National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for rounding sources electric

  1. Electric Kettle Takes Down Microwave in Final Round of #EnergyFaceoff |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Electric Kettle Takes Down Microwave in Final Round of #EnergyFaceoff Electric Kettle Takes Down Microwave in Final Round of #EnergyFaceoff November 24, 2014 - 12:13pm Addthis The electric kettle wins the final round of #EnergyFaceoff. | Graphic by Stacy Buchanan, National Renewable Energy Laboratory The electric kettle wins the final round of #EnergyFaceoff. | Graphic by Stacy Buchanan, National Renewable Energy Laboratory Allison Casey Senior Communicator, NREL How can

  2. Electric Blanket Delivers K.O. to Space Heater During #EnergyFaceoff Round Three

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    #EnergyFaceoff round three goes to the electric blanket, see how much more money it can save you over a space heater!

  3. Electric Blanket vs. Space Heater: #EnergyFaceoff Round 3 Heats Up |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy Electric Blanket vs. Space Heater: #EnergyFaceoff Round 3 Heats Up Electric Blanket vs. Space Heater: #EnergyFaceoff Round 3 Heats Up November 17, 2014 - 9:49am Q&A Which appliance do you think is more efficient? Tell Us Addthis #EnergyFaceoff heats up with round 3… Electric blanket vs. space heater. Which is more efficient? | Graphic by Stacy Buchanan, National Renewable Energy Laboratory #EnergyFaceoff heats up with round 3... Electric blanket vs. space

  4. Compact portable electric power sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fry, D.N.; Holcomb, D.E.; Munro, J.K.; Oakes, L.C.; Matson, M.J.

    1997-02-01

    This report provides an overview of recent advances in portable electric power source (PEPS) technology and an assessment of emerging PEPS technologies that may meet US Special Operations Command`s (SOCOM) needs in the next 1--2- and 3--5-year time frames. The assessment was performed through a literature search and interviews with experts in various laboratories and companies. Nineteen PEPS technologies were reviewed and characterized as (1) PEPSs that meet SOCOM requirements; (2) PEPSs that could fulfill requirements for special field conditions and locations; (3) potentially high-payoff sources that require additional R and D; and (4) sources unlikely to meet present SOCOM requirements. 6 figs., 10 tabs.

  5. Fluid jet electric discharge source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bender, Howard A. (Ripon, CA)

    2006-04-25

    A fluid jet or filament source and a pair of coaxial high voltage electrodes, in combination, comprise an electrical discharge system to produce radiation and, in particular, EUV radiation. The fluid jet source is composed of at least two serially connected reservoirs, a first reservoir into which a fluid, that can be either a liquid or a gas, can be fed at some pressure higher than atmospheric and a second reservoir maintained at a lower pressure than the first. The fluid is allowed to expand through an aperture into a high vacuum region between a pair of coaxial electrodes. This second expansion produces a narrow well-directed fluid jet whose size is dependent on the size and configuration of the apertures and the pressure used in the reservoir. At some time during the flow of the fluid filament, a high voltage pulse is applied to the electrodes to excite the fluid to form a plasma which provides the desired radiation; the wavelength of the radiation being determined by the composition of the fluid.

  6. Prestressed glass, aezoelectric electrical power source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Newson, Melvin M.

    1976-01-01

    An electrical power source which comprises a body of prestressed glass having a piezoelectric transducer supported on the body in direct mechanical coupling therewith.

  7. Electric Kettle Takes Down Microwave in Final Round of #EnergyFaceoff...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Three Microwave or electric kettle, which appliance should win the honor of heating your water? | Graphic by Stacy Buchanan, National Renewable Energy Laboratory Microwave vs. ...

  8. Extreme-UV electrical discharge source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fornaciari, Neal R.; Nygren, Richard E.; Ulrickson, Michael A.

    2002-01-01

    An extreme ultraviolet and soft x-ray radiation electric capillary discharge source that includes a boron nitride housing defining a capillary bore that is positioned between two electrodes one of which is connected to a source of electric potential can generate a high EUV and soft x-ray radiation flux from the capillary bore outlet with minimal debris. The electrode that is positioned adjacent the capillary bore outlet is typically grounded. Pyrolytic boron nitride, highly oriented pyrolytic boron nitride, and cubic boron nitride are particularly suited. The boron nitride capillary bore can be configured as an insert that is encased in an exterior housing that is constructed of a thermally conductive material. Positioning the ground electrode sufficiently close to the capillary bore outlet also reduces bore erosion.

  9. Electric Power From Ambient Energy Sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeSteese, John G.; Hammerstrom, Donald J.; Schienbein, Lawrence A.

    2000-10-03

    This report summarizes research on opportunities to produce electric power from ambient sources as an alternative to using portable battery packs or hydrocarbon-fueled systems in remote areas. The work was an activity in the Advanced Concepts Project conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the Office of Research and Development in the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nonproliferation and National Security.

  10. Solar Energy Sources SES Solar Inc formerly Electric Network...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    SES Solar Inc formerly Electric Network com Jump to: navigation, search Name: Solar Energy Sources - SES Solar Inc (formerly Electric Network.com) Place: Vancouver, British...

  11. Compact portable electric power sources (Technical Report) | SciTech

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Connect Compact portable electric power sources Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Compact portable electric power sources × You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) SciTech Connect. This site is a product of DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) and is provided as a public service. Visit OSTI to utilize additional information resources in energy science and technology. A paper copy of this document is also available for sale to the

  12. CCPI Round 2 Selections | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CCPI Round 2 Selections CCPI Round 2 Selections In October 2004, the U.S. Department of Energy announced its second round of project selections in the Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI). CCPI is a $2 billion, 10-year program to develop and demonstrate a new generation of power plant technologies. These power plants will be fueled by coal, the nation's most used fuel for electric power generation, but will achieve substantially reduced emissions of sulfur, nitrogen and mercury compounds. Some of

  13. Combined Electric Machine and Current Source Inverter Drive System - Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Innovation Portal Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Energy Analysis Energy Analysis Advanced Materials Advanced Materials Find More Like This Return to Search Combined Electric Machine and Current Source Inverter Drive System Oak Ridge National Laboratory Contact ORNL About This Technology Publications: PDF Document Publication 11-G00249_ID2505.pdf (764 KB) Technology Marketing SummaryThis technology is a drive system that includes a permanent magnet-less (PM-L) electric motor

  14. Fact #753: November 12, 2012 Sources of Electricity by State | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy 3: November 12, 2012 Sources of Electricity by State Fact #753: November 12, 2012 Sources of Electricity by State Electric vehicles do not create emissions from a tailpipe like conventional vehicles do. The electricity used to fuel electric vehicles is generated at power plants all across the nation. Because each plant that generates electricity can use a different mix of energy sources, the emissions associated with electric vehicle charging can vary significantly depending on

  15. Electric machine and current source inverter drive system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hsu, John S

    2014-06-24

    A drive system includes an electric machine and a current source inverter (CSI). This integration of an electric machine and an inverter uses the machine's field excitation coil for not only flux generation in the machine but also for the CSI inductor. This integration of the two technologies, namely the U machine motor and the CSI, opens a new chapter for the component function integration instead of the traditional integration by simply placing separate machine and inverter components in the same housing. Elimination of the CSI inductor adds to the CSI volumetric reduction of the capacitors and the elimination of PMs for the motor further improve the drive system cost, weight, and volume.

  16. Semiconductor light source with electrically tunable emission wavelength

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Belenky, Gregory (Port Jefferson, NY); Bruno, John D. (Bowie, MD); Kisin, Mikhail V. (Centereach, NY); Luryi, Serge (Setauket, NY); Shterengas, Leon (Centereach, NY); Suchalkin, Sergey (Centereach, NY); Tober, Richard L. (Elkridge, MD)

    2011-01-25

    A semiconductor light source comprises a substrate, lower and upper claddings, a waveguide region with imbedded active area, and electrical contacts to provide voltage necessary for the wavelength tuning. The active region includes single or several heterojunction periods sandwiched between charge accumulation layers. Each of the active region periods comprises higher and lower affinity semiconductor layers with type-II band alignment. The charge carrier accumulation in the charge accumulation layers results in electric field build-up and leads to the formation of generally triangular electron and hole potential wells in the higher and lower affinity layers. Nonequillibrium carriers can be created in the active region by means of electrical injection or optical pumping. The ground state energy in the triangular wells and the radiation wavelength can be tuned by changing the voltage drop across the active region.

  17. Electrode configuration for extreme-UV electrical discharge source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spence, Paul Andrew (Pleasanton, CA); Fornaciari, Neal Robert (Tracey, CA); Chang, Jim Jihchyun (San Ramon, CA)

    2002-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that debris generation within an electric capillary discharge source, for generating extreme ultraviolet and soft x-ray, is dependent on the magnitude and profile of the electric field that is established along the surfaces of the electrodes. An electrode shape that results in uniform electric field strength along its surface has been developed to minimize sputtering and debris generation. The electric discharge plasma source includes: (a) a body that defines a circular capillary bore that has a proximal end and a distal end; (b) a back electrode positioned around and adjacent to the distal end of the capillary bore wherein the back electrode has a channel that is in communication with the distal end and that is defined by a non-uniform inner surface which exhibits a first region which is convex, a second region which is concave, and a third region which is convex wherein the regions are viewed outwardly from the inner surface of the channel that is adjacent the distal end of the capillary bore so that the first region is closest to the distal end; (c) a front electrode positioned around and adjacent to the proximal end of the capillary bore wherein the front electrode has an opening that is communication with the proximal end and that is defined by a non-uniform inner surface which exhibits a first region which is convex, a second region which is substantially linear, and third region which is convex wherein the regions are viewed outwardly from the inner surface of the opening that is adjacent the proximal end of the capillary bore so that the first region is closest to the proximal end; and (d) a source of electric potential that is connected across the front and back electrodes.

  18. Fact #799: September 30, 2013 Electricity Generation by Source, 2003-2012 |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 9: September 30, 2013 Electricity Generation by Source, 2003-2012 Fact #799: September 30, 2013 Electricity Generation by Source, 2003-2012 With the increase in market penetration for electric vehicles, the upstream emissions from electricity generation become important. Those emissions are dependent upon the source of electricity generation. Although the generation of electricity varies greatly by region, the overall use of coal declined by about 24% from 2008 to 2012.

  19. Photovoltaic Supply Chain and Cross-Cutting Technologies Round 1 |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Technology to Market » Photovoltaic Supply Chain and Cross-Cutting Technologies Round 1 Photovoltaic Supply Chain and Cross-Cutting Technologies Round 1 On June 11, 2009, DOE announced the first round of Photovoltaic (PV) Supply Chain and Cross-Cutting Technologies awardees. The funded projects target manufacturing and product cost reduction with the potential to have a near-term impact on a substantial segment of the PV industry. General Electric Global Research

  20. ,,,"Electricity","from Sources",,"Natural Gas","from Sources",,"Steam","from Sources"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.3;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,"Electricity","Components",,"Natural Gas","Components",,"Steam","Components" ,,,,"Electricity",,,"Natural Gas",,,"Steam" ,,,"Electricity","from Sources",,"Natural Gas","from Sources",,"Steam","from Sources" ,,"Electricity","from Local","Other

  1. Ultrafast electrical control of a resonantly driven single photon source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cao, Y.; Bennett, A. J. Ellis, D. J. P.; Shields, A. J.; Farrer, I.; Ritchie, D. A.

    2014-08-04

    We demonstrate generation of a pulsed stream of electrically triggered single photons in resonance fluorescence, by applying high frequency electrical pulses to a single quantum dot in a p-i-n diode under resonant laser excitation. Single photon emission was verified, with the probability of multiple photon emission reduced to 2.8%. We show that despite the presence of charge noise in the emission spectrum of the dot, resonant excitation acts as a filter to generate narrow bandwidth photons.

  2. International Technical Working Group Round Robin Tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dudder, Gordon B.; Hanlen, Richard C.; Herbillion, Georges M.

    2003-02-01

    The goal of nuclear forensics is to develop a preferred approach to support illicit trafficking investigations. This approach must be widely understood and accepted as credible. The principal objectives of the Round Robin Tests are to prioritize forensic techniques and methods, evaluate attribution capabilities, and examine the utility of database. The HEU (Highly Enriched Uranium) Round Robin, and previous Plutonium Round Robin, have made tremendous contributions to fulfilling these goals through a collaborative learning experience that resulted from the outstanding efforts of the nine participating internal laboratories. A prioritized list of techniques and methods has been developed based on this exercise. Current work is focused on the extent to which the techniques and methods can be generalized. The HEU Round Robin demonstrated a rather high level of capability to determine the important characteristics of the materials and processes using analytical methods. When this capability is combined with the appropriate knowledge/database, it results in a significant capability to attribute the source of the materials to a specific process or facility. A number of shortfalls were also identified in the current capabilities including procedures for non-nuclear forensics and the lack of a comprehensive network of data/knowledge bases. The results of the Round Robin will be used to develop guidelines or a ''recommended protocol'' to be made available to the interested authorities and countries to use in real cases.

  3. Piping inspection round robin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heasler, P.G.; Doctor, S.R.

    1996-04-01

    The piping inspection round robin was conducted in 1981 at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to quantify the capability of ultrasonics for inservice inspection and to address some aspects of reliability for this type of nondestructive evaluation (NDE). The round robin measured the crack detection capabilities of seven field inspection teams who employed procedures that met or exceeded the 1977 edition through the 1978 addenda of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Section 11 Code requirements. Three different types of materials were employed in the study (cast stainless steel, clad ferritic, and wrought stainless steel), and two different types of flaws were implanted into the specimens (intergranular stress corrosion cracks (IGSCCs) and thermal fatigue cracks (TFCs)). When considering near-side inspection, far-side inspection, and false call rate, the overall performance was found to be best in clad ferritic, less effective in wrought stainless steel and the worst in cast stainless steel. Depth sizing performance showed little correlation with the true crack depths.

  4. Method and apparatus for debris mitigation for an electrical discharge source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Klebanoff, Leonard E. (San Clemente, CA); Rader, Daniel J. (Albuquerque, NM); Silfvast, William T. (Helena, CA)

    2006-01-24

    Method and apparatus for mitigating the transport of debris generated and dispersed from electric discharge sources by thermophoretic and electrostatic deposition. A member is positioned adjacent the front electrode of an electric discharge source and used to establish a temperature difference between it and the front electrode. By flowing a gas between the member and the front electrode a temperature gradient is established that can be used for thermophoretic deposition of particulate debris on either the member or front electrode depending upon the direction of the thermal gradient. Establishing an electric field between the member and front electrode can aid in particle deposition by electrostatic deposition.

  5. Clean Coal Power Initiative Round III | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Clean Coal Power Initiative Round III Clean Coal Power Initiative Round III In December 2009, the U.S. Department of Energy announced the selection of three new projects with a value of $3.18 billion to accelerate the development of advanced coal technologies with carbon capture and storage at commercial-scale. These projects will help to enable commercial deployment to ensure the United States has clean, reliable, and affordable electricity and power. An investment of up to $979 million,

  6. Second Round of American Energy Data Challenge Winners Announced |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Second Round of American Energy Data Challenge Winners Announced Second Round of American Energy Data Challenge Winners Announced April 29, 2014 - 10:39am Addthis Patricia A. Hoffman Patricia A. Hoffman Assistant Secretary, Office of Electricity Delivery & Energy Reliability What are the key facts? The American Energy Data Challenge is year long, four part initiative designed to amplify open data and encourage innovation I am pleased to announce the winners of the

  7. Table A67. Capability to Switch from Electricity to Alternative Energy Source

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7. Capability to Switch from Electricity to Alternative Energy Sources" " by Industry Group, Selected Industries, and Selected Characteristics," " 1994: Part 1" " (Estimates in Million Kilowatthours)" ,,,"Electricity Receipts",,,," Alternative Types of Energy(b)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke",,"RSE" "SIC"," ","Total","

  8. Source of electrical power for an electric vehicle and other purposes, and related methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    LaFollette, Rodney M.

    2000-05-16

    Microthin sheet technology is disclosed by which superior batteries are constructed which, among other things, accommodate the requirements for high load rapid discharge and recharge, mandated by electric vehicle criteria. The microthin sheet technology has process and article overtones and can be used to form thin electrodes used in batteries of various kinds and types, such as spirally-wound batteries, bipolar batteries, lead acid batteries, silver/zinc batteries, and others. Superior high performance battery features include: (a) minimal ionic resistance; (b) minimal electronic resistance; (c) minimal polarization resistance to both charging and discharging; (d) improved current accessibility to active material of the electrodes; (e) a high surface area to volume ratio; (f) high electrode porosity (microporosity); (g) longer life cycle; (h) superior discharge/recharge characteristics; (j) higher capacities (A.multidot.hr); and k) high specific capacitance.

  9. Source of electrical power for an electric vehicle and other purposes, and related methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    LaFollette, Rodney M.

    2002-11-12

    Microthin sheet technology is disclosed by which superior batteries are constructed which, among other things, accommodate the requirements for high load rapid discharge and recharge, mandated by electric vehicle criteria. The microthin sheet technology has process and article overtones and can be used to form corrugated thin electrodes used in batteries of various kinds and types, such as spirally-wound batteries, bipolar batteries, lead acid batteries, silver/zinc batteries, and others. Superior high performance battery features include: (a) minimal ionic resistance; (b) minimal electronic resistance; (c) minimal polarization resistance to both charging and discharging; (d) improved current accessibility to active material of the electrodes; (e) a high surface area to volume ratio; (f) high electrode porosity (microporosity); (g) longer life cycle; (h) superior discharge/recharge characteristics; (i) higher capacities (A.multidot.hr); and (j) high specific capacitance.

  10. Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Residual and Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coke and Breeze) NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) (billion NGL(e) (million Other(f) Code(a) End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States

  11. Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal NAICS Net Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal Code(a) End Use Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coke and Breeze) Other(f) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 15,658 2,850 251 129 5,512 79 1,016 5,820 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel --

  12. Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Demand Residual and Natural Gas(c) LPG and Coke and Breeze) for Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) (billion NGL(d) (million End Use (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 977,338 40 22 5,357 21

  13. Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Table 5.8 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal Net Demand Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal End Use for Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) Natural Gas(c) NGL(d) Coke and Breeze) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 3,335 251 129 5,512 79 1,016 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 84 133 23 2,119 8 547

  14. Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Residual and Natural Gas(c) LPG and Coke and Breeze) Total Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) (billion NGL(d) (million Other(e) End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION

  15. Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal Net Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal End Use Total Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) Natural Gas(c) NGL(d) Coke and Breeze) Other(e) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 15,658 2,850 251 129 5,512 79 1,016 5,820 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fue -- 41 133 23 2,119 8 547 -- Conventional Boiler Use 41 71 17

  16. The integration of renewable energy sources into electric power transmission systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnes, P.R.; Dykas, W.P.; Kirby, B.J.; Purucker, S.L.; Lawler, J.S.

    1995-07-01

    Renewable energy technologies such as photovoltaics, solar thermal power plants, and wind turbines are nonconventional, environmentally attractive sources of energy that can be considered for electric power generation. Many of the areas with abundant renewable energy resources (very sunny or windy areas) are far removed from major load centers. Although electrical power can be transmitted over long distances of many hundreds of miles through high-voltage transmission lines, power transmission systems often operate near their limits with little excess capacity for new generation sources. This study assesses the available capacity of transmission systems in designated abundant renewable energy resource regions and identifies the requirements for high-capacity plant integration in selected cases. In general, about 50 MW of power from renewable sources can be integrated into existing transmission systems to supply local loads without transmission upgrades beyond the construction of a substation to connect to the grid. Except in the Southwest, significant investment to strengthen transmission systems will be required to support the development of high-capacity renewable sources of 1000 MW or greater in areas remote from major load centers. Cost estimates for new transmission facilities to integrate and dispatch some of these high-capacity renewable sources ranged from several million dollars to approximately one billion dollars, with the latter figure an increase in total investment of 35%, assuming that the renewable source is the only user of the transmission facility.

  17. ,,"Electricity Receipts(b)",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(c)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7 Relative Standard Errors for Table 10.7;" " Unit: Percents." ,,"Electricity Receipts(b)",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(c)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Natural","Distillate","Residual",,,"and" "Code(a)","Subsector and

  18. Vampire Power Is Scary All Year Round | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Vampire Power Is Scary All Year Round Vampire Power Is Scary All Year Round November 8, 2010 - 12:46pm Addthis Chris Stewart Senior Communicator at DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory Last week, U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Steven Chu posted information about slaying energy vampires on his Facebook page. (He also posted a picture of himself as a zombie, which is also is very scary!) Energy vampires are appliances that even when turned off utilize a small amount of electricity,

  19. The integration of renewable energy sources into electric power distribution systems. Volume 2, Utility case assessments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zaininger, H.W.; Ellis, P.R.; Schaefer, J.C.

    1994-06-01

    Electric utility distribution system impacts associated with the integration of renewable energy sources such as photovoltaics (PV) and wind turbines (WT) are considered in this project. The impacts are expected to vary from site to site according to the following characteristics: (1) The local solar insolation and/or wind characteristics; (2) renewable energy source penetration level; (3) whether battery or other energy storage systems are applied; and (4) local utility distribution design standards and planning practices. Small, distributed renewable energy sources are connected to the utility distribution system like other, similar kW- and MW-scale equipment and loads. Residential applications are expected to be connected to single-phase 120/240-V secondaries. Larger kw-scale applications may be connected to three-phase secondaries, and larger hundred-kW and MW-scale applications, such as MW-scale windfarms or PV plants, may be connected to electric utility primary systems via customer-owned primary and secondary collection systems. Small, distributed renewable energy sources installed on utility distribution systems will also produce nonsite-specific utility generation system benefits such as energy and capacity displacement benefits, in addition to the local site-specific distribution system benefits. Although generation system benefits are not site-specific, they are utility-specific, and they vary significantly among utilities in different regions. In addition, transmission system benefits, environmental benefits and other benefits may apply. These benefits also vary significantly among utilities and regions. Seven utility case studies considering PV, WT, and battery storage were conducted to identify a range of potential renewable energy source distribution system applications.

  20. " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Supplier Sources of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1.3. Number of Establishments by Quantity of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Supplier Sources of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,,"Electricity","Components",,,"Natural","Gas","Components",,"Steam","Components"

  1. " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Supplier Sources of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8 Number of Establishments by Quantity of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Supplier Sources of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,,"Electricity","Components",,,"Natural","Gas","Components",,"Steam","Components"

  2. " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Supplier Sources of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8 Number of Establishments by Quantity of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Supplier Sources of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,,"Electricity","Components",,,"Natural","Gas","Components",,"Steam","Components"

  3. DOE Announces Selections for SSL Core Technology Research (Round...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Research (Round 7), Product Development (Round 7), and U.S. Manufacturing (Round 2) Funding ... phosphor integration trade-offs in their high brightness package design and fabrication. ...

  4. Inhomogeneities of plasma density and electric field as sources of electrostatic turbulence in the auroral region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ilyasov, Askar A.; Chernyshov, Alexander A. Mogilevsky, Mikhail M.; Golovchanskaya, Irina V. Kozelov, Boris V.

    2015-03-15

    Inhomogeneities of plasma density and non-uniform electric fields are compared as possible sources of a sort of electrostatic ion cyclotron waves that can be identified with broadband extremely low frequency electrostatic turbulence in the topside auroral ionosphere. Such waves are excited by inhomogeneous energy-density-driven instability. To gain a deeper insight in generation of these waves, computational modeling is performed with various plasma parameters. It is demonstrated that inhomogeneities of plasma density can give rise to this instability even in the absence of electric fields. By using both satellite-observed and model spatial distributions of plasma density and electric field in our modeling, we show that specific details of the spatial distributions are of minor importance for the wave generation. The solutions of the nonlocal inhomogeneous energy-density-driven dispersion relation are investigated for various ion-to-electron temperature ratios and directions of wave propagation. The relevance of the solutions to the observed spectra of broadband extremely low frequency emissions is shown.

