,166 26

428

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Washington Electricity Profile 2010 Washington profile Washington Electricity Profile 2010 Washington profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Washington) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Hydroelectric Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 30,478 10 Electric Utilities 26,498 5 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,979 26 Net Generation (megawatthours) 103,472,729 15 Electric Utilities 88,057,219 14 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 15,415,510 23 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 14 39 Nitrogen Oxide 21 37 Carbon Dioxide 13,984 39 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.3 47 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.4 50 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 298 49 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 90,379,970 16 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 88,116,958 14

429

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Mexico Electricity Profile 2010 New Mexico profile Mexico Electricity Profile 2010 New Mexico profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (New Mexico) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SPP/WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 8,130 36 Electric Utilities 6,345 33 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,785 36 Net Generation (megawatthours) 36,251,542 37 Electric Utilities 30,848,406 33 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 5,403,136 37 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 15 38 Nitrogen Oxide 56 19 Carbon Dioxide 29,379 31 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 42 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 3.4 5 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,787 11 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 22,428,344 39 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 22,428,344 38

430

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Delaware Electricity Profile 2010 Delaware profile Delaware Electricity Profile 2010 Delaware profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Delaware) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 3,389 46 Electric Utilities 55 48 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,334 29 Net Generation (megawatthours) 5,627,645 50 Electric Utilities 30,059 46 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 5,597,586 36 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 13 41 Nitrogen Oxide 5 47 Carbon Dioxide 4,187 45 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.2 7 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 16 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,640 15 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 11,605,932 44 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 7,582,539 46

431

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Ohio Electricity Profile 2010 Ohio profile Ohio Electricity Profile 2010 Ohio profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Ohio) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 33,071 8 Electric Utilities 20,179 13 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 12,892 7 Net Generation (megawatthours) 143,598,337 7 Electric Utilities 92,198,096 10 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 51,400,241 7 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 610 1 Nitrogen Oxide 122 3 Carbon Dioxide 121,964 4 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 9.4 1 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 17 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,872 8 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 154,145,418 4 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 105,329,797 9

432

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Arkansas Electricity Profile 2010 Arkansas profile Arkansas Electricity Profile 2010 Arkansas profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Arkansas) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC/SPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 15,981 25 Electric Utilities 11,488 23 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,493 24 Net Generation (megawatthours) 61,000,185 25 Electric Utilities 47,108,063 20 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 13,892,122 27 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 74 22 Nitrogen Oxide 40 29 Carbon Dioxide 34,018 28 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.7 22 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.5 24 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,229 29 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 48,194,285 29 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 48,194,285 27

433

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oklahoma Electricity Profile 2010 Oklahoma profile Oklahoma Electricity Profile 2010 Oklahoma profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Oklahoma) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SPP Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 21,022 20 Electric Utilities 16,015 18 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 5,006 17 Net Generation (megawatthours) 72,250,733 22 Electric Utilities 57,421,195 17 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 14,829,538 24 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 85 21 Nitrogen Oxide 71 12 Carbon Dioxide 49,536 17 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.6 24 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.2 11 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,512 17 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 57,845,980 25 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 57,845,980 23

434

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Iowa Electricity Profile 2010 Iowa profile Iowa Electricity Profile 2010 Iowa profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Iowa) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 14,592 28 Electric Utilities 11,282 24 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,310 30 Net Generation (megawatthours) 57,508,721 26 Electric Utilities 46,188,988 21 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 11,319,733 30 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 108 18 Nitrogen Oxide 50 22 Carbon Dioxide 47,211 20 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 4.1 11 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 14 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,810 10 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 45,445,269 31 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 45,445,269 28

435

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

West Virginia Electricity Profile 2010 West Virginia profile West Virginia Electricity Profile 2010 West Virginia profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (West Virginia) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 16,495 24 Electric Utilities 11,719 21 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,775 19 Net Generation (megawatthours) 80,788,947 20 Electric Utilities 56,719,755 18 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 24,069,192 13 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 105 20 Nitrogen Oxide 49 23 Carbon Dioxide 74,283 12 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.9 20 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 25 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2,027 5 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 32,031,803 34 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 32,031,803 33

436

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Vermont Electricity Profile 2010 Vermont profile Vermont Electricity Profile 2010 Vermont profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Vermont) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 1,128 50 Electric Utilities 260 45 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 868 43 Net Generation (megawatthours) 6,619,990 49 Electric Utilities 720,853 44 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 5,899,137 35 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide * 51 Nitrogen Oxide 1 50 Carbon Dioxide 8 51 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) * 51 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.2 51 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3 51 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 5,594,833 51 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 5,594,833 48 Direct Use (megawatthours) 19,806 47

