National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for roughness slope terrain

  1. Bipedal Robotic Walking on Flat-Ground, Up-Slope and Rough Terrain with Human-Inspired Hybrid Zero Dynamics 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nadubettu Yadukumar, Shishir 1986-

    2012-12-10

    The thesis shows how to achieve bipedal robotic walking on flat-ground, up-slope and rough terrain by using Human-Inspired control. We begin by considering human walking data and find outputs (or virtual constraints) that, when calculated from...

  2. Hazard avoidance for high-speed rough-terrain unmanned ground vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spenko, Matthew J. (Matthew Julius), 1976-

    2005-01-01

    High-speed unmanned ground vehicles have important applications in rough-terrain. In these applications unexpected and dangerous situations can occur that require rapid hazard avoidance maneuvers. At high speeds, there is ...

  3. Wind assessment in complex terrain with the numeric model Aiolos implementation of the influence of roughness changes and stability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Detlev

    to the influence of roughness changes and the thermal stratification. Wind potential assessments of two sites of roughness changes on the terrain surface and thermal stratification of the at- mosphere are taken a neutral thermal stratification situation is assumed. But for a north eu- ropean situation a light stable

  4. Rough-terrain mobile robot planning and control with application to planetary exploration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iagnemma, Karl David

    2001-01-01

    Future planetary exploration missions will require mobile robots to perform difficult tasks in highly challenging terrain, with limited human supervision. Current motion planning and control algorithms are not well suited ...

  5. Urbanizing terrains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romanos, Christoforos

    2008-01-01

    Urban "sprawl"in the East Attica area of Athens has dramatically changed the former rural economy in a manner consistent with the urbanizing terrain's underlying properties: agricultural subdivisions, existing centres, ...

  6. Placement of Traffic Barriers on Roadside and Median Slopes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferdous, Md Rubiat

    2011-08-08

    terrains are investigated using numerical simulations. A procedure is developed that provide guidance for their placement on roadside and median slopes. The research approach consists of nonlinear finite element analyses and multi-rigid-body dynamic...

  7. Design methods for cost-effective teams of mobile robots in uncertain terrain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michaluk, Nathaniel

    2014-01-01

    Conducting planetary exploration missions with mobile robots is expensive, with costs ranging from hundreds of millions to billions of dollars. Developing reliable robots to work remotely on rough, uncertain terrain is ...

  8. Minimalistic control of biped walking in rough terrain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iida, Fumiya

    Toward our comprehensive understanding of legged locomotion in animals and machines, the compass gait model has been intensively studied for a systematic investigation of complex biped locomotion dynamics. While most of ...

  9. Performance-Based Rough Terrain Navigation for Nonholonomic Mobile Robots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, Lynne E.

    , performance issues (e.g., robot safety, or geometric, time-based, and physics- based criteria) are adequately, such as robot safety, or geometric, time-based, and physics-based criteria. However, where uncertainties exist that by incorporating criterion-optimizing design in each module and organizing them in a behavior-based architecture

  10. GIS Fundamentals Lesson 10: Terrain Analysis Lesson 10: Terrain Analyses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Butler, Christopher J.

    GIS Fundamentals Lesson 10: Terrain Analysis Lesson 10: Terrain Analyses What You'll Learn: Basic if needed. You should read chapter 11 in the GIS Fundamentals textbook before starting. Data are located processing, using the ArcGIS Hydrology tools. 1 #12;GIS Fundamentals Lesson 10: Terrain Analysis Project1

  11. Quasi-Steady Katabatic Winds on Slopes in Wide Valleys: Hydraulic Theory and Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunt, Julian

    Quasi-Steady Katabatic Winds on Slopes in Wide Valleys: Hydraulic Theory and Observations M in the presence of weak synoptic winds. Because of the lateral constraints on the flow, Coriolis effects by sloping topography (Strobach 1991), as is the terrain of most urban areas of the world. Air circulation

  12. Terrainosaurus: realistic terrain synthesis using genetic algorithms 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saunders, Ryan L.

    2007-04-25

    a new, design-by-example method for synthesizing terrain height fields. In this approach, the user designs the layout of the terrain by sketching out simple regions using a CAD-style interface, and specifies the desired terrain characteristics...

  13. Representing Terrain With Mathematical Operators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franklin, W. Randolph

    of the terrain's generation by digging channels in the surface. Given our current reliance on digital map data a series of parameters (including size and area of influence of the drill, as well as the density formation mimics physical phenomena associated with geological terrain formation (such as erosion, digging

  14. Gravitational slopes, geomorphology, and material strengths of the nucleus of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko from OSIRIS observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groussin, O; Auger, A -T; Kührt, E; Gaskell, R; Capanna, C; Scholten, F; Preusker, F; Lamy, P; Hviid, S; Knollenberg, J; Keller, U; Huettig, C; Sierks, H; Barbieri, C; Rodrigo, R; Koschny, D; Rickman, H; Hearn, M F A; Agarwal, J; Barucci, M A; Bertaux, J -L; Bertini, I; Boudreault, S; Cremonese, G; Da Deppo, V; Davidsson, B; Debei, S; De Cecco, M; El-Maarry, M R; Fornasier, S; Fulle, M; Gutiérrez, P J; Güttler, C; Ip, W -H; Kramm, J -R; Küppers, M; Lazzarin, M; Lara, L M; Moreno, J J Lopez; Marchi, S; Marzari, F; Massironi, M; Michalik, H; Naletto, G; Oklay, N; Pommerol, A; Pajola, M; Thomas, N; Toth, I; Tubiana, C; Vincent, J -B

    2015-01-01

    We study the link between gravitational slopes and the surface morphology on the nucleus of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko and provide constraints on the mechanical properties of the cometary material. We computed the gravitational slopes for five regions on the nucleus that are representative of the different morphologies observed on the surface, using two shape models computed from OSIRIS images by the stereo-photoclinometry (SPC) and stereo-photogrammetry (SPG) techniques. We estimated the tensile, shear, and compressive strengths using different surface morphologies and mechanical considerations. The different regions show a similar general pattern in terms of the relation between gravitational slopes and terrain morphology: i) low-slope terrains (0-20 deg) are covered by a fine material and contain a few large ($>$10 m) and isolated boulders, ii) intermediate-slope terrains (20-45 deg) are mainly fallen consolidated materials and debris fields, with numerous intermediate-size boulders from $<$1 m to ...

  15. All-terrain vehicle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Somerton-Rayner, M.

    1986-12-16

    This patent describes an all-terrain vehicle comprising: a chassis; four road wheel axles equally spaced along the chassis; suspension means mounting the axles on the chassis; wheels mounted adjacent both ends of each of the axles, the wheels on the foremost and the rearmost axles being steerably mounted; propulsion and driving means including a single internal combustion engine and gearbox, and first and second transfer boxes both coupled to be driven by the engine through the gearbox; the first transfer box driving the first and third axles and the second transfer box driving the second and fourth axles; means for driving in the alternative all four wheels and only the center two wheels; power-assisted steering gear means operatively connected to the steerably-mounted wheels of the foremost axle; and steering coupling means extending between the steerably-mounted wheels on the foremost and rearmost axles so dimensioned that upon steering of the front wheels, the rear wheels perform castoring constrained to a smaller turning angle and a lower rate of angular movement than the front wheels.

  16. Large Eddy Simulation of Stable Boundary Layer Turbulent Processes in Complex Terrain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eric D. Skyllingstad

    2005-01-26

    Research was performed using a turbulence boundary layer model to study the behavior of cold, dense flows in regions of complex terrain. Results show that flows develop a balance between turbulent entrainment of warm ambient air and dense, cold air created by surface cooling. Flow depth and strength is a function of downslope distance, slope angle and angle changes, and the ambient air temperature.

  17. LARGE EDDY SIMULATION OF TURBULENT BOUNDARY LAYERS OVER ROUGH BEDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawlak, Geno

    that determines the response of the boundary layer is not clear. One method to characterize the irregular nature with different spectral slopes using 2D 10 % loading square waves as basis functions. These square waves can) is then used to simulate the turbulent boundary layer over the rough beds. The LES solver is first validated

  18. Water-related ecological impacts of rill erosion processes in Mediterranean-dry reclaimed slopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Espigares, Tíscar

    water status and potential seed germination) and vegetation structure in five coal-mining reclaimed is maximized by different mechanisms: the reduction of water infiltration by surface crust formation and cross-slope surface roughness reduction, and the efficient evacuation of water flows from the slope by rill networks

  19. Roughness Tolerance Studies for the Undulator Beam Pipe Chamber of LCLS-II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bane, K

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the effect of wall roughness on the wakefield-induced energy variation in the undulator beam pipe of LCLS-II. We find that a wall roughness equivalent to an rms surface slope of 30 mr increases the total induced energy variation within the bunch (due to the resistive wall wake) by a modest 20%.

  20. The influence of forest clearing on landsliding is central to long-standing concern over the effects of timber harvesting on slope stability.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montgomery, David R.

    the effects of timber harvesting on slope stability. Here we document a strong topographic control on shallow landsliding by combining unique ground-based landslide surveys in an intensively monitored study area in steep, convergent topography. In terrain predicted to be at low risk of slope failure, a random model

  1. Monitoring high-mountain terrain deformation from repeated air-and spaceborne optical data: examples using digital

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kääb, Andreas

    Monitoring high-mountain terrain deformation from repeated air- and spaceborne optical data 2002 Abstract High mountains represent one of the most dynamic environments on earth. Monitoring of F 60 m RMS of the ASTER DEM was found for rough high-mountain topography, and F 18 m RMS

  2. FINAL REPORT CANYON AND SLOPE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Scott

    and the influence of canyons on slope cur- rents ; f) identification of communities which may be affected by oil and gas operations; and g) identification of measures for alleviating or eliminating the effects of oil

  3. Human estimation of slope, distance, and height of terrain in simulated lunar conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oravetz, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    As NASA's Vision for Space Exploration seeks to explore mountainous regions near the southern pole through frequent, long excursions, astronauts will require accurate navigational assistance. Current and future technology, ...