  5. DOE Announces Selections for SSL Core Technology (Round 6), Product

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Development (Round 6), and U.S. Manufacturing (Round 1) Funding Opportunities | Department of Energy (Round 6), Product Development (Round 6), and U.S. Manufacturing (Round 1) Funding Opportunities DOE Announces Selections for SSL Core Technology (Round 6), Product Development (Round 6), and U.S. Manufacturing (Round 1) Funding Opportunities The National Energy Technology Laboratory, on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), is pleased to announce the following selections for

  6. DOE Announces Selections for SSL Core Technology Research (Round 10),

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Product Development (Round 10), and U.S. Manufacturing (Round 6) Funding Opportunities | Department of Energy DOE Announces Selections for SSL Core Technology Research (Round 10), Product Development (Round 10), and U.S. Manufacturing (Round 6) Funding Opportunities DOE Announces Selections for SSL Core Technology Research (Round 10), Product Development (Round 10), and U.S. Manufacturing (Round 6) Funding Opportunities The U.S. Department of Energy has announced the competitive selection of

  7. DOE Announces Selections for SSL Core Technology Research (Round 7),

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Product Development (Round 7), and U.S. Manufacturing (Round 2) Funding Opportunities | Department of Energy Research (Round 7), Product Development (Round 7), and U.S. Manufacturing (Round 2) Funding Opportunities DOE Announces Selections for SSL Core Technology Research (Round 7), Product Development (Round 7), and U.S. Manufacturing (Round 2) Funding Opportunities The National Energy Technology Laboratory, on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), is pleased to announce the

  8. Causal Analysis of the Inadvertent Contact with an Uncontrolled Electrical Hazardous Energy Source (120 Volts AC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David E. James; Dennis E. Raunig; Sean S. Cunningham

    2014-10-01

    On September 25, 2013, a Health Physics Technician (HPT) was performing preparations to support a pneumatic transfer from the HFEF Decon Cell to the Room 130 Glovebox in HFEF, per HFEF OI 3165 section 3.5, Field Preparations. This activity involves an HPT setting up and climbing a portable ladder to remove the 14-C meter probe from above ball valve HBV-7. The HPT source checks the meter and probe and then replaces the probe above HBV-7, which is located above Hood ID# 130 HP. At approximately 13:20, while reaching past the HBV-7 valve position indicator switches in an attempt to place the 14-C meter probe in the desired location, the HPTs left forearm came in contact with one of the three sets of exposed terminals on the valve position indication switches for HBV 7. This resulted in the HPT receiving an electrical shock from a 120 Volt AC source. Upon moving the arm, following the electrical shock, the HPT noticed two exposed electrical connections on a switch. The HPT then notified the HFEF HPT Supervisor, who in turn notified the MFC Radiological Controls Manager and HFEF Operations Manager of the situation. Work was stopped in the area and the hazard was roped off and posted to prevent access to the hazard. The HPT was escorted by the HPT Supervisor to the MFC Dispensary and then preceded to CFA medical for further evaluation. The individual was evaluated and released without any medical restrictions. Causal Factor (Root Cause) A3B3C01/A5B2C08: - Knowledge based error/Attention was given to wrong issues - Written Communication content LTA, Incomplete/situation not covered The Causal Factor (root cause) was attention being given to the wrong issues during the creation, reviews, verifications, and actual performance of HFEF OI-3165, which covers the need to perform the weekly source check and ensure placement of the probe prior to performing a rabbit transfer. This resulted in the hazard not being identified and mitigated in the procedure. Work activities with in HFEF-OI-3165 placed the HPT in proximity of an unmitigated hazard directly resulting in this event. Contributing Factor A3B3C04/A4B5C04: - Knowledge Based Error, LTA Review Based on Assumption That Process Will Not Change - Change Management LTA, Risks/consequences associated with change not adequately reviewed/assessed Prior to the pneumatic system being out of service, the probe and meter were not being source checked together. The source check issue was identified and addressed during the period of time when the system was out of service. The corrective actions for this issue resulted in the requirement that a meter and probe be source checked together as it is intended to be used. This changed the activity and required an HPT to weekly, when in use, remove and install the probe from above HBV-7 to meet the requirement of LRD 15001 Part 5 Article 551.5. Risks and consequences associated with this change were not adequately reviewed or assessed. Failure to identify the hazard associated with this change directly contributed to this event.

  9. Table 8.4c Consumption for Electricity Generation by Energy Source...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Year Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power Renewable Energy Other 9 Electricity Net Imports Total Coal 1 Petroleum 2 Natural Gas 3 Other Gases 4 Total Conventional Hydroelectric ...

  10. OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS AVAILABILITY AND IMPROVEMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cutler, Roy I; Peplov, Vladimir V; Wezensky, Mark W; Norris, Kevin Paul; Barnett, William E; Hicks, Jim; Weaver, Joey T; Moss, John; Rust, Kenneth R; Mize, Jeffery J; Anderson, David E

    2011-01-01

    SNS electrical systems have been operational for 4 years. System availability statistics and improvements are presented for AC electrical systems, DC and pulsed power supplies and klystron modulators.

  11. First round of NISE awards posted

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    First round of NISE awards posted First round of NISE awards posted April 13, 2011 by Francesca Verdier The first round of NERSC Initiative for Scientific Exploration (NISE) awards have been posted. 36 projects were awarded 34.77 million hours. See: 2011 NISE Awards. Subscribe via RSS Subscribe Browse by Date January 2016 December 2015 November 2015 October 2015 September 2015 August 2015 July 2015 April 2015 March 2015 January 2015 December 2014 November 2014 October 2014 August 2014 June 2014

  12. Community Leaders Round Table | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Community Leaders Round Table The Round Table consists of citizens with regional constituencies, including elected officials on the village, city, township, county and state levels; leaders of school districts, environmental boards and other agencies; and officers of labor unions and home owners associations. The Argonne National Laboratory/U.S. Department of Energy Community Leaders Round Table provides an informal and convenient forum for sharing information about Argonne plans and activities

  13. DOE's Round Robin Test Program FAQ Sheet

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Frequently Asked Questions for: DOE's Round Robin Test Program May 2011 i Table of Contents Introduction ........................................................................................................................................ 1 What products will be tested? .......................................................................................................... 1 What is the testing process?

  14. The Mesaba Energy Project: Clean Coal Power Initiative, Round 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stone, Richard; Gray, Gordon; Evans, Robert

    2014-07-31

    The Mesaba Energy Project is a nominal 600 MW integrated gasification combine cycle power project located in Northeastern Minnesota. It was selected to receive financial assistance pursuant to code of federal regulations (?CFR?) 10 CFR 600 through a competitive solicitation under Round 2 of the Department of Energy?s Clean Coal Power Initiative, which had two stated goals: (1) to demonstrate advanced coal-based technologies that can be commercialized at electric utility scale, and (2) to accelerate the likelihood of deploying demonstrated technologies for widespread commercial use in the electric power sector. The Project was selected in 2004 to receive a total of $36 million. The DOE portion that was equally cost shared in Budget Period 1 amounted to about $22.5 million. Budget Period 1 activities focused on the Project Definition Phase and included: project development, preliminary engineering, environmental permitting, regulatory approvals and financing to reach financial close and start of construction. The Project is based on ConocoPhillips? E-Gas? Technology and is designed to be fuel flexible with the ability to process sub-bituminous coal, a blend of sub-bituminous coal and petroleum coke and Illinois # 6 bituminous coal. Major objectives include the establishment of a reference plant design for Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (?IGCC?) technology featuring advanced full slurry quench, multiple train gasification, integration of the air separation unit, and the demonstration of 90% operational availability and improved thermal efficiency relative to previous demonstration projects. In addition, the Project would demonstrate substantial environmental benefits, as compared with conventional technology, through dramatically lower emissions of sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, volatile organic compounds, carbon monoxide, particulate matter and mercury. Major milestones achieved in support of fulfilling the above goals include obtaining Site, High Voltage Transmission Line Route, and Natural Gas Pipeline Route Permits for a Large Electric Power Generating Plant to be located in Taconite, Minnesota. In addition, major pre-construction permit applications have been filed requesting authorization for the Project to i) appropriate water sufficient to accommodate its worst case needs, ii) operate a major stationary source in compliance with regulations established to protect public health and welfare, and iii) physically alter the geographical setting to accommodate its construction. As of the current date, the Water Appropriation Permits have been obtained.

  15. Ball mounting fixture for a roundness gage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gauler, A.L.; Pasieka, D.F.

    1983-11-15

    A ball mounting fixture for a roundness gage is disclosed. The fixture includes a pair of chuck assemblies oriented substantially transversely with respect to one another and mounted on a common base. Each chuck assembly preferably includes a rotary stage and a wobble plate affixed thereto. A ball chuck affixed to each wobble plate is operable to selectively support a ball to be measured for roundness, with the wobble plate permitting the ball chuck to be tilted to center the ball on the axis of rotation of the rotary stage. In a preferred embodiment, each chuck assembly includes a vacuum chuck operable to selectively support the ball to be measured for roundness. The mounting fixture enables a series of roundness measurements to be taken with a conventional rotating gagehead roundness instrument, which measurements can be utilized to determine the sphericity of the ball. 6 figs.

  16. Ball mounting fixture for a roundness gage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gauler, Allen L. (Los Alamos, NM); Pasieka, Donald F. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1983-01-01

    A ball mounting fixture for a roundness gage is disclosed. The fixture includes a pair of chuck assemblies oriented substantially transversely with respect to one another and mounted on a common base. Each chuck assembly preferably includes a rotary stage and a wobble plate affixed thereto. A ball chuck affixed to each wobble plate is operable to selectively support a ball to be measured for roundness, with the wobble plate permitting the ball chuck to be tilted to center the ball on the axis of rotation of the rotary stage. In a preferred embodiment, each chuck assembly includes a vacuum chuck operable to selectively support the ball to be measured for roundness. The mounting fixture enables a series of roundness measurements to be taken with a conventional rotating gagehead roundness instrument, which measurements can be utilized to determine the sphericity of the ball.

  17. Table 8.4b Consumption for Electricity Generation by Energy Source...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Subset of Table 8.4a; Billion Btu) Year Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power 5 Renewable Energy Other 9 Electricity Net Imports 10 Total Coal 1 Petroleum 2 Natural Gas 3 Other ...

  18. Table 8.4a Consumption for Electricity Generation by Energy Source...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Year Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power 5 Renewable Energy Other 9 Electricity Net Imports 10 Total Coal 1 Petroleum 2 Natural Gas 3 Other Gases 4 Total Conventional Hydroelectric ...

  19. Promoting electricity from renewable energy sources -- lessons learned from the EU, U.S. and Japan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haas, Reinhard; Meyer, Niels I.; Held, Anne; Finon, Dominique; Lorenzoni, Arturo; Wiser, Ryan; Nishio, Ken-ichiro

    2007-06-01

    The promotion of electricity generated from Renewable Energy Sources (RES) has recently gained high priority in the energy policy strategies of many countries in response to concerns about global climate change, energy security and other reasons. This chapter compares and contrasts the experience of a number of countries in Europe, states in the US as well as Japan in promoting RES, identifying what appear to be the most successful policy measures. Clearly, a wide range of policy instruments have been tried and are in place in different parts of the world to promote renewable energy technologies. The design and performance of these schemes varies from place to place, requiring further research to determine their effectiveness in delivering the desired results. The main conclusions that can be drawn from the present analysis are: (1) Generally speaking, promotional schemes that are properly designed within a stable framework and offer long-term investment continuity produce better results. Credibility and continuity reduce risks thus leading to lower profit requirements by investors. (2) Despite their significant growth in absolute terms in a number of key markets, the near-term prognosis for renewables is one of modest success if measured in terms of the percentage of the total energy provided by renewables on a world-wide basis. This is a significant challenge, suggesting that renewables have to grow at an even faster pace if we expect them to contribute on a significant scale to the world's energy mix.

  20. Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Table 5.3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Demand Residual and Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coke and Breeze) NAICS for Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) (billion NGL(e) (million Code(a) End Use (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons)

  1. Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal NAICS Net Demand Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal Code(a) End Use for Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coke and Breeze) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 3,335 251 129 5,512 79 1,016 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 84 133 23

  2. The Wheels on the Bus Go Round and Round... | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The Wheels on the Bus Go Round and Round... The Wheels on the Bus Go Round and Round... March 9, 2010 - 5:30am Addthis Shannon Brescher Shea Communications Manager, Clean Cities Program I have a love/hate relationship with buses. I love that they save me gasoline, are more efficient than driving a car, and reduce my greenhouse gas emissions. However, I hate them when they're running late! But there is one category of buses that I'm particularly fond of - those that run on alternative fuels. In

  3. Electric Blanket Delivers K.O. to Space Heater During #EnergyFaceoff...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electric Blanket Delivers K.O. to Space Heater During EnergyFaceoff Round Three Electric Blanket Delivers K.O. to Space Heater During EnergyFaceoff Round Three November 19, 2014 ...

  4. ELECTRIC

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ELECTRIC cdrtrokArJclaeT 3 I+ &i, y$ \I &OF I*- j< t j,fci..- ir )(yiT !E-li, ( \-,v? Cl -p/4.4 RESEARCH LABORATORIES EAST PITTSBURGH, PA. 8ay 22, 1947 Mr. J. Carrel Vrilson General ?!!mager Atomic Qxzgy Commission 1901 Constitution Avenue Kashington, D. C. Dear Sir: In the course of OUT nuclenr research we are planning to study the enc:ri;y threshold anti cross section for fission. For thib program we require a s<>piAroted sample of metallic Uranium 258 of high purity. A

  5. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Alabama" "megawatthours" "Item", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent Share 2000","Percent Share 2010","Percent Share 2013" "Electric

  6. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Arkansas" "megawatthours" "item", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent Share 2000","Percent Share 2010","Percent Share 2013" "Electric

  7. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    United States" "megawatts" "Item", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Electric

  8. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Alaska" "megawatthours" "item", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent Share 2000","Percent Share 2010","Percent Share 2013" "Electric

  9. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Arizona" "megawatthours" "item", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent Share 2000","Percent Share 2010","Percent Share 2013" "Electric

  10. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    California" "megawatthours" "Item", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent Share 2000","Percent Share 2010","Percent Share 2013" "Electric

  11. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Colorado" "megawatthours" "Item", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent Share 2000","Percent Share 2010","Percent Share 2013" "Electric

  12. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Connecticut" "megawatthours" "Item", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent Share 2000","Percent Share 2010","Percent Share 2013" "Electric

  13. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Delaware" "megawatthours" "Item", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent Share 2000","Percent Share 2010","Percent Share 2013" "Electric

  14. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Florida" "megawatthours" "item", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent Share 2000","Percent Share 2010","Percent Share 2013" "Electric

  15. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Georgia" "megawatthours" "Item", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent Share 2000","Percent Share 2010","Percent Share 2013" "Electric

  16. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Hawaii" "megawatthours" "Item", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent Share 2000","Percent Share 2010","Percent Share 2013" "Electric

  17. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Idaho" "megawatthours" "Item", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent Share 2000","Percent Share 2010","Percent Share 2013" "Electric

  18. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Illinois" "megawatthours" "Item", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent Share 2000","Percent Share 2010","Percent Share 2013" "Electric

  19. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Indiana" "megawatthours" "Item", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent Share 2000","Percent Share 2010","Percent Share 2013" "Electric

  20. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Iowa" "megawatthours" "Item", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent Share 2000","Percent Share 2010","Percent Share 2013" "Electric

  1. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Kansas" "megawatthours" "Item", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent Share 2000","Percent Share 2010","Percent Share 2013" "Electric

  2. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Kentucky" "megawatthours" "Item", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent Share 2000","Percent Share 2010","Percent Share 2013" "Electric

  3. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Louisiana" "megawatthours" "Item", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent Share 2000","Percent Share 2010","Percent Share 2013" "Electric

  4. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Maryland" "megawatthours" "Item", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent Share 2000","Percent Share 2010","Percent Share 2013" "Electric

  5. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Massachusetts" "megawatthours" "Item", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent Share 2000","Percent Share 2010","Percent Share 2013" "Electric

  6. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Michigan" "megawatthours" "Item", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent Share 2000","Percent Share 2010","Percent Share 2013" "Electric

  7. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Minnesota" "megawatthours" "Item", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent Share 2000","Percent Share 2010","Percent Share 2013" "Electric

  8. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mississippi" "megawatthours" "Item", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent Share 2000","Percent Share 2010","Percent Share 2013" "Electric

  9. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Missouri" "megawatthours" "Item", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent Share 2000","Percent Share 2010","Percent Share 2013" "Electric

  10. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Montana" "megawatthours" "Item", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent Share 2000","Percent Share 2010","Percent Share 2013" "Electric

  11. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nebraska" "megawatthours" "Item", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent Share 2000","Percent Share 2010","Percent Share 2013" "Electric

  12. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nevada" "megawatthours" "Item", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent Share 2000","Percent Share 2010","Percent Share 2013" "Electric

  13. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Hampshire" "megawatthours" "Item", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent Share 2000","Percent Share 2010","Percent Share 2013" "Electric

  14. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Jersey" "megawatthours" "Item", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent Share 2000","Percent Share 2010","Percent Share 2013" "Electric

  15. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mexico" "megawatthours" "Item", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent Share 2000","Percent Share 2010","Percent Share 2013" "Electric

  16. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    York" "megawatthours" "Item", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent Share 2000","Percent Share 2010","Percent Share 2013" "Electric

  17. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Carolina" "megawatthours" "Item", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent Share 2000","Percent Share 2010","Percent Share 2013" "Electric

  18. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Dakota" "megawatthours" "Item", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent Share 2000","Percent Share 2010","Percent Share 2013" "Electric

  19. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Ohio" "megawatthours" "Item", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent Share 2000","Percent Share 2010","Percent Share 2013" "Electric

  20. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oklahoma" "megawatthours" "Item", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent Share 2000","Percent Share 2010","Percent Share 2013" "Electric

  1. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oregon" "megawatthours" "Item", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent Share 2000","Percent Share 2010","Percent Share 2013" "Electric

  2. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Pennsylvania" "megawatthours" "Item", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent Share 2000","Percent Share 2010","Percent Share 2013" "Electric

  3. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Carolina" "megawatthours" "Item", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent Share 2000","Percent Share 2010","Percent Share 2013" "Electric

  4. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Dakota" "megawatthours" "Item", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent Share 2000","Percent Share 2010","Percent Share 2013" "Electric

  5. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Tennessee" "megawatthours" "Item", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent Share 2000","Percent Share 2010","Percent Share 2013" "Electric

  6. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Texas" "megawatthours" "Item", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent Share 2000","Percent Share 2010","Percent Share 2013" "Electric

  7. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Utah" "megawatthours" "Item", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent Share 2000","Percent Share 2010","Percent Share 2013" "Electric

  8. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Vermont" "megawatthours" "Item", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent Share 2000","Percent Share 2010","Percent Share 2013" "Electric

  9. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Viriginia" "megawatthours" "Item", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent Share 2000","Percent Share 2010","Percent Share 2013" "Electric

  10. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Washington" "megawatthours" "Item", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent Share 2000","Percent Share 2010","Percent Share 2013" "Electric

  11. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    West Virginia" "megawatthours" "Item", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent Share 2000","Percent Share 2010","Percent Share 2013" "Electric

  12. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wisconsin" "megawatthours" "Item", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent Share 2000","Percent Share 2010","Percent Share 2013" "Electric

  13. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wyoming" "megawatthours" "Item", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent Share 2000","Percent Share 2010","Percent Share 2013" "Electric

  14. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    United States" "megawatthours" "Item", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent Share 2000","Percent Share 2010","Percent Share 2013" "Electric

  15. Small Modular Reactors and U.S. Clean Energy Sources for Electricity

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    For the clean energy goal to be met, then, the non-carbon emitting sources must provide some 2900 TWhr. Hydropower is generally assumed to have reached a maximum of 250 TWhr, so if we assume...

  16. International Round-Robin Testing of Bulk Thermoelectrics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Hsin; Porter, Wallace D; Bottner, Harold; Konig, Jan; Chen, Lidong; Bai, Shengqiang; Tritt, Terry M.; Mayolett, Alex; Smith, Charlene; Harris, Fred; Sharp, Jeff; Lo, Jason; Keinke, Holger; Kiss, Laszlo I.

    2011-11-01

    Two international round-robin studies were conducted on transport properties measurements of bulk thermoelectric materials. The study discovered current measurement problems. In order to get ZT of a material four separate transport measurements must be taken. The round-robin study showed that among the four properties Seebeck coefficient is the one can be measured consistently. Electrical resistivity has +4-9% scatter. Thermal diffusivity has similar +5-10% scatter. The reliability of the above three properties can be improved by standardizing test procedures and enforcing system calibrations. The worst problem was found in specific heat measurements using DSC. The probability of making measurement error is great due to the fact three separate runs must be taken to determine Cp and the baseline shift is always an issue for commercial DSC. It is suggest the Dulong Petit limit be always used as a guide line for Cp. Procedures have been developed to eliminate operator and system errors. The IEA-AMT annex is developing standard procedures for transport properties testing.

  17. SOURCE?

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SEEDplatform@ee.doe.gov. WHAT IS 0PEN SOURCE? Open source means that the base software code is publically available so that anyone has the ability to access and contribute to the code OPEN SOURCE BENEFITS * Platform is flexible and adaptable * Developers can create proprietary platform add- ons while still maintaining an inter-operable system * A national brand and standard is created * Local jurisdiction officials can have input on the direction and maintanence of the core code * The code base

  18. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Alabama" "megawatts" "Item", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Electric utilities",23419,23615,23642,23642,23285,23144,23182,23218,23252,23346,22943,23429,22532,22366,21461,21292,20840,20692,20463,19878,19972,19972,19902,19354,95,72.9,72.4

  19. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Arkansas" "megawatts" "Item", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Electric utilities",11559,13131,11464,11488,11456,11459,11467,10669,10434,9769,9774,9551,9615,9330,9279,9619,9688,9639,9639,9168,9033,9000,8996,8944,96,71.9,78.2

  20. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Alaska" "megawatts" "Item", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Electric Utilities",2205,1946,1891,1889,1868,1847,1820,1736,1769,1722,1752,1740,1770,1775,1725,1702,1763,1739,1737,1740,1715,1679,1551,1547,84,91.4,92.5

  1. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    " "Arizona" "megawatts" "Item", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Electric utilities",20668,20277,20168,20115,20127,19717,19551,19566,18860,16854,15542,15516,15284,15140,15091,15084,15164,15147,15222,15067,14990,14970,14911,14906,98.9,76.2,74.1

  2. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    California" "megawatts" "Item", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Electric utilities",28165,30294,29011,28685,28021,26467,26334,26346,25248,23739,23171,24390,24347,24321,24324,30665,43711,43936,43303,42329,43140,42673,42780,42822,46.5,42.6,38.2

  3. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Colorado" "megawatts" "Item", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Electric utilities",10238,10475,10580,9114,8454,8142,8008,8034,7955,7954,7883,7596,7479,7271,7255,6938,6851,6795,6648,6675,6637,6629,6610,6533,86.6,66.2,69.3

  4. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Connecticut" "megawatts" "Item", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Electric utilities",152,152,154,160,111,111,111,37,25,174,210,78,185,2204,2454,5617,6295,6321,6723,6579,6600,6600,6764,7079,34.2,1.9,1.7

  5. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Delaware" "megawatts" "Item", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Electric utilities",102,98,56,55,55,55,56,58,194,58,58,233,184,969,2285,2285,2277,2239,2239,2269,2269,2267,2162,1777,40.1,1.6,3.1

  6. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    District of Columbia" "megawatts" "Item", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Electric utilities",0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,806,806,806,806,806,806,806,806,806,806,0,0,0

  7. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Florida" "megawatts" "Item", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Electric utilities",50967,51373,51298,50853,50781,47222,47224,45184,45196,42619,41996,40267,38238,37265,36537,36472,39460,36899,35857,34769,33663,33403,32204,32103,89.7,86,86.7

  8. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Georgia" "megawatts" "Item", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Electric utilities",28875,29293,27146,26639,26558,26462,26432,26542,26538,25404,24804,25821,24099,24861,23331,23392,23148,22791,22299,21698,21163,21160,20752,20731,89.6,72.7,75.6

  9. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Hawaii" "megawatts" "Item", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Electric utilities",1821,1821,1821,1828,1859,1730,1730,1730,1705,1691,1624,1622,1622,1627,1609,1617,1597,1611,1603,1603,1603,1602,1522,1488,68.1,72.1,66.1

  10. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Idaho" "megawatts" "Item", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Electric utilities",3394,3394,3035,3035,3029,2686,2547,2558,2558,2394,2439,2674,2521,2585,2571,2576,2576,2553,2559,2500,2300,2308,2282,2282,85.7,76.1,68.9

  11. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Illinois" "megawatts" "Item", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Electric utilities",5269,5274,5280,4789,4819,4680,4630,4731,3976,4233,3007,4151,4420,17497,16817,30367,33550,33169,33143,32951,32770,33644,32644,32597,48.1,10.9,11.7

  12. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Indiana" "megawatts" "Item", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Electric utilities",23309,23031,22763,23008,23631,23598,22012,22021,22017,21261,21016,20392,20616,20554,20358,20337,20201,20681,20712,20632,20901,20901,20702,20588,85.9,83.2,85.7

  13. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Iowa" "megawatts" "Item", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Electric utilities",12092,12179,11863,11282,11479,11274,10669,9562,10090,9895,9039,8457,8402,8511,8438,8370,8217,8161,8237,8219,8069,8074,8093,7702,93.5,77.3,75.9

  14. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Kansas" "megawatts" "Item", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Electric utilities",11485,11593,11746,11732,11733,11246,10944,10829,10734,10705,10729,10244,10223,10089,10023,9918,9789,9697,9678,9525,9525,9518,9507,9475,99.5,93.5,80.6

  15. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Kentucky" "megawatts" "Item", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Electric utilities",19599,19681,19601,18945,18763,16759,16819,16878,16234,15860,15349,15419,15229,14781,14708,13995,15660,15686,15425,15397,15297,15297,15333,15511,88,92.6,93.3

  16. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Louisiana" "megawatts" "Item", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Electric utilities",17297,16661,15991,16471,15615,15755,14756,15176,15137,14249,12728,14233,14165,14317,16339,17014,17080,17150,17019,16433,16221,16221,15883,15839,67.8,61.6,65.9

  17. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Maine" "megawatts" "Item", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Electric utilities",14,19,19,19,19,19,19,19,19,19,19,16,17,21,63,1457,1502,2388,2433,2253,2222,2222,2379,2369,0.5,0.4,0.3

  18. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Maryland" "megawatts" "Item", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Electric utilities",85,85,81,80,80,80,80,79,79,79,70,70,70,753,10955,10971,11105,10958,10958,10838,10709,10709,10723,9758,7.2,0.6,0.7