437

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Mississippi Electricity Profile 2010 Mississippi profile Mississippi Electricity Profile 2010 Mississippi profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Mississippi) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 15,691 26 Electric Utilities 10,858 26 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,833 18 Net Generation (megawatthours) 54,487,260 28 Electric Utilities 40,841,436 27 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 13,645,824 28 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 59 26 Nitrogen Oxide 31 32 Carbon Dioxide 26,845 32 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.4 26 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.2 30 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,086 36 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 49,687,166 28 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 49,687,166 26

438

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Wisconsin Electricity Profile 2010 Wisconsin profile Wisconsin Electricity Profile 2010 Wisconsin profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Wisconsin) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 17,836 23 Electric Utilities 13,098 19 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,738 20 Net Generation (megawatthours) 64,314,067 24 Electric Utilities 45,579,970 22 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 18,734,097 18 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 145 12 Nitrogen Oxide 49 25 Carbon Dioxide 47,238 19 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.0 9 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.7 20 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,619 16 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 68,752,417 22 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 68,752,417 21

439

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Colorado Electricity Profile 2010 Colorado profile Colorado Electricity Profile 2010 Colorado profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Colorado) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 13,777 30 Electric Utilities 9,114 28 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,662 22 Net Generation (megawatthours) 50,720,792 30 Electric Utilities 39,584,166 28 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 11,136,626 31 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 45 29 Nitrogen Oxide 55 20 Carbon Dioxide 40,499 24 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.0 32 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.4 10 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,760 12 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 52,917,786 27 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 52,917,786 24

440

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hampshire Electricity Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile Hampshire Electricity Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (New Hampshire) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 4,180 43 Electric Utilities 1,132 41 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,048 32 Net Generation (megawatthours) 22,195,912 42 Electric Utilities 3,979,333 41 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 18,216,579 19 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 34 32 Nitrogen Oxide 6 46 Carbon Dioxide 5,551 43 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.4 17 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 46 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 551 47 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 10,890,074 47 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 7,712,938 45

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rounding sources electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 North Carolina profile Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 North Carolina profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (North Carolina) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 27,674 12 Electric Utilities 25,553 6 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,121 34 Net Generation (megawatthours) 128,678,483 10 Electric Utilities 121,251,138 3 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 7,427,345 34 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 131 14 Nitrogen Oxide 57 16 Carbon Dioxide 73,241 13 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.2 31 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 34 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,255 28 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 136,414,947 9 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 136,414,947 5

442

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nevada Electricity Profile 2010 Nevada profile Nevada Electricity Profile 2010 Nevada profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Nevada) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 11,421 34 Electric Utilities 8,713 29 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,708 33 Net Generation (megawatthours) 35,146,248 38 Electric Utilities 23,710,917 34 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 11,435,331 29 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 7 44 Nitrogen Oxide 15 40 Carbon Dioxide 17,020 38 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.4 46 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 37 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,068 37 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 33,772,595 33 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 32,348,879 32

443

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Kansas Electricity Profile 2010 Kansas profile Kansas Electricity Profile 2010 Kansas profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Kansas) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/SPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 12,543 32 Electric Utilities 11,732 20 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 812 45 Net Generation (megawatthours) 47,923,762 32 Electric Utilities 45,270,047 24 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,653,716 44 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 41 30 Nitrogen Oxide 46 26 Carbon Dioxide 36,321 26 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 33 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.1 13 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,671 14 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 40,420,675 32 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 40,420,675 30

444

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nebraska Electricity Profile 2010 Nebraska profile Nebraska Electricity Profile 2010 Nebraska profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Nebraska) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/SPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 7,857 38 Electric Utilities 7,647 30 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 210 50 Net Generation (megawatthours) 36,630,006 36 Electric Utilities 36,242,921 30 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 387,085 50 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 65 24 Nitrogen Oxide 40 30 Carbon Dioxide 24,461 34 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.9 12 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.4 9 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,472 19 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 29,849,460 36 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 29,849,460 35

445

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Missouri Electricity Profile 2010 Missouri profile Missouri Electricity Profile 2010 Missouri profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Missouri) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC/SPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 21,739 18 Electric Utilities 20,360 12 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,378 39 Net Generation (megawatthours) 92,312,989 18 Electric Utilities 90,176,805 12 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,136,184 46 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 233 8 Nitrogen Oxide 56 18 Carbon Dioxide 78,815 10 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.6 6 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 26 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,882 7 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 86,085,117 17 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 86,085,117 15

446

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Dakota Electricity Profile 2010 North Dakota profile Dakota Electricity Profile 2010 North Dakota profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (North Dakota) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 6,188 40 Electric Utilities 4,912 34 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,276 40 Net Generation (megawatthours) 34,739,542 39 Electric Utilities 31,343,796 32 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,395,746 41 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 116 17 Nitrogen Oxide 52 21 Carbon Dioxide 31,064 30 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 7.3 3 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 3.3 6 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,971 6 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 12,956,263 42 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 12,956,263 41