  4. North Slope (Wahluke Slope) expedited response action cleanup plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    The purpose of this action is to mitigate any threat to public health and the environment from hazards on the North Slope and meet the expedited response action (ERA) objective of cleanup to a degree requiring no further action. The ERA may be the final remediation of the 100-I-3 Operable Unit. A No Action record of decision (ROD) may be issued after remediation completion. The US Department of Energy (DOE) currently owns or administers approximately 140 mi{sup 2} (about 90,000 acres) of land north and east of the Columbia River (referred to as the North Slope) that is part of the Hanford Site. The North Slope, also commonly known as the Wahluke Slope, was not used for plutonium production or support facilities; it was used for military air defense of the Hanford Site and vicinity. The North Slope contained seven antiaircraft gun emplacements and three Nike-Ajax missile positions. These military positions were vacated in 1960--1961 as the defense requirements at Hanford changed. They were demolished in 1974. Prior to government control in 1943, the North Slope was homesteaded. Since the initiation of this ERA in the summer of 1992, DOE signed the modified Hanford Federal Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) with the Washington Department of Ecology (Ecology) and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in which a milestone was set to complete remediation activities and a draft closeout report by October 1994. Remediation activities will make the North Slope area available for future non-DOE uses. Thirty-nine sites have undergone limited characterization to determine if significant environmental hazards exist. This plan documents the results of that characterization and evaluates the potential remediation alternatives.

  5. Parallelized Distributed Embedded Control System for 2D Walking Robot for Studying Rough Terrain Locomotion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strunk, Gavin

    2010-12-10

    , parallelized, embedded control system was developed to provide the control structure for the Jaywalker. This system was chosen for its ability to execute simultaneous tasks efficiently. The two level control system provides a first level to implement a higher...

  6. Development of a Hybrid Powered 2D Biped Walking Machine Designed for Rough Terrain Locomotion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Bryce C.

    2010-07-28

    Biped robots hold promise as terrestrial explorers because they require a single discrete foothold to place their next step. However, biped robots are multi-input multi-output dynamically unstable machines. This makes ...

  7. Analysis, design, and control of an omnidirectional mobile robot in rough terrain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Udengaard, Martin Richard

    2008-01-01

    An omnidirectional mobile robot is able, kinematically, to move in any direction regardless of current pose. To date, nearly all designs and analyses of omnidirectional mobile robots have considered the case of motion on ...

  8. Creating Standards for Winter Terrain Parks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to engineering frame motivated creation of a 501c(3) non-profit, United States Terrain Park Council Dedicated fatalities (31 male, 6 female) mostly young J. Shealy (2000) Snowboard injury rate doubled during 1990-2000 from 3.37 to 6.97 per 1000 skier days Deaths: 50 (2007-2008) 39 (2008-2009) Compiled by California Ski

  9. Rock Slopes from Mechanics to Decision Making

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Einstein, Herbert H.

    Rock slope instabilities are discussed in the context of decision making for risk assessment and management. Hence, the state of the slope and possible failure mechanism need to be defined first. This is done with geometrical ...

  10. GEOPHYSICS FOR SLOPE STABILITY ROBERT HACK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hack, Robert

    GEOPHYSICS FOR SLOPE STABILITY ROBERT HACK Section Engineering Geology, Centre for Technical-mail: hack@itc.nl (Received 2 June, 2000; Accepted 4 September, 2000) Abstract. A pre-requisite in slope Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands. #12;424 ROBERT HACK the slope material with, for example, manganese

  11. Seoul, South Korea -classification deteriorating slope stability -Robert Hack 1 SLOPE STABILITY CLASSIFICATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hack, Robert

    Seoul, South Korea - classification deteriorating slope stability - Robert Hack 1 SLOPE STABILITY CLASSIFICATION OF TIME DEPENDENT DETERIORATING SLOPES Seoul, Korea, 29 February 2008 Robert Hack Engineering) The Netherlands #12;Seoul, South Korea - classification deteriorating slope stability - Robert Hack 2 Jan van

  12. Biocorrosive Thermophilic Microbial Communities in Alaskan North Slope Oil Facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duncan, Kathleen E.

    2010-01-01

    in Alaskan North Slope Oil Facilities Kathleen E. Duncan,in Alaskan North Slope oil production facilities. Title:in Alaskan North Slope Oil Facilities Authors: Kathleen E.

  13. Electrokinetic transport in microchannels with random roughness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Moran [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kang, Qinjun [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    We present a numerical framework to model the electrokinetic transport in microchannels with random roughness. The three-dimensional microstructure of the rough channel is generated by a random generation-growth method with three statistical parameters to control the number density, the total volume fraction, and the anisotropy characteristics of roughness elements. The governing equations for the electrokinetic transport are solved by a high-efficiency lattice Poisson?Boltzmann method in complex geometries. The effects from the geometric characteristics of roughness on the electrokinetic transport in microchannels are therefore modeled and analyzed. For a given total roughness volume fraction, a higher number density leads to a lower fluctuation because of the random factors. The electroosmotic flow rate increases with the roughness number density nearly logarithmically for a given volume fraction of roughness but decreases with the volume fraction for a given roughness number density. When both the volume fraction and the number density of roughness are given, the electroosmotic flow rate is enhanced by the increase of the characteristic length along the external electric field direction but is reduced by that in the direction across the channel. For a given microstructure of the rough microchannel, the electroosmotic flow rate decreases with the Debye length. It is found that the shape resistance of roughness is responsible for the flow rate reduction in the rough channel compared to the smooth channel even for very thin double layers, and hence plays an important role in microchannel electroosmotic flows.

  14. Concentration of Eigenfunctions in Rough Media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Hart F.

    Concentration of Eigenfunctions in Rough Media Hart F. Smith Department of Mathematics University of Washington, Seattle UC Irvine - June 18, 2012 Hart F. Smith Eigenfunctions in Rough Media #12;M = compact L2(M) (p) ( p 2 ) Hart F. Smith Eigenfunctions in Rough Media #12;M = compact manifold with volume

  15. SHORT COMMUNICATION Dynamical analysis of winter terrain park jumps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of this work is to show how a dynamical analysis can assess impact injury risks and inform safer terrain park frequently pose a hazard to patrons and may represent a significant liability risk to winter resorts. By performing a simple dynamic analysis of terrain park jumps, the relative risk to impact injuries for any

  16. Benthic Terrain Modeler: Interpreting the Bathymetric Environment Shaun Walbridge1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Dawn Jeannine

    that they can be used on any digital elevation data. The inclusion of easily customizable terrain classification, aspect, and rugosity from an input bathymetric data set. Additionally, terrain classification scripts allow users the freedom to create their own zone and structure classifications and define

  17. Vibration-based Terrain Classification Using Support Vector Machines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zell, Andreas

    Vibration-based Terrain Classification Using Support Vector Machines Christian Weiss, Holger Fr a method for terrain classification based on vibration induced in the vehicle's body. An accelerometer mounted on the vehicle measures the vibration perpendicular to the ground surface. We experimentally

  18. Representation of Terrain Data Using a Mathematical "Drill" Operator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franklin, W. Randolph

    Representation of Terrain Data Using a Mathematical "Drill" Operator Christopher S. Stuetzle1 and W and Franklin (RPI) Autocarto 2012 17 Sep 2012 6 / 24 #12;The Drill Operator v Then cut along an ever deeper Creates hydrography. 1 How can we fit a drill to a terrain location (pixel) p? 2 How can we represent

  19. Title: Digital Terrain Model of Southern Ontario Data Creator /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Title: Digital Terrain Model of Southern Ontario Data Creator / Copyright Owner: First Base/A Coverage Date(s): 2002 Updates: N/A Abstract: The Digital Terrain Model (DTM) of southern Ontario / UTM (17) Resolution: N/A Coordinates: N/A Index Map: N/A Keywords (Place): Ontario Keywords (Subject

  20. Innovative Gamma Ray Spectrometer Detection Systems for Conducting Scanning Surveys on Challenging Terrain - 13583

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palladino, Carl; Mason, Bryan; Engle, Matt; LeVangie, James [The Palladino Company, Inc., 720 Fillmore St., San Francisco, CA 94117 (United States)] [The Palladino Company, Inc., 720 Fillmore St., San Francisco, CA 94117 (United States); Dempsey, Gregg [United States Environmental Protection Agency, P.O. Box 98517, Las Vegas, NV 89193-8517 (United States)] [United States Environmental Protection Agency, P.O. Box 98517, Las Vegas, NV 89193-8517 (United States); Klemovich, Ron [HydroGeoLogic, Inc., 6340 Glenwood, Suite 200, Building No. 7, Overland Park, KS 66202 (United States)] [HydroGeoLogic, Inc., 6340 Glenwood, Suite 200, Building No. 7, Overland Park, KS 66202 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The Santa Susana Field Laboratory located near Simi Valley, California was investigated to determine the nature and extent of gamma radiation anomalies. The primary objective was to conduct gamma scanning surveys over 100 percent of the approximately 1,906,000 square meters (471 acre) project site with the most sensitive detection system possible. The site had challenging topography that was not conducive to traditional gamma scanning detection systems. Terrain slope varied from horizontal to 48 degrees and the ground surface ranged from flat, grassy meadows to steep, rocky hillsides. In addition, the site was home to many protected endangered plant and animal species, and archaeologically significant sites that required minimal to no disturbance of the ground surface. Therefore, four innovative and unique gamma ray spectrometer detection systems were designed and constructed to successfully conduct gamma scanning surveys of approximately 1,076,000 square meters (266 acres) of the site. (authors)

  1. Digital terrain modeling with the Chebyshev polynomials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florinsky, I V

    2015-01-01

    Mathematical problems of digital terrain analysis include interpolation of digital elevation models (DEMs), DEM generalization and denoising, and computation of morphometric variables by calculation of partial derivatives of elevation. Traditionally, these procedures are based on numerical treatments of two-variable discrete functions of elevation. We developed a spectral analytical method and algorithm based on high-order orthogonal expansions using the Chebyshev polynomials of the first kind with the subsequent Fejer summation. The method and algorithm are intended for DEM analytical treatment, such as, DEM global approximation, denoising, and generalization as well as computation of morphometric variables by analytical calculation of partial derivatives. To test the method and algorithm, we used a DEM of the Northern Andes including 230,880 points (the elevation matrix 480 $\\times$ 481). DEMs were reconstructed with 480, 240, 120, 60, and 30 expansion coefficients. The first and second partial derivatives ...