  19. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Massachusetts" "megawatts" "Item", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Electric utilities",969,991,956,936,930,829,827,837,983,981,981,945,993,997,2216,3386,11295,9366,9289,9219,9461,9452,9770,9909,8.1,6.8,7.1

  20. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Michigan" "megawatts" "Item", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Electric utilities",22148,22517,22401,21639,21759,21885,21894,22734,23029,23310,23345,23575,22833,22757,22378,21948,21916,21990,21986,22396,22395,22347,22258,22298,88.3,72.6,73.5

  1. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Minnesota" "megawatts" "Item", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Electric utilities",11901,11685,11650,11547,11639,11432,10719,10458,10543,10175,10129,10073,9885,9069,8988,9090,9217,9181,8925,8936,8853,8830,8854,8806,88.4,78.5,75.5

  2. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mississippi" "megawatts" "Item", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Electric utilities",12842,12691,11442,10858,10081,10093,9377,9407,8904,8431,8656,8888,7964,7057,6817,7156,7159,7177,7170,7041,6972,6972,6839,6839,78.3,69.2,82.5

  3. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Missouri" "megawatts" "Item", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Electric utilities",20562,20767,20831,20360,19600,19621,19570,19675,18970,18602,18587,18409,18221,17182,16757,16284,16215,15980,15727,15490,15429,15405,15311,15179,99.4,93.7,94.3

  4. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Montana" "megawatts" "Item", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Electric utilities",2568,2570,2483,2340,2232,2190,2179,2163,2186,2189,2274,2237,2235,2265,2257,4945,4943,4943,4943,4907,4871,4871,4829,4912,38.7,39.9,40.6

  5. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nebraska" "megawatts" "Item", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Electric utilities",7911,7810,7834,7647,7675,7011,6959,7056,7007,6722,6667,6154,6112,6043,5963,5944,5894,5765,5663,5651,5645,5637,5584,5586,99.7,97.3,93.6

  6. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nevada" "megawatts" "Item", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Electric utilities",7915,7807,8939,8713,8741,8741,6998,6771,5611,5389,5323,5384,5388,5434,5434,5642,5642,5643,5556,5478,5235,5235,5125,4944,80.9,76.3,74.3

  7. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Hampshire" "megawatts" "Item", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Electric utilities",1121,1121,1134,1132,1118,1125,1121,1116,1121,1121,1121,1105,1128,2290,2294,2292,2715,2705,2698,2692,2692,2692,2793,2821,80.2,27.1,25.4

  8. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Jersey" "megawatts" "Item", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Electric utilities",544,517,473,460,466,477,558,1005,1005,1190,1244,1244,1244,1005,12085,13390,13684,13645,13817,13500,13850,13850,13725,13648,6.2,2.5,2.9

  9. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mexico" "megawatts" "Item", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Electric utilities",5912,6359,6321,6345,6344,6324,6324,6223,5692,5348,5398,5463,5250,5250,5299,5294,5183,5077,5078,4940,4967,4967,4950,4947,93.8,78,74.5

  10. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    York" "megawatts" "Item", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Electric utilities",10736,10739,11022,11032,11871,11784,12056,12046,11927,11386,11902,11675,11572,15807,17679,29587,29987,30061,32149,31567,32323,30163,31177,31020,44.4,28,26.9

  11. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Carolina" "megawatts" "Item", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Electric utilities",26706,27265,26158,25398,25376,25405,25345,24553,23822,23984,24036,23650,23478,22015,21182,21020,21054,20923,20597,19691,20041,20043,19990,20049,89.9,91.8,88.9

  12. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Dakota" "megawatts" "Item", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Electric utilities",5292,5217,4908,4912,4852,4691,4668,4634,4622,4673,4561,4659,4677,4679,4676,4657,4733,4208,4485,4487,4476,4476,4497,4476,99.2,79.4,80.6

  13. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Ohio" "megawatts" "Item", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Electric utilities",20779,21072,20120,20179,20356,20340,20012,20147,19312,27713,27547,27304,27081,26301,27083,26768,26630,27279,27365,26347,26388,26388,26939,25365,92.3,61,64

  14. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oklahoma" "megawatts" "Item", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Electric utilities",16951,17148,16487,16015,16187,15913,14495,14648,13992,13460,13463,13387,12941,13438,12861,12622,12931,13092,12928,12546,12348,12348,12308,12284,94.6,76.2,72.8

  15. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oregon" "megawatts" "Item", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Electric utilities",10973,10888,10892,10846,10683,10491,10502,9971,9839,9805,10298,10357,10354,10337,10293,10449,10537,10526,10445,10165,10132,10132,11235,11235,91.7,76.1,70.1

  16. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Pennsylvania" "megawatts" "Item", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Electric utilities",455,455,455,455,455,455,455,455,455,4921,4921,4887,4887,13394,25251,33781,33825,34060,33699,32710,32509,32505,32423,32526,36.3,1,1.1

  17. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Carolina" "megawatts" "Item", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Electric utilities",21039,21280,22227,22082,22100,22062,21730,21019,20787,20406,19402,19103,18246,17717,17682,17627,17431,17165,16693,16152,16131,16118,16162,14909,94.8,92.1,91.4

  18. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Dakota" "megawatts" "Item", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Electric utilities",3480,3428,3130,2994,3042,2911,2826,2889,2759,2618,2650,2752,2712,2710,2763,2791,2795,2822,2818,2831,2543,2543,2519,2517,100,82.6,84.7

  19. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Tennessee" "megawatts" "Item", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Electric utilities",20635,20635,20474,20761,20211,20249,19770,19768,19120,19044,19011,19137,18600,17893,17253,17546,18212,17253,16144,16334,16076,16076,16121,16848,92,96.9,96.8

  20. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Texas" "megawatts" "Item", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Electric utilities",28705,28463,27389,26533,25140,25005,24569,24991,24033,23587,22629,38903,38940,65384,65293,65209,64858,64768,64425,63351,63214,63213,61420,61261,79.8,24.5,26.2

  1. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Utah" "megawatts" "Item", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Electric utilities",6669,6637,6641,6648,6581,6499,6710,6212,6053,5754,5574,5575,5131,5113,5104,5079,4947,4927,4930,4818,4678,4670,4645,4563,97.9,88.7,86.6

  2. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Vermont" "megawatts" "Item", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Electric utilities",329,329,265,260,257,259,258,259,258,261,260,261,262,778,783,775,904,901,899,902,911,911,908,882,78.9,23,26.2

  3. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Virginia" "megawatts" "Item", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Electric utilities",20601,20626,19999,19430,19131,18824,18372,18162,18087,17547,17045,15817,15761,15608,15312,15316,15293,14764,14300,13764,14055,14020,13652,13661,79.5,80.6,83

  4. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Washington" "megawatts" "Item", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Electric utilities",27070,27037,26375,26498,26322,26243,24511,24303,24046,23828,24166,24132,24191,23841,25190,25236,25274,24277,24278,24254,24243,24242,24243,24173,91.5,86.9,88.3

  5. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    West Virginia" "megawatts" "Item", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Electric utilities",10625,10590,11740,11719,11698,11698,11711,11975,10890,10164,10164,10172,10188,14475,14505,14495,14491,14492,14495,14510,14448,14448,14435,14435,95.9,71,65.3

  6. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wisconsin" "megawatts" "Item", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Electric utilities",13358,13464,13408,13098,12998,12975,11767,12911,12877,12405,12523,12335,12246,12211,12086,11862,11866,11866,11536,11264,10909,10747,10504,10545,89.8,73.4,77

  7. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wyoming" "megawatts" "Item", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Electric utilities",7279,7278,7333,6931,6713,6450,6142,6137,6241,6086,6088,6083,6050,6048,6012,6018,6045,5966,5971,5864,5842,5842,5817,5800,97.1,86.8,86.9

  8. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    District of Columbia" "megawatthours" "Item", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent Share 2000","Percent Share 2010","Percent Share 2013" "Electric utilities",0,0,71199,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,97423,230003,243975,70661,109809,188862,274252,188452,73991,179814,361043,67.5,0,0 "Natural

  9. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Maine" "megawatthours" "Item", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent Share 2000","Percent Share 2010","Percent Share 2013" "Electric utilities",597,168,754,1759,867,1080,1317,489,827,1121,1409,865,0,2781,1189273,3549008,3222785,7800149,2668381,9015544,8075919,8334852,9518506,9063595,0,0,0

  10. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Rhode Island" "megawatthours" "Item", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent Share 2000","Percent Share 2010","Percent Share 2013" "Electric utilities",10659,10552,10473,10827,10612,10612,11075,11008,10805,12402,11771,11836,0,10823,9436,2061351,3562833,3301111,653076,68641,53740,109308,171457,591756,0.2,0.1,0.2

  11. Property-close source separation of hazardous waste and waste electrical and electronic equipment - A Swedish case study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernstad, Anna; Cour Jansen, Jes la; Aspegren, Henrik

    2011-03-15

    Through an agreement with EEE producers, Swedish municipalities are responsible for collection of hazardous waste and waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE). In most Swedish municipalities, collection of these waste fractions is concentrated to waste recycling centres where households can source-separate and deposit hazardous waste and WEEE free of charge. However, the centres are often located on the outskirts of city centres and cars are needed in order to use the facilities in most cases. A full-scale experiment was performed in a residential area in southern Sweden to evaluate effects of a system for property-close source separation of hazardous waste and WEEE. After the system was introduced, results show a clear reduction in the amount of hazardous waste and WEEE disposed of incorrectly amongst residual waste or dry recyclables. The systems resulted in a source separation ratio of 70 wt% for hazardous waste and 76 wt% in the case of WEEE. Results show that households in the study area were willing to increase source separation of hazardous waste and WEEE when accessibility was improved and that this and similar collection systems can play an important role in building up increasingly sustainable solid waste management systems.

  12. 2014,"AK","Total Electric Power Industry","All Sources",10,6,59.1,52.9

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "Planned Year","State Code","Producer Type","Fuel Source","Generators","Facilities","Nameplate Capacity (Megawatts)","Summer Capacity (Megawatts)" 2014,"AK","Total Electric Power Industry","All Sources",10,6,59.1,52.9 2014,"AK","Total Electric Power Industry","Hydroelectric",2,1,4.8,4.8 2014,"AK","Total Electric Power

  13. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Rhode Island" "megawatts" "item", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Electric utilities",8,8,7,7,7,7,8,8,6,7,9,9,7,6,7,7,441,441,442,148,148,148,162,263,0.5,0.4,0.4 "Hydroelectric",0,0,0,0,0,0,1,1,1,0,1,1,1,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,1,1,1,0.2,0,0 "Natural

  14. START Program for Renewable Energy Project Development Assistance - Round

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Three Application | Department of Energy START Program for Renewable Energy Project Development Assistance - Round Three Application START Program for Renewable Energy Project Development Assistance - Round Three Application Download the application for the START Program for Renewable Energy Project Development Assistance-Round Three. Download the Non-Disclosure Agreement to submit along with your application. PDF icon START Program for Renewable Energy Project Development Assistance Round

  15. First Round of American Energy Data Challenge Winners Announced |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Department of Energy First Round of American Energy Data Challenge Winners Announced First Round of American Energy Data Challenge Winners Announced December 19, 2013 - 12:20pm Addthis EIA Administrator Adam Sieminski announces the winners of the first round of the American Energy Data Challenge. Adam Sieminski Administrator of the U.S. Energy Information Administration How can I participate? Learn more about the first round of American Energy Data Challenge winners by following the links to

  16. Rooftop Solar Challenge Round 1 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Soft Costs » Rooftop Solar Challenge Round 1 Rooftop Solar Challenge Round 1 The first round of the Rooftop Solar Challenge supported 22 teams working to spur solar power deployment by cutting red tape and improving finance options. By streamlining and standardizing permitting, zoning, metering, and connection processes, these teams helped reduce barriers and lower costs for residential and small commercial rooftop solar systems. DOE announced a second round of the Rooftop Solar Challenge in

  17. Electrically powered hand tool

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Myers, Kurt S.; Reed, Teddy R.

    2007-01-16

    An electrically powered hand tool is described and which includes a three phase electrical motor having a plurality of poles; an electrical motor drive electrically coupled with the three phase electrical motor; and a source of electrical power which is converted to greater than about 208 volts three-phase and which is electrically coupled with the electrical motor drive.

  18. International Round-Robin on Transport Properties of Bismuth Telluride |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Round-Robin on Transport Properties of Bismuth Telluride International Round-Robin on Transport Properties of Bismuth Telluride IEA-AMT round-robin testing of n- and p-type bismuth telluride transport properties showed significant measurement issues and highlighted need for standardization of measurements of thermoelectric material properties PDF icon wang.pdf More Documents & Publications Reliability of Transport Properties for Bulk Thermoelectrics Thermoelectric

  19. Photovoltaic Supply Chain and Cross-Cutting Technologies Round 2 |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Technology to Market » Photovoltaic Supply Chain and Cross-Cutting Technologies Round 2 Photovoltaic Supply Chain and Cross-Cutting Technologies Round 2 Four projects are working to accelerate the development of revolutionary products or processes for the photovoltaic (PV) industry through the High Impact Supply Chain R&D for PV Technologies/Systems program, which represents the second round of PV Supply Chain and Cross-Cutting Technologies funding. These projects

  20. Solar Foundational Program to Advance Cell Efficiency Round 2 | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Photovoltaics » Solar Foundational Program to Advance Cell Efficiency Round 2 Solar Foundational Program to Advance Cell Efficiency Round 2 The SunShot Foundational Program to Advance Cell Efficiency (F-PACE) aims to increase the efficiency of photovoltaic (PV) cells achieved in the laboratory and on manufacturing lines. Launched in September 2011, the first round of the F-PACE program supported 18 research projects over a 36-month performance period. These efforts laid the

  1. Solar Foundational Program to Advance Cell Efficiency Round 1 | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Photovoltaics » Solar Foundational Program to Advance Cell Efficiency Round 1 Solar Foundational Program to Advance Cell Efficiency Round 1 The first round of the Foundational Program to Advance Cell Efficiency (F-PACE) program supported 18 projects working to create the technical foundation for significant increases in photovoltaic (PV) efficiency. Combining both the technical and funding resources of DOE and the National Science Foundation, this research investment worked toward

  2. Energy Department Announces Second Round of National Strategy for the

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Arctic Region Meetings | Department of Energy Announces Second Round of National Strategy for the Arctic Region Meetings Energy Department Announces Second Round of National Strategy for the Arctic Region Meetings February 13, 2015 - 4:38pm Addthis The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is announcing the second round of tribal consultations and stakeholder outreach meetings on the National Strategy for the Arctic Region (NSAR), 10-Year Plan to accelerate renewable energy deployment in the

  3. DOE Issues Amended Funding Opportunity Announcement for Third Round of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Clean Coal Power Initiative | Department of Energy Issues Amended Funding Opportunity Announcement for Third Round of Clean Coal Power Initiative DOE Issues Amended Funding Opportunity Announcement for Third Round of Clean Coal Power Initiative June 15, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy has issued an amendment to the Funding Opportunity Announcement for Round 3 of the Clean Coal Power Initiative. The amendment, which was issued on June 9, 2009, incorporates

  4. Initial Results of IEC 62804 Draft Round Robin Testing (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hacke, P.; Terwilliger, K.; Koch, S.; Weber, T.; Berghold, J.; Hoffmann, S.; Ambrosi, H.; Koehl, M.; Dietrich, S.; Ebert, M.; Mathiak, G.

    2013-05-01

    This presentation discusses the Initial round robin results of the IEC 62804 system voltage durability qualification test for crystalline silicon modules.

  5. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Second Production Builder Round Table

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Branding and Messaging * Write a press release on the round table, listing attendees * ... that will be trusted more than builder marketing efforts DOE will continue leveraging a ...

  6. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nevada Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Nevada) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 10,652 34 Electric...

  7. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Minnesota Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Minnesota) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 15,758 26 Electric...

  8. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    York Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (New York) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural Gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 39,918 6 Electric...

  9. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Vermont Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Vermont) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Nuclear Net summer capacity (megawatts) 1,255 50 Electric...

  10. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Hampshire Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (New Hampshire) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Nuclear Net summer capacity (megawatts) 4,413 44 Electric...

  11. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Montana Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Montana) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 6,329 41 Electric utilities...

  12. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Virginia Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Virginia) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Nuclear Net summer capacity (megawatts) 24,828 16 Electric...

  13. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Missouri Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Missouri) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 21,801 19 Electric...

  14. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Texas Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Texas) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 109,584 1 Electric...

  15. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wisconsin Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Wisconsin) Item Value Rank Primary Energy Source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 17,342 23 Electric...

  16. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Michigan Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Michigan) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 30,128 11 Electric...

  17. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Jersey Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (New Jersey) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Nuclear Net summer capacity (megawatts) 18,997 22 Electric...

  18. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Pennsylvania Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Pennsylvania) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 43,040 5 Electric...

  19. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nebraska Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Nebraska) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 8,449 36 Electric utilities...

  20. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Alaska Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Alaska) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural Gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 2,384 48 Electric...

  1. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oklahoma Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Oklahoma) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 23,300 17 Electric...

  2. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Dakota Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (North Dakota) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 6,566 40 Electric...

  3. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Maryland Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Maryland) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 12,339 33 Electric...

  4. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Carolina Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (South Carolina) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Nuclear Net summer capacity (megawatts) 23,017 18 Electric...

  5. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Tennessee Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Tennessee) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 21,326 20 Electric...

  6. Electricity | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sources Electricity Electricity March 17, 2016 Dr. Imre Gyuk -- pictured speaking at a Green Mountain Power energy storage event -- was recently recognized for his game-changing ...

  7. Electric vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-03-01

    Quiet, clean, and efficient, electric vehicles (EVs) may someday become a practical mode of transportation for the general public. Electric vehicles can provide many advantages for the nation's environment and energy supply because they run on electricity, which can be produced from many sources of energy such as coal, natural gas, uranium, and hydropower. These vehicles offer fuel versatility to the transportation sector, which depends almost solely on oil for its energy needs. Electric vehicles are any mode of transportation operated by a motor that receives electricity from a battery or fuel cell. EVs come in all shapes and sizes and may be used for different tasks. Some EVs are small and simple, such as golf carts and electric wheel chairs. Others are larger and more complex, such as automobile and vans. Some EVs, such as fork lifts, are used in industries. In this fact sheet, we will discuss mostly automobiles and vans. There are also variations on electric vehicles, such as hybrid vehicles and solar-powered vehicles. Hybrid vehicles use electricity as their primary source of energy, however, they also use a backup source of energy, such as gasoline, methanol or ethanol. Solar-powered vehicles are electric vehicles that use photovoltaic cells (cells that convert solar energy to electricity) rather than utility-supplied electricity to recharge the batteries. This paper discusses these concepts.

  8. DOE's Round Robin Test Program FAQ Sheet | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    DOE's Round Robin Test Program FAQ Sheet DOE's Round Robin Test Program FAQ Sheet This document is the May 2011 version of the Frequently Asked Questions about the US Department of Energy's Round Robin Test Program. PDF icon roundrobintestprogram_faq_may2011.pdf More Documents & Publications 6450-01-P, DOE 10 CFR Parts 430 and 431, Docket No. EERE-2010-BT-CE-0014 RIN 1904-AC23, Draft Submission to Federal Register, Notice of Revisions to Energy Efficiency Enforcement Regulations, Request for

  9. Carrying Semiautomatic Pistols with a Round in the Chamber

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-10-28

    Sets forth requirements for a DOE security police officer who must carry a round in the chamber of a semiautomatic pistol while on duty. Does not cancel other directives.

  10. International Round-Robin on Transport Properties of Bismuth...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    IEA-AMT round-robin testing of n- and p-type bismuth telluride transport properties showed ... of measurements of thermoelectric material properties PDF icon wang.pdf More ...

  11. DOE ZERH Second Leading Builder Round Table Meeting Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On October 23rd-24th, 2014, the ZERH program held its Second Leading Production Builder Round Table Meeting in Suwanee, GA. The purpose was to provide top executives from leading builders with a...

  12. The Mesaba Energy Project: Clean Coal Power Initiative, Round...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Mesaba Energy Project: Clean Coal Power Initiative, Round 2 Stone, Richard; Gray, Gordon; Evans, Robert 01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; 20 FOSSIL-FUELED POWER PLANTS The Mesaba Energy...

  13. Next Generation Photovoltaics Round 2 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Photovoltaics » Next Generation Photovoltaics Round 2 Next Generation Photovoltaics Round 2 Twenty-three solar projects are investigating transformational photovoltaic (PV) technologies with the potential to meet SunShot cost targets. The projects' goals are to: Increase efficiency Reduce costs Improve reliability Create more secure and sustainable supply chains. On Sept. 1, 2011, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced $24.5 million to fund the Next Generation Photovoltaics II projects

  14. 2015 Leading Builder Round Table Report | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Leading Builder Round Table Report 2015 Leading Builder Round Table Report The nation is on the cusp of a dramatic movement to zero energy ready homes. This includes statewide codes, large developments, and a growing amount of commitment to the DOE Zero Energy Ready Home program. Much of this progress can be attributed to a small contingent of our nation's leading builders who are demonstrating the technical, cost, and design feasibility for this level of excellence At the 2015 Leading Builder

  15. Nuclear Waste Analytical Round Robins 1-6 summary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, G.L.; Marschman, S.C.

    1993-12-31

    The MCC has conducted six round robins for the waste management, research, and development community from 1987 to present. The laboratories participating regularly are Ames, Argonne, Catholic University, Lawrence Livermore, Pacific Northwest Laboratory, Savannah River, and West Valley Nuclear. Glass types analyzed in these round robins all have been simulated nuclear waste compositions expected from vitrification of high-level nuclear waste. A wide range of analytical procedures have been used by the participating laboratories including Atomic Absorption spectroscopy, inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy, direct current plasma-emission spectroscopy, and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy techniques. Consensus average relative error for Round Robins 1 through 6 is 5.4%, with values ranging from 9.4 to 1.1%. Trend on the average improved with each round robin. When the laboratories analyzed samples over longer periods of time, the intralaboratory variability increased. Lab-to-lab variation accounts for most of the total variability found in all the round robins. Participation in the radiochemistry portion has been minimal, and analytical results poor compared to nonradiochemistry portion. Additional radiochemical work is needed in future round robins.

  16. BAG (Continuous Round Robin Packet Capture)

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2006-03-10

    Bag is a miniature pcap filter which takes pcap input (or input off the wire) using a bpf filter, if specified, and then writes the output to stdout or a file (in pcap format). It depends for some aspects of its functionality on a libpcap library which uses a shared memory packet capture ring bugger. There are two build in modules: chcksum and session. the build in chcksum modules is used to anonymize the ipmore » addresses and repair any checksums in the stream. % bag -r /tmp/*.pcap -Cchucksum, 128.1 65: 10.10 The session module generates sessions which are defined as a series of packets that have two things in common. the first is a unique five-tuple composed oi an IP protocol, IP source address, IP source port, IP destination address, and IP destination port. The second is that if the originating packet is associated with a bi-directional service such as ftpltcp, characteristics and data will be kept for both flows involved with the service. The only protocols evaluated beyond the IP header are ICMP, TCP and UDP. A session can last for as long as bag is running. However, under normal conditions, sessions are generated every time they appear to have closed down. There is a man page included with the distribution which goes into more detail.« less

  17. Round Robin Testing of Commercial Hydrogen Sensor Performance--Observations and Results: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buttner, W.; Burgess, R.; Rivkin, C.; Post, M.; Boon-Bret, L.; Black, G.; Harskamp, F.; Moretto, P.

    2010-10-01

    This paper presented observations and results from round robin testing of commercial hydrogen sensor performance.

  18. CDFI Fund 2015 Round of New Markets Tax Credit Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of the Treasury’s Community Development Financial Institutions Fund (CDFI Fund) has opened the calendar year (CY) 2015 Notice of Allocation Availability (NOAA) funding round for the New Markets Tax Credit Program (NMTC Program). The NOAA makes up to $5 billion in tax credit allocation authority available for the CY 2015 round, pending Congressional authorization. Eligible parties must be certified as Community Development Entities (CDEs) by the CDFI Fund. The NMTC Program aims to break this cycle of disinvestment by attracting the private investment necessary to reinvigorate struggling local economies.