447

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Minnesota Electricity Profile 2010 Minnesota profile Minnesota Electricity Profile 2010 Minnesota profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Minnesota) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 14,715 27 Electric Utilities 11,547 22 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,168 31 Net Generation (megawatthours) 53,670,227 29 Electric Utilities 45,428,599 23 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,241,628 32 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 57 27 Nitrogen Oxide 44 27 Carbon Dioxide 32,946 29 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.3 27 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.8 18 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,353 21 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 67,799,706 23 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 67,799,706 22

448

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Louisiana Electricity Profile 2010 Louisiana profile Louisiana Electricity Profile 2010 Louisiana profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Louisiana) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC/SPP Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 26,744 14 Electric Utilities 16,471 17 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 10,272 10 Net Generation (megawatthours) 102,884,940 16 Electric Utilities 51,680,682 19 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 51,204,258 8 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 126 15 Nitrogen Oxide 75 11 Carbon Dioxide 58,706 14 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.7 21 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 21 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,258 27 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 85,079,692 18 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 85,079,692 16

449

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Utah Electricity Profile 2010 Utah profile Utah Electricity Profile 2010 Utah profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Utah) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 7,497 39 Electric Utilities 6,648 32 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 849 44 Net Generation (megawatthours) 42,249,355 35 Electric Utilities 39,522,124 29 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,727,231 43 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 25 34 Nitrogen Oxide 68 13 Carbon Dioxide 35,519 27 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 38 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 3.6 4 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,853 9 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 28,044,001 37 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 28,044,001 36

450

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Virginia Electricity Profile 2010 Virginia profile Virginia Electricity Profile 2010 Virginia profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Virginia) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/SERC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 24,109 16 Electric Utilities 19,434 15 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,676 21 Net Generation (megawatthours) 72,966,456 21 Electric Utilities 58,902,054 16 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 14,064,402 25 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 120 16 Nitrogen Oxide 49 24 Carbon Dioxide 39,719 25 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.6 15 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.5 23 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,200 30 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 113,806,135 10 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 113,806,135 7

451

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Dakota Electricity Profile 2010 North Dakota profile Dakota Electricity Profile 2010 North Dakota profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (North Dakota) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 6,188 40 Electric Utilities 4,912 34 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,276 40 Net Generation (megawatthours) 34,739,542 39 Electric Utilities 31,343,796 32 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,395,746 41 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 116 17 Nitrogen Oxide 52 21 Carbon Dioxide 31,064 30 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 7.3 3 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 3.3 6 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,971 6 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 12,956,263 42 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 12,956,263 41

452

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Alaska Electricity Profile 2010 Alaska profile Alaska Electricity Profile 2010 Alaska profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Alaska) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) -- Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 2,067 48 Electric Utilities 1,889 39 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 178 51 Net Generation (megawatthours) 6,759,576 48 Electric Utilities 6,205,050 40 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 554,526 49 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 3 46 Nitrogen Oxide 16 39 Carbon Dioxide 4,125 46 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 41 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 5.2 1 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,345 23 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 6,247,038 50 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 6,247,038 47

453

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Minnesota Electricity Profile 2010 Minnesota profile Minnesota Electricity Profile 2010 Minnesota profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Minnesota) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 14,715 27 Electric Utilities 11,547 22 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,168 31 Net Generation (megawatthours) 53,670,227 29 Electric Utilities 45,428,599 23 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,241,628 32 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 57 27 Nitrogen Oxide 44 27 Carbon Dioxide 32,946 29 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.3 27 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.8 18 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,353 21 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 67,799,706 23 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 67,799,706 22

454

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Maryland Electricity Profile 2010 Maryland profile Maryland Electricity Profile 2010 Maryland profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Maryland) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 12,516 33 Electric Utilities 80 47 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 12,436 9 Net Generation (megawatthours) 43,607,264 33 Electric Utilities 2,996 48 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 43,604,268 9 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 45 28 Nitrogen Oxide 25 34 Carbon Dioxide 26,369 33 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.3 29 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 29 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,333 24 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 65,335,498 24 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 36,082,473 31

455

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

York Electricity Profile 2010 New York profile York Electricity Profile 2010 New York profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (New York) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 39,357 6 Electric Utilities 11,032 25 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 28,325 5 Net Generation (megawatthours) 136,961,654 9 Electric Utilities 34,633,335 31 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 102,328,319 5 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 62 25 Nitrogen Oxide 44 28 Carbon Dioxide 41,584 22 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 40 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.7 44 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 669 42 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 144,623,573 7 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 79,119,769 18