  2. Water Dynamics at Rough Interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Markus Rosenstihl; Kerstin Kämpf; Felix Klameth; Matthias Sattig; Michael Vogel

    2014-07-21

    We use molecular dynamics computer simulations and nuclear magnetic resonance experiments to investigate the dynamics of water at interfaces of molecular roughness and low mobility. We find that, when approaching such interfaces, the structural relaxation of water, i.e., the $\\alpha$ process, slows down even when specific attractive interactions are absent. This prominent effect is accompanied by a smooth transition from Vogel to Arrhenius temperature dependence and by a growing importance of jump events. Consistently, at protein surfaces, deviations from Arrhenius behavior are weak when free water does not exist. Furthermore, in nanoporous silica, a dynamic crossover of liquid water occurs when a fraction of solid water forms near 225 K and, hence, the liquid dynamics changes from bulk-like to interface-dominated. At sufficiently low temperatures, water exhibits a quasi-universal $\\beta$ process, which is characterized by an activation energy of $E_a\\!=\\!0.5$ eV and involves anisotropic reorientation about large angles. As a consequence of its large amplitude, the faster $\\beta$ process destroys essentially all orientational correlation, rendering observation of a possible slower $\\alpha$ process difficult in standard experiments. Nevertheless, we find indications for the existence of structural relaxation down to a glass transition of interfacial water near 185 K. Hydrated proteins show a highly restricted backbone motion with an amplitude, which decreases upon cooling and vanishes at comparable temperatures, providing evidence for a high relevance of water rearrangements in the hydration shell for secondary protein relaxations.

  3. Stability of submerged slopes on the flanks of the Hawaiian Islands, a simplified approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, H.J.; Torresan, M.E.; McArthur, W.

    1994-12-31

    Undersea transmission lines and shoreline AC-DC conversion stations and near-shore transmission lines are being considered as part of a system for transporting energy between the Hawaiian Islands. These facilities will need to be designed so that they will not be damaged or destroyed by coastal or undersea landslides. Advanced site surveys and engineering design of these facilities will require detailed site specific analyses, including sediment sampling and laboratory testing of samples, in situ testing of sediment and rock, detailed charting of bathymetry, and two- or three-dimensional numerical analyses of the factors of safety of the slopes against failure from the various possible loading mechanisms. An intermediate approximate approach can be followed that involves gravity and piston cores, laboratory testing and the application of simplified models to determine a seismic angle of repose for actual sediment in the vicinity of the planned facility. An even simpler and more approximate approach involves predictions of angles of repose using classification of the sediment along a proposed route as either a coarse volcaniclastic sand, a calcareous ooze, or a muddy terrigenous sediment. The steepest slope that such a sediment can maintain is the static angle of repose. Sediment may be found on slopes as steep as these, but it must be considered metastable and liable to fail in the event of any disturbance, storm or earthquake. The seismic angle of repose likely governs most slopes on the Hawaiian Ridge. This declivity corresponds to the response of the slope to a continuing seismic environment. As a long history of earthquakes affects the slopes, they gradually flatten to this level. Slopes that exceed or roughly equal this value can be considered at risk to fail during future earthquakes. Seismic and static angles of repose for three sediment types are tabulated in this report.

  4. Wind profiles on the stoss slope of sand dunes: Implications for eolian sand transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frank, A.; Kocurek, G. (Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1993-04-01

    Starting with the work of R.A. Bagnold it has been recognized that the shear stress exerted by the wind on sand grains is the driving force for eolian sand transport. Calculation of accurate rates of sand transport is essential for prediction of migration rates of sand dunes in modern environments as well as reconstructing paleoclimates (wind speed and direction) from eolian deposits. Because a sand dune is a streamlined obstacle in the path of the wind, continuity necessitates that the flow field is compressed over the windward side of a dune and shear stress should progressively increase up the slope as the flow accelerates. However, airflow measurements over 14 dunes (at White Sands, New Mexico; Algodones, CA; and Padre Island, TX) show that compression of the flow field occurs very close to the surface and as a consequence, the overlying flow actually shows an overall decrease in shear stress up the slope. Measurements commonly collected in the overlying zone are not representative of the near-surface, sand-driving wind. Furthermore, near-surface compression of the flow field implies that a pressure gradient exists that would render the current transport models inappropriate for sloping surfaces that dominate natural sandy desert terrains.

  5. Subsurface water flow simulated for hill slopes with spatially dependent soil hydraulic characteristics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharma, M.L.; Luxmoore, R.J.; DeAngelis, R.; Ward, R.C.; Yeh, G.T.

    1987-08-01

    Water flow through hill slopes consisting of five soil layers, with varying spatial dependence in hydraulic characteristics in the lateral plane was simulated by solving Richards' equation in three dimensions under varying rainfall intensities and for two complexities of terrain. By concepts of similar media the variability in soil hydraulic characteristics was expressed by a single dimensionless parameter, the scaling factor ..cap alpha... The moments of log normally distributed ..cap alpha.. were set as: Mean = 1.0 and standard deviation = 1.0. Four cases of spatial dependence of ..cap alpha.. in the lateral plane were selected for simulation, using exponential variogram functions ranging in spatial structure from random (no spatial dependence) to large dependence (large correlation lengths). The simulations showed that the rates of subsurface flow from the 30/sup 0/ hillslope, during and following rainfall, were significantly enhanced with an increase in spatial dependence. Subsurface drainage was also increased with increases in rainfall intensity and slop complexity. For hill slopes the relative effects of spatial dependence in soil hydraulic characteristics was smaller with 30/sup 0/ horizontal pitching than without pitching. Hill slopes with a random distribution of hydraulic characteristics provided greater opportunity for soil units with differing water capacities to interact than in cases with spatially correlated distributions. This greater interaction is associated with a greater lag in subsurface flow generation. These studies illustrate some of the expected effects of spatial dependence of soil hydraulic characteristics of the integrated hydrologic response of land areas.

  6. Park Profiler/Jump Analyzer Practical method for determining terrain park jump performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Terrain Park jump safety as a rider/resort partnership II. USTPC criteria: Quantifying best practices in terrain park jump design III. "Park Profiler" - practical tool to measure TP jump IV. "Jump Analyzer of flying ... but, as Icarus leaned the hard way, there are risks. #12;Terrain Park Jump Safety Terrain park

  7. Terrain sensing and estimation for dynamic outdoor mobile robots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, Christopher Charles

    2007-01-01

    In many applications, mobile robots are required to travel on outdoor terrain at high speed. Compared to traditional low-speed, laboratory-based robots, outdoor scenarios pose increased perception and mobility challenges ...

  8. Flow over Heated Terrain. Part II: Generation of Convective Precipitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tucker, Donna F.; Crook, N. Andrew

    2005-09-01

    Previous studies have shown that thunderstorms in the Rocky Mountain region have preferred areas in which to form. There has been some indication that these areas depend on the midtropospheric wind direction. A nonhydrostatic model with a terrain...

  9. Development of the Robotic Touch foot Sensor for 2D walking Robot, for Studying Rough Terrain Locomotion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Hunwoo

    2012-08-31

    SENSOR ………..14 2.1 Making coil flat and spiral…………………………………………….....14 2.2 Current generator..……………………………………………………….17 2.3 Passive low pass filter….……..…………………………………………19 2.4 Analog to Digital conversion with a sampling clock generator…………19 2....5 Power management and avoiding redundancy with multiplexers……….21 2.6 Microprocessor to read ADC …………………………………………...23 2.7 Test beds for developed sensors…………………………………………23 3. Trouble shoots……………………………………………………………………25 3.1 Interference among coils...

  10. Rough surface reconstruction for ultrasonic NDE simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, Wonjae; Shi, Fan; Lowe, Michael J. S.; Skelton, Elizabeth A.; Craster, Richard V.

    2014-02-18

    The reflection of ultrasound from rough surfaces is an important topic for the NDE of safety-critical components, such as pressure-containing components in power stations. The specular reflection from a rough surface of a defect is normally lower than it would be from a flat surface, so it is typical to apply a safety factor in order that justification cases for inspection planning are conservative. The study of the statistics of the rough surfaces that might be expected in candidate defects according to materials and loading, and the reflections from them, can be useful to develop arguments for realistic safety factors. This paper presents a study of real rough crack surfaces that are representative of the potential defects in pressure-containing power plant. Two-dimensional (area) values of the height of the roughness have been measured and their statistics analysed. Then a means to reconstruct model cases with similar statistics, so as to enable the creation of multiple realistic realizations of the surfaces, has been investigated, using random field theory. Rough surfaces are reconstructed, based on a real surface, and results for these two-dimensional descriptions of the original surface have been compared with those from the conventional model based on a one-dimensional correlation coefficient function. In addition, ultrasonic reflections from them are simulated using a finite element method.

  11. A CONSTRUCTION OF THE ROUGH PATH ABOVE FRACTIONAL ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-03-05

    Appl. 120 (2010) 1444–1472], where the construction of a rough path over B was first introduced. 1. Introduction. Rough paths analysis is a theory introduced by ...

  12. Flow rule of dense granular flows down a rough incline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tamas Borzsonyi; Robert E. Ecke

    2007-07-09

    We present experimental findings on the flow rule for granular flows on a rough inclined plane using various materials including sand and glass beads of various sizes and four types of copper particles with different shapes. We characterize the materials by measuring $h_s$ (the thickness at which the flow subsides) as a function of the plane inclination $\\theta$ on various surfaces. Measuring the surface velocity $u$ of the flow as a function of flow thickness $h$, we find that for sand and glass beads the Pouliquen flow rule $u/\\sqrt{gh} \\sim \\beta h/h_s$ provides reasonable but not perfect collapse of the $u(h)$ curves measured for various $\\theta$ and mean particle diameter $d$. Improved collapse is obtained for sand and glass beads by using a recently proposed scaling of the form $u/\\sqrt{gh} =\\beta \\cdot h \\tan^2\\theta /h_s\\ \\tan^2\\theta_1$ where $\\theta_1$ is the angle at which the $h_s(\\theta)$ curves diverge. Measuring the slope $\\beta$ for ten different sizes of sand and glass beads, we find a systematic, strong increase of $\\beta$ with the divergence angle $\\theta_1$ of $h_s$. The copper materials with different shapes are not well described by either flow rule with $u \\sim h^{3/2}$.