  19. DOE Announces Selections for SSL Core Technology Research (Round 10),

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Product Development (Round 10), and U.S. Manufacturing (Round 6) Funding Opportunities | Department of Energy The U.S. Department of Energy has announced the competitive selection of 10 projects for solid-state lighting (SSL), in response to the SSL R&D funding opportunity announcement (FOA) DE-FOA-0001171. The one- to two-year projects will focus on the areas of Core Technology Research, which involves the application of fundamental scientific concepts to SSL technology; Product

  20. Application of Spatial Data Modeling and Geographical Information Systems (GIS) for Identification of Potential Siting Options for Various Electrical Generation Sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mays, Gary T; Belles, Randy; Blevins, Brandon R; Hadley, Stanton W; Harrison, Thomas J; Jochem, Warren C; Neish, Bradley S; Omitaomu, Olufemi A; Rose, Amy N

    2012-05-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) initiated an internal National Electric Generation Siting Study, which is an ongoing multiphase study addressing several key questions related to our national electrical energy supply. This effort has led to the development of a tool, OR-SAGE (Oak Ridge Siting Analysis for power Generation Expansion), to support siting evaluations. The objective in developing OR-SAGE was to use industry-accepted approaches and/or develop appropriate criteria for screening sites and employ an array of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) data sources at ORNL to identify candidate areas for a power generation technology application. The initial phase of the study examined nuclear power generation. These early nuclear phase results were shared with staff from the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), which formed the genesis and support for an expansion of the work to several other power generation forms, including advanced coal with carbon capture and storage (CCS), solar, and compressed air energy storage (CAES). Wind generation was not included in this scope of work for EPRI. The OR-SAGE tool is essentially a dynamic visualization database. The results shown in this report represent a single static set of results using a specific set of input parameters. In this case, the GIS input parameters were optimized to support an economic study conducted by EPRI. A single set of individual results should not be construed as an ultimate energy solution, since US energy policy is very complex. However, the strength of the OR-SAGE tool is that numerous alternative scenarios can be quickly generated to provide additional insight into electrical generation or other GIS-based applications. The screening process divides the contiguous United States into 100 x 100 m (1-hectare) squares (cells), applying successive power generation-appropriate site selection and evaluation criteria (SSEC) to each cell. There are just under 700 million cells representing the contiguous United States. If a cell meets the requirements of each criterion, the cell is deemed a candidate area for siting a specific power generation form relative to a reference plant for that power type. Some SSEC parameters preclude siting a power plant because of an environmental, regulatory, or land-use constraint. Other SSEC assist in identifying less favorable areas, such as proximity to hazardous operations. All of the selected SSEC tend to recommend against sites. The focus of the ORNL electrical generation source siting study is on identifying candidate areas from which potential sites might be selected, stopping short of performing any detailed site evaluations or comparisons. This approach is designed to quickly screen for and characterize candidate areas. Critical assumptions supporting this work include the supply of cooling water to thermoelectric power generation; a methodology to provide an adequate siting footprint for typical power plant applications; a methodology to estimate thermoelectric plant capacity while accounting for available cooling water; and a methodology to account for future ({approx}2035) siting limitations as population increases and demands on freshwater sources change. OR-SAGE algorithms were built to account for these critical assumptions. Stream flow is the primary thermoelectric plant cooling source evaluated in this study. All cooling was assumed to be provided by a closed-cycle cooling (CCC) system requiring makeup water to account for evaporation and blowdown. Limited evaluations of shoreline cooling and the use of municipal processed water (gray) cooling were performed. Using a representative set of SSEC as input to the OR-SAGE tool and employing the accompanying critical assumptions, independent results for the various power generation sources studied were calculated.

  1. An In-Depth Look at Ground Source Heat Pumps and Other Electric Loads in Two GreenMax Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Puttagunta, Srikanth; Shapiro, Carl

    2012-04-01

    Building America research team Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) partnered with WPPI Energy to answer key research questions on in-field performance of ground-source heat pumps and lighting, appliance, and miscellaneous loads (LAMELs) through extensive field monitoring at two WPPI GreenMax demonstration homes in Wisconsin. These two test home evaluations provided valuable data on the true in-field performance of various building mechanical systems and LAMELs.

  2. Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    . Total Electricity Consumption and Expenditures, 2003" ,"All Buildings* Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures" ,"Number of Buildings...

  3. Green Functions for the Radial Electric Component of the Monopole...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Green Functions for the Radial Electric Component of the Monopole Wake Field in a Round Resistive Chamber Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Green Functions for the Radial...

  4. DC source assemblies

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Campbell, Jeremy B; Newson, Steve

    2013-02-26

    Embodiments of DC source assemblies of power inverter systems of the type suitable for deployment in a vehicle having an electrically grounded chassis are provided. An embodiment of a DC source assembly comprises a housing, a DC source disposed within the housing, a first terminal, and a second terminal. The DC source also comprises a first capacitor having a first electrode electrically coupled to the housing, and a second electrode electrically coupled to the first terminal. The DC source assembly further comprises a second capacitor having a first electrode electrically coupled to the housing, and a second electrode electrically coupled to the second terminal.

  5. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Georgia Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Georgia) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 38,210 7 Electric...

  6. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Arizona Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Arizona) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 27,910 13 Electric...

  7. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Maine Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Maine) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 4,499 43 Electric...

  8. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Utah Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Utah) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 7,698 39 Electric utilities 6,669...

  9. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Hawaii Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Hawaii) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Petroleum Net summer capacity (megawatts) 2,757 47 Electric...

  10. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Kentucky Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Kentucky) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 21,004 21 Electric...

  11. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Indiana Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Indiana) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 27,196 14 Electric...

  12. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Colorado Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Colorado) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 14,769 30 Electric...

  13. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Ohio Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Ohio) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 32,482 8 Electric utilities 20,779...

  14. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Iowa Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Iowa) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 15,929 25 Electric utilities...

  15. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Illinois Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Illinois) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Nuclear Net summer capacity (megawatts) 44,950 4 Electric...

  16. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mexico Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (New Mexico) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 7,938 38 Electric...

  17. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Kansas Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Kansas) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 14,093 32 Electric...

  18. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Florida Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Florida) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 58,781 3 Electric...

  19. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Second Production Builder Round Table

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Home Second Production Builder Round Table January 2015 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, subcontractors, or affliated partners, make any warranty, express or implied, or assume any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or

  20. Solid-State Lighting Manufacturing Research and Development - Round 3

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    (DE-FOA-0000561) | Department of Energy 3 (DE-FOA-0000561) Solid-State Lighting Manufacturing Research and Development - Round 3 (DE-FOA-0000561) September 23, 2011 - 6:44pm Addthis This funding opportunity is closed. The objective of this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is achieve cost reduction of solid-state lighting for general illumination through improvements in manufacturing equipment, processes, or techniques. It is anticipated that success will lead to a more rapid

  1. Solid-State Lighting Manufacturing Research and Development - Round 4

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    (DE-FOA-0000792) | Department of Energy 4 (DE-FOA-0000792) Solid-State Lighting Manufacturing Research and Development - Round 4 (DE-FOA-0000792) November 29, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis This funding opportunity is closed. The objective of this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is to achieve cost reduction of solid-state lighting (SSL) for general illumination through improvements in manufacturing equipment, processes, or techniques. It is anticipated that success will lead to a more rapid

  2. MaRIE: A Presentation to the Science Campaigns Round Robin (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: MaRIE: A Presentation to the Science Campaigns Round Robin Citation Details In-Document Search Title: MaRIE: A Presentation to the Science Campaigns Round Robin You...

  3. Electricity 101 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Resources » Electricity 101 Electricity 101 FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS: Why do other countries use different shaped plugs? Why do outlets have three holes? Why do we have AC electricity? Can we harness lightning as an energy source? Can we have wireless transmission of electricity? SYSTEM: What is electricity? Where does electricity come from? What is the "grid"? How much electricity does a typical household use? How did the electric system evolve? What does the future look like?

  4. Upright Vacuum Sweeps Up the Competition in #EnergyFaceoff Round Two |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Upright Vacuum Sweeps Up the Competition in #EnergyFaceoff Round Two Upright Vacuum Sweeps Up the Competition in #EnergyFaceoff Round Two November 12, 2014 - 10:17am Addthis The vacuum takes the title of most efficient in #EnergyFaceoff round two. | Graphic courtesy of Stacy Buchanan, National Renewable Energy Laboratory The vacuum takes the title of most efficient in #EnergyFaceoff round two. | Graphic courtesy of Stacy Buchanan, National Renewable Energy Laboratory

  5. Computer Defeats Video Game System in #EnergyFaceoff Round One | Department

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    of Energy Defeats Video Game System in #EnergyFaceoff Round One Computer Defeats Video Game System in #EnergyFaceoff Round One November 5, 2014 - 3:30pm Addthis The computer takes the efficiency title in round one of #EnergyFaceoff. | Graphic courtesy of Stacy Buchanan, National Renewable Energy Laboratory The computer takes the efficiency title in round one of #EnergyFaceoff. | Graphic courtesy of Stacy Buchanan, National Renewable Energy Laboratory Allison Casey Senior Communicator, NREL

  6. EIA - Electricity Generating Capacity

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Electricity Generating Capacity Release Date: January 3, 2013 | Next Release: August 2013 Year Existing Units by Energy Source Unit Additions Unit Retirements 2011 XLS XLS XLS 2010...

  7. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mississippi Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Mississippi) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 15,561 28...

  8. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Massachusetts Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Massachusetts) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 13,678 32...

  9. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Connecticut Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Connecticut) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Nuclear Net summer capacity (megawatts) 8,769 35...

  10. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    North Carolina Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (North Carolina) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 30,048 12...

  11. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Rhode Island Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Rhode Island) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 1,809 49...

  12. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    West Virginia Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (West Virginia) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 16,282 24...

  13. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    District of Columbia Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (District of Columbia) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity...

  14. Electricity Monthly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Methodology and Documentation General The Electricity Monthly Update is prepared by the Electric Power Operations Team, Office of Electricity, Renewables and Uranium Statistics, U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), U.S. Department of Energy. Data published in the Electricity Monthly Update are compiled from the following sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-826,"Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenues with State Distributions Report," U.S. Energy

  15. Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A. Total Electricity Consumption and Expenditures for All Buildings, 2003" ,"All Buildings Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures" ,"Number of...

  16. Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    C9. Total Electricity Consumption and Expenditures, 1999" ,"All Buildings Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures" ,"Number of Buildings...

  17. Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    DIV. Total Electricity Consumption and Expenditures by Census Division, 1999" ,"All Buildings Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures" ,"Number...

  18. Firearm equipped with live round inhibiting means and method of making same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baehr, D.G.

    1990-11-13

    A firearm is disclosed having live round inhibiting means mounted in the barrel of the firearm which permits a blank cartridge to be loaded into a firearm and fired while preventing the loading and firing of a live round. The live round inhibiting means comprise shaft means mounted in the barrel of the firearm and which extends a sufficient length into the barrel at a point just beyond the chamber portion of the firearm to engage the bullet portion of a live round to prevent it from properly chambering, while permitting a blank cartridge to be loaded into the firearm and fired without engaging the live round-inhibiting shaft means. 9 figs.

  19. Firearm equipped with live round inhibiting means and method of making same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baehr, Donald G. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1990-01-01

    A firearm is disclosed having live round inhibiting means mounted in the barrel of the firearm which permits a blank cartridge to be loaded into a firearm and fired while preventing the loading and firing of a live round. The live round inhibiting means comprise shaft means mounted in the barrel of the firearm and which extends a sufficient length into the barrel at a point just beyond the chamber portion of the firearm to engage the bullet portion of a live round to prevent it from properly chambering, while permitting a blank cartridge to be loaded into the firearm and fired without engaging the live round-inhibiting shaft means.

  20. Electrical system architecture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Algrain, Marcelo C. (Peoria, IL); Johnson, Kris W. (Washington, IL); Akasam, Sivaprasad (Peoria, IL); Hoff, Brian D. (East Peoria, IL)

    2008-07-15

    An electrical system for a vehicle includes a first power source generating a first voltage level, the first power source being in electrical communication with a first bus. A second power source generates a second voltage level greater than the first voltage level, the second power source being in electrical communication with a second bus. A starter generator may be configured to provide power to at least one of the first bus and the second bus, and at least one additional power source may be configured to provide power to at least one of the first bus and the second bus. The electrical system also includes at least one power consumer in electrical communication with the first bus and at least one power consumer in electrical communication with the second bus.

  1. Lesson 2- Electricity Basics

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    It’s difficult to imagine life without convenient electricity. You just flip a switch or plug in an appliance, and it’s there. But how did it get there? Many steps go into providing the reliable electricity we take for granted. This lesson takes a closer look at electricity. It follows the path of electricity from the fuel source to the home, including the power plant and the electric power grid. It also covers the role of electric utilities in the generation, transmission, and distribution of electricity.

  2. Microwave vs. Electric Kettle: Which Appliance Is in Hot Water in

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    #EnergyFaceoff Round 4? | Department of Energy Microwave vs. Electric Kettle: Which Appliance Is in Hot Water in #EnergyFaceoff Round 4? Microwave vs. Electric Kettle: Which Appliance Is in Hot Water in #EnergyFaceoff Round 4? November 24, 2014 - 9:38am Q&A Which appliance do you think is more efficient? Tell Us Addthis Microwave or electric kettle, which appliance should win the honor of heating your water? | Graphic by Stacy Buchanan, National Renewable Energy Laboratory Microwave or

  3. Renewable energy generation sources...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    energy generation sources have begun to generate significant amounts of power for the national electricity grid. With the Molten Salt Test Loop (MSTL), Sandia and its industry ...

  4. PARENT Quick Blind Round-Robin Test Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Braatz, Brett G.; Heasler, Patrick G.; Meyer, Ryan M.

    2014-09-30

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has established the Program to Assess the Reliability of Emerging Nondestructive Techniques (PARENT) whose goal is to investigate the effectiveness of current and novel nondestructive examination procedures and techniques to find flaws in nickel-alloy welds and base materials. This is to be done by conducting a series of open and blind international round-robin tests on a set of piping components that include large-bore dissimilar metal welds, small-bore dissimilar metal welds, and bottom-mounted instrumentation penetration welds. The blind testing is being conducted in two segments, one is called Quick-Blind and the other is called Blind. The Quick-Blind testing and destructive analysis of the test blocks has been completed. This report describes the four Quick-Blind test blocks used, summarizes their destructive analysis, gives an overview of the nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques applied, provides an analysis inspection data, and presents the conclusions drawn.

  5. DOE Seeks Applications for Third Round of Clean Coal Power Initiative |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy for Third Round of Clean Coal Power Initiative DOE Seeks Applications for Third Round of Clean Coal Power Initiative August 11, 2008 - 2:40pm Addthis Funding Opportunity Announcement Solicits Applications for Carbon Capture and Sequestration WASHINGTON, DC -The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today issued the final Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) for Round 3 of the Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI) which seeks to accelerate the commercial deployment of advanced

  6. EA-1980: Spar Canyon-Round Valley Access Road System Improvements, Custer

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    County, Idaho | Department of Energy 80: Spar Canyon-Round Valley Access Road System Improvements, Custer County, Idaho EA-1980: Spar Canyon-Round Valley Access Road System Improvements, Custer County, Idaho Summary Bonneville Power Administration and the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) are jointly preparing an EA to assess potential environmental impacts of proposed improvements to the access road system for its existing Spar Canyon-Round Valley Transmission Line located on BLM land in

  7. The Mesaba Energy Project: Clean Coal Power Initiative, Round 2 (Technical

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Report) | SciTech Connect The Mesaba Energy Project: Clean Coal Power Initiative, Round 2 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The Mesaba Energy Project: Clean Coal Power Initiative, Round 2 The Mesaba Energy Project is a nominal 600 MW integrated gasification combine cycle power project located in Northeastern Minnesota. It was selected to receive financial assistance pursuant to code of federal regulations (?CFR?) 10 CFR 600 through a competitive solicitation under Round 2 of the

  8. CALiPER Round 11 Test Results Webcast | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    11 Test Results Webcast CALiPER Round 11 Test Results Webcast In this February 8, 2011 webcast, Mia Paget of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory provided the results of each CALiPER round with a "snapshot" of SSL technology status, identifying market trends and issues related to SSL product performance. Round 11 looked at five applications: arm-mounted roadway luminaires, post-top roadway luminaires, linear replacement lamps, high-bay luminaires, and small replacement lamps. View

  9. Lab-Corps Program Announces Second Round of Training for Entrepreneurial

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Teams at National Labs | Department of Energy Corps Program Announces Second Round of Training for Entrepreneurial Teams at National Labs Lab-Corps Program Announces Second Round of Training for Entrepreneurial Teams at National Labs March 17, 2016 - 4:00pm Addthis The Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's Lab-Corps program today launched its second round of clean energy entrepreneurship trainings this week in Golden, Colorado. The $2.3 million pilot, started in 2014, is based

  10. Federal-Tribal Partnership on Climate Change Action Rounds Corner, Shifts

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Into High Gear at 2013 Tribal Nations Conference | Department of Energy Federal-Tribal Partnership on Climate Change Action Rounds Corner, Shifts Into High Gear at 2013 Tribal Nations Conference Federal-Tribal Partnership on Climate Change Action Rounds Corner, Shifts Into High Gear at 2013 Tribal Nations Conference November 19, 2013 - 5:12pm Addthis Federal-Tribal Partnership on Climate Change Action Rounds Corner, Shifts Into High Gear at 2013 Tribal Nations Conference David F. Conrad

  11. Text-Alternative Version: CALiPER Round 7 Testing Results and SSL Product Life Issues

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Below is the text-alternative version of the CALiPER Round 7 Testing Results and SSL Product Life Issues webcast.

  12. Summary of Results: Round 9 of CALiPER Product Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2009-10-01

    The Round 9 Summary Report from the U.S. Department of Energy's Solid-State Lighting CALiPER Testing Program.

  13. Middle School Academic Competition - Round Robin | U.S. DOE Office...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    (NSB) NSB Home About High School Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2015 Competition Results Middle School Round Robin Middle School Double Elimination Middle...

  14. Hair Dryer vs. Upright Vacuum: Round Two of #EnergyFaceoff Begins |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy Hair Dryer vs. Upright Vacuum: Round Two of #EnergyFaceoff Begins Hair Dryer vs. Upright Vacuum: Round Two of #EnergyFaceoff Begins November 10, 2014 - 9:35am Q&A Which appliance do you think is more efficient? Ask Us Addthis The hair dryer and the vacuum go head to head in #EnergyFaceoff round two! | Graphic courtesy of Stacy Buchanan, National Renewable Energy Lab The hair dryer and the vacuum go head to head in #EnergyFaceoff round two! | Graphic courtesy of Stacy

  15. Energy Sources | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sources Energy Sources Renewable Energy Renewable Energy Learn more about energy from solar, wind, water, geothermal and biomass. Read more Nuclear Nuclear Learn more about how we use nuclear energy. Read more Electricity Electricity Learn more about how we use electricity as an energy source. Read more Fossil Fossil Learn more about our fossil energy sources: coal, oil and natural gas. Read more Primary energy sources take many forms, including nuclear energy, fossil energy -- like oil, coal

  16. East Central Electric Cooperative- Residential Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    East Central Electric Cooperative offers rebates to residential customers to install energy-efficient ground source heat pumps, electric water heaters, and air conditioners. To qualify for the...

  17. Aiken Electric Cooperative Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Aiken Electric Cooperative Inc Place: Aiken, South Carolina Zip: 29802 Sector: Hydro, Hydrogen, Renewable Energy Product: A utility that provides electricity from renewable sources...

  18. Electricity Monthly Update - Energy Information Administration

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    all Electricity Reports Electricity Monthly Update With Data ... Issue: March 2016 February 2016 January 2016 December 2015 ... Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923 ...

  19. Wind Turbine Gearbox Condition Monitoring Round Robin Study - Vibration Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheng, S.

    2012-07-01

    The Gearbox Reliability Collaborative (GRC) at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) tested two identical gearboxes. One was tested on the NWTCs 2.5 MW dynamometer and the other was field tested in a turbine in a nearby wind plant. In the field, the test gearbox experienced two oil loss events that resulted in damage to its internal bearings and gears. Since the damage was not severe, the test gearbox was removed from the field and retested in the NWTCs dynamometer before it was disassembled. During the dynamometer retest, some vibration data along with testing condition information were collected. These data enabled NREL to launch a Wind Turbine Gearbox Condition Monitoring Round Robin project, as described in this report. The main objective of this project was to evaluate different vibration analysis algorithms used in wind turbine condition monitoring (CM) and find out whether the typical practices are effective. With involvement of both academic researchers and industrial partners, the project sets an example on providing cutting edge research results back to industry.

  20. Power Conversion Apparatus and Method for Hybrid Electric and Electric

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Vehicle Engines - Energy Innovation Portal Power Conversion Apparatus and Method for Hybrid Electric and Electric Vehicle Engines Oak Ridge National Laboratory Contact ORNL About This Technology Technology Marketing SummaryORNL researchers developed a solution to power source problems in hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) and electric vehicle (EV) engines. These engines typically use voltage source inverters. The conventional type of converter requires costly capacitors, has trouble with high

  1. Electricity Monthly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    77 -2.1% Subbituminous 73,777 73 47,345 44 55.8% 75,105 66 -1.8% Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration NOTE: Stockpile levels shown above reflect a sample of electric...

  2. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Louisiana Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Louisiana) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 26,228 15...

  3. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Delaware Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Delaware) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 3,246 46...

  4. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    California Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (California) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Natural Gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 73,772 2...

  5. November 2011 Electrical Safety Occurrences

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    tagout) or disturbance of a previously unknown or mislocated hazardous energy source (e.g., live electrical power circuit, steam line, pressurized gas) resulting in a person...

  6. The Round Robin Program: Ground Motion in the Vicinity of the Grove Event

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Grove Event Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The Round Robin Program: Ground Motion in the Vicinity of the Grove Event Five Round Robin stations were installed in an easterly line on grove, and, in addition, data are provided form a Round Robin type canister placed at a pore pressure measuring station on another line. Almost all of the gages performed well Authors: Long, J. W. Publication Date: 1975-12-01 OSTI Identifier: 16243 Report Number(s):

  7. CALiPER Round 7 Testing Results and SSL Product Life Issues | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy 7 Testing Results and SSL Product Life Issues CALiPER Round 7 Testing Results and SSL Product Life Issues This April 9, 2009 webcast provided an overview of CALiPER's Round 7 testing results, and an update on the emerging understanding of service life and long-term reliability for solid-state lighting products. Heidi Steward of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) highlighted the testing results from CALiPER Round 7, including featured product categories outdoor lighting,

  8. Energy Department Selects Five Alaska Villages in next round of START

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Project to Support Clean Energy Development | Department of Energy Selects Five Alaska Villages in next round of START Project to Support Clean Energy Development Energy Department Selects Five Alaska Villages in next round of START Project to Support Clean Energy Development May 28, 2015 - 6:35pm Addthis NEWS MEDIA CONTACT (202) 586-4940 DOENews@hq.doe.gov WASHINGTON- Today, when visiting the Alaska Native Science and Engineering Program at the University of Alaska-Anchorage, Deputy Energy

  9. Nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEFs) low cost generator design using power MOSFET and Cockcroft-Walton multiplier circuit as high voltage DC source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sulaeman, M. Y.; Widita, R.

    2014-09-30

    Purpose: Non-ionizing radiation therapy for cancer using pulsed electric field with high intensity field has become an interesting field new research topic. A new method using nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEFs) offers a novel means to treat cancer. Not like the conventional electroporation, nsPEFs able to create nanopores in all membranes of the cell, including membrane in cell organelles, like mitochondria and nucleus. NsPEFs will promote cell death in several cell types, including cancer cell by apoptosis mechanism. NsPEFs will use pulse with intensity of electric field higher than conventional electroporation, between 20100 kV/cm and with shorter duration of pulse than conventional electroporation. NsPEFs requires a generator to produce high voltage pulse and to achieve high intensity electric field with proper pulse width. However, manufacturing cost for creating generator that generates a high voltage with short duration for nsPEFs purposes is highly expensive. Hence, the aim of this research is to obtain the low cost generator design that is able to produce a high voltage pulse with nanosecond width and will be used for nsPEFs purposes. Method: Cockcroft-Walton multiplier circuit will boost the input of 220 volt AC into high voltage DC around 1500 volt and it will be combined by a series of power MOSFET as a fast switch to obtain a high voltage with nanosecond pulse width. The motivation using Cockcroft-Walton multiplier is to acquire a low-cost high voltage DC generator; it will use capacitors and diodes arranged like a step. Power MOSFET connected in series is used as voltage divider to share the high voltage in order not to damage them. Results: This design is expected to acquire a low-cost generator that can achieve the high voltage pulse in amount of ?1.5 kV with falltime 3 ns and risetime 15 ns into a 50? load that will be used for nsPEFs purposes. Further detailed on the circuit design will be explained at presentation.

  10. Status of Tampa Electric Company IGCC Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jenkins, S.D.

    1992-01-01

    Tampa Electric Company will utilize Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle technology for its new Polk Power Station Unit [number sign]1. The project is partially funded under the Department of Energy Clean Coal Technology Program Round III. This paper describes the technology to be used, process details, demonstration of a new hot gas clean-up system, and the schedule, leading to commercial operation in July 1996.

  11. Status of Tampa Electric Company IGCC Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jenkins, S.D.

    1992-10-01

    Tampa Electric Company will utilize Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle technology for its new Polk Power Station Unit {number_sign}1. The project is partially funded under the Department of Energy Clean Coal Technology Program Round III. This paper describes the technology to be used, process details, demonstration of a new hot gas clean-up system, and the schedule, leading to commercial operation in July 1996.

  12. Electric power monthly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-08-01

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares the Electric Power Monthly (EPM) for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. This publication provides monthly statistics for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source, consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead.