456

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 North Carolina profile Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 North Carolina profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (North Carolina) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 27,674 12 Electric Utilities 25,553 6 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,121 34 Net Generation (megawatthours) 128,678,483 10 Electric Utilities 121,251,138 3 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 7,427,345 34 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 131 14 Nitrogen Oxide 57 16 Carbon Dioxide 73,241 13 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.2 31 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 34 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,255 28 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 136,414,947 9 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 136,414,947 5

457

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Montana Electricity Profile 2010 Montana profile Montana Electricity Profile 2010 Montana profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Montana) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 5,866 41 Electric Utilities 2,340 38 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,526 27 Net Generation (megawatthours) 29,791,181 41 Electric Utilities 6,271,180 39 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 23,520,001 14 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 22 35 Nitrogen Oxide 21 35 Carbon Dioxide 20,370 35 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 35 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 22 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,507 18 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 13,423,138 41 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 10,803,422 43

458

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Iowa Electricity Profile 2010 Iowa profile Iowa Electricity Profile 2010 Iowa profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Iowa) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 14,592 28 Electric Utilities 11,282 24 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,310 30 Net Generation (megawatthours) 57,508,721 26 Electric Utilities 46,188,988 21 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 11,319,733 30 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 108 18 Nitrogen Oxide 50 22 Carbon Dioxide 47,211 20 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 4.1 11 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 14 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,810 10 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 45,445,269 31 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 45,445,269 28

459

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Illinois Electricity Profile 2010 Illinois profile Illinois Electricity Profile 2010 Illinois profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Illinois) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/RFC/SERC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 44,127 5 Electric Utilities 4,800 35 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 39,327 3 Net Generation (megawatthours) 201,351,872 5 Electric Utilities 12,418,332 35 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 188,933,540 3 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 232 9 Nitrogen Oxide 83 8 Carbon Dioxide 103,128 6 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.5 25 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 38 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,129 34 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 144,760,674 6 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 77,890,532 19

460

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Louisiana Electricity Profile 2010 Louisiana profile Louisiana Electricity Profile 2010 Louisiana profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Louisiana) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC/SPP Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 26,744 14 Electric Utilities 16,471 17 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 10,272 10 Net Generation (megawatthours) 102,884,940 16 Electric Utilities 51,680,682 19 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 51,204,258 8 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 126 15 Nitrogen Oxide 75 11 Carbon Dioxide 58,706 14 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.7 21 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 21 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,258 27 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 85,079,692 18 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 85,079,692 16

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rounding sources electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

California Electricity Profile 2010 California profile California Electricity Profile 2010 California profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (California) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SPP/WECC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 67,328 2 Electric Utilities 28,689 2 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 38,639 4 Net Generation (megawatthours) 204,125,596 4 Electric Utilities 96,939,535 8 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 107,186,061 4 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 3 47 Nitrogen Oxide 80 9 Carbon Dioxide 55,406 16 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) * 49 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 41 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 598 46 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 258,525,414 2 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 240,948,673 2

462

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Dakota Electricity Profile 2010 South Dakota profile Dakota Electricity Profile 2010 South Dakota profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (South Dakota) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/WECC Primary Energy Source Hydroelectric Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 3,623 45 Electric Utilities 2,994 37 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 629 48 Net Generation (megawatthours) 10,049,636 46 Electric Utilities 8,682,448 36 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,367,188 47 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 12 43 Nitrogen Oxide 12 43 Carbon Dioxide 3,611 47 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.6 23 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.6 8 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 792 41 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 11,356,149 46 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 11,356,149 42

463

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Jersey Electricity Profile 2010 New Jersey profile Jersey Electricity Profile 2010 New Jersey profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (New Jersey) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 18,424 22 Electric Utilities 460 43 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 17,964 6 Net Generation (megawatthours) 65,682,494 23 Electric Utilities -186,385 50 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 65,868,878 6 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 14 40 Nitrogen Oxide 15 41 Carbon Dioxide 19,160 37 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.5 45 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.5 48 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 643 43 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 79,179,427 20 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 50,482,035 25

464

electric | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

electric electric Dataset Summary Description This dataset is part of a larger internal dataset at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) that explores various characteristics of large solar electric (both PV and CSP) facilities around the United States. This dataset focuses on the land use characteristics for solar facilities that are either under construction or currently in operation. Source Land-Use Requirements for Solar Power Plants in the United States Date Released June 25th, 2013 (5 months ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords acres area average concentrating solar power csp Density electric hectares km2 land land requirements land use land-use mean photovoltaic photovoltaics PV solar statistics Data application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon Master Solar Land Use Spreadsheet (xlsx, 1.5 MiB)