  13. Geostatistical Mapping of Mountain Precipitation Incorporating Autosearched Effects of Terrain and Climatic Characteristics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at San Antonio, University of

    Geostatistical Mapping of Mountain Precipitation Incorporating Autosearched Effects of Terrain 2004, in final form 30 March 2005) ABSTRACT Hydrologic and ecologic studies in mountainous terrain mountain precipitation using only precipi- tation gauge data. The ASOADeK model considers both

  14. Parallel Implementation of a Vehicle-Tire-Terrain Interaction Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Negrut, Dan

    (VTTIM) · Three components o Vehicle o Tire o Terrain/Soil mechanics · Two interfaces o Vehicle support for ANCF `tire' 9 #12;Types of Soil Mechanics Models · Empirical Methods o WES numerics, Bekker of Tire Models · Rigid o Simple to implement in parallel o Only accurate if deformation of soil is much

  15. Towards a mathematics of terrain W. Randolph Franklin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franklin, W. Randolph

    explicitly, and · enforces global consistencies. Why? To put compression and other ops on a logical is derivative of elevation, but · that amplifies errors, and · lossy compression has errors, so · maybe we want the geology) to deep (simulating every molecule). · One solution: Scooping. Carve terrain from a block using

  16. The All Terrain Bio nano Gear for Space Radiation Detection System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mavroidis, Constantinos

    The All Terrain Bio nano Gear for Space Radiation Detection System Ajay Ummat, Constantinos in real-time while an astronaut is in the mission. All Terrain Bio-nano (ATB) gear system is one the current or any other future space suits. The proposed All Terrain Bio nano (ATB) gear is one such concept

  17. Combinatorial Block Copolymer Ordering on Tunable Rough

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kulkarni M. M.; Yager K.; Sharma, A.; Karim, A.

    2012-05-01

    Morphology control of block copolymer (BCP) thin films through substrate interaction via controlled roughness parameters is of significant interest for numerous high-tech applications ranging from solar cells to high-density storage media. While effects of substrate surface energy (SE) and roughness (R) on BCP morphology have been individually investigated, their synergistic effects have not been explored in any systematic manner. Interestingly, orientation response of BCP to changes in SE can be similar to what can be accomplished with variations in R. Here we present a novel approach for orienting lamellar BCP films of poly(styrene)-block-poly(methyl methacrylate) (PS-PMMA) on spin-coated xerogel (a dried gel of silica nanoparticle network) substrate with simultaneously tunable surface energy, {gamma}{sub s} {approx} 29-53 mJ/m{sup 2}, by UVO exposure and roughness, R{sub rms} {approx} 0.5-30 nm, by sol-gel processing steps of regulating the catalyst concentration and sol aging time. As in previous BCP orientation studies on 20 nm diameter monodisperse silica nanoparticle coated surface, we find a similar but broadened oscillatory BCP orientation behavior with film thickness due to the random rather than periodic rough surfaces. We also find that higher random roughness amplitude is not the necessary criteria for obtaining a vertical orientation of BCP lamellae. Rather, a high surface fractal dimension (D{sub f} > 2.4) of the rough substrate in conjunction with an optimal substrate surface energy {gamma}{sub s} 29 mJ/m{sup 2} results in 100% vertically oriented lamellar microdomains. The AFM measured film surface microstructure correlates well with the internal 3D BCP film structure probed by grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS) and rotational small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). In contrast to tunable self-assembled monolayer (SAM)-coated substrates, the xerogel films are very durable and retain their chemical properties over period of several months. These results also highlight importantly that BCP orientation control for nanotechnology is possible not only on specially prepared patterned substrates but also on industrially viable sol-gel substrates.

  18. Are trout populations affected by reach-scale stream slope?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ). Reach-scale stream slope and the energy that it helps to gen- erate exert a dominant influenceAre trout populations affected by reach-scale stream slope? Daniel J. Isaak And Wayne A. Hubert Abstract: Reach-scale stream slope and the structure of associated physical habitats are thought to affect

  19. Correlating toughness and roughness in ductile fracture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ponson, Laurent; Osovski, Shmulik; Bouchaud, Elisabeth; Tvergaard, Viggo; Needleman, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Three dimensional calculations of ductile crack growth under mode I plane strain, small scale yielding conditions are carried out using an elastic-viscoplastic constitutive relation for a progres- sively cavitating plastic solid with two populations of void nucleating second phase particles. Full field solutions are obtained for three dimensional material microstructures characterized by ran- dom distributions of void nucleating particles. Crack growth resistance curves and fracture surface roughness statistics are calculated using standard procedures. The range of void nucleating particle volume fractions considered give rise to values of toughness, JIC, that vary by a factor of four. For all volume fractions considered, the computed fracture surfaces are self-affine over a size range of about two orders of magnitude with a roughness exponent of 0.54 $\\pm$ 0.03. For small void nucleating particle volume fractions, the mean large particle spacing serves as a single dominant length scale. In this regime, the c...

  20. Correlating toughness and roughness in ductile fracture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laurent Ponson; Ankit Srivastava; Shmulik Osovski; Elisabeth Bouchaud; Viggo Tvergaard; Alan Needleman

    2013-07-16

    Three dimensional calculations of ductile crack growth under mode I plane strain, small scale yielding conditions are carried out using an elastic-viscoplastic constitutive relation for a progres- sively cavitating plastic solid with two populations of void nucleating second phase particles. Full field solutions are obtained for three dimensional material microstructures characterized by ran- dom distributions of void nucleating particles. Crack growth resistance curves and fracture surface roughness statistics are calculated using standard procedures. The range of void nucleating particle volume fractions considered give rise to values of toughness, JIC, that vary by a factor of four. For all volume fractions considered, the computed fracture surfaces are self-affine over a size range of about two orders of magnitude with a roughness exponent of 0.54 $\\pm$ 0.03. For small void nucleating particle volume fractions, the mean large particle spacing serves as a single dominant length scale. In this regime, the correlation length of the fracture surface corresponding to the cut-off of the self-affine behavior is found to be linearly related to JIC thus quantitatively correlating toughness and fracture surface roughness.

  1. Distributed Roughness Receptivity in a Flat Plate Boundary Layer 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuester, Matthew Scott

    2014-04-18

    the incoming boundary layer. This dissertation describes an experiment specifically designed to study the shielding effect. Three roughness configurations, a deterministic distributed roughness patch, a slanted rectangle, and the combination of the two, were...

  2. A fast direct numerical simulation method for characterising hydraulic roughness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung, Daniel; MacDonald, Michael; Hutchins, Nicholas; Ooi, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    We describe a fast direct numerical simulation (DNS) method that promises to directly characterise the hydraulic roughness of any given rough surface, from the hydraulically smooth to the fully rough regime. The method circumvents the unfavourable computational cost associated with simulating high-Reynolds-number flows by employing minimal-span channels (Jimenez & Moin 1991). Proof-of-concept simulations demonstrate that flows in minimal-span channels are sufficient for capturing the downward velocity shift, that is, the Hama roughness function, predicted by flows in full-span channels. We consider two sets of simulations, first with modelled roughness imposed by body forces, and second with explicit roughness described by roughness-conforming grids. Owing to the minimal cost, we are able to conduct DNSs with increasing roughness Reynolds numbers while maintaining a fixed blockage ratio, as is typical in full-scale applications. The present method promises a practical, fast and accurate tool for character...

  3. Adhesive rough contacts near complete contact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Ciavarella

    2015-05-01

    Recently, there has been some debate over the effect of adhesion on the contact of rough surfaces. Classical asperity theories predict, in agreement with experimental observations, that adhesion is always destroyed by roughness except if the amplitude of the same is extremely small, and the materials are particularly soft. This happens for all fractal dimensions. However, these theories are limited due to the geometrical simplification, which may be particularly strong in conditions near full contact. We introduce therefore a simple model for adhesion, which aims at being rigorous near full contact, where we postulate there are only small isolated gaps between the two bodies. The gaps can be considered as "pressurized cracks" by using Ken Johnson's idea of searching a corrective solution to the full contact solution. The solution is an extension of the adhesive-less solution proposed recently by Xu, Jackson, and Marghitu (XJM model) (2014). This process seems to confirm recent theories using the JKR theory, namely that the effect of adhesion depends critically on the fractal dimension. For D2.5, seems for large enough magnifications that a full fractal roughness completely destroys adhesion. These results are partly paradoxical since strong adhesion is not observed in nature except in special cases. A possible way out of the paradox may be that the conclusion is relevant for the near full contact regime, where the strong role of flaws at the interfaces, and of gaps full of contaminant, trapped air or liquid in pressure, needs to be further explored. If conditions near full contact are not achieved on loading, probably the conclusions of classical asperity theories may be confirmed.

  4. Wind Regimes in Complex Terrain of the Great Valley of Eastern Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Birdwell, Kevin R [ORNL

    2011-05-01

    This research was designed to provide an understanding of physical wind mechanisms within the complex terrain of the Great Valley of Eastern Tennessee to assess the impacts of regional air flow with regard to synoptic and mesoscale weather changes, wind direction shifts, and air quality. Meteorological data from 2008 2009 were analyzed from 13 meteorological sites along with associated upper level data. Up to 15 ancillary sites were used for reference. Two-step complete linkage and K-means cluster analyses, synoptic weather studies, and ambient meteorological comparisons were performed to generate hourly wind classifications. These wind regimes revealed seasonal variations of underlying physical wind mechanisms (forced channeled, vertically coupled, pressure-driven, and thermally-driven winds). Synoptic and ambient meteorological analysis (mixing depth, pressure gradient, pressure gradient ratio, atmospheric and surface stability) suggested up to 93% accuracy for the clustered results. Probabilistic prediction schemes of wind flow and wind class change were developed through characterization of flow change data and wind class succession. Data analysis revealed that wind flow in the Great Valley was dominated by forced channeled winds (45 67%) and vertically coupled flow (22 38%). Down-valley pressure-driven and thermally-driven winds also played significant roles (0 17% and 2 20%, respectively), usually accompanied by convergent wind patterns (15 20%) and large wind direction shifts, especially in the Central/Upper Great Valley. The behavior of most wind regimes was associated with detectable pressure differences between the Lower and Upper Great Valley. Mixing depth and synoptic pressure gradients were significant contributors to wind pattern behavior. Up to 15 wind classes and 10 sub-classes were identified in the Central Great Valley with 67 joined classes for the Great Valley at-large. Two-thirds of Great Valley at-large flow was defined by 12 classes. Winds flowed on-axis only 40% of the time. The Great Smoky Mountains helped create down-valley pressure-driven winds, downslope mountain breezes, and divergent air flow. The Cumberland Mountains and Plateau were associated with wind speed reductions in the Central Great Valley, Emory Gap Flow, weak thermally-driven winds, and northwesterly down sloping. Ridge-and-valley terrain enhanced wind direction reversals, pressure-driven winds, as well as locally and regionally produced thermally-driven flow.