  13. Internal hydraulic analysis of impeller rounding in centrifugal pumps as turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, Punit; Nestmann, Franz [Institute of Water and River Basin Management (IWG), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Kaiser Str. 12, D 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2011-01-15

    The use of pumps as turbines in different applications has been gaining importance in the recent years, but the subject of hydraulic optimization still remains an open research problem. One of these optimization techniques that include rounding of the sharp edges at the impeller periphery (or turbine inlet) has shown tendencies of performance enhancement. In order to understand the effect of this hydraulic optimization, the paper introduces an analytical model in the pump as turbine control volume and brings out the functionalities of the internal variables classified under control variables consisting of the system loss coefficient and exit relative flow direction and under dependent variables consisting of net tangential flow velocity, net head and efficiency. The paper studies the effects of impeller rounding on a combination of radial flow and mixed flow pumps as turbines using experimental data. The impeller rounding is seen to have positive impact on the overall efficiency in different operating regions with an improvement in the range of 1-3%. The behaviour of the two control variables have been elaborately studied in which it is found that the system loss coefficient has reduced drastically due to rounding effects, while the extent of changes to the exit relative flow direction seems to be limited in comparison. The reasons for changes to these control variables have been physically interpreted and attributed to the behaviour of the wake zone at the turbine inlet and circulation within the impeller control volume. The larger picture of impeller rounding has been discussed in comparison with performance prediction models in pumps as turbines. The possible limitations of the analytical model as well as the test setup are also presented. The paper concludes that the impeller rounding technique is very important for performance optimization and recommends its application on all pump as turbine projects. It also recommends the standardization of the rounding effects over wide range of pump shapes including axial pumps. (author)

  14. Electricity Generation | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Electricity Generation Electricity Generation The United States of America continues to generate the most geothermal electricity in the world: more than 3.5 gigawatts, predominantly from the western United States. That's enough to power about three and half million homes! Pictured above, the Raft River geothermal plant is located in Idaho. Source: Geothermal Resources Council The United States of America continues to generate the most geothermal electricity in the world: more than 3.5 gigawatts,

  15. Advanced Materials and Devices for Stationary Electrical Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    (e.g., the distributed grid and electric vehicles), and the projected increase in renewable energy sources. Advanced Materials and Devices for Stationary Electrical Energy...

  16. Ozark Border Electric Cooperative- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Ozark Border Electric Cooperative has made rebates available to residential members for the installation of energy efficient geothermal and air source heat pumps, electric water heaters, and room...

  17. Radioisotopic heat source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jones, G.J.; Selle, J.E.; Teaney, P.E.

    1975-09-30

    Disclosed is a radioisotopic heat source and method for a long life electrical generator. The source includes plutonium dioxide shards and yttrium or hafnium in a container of tantalum-tungsten-hafnium alloy, all being in a nickel alloy outer container, and subjected to heat treatment of from about 1570$sup 0$F to about 1720$sup 0$F for about one h. (auth)

  18. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Alaska Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Alaska) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural Gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 2,384 48 Electric utilities 2,205 39 IPP & CHP 179 50 Net generation (megawatthours) 6,496,822 49 Electric utilities 5,851,727 39 IPP & CHP 645,095 49 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 4,202 43 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 18,043 37 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 3,768 44 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 29 Nitrogen oxide

  19. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Arizona Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Arizona) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 27,910 13 Electric utilities 20,668 12 IPP & CHP 7,242 16 Net generation (megawatthours) 113,325,986 12 Electric utilities 92,740,582 8 IPP & CHP 20,585,405 15 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 23,716 31 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 59,416 15 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 55,342 16 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.4 42 Nitrogen

  20. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    California Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (California) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Natural Gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 73,772 2 Electric utilities 28,165 4 IPP & CHP 45,607 2 Net generation (megawatthours) 200,077,115 5 Electric utilities 78,407,643 14 IPP & CHP 121,669,472 4 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 2,109 48 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 96,842 5 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 57,323 13 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.0 49

  1. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Colorado Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Colorado) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 14,769 30 Electric utilities 10,238 28 IPP & CHP 4,531 20 Net generation (megawatthours) 52,937,436 28 Electric utilities 42,508,826 25 IPP & CHP 10,428,610 29 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 40,012 27 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 49,623 21 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 39,387 20 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.5 27 Nitrogen

  2. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Connecticut Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Connecticut) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Nuclear Net summer capacity (megawatts) 8,769 35 Electric utilities 152 46 IPP & CHP 8,617 13 Net generation (megawatthours) 35,610,789 38 Electric utilities 50,273 45 IPP & CHP 35,560,516 10 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 3,512 45 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 9,372 45 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 8,726 41 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.2 47 Nitrogen

  3. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Delaware Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Delaware) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 3,246 46 Electric utilities 102 47 IPP & CHP 3,144 32 Net generation (megawatthours) 7,760,861 47 Electric utilities 25,986 47 IPP & CHP 7,734,875 34 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 2,241 47 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 2,585 48 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 4,722 43 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 40 Nitrogen oxide

  4. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    District of Columbia Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (District of Columbia) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 9 51 Electric utilities IPP & CHP 9 51 Net generation (megawatthours) 65,852 51 Electric utilities IPP & CHP 65,852 51 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 0 51 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 148 51 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 49 50 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.0 51 Nitrogen oxide (lbs/MWh) 4.5 3

  5. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Florida Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Florida) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 58,781 3 Electric utilities 50,967 1 IPP & CHP 7,813 15 Net generation (megawatthours) 222,398,924 3 Electric utilities 202,527,297 1 IPP & CHP 19,871,627 18 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 117,797 12 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 88,345 6 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 108,431 3 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.1 34

  6. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Georgia Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Georgia) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 38,210 7 Electric utilities 28,875 2 IPP & CHP 9,335 10 Net generation (megawatthours) 120,953,734 10 Electric utilities 107,082,884 4 IPP & CHP 13,870,850 26 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 123,735 10 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 55,462 20 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 56,812 15 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.0 20

  7. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Hawaii Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Hawaii) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Petroleum Net summer capacity (megawatts) 2,757 47 Electric utilities 1,821 40 IPP & CHP 937 45 Net generation (megawatthours) 10,267,052 45 Electric utilities 5,748,256 40 IPP & CHP 4,518,796 40 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 20,710 33 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 25,416 31 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 7,428 42 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 4.0 5 Nitrogen oxide

  8. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Idaho Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Idaho) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Hydroelectric Net summer capacity (megawatts) 4,924 42 Electric utilities 3,394 37 IPP & CHP 1,530 39 Net generation (megawatthours) 15,186,128 43 Electric utilities 9,600,216 36 IPP & CHP 5,585,912 39 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 6,565 42 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 7,627 46 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 1,942 49 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 37 Nitrogen

  9. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Illinois Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Illinois) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Nuclear Net summer capacity (megawatts) 44,950 4 Electric utilities 5,269 35 IPP & CHP 39,681 4 Net generation (megawatthours) 203,004,919 4 Electric utilities 11,571,734 35 IPP & CHP 191,433,185 3 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 203,951 6 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 63,358 11 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 97,812 6 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.0 21 Nitrogen

  10. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Indiana Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Indiana) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 27,196 14 Electric utilities 23,309 8 IPP & CHP 3,888 24 Net generation (megawatthours) 110,403,477 13 Electric utilities 96,047,678 7 IPP & CHP 14,355,799 23 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 273,718 4 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 121,681 3 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 98,895 5 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.0 2 Nitrogen

  11. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Iowa Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Iowa) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 15,929 25 Electric utilities 12,092 21 IPP & CHP 3,837 26 Net generation (megawatthours) 56,670,757 27 Electric utilities 41,932,708 26 IPP & CHP 14,738,048 22 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 106,879 14 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 44,657 25 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 39,175 21 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.8 6 Nitrogen oxide

  12. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Kansas Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Kansas) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 14,093 32 Electric utilities 11,593 24 IPP & CHP 2,501 35 Net generation (megawatthours) 48,472,581 32 Electric utilities 39,808,763 28 IPP & CHP 8,663,819 32 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 30,027 30 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 30,860 30 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 33,125 27 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.2 30 Nitrogen

  13. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Kentucky Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Kentucky) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 21,004 21 Electric utilities 19,599 16 IPP & CHP 1,405 40 Net generation (megawatthours) 89,741,021 18 Electric utilities 89,098,127 11 IPP & CHP 642,894 50 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 190,782 7 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 87,201 7 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 85,304 7 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 4.3 4 Nitrogen oxide

  14. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Louisiana Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Louisiana) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 26,228 15 Electric utilities 17,297 17 IPP & CHP 8,931 12 Net generation (megawatthours) 102,010,177 15 Electric utilities 56,226,016 17 IPP & CHP 45,784,161 8 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 122,578 11 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 82,286 9 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 58,274 12 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.4 16

  15. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Maine Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Maine) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 4,499 43 Electric utilities 14 49 IPP & CHP 4,485 21 Net generation (megawatthours) 14,030,038 44 Electric utilities 597 49 IPP & CHP 14,029,441 25 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 13,365 38 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 9,607 44 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 3,675 45 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 23 Nitrogen oxide

  16. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Maryland Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Maryland) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 12,339 33 Electric utilities 85 48 IPP & CHP 12,254 8 Net generation (megawatthours) 35,850,812 37 Electric utilities 30,205 46 IPP & CHP 35,820,607 9 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 41,539 26 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 21,995 34 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 18,950 34 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.3 17 Nitrogen oxide

  17. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Massachusetts Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Massachusetts) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 13,678 32 Electric utilities 969 42 IPP & CHP 12,709 7 Net generation (megawatthours) 32,885,021 40 Electric utilities 611,320 44 IPP & CHP 32,273,700 12 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 12,339 40 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 15,150 41 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 14,735 38 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.8 38

  18. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Michigan Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Michigan) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 30,128 11 Electric utilities 22,148 9 IPP & CHP 7,981 14 Net generation (megawatthours) 105,417,801 14 Electric utilities 83,171,310 13 IPP & CHP 22,246,490 14 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 237,091 5 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 86,058 8 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 67,193 10 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 4.5 3 Nitrogen oxide

  19. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Minnesota Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Minnesota) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 15,758 26 Electric utilities 11,901 22 IPP & CHP 3,858 25 Net generation (megawatthours) 51,296,988 31 Electric utilities 41,155,904 27 IPP & CHP 10,141,084 30 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 35,625 28 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 36,972 28 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 29,255 29 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.4 28 Nitrogen

  20. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mississippi Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Mississippi) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 15,561 28 Electric utilities 12,842 20 IPP & CHP 2,719 35 Net generation (megawatthours) 52,810,264 29 Electric utilities 45,413,403 23 IPP & CHP 7,396,861 35 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 87,718 17 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 24,490 32 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 22,633 33 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.3 9

  1. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Missouri Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Missouri) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 21,801 19 Electric utilities 20,562 15 IPP & CHP 1,239 42 Net generation (megawatthours) 91,626,593 17 Electric utilities 89,217,205 10 IPP & CHP 2,409,387 46 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 157,488 8 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 78,033 10 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 78,344 8 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.4 8 Nitrogen oxide

  2. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Montana Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Montana) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 6,329 41 Electric utilities 2,568 38 IPP & CHP 3,761 27 Net generation (megawatthours) 27,687,326 41 Electric utilities 7,361,898 38 IPP & CHP 20,325,428 16 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 16,865 36 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 21,789 35 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 16,951 35 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.2 31 Nitrogen oxide

  3. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nebraska Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Nebraska) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 8,449 36 Electric utilities 7,911 30 IPP & CHP 538 49 Net generation (megawatthours) 37,104,628 34 Electric utilities 35,170,167 30 IPP & CHP 1,934,461 48 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 66,884 22 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 31,505 29 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 28,043 32 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.6 7 Nitrogen oxide

  4. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nevada Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Nevada) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 10,652 34 Electric utilities 7,915 29 IPP & CHP 2,737 34 Net generation (megawatthours) 36,443,874 35 Electric utilities 27,888,008 34 IPP & CHP 8,555,866 33 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 7,436 41 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 16,438 39 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 15,690 37 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.4 43 Nitrogen

  5. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Hampshire Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (New Hampshire) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Nuclear Net summer capacity (megawatts) 4,413 44 Electric utilities 1,121 41 IPP & CHP 3,292 30 Net generation (megawatthours) 19,778,520 42 Electric utilities 2,266,903 41 IPP & CHP 17,511,617 20 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 3,733 44 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 5,057 47 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 3,447 46 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.4 45 Nitrogen

  6. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Jersey Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (New Jersey) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Nuclear Net summer capacity (megawatts) 18,997 22 Electric utilities 544 43 IPP & CHP 18,452 6 Net generation (megawatthours) 64,750,942 24 Electric utilities -122,674 50 IPP & CHP 64,873,616 6 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 3,196 46 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 15,299 40 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 15,789 36 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.1 48 Nitrogen oxide

  7. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mexico Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (New Mexico) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 7,938 38 Electric utilities 5,912 33 IPP & CHP 2,026 36 Net generation (megawatthours) 35,870,965 36 Electric utilities 29,833,095 33 IPP & CHP 6,037,870 37 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 17,735 34 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 59,055 16 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 28,535 31 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 36 Nitrogen

  8. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    York Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (New York) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural Gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 39,918 6 Electric utilities 10,736 26 IPP & CHP 29,182 5 Net generation (megawatthours) 136,116,830 8 Electric utilities 33,860,490 31 IPP & CHP 102,256,340 5 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 30,947 29 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 44,824 24 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 33,456 26 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.5 41 Nitrogen

  9. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    North Carolina Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (North Carolina) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 30,048 12 Electric utilities 26,706 6 IPP & CHP 3,342 29 Net generation (megawatthours) 125,936,293 9 Electric utilities 116,317,050 2 IPP & CHP 9,619,243 31 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 71,293 20 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 62,397 12 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 56,940 14 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.1 32

  10. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Dakota Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (North Dakota) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 6,566 40 Electric utilities 5,292 34 IPP & CHP 1,274 41 Net generation (megawatthours) 35,021,673 39 Electric utilities 31,044,374 32 IPP & CHP 3,977,299 42 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 56,854 23 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 48,454 22 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 30,274 28 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.2 11 Nitrogen oxide

  11. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Ohio Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Ohio) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 32,482 8 Electric utilities 20,779 11 IPP & CHP 11,703 9 Net generation (megawatthours) 137,284,189 7 Electric utilities 88,763,825 12 IPP & CHP 48,520,364 7 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 346,873 2 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 102,526 4 Carbon dioxide (thousand metrictons) 102,466 4 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.1 1 Nitrogen oxide (lbs/MWh)

  12. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oklahoma Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Oklahoma) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 23,300 17 Electric utilities 16,951 18 IPP & CHP 6,349 17 Net generation (megawatthours) 73,673,680 22 Electric utilities 53,348,841 18 IPP & CHP 20,324,839 17 Emissions Sulfur dioxide 80,418 19 Nitrogen oxide 57,024 17 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 46,268 19 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.2 18 Nitrogen oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.5 19

  13. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oregon Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Oregon) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Hydroelectric Net summer capacity (megawatts) 15,662 27 Electric utilities 10,973 25 IPP & CHP 4,689 19 Net generation (megawatthours) 59,895,515 26 Electric utilities 43,254,167 24 IPP & CHP 16,641,348 21 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 17,511 35 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 13,803 42 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 9,500 40 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 39 Nitrogen

  14. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Pennsylvania Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Pennsylvania) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 43,040 5 Electric utilities 455 44 IPP & CHP 42,584 3 Net generation (megawatthours) 226,785,630 2 Electric utilities 1,105,740 42 IPP & CHP 225,679,890 2 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 276,851 3 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 151,148 2 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 108,729 2 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.4 15 Nitrogen

  15. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Rhode Island Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Rhode Island) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 1,809 49 Electric utilities 8 50 IPP & CHP 1,802 38 Net generation (megawatthours) 6,246,807 50 Electric utilities 10,659 48 IPP & CHP 6,236,148 36 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 1,271 49 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 1,161 49 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 2,838 48 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.4 44 Nitrogen

  16. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Carolina Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (South Carolina) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Nuclear Net summer capacity (megawatts) 23,017 18 Electric utilities 21,039 10 IPP & CHP 1,978 37 Net generation (megawatthours) 95,249,894 16 Electric utilities 91,795,732 9 IPP & CHP 3,454,162 44 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 47,671 25 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 19,035 36 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 28,809 30 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 35

  17. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    South Dakota Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (South Dakota) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Hydroelectric Net summer capacity (megawatts) 4,109 45 Electric utilities 3,480 36 IPP & CHP 629 48 Net generation (megawatthours) 10,108,887 46 Electric utilities 8,030,545 37 IPP & CHP 2,078,342 47 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 15,347 37 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 11,430 43 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 3,228 47 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.0 12

  18. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Tennessee Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Tennessee) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 21,326 20 Electric utilities 20,635 13 IPP & CHP 690 47 Net generation (megawatthours) 79,651,619 19 Electric utilities 75,988,871 15 IPP & CHP 3,662,748 43 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 86,204 18 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 23,189 33 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 38,118 22 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.2 19 Nitrogen oxide

  19. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Texas Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Texas) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 109,584 1 Electric utilities 28,705 3 IPP & CHP 80,879 1 Net generation (megawatthours) 433,380,166 1 Electric utilities 96,131,888 6 IPP & CHP 337,248,278 1 Emissions Sulfur Dioxide (short tons) 383,728 1 Nitrogen Oxide short tons) 228,695 1 Carbon Dioxide (thousand metric tons) 257,465 1 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.8 25 Nitrogen Oxide

  20. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Utah Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Utah) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 7,698 39 Electric utilities 6,669 32 IPP & CHP 1,029 44 Net generation (megawatthours) 42,516,751 33 Electric utilities 39,526,881 29 IPP & CHP 2,989,870 45 Emissions Sulfur Dioxide (short tons) 23,670 32 Nitrogen Oxide (short tons) 62,296 13 Carbon Dioxide (thousand metric tons) 35,699 24 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.1 33 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh)

  1. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Vermont Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Vermont) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Nuclear Net summer capacity (megawatts) 1,255 50 Electric utilities 329 45 IPP & CHP 925 46 Net generation (megawatthours) 6,884,910 48 Electric utilities 872,238 43 IPP & CHP 6,012,672 38 Emissions Sulfur Dioxide (short tons) 71 50 Nitrogen Oxide (short tons) 792 50 Carbon Dioxide (thousand metric tons) 15 51 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.0 50 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.2 51

  2. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Virginia Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Virginia) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Nuclear Net summer capacity (megawatts) 24,828 16 Electric utilities 20,601 14 IPP & CHP 4,227 22 Net generation (megawatthours) 76,896,565 20 Electric utilities 63,724,860 16 IPP & CHP 13,171,706 28 Emissions Sulfur Dioxide (short tons) 68,077 21 Nitrogen Oxide (short tons) 39,706 27 Carbon Dioxide (thousand metric tons) 34,686 25 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.8 26 Nitrogen

  3. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Washington Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Washington) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Hydroelectric Net summer capacity (megawatts) 30,656 10 Electric utilities 27,070 5 IPP & CHP 3,586 28 Net generation (megawatthours) 114,172,916 11 Electric utilities 100,013,661 5 IPP & CHP 14,159,255 24 Emissions Sulfur Dioxide (short tons) 13,259 39 Nitrogen Oxide (short tons) 17,975 38 Carbon Dioxide (thousand metric tons) 12,543 39 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.2 46

  4. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    West Virginia Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (West Virginia) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 16,282 24 Electric utilities 10,625 27 IPP & CHP 5,657 18 Net generation (megawatthours) 75,863,067 21 Electric utilities 46,351,104 22 IPP & CHP 29,511,963 13 Emissions Sulfur Dioxide (short tons) 93,888 15 Nitrogen Oxide (short tons) 60,229 14 Carbon Dioxide (thousand metric tons) 68,862 9 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.5 14

  5. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wisconsin Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Wisconsin) Item Value Rank Primary Energy Source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 17,342 23 Electric utilities 13,358 19 IPP & CHP 3,984 23 Net generation (megawatthours) 65,962,792 23 Electric utilities 47,027,455 20 IPP & CHP 18,935,337 19 Emissions Sulfur Dioxide (short tons) 108,306 13 Nitrogen Oxide (short tons) 44,114 26 Carbon Dioxide (thousand metric tons) 47,686 18 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.3 10 Nitrogen

  6. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wyoming Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Wyoming) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 8,381 37 Electric utilities 7,279 31 IPP & CHP 1,102 43 Net generation (megawatthours) 52,483,065 30 Electric utilities 48,089,178 19 IPP & CHP 4,393,887 41 Emissions Sulfur Dioxide (short tons) 49,587 24 Nitrogen Oxide (short tons) 55,615 19 Carbon Dioxide (thousand metric tons) 50,687 17 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 24 Nitrogen Oxide

  7. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Idaho Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Idaho) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Hydroelectric Net summer capacity (megawatts) 4,924 42 Electric utilities 3,394 37 IPP & CHP 1,530 39 Net generation (megawatthours) 15,186,128 43 Electric utilities 9,600,216 36 IPP & CHP 5,585,912 39 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 6,565 42 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 7,627 46 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 1,942 49 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 37 Nitrogen

  8. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Oregon Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Oregon) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Hydroelectric Net summer capacity (megawatts) 15,662 27 Electric utilities 10,973 25 IPP & CHP 4,689 19 Net generation (megawatthours) 59,895,515 26 Electric utilities 43,254,167 24 IPP & CHP 16,641,348 21 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 17,511 35 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 13,803 42 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 9,500 40 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 39 Nitrogen

  9. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    South Dakota Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (South Dakota) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Hydroelectric Net summer capacity (megawatts) 4,109 45 Electric utilities 3,480 36 IPP & CHP 629 48 Net generation (megawatthours) 10,108,887 46 Electric utilities 8,030,545 37 IPP & CHP 2,078,342 47 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 15,347 37 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 11,430 43 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 3,228 47 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.0 12

  10. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    United States Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (United States) Item Value Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 1,060,064 Electric utilities 616,799 IPP & CHP 443,264 Net generation (megawatthours) 4,065,964,067 Electric utilities 2,388,058,409 IPP & CHP 1,677,905,658 Emissions Sulfur Dioxide (short tons) 3,978,753 Nitrogen Oxide (short tons) 2,411,564 Carbon Dioxide (thousand metric tons) 2,172,355 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.0 Nitrogen Oxide

  11. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Washington Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Washington) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Hydroelectric Net summer capacity (megawatts) 30,656 10 Electric utilities 27,070 5 IPP & CHP 3,586 28 Net generation (megawatthours) 114,172,916 11 Electric utilities 100,013,661 5 IPP & CHP 14,159,255 24 Emissions Sulfur Dioxide (short tons) 13,259 39 Nitrogen Oxide (short tons) 17,975 38 Carbon Dioxide (thousand metric tons) 12,543 39 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.2 46

  12. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wyoming Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Wyoming) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 8,381 37 Electric utilities 7,279 31 IPP & CHP 1,102 43 Net generation (megawatthours) 52,483,065 30 Electric utilities 48,089,178 19 IPP & CHP 4,393,887 41 Emissions Sulfur Dioxide (short tons) 49,587 24 Nitrogen Oxide (short tons) 55,615 19 Carbon Dioxide (thousand metric tons) 50,687 17 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 24 Nitrogen Oxide

  13. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Arkansas Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Arkansas) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 14,786 29 Electric utilities 11,559 23 IPP & CHP 3,227 31 Net generation (megawatthours) 60,322,492 25 Electric utilities 46,547,772 21 IPP & CHP 13,774,720 27 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 88,811 16 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 45,896 23 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 37,346 23 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.9 13 Nitrogen

  14. Secretary Chu Announces Second Round of "America's Next Top Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Innovator" on One Year Anniversary of the White House Startup America Initiative | Department of Energy Second Round of "America's Next Top Energy Innovator" on One Year Anniversary of the White House Startup America Initiative Secretary Chu Announces Second Round of "America's Next Top Energy Innovator" on One Year Anniversary of the White House Startup America Initiative January 31, 2012 - 11:36am Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - Today, on the one year anniversary of the

  15. MaRIE: A Presentation to the Science Campaigns Round Robin (Conference) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Conference: MaRIE: A Presentation to the Science Campaigns Round Robin Citation Details In-Document Search Title: MaRIE: A Presentation to the Science Campaigns Round Robin Authors: Stevens, Michael Francis [1] ; Barnes, Cris William [1] + Show Author Affiliations Los Alamos National Laboratory Publication Date: 2014-10-14 OSTI Identifier: 1159570 Report Number(s): LA-UR-14-27998 DOE Contract Number: AC52-06NA25396 Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation: Conference: 2014

  16. U.S. Department of Energy Selects First Round of Small-Scale Biorefinery

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Projects for Up to $114 Million in Federal Funding | Department of Energy First Round of Small-Scale Biorefinery Projects for Up to $114 Million in Federal Funding U.S. Department of Energy Selects First Round of Small-Scale Biorefinery Projects for Up to $114 Million in Federal Funding January 29, 2008 - 10:53am Addthis Ten percent commercial-scale biorefineries will help the nation meet new Renewable Fuels Standard WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Secretary Samuel W. Bodman

  17. DOE Announces Selections for SSL R&D Funding Opportunity (Round 9) |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy R&D Funding Opportunity (Round 9) DOE Announces Selections for SSL R&D Funding Opportunity (Round 9) The U.S. Department of Energy has announced the competitive selection of nine projects for solid-state lighting (SSL), in response to the SSL R&D funding opportunity announcement (FOA) DE-FOA-0000973. The one- to two-year projects will focus on the areas of Core Technology Research, which involves the application of fundamental scientific concepts to SSL

  18. The Round Robin Program: Ground Motion in the Vicinity of the Elida Event

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Elida Event Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The Round Robin Program: Ground Motion in the Vicinity of the Elida Event Surface motion was measured at seven stations on the Elida even for the Round Robin program; all gages provided complete records. Analysis of the data revealed that two stations had their identities switched in the field Authors: Long, J. W. Publication Date: 1975-10-01 OSTI Identifier: 16242 Report Number(s): SAND75-0463;

  19. The Round Robin Program: Ground Motion in the Vicinity of the Waller Event

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Waller Event Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The Round Robin Program: Ground Motion in the Vicinity of the Waller Event Surface motion was measured at four stations on the Waller event for the Round Robin program. All gages provided complete records. On stations was fifty feet from ground zero; the remaining three stations were at half-shot-depth distance Authors: Long, J. W. Publication Date: 1975-09-01 OSTI Identifier: 16244 Report Number(s):

  20. U.S. Department of Energy Wind Program Announces New Round of Funding for

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2016 Collegiate Wind Competition | Department of Energy U.S. Department of Energy Wind Program Announces New Round of Funding for 2016 Collegiate Wind Competition U.S. Department of Energy Wind Program Announces New Round of Funding for 2016 Collegiate Wind Competition October 30, 2014 - 5:30pm Addthis The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Renewable Energy Laboratory today issued a Request for Proposals seeking teams of students to participate in the 2016 U.S. Department of Energy

  1. Tunable terahertz radiation source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boulaevskii, Lev; Feldmann, David M; Jia, Quanxi; Koshelev, Alexei; Moody, Nathan A

    2014-01-21

    Terahertz radiation source and method of producing terahertz radiation, said source comprising a junction stack, said junction stack comprising a crystalline material comprising a plurality of self-synchronized intrinsic Josephson junctions; an electrically conductive material in contact with two opposing sides of said crystalline material; and a substrate layer disposed upon at least a portion of both the crystalline material and the electrically-conductive material, wherein the crystalline material has a c-axis which is parallel to the substrate layer, and wherein the source emits at least 1 mW of power.