465

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Massachusetts Electricity Profile 2010 Massachusetts profile Massachusetts Electricity Profile 2010 Massachusetts profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Massachusetts) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 13,697 31 Electric Utilities 937 42 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 12,760 8 Net Generation (megawatthours) 42,804,824 34 Electric Utilities 802,906 43 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 42,001,918 10 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 35 31 Nitrogen Oxide 17 38 Carbon Dioxide 20,291 36 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.8 34 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 39 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,045 38 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 57,123,422 26 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 31,822,942 34

466

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nebraska Electricity Profile 2010 Nebraska profile Nebraska Electricity Profile 2010 Nebraska profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Nebraska) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/SPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 7,857 38 Electric Utilities 7,647 30 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 210 50 Net Generation (megawatthours) 36,630,006 36 Electric Utilities 36,242,921 30 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 387,085 50 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 65 24 Nitrogen Oxide 40 30 Carbon Dioxide 24,461 34 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.9 12 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.4 9 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,472 19 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 29,849,460 36 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 29,849,460 35

467

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Montana Electricity Profile 2010 Montana profile Montana Electricity Profile 2010 Montana profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Montana) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 5,866 41 Electric Utilities 2,340 38 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,526 27 Net Generation (megawatthours) 29,791,181 41 Electric Utilities 6,271,180 39 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 23,520,001 14 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 22 35 Nitrogen Oxide 21 35 Carbon Dioxide 20,370 35 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 35 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 22 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,507 18 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 13,423,138 41 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 10,803,422 43

468

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Maine Electricity Profile 2010 Maine profile Maine Electricity Profile 2010 Maine profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Maine) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 4,430 42 Electric Utilities 19 49 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,410 25 Net Generation (megawatthours) 17,018,660 43 Electric Utilities 1,759 49 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 17,016,901 22 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 12 42 Nitrogen Oxide 8 44 Carbon Dioxide 4,948 44 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 36 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.1 33 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 641 44 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 11,531,568 45 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 151,588 51 Energy-Only Provider Sales (megawatthours) 11,379,980 10

469

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Texas Electricity Profile 2010 Texas profile Texas Electricity Profile 2010 Texas profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Texas) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC/SPP/TRE/WECC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 108,258 1 Electric Utilities 26,533 4 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 81,724 1 Net Generation (megawatthours) 411,695,046 1 Electric Utilities 95,099,161 9 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 316,595,885 1 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 430 2 Nitrogen Oxide 204 1 Carbon Dioxide 251,409 1 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.3 28 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.1 32 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,346 22 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 358,457,550 1 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 358,457,550 1

470

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Florida Electricity Profile 2010 Florida profile Florida Electricity Profile 2010 Florida profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Florida) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) FRCC/SERC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 59,147 3 Electric Utilities 50,853 1 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,294 13 Net Generation (megawatthours) 229,095,935 3 Electric Utilities 206,062,185 1 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 23,033,750 15 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 160 11 Nitrogen Oxide 101 5 Carbon Dioxide 123,811 2 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.5 37 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 35 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,191 31 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 231,209,614 3 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 231,209,614 3

471

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hawaii Electricity Profile 2010 Hawaii profile Hawaii Electricity Profile 2010 Hawaii profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Hawaii) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) -- Primary Energy Source Petroleum Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 2,536 47 Electric Utilities 1,828 40 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 708 47 Net Generation (megawatthours) 10,836,036 45 Electric Utilities 6,416,068 38 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,419,968 38 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 17 36 Nitrogen Oxide 21 36 Carbon Dioxide 8,287 42 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.4 16 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 4.3 2 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,686 13 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 10,016,509 48 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 10,016,509 44

472

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Connecticut Electricity Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Connecticut Electricity Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Connecticut) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 8,284 35 Electric Utilities 160 46 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,124 15 Net Generation (megawatthours) 33,349,623 40 Electric Utilities 65,570 45 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 33,284,053 11 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 2 48 Nitrogen Oxide 7 45 Carbon Dioxide 9,201 41 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.1 48 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.5 49 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 608 45 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 30,391,766 35 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 13,714,958 40

473

Quantum Electrical Measurements Portal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Home > Quantum Electrical Measurements Portal. Quantum Electrical Measurements Portal. Subject Areas. Electrical ...

2013-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

474

California Electric Energy Crisis - Electricity Information  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Electricity Information Available Formats; Status of Electric Industry Restructuring Activity in California: html: California State Electricity Profil ...