  5. North Slope action holds West Coast spotlight

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, H.M.

    1981-05-25

    The first oil from a North Slope reservoir outside Prudhoe Bay will begin flowing next year at rate of 80,000 bpd from Kuparuk field now under development by Atlantic Richfield Co. west of Prudhoe Bay. Just north of the Kuparuk development, Conoco Inc. has found a commercial reservoir in the Milne Point unit and will be drilling confirmation and delineation wells later this year and in 1982. Another area which very likely will be developed for production is located northeast of Prudhoe Bay, where Sohio Alaska Petroleum Co. has announced discoveries in 2 Sag Delta wells. In California's San Joaquin Valley, 3 Kern County fields - South Belridge, Elk Hills, and Lost Hills - are the sites of intensive drilling. Seven rigs are working in the Santa Barbara Channel, 3 of them developing known fields from permanent platforms.

  6. Biocorrosive Thermophilic Microbial Communities in Alaskan North Slope Oil Facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duncan, Kathleen E.

    2010-01-01

    in Alaskan North Slope oil production facilities. Title:Profiling Despite oil production from several major16) was isolated from oil-production water and has optimal

  7. Atmospheric studies in complex terrain: a planning guide for future studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orgill, M.M.

    1981-02-01

    The objective of this study is to assist the US Department of Energy in Conducting its atmospheric studies in complex terrain (ASCOT0 by defining various complex terrain research systems and relating these options to specific landforms sites. This includes: (1) reviewing past meteorological and diffusion research on complex terrain; (2) relating specific terrain-induced airflow phenomena to specific landforms and time and space scales; (3) evaluating the technical difficulty of modeling and measuring terrain-induced airflow phenomena; and (4) avolving severdal research options and proposing candidate sites for continuing and expanding field and modeling work. To evolve research options using variable candidate sites, four areas were considered: site selection, terrain uniqueness and quantification, definition of research problems and research plans. 36 references, 111 figures, 20 tables.

  8. Hydrothermal coupling in a rough fracture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neuville, A; Schmittbuhl, J; Neuville, Am\\'{e}lie; Toussaint, Renaud; Schmittbuhl, Jean

    2006-01-01

    Heat exchange during laminar flow is studied at the fracture scale on the basis of the Stokes equation. We used a synthetic aperture model (a self-affine model) that has been shown to be a realistic geometrical description of the fracture morphology. We developed a numerical modelling using a finite difference scheme of the hydrodynamic flow and its coupling with an advection/conduction description of the fluid heat. As a first step, temperature within the surrounding rock is supposed to be constant. Influence of the fracture roughness on the heat flux through the wall, is estimated and a thermalization length is shown to emerge. Implications for the Soultz-sous-For\\^{e}ts geothermal project are discussed.

  9. A hybrid method for quasi-three-dimensional slope stability analysis in a municipal solid waste landfill

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, L.; Batlle, F.

    2011-12-15

    Highlights: > A quasi-three-dimensional slope stability analysis method was proposed. > The proposed method is a good engineering tool for 3D slope stability analysis. > Factor of safety from 3D analysis is higher than from 2D analysis. > 3D analysis results are more sensitive to cohesion than 2D analysis. - Abstract: Limited space for accommodating the ever increasing mounds of municipal solid waste (MSW) demands the capacity of MSW landfill be maximized by building landfills to greater heights with steeper slopes. This situation has raised concerns regarding the stability of high MSW landfills. A hybrid method for quasi-three-dimensional slope stability analysis based on the finite element stress analysis was applied in a case study at a MSW landfill in north-east Spain. Potential slides can be assumed to be located within the waste mass due to the lack of weak foundation soils and geosynthetic membranes at the landfill base. The only triggering factor of deep-seated slope failure is the higher leachate level and the relatively high and steep slope in the front. The valley-shaped geometry and layered construction procedure at the site make three-dimensional slope stability analyses necessary for this landfill. In the finite element stress analysis, variations of leachate level during construction and continuous settlement of the landfill were taken into account. The 'equivalent' three-dimensional factor of safety (FoS) was computed from the individual result of the two-dimensional analysis for a series of evenly spaced cross sections within the potential sliding body. Results indicate that the hybrid method for quasi-three-dimensional slope stability analysis adopted in this paper is capable of locating roughly the spatial position of the potential sliding mass. This easy to manipulate method can serve as an engineering tool in the preliminary estimate of the FoS as well as the approximate position and extent of the potential sliding mass. The result that FoS obtained from three-dimensional analysis increases as much as 50% compared to that from two-dimensional analysis implies the significance of the three-dimensional effect for this study-case. Influences of shear parameters, time elapse after landfill closure, leachate level as well as unit weight of waste on FoS were also investigated in this paper. These sensitivity analyses serve as the guidelines of construction practices and operating procedures for the MSW landfill under study.

  10. On-the-Fly Decompression and Rendering of Multiresolution Terrain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindstrom, P; Cohen, J D

    2009-04-02

    We present a streaming geometry compression codec for multiresolution, uniformly-gridded, triangular terrain patches that supports very fast decompression. Our method is based on linear prediction and residual coding for lossless compression of the full-resolution data. As simplified patches on coarser levels in the hierarchy already incur some data loss, we optionally allow further quantization for more lossy compression. The quantization levels are adaptive on a per-patch basis, while still permitting seamless, adaptive tessellations of the terrain. Our geometry compression on such a hierarchy achieves compression ratios of 3:1 to 12:1. Our scheme is not only suitable for fast decompression on the CPU, but also for parallel decoding on the GPU with peak throughput over 2 billion triangles per second. Each terrain patch is independently decompressed on the fly from a variable-rate bitstream by a GPU geometry program with no branches or conditionals. Thus we can store the geometry compressed on the GPU, reducing storage and bandwidth requirements throughout the system. In our rendering approach, only compressed bitstreams and the decoded height values in the view-dependent 'cut' are explicitly stored on the GPU. Normal vectors are computed in a streaming fashion, and remaining geometry and texture coordinates, as well as mesh connectivity, are shared and re-used for all patches. We demonstrate and evaluate our algorithms on a small prototype system in which all compressed geometry fits in the GPU memory and decompression occurs on the fly every rendering frame without any cache maintenance.

  11. The Effect of Slope in the Casimir Rack Gear

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuliya Voronina; Petr Silaev

    2013-09-17

    The effect of slope for the rack gear in the massless scalar field model is considered. It appears, that the slope of profile surfaces can essentially change the value of normal Casimir force, whereas average value of tangential force remains almost unchanged. At the same time we observe essential shift of maximum and minimum tangential force positions.

  12. SLOPE DISTRIBUTIONS, THRESHOLD HILLSLOPES, AND STEADY-STATE TOPOGRAPHY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montgomery, David R.

    SLOPE DISTRIBUTIONS, THRESHOLD HILLSLOPES, AND STEADY-STATE TOPOGRAPHY DAVID R. MONTGOMERY hillslopes, and steady-state topography. Plots of drainage area versus slope for these mountain ranges or exponential distributions in areas of active rock uplift and depositional topography, respectively. Local

  13. Comparison of TDR and Inclinometers for Slope Monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    monitoring movement in soil and rock slopes and embankments as well as retrofitting deformed inclinometer of an expansive cement grout. When localized shear movements in rock or soil are sufficient to fracture the grout 2 involved installation of coaxial cable in the highwall slope of an oil sands mine. Details

  14. Wetting, Spreading, and Adsorption on Randomly Rough Surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Herminghaus

    2011-11-17

    The wetting properties of solid substrates with customary (i.e., macroscopic) random roughness are considered as a function of the microscopic contact angle of the wetting liquid and its partial pressure in the surrounding gas phase. Analytic expressions are derived which allow for any given lateral correlation function and height distribution of the roughness to calculate the wetting phase diagram, the adsorption isotherms, and to locate the percolation transition in the adsorbed liquid film. Most features turn out to depend only on a few key parameters of the roughness, which can be clearly identified. It is shown that a first order transition in the adsorbed film thickness, which we term 'Wenzel prewetting', occurs generically on typical roughness topographies, but is absent on purely Gaussian roughness. It is thereby shown that even subtle deviations from Gaussian roughness characteristics may be essential for correctly predicting even qualitative aspects of wetting.

  15. Sidewinding on Slopes Ross L. Hatton and Howie Choset

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choset, Howie

    of the sidewinding pattern needed to maintain stability. Our theoretical results are supported by experiments to propel the robot over flat terrain or well-defined obstacles such as pipes, e.g. [1]­[5]. As these basic measurements taken on our snake robots. II. BACKGROUND Our analysis in this paper draws on prior research

  16. Enhanced Tissue Adhesion by Increased Porosity and Surface Roughness...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Enhanced Tissue Adhesion by Increased Porosity and Surface Roughness of Carbon Based Biomaterials Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Enhanced Tissue Adhesion by Increased...