  2. Saving Electricity | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Saving Electricity Saving Electricity Reducing energy use in your home saves you money, increases our energy security and reduces the pollution that is emitted from non-renewable sources of energy. <a href="/node/1265906">Learn more about reducing your electricity use</a>. Reducing energy use in your home saves you money, increases our energy security and reduces the pollution that is emitted from non-renewable sources of energy. Learn more about reducing your electricity

  3. Electric vehicle system for charging and supplying electrical power

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Su, Gui Jia

    2010-06-08

    A power system that provides power between an energy storage device, an external charging-source/load, an onboard electrical power generator, and a vehicle drive shaft. The power system has at least one energy storage device electrically connected across a dc bus, at least one filter capacitor leg having at least one filter capacitor electrically connected across the dc bus, at least one power inverter/converter electrically connected across the dc bus, and at least one multiphase motor/generator having stator windings electrically connected at one end to form a neutral point and electrically connected on the other end to one of the power inverter/converters. A charging-sourcing selection socket is electrically connected to the neutral points and the external charging-source/load. At least one electronics controller is electrically connected to the charging-sourcing selection socket and at least one power inverter/converter. The switch legs in each of the inverter/converters selected by the charging-source/load socket collectively function as a single switch leg. The motor/generators function as an inductor.

  4. EA-1980: Spar Canyon-Round Valley Access Road System Improvements, Custer County, Idaho

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bonneville Power Administration is preparing an EA to assess potential environmental impacts of proposed improvements to the access road system for its existing Spar Canyon-Round Valley Transmission Line located on Bureau of Land Management land in Custer County, Idaho.

  5. Lesson 2 - Electricity Basics | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2 - Electricity Basics Lesson 2 - Electricity Basics It's difficult to imagine life without convenient electricity. You just flip a switch or plug in an appliance, and it's there. But how did it get there? Many steps go into providing the reliable electricity we take for granted. This lesson takes a closer look at electricity. It follows the path of electricity from the fuel source to the home, including the power plant and the electric power grid. It also covers the role of electric utilities

  6. Piezotube borehole seismic source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Daley, Tom M; Solbau, Ray D; Majer, Ernest L

    2014-05-06

    A piezoelectric borehole source capable of permanent or semipermanent insertion into a well for uninterrupted well operations is described. The source itself comprises a series of piezoelectric rings mounted to an insulative mandrel internally sized to fit over a section of well tubing, the rings encased in a protective housing and electrically connected to a power source. Providing an AC voltage to the rings will cause expansion and contraction sufficient to create a sonic pulse. The piezoelectric borehole source fits into a standard well, and allows for uninterrupted pass-through of production tubing, and other tubing and electrical cables. Testing using the source may be done at any time, even concurrent with well operations, during standard production.

  7. Model documentation: Electricity Market Module, Electricity Fuel Dispatch Submodule

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-04-08

    This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the National Energy Modeling System Electricity Fuel Dispatch Submodule (EFD), a submodule of the Electricity Market Module (EMM). The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, model source code, and forecast results generated through the synthesis and scenario development based on these components.

  8. Intercounty Electric Cooperative- Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Intercounty Electric Cooperative provides rebates to its customers for the purchase of a variety of energy efficient equipment and appliances. Eligible technologies include: geothermal, air source,...

  9. Minnesota Valley Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    heat pumps, ground-source heat pumps, Energy Star appliances, and electric resistance heating products. Equipment rebates are only available to those participating in the...

  10. Buying Clean Electricity | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    an optional service, called green pricing, that allows customers to pay a small premium in exchange for electricity generated from clean, renewable ("green") energy sources. ...

  11. Nozzle for electric dispersion reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sisson, W.G.; Harris, M.T.; Scott, T.C.; Basaran, O.A.

    1996-04-02

    A nozzle for an electric dispersion reactor includes two coaxial cylindrical bodies, the inner one of the two delivering disperse phase fluid into a continuous phase fluid. A potential difference generated by a voltage source creates a dispersing electric field at the end of the inner electrode. 5 figs.

  12. Nozzle for electric dispersion reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sisson, W.G.; Basaran, O.A.; Harris, M.T.

    1998-04-14

    A nozzle for an electric dispersion reactor includes two concentric electrodes, the inner one of the two delivering disperse phase fluid into a continuous phase fluid. A potential difference generated by a voltage source creates a dispersing electric field at the end of the inner electrode. 4 figs.

  13. Nozzle for electric dispersion reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sisson, W.G.; Harris, M.T.; Scott, T.C.; Basaran, O.A.

    1998-06-02

    A nozzle for an electric dispersion reactor includes two coaxial cylindrical bodies, the inner one of the two delivering disperse phase fluid into a continuous phase fluid. A potential difference generated by a voltage source creates a dispersing electric field at the end of the inner electrode. 5 figs.

  14. Nozzle for electric dispersion reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sisson, Warren G. (Oak Ridge, TN); Harris, Michael T. (Knoxville, TN); Scott, Timothy C. (Knoxville, TN); Basaran, Osman A. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1998-01-01

    A nozzle for an electric dispersion reactor includes two coaxial cylindrical bodies, the inner one of the two delivering disperse phase fluid into a continuous phase fluid. A potential difference generated by a voltage source creates a dispersing electric field at the end of the inner electrode.

  15. Nozzle for electric dispersion reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sisson, Warren G. (Oak Ridge, TN); Harris, Michael T. (Knoxville, TN); Scott, Timothy C. (Knoxville, TN); Basaran, Osman A. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1996-01-01

    A nozzle for an electric dispersion reactor includes two coaxial cylindrical bodies, the inner one of the two delivering disperse phase fluid into a continuous phase fluid. A potential difference generated by a voltage source creates a dispersing electric field at the end of the inner electrode.

  16. Nozzle for electric dispersion reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sisson, Warren G. (Oak Ridge, TN); Basaran, Osman A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Harris, Michael T. (Knoxville, TN)

    1998-01-01

    A nozzle for an electric dispersion reactor includes two concentric electrodes, the inner one of the two delivering disperse phase fluid into a continuous phase fluid. A potential difference generated by a voltage source creates a dispersing electric field at the end of the inner electrode.

  17. Nozzle for electric dispersion reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sisson, Warren G. (Oak Ridge, TN); Basaran, Osman A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Harris, Michael T. (Knoxville, TN)

    1995-01-01

    A nozzle for an electric dispersion reactor includes two concentric electrodes, the inner one of the two delivering disperse phase fluid into a continuous phase fluid. A potential difference generated by a voltage source creates a dispersing electric field at the end of the inner electrode.

  18. Nozzle for electric dispersion reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sisson, W.G.; Basaran, O.A.; Harris, M.T.

    1995-11-07

    A nozzle for an electric dispersion reactor includes two concentric electrodes, the inner one of the two delivering disperse phase fluid into a continuous phase fluid. A potential difference generated by a voltage source creates a dispersing electric field at the end of the inner electrode. 4 figs.

  19. Conserving Electric Energy | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Conserving Electric Energy Conserving Electric Energy A classroom activity whereby students participate in two experiments in which they gain an appreciation for their dependency on electricity, and learn how regulating the rate of energy consumption makes the energy source last longer. PDF icon Conserving Electric Energy - Elementary School More Documents & Publications Activity: Conserving Electric Energy Energy Basics Activity: How Much Does it Cost to Light Your School?

  20. Compact portable electric power sources (Technical Report) |...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Org: USDOE, Washington, DC (United States) Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 24 POWER TRANSMISSION AND DISTRIBUTION; 25 ENERGY STORAGE; POWER...

  1. China Energy Efficiency Round Robin Testing Results for Room Air Conditioners

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Nan; Fridley, David; Zheng, Nina; Pierrot, Andre

    2010-06-07

    In recent years China's energy consumption has increased rapidly. The problem of high energy consumption intensity and low energy utilization efficiency is serious, and the contradiction between economic development and energy and environmental resources has become increasingly acute, making energy conservation and consumption reduction an important society-wide concern. At the same time, global climate change has and will continue to have profound impacts on human survival and development, and is another major challenge to all countries. In order to accelerate China's energy conservation and emission reduction work, the National Leading Group to Address Climate Change, Energy Conservation and Emission Reduction was founded with Premier Wen Jiabao as the head, and the 'Comprehensive Work Program of Energy Conservation and Emission Reduction' and 'China's National Program of Addressing Climate Change' were issued, under which China's energy conservation and emission reduction work has been fully deployed. Efforts to promote energy efficiency have been further strengthened in all levels of government, and various policies and measures have progressively been issued and implemented. In addition, based on China's experience with implementing energy-saving priority strategies over the past 20+ years, our government established a goal of a 20% decrease in energy consumption per unit GDP in the 'Eleventh Five-year Development Plan'. Furthermore, in November 2009, in order to support global greenhouse gas emission reduction activities and promote China's low carbon economic development, the government established a further 40-50% reduction in energy consumption per unit GDP by 2020 compared to the year 2005. Improving energy utilization efficiency by scientific and technological progress will undoubtedly play an important role in achieving the above stated objectives. The improvement of energy efficiency of energy consuming products has always been an important component of all countries energy strategies. As we all know, a very large amount of total energy consumption is due to energy consuming products and equipment, which account for about 50% of China's total energy consumption. However, the current average energy utilization efficiency of this sector is only about 60%, 10 percent lower than the international advanced level. Therefore, China's energy consuming products and equipment sector holds great energy-saving potential. On the other hand, the energy supplied to these products is mainly from fossil fuel combustion, a major source of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Therefore, improving the energy efficiency and augmenting the market share of market-dominant energy consuming products is of significant importance to achieving China's energy saving and emission reduction target and is an effective means to deal with energy and environmental constraints and climate change issues. Main energy consuming products generally include widely-used home appliances, industrial equipment, office equipment, transportation vehicles, etc. China is one of the major manufacturers and exporters of energy end-using products such as air-conditioners, refrigerators, televisions, etc. Their overall energy efficiency is comparatively low and the products are poorly designed, leading to great energy-saving potential. For example, electricity consumption of air conditioners accounts for about 20% of China's total electricity consumption and 40% of the summer electricity peak load in large and medium cities. However, less than 5% of units sold in the domestic market in 2009 reached the standard's highly efficient level of grade 2 above. The electricity consumption of electric motors and their related drive systems accounts for about 60% of China's total electricity consumption; however, less than 2% of the domestic market share consists of energy-efficient electric motor products. Promoting the energy efficiency and market shares of main energy-consuming products has become an important determinant of achieving energy conservation and emission reduc

  2. Electric Vehicles

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Ozpineci, Burak

    2014-07-23

    Burak Ozpineci sees a future where electric vehicles charge while we drive them down the road, thanks in part to research under way at ORNL.

  3. Electric Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ozpineci, Burak

    2014-05-02

    Burak Ozpineci sees a future where electric vehicles charge while we drive them down the road, thanks in part to research under way at ORNL.

  4. Electric Power | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Power Electric Power From incandescent bulbs to fluorescents to LEDs, <a href="/node/772396">learn more</a> about the long history of the light bulb. From incandescent bulbs to fluorescents to LEDs, learn more about the long history of the light bulb. Electricity -- the flow of electrical power -- is a secondary energy source, generated by the conversion of primary sources of energy, like fossil, nuclear, wind or solar. Keeping the power flowing to American homes and

  5. Round Robin Testing of Commercial Hydrogen Sensor Performance - Observations and Results: Preprnt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Round Robin Testing of Commercial Hydrogen Sensor Performance-Observations and Results Preprint W. Buttner, R. Burgess, C. Rivkin, and M. Post National Renewable Energy Laboratory L. Boon-Brett, G. Black, F. Harskamp, and P. Moretto European Commission, DG Joint Research Centre, Institute for Energy Presented at the 2010 National Hydrogen Association Hydrogen Conference and Expo Long Beach, California May 3-6, 2010 Conference Paper NREL/CP-5600-48305 October 2010 NOTICE The submitted manuscript

  6. High School Academic Competition - Round Robin | U.S. DOE Office of Science

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    (SC) Round Robin National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About National Science Bowl Contacts Regional Science Bowl Coordinators National Science Bowl FAQ's Alumni Past National Science Bowl Winners Past National Science Bowl Photos and Videos National Science Bowl Logos High School Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2015 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence

  7. Middle School Academic Competition - Round Robin | U.S. DOE Office of

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Science (SC) Academic Competition - Round Robin National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About National Science Bowl Contacts Regional Science Bowl Coordinators National Science Bowl FAQ's Alumni Past National Science Bowl Winners Past National Science Bowl Photos and Videos National Science Bowl Logos High School Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2015 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal

  8. Middle School Academic Competition - Round Robin | U.S. DOE Office of

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Science (SC) Academic Competition - Round Robin National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About National Science Bowl Contacts Regional Science Bowl Coordinators National Science Bowl FAQ's Alumni Past National Science Bowl Winners Past National Science Bowl Photos and Videos National Science Bowl Logos High School Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2015 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal

  9. Continuous casting and inside rolling of round billets for seamless pipe. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwarz, G.

    1996-07-16

    An invention is described which relates to a patented process and to a motor driven mandrel apparatus (Patent No. 4,546,816) which has the property to roll without slip (or friction) or to roll with controlled friction on the inside surface of a non rotating hollow round. Each point on the circumferential surface of the mandrel describes a hypocycloidal curve or a curve with a hypocycloidal characteristic during the operation of the mandrel.

  10. DOE Announces Selections for SSL Manufacturing R&D (Round 3) Funding

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Opportunity | Department of Energy 3) Funding Opportunity DOE Announces Selections for SSL Manufacturing R&D (Round 3) Funding Opportunity The U.S. Department of Energy has announced the competitive selection of three projects for solid-state lighting (SSL), in response to the SSL Manufacturing R&D funding opportunity announcement (FOA) DE-FOA-0000561. The two-year projects will focus on achieving significant cost reductions while maintaining quality by improving manufacturing

  11. DOE Announces Selections for SSL Manufacturing R&D (Round 4) Funding

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Opportunity | Department of Energy 4) Funding Opportunity DOE Announces Selections for SSL Manufacturing R&D (Round 4) Funding Opportunity The U.S. Department of Energy has announced the competitive selection of five projects for solid-state lighting (SSL), in response to the SSL Manufacturing R&D funding opportunity announcement (FOA) DE-FOA-0000792. The two-year projects will focus on achieving significant cost reductions while maintaining quality by improving manufacturing

  12. Table 7.3 Average Prices of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam, 2010;

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 Average Prices of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Supplier Sources of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam; Unit: U.S. Dollars per Physical Units. Electricity Components Natural Gas Components Steam Components Electricity Natural Gas Steam Electricity from Sources Natural Gas from Sources Steam from Sources Electricity from Local Other than Natural Gas from Local Other than Steam from Local Other than

  13. Table 7.7 Quantity of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam, 2010;

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7 Quantity of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Supplier Sources of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Electricity Components Natural Gas Components Steam Components Electricity Natural Gas Steam Electricity from Sources Natural Gas from Sources Steam from Sources Electricity from Local Other than Natural Gas from Local Other than Steam from Local Other than NAICS Total

  14. Roles of electricity: Electric steelmaking

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burwell, C.C.

    1986-07-01

    Electric steel production from scrap metal continues to grow both in total quantity and in market share. The economics of electric-steel production in general, and of electric minimills in particular, seem clearly established. The trend towards electric steelmaking provides significant economic and competitive advantages for producers and important overall economic, environmental, and energy advantages for the United States at large. Conversion to electric steelmaking offers up to a 4-to-1 advantage in terms of the overall energy used to produce a ton of steel, and s similar savings in energy cost for the producer. The amount of old scrap used to produce a ton of steel has doubled since 1967 because of the use of electric furnaces.

  15. NREL: Transportation Research - Electric and Plug-In Hybrid Electric Fleet

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Vehicle Testing Electric and Plug-In Hybrid Electric Fleet Vehicle Testing How Electric and Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles Work EVs use batteries to store the electric energy that powers the motor. EV batteries are charged by plugging the vehicle into an electric power source. PHEVs are powered by an internal combustion engine that can run on conventional or alternative fuels and an electric motor that uses energy stored in batteries. The vehicle can be plugged into an electric power

  16. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Alabama Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Alabama) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 32,353 9 Electric utilities 23,419 7 IPP & CHP 8,934 11 Net generation (megawatthours) 150,572,924 6 Electric utilities 115,027,021 3 IPP & CHP 35,545,903 11 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 144,568 9 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 56,885 18 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 66,986 11 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 22 Nitrogen oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.8 39

  17. Electric machine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    El-Refaie, Ayman Mohamed Fawzi (Niskayuna, NY); Reddy, Patel Bhageerath (Madison, WI)

    2012-07-17

    An interior permanent magnet electric machine is disclosed. The interior permanent magnet electric machine comprises a rotor comprising a plurality of radially placed magnets each having a proximal end and a distal end, wherein each magnet comprises a plurality of magnetic segments and at least one magnetic segment towards the distal end comprises a high resistivity magnetic material.

  18. Magnetron sputtering source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Makowiecki, Daniel M. (Livermore, WA); McKernan, Mark A. (Livermore, CA); Grabner, R. Fred (Brentwood, CA); Ramsey, Philip B. (Livermore, CA)

    1994-01-01

    A magnetron sputtering source for sputtering coating substrates includes a high thermal conductivity electrically insulating ceramic and magnetically attached sputter target which can eliminate vacuum sealing and direct fluid cooling of the cathode assembly. The magnetron sputtering source design results in greater compactness, improved operating characteristics, greater versatility, and low fabrication cost. The design easily retrofits most sputtering apparatuses and provides for safe, easy, and cost effective target replacement, installation, and removal.

  19. Magnetron sputtering source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Makowiecki, D.M.; McKernan, M.A.; Grabner, R.F.; Ramsey, P.B.

    1994-08-02

    A magnetron sputtering source for sputtering coating substrates includes a high thermal conductivity electrically insulating ceramic and magnetically attached sputter target which can eliminate vacuum sealing and direct fluid cooling of the cathode assembly. The magnetron sputtering source design results in greater compactness, improved operating characteristics, greater versatility, and low fabrication cost. The design easily retrofits most sputtering apparatuses and provides for safe, easy, and cost effective target replacement, installation, and removal. 12 figs.

  20. A Magnetically Controlled Plasma Source Inventor Yevgeny Raitses...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A Magnetically Controlled Plasma Source Inventor Yevgeny Raitses This invention is a multipurpose and highly versatile plasma source that uses applied electric and magnetic fields...

  1. E Source | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    use and provision of energy. Who Is E Source? Whether you're an electric or natural gas utility or a large business customer served by a utility, your problems are probably...

  2. Electrical connector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dilliner, Jennifer L.; Baker, Thomas M.; Akasam, Sivaprasad; Hoff, Brian D.

    2006-11-21

    An electrical connector includes a female component having one or more receptacles, a first test receptacle, and a second test receptacle. The electrical connector also includes a male component having one or more terminals configured to engage the one or more receptacles, a first test pin configured to engage the first test receptacle, and a second test pin configured to engage the second test receptacle. The first test receptacle is electrically connected to the second test receptacle, and at least one of the first test pin and the second test pin is shorter in length than the one or more terminals.

  3. Electric power annual 1997. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-07-01

    The Electric Power Annual presents a summary of electric power industry statistics at national, regional, and State levels. The objective of the publication is to provide industry decisionmakers, government policy-makers, analysts, and the general public with data that may be used in understanding US electricity markets. The Electric Power Annual is prepared by the Electric Power Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. Volume 1 -- with a focus on US electric utilities -- contains final 1997 data on net generation and fossil fuel consumption, stocks, receipts, and cost; preliminary 1997 data on generating unit capability, and retail sales of electricity, associated revenue, and the average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold (based on a monthly sample: Form EIA-826, ``Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Report with State Distributions``). Additionally, information on net generation from renewable energy sources and on the associated generating capability is included in Volume 1 of the EPA.

  4. Electric vehicle climate control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dauvergne, J.

    1994-04-01

    EVs have insufficient energy sources for a climatic comfort system. The heat rejection of the drivetrain is dispersed in the vehicle (electric motor, batteries, electronic unit for power control). Its level is generally low (no more than 2-kW peaks) and variable according to the trip profile, with no heat rejection at rest and a maximum during regenerative braking. Nevertheless, it must be used for heating. It is not realistic to have the A/C compressor driven by the electric traction motor: the motor does not operate when the vehicle is at rest, precisely when maximum cooling power is required. The same is true for hybrid vehicles during electric operation. It is necessary to develop solutions that use stored onboard energy either from the traction batteries or specific storage source. In either case, it is necessary to design the climate control system to use the energy efficiently to maximize range and save weight. Heat loss through passenger compartment seals and the walls of the passenger compartment must be limited. Plastic body panes help to reduce heat transfer, and heat gain is minimized with insulating glazing. This article describes technical solutions to solve the problem of passenger thermal comfort. However, the heating and A/C systems of electrically operated vehicles may have marginal performance at extreme outside temperatures.

  5. Electric generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Foster, Jr., John S. (Pleasanton, CA); Wilson, James R. (Livermore, CA); McDonald, Jr., Charles A. (Danville, CA)

    1983-01-01

    1. In an electrical energy generator, the combination comprising a first elongated annular electrical current conductor having at least one bare surface extending longitudinally and facing radially inwards therein, a second elongated annular electrical current conductor disposed coaxially within said first conductor and having an outer bare surface area extending longitudinally and facing said bare surface of said first conductor, the contiguous coaxial areas of said first and second conductors defining an inductive element, means for applying an electrical current to at least one of said conductors for generating a magnetic field encompassing said inductive element, and explosive charge means disposed concentrically with respect to said conductors including at least the area of said inductive element, said explosive charge means including means disposed to initiate an explosive wave front in said explosive advancing longitudinally along said inductive element, said wave front being effective to progressively deform at least one of said conductors to bring said bare surfaces thereof into electrically conductive contact to progressively reduce the inductance of the inductive element defined by said conductors and transferring explosive energy to said magnetic field effective to generate an electrical potential between undeformed portions of said conductors ahead of said explosive wave front.

  6. Optimized Hydrogen and Electricity Generation from Wind | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Optimized Hydrogen and Electricity Generation from Wind Optimized Hydrogen and Electricity Generation from Wind Several optimizations can be employed to create hydrogen and electricity from a wind energy source. The key element in hydrogen production from an electrical source is an electrolyzer to convert water and electricity into hydrogen and oxygen. PDF icon 34364.pdf More Documents & Publications Current (2009) State-of-the-Art Hydrogen Production Cost Estimate Using Water

  7. Ion source based on the cathodic arc

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sanders, D.M.; Falabella, S.

    1994-02-01

    A cylindrically symmetric arc source to produce a ring of ions which leave the surface of the arc target radially and are reflected by electrostatic fields present in the source to a point of use, such as a part to be coated, is described. An array of electrically isolated rings positioned in the source serves the dual purpose of minimizing bouncing of macroparticles and providing electrical insulation to maximize the electric field gradients within the source. The source also includes a series of baffles which function as a filtering or trapping mechanism for any macroparticles. 3 figures.

  8. Ion source based on the cathodic arc

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sanders, David M. (Livermore, CA); Falabella, Steven (Livermore, CA)

    1994-01-01

    A cylindrically symmetric arc source to produce a ring of ions which leave the surface of the arc target radially and are reflected by electrostatic fields present in the source to a point of use, such as a part to be coated. An array of electrically isolated rings positioned in the source serves the dual purpose of minimizing bouncing of macroparticles and providing electrical insulation to maximize the electric field gradients within the source. The source also includes a series of baffles which function as a filtering or trapping mechanism for any macroparticles.

  9. Round Table Meeting Summaries Purchase Order: DE-IE0000002 Final Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Round Table Meeting Summaries Purchase Order: DE-IE0000002 Final Report 25-Apr-11 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs CNI Professional Services, LLC 2600 John Saxon Blvd Norman, OK 73026 Jonathan Blackwell Project Manager Phone: (202) 361-1998 Work Performed for: Submitted by: Point of Contact: jonathan.blackwell@chickasaw.com Key Word Comment Meeting 1 Alaska We deal with about 15 isolated, very remote villages. No infrastructure, roads or grid. There are good

  10. Photonic crystal light source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fleming, James G. (Albuquerque, NM); Lin, Shawn-Yu (Albuquerque, NM); Bur, James A. (Corrales, NM)

    2004-07-27

    A light source is provided by a photonic crystal having an enhanced photonic density-of-states over a band of frequencies and wherein at least one of the dielectric materials of the photonic crystal has a complex dielectric constant, thereby producing enhanced light emission at the band of frequencies when the photonic crystal is heated. The dielectric material can be a metal, such as tungsten. The spectral properties of the light source can be easily tuned by modification of the photonic crystal structure and materials. The photonic crystal light source can be heated electrically or other heating means. The light source can further include additional photonic crystals that exhibit enhanced light emission at a different band of frequencies to provide for color mixing. The photonic crystal light source may have applications in optical telecommunications, information displays, energy conversion, sensors, and other optical applications.