475

Table 7.7 Quantity of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam, 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 Quantity of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam, 2002;" 7 Quantity of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Supplier Sources of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." ,,,"Electricity","Components",,"Natural Gas","Components",,"Steam","Components" " "," ",,,"Electricity",,,"Natural Gas",,,"Steam"," ",," " " "," ",,"Electricity","from Sources",,"Natural Gas","from Sources",,"Steam","from Sources"

476

Table 7.10 Expenditures for Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam, 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Expenditures for Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam, 2002;" 0 Expenditures for Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Supplier Sources of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam;" " Unit: Million U.S. Dollars." ,,,"Electricity","Components",,"Natural Gas","Components",,"Steam","Components" " "," ",,,"Electricity",,,"Natural Gas",,,"Steam"," ",," " " "," ",,"Electricity","from Sources",,"Natural Gas","from Sources",,"Steam","from Sources","RSE"

477

Table 7.3 Average Prices of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam, 20  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Average Prices of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam, 2002;" 3 Average Prices of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Supplier Sources of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam;" " Unit: U.S. Dollars per Physical Units." ,,,"Electricity","Components",,"Natural Gas","Components",,"Steam","Components" " "," ",,,"Electricity",,,"Natural Gas",,,"Steam"," ",," " " "," ",,"Electricity","from Sources",,"Natural Gas","from Sources",,"Steam","from Sources"

478

Table N11.4. Expenditures for Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam, 19  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Expenditures for Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam, 1998;" 4. Expenditures for Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam, 1998;" " Level: National Data and Regional Totals; " " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Supplier Sources of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam;" " Unit: Million U.S. Dollars." ,,,"Electricity","Components",,"Natural Gas","Components",,"Steam","Components" " "," ",,,"Electricity",,,"Natural Gas",,,"Steam"," ",," " " "," ",,"Electricity","from Sources",,"Natural Gas","from Sources",,"Steam","from Sources","RSE"

479

Central Hudson Gas & Electric (Electric) - Commercial Lighting...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here Home Savings Central Hudson Gas & Electric (Electric) - Commercial Lighting Rebate Program Central Hudson Gas & Electric (Electric) - Commercial Lighting Rebate...

480

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

and",,"Coke and"," ","of Energy Sources","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Source(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Gas(e)","NGL(f)","Coal","...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rounding sources electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

sidual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke and",,"of Energy Sources" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Source(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Natural...

482

Heat Source Lire,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Source Lire, Source Lire, (liayrICS-25 ) tooling Tulles (Ai 1,06:1) - 11 (31.118 Module Stack Thermoelectric Module:, (14) ltcal L/Mr r a it i lli tisli Block Mounting Interface MMRTG Design Housing (At 2219) Fin (At Go63) Thermal Insulation (Min-K & Microtherm) Space Radioisotope Power Systems Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator January 2008 What is a Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator? Space exploration missions require safe, reliable, long-lived power systems to provide electricity and heat to spacecraft and their science instruments. A uniquely capable source of power is the radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) - essentially a nuclear battery that reliably converts heat into electricity. The Department of Energy and NASA are developing

483

electricity demand | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

demand demand Dataset Summary Description The New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development publishes energy data including many datasets related to electricity. Included here are three electricity consumption and demand datasets, specifically: annual observed electricity consumption by sector (1974 to 2009); observed percentage of consumers by sector (2002 - 2009); and regional electricity demand, as a percentage of total demand (2009). Source New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development Date Released Unknown Date Updated July 03rd, 2009 (5 years ago) Keywords Electricity Consumption electricity demand energy use by sector New Zealand Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon Electricity Consumption by Sector (1974 - 2009) (xls, 46.1 KiB) application/vnd.ms-excel icon Percentage of Consumers by Sector (2002 - 2009) (xls, 43.5 KiB)

484

Ion source based on the cathodic arc  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cylindrically symmetric arc source to produce a ring of ions which leave the surface of the arc target radially and are reflected by electrostatic fields present in the source to a point of use, such as a part to be coated, is described. An array of electrically isolated rings positioned in the source serves the dual purpose of minimizing bouncing of macroparticles and providing electrical insulation to maximize the electric field gradients within the source. The source also includes a series of baffles which function as a filtering or trapping mechanism for any macroparticles. 3 figures.

Sanders, D.M.; Falabella, S.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Photonic crystal light source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A light source is provided by a photonic crystal having an enhanced photonic density-of-states over a band of frequencies and wherein at least one of the dielectric materials of the photonic crystal has a complex dielectric constant, thereby producing enhanced light emission at the band of frequencies when the photonic crystal is heated. The dielectric material can be a metal, such as tungsten. The spectral properties of the light source can be easily tuned by modification of the photonic crystal structure and materials. The photonic crystal light source can be heated electrically or other heating means. The light source can further include additional photonic crystals that exhibit enhanced light emission at a different band of frequencies to provide for color mixing. The photonic crystal light source may have applications in optical telecommunications, information displays, energy conversion, sensors, and other optical applications.