  17. FOREST-AIR FLUXES OF CARBON, WATER AND ENERGY OVER NON-FLAT TERRAIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Xuhui

    FOREST-AIR FLUXES OF CARBON, WATER AND ENERGY OVER NON-FLAT TERRAIN XUHUI LEE and XINZHANG HU-air exchange of carbon, water, and energy was conducted at a mid-latitude, mixed forest on non-flat terrain to address this question, we conducted a field experiment on energy and carbon exchanges in a mixed forest

  18. Title: Digital Terrain Model of Southern Ontario: City of Toronto Data Creator /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Title: Digital Terrain Model of Southern Ontario: City of Toronto Data Creator / Copyright Owner Ontario is a topographic model of the earth's surface. The data files outline features such as: bridge: N/A Keywords (Place): Toronto, Ontario Keywords (Subject): Contours, Digital Terrain Models

  19. Stability of Passive Dynamic Walking on Uneven Terrain Katie Byl and Russ Tedrake

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tedrake, Russ

    and MFPTs on uneven terrain. mh/m a (m) MFPT: std .5° MFPT: std 1.0° walker #1 2.0 .6 20 6 walker #2 0.3 .7 Institute of Technology email: katiebyl@mit.edu, russt@mit.edu, web: http terrain. Although deterministic definitions of stability do not apply, for sufficiently low levels

  20. A Realistic Framework for Delay-Tolerant Network Routing in Open Terrains with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Realistic Framework for Delay-Tolerant Network Routing in Open Terrains with Continuous Churn to classify routing protocols based on the difference in their behavior under churn. Keywords: Delay model churn in the network, by having these nodes enter the terrain as a Poisson process and exit

  1. Optimal Complete Terrain Coverage using an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Anqi Xu, Chatavut Viriyasuthee, and Ioannis Rekleitis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dudek, Gregory

    Optimal Complete Terrain Coverage using an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Anqi Xu, Chatavut Viriyasuthee an aerial vehicle. Ex- tensive experimental results in simulation validate the presented system, along. INTRODUCTION This paper presents a realization of an optimal terrain coverage algorithm for an Unmanned Aerial

  2. Free surface flows with large slopes: beyond lubrication theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snoeijer, J H

    2006-01-01

    The description of free surface flows can often be simplified to thin film (or lubrication) equations, when the slopes of the liquid-gas interface are small. Here we present a long wavelength theory that remains fully quantitative for steep interface slopes, by expanding about Stokes flow in a wedge. For small capillary numbers, the variations of the interface slope are slow and can be treated perturbatively. This geometry occurs naturally for flows with contact lines: we quantify the difference with ordinary lubrication theory through a numerical example and analytically recover the full Cox-Voinov asymptotic solution.

  3. CHARACTERIZATION OF SURFACE ROUGHNESS AND INITIAL CONDITIONS FOR CYLINDRICAL HYDRODYNAMIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barnes, Cris W.

    CHARACTERIZATION OF SURFACE ROUGHNESS AND INITIAL CONDITIONS FOR CYLINDRICAL HYDRODYNAMIC AND MIX across a variable density interface, that interface must be well characterized. There exist a number, characterizing, and affecting the surface roughness was driven by Ablative Rayleigh-Taylor work5

  4. Counterintuitive MCNPX Results for Scintillator Surface Roughness Effect

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-08-12

    We have reported on our recent MCNPX simulation results of energy deposition for a group of 8 scintillation detectors, coupled with various rough surface patterns. The MCNPX results generally favored the detectors with various rough surface patterns. The observed MCNPX results are not fully explained by this work.

  5. Residential model for steep slopes : case study, Ajaltoun, Lebanon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abourached, Toufic

    1984-01-01

    The objective of this thesis is to develop a residential model for steep slopes, in the mountain village of Ajaltoun. It is anticipated that this preliminary design would represent an alternative method for residential ...

  6. A Methodology for Evaluating Liquefaction Susceptibility in Shallow Sandy Slopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buscarnera, Giuseppe

    This paper illustrates a modeling approach for evaluating the liquefaction susceptibility of shallow sandy slopes. The methodology is based on a theoretical framework for capturing undrained bifurcation in saturated granular ...

  7. Linear and nonlinear stratified spindown over sloping topography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benthuysen, Jessica A

    2010-01-01

    In a stratified rotating fluid, frictionally driven circulations couple with the buoyancy field over sloping topography. Analytical and numerical methods are used to quantify the impact of this coupling on the vertical ...

  8. Uranium - thorium series study on Yucatan slope cores 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Exner, Mary Elizabeth

    1972-01-01

    URANIUM ? THORIUM SERIES STUDY ON YUCATAN SLOPE CORES A Thesis by Mary Elizabeth Exner Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August, 1972... Major Subject: Oceanography URANIUM ? THORIUM SERIES STUDY ON YUCATAN SLOPE CORES A Thesis by Mary Elizabeth Exner Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of ommittee) , 1 (Head of Department)' p (Member ) (Member) August, 1972 gg...

  9. Stratigraphic architecture and evolution of the continental slope system in offshore Hainan, northern South China Sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Müller, Dietmar

    Stratigraphic architecture and evolution of the continental slope system in offshore Hainan the evolution of the stratigraphic architecture of two siliciclastic northern South China Sea continental slope structures, and slump deposits. The associated stratigraphic architecture in slope clinoforms is chaotic

  10. Gravitational quantum states of neutrons in a rough waveguide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. E. Meyerovich; V. V. Nesvizhevsky

    2006-03-22

    A theory of gravitational quantum states of ultracold neutrons in waveguides with absorbing/scattering walls is presented. The theory covers recent experiments in which the ultracold neutrons were beamed between a mirror and a rough scatterer/absorber. The analysis is based on a recently developed theory of quantum transport along random rough walls which is modified in order to include leaky (absorbing) interfaces and, more importantly, the low-amplitude high-aperture roughness. The calculations are focused on a regime when the direct transitions into the continuous spectrum above the absorption threshold dominate the depletion of neutrons from the gravitational states and are more efficient than the processes involving the intermediate states. The theoretical results for the neutron count are sensitive to the correlation radius (lateral size) of surface inhomogeneities and to the ratio of the particle energy to the absorption threshold in a weak roughness limit. The main impediment for observation of the higher gravitational states is the "overhang" of the particle wave functions which can be overcome only by use scatterers with strong roughness. In general, the strong roughness with high amplitude is preferable if one wants just to detect the individual gravitational states, while the strong roughness experiments with small amplitude and high aperture are preferable for the quantitative analysis of the data. We also discuss the ways to further improve the accuracy of calculations and to optimize the experimental regime.

  11. Wetting on Random Roughness: the Ubiquity of Wenzel Prewetting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephan Herminghaus

    2012-03-23

    The wetting properties of solid substrates with macroscopic random roughness are considered as a function of the microscopic contact angle of the wetting liquid and its partial pressure in the surrounding gas phase. It is shown that Wenzel prewetting, which has been recently predicted for a rather wide class of roughness pro?les derived from Gaussian random processes by a general distortion procedure, should in fact be ubiquitous and prevail under even much milder conditions. The well-known transition occurring at Wenzel's angle is accompanied by a prewetting transition, at which a jump in the adsorbed liquid volume occurs. This should be present on most surfaces bearing homogeneous, isotropic random roughness.

  12. Assessment of technologies for constructing self-drying low-slope roofs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kyle, D.M.; Desjarlais, A.O.

    1994-05-01

    Issues associated with removing excessive moisture from low-slope roofs have been assessed. The economic costs associated with moisture trapped in existing roofs have been estimated. The evidence suggests that existing moisture levels cause approximately a 40% overall reduction in the R-value of installed roofing insulation in the United States. Excess operating costs are further increased by a summertime heat transfer mode unique to wet insulation, caused by the daily migration of water within the roof. By itself, this effect can increase peak electrical demand for air conditioning by roughly 15 W/m{sup 2} of roofing, depending on the type of insulation. This effect will increase peak demand capacity required of utilities in any geographic region (e.g., 900 MW in the South). A simple formula has been derived for predicting the effect that self-drying roofs can have upon time-averaged construction costs. It is presumed that time-averaged costs depend predominantly upon (1) actual service life and (2) the likelihood that the less expensive recover membranes can be installed safely over old roofs. For example, an increase in service life from 15 to 20 years should reduce the current cost of roofing ($12 billion/year) by 21%. Another simple formula for predicting the reroofing waste volume indicates that an increase in service life from 15 to 20 years might reduce the current estimated 0.4 billion ft{sup 3}/year of waste by 25%. A finite-difference computer program has been used to study the flow of heat and moisture within typical existing roofs for a variety of US climates. Nearly all publicly available experimental drying data have been consulted. The drying times for most existing low-slope roofs in the United States are controlled largely climate and the permeability of the structural deck to water vapor.

  13. Influence of surface roughness and waviness upon thermal contact resistance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yovanovich, M. Michael

    1967-01-01

    This work deals with the phenomenon of thermal resistance between contacting solids. Attention is directed towards contiguous solids possessing both surface roughness and waviness. When two such surfaces are brought together ...

  14. Effect of Surface Roughness on Wind Turbine Performance 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ehrmann, Robert Schaefer

    2014-06-25

    Wind farm operators observe production deficits as machines age. Quantifying deterioration on individual components is difficult, but one potential explanation is accumulation of blade surface roughness. Historically, wind turbine airfoils were...

  15. PROPAGATION OF SINGULARITIES FOR ROUGH METRICS HART F. SMITH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Hart F.

    PROPAGATION OF SINGULARITIES FOR ROUGH METRICS HART F. SMITH Abstract. We use a wave packet the Simons Foundation (# 266371 to Hart Smith). 1 #12;2 HART F. SMITH H¨ormander's theorem [9] on propagation

  16. Hypersonic Measurements of Roughness-Induced Transient Growth 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharp, Nicole Susanne

    2014-04-17

    The effects of surface roughness on boundary-layer disturbance growth and laminar-to-turbulent transition are not well understood, especially in hypersonic boundary layers. The transient growth mechanism that produces algebraic growth of stream wise...

  17. Slope Error Measurement Tool for Solar Parabolic Trough Collectors: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stynes, J. K.; Ihas, B.

    2012-04-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has developed an optical measurement tool for parabolic solar collectors that measures the combined errors due to absorber misalignment and reflector slope error. The combined absorber alignment and reflector slope errors are measured using a digital camera to photograph the reflected image of the absorber in the collector. Previous work using the image of the reflection of the absorber finds the reflector slope errors from the reflection of the absorber and an independent measurement of the absorber location. The accuracy of the reflector slope error measurement is thus dependent on the accuracy of the absorber location measurement. By measuring the combined reflector-absorber errors, the uncertainty in the absorber location measurement is eliminated. The related performance merit, the intercept factor, depends on the combined effects of the absorber alignment and reflector slope errors. Measuring the combined effect provides a simpler measurement and a more accurate input to the intercept factor estimate. The minimal equipment and setup required for this measurement technique make it ideal for field measurements.