  11. Capillary discharge source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bender, III, Howard Albert

    2003-11-25

    Debris generation from an EUV electric discharge plasma source device can be significantly reduced or essentially eliminated by encasing the electrodes with dielectric or electrically insulating material so that the electrodes are shielded from the plasma, and additionally by providing a path for the radiation to exit wherein the electrodes are not exposed to the area where the radiation is collected. The device includes: (a) a body, which is made of an electrically insulating material, that defines a capillary bore that has a proximal end and a distal end and that defines at least one radiation exit; (b) a first electrode that defines a first channel that has a first inlet end that is connected to a source of gas and a first outlet end that is in communication with the capillary bore, wherein the first electrode is positioned at the distal end of the capillary bore; (c) a second electrode that defines a second channel that has a second inlet end that is in communication with the capillary bore and an outlet end, wherein the second electrode is positioned at the proximal end of the capillary bore; and (d) a source of electric potential that is connected across the first and second electrodes, wherein radiation generated within the capillary bore is emitted through the at least one radiation exit and wherein the first electrode and second electrode are shielded from the emitted radiation.

  12. Trends in Renewable Energy Consumption and Electricity

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2012-01-01

    Presents a summary of the nations renewable energy consumption in 2010 along with detailed historical data on renewable energy consumption by energy source and end-use sector. Data presented also includes renewable energy consumption for electricity generation and for non-electric use by energy source, and net summer capacity and net generation by energy source and state. The report covers the period from 2006 through 2010.

  13. "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Source(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Natural Gas(e)","NGL(f)","Coal","Breeze","Other(g)","Produced Onsite(h)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1.4 Relative Standard Errors for Table 1.4;" " Unit: Percents." ,,"Any",,,,,,,,,"Shipments" "NAICS",,"Energy","Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke and",,"of Energy Sources" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Source(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Natural

  14. Renewable Electricity Futures for the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mai, Trieu; Hand, Maureen; Baldwin, Sam F.; Wiser , Ryan; Brinkman, G.; Denholm, Paul; Arent, Doug; Porro, Gian; Sandor, Debra; Hostick, Donna J.; Milligan, Michael; DeMeo, Ed; Bazilian, Morgan

    2014-04-14

    This paper highlights the key results from the Renewable Electricity (RE) Futures Study. It is a detailed consideration of renewable electricity in the United States. The paper focuses on technical issues related to the operability of the U. S. electricity grid and provides initial answers to important questions about the integration of high penetrations of renewable electricity technologies from a national perspective. The results indicate that the future U. S. electricity system that is largely powered by renewable sources is possible and the further work is warranted to investigate this clean generation pathway. The central conclusion of the analysis is that renewable electricity generation from technologies that are commercially available today, in combination with a more flexible electric system, is more than adequate to supply 80% of the total U. S. electricity generation in 2050 while meeting electricity demand on an hourly basis in every region of the United States.

  15. Improved Characterization and Monitoring of Electromagnetic Sources -

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Innovation Portal Energy Analysis Energy Analysis Electricity Transmission Electricity Transmission Find More Like This Return to Search Improved Characterization and Monitoring of Electromagnetic Sources Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Contact LLNL About This Technology Technology Marketing Summary LLNL's technology is useful in fields such as power systems engineering, security monitoring, and vehicle tracking to identify, locate and monitor a particular source of

  16. Sourcing Capabilities | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Home > GE Global Research Sourcing External Document & Process Repository > Sourcing Capabilities Sourcing Capabilities The General Electric Company is strongly committed to meet the principles of Public Laws, Federal Acquisition Regulations (FARs), and specific cognizant Government Agency FAR supplemental regulations, and directs that business practices and procedures conform to these Federal laws and regulations. It is the policy of GE Global Research to encourage participation in

  17. High current ion source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, Ian G. (1088 Woodside Rd., Berkeley, CA 94708); MacGill, Robert A. (645 Kern St., Richmond, CA 94805); Galvin, James E. (2 Commodore Dr. #276, Emeryville, CA 94608)

    1990-01-01

    An ion source utilizing a cathode and anode for producing an electric arc therebetween. The arc is sufficient to vaporize a portion of the cathode to form a plasma. The plasma leaves the generation region and expands through another regon. The density profile of the plasma may be flattened using a magnetic field formed within a vacuum chamber. Ions are extracted from the plasma to produce a high current broad on beam.

  18. Small Wind Electric Systems | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Wind Electric Systems Small Wind Electric Systems Wind power is the fastest growing source of energy in the world -- efficient, cost effective, and non-polluting. If you have enough wind resource in your area and the situation is right, small wind electric systems are one of the most cost-effective home-based renewable energy systems -- with zero emissions and pollution. Small wind electric systems can: Lower your electricity bills by 50%-90% Help you avoid the high costs of having utility power

  19. Small Wind Electric Systems | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Wind Electric Systems Small Wind Electric Systems Wind power is the fastest growing source of energy in the world -- efficient, cost effective, and non-polluting. If you have enough wind resource in your area and the situation is right, small wind electric systems are one of the most cost-effective home-based renewable energy systems -- with zero emissions and pollution. Small wind electric systems can: Lower your electricity bills by 50%-90% Help you avoid the high costs of having utility power

  20. UbiQD Named Top High-Growth Company and Job Creator in Northern New Mexico, Closes Round of Financing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    UbiQD Named Top High-Growth Company and Job Creator in Northern New Mexico, Closes Round of Financing November 17, 2015 UbiQD, LLC, a low-toxicity, low-cost quantum dot manufacturer, was recently recognized with a Northern New Mexico 20/20 Award that identifies high-growth companies driving regional economic growth. This award follows on the heels of a general upswing in UbiQD's business. The company closed a new investment round, bringing the total financing to more than $700,000; welcomed Dr.

  1. Electricity Monthly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Methodology and Documentation General The Electricity Monthly Update is prepared by the Electric Power Operations Team, Office of Electricity, Renewables and Uranium Statistics,...

  2. Electricity Monthly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Contact Information and Staff The Electricity Monthly Update is prepared by the Electric Power Operations Team, Office of Electricity, Renewables and Uranium Statistics, U.S....

  3. Electricity storage using a thermal storage scheme

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, Alexander

    2015-01-22

    The increasing use of renewable energy technologies for electricity generation, many of which have an unpredictably intermittent nature, will inevitably lead to a greater demand for large-scale electricity storage schemes. For example, the expanding fraction of electricity produced by wind turbines will require either backup or storage capacity to cover extended periods of wind lull. This paper describes a recently proposed storage scheme, referred to here as Pumped Thermal Storage (PTS), and which is based on sensible heat storage in large thermal reservoirs. During the charging phase, the system effectively operates as a high temperature-ratio heat pump, extracting heat from a cold reservoir and delivering heat to a hot one. In the discharge phase the processes are reversed and it operates as a heat engine. The round-trip efficiency is limited only by process irreversibilities (as opposed to Second Law limitations on the coefficient of performance and the thermal efficiency of the heat pump and heat engine respectively). PTS is currently being developed in both France and England. In both cases, the schemes operate on the Joule-Brayton (gas turbine) cycle, using argon as the working fluid. However, the French scheme proposes the use of turbomachinery for compression and expansion, whereas for that being developed in England reciprocating devices are proposed. The current paper focuses on the impact of the various process irreversibilities on the thermodynamic round-trip efficiency of the scheme. Consideration is given to compression and expansion losses and pressure losses (in pipe-work, valves and thermal reservoirs); heat transfer related irreversibility in the thermal reservoirs is discussed but not included in the analysis. Results are presented demonstrating how the various loss parameters and operating conditions influence the overall performance.

  4. Clean Electricity Initiatives in California

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Edward Randolph Director, Energy Division California Public Utilities Commission July 14, 2014 2014 EIA Energy Conference Clean Electricity Policy Initiatives In California (Partial) * Wholesale Renewables : - Renewables Portfolio Standard - Feet in Tariffs (RAM & ReMAT) - All source procurement (under development) * Customer Renewable Generation - California Solar Initiative - Net Energy Metering - Green Tariffs - Energy Efficiency - Demand Response - Rate Reform - Storage - Retirement of

  5. Electricity production using solar energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Demirbas, M.F.

    2007-07-01

    In this study, a solar-powered development project is used to identify whether it is possible to utilize solar technologies in the electricity production sector. Electricity production from solar energy has been found to be a promising method in the future. Concentrated solar energy can be converted to chemical energy via high-temperature endothermic reactions. Coal and biomass can be pyrolyzed or gasified by using concentrated solar radiation for generating power. Conventional energy will not be enough to meet the continuously increasing need for energy in the future. In this case, renewable energy sources will become important. Solar energy is an increasing need for energy in the future. Solar energy is a very important energy source because of its advantages. Instead of a compressor system, which uses electricity, an absorption cooling system, using renewable energy and kinds of waste heat energy, may be used for cooling.

  6. Spatially resolved imaging of opto-electrical property variations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nikiforov, Maxim; Darling, Seth B; Suzer, Ozgun; Guest, Jeffrey; Roelofs, Andreas

    2014-09-16

    Systems and methods for opto electric properties are provided. A light source illuminates a sample. A reference detector senses light from the light source. A sample detector receives light from the sample. A positioning fixture allows for relative positioning of the sample or the light source with respect to each other. An electrical signal device measures the electrical properties of the sample. The reference detector, sample detector and electrical signal device provide information that may be processed to determine opto-electric properties of the same.

  7. Electrical receptacle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leong, R.

    1993-06-22

    The invention is a receptacle for a three prong electrical plug which has either a tubular or U-shaped grounding prong. The inventive receptacle has a grounding prong socket which is sufficiently spacious to prevent the socket from significantly stretching when a larger, U-shaped grounding prong is inserted into the socket, and having two ridges to allow a snug fit when a smaller tubular shape grounding prong is inserted into the socket. The two ridges are made to prevent the socket from expanding when either the U-shaped grounding prong or the tubular grounding prong is inserted.

  8. Electrical Safety

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE HANDBOOK ELECTRICAL SAFETY DOE-HDBK-1092-2013 July 2013 Superseding DOE-HDBK-1092-2004 December 2004 U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, D.C.20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-HDBK-1092-2013 Available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web site at http://www.hss.doe.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ ii DOE-HDBK-1092-2013 FOREWORD 1. This Department of Energy (DOE) Handbook is

  9. Electrical Safety

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE HANDBOOK ELECTRICAL SAFETY DOE-HDBK-1092-2013 July 2013 Superseding DOE-HDBK-1092-2004 December 2004 U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, D.C.20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-HDBK-1092-2013 Available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web site at http://www.hss.doe.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ ii DOE-HDBK-1092-2013 FOREWORD 1. This Department of Energy (DOE) Handbook is

  10. UES (Electric)- Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    UniSource Energy Services (UES) offers the Commercial Energy Solutions Program for non-residential electric customers to upgrade existing equipment with more energy efficient measures. Rebates are...

  11. Palmetto Electric Cooperative- Buried Treasure Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Palmetto Electric Cooperative offers rebates for its members who install ground-source heat pumps (also known as geothermal heat pumps) through the Buried Treasure Rebate Program. Rebates are in...

  12. Cumberland Valley Electric Cooperative- Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Cumberland Valley Electric offers a number of programs to promote energy conservation. This program offers rebates for air source heat pumps, building insulation (including windows and doors), and...

  13. Table 7.10 Expenditures for Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam, 2010;

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0 Expenditures for Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Supplier Sources of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam; Unit: Million U.S. Dollars. Electricity Components Natural Gas Electricity Electricity from Sources Natural Gas NAICS Electricity from Local Other than Natural Gas from Local Code(a) Subsector and Industry Total Utility(b) Local Utility(c) Total Utility(b) Total United States 311 Food 5,328 4,635

  14. Achieving 30% Renewable Electricity Use by 2025 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Renewable Energy Projects » Achieving 30% Renewable Electricity Use by 2025 Achieving 30% Renewable Electricity Use by 2025 Achieving 30% Renewable Electricity Use by 2025 By 2025, 30% of the electricity consumed by the federal government is to come from renewable energy sources, according to Executive Order 13693: Planning for Federal Sustainability in the Next Decade. To achieve 30% renewable electricity by the 2025 target, the executive order established a hierarchy of practices for federal

  15. EV Everywhere: Electric Vehicle Basics | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Basics EV Everywhere: Electric Vehicle Basics Just as there are a variety of technologies available in conventional vehicles, plug-in electric vehicles (also known as electric cars or EVs) have different capabilities that can accommodate different drivers' needs. EVs' major feature is that drivers can plug them in to charge from an off-board electric power source. This distinguishes them from hybrid electric vehicles, which supplement an internal combustion engine with battery power but cannot

  16. Light Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a Light Source Data and Analysis Framework at NERSC Jack Deslippe, Shane Canon, Eli Dart, Abdelilah Essiari, Alexander Hexemer, Dula Parkinson, Simon Patton, Craig Tull + Many More The ALS Data Needs September 21, 2010 - NIST (MD) Light source data volumes are growing many times faster than Moore's law. ● Light source luminosity ● Detector resolution & rep-rates ● Sample automation BES user facilities serve 10,000 scientists and engineers every year. Mostly composed of many small

  17. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hybrid and Plug-In Electric Vehicle

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Emissions Data Sources and Assumptions Electricity Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hybrid and Plug-In Electric Vehicle Emissions Data Sources and Assumptions to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hybrid and Plug-In Electric Vehicle Emissions Data Sources and Assumptions on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hybrid and Plug-In Electric Vehicle Emissions Data Sources and Assumptions on Twitter Bookmark

  18. Ion source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, Ka-Ngo (Hercules, CA); Ehlers, Kenneth W. (Alamo, CA)

    1984-01-01

    A magnetic filter for an ion source reduces the production of undesired ion species and improves the ion beam quality. High-energy ionizing electrons are confined by the magnetic filter to an ion source region, where the high-energy electrons ionize gas molecules. One embodiment of the magnetic filter uses permanent magnets oriented to establish a magnetic field transverse to the direction of travel of ions from the ion source region to the ion extraction region. In another embodiment, low energy 16 eV electrons are injected into the ion source to dissociate gas molecules and undesired ion species into desired ion species.

  19. EA-164-A Constellation Power Source, Inc | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    A Constellation Power Source, Inc EA-164-A Constellation Power Source, Inc Order authorizing Constellation Power Source, Inc to export electric energy to Canada. PDF icon EA-164-A Constellation Power Source, Inc More Documents & Publications EA-164 Constellation Power Source, Inc EA-196-A Minnesota Power, Sales EA-232 OGE Energy Resources

  20. Improved negative ion source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Delmore, J.E.

    1984-05-01

    A method and apparatus for providing a negative ion source accelerates electrons away from a hot filament electron emitter into a region of crossed electric and magnetic fields arranged in a magnetron configuration. During a portion of the resulting cycloidal path, the electron velocity is reduced below its initial value. The electron accelerates as it leaves the surface at a rate of only slightly less than if there were no magnetic field, thereby preventing a charge buildup at the surface of the emitter. As the electron traverses the cycloid, it is decelerated during the second, third, and fourth quadrants, then reaccelerated as it approaches the end of the fourth quadrant to regain its original velocity. The minimum velocity occurs during the fourth quadrant, and corresponds to an electron temperature of 200 to 500/sup 0/C for the electric and magnetic fields commonly encountered in the ion sources of magnetic sector mass spectrometers. An ion source using the above-described thermalized electrons is also disclosed.

  1. Negative ion source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Delmore, James E. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1987-01-01

    A method and apparatus for providing a negative ion source accelerates electrons away from a hot filament electron emitter into a region of crossed electric and magnetic fields arranged in a magnetron configuration. During a portion of the resulting cycloidal path, the electron velocity is reduced below its initial value. The electron accelerates as it leaves the surface at a rate of only slightly less than if there were no magnetic field, thereby preventing a charge buildup at the surface of the emitter. As the electron traverses the cycloid, it is decelerated during the second, third, and fourth quadrants, then reeccelerated as it approaches the end of the fourth quadrant to regain its original velocity. The minimum velocity occurs during the fourth quadrant, and corresponds to an electron temperature of 200.degree. to 500.degree. for the electric and magnetic fields commonly encountered in the ion sources of magnetic sector mass spectrometers. An ion source using the above-described thermalized electrons is also disclosed.

  2. U.S. Department of Energy Selects First Round of Small-Scale...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... the nation's energy, economic and national security by reducing our nation's reliance on foreign oil through increased efficiency and diversification of clean energy sources. ...

  3. Miniature electrically operated diaphragm valve

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Adkins, Douglas R.; Spletzer, Barry L.; Wong, Chungnin C.; Frye-Mason, Gregory C.; Fischer, Gary J.; Hesketh, Peter J.

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides a miniature electrically operated valve that can stand off significant pressures, that can be inexpensively produced, and that can be made to operate without continuous electrical power. A valve according to the present invention comprises a housing and a beam mounted with the housing. A diaphragm mounted with the housing forms a sealed fluid volume. An electromagnetic energy source, such as an electromagnetic coil, mounts with the housing and when energized urges the beam in one direction. The beam can be urged in the opposing direction by passive means or by reversing the polarity of the electromagnetic energy source or by a second electromagnetic energy source. Two fluid ports mount with the housing. A first fluid port mounts so that, as the beam is urged in one direction or the opposite, the beam urges the diaphragm to move between engaging and substantially sealing the fluid port and disengaging and not substantially sealing the fluid port. A seat can be mounted with the diaphragm to aid in sealing the fluid port. Latching mechanisms such as permanent magnets can be mounted so that the valve remains in the open or closed positions without continuous electrical power input. Fluid can flow through the housing between the two fluid ports when the diaphragm does not seal the first fluid port, but can be prevented from flowing by urging the beam so that the diaphragm seals the first fluid port. Various embodiments accommodate various latching mechanisms, electromagnetic energy sources, number of fluid ports, and diaphragm design considerations.

  4. Electric Power Monthly, August 1990. [Glossary included

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-11-29

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly summaries of electric utility statistics at the national, Census division, and State level. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data includes generation by energy source (coal, oil, gas, hydroelectric, and nuclear); generation by region; consumption of fossil fuels for power generation; sales of electric power, cost data; and unusual occurrences. A glossary is included.

  5. Wireless Power Transfer for Electric Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scudiere, Matthew B; McKeever, John W

    2011-01-01

    As Electric and Hybrid Electric Vehicles (EVs and HEVs) become more prevalent, there is a need to change the power source from gasoline on the vehicle to electricity from the grid in order to mitigate requirements for onboard energy storage (battery weight) as well as to reduce dependency on oil by increasing dependency on the grid (our coal, gas, and renewable energy instead of their oil). Traditional systems for trains and buses rely on physical contact to transfer electrical energy to vehicles in motion. Until recently, conventional magnetically coupled systems required a gap of less than a centimeter. This is not practical for vehicles of the future.

  6. Projecting Electricity Demand in 2050

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hostick, Donna J.; Belzer, David B.; Hadley, Stanton W.; Markel, Tony; Marnay, Chris; Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW

    2014-07-01

    This paper describes the development of end-use electricity projections and load curves that were developed for the Renewable Electricity (RE) Futures Study (hereafter RE Futures), which explored the prospect of higher percentages (30% − 90%) of total electricity generation that could be supplied by renewable sources in the United States. As input to RE Futures, two projections of electricity demand were produced representing reasonable upper and lower bounds of electricity demand out to 2050. The electric sector models used in RE Futures required underlying load profiles, so RE Futures also produced load profile data in two formats: 8760 hourly data for the year 2050 for the GridView model, and in 2-year increments for 17 time slices as input to the Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) model. The process for developing demand projections and load profiles involved three steps: discussion regarding the scenario approach and general assumptions, literature reviews to determine readily available data, and development of the demand curves and load profiles.

  7. "Table B21. Space-Heating Energy Sources, Floorspace, 1999"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... "District Chilled Water ......",2750,2739,1012,517,"Q",2279,"Q","Q" "Water-Heating Energy Sources" "(more than one may apply)" "Electricity ......",24171,230...

  8. "Table B27. Space Heating Energy Sources, Floorspace for Non...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... "District Chilled Water ......",2853,2734,637,605,"Q",2231,"Q","N" "Water-Heating Energy Sources" "(more than one may apply)" "Electricity ......",27490,265...

  9. Carbothermic reduction with parallel heat sources

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Troup, Robert L. (Murrysville, PA); Stevenson, David T. (Washington Township, Washington County, PA)

    1984-12-04

    Disclosed are apparatus and method of carbothermic direct reduction for producing an aluminum alloy from a raw material mix including aluminum oxide, silicon oxide, and carbon wherein parallel heat sources are provided by a combustion heat source and by an electrical heat source at essentially the same position in the reactor, e.g., such as at the same horizontal level in the path of a gravity-fed moving bed in a vertical reactor. The present invention includes providing at least 79% of the heat energy required in the process by the electrical heat source.

  10. Electric power annual 1996. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-08-01

    The Electric Power Annual presents a summary of electric power industry statistics at national, regional, and State levels. The objective of the publication is to provide industry decisionmakers, government policy-makers, analysts, and the general public with data that may be used in understanding US electricity markets. The Electric Power Annual is prepared by the Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. Volume 1--with a focus on US electric utilities--contains final 1996 data on net generation and fossil fuel consumption, stocks, receipts, and cost; preliminary 1996 data on generating unit capability, and retail sales of electricity, associated revenue, and the average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Additionally, information on net generation from renewable energy sources and on the associated generating capability is included in Volume 1 of the EPA. Data published in the Electric Power Annual Volume 1 are compiled from three statistical forms filed monthly and two forms filed annually by electric utilities. These forms are described in detail in the Technical Notes. 5 figs., 30 tabs.

  11. Seismic sources

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Green, M.A.; Cook, N.G.W.; McEvilly, T.V.; Majer, E.L.; Witherspoon, P.A.

    1987-04-20

    Apparatus is described for placement in a borehole in the earth, which enables the generation of closely controlled seismic waves from the borehole. Pure torsional shear waves are generated by an apparatus which includes a stator element fixed to the borehole walls and a rotor element which is electrically driven to rapidly oscillate on the stator element to cause reaction forces transmitted through the borehole walls to the surrounding earth. Longitudinal shear waves are generated by an armature that is driven to rapidly oscillate along the axis of the borehole, to cause reaction forces transmitted to the surrounding earth. Pressure waves are generated by electrically driving pistons that press against opposite ends of a hydraulic reservoir that fills the borehole. High power is generated by energizing the elements for more than about one minute. 9 figs.

  12. A round robin evaluation of the corrosiveness of wet residential insulation by electrochemical measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stansbury, E.E. , Knoxville, TN )

    1991-10-01

    The results of a round cabin evaluation of the use of an electrochemical method of calculating the corrosion rate of low carbon steel in environments related to cellulosic building insulations are reported. Environments included the leachate from a wet cellulosic insulation and solutions based on pure and commercial grades of borax, ammonium sulfate and aluminum sulfate. The pH values of these environments were in the range of 2.5 to 9.5. Electrochemical measurements were made using a direct reading corrosion rate instrument. The calculated corrosion rates were compared with those determined directly by weight loss measurements. Electrochemical measurements were made over a period of 48 hours and weight loss exposures were for two weeks. Poor agreement was observed for the corrosion rates determined electrochemically and the values were consistently larger than those based on weight loss. Reasons proposed for these results included the complex nature of the corrosion product deposits and the control these deposits have on oxygen diffusion to the metal interface. Both factors influence the validity of the calculation of the corrosion rate by the direct reading instrument. It was concluded that development of a viable electrochemical method of general applicability to the evaluation of the corrosiveness of wet residential building thermal insulations were doubtful. Because of the controlling influence of dissolved oxygen on the corrosion rate in the insulation leachate, an alternate evaluation method is proposed in which a thin steel specimen is partially immersed in wet insulation for three weeks. The corrosiveness of the wet insulation is evaluated in terms of the severity of attack near the metal-air-wet insulation interface. With thin metal specimens, complete penetration along the interface is proposed as a pass/fail criterion. An environment of sterile cotton wet with distilled water is proposed as a comparative standard. 9 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Round 1 Emissions Results from Compressed Natural Gas Vans and Gasoline Controls Operating in the U.S. Federal Fleet

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Round 1 Emissions Results from Compressed Natural Gas Vans and Gasoline Controls Operating in the U.S. Federal Fleet Kenneth J. Kelly, Brent K. Bailey, and Timothy C. Coburn National Renewable Energy Laboratory Leslie Eudy ManTech Environmental Technology, Inc. Peter Lissiuk Environmental Research and Development Corp. Presented at Society for Automotive Engineers International Spring Fuels and Lubricants Meeting Dearborn, MI May 6-8, 1996 The work described here was wholly funded by the U.S.