Fleming, James G. (Albuquerque, NM); Lin, Shawn-Yu (Albuquerque, NM); Bur, James A. (Corrales, NM)

2004-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

486

Compare All CBECS Activities: Electricity Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Electricity Use Electricity Use Compare Activities by ... Electricity Use Total Electricity Consumption by Building Type Commercial buildings in the U.S. used a total of approximately 908 billion kilowatthours (kWh) of electricity in 1999. Office and mercantile buildings used the most total electricity. Both of these building types used electricity as their predominant energy source. Figure showing total electricity consumption by building type. If you need assistance viewing this page, please call 202-586-8800. Electricity Consumption per Building by Building Type Inpatient health care buildings used by far the most electricity per building. Figure showing electricity consumption per building by building type. If you need assistance viewing this page, please call 202-586-8800.

487

Definition: Electricity generation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electricity generation Electricity generation Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Electricity generation The process of producing electric energy or the amount of electric energy produced by transforming other forms of energy into electrical energy; commonly expressed in kilowatt-hours (kWh) or megawatt-hours (MWh).[1][2] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Electricity generation is the process of generating electrical power from other sources of primary energy. The fundamental principles of electricity generation were discovered during the 1820s and early 1830s by the British scientist Michael Faraday. His basic method is still used today: electricity is generated by the movement of a loop of wire, or disc of copper between the poles of a magnet. For electric utilities, it is the

488

Definition: Electric power | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

power power Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Electric power The amount of energy produced per second; the rate at which electric energy is transferred; commonly expressed in megawatts (MW).[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Electric power is the rate at which electric energy is transferred by an electric circuit. The SI unit of power is the watt, one joule per second. Electric power is usually produced by electric generators, but can also be supplied by chemical sources such as electric batteries. Electric power is generally supplied to businesses and homes by the electric power industry. Electric power is usually sold by the kilowatt hour (3.6 MJ) which is the product of power in kilowatts multiplied by running time in hours. View on Reegle Reegle Definition

489

Naknek Electric Association | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Naknek Electric Association Naknek Electric Association Jump to: navigation, search Name Naknek Electric Assn, Inc Place Alaska Utility Id 13201 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location AK Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 -- File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial Rate - Single Phase Commercial Commercial Rate - Three Phase Commercial Large Power - Seasonal Primary Industrial Large Power - Secondary Industrial Large Power - Secondary Seasonal Industrial Large Power - Year Round Primary Industrial Residential Rate Residential

490

Electricity Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Emissions Caps and the Impact of a Radical Change in Nuclear Electricity Costs journal International Journal of Energy Economics and Policy volume year month chapter...

491

Round Table Meeting Summaries Purchase Order: DE-IE0000002 Final Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Round Table Meeting Summaries Round Table Meeting Summaries Purchase Order: DE-IE0000002 Final Report 25-Apr-11 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs CNI Professional Services, LLC 2600 John Saxon Blvd Norman, OK 73026 Jonathan Blackwell Project Manager Phone: (202) 361-1998 Work Performed for: Submitted by: Point of Contact: jonathan.blackwell@chickasaw.com Key Word Comment Meeting 1 Alaska We deal with about 15 isolated, very remote villages. No infrastructure, roads or grid. There are good wind resources. Some villages have geothermal. Woody biomass is at about half of the villages. Alaska Energy helped with the studies. We need strategic energy planning at the community level. Need to get village buy in. No one can tell the villages what to do. I have some other things to say, but they are probably not appropriate now.

492

The Consumer Electronics Show round-up | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

The Consumer Electronics Show round-up The Consumer Electronics Show round-up Home > Groups > OpenEI Community Central Graham7781's picture Submitted by Graham7781(2002) Super contributor 23 January, 2013 - 13:57 CES electronics home automation Las Vegas OpenEI Smart Grid Every January, Las Vegas hosts the Consumer Electronics Show. The CES is the world's largest technology-related trade show. The highlights of this year's show were OLED TVs, ultra-thin laptops, tablets, and smartphones. However, a few smart grid-related technologies were making an impression. There was a wide-range of tech related to home automation. Some of these devices included HVAC, lighting, audio-visual, shading, security, automated door locks, and security, all controllable my multiple in-home devices. These technologies, along with the "smart grid", are all the make-up of a

493

Report on the first round of the Mock LISA Data Challenges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Mock LISA Data Challenges (MLDCs) have the dual purpose of fostering the development of LISA data analysis tools and capabilities, and demonstrating the technical readiness already achieved by the gravitational-wave community in distilling a rich science payoff from the LISA data output. The first round of MLDCs has just been completed: nine data sets containing simulated gravitational wave signals produced either by galactic binaries or massive black hole binaries embedded in simulated LISA instrumental noise were released in June 2006 with deadline for submission of results at the beginning of December 2006. Ten groups have participated in this first round of challenges. Here we describe the challenges, summarise the results, and provide a first critical assessment of the entries.