  18. Sept 2001 Rough Draft OFFM Policy Letter 02-1.doc | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sept 2001 Rough Draft OFFM Policy Letter 02-1.doc Sept 2001 Rough Draft OFFM Policy Letter 02-1.doc Sept 2001 Rough Draft OFFM Policy Letter 02-1.doc More Documents & Publications...

  19. Modelling of wind turbine wakes in complex terrain using computational fluid dynamics 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Makridis, Alexandros

    2012-06-25

    This thesis focuses on modelling of wind turbine wakes when they are affected by real complex terrain features, such as hills and forests, and also examines the effect of the rotational momentum imparted to the downstream ...

  20. Mapping textures on 3d terrains: a hybrid cellular automata approach 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sinvhal, Swapnil

    2007-04-25

    It is a time consuming task to generate textures for large 3D terrain surfaces in computer games, flight simulations and computer animations. This work explores the use of cellular automata in the automatic generation of ...

  1. Guidance and control using model predictive control for low altitude real-time terrain following flight

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lapp, Tiffany Rae, 1979-

    2004-01-01

    This thesis presents the design and implementation of a model predictive control based trajectory optimization method for Nap-of-the-Earth (NOE) flight. A NOE trajectory reference is generated over a subspace of the terrain. ...

  2. The design of a frame for an all terrain, lever propelled wheelchair

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walton, John Michael

    2011-01-01

    This thesis outlines the process of designing a frame for the Leveraged Freedom Chair (LFC) Prime, an all-terrain levered powered wheelchair designed to improve the mobility of disabled individuals. This design allows for ...

  3. L2-Gain Optimization for Robust Bipedal Walking on Unknown Terrain Hongkai Dai and Russ Tedrake

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tedrake, Russ

    control analysis and design methodologies without additional machinery. We attempt to provide that machinery here. In particular, we quantify the robustness of the system to terrain perturbations by defining

  4. Ph.D. Showcase: Measuring Terrain Distances Through Extracted Channel Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franklin, W. Randolph

    of elevation data. This is a crucial step in better- ing the design and construction of levees and dams. (Fully An important characteristic of a terrain is the drainage, or channel, network, because hydraulic erosion

  5. Instrumentation for slope stability -- Experience from an urban area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flentje, P.; Chowdhury, R.

    1999-07-01

    This paper describes the monitoring of several existing landslides in an urban area near Wollongong in the state of New South Wales, Australia. A brief overview of topography and geology is given and reference is made to the types of slope movement, processes and causal factors. Often the slope movements are extremely slow and imperceptible to the eye, and catastrophic failures are quite infrequent. However, cumulative movements at these slower rates do, over time, cause considerable distress to structures and disrupt residential areas and transport routes. Inclinometers and piezometers have been installed at a number of locations and monitoring of these has been very useful. The performance of instrumentation at different sites is discussed in relation to the monitoring of slope movements and pore pressures. Interval rates of inclinometer shear displacement have been compared with various periods of cumulative rainfall to assess the relationships.

  6. Ultrawideband radar clutter measurements of forested terrain, 1991--1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheen, D.M.; Severtsen, R.H.; Prince, J.M.; Davis, K.C.; Collins, H.D.

    1993-06-01

    The ultrawideband (UWB) radar clutter measurements project was conducted to provide radar clutter data for new ultrawideband radar systems which are currently under development. A particular goal of this project is to determine if conventional narrow band clutter data may be extrapolated to the UWB case. This report documents measurements conducted in 1991 and additional measurements conducted in 1992. The original project consisted of clutter measurements of forested terrain in the Olympic National Forest near Sequim, WA. The impulse radar system used a 30 kW peak impulse source with a 2 Gigasample/second digitizer to form a UHF (300--1000 MHz) ultrawideband impulse radar system. Additional measurements were conducted in parallel using a Systems Planning Corporation (SPC) step-chirp radar system. This system utilized pulse widths of 1330 nanoseconds over a bandwidth of 300--1000 MHz to obtain similar resolution to the impulse system. Due to the slow digitizer data throughput in the impulse radar system, data collection rates were significantly higher using the step-chirp system. Additional forest clutter measurements were undertaken in 1992 to increase the amount of data available, and especially to increase the amount of data from the impulse radar system.

  7. Settlement Prediction, Gas Modeling and Slope Stability Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Politècnica de Catalunya, Universitat

    Settlement Prediction, Gas Modeling and Slope Stability Analysis in Coll Cardús Landfill Li Yu UNIVERSIDAD POLITÉCNICA DE CATALUÑA April, 2007 GEOMODELS #12;Introduction to Coll Cardús landfill Prediction of settlement in Coll Cardús landfill 1) Settlement prediction by empirical method 2) Settlement prediction

  8. Stress distribution and development within geosynthetic-reinforced soil slopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    September 2011, accepted 2 December 2011 ABSTRACT: Numerical methods combined with centrifuge tests are used is evaluated using finite element analysis. Advanced models and an integration algorithm are implemented by centrifuge tests of two GRS slopes with different backfill densities. Numerical results indicate that soil

  9. Juvenile Salmon Passage in Sloped-Baffled Culverts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thurman, David R.; Horner-Devine, Alex R.; Morrison, Ryan R.; Hotchkiss, Rollin H

    2007-01-01

    m (15’) apart at 42 l/s (1.5 cfs). Under this combination ofBaseline flow at 42 l/s (1.5 cfs), 1.14% culvert slope, 4.57increased to 85 l/s (3.0 cfs) for the same parameters the

  10. Application of Rough Set Theory to Analysis of Hydrocyclone Operation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Owladeghaffari, H; Irannajad, M

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes application of rough set theory, on the analysis of hydrocyclone operation. In this manner, using Self Organizing Map (SOM) as preprocessing step, best crisp granules of data are obtained. Then, using a combining of SOM and rough set theory (RST)-called SORST-, the dominant rules on the information table, obtained from laboratory tests, are extracted. Based on these rules, an approximate estimation on decision attribute is fulfilled. Finally, a brief comparison of this method with the SOM-NFIS system (briefly SONFIS) is highlighted.

  11. E ective boundary conditions for laminar ows over periodic rough boundaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Achdou, Yves

    E#27;ective boundary conditions for laminar #29;ows over periodic rough boundaries Yves Achdou #3 are proposed for a laminar #29;ow over a rough wall with periodic roughness elements. These e#27;ective is such an approach ? In this paper, we wish to answer these questions for laminar #29;ows over periodic rough walls

  12. ORIGINAL PAPER Transient Heat Conduction Between Rough Sliding Surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Awtar, Shorya

    , and the results are combined with the height distributions to determine the mean heat flux and the mean normal increases with the square root of the sliding speed and decreases with the 3/4 power of the combined RMSORIGINAL PAPER Transient Heat Conduction Between Rough Sliding Surfaces Yuwei Liu · J. R. Barber

  13. Analysis of the Scattering by an Unbounded Rough Surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-11-12

    eling acoustic and electromagnetic wave propagation over outdoor ground and sea surfaces, optical scattering from the ... been intensively examined by researchers in the engineering community. ..... explicit characterization of the norm in H1(?) via Fourier coefficient: ...... rough surfaces, Wave Motion, 24 (1996)

  14. HIGH FIELD Q-SLOPE AND THE BAKING EFFECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ciovati, Gianluigi [JLAB

    2009-11-01

    The performance of SRF cavities made of bulk Nb at high fields (peak surface magnetic field greater than about 90 mT) is characterized by exponentially increasing RF losses (high-field Q-slope), in the absence of field emission, which are often mitigated by a low temperature (100-140 °C, 12-48h) baking. In this contribution, recent experimental results and phenomenological models to explain this effect will be briefly reviewed. New experimental results on the high-field Q-slope will be presented for cavities that had been heat treated at high temperature in the presence of a small partial pressure of nitrogen. Improvement of the cavity performances have been obtained, while surface analysis measurements on Nb samples treated with the cavities revealed significantly lower hydrogen concentration than for samples that followed standard cavity treatments.

  15. Relaxing competition through speculation: Committing to a negative supply slope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holmberg, Pär; Willems, Bert

    2012-12-10

    . The main differences between our paper and the delegation literature is that we use financial contracts instead of delegation as the commitment device, 6 Downward sloping supply bids were allowed in the Nordic power exchange (Nord Pool) until it introduced... a new clearing algorithm on October 10, 2007 that could no longer handle them. Total supply of a firm consists of its supply in the power exchange plus its supply delivered directly to consumers with bilateral contracts. So if bilaterally contracted...

  16. North Slope Decision Support for Water Resource Planning and Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schnabel, William; Brumbelow, Kelly

    2013-03-31

    The objective of this project was to enhance the water resource decision-making process with respect to oil and gas exploration/production activities on Alaska’s North Slope. To this end, a web-based software tool was developed to allow stakeholders to assemble, evaluate, and communicate relevant information between and amongst themselves. The software, termed North Slope Decision Support System (NSDSS), is a visually-referenced database that provides a platform for running complex natural system, planning, and optimization models. The NSDSS design was based upon community input garnered during a series of stakeholder workshops, and the end product software is freely available to all stakeholders via the project website. The tool now resides on servers hosted by the UAF Water and Environmental Research Center, and will remain accessible and free-of-charge for all interested stakeholders. The development of the tool fostered new advances in the area of data evaluation and decision support technologies, and the finished product is envisioned to enhance water resource planning activities on Alaska’s North Slope.