  14. Electric and Hybrid Electric Vehicle Sales: December 2010 - June 2013 |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy Electric and Hybrid Electric Vehicle Sales: December 2010 - June 2013 Electric and Hybrid Electric Vehicle Sales: December 2010 - June 2013 Sales data for various models of electric and hybrid electric vehicles from December 2010 through June 2013. File Electric and Hybrid Electric Vehicle Sales: December 2010 - June 2013 (Excel) File Electric and Hybrid Electric Vehicle Sales: December 2010 - June 2013 (CSV) Image icon Chart of Electric and Hybrid Electric Vehicle

  15. Renewable Electricity Futures for the United States

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Renewable Electricity Futures Study (RE Futures) provides an analysis of the grid integration opportunities, challenges, and implications of high levels of renewable electricity generation for the U.S. electric system. The study is not a market or policy assessment. Rather, RE Futures examines renewable energy resources and many technical issues related to the operability of the U.S. electricity grid, and provides initial answers to important questions about the integration of high penetrations of renewable electricity technologies from a national perspective. RE Futures results indicate that a future U.S. electricity system that is largely powered by renewable sources is possible and that further work is warranted to investigate this clean generation pathway.

  16. Renewable Electricity Futures Study Executive Summary

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Renewable Electricity Futures Study (RE Futures) provides an analysis of the grid integration opportunities, challenges, and implications of high levels of renewable electricity generation for the U.S. electric system. The study is not a market or policy assessment. Rather, RE Futures examines renewable energy resources and many technical issues related to the operability of the U.S. electricity grid, and provides initial answers to important questions about the integration of high penetrations of renewable electricity technologies from a national perspective. RE Futures results indicate that a future U.S. electricity system that is largely powered by renewable sources is possible and that further work is warranted to investigate this clean generation pathway.

  17. Technology Roadmap - Electric and Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Roadmap - Electric and Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Technology Roadmap - Electric and Plug-in Hybrid Electric...

  18. Electrical Generation for More-Electric Aircraft using Solid...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electrical Generation for More-Electric Aircraft using Solid Oxide Fuel Cells Electrical Generation for More-Electric Aircraft using Solid Oxide Fuel Cells This study, completed by...

  19. Electric Power detailed State data

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Detailed State Data Final annual data for 2014 Release Date: October 21, 2015 Next Release Date: October 15, 2016 January 13, 2016 Revision/Corrections Annual data format 1990 - 2014 Net Generation by State by Type of Producer by Energy Source (EIA-906, EIA-920, and EIA-923)1 XLS 1990 - 2014 Fossil Fuel Consumption for Electricity Generation by Year, Industry Type and State (EIA-906, EIA-920, and EIA-923)2 XLS 1990 - 2013 Existing Nameplate and Net Summer Capacity by Energy Source, Producer Type

  20. Role of Energy Storage with Renewable Electricity Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denholm, P.; Ela, E.; Kirby, B.; Milligan, M.

    2010-01-01

    Renewable energy sources, such as wind and solar, have vast potential to reduce dependence on fossil fuels and greenhouse gas emissions in the electric sector. Climate change concerns, state initiatives including renewable portfolio standards, and consumer efforts are resulting in increased deployments of both technologies. Both solar photovoltaics (PV) and wind energy have variable and uncertain (sometimes referred to as intermittent) output, which are unlike the dispatchable sources used for the majority of electricity generation in the United States. The variability of these sources has led to concerns regarding the reliability of an electric grid that derives a large fraction of its energy from these sources as well as the cost of reliably integrating large amounts of variable generation into the electric grid. In this report, we explore the role of energy storage in the electricity grid, focusing on the effects of large-scale deployment of variable renewable sources (primarily wind and solar energy).

  1. Electrical safety guidelines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    The Electrical Safety Guidelines prescribes the DOE safety standards for DOE field offices or facilities involved in the use of electrical energy. It has been prepared to provide a uniform set of electrical safety standards and guidance for DOE installations in order to affect a reduction or elimination of risks associated with the use of electrical energy. The objectives of these guidelines are to enhance electrical safety awareness and mitigate electrical hazards to employees, the public, and the environment.

  2. DOE handbook electrical safety

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-01-01

    Electrical Safety Handbook presents the Department of Energy (DOE) safety standards for DOE field offices or facilities involved in the use of electrical energy. It has been prepared to provide a uniform set of electrical safety guidance and information for DOE installations to effect a reduction or elimination of risks associated with the use of electrical energy. The objectives of this handbook are to enhance electrical safety awareness and mitigate electrical hazards to employees, the public, and the environment.

  3. Edison Electric Institute Update

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentationgiven at the Fall 2011 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meetingdiscusses the Edison Electric Institute (EEI) and the current electricity landscape.

  4. Electricity Monthly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Electric Power Sector comprises electricity-only and combined heat and power (CHP) plants within the North American Industrial Classification System 22 category whose...

  5. DOE Electricity Advisory Committee

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electricity Advisory Committee March 2015 1 MEMORANDUM TO: Honorable Patricia Hoffman, Assistant Secretary for Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, U.S. Department of ...

  6. Electricity Monthly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    See all Electricity Reports Electricity Monthly Update With Data for November 2014 | Release Date: Jan. 26, 2015 | Next Release Date: Feb. 24, 2015 Previous Issues Issue:...

  7. Electricity Monthly Update

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Update November 28, 2012 Map of Electric System Selected for Daily Peak Demand was replaced with the correct map showing Selected Wholesale Electricity and Natural Gas Locations....

  8. Electricity Monthly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of electricity. End-use data is the first "data page" based on the assumption that information about retail electricity service is of greatest interest to a general...

  9. Annual Power Electric

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Noncoincident Peak Load by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Assessment Area, Actual Table 8.6.B. Noncoincident Peak Load by North American Electric Reliability ...

  10. Integrating Electricity Subsector

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Integrating Electricity Subsector Failure Scenarios into a Risk Assessment Methodology ... Executive, Cyber Security Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) For more information on ...

  11. Intense fusion neutron sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuteev, B. V.; Goncharov, P. R.; Sergeev, V. Yu.; Khripunov, V. I.

    2010-04-15

    The review describes physical principles underlying efficient production of free neutrons, up-to-date possibilities and prospects of creating fission and fusion neutron sources with intensities of 10{sup 15}-10{sup 21} neutrons/s, and schemes of production and application of neutrons in fusion-fission hybrid systems. The physical processes and parameters of high-temperature plasmas are considered at which optimal conditions for producing the largest number of fusion neutrons in systems with magnetic and inertial plasma confinement are achieved. The proposed plasma methods for neutron production are compared with other methods based on fusion reactions in nonplasma media, fission reactions, spallation, and muon catalysis. At present, intense neutron fluxes are mainly used in nanotechnology, biotechnology, material science, and military and fundamental research. In the near future (10-20 years), it will be possible to apply high-power neutron sources in fusion-fission hybrid systems for producing hydrogen, electric power, and technological heat, as well as for manufacturing synthetic nuclear fuel and closing the nuclear fuel cycle. Neutron sources with intensities approaching 10{sup 20} neutrons/s may radically change the structure of power industry and considerably influence the fundamental and applied science and innovation technologies. Along with utilizing the energy produced in fusion reactions, the achievement of such high neutron intensities may stimulate wide application of subcritical fast nuclear reactors controlled by neutron sources. Superpower neutron sources will allow one to solve many problems of neutron diagnostics, monitor nano-and biological objects, and carry out radiation testing and modification of volumetric properties of materials at the industrial level. Such sources will considerably (up to 100 times) improve the accuracy of neutron physics experiments and will provide a better understanding of the structure of matter, including that of the neutron itself.

  12. Computers, Electronics and Electrical Equipment (2010 MECS) | Department of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Computers, Electronics and Electrical Equipment (2010 MECS) Computers, Electronics and Electrical Equipment (2010 MECS) Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint for Computers, Electronics and Electrical Equipment Sector (NAICS 334, 335) Energy use data source: 2010 EIA MECS (with adjustments) Footprint Last Revised: February 2014 View footprints for other sectors here. Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint PDF icon Computers, Electronics and Electrical Equipment More Documents

  13. NREL: Transportation Research - Hybrid Electric Fleet Vehicle Testing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hybrid Electric Fleet Vehicle Testing How Hybrid Electric Vehicles Work Hybrid electric vehicles combine a primary power source, an energy storage system, and an electric motor to achieve a combination of emissions, fuel economy, and range benefits. Such vehicles use less petroleum-based fuel and capture energy created during braking and idling. This collected energy is used to propel the vehicle during normal drive cycles. The batteries supply additional power for acceleration and hill

  14. Fact #840: September 29, 2014 World Renewable Electricity Consumption is

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Growing | Department of Energy 40: September 29, 2014 World Renewable Electricity Consumption is Growing Fact #840: September 29, 2014 World Renewable Electricity Consumption is Growing Electricity generated from sources that are renewable - hydroelectric power, bio-fuels, geothermal, solar, wind, wood, waste - have grown 150% from 1980 to 2011 (latest year available). Of the selected countries/regions shown, Europe has consistently had the highest consumption of renewable electricity.

  15. Seismic sources

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Green, Michael A. (Oakland, CA); Cook, Neville G. W. (Lafayette, CA); McEvilly, Thomas V. (Berkeley, CA); Majer, Ernest L. (El Cirrito, CA); Witherspoon, Paul A. (Berkeley, CA)

    1992-01-01

    Apparatus is described for placement in a borehole in the earth, which enables the generation of closely controlled seismic waves from the borehole. Pure torsional shear waves are generated by an apparatus which includes a stator element fixed to the borehole walls and a rotor element which is electrically driven to rapidly oscillate on the stator element to cause reaction forces transmitted through the borehole walls to the surrounding earth. Logitudinal shear waves are generated by an armature that is driven to rapidly oscillate along the axis of the borehole relative to a stator that is clamped to the borehole, to cause reaction forces transmitted to the surrounding earth. Pressure waves are generated by electrically driving pistons that press against opposite ends of a hydraulic reservoir that fills the borehole. High power is generated by energizing the elements at a power level that causes heating to over 150.degree. C. within one minute of operation, but energizing the elements for no more than about one minute.

  16. EA-164 Constellation Power Source, Inc | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Constellation Power Source, Inc EA-164 Constellation Power Source, Inc Order authorizing Constellation Power Source, Inc to export electric energy to Canada. PDF icon EA-164 Constellation Power Source, Inc More Documents & Publications EA-162 PP&L, Inc EA-163 Duke Energy Trading and Marketing, L.L.C EA-158 Williams Energy Services Company

  17. CASL - Westinghouse Electric Company

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Westinghouse Electric Company Cranberry Township, PA Westinghouse Electric Company provides fuel, services, technology, plant design and equipment for the commercial nuclear electric power industry. Westinghouse nuclear technology is helping to provide future generations with safe, clean and reliable electricity. Key Contributions Definition of CASL challenge problems Existing codes and expertise Data for validation Computatinoal fluid dynamics modeling and analysis Development of test stand for

  18. International Round-Robin Study on Thermoelectric Transport Properties of n-type Half-Heusler from 300 K to 773 K

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Hsin; Bai, Shengqiang; Chen, Lidong; Cuenat, Alexander; Joshi, Giri; Kleinke, Holger; Konig, Jan; Lee, Hee Woong; Martin, Joshua; Oh, Min-Wook; Porter, Wallace D.; Ren, Zhifeng; Salvador, James R.; Sharp, Jeff W.; Taylor, Patrick; Thompson, Alan J.; Tseng, Yu -Chih

    2015-09-03

    International transport property measurement round-robins have been conducted by the Thermoelectric Annex under the International Energy Agency (IEA) Implementing Agreement on Advanced Materials for Transportation (AMT). The previous round-robins used commercially available bismuth telluride as the testing material, with the goals of understanding measurement issues and developing standard testing procedures. The current round-robin extended the measurement temperature range to 773 K. It was designed to meet the increasing demands for reliable transport data of thermoelectric materials for power generation applications. Eleven laboratories from six IEA-AMT member countries participated in this study. Half-Heusler (n-type) material prepared by GMZ Energy was selected for the round-robin. The measured transport properties showed narrower distribution on uncertainties compared to previous round-robin efforts. The study intentionally included multiple testing methods and instrument types. Over the full temperature range, the measurement discrepancies on the figure of merit, ZT, in this round-robin were ±1.5 to ±16.4% from the averages.

  19. International Round-Robin Study on Thermoelectric Transport Properties of n-type Half-Heusler from 300 K to 773 K

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wang, Hsin; Bai, Shengqiang; Chen, Lidong; Cuenat, Alexander; Joshi, Giri; Kleinke, Holger; Konig, Jan; Lee, Hee Woong; Martin, Joshua; Oh, Min-Wook; et al

    2015-09-03

    International transport property measurement round-robins have been conducted by the Thermoelectric Annex under the International Energy Agency (IEA) Implementing Agreement on Advanced Materials for Transportation (AMT). The previous round-robins used commercially available bismuth telluride as the testing material, with the goals of understanding measurement issues and developing standard testing procedures. The current round-robin extended the measurement temperature range to 773 K. It was designed to meet the increasing demands for reliable transport data of thermoelectric materials for power generation applications. Eleven laboratories from six IEA-AMT member countries participated in this study. Half-Heusler (n-type) material prepared by GMZ Energy was selectedmore » for the round-robin. The measured transport properties showed narrower distribution on uncertainties compared to previous round-robin efforts. The study intentionally included multiple testing methods and instrument types. Over the full temperature range, the measurement discrepancies on the figure of merit, ZT, in this round-robin were ±1.5 to ±16.4% from the averages.« less

  20. ELECTRICITY DELIVERY AND ENERGY RELIABILITY Appropriation Overview

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    DELIVERY AND ENERGY RELIABILITY Appropriation Overview Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE) leads the Department's efforts to strengthen, transform, and improve our energy infrastructure so that consumers have access to reliable, secure, and clean sources of energy. To accomplish this critical mission, the Office works with private industry and Federal, state, local, and tribal governments on a variety of initiatives to modernize the electric grid. Grid modernization is critical to

  1. Electricity Transmission, A Primer

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Transmission A Primer National Council on Electricity Policy National Council on Electricity Policy i Electricity Transmission A Primer By Matthew H. Brown, National Conference of State Legislatures Richard P. Sedano, The Regulatory Assistance Project National Council on Electric Policy The National Council on Electricity Policy is a joint venture among the National Conference of State Legislatures (NCSL), the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC) and the National

  2. Systems and methods for an integrated electrical sub-system powered by wind energy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, Yan (Ballston Lake, NY); Garces, Luis Jose (Niskayuna, NY)

    2008-06-24

    Various embodiments relate to systems and methods related to an integrated electrically-powered sub-system and wind power system including a wind power source, an electrically-powered sub-system coupled to and at least partially powered by the wind power source, the electrically-powered sub-system being coupled to the wind power source through power converters, and a supervisory controller coupled to the wind power source and the electrically-powered sub-system to monitor and manage the integrated electrically-powered sub-system and wind power system.

  3. Baltimore Gas & Electric Company (Electric) - Residential Energy...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AC: 30 Recycling RefrigeratorFreezer: 50 ACDehumidifier: 25 Summary The Baltimore Gas & Electric Company (BGE) offers rebates for residential customers to improve the...

  4. Quality Assurance Peer Review Chart Rounds in 2011: A Survey of Academic Institutions in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawrence, Yaacov Richard; Whiton, Michal A.; Department of Radiation Oncology, Skagit Valley Hospital Regional Cancer Care Center, Mt. Vernon, Washington ; Symon, Zvi; Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University ; Wuthrick, Evan J.; Department of Radiation Oncology, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio ; Doyle, Laura; Harrison, Amy S.; Dicker, Adam P.

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: In light of concerns regarding the quality of radiation treatment delivery, we surveyed the practice of quality assurance peer review chart rounds at American academic institutions. Methods and Materials: An anonymous web-based survey was sent to the chief resident of each institution across the United States. Results: The response rate was 80% (57/71). The median amount of time spent per patient was 2.7 minutes (range, 0.6-14.4). The mean attendance by senior physicians and residents was 73% and 93%, respectively. A physicist was consistently present at peer review rounds in 66% of departments. There was a close association between attendance by senior physicians and departmental organization: in departments with protected time policies, good attendance was 81% vs. 31% without protected time (p = 0.001), and in departments that documented attendance, attending presence was 69% vs. 29% in departments without documentation (p < 0.05). More than 80% of institutions peer review all external beam therapy courses; however, rates were much lower for other modalities (radiosurgery 58%, brachytherapy 40%-47%). Patient history, chart documentation, and dose prescription were always peer reviewed in >75% of institutions, whereas dosimetric details (beams, wedges), isodose coverage, intensity-modulated radiation therapy constraints, and dose-volume histograms were always peer reviewed in 63%, 59%, 42%, and 50% of cases, respectively. Chart rounds led to both minor (defined as a small multileaf collimator change/repeated port film) and major (change to dose prescription or replan with dosimetry) treatment changes. Whereas at the majority of institutions changes were rare (<10% of cases), 39% and 11% of institutions reported that minor and major changes, respectively, were made to more than 10% of cases. Conclusion: The implementation of peer review chart rounds seems inconsistent across American academic institutions. Brachytherapy and radiosurgical procedures are rarely reviewed. Attendance by senior physicians is variable, but it improves when scheduling clashes are avoided. The potential effect of a more thorough quality assurance peer review on patient outcomes is not known.

  5. acousto-electricV1.0

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2011-09-08

    Seismo-electric for both seismic and electric sources Code is for a layered acoustic and electric medium. Seismic calculated at a time step delta_t, the electric and magnetic fields calculated at a smaller time step within delta_t. Seismic calculated on a smaller grid than the EM calculations. At appropriate time steps pressure is interpolated onto the EM grid and/or electric fields interpolated onto the seismic grid. This version takes into the air-earth interface for both seismicmore » and EM wave fields. Solutions of coupled first order Maxwell's equations are solved in the two dimensional environment using a finite- difference scheme on a staggered spatial and temporal grid. The acoustic equations (where shear is ignored) are obtained from the poroelastic governing equations. The acoustic equations are solved using a finite-difference approach with a staggered grid in space and time.« less

  6. Understanding the Environmental Impacts of Electricity: Product Labeling and Certification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bird, L.

    2003-01-01

    Electricity consumers are increasingly gaining the ability to choose among power options from either their current electric utilities or from alternative power providers. In order to help consumers make informed decisions about their electricity purchases and to compare alternatives, many states are requiring electricity providers to disclose information regarding the fuel sources used to generate electricity and the associated environmental impacts. Like nutrition labels, environmental disclosure labels present the content or sources of electricity and are typically included with electricity bills and in product offers. These labels allow consumers to compare the environmental impacts of standard and cleaner power options, which are typically available. This paper discusses clean, green power options available to power purchasers and the tools and information that can be used to make more sustainable power purchase decisions.

  7. Electrical initiation of an energetic nanolaminate film

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tringe, Joseph W. (Walnut Creek, CA); Gash, Alexander E. (Brentwood, CA); Barbee, Jr., Troy W. (Palo Alto, CA)

    2010-03-30

    A heating apparatus comprising an energetic nanolaminate film that produces heat when initiated, a power source that provides an electric current, and a control that initiates the energetic nanolaminate film by directing the electric current to the energetic nanolaminate film and joule heating the energetic nanolaminate film to an initiation temperature. Also a method of heating comprising providing an energetic nanolaminate film that produces heat when initiated, and initiating the energetic nanolaminate film by directing an electric current to the energetic nanolaminate film and joule heating the energetic nanolaminate film to an initiation temperature.

  8. Electrically actuatable temporal tristimulus-color device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Koehler, Dale R. (1332 Wagontrain Dr., Albuquerque, NM 87123)

    1992-01-01

    The electrically actuated light filter operates in a cyclical temporal mode to effect a tristimulus-color light analyzer. Construction is based on a Fabry-Perot interferometer comprised of a high-speed movable mirror pair and cyclically powered electrical actuators. When combined with a single vidicon tube or a monochrome solid state image sensor, a temporally operated tristimulus-color video camera is effected. A color-generated is accomplished when constructed with a companion light source and is a flicker-free colored-light source for transmission type display systems. Advantages of low cost and small physical size result from photolithographic batch-processing manufacturability.

  9. Radiation source with shaped emission

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kubiak, Glenn D.; Sweatt, William C.

    2003-05-13

    Employing a source of radiation, such as an electric discharge source, that is equipped with a capillary region configured into some predetermined shape, such as an arc or slit, can significantly improve the amount of flux delivered to the lithographic wafers while maintaining high efficiency. The source is particularly suited for photolithography systems that employs a ringfield camera. The invention permits the condenser which delivers critical illumination to the reticle to be simplified from five or more reflective elements to a total of three or four reflective elements thereby increasing condenser efficiency. It maximizes the flux delivered and maintains a high coupling efficiency. This architecture couples EUV radiation from the discharge source into a ring field lithography camera.

  10. Greater fuel diversity needed to meet growing US electricity demand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burt, B.; Mullins, S.

    2008-01-15

    Electricity demand is growing in the USA. One way to manage the uncertainty is to diversity fuel sources. Fuel sources include coal, natural gas, nuclear and renewable energy sources. Tables show actual and planned generation projects by fuel types. 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  11. Electric arc saw apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deichelbohrer, Paul R [Richland, WA

    1986-01-01

    A portable, hand held electric arc saw has a small frame for supporting an electrically conducting rotary blade which serves as an electrode for generating an electric arc to erode a workpiece. Electric current is supplied to the blade by biased brushes and a slip ring which are mounted in the frame. A pair of freely movable endless belts in the form of crawler treads stretched between two pulleys are used to facilitate movement of the electric arc saw. The pulleys are formed of dielectric material to electrically insulate the crawler treads from the frame.

  12. Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: All Energy Sources Collected;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Table 7.1 Average Prices of Purchased Energy Sources, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: All Energy Sources Collected; Unit: U.S. Dollars per Physical Units. Selected Wood and Other Biomass Components Coal Components Coke Electricity Components Natural Gas Components Steam Components Total Wood Residues Bituminous Electricity Diesel Fuel Motor Natural Gas Steam and Wood-Related and Electricity from Sources and Gasoline Pulping Liquor Natural Gas from Sources

  13. Table 7.2 Average Prices of Purchased Energy Sources, 2010;

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Table 7.2 Average Prices of Purchased Energy Sources, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: All Energy Sources Collected; Unit: U.S. Dollars per Million Btu. Selected Wood and Other Biomass Components Coal Components Coke Electricity Components Natural Gas Components Steam Components Total Wood Residues Bituminous Electricity Diesel Fuel Motor Natural Gas Steam and Wood-Related and Electricity from Sources and Gasoline Pulping Liquor Natural Gas from Sources Steam

  14. Infrared source test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ott, L.

    1994-11-15

    The purpose of the Infrared Source Test (IRST) is to demonstrate the ability to track a ground target with an infrared sensor from an airplane. The system is being developed within the Advance Technology Program`s Theater Missile Defense/Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) section. The IRST payload consists of an Amber Radiance 1 infrared camera system, a computer, a gimbaled mirror, and a hard disk. The processor is a custom R3000 CPU board made by Risq Modular Systems, Inc. for LLNL. The board has ethernet, SCSI, parallel I/O, and serial ports, a DMA channel, a video (frame buffer) interface, and eight MBytes of main memory. The real-time operating system VxWorks has been ported to the processor. The application code is written in C on a host SUN 4 UNIX workstation. The IRST is the result of a combined effort by physicists, electrical and mechanical engineers, and computer scientists.

  15. ARPA-E: Advancing the Electric Grid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lemmon, John; Ruiz, Pablo; Sommerer, Tim; Aziz, Michael

    2014-02-24

    The electric grid was designed with the assumption that all energy generation sources would be relatively controllable, and grid operators would always be able to predict when and where those sources would be located. With the addition of renewable energy sources like wind and solar, which can be installed faster than traditional generation technologies, this is no longer the case. Furthermore, the fact that renewable energy sources are imperfectly predictable means that the grid has to adapt in real-time to changing patterns of power flow. We need a dynamic grid that is far more flexible. This video highlights three ARPA-E-funded approaches to improving the grid's flexibility: topology control software from Boston University that optimizes power flow, gas tube switches from General Electric that provide efficient power conversion, and flow batteries from Harvard University that offer grid-scale energy storage.

  16. ARPA-E: Advancing the Electric Grid

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Lemmon, John; Ruiz, Pablo; Sommerer, Tim; Aziz, Michael

    2014-03-13

    The electric grid was designed with the assumption that all energy generation sources would be relatively controllable, and grid operators would always be able to predict when and where those sources would be located. With the addition of renewable energy sources like wind and solar, which can be installed faster than traditional generation technologies, this is no longer the case. Furthermore, the fact that renewable energy sources are imperfectly predictable means that the grid has to adapt in real-time to changing patterns of power flow. We need a dynamic grid that is far more flexible. This video highlights three ARPA-E-funded approaches to improving the grid's flexibility: topology control software from Boston University that optimizes power flow, gas tube switches from General Electric that provide efficient power conversion, and flow batteries from Harvard University that offer grid-scale energy storage.

  17. Electric Efficiency Standard

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In December 2009, the Indiana Utility Regulatory Commission's (IURC) ordered utilities to establish demand-side management (DSM) electric savings goals leading to 2.0% reduction of electricity sa...

  18. Electricity Monthly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    cheap price of natural gas reduced coals share of electricity production. Days of Burn Days of burn Coal capacity The average number of days of burn held at electric power...

  19. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mai, T.

    2012-10-01

    This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050.

  20. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mai, T.

    2013-04-01

    This presentation summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050.