Arnaud, K A; Babak, S; Baker, J; Benacquista, M J; Bloomer, E; Brown, D; Camp, J B; Cannizzo, J K; Christensen, N; Clark, J; Cornsih, N J; Crowder, J; Cutler, C; Fairhurst, S; Finn, L S; Halloin, H; Hayama, K; Hendry, M; Jeannin, O; Królak, A; Larson, S L; Mandel, I; Messenger, C; Meyer, R; Mohanty, S; Nayak, R; Numata, K; Petiteau, A; Pitkin, M; Plagnol, E; Porter, E K; Prix, R; Roever, C; Sathyaprakash, B S; Stroeer, A; Sutton, P; Thirumalainambi, R; Thompson, D E; Toher, J; Umstätter, R; Vallisneri, M; Vecchio, A; Vinet, J Y; Whelan, J T; Woan, G

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

Report on the first round of the Mock LISA Data Challenges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Mock LISA Data Challenges (MLDCs) have the dual purpose of fostering the development of LISA data analysis tools and capabilities, and demonstrating the technical readiness already achieved by the gravitational-wave community in distilling a rich science payoff from the LISA data output. The first round of MLDCs has just been completed: nine data sets containing simulated gravitational wave signals produced either by galactic binaries or massive black hole binaries embedded in simulated LISA instrumental noise were released in June 2006 with deadline for submission of results at the beginning of December 2006. Ten groups have participated in this first round of challenges. Here we describe the challenges, summarise the results, and provide a first critical assessment of the entries.

K. A. Arnaud; G. Auger; S. Babak; J. Baker; M. J. Benacquista; E. Bloomer; D. Brown; J. B. Camp; J. K. Cannizzo; N. Christensen; J. Clark; N. J. Cornsih; J. Crowder; C. Cutler; L. S. Finn; H. Halloin; K. Hayama; M. Hendry; O. Jeannin; A. Krolak; S. L. Larson; I. Mandel; C. Messenger; R. Meyer; S. Mohanty; R. Nayak; K. Numata; A. Petiteau; M. Pitkin; E. Plagnol; E. K. Porter; R. Prix; C. Roever; B. S. Sathyaprakash; A. Stroeer; R. Thirumalainambi; D. E. Thompson; J. Toher; R. Umstaetter; M. Vallisneri; A. Vecchio; J Veitch; J-Y. Vinet; J. T. Whelan; G. Woan

2007-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

495

Table 8.11c Electric Net Summer Capacity: Electric Power Sector by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

7 Solar thermal and photovoltaic (PV) energy. Sources: - 1989-1997-U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric

496

Can I generate and sell electricity to an electric utility? - FAQ ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

How many alternative fuel and hybrid vehicles are there in the U.S.? How much U.S. energy consumption and electricity generation comes from renewable sources?

497

Round-robin artificial contamination test on high voltage dc insulators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper summarizes the results of a worldwide round-robin test of high voltage dc (HVDC) insulators, which was carried out in six laboratories aiming at standardization of the method for artificial contamination tests on HVDC insulators. Flashover characteristics of three kinds of specimens were evaluated by the clean fog and the salt fog procedures. Sufficient information is now available to allow the preparation of provisional international specifications for artificial contamination testing of HVDC insulators.

Naito, K.; Schneider, H.M.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

Sechage solaire des aliments (solar food drying and conservation of food for year-round consumption)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is an introduction to food drying as a measure to avoid the loss of agricultural surpluses, and conserve food for year-round consumption. It discusses the basic rules of food drying and gives an overview of various methods and appropriate dryer constructions. It also provides detailed explanations on how to process vegetables, fruits, and meats and gives advice on storage and cooking.

Not Available

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

Best Practices for the Application of Hand-Held Computers to Operator Rounds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report captures the experiences of several plants that use handheld computers for operator rounds. It also describes related industry experience and provides guidance for those who are considering a transition from paper to handheld computers. The objective is to provide lessons learned in order to aid utilities in transitioning to electronic data collection. The report has not concluded that every plant should make this transition; rather, it offers insights on performing thorough evaluations so ut...

2010-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

500

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #799: September 30, 2013 Electricity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9: September 30, 9: September 30, 2013 Electricity Generation by Source, 2003-2012 to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #799: September 30, 2013 Electricity Generation by Source, 2003-2012 on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #799: September 30, 2013 Electricity Generation by Source, 2003-2012 on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #799: September 30, 2013 Electricity Generation by Source, 2003-2012 on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #799: September 30, 2013 Electricity Generation by Source, 2003-2012 on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #799: September 30, 2013 Electricity Generation by Source, 2003-2012 on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #799: September 30, 2013 Electricity Generation by Source, 2003-2012 on