  17. DEVELOPMENT OF SHALLOW VISCOUS OIL RESERVES IN NORTH SLOPE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kishore K. Mohanty

    2003-07-01

    North Slope of Alaska has huge oil deposits in heavy oil reservoirs such as Ugnu, West Sak and Shrader Bluff etc. The viscosity of the last two reservoir oils vary from {approx}30 cp to {approx}3000 cp and the amount in the range of 10-20 billion barrels. High oil viscosity and low formation strength impose problems to high recovery and well productivity. Water-alternate-gas injection processes can be effective for the lower viscosity end of these deposits in West Sak and Shrader Bluff. Several gas streams are available in the North Slope containing NGL and CO{sub 2} (a greenhouse gas). The goal of this research is to develop tools to find optimum solvent, injection schedule and well-architecture for a WAG process in North Slope shallow sand viscous oil reservoirs. In the last quarter, we have developed streamline generation and convection subroutines for miscible gas injection. The WAG injection algorithms are being developed. We formulated a four-phase relative permeability model based on two-phase relative permeabilities. The new relative permeability formulations are being incorporated into the simulator. Wettabilities and relative permeabilities are being measured. Plans for the next quarter includes modeling of WAG injection in streamline based simulation, relative permeability studies with cores, incorporation of complex well-architecture.

  18. Comparison of slope stability in two Brazilian municipal landfills

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gharabaghi, B. Singh, M.K.; Inkratas, C. Fleming, I.R. McBean, E.

    2008-07-01

    The implementation of landfill gas to energy (LFGTE) projects has greatly assisted in reducing the greenhouse gases and air pollutants, leading to an improved local air quality and reduced health risks. The majority of cities in developing countries still dispose of their municipal waste in uncontrolled 'open dumps.' Municipal solid waste landfill construction practices and operating procedures in these countries pose a challenge to implementation of LFGTE projects because of concern about damage to the gas collection infrastructure (horizontal headers and vertical wells) caused by minor, relatively shallow slumps and slides within the waste mass. While major slope failures can and have occurred, such failures in most cases have been shown to involve contributory factors or triggers such as high pore pressures, weak foundation soil or failure along weak geosynthetic interfaces. Many researchers who have studied waste mechanics propose that the shear strength of municipal waste is sufficient such that major deep-seated catastrophic failures under most circumstances require such contributory factors. Obviously, evaluation of such potential major failures requires expert analysis by geotechnical specialists with detailed site-specific information regarding foundation soils, interface shearing resistances and pore pressures both within the waste and in clayey barrier layers or foundation soils. The objective of this paper is to evaluate the potential use of very simple stability analyses which can be used to study the potential for slumps and slides within the waste mass and which may represent a significant constraint on construction and development of the landfill, on reclamation and closure and on the feasibility of a LFGTE project. The stability analyses rely on site-specific but simple estimates of the unit weight of waste and the pore pressure conditions and use 'generic' published shear strength envelopes for municipal waste. Application of the slope stability analysis method is presented in a case study of two Brazilian landfill sites; the Cruz das Almas Landfill in Maceio and the Muribeca Landfill in Recife. The Muribeca site has never recorded a slope failure and is much larger and better-maintained when compared to the Maceio site at which numerous minor slumps and slides have been observed. Conventional limit-equilibrium analysis was used to calculate factors of safety for stability of the landfill side slopes. Results indicate that the Muribeca site is more stable with computed factors of safety values in the range 1.6-2.4 compared with computed values ranging from 0.9 to 1.4 for the Maceio site at which slope failures have been known to occur. The results suggest that this approach may be useful as a screening-level tool when considering the feasibility of implementing LFGTE projects.

  19. 358 Natural Areas Journal Volume 24 (4), 2004 Slope Correction of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abella, Scott R.

    are corrected for slope gradient, ecological field studies will underestimate basal area and density per unit-Dombois and Ellenberg 1974), or more commonly was not mentioned at all (e.g., Bonham 1989, Kent and Coker 1992). Slope

  20. Los Alamos Lab to perform slope-side cleanup near Smith's Marketplace

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Los Alamos Lab to perform slope-side cleanup near Smith's Marketplace Los Alamos National Laboratory to perform slope-side cleanup near Smith's Marketplace The Lab is performing a...

  1. Immersed Boundary Methods for High-Resolution Simulation of Atmospheric Boundary-Layer Flow Over Complex Terrain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chow, Fotini Katopodes

    models, such as the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, are in- creasingly used for high facilitates explicit resolution of complex terrain, even urban terrain, in the WRF mesoscale model. First gradient boundary conditions. Specified diurnal heating in a valley, producing anabatic winds, is used

  2. Combinatorial Block Copolymer Ordering on Tunable Rough Substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kulkarni, Manish M.; Yager, Kevin G.; Sharma, Ashutosh; Karim, Alamgir (IIT-India); (Akron); (BNL)

    2012-10-25

    Morphology control of block copolymer (BCP) thin films through substrate interaction via controlled roughness parameters is of significant interest for numerous high-tech applications ranging from solar cells to high-density storage media. While effects of substrate surface energy (SE) and roughness (R) on BCP morphology have been individually investigated, their synergistic effects have not been explored in any systematic manner. Interestingly, orientation response of BCP to changes in SE can be similar to what can be accomplished with variations in R. Here we present a novel approach for orienting lamellar BCP films of poly(styrene)-block-poly(methyl methacrylate) (PS-PMMA) on spin-coated xerogel (a dried gel of silica nanoparticle network) substrate with simultaneously tunable surface energy, {gamma}{sub s} {approx} 29-53 mJ/m{sup 2}, by UVO exposure and roughness, R{sub rms} {approx} 0.5-30 nm, by sol-gel processing steps of regulating the catalyst concentration and sol aging time. As in previous BCP orientation studies on 20 nm diameter monodisperse silica nanoparticle coated surface, we find a similar but broadened oscillatory BCP orientation behavior with film thickness due to the random rather than periodic rough surfaces. We also find that higher random roughness amplitude is not the necessary criteria for obtaining a vertical orientation of BCP lamellae. Rather, a high surface fractal dimension (D{sub f} > 2.4) of the rough substrate in conjunction with an optimal substrate surface energy {gamma}{sub s} {approx} 29 mJ/m{sup 2} results in 100% vertically oriented lamellar microdomains. The AFM measured film surface microstructure correlates well with the internal 3D BCP film structure probed by grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS) and rotational small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). In contrast to tunable self-assembled monolayer (SAM)-coated substrates, the xerogel films are very durable and retain their chemical properties over period of several months. These results also highlight importantly that BCP orientation control for nanotechnology is possible not only on specially prepared patterned substrates but also on industrially viable sol-gel substrates.

  3. 3D Analysis of Steep Slopes Subjected to Seismic Excitation S.S. Nadukuru1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michalowski, Radoslaw L.

    for the assessment of the factor of safety for slopes with predefined width of the failure mechanism is shown3D Analysis of Steep Slopes Subjected to Seismic Excitation S.S. Nadukuru1 , T. Martel1 , Student for the seismic excitation. A three-dimensional analysis of slopes is used here, based on the kinematic theorem

  4. DRAFT TECHNICAL GUIDANCE DOCUMENT ON STATIC AND SEISMIC SLOPE STABILITY FOR SOLID WASTE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    stability of landfill slopes. Locating the critical cross- section is usually accomplished by analyzing two of landfill slopes. The two-dimensional cross-sections are usually analyzed using a limit equilibrium slope- and post-closure conditions (e.g., seismic events, settlement, and expansion). o Settlement caused

  5. Namur, Belgium -weathering deteriorating slope stability future -Robert Hack 1 WEATHERING DETERIORATING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hack, Robert

    Namur, Belgium - weathering deteriorating slope stability future - Robert Hack 1 WEATHERING DETERIORATING AND SLOPE STABILITY CLASSIFICATION FOR THE FUTURE Namur, Belgium, 12 June 2008 Robert Hack Geo #12;Namur, Belgium - weathering deteriorating slope stability future - Robert Hack 2 Jan van Goyen

  6. Heat transfer between elastic solids with randomly rough surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. N. J. Persson; B. Lorenz; A. I. Volokitin

    2009-08-27

    We study the heat transfer between elastic solids with randomly rough surfaces. We include both the heat transfer from the area of real contact, and the heat transfer between the surfaces in the noncontact regions. We apply a recently developed contact mechanics theory, which accounts for the hierarchical nature of the contact between solids with roughness on many different length scales. For elastic contact, at the highest (atomic) resolution the area of real contact typically consists of atomic (nanometer) sized regions, and we discuss the implications of this for the heat transfer. For solids with very smooth surfaces, as is typical in many modern engineering applications, the interfacial separation in the non-contact regions will be very small, and for this case we show the importance of the radiative heat transfer associated with the evanescent electromagnetic waves which exist outside of all bodies.

  7. Capillary adhesion between elastic solids with randomly rough surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. N. J. Persson

    2008-05-06

    I study how the contact area and the work of adhesion, between two elastic solids with randomly rough surfaces, depend on the relative humidity. The surfaces are assumed to be hydrophilic, and capillary bridges form at the interface between the solids. For elastically hard solids with relative smooth surfaces, the area of real contact and therefore also the sliding friction, are maximal when there is just enough liquid to fill out the interfacial space between the solids, which typically occurs for $d_{\\rm K} \\approx 3 h_{\\rm rms}$, where $d_{\\rm K}$ is the height of the capillary bridge and $h_{\\rm rms}$ the root-mean-square roughness of the (combined) surface roughness profile. For elastically soft solids, the area of real contact is maximal for very low humidity (i.e., small $d_{\\rm K}$), where the capillary bridges are able to pull the solids into nearly complete contact. In both case, the work of adhesion is maximal (and equal to $2\\gamma {\\rm cos}\\theta$, where $\\gamma$ is the liquid surface tension and $\\theta$ the liquid-solid contact angle) when $d_{\\rm K} >> h_{\\rm rms}$, corresponding to high relative humidity.

  8. The Inverting Effect of Curvature in Winter Terrain Park Jump Takeoffs J. A. McNeil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a significantly greater head/neck injury risk to resort patrons than normal skiing activities [1­4]. One intentionally, curvature in the takeoff can lead to involuntary inversion. In this work we lay out the basic a potential injury risk. A mitigating takeoff design criterion adopted by the US Terrain Park Council based

  9. Modelling the "Pop" in Winter Terrain Park Jumps J. A. McNeil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    at ski resorts have found that jumping generally poses a signif- icantly greater risk of spine and head found that jumping generally (whether in a terrain park or not) poses a significantly greater risk of the feature." The authors have since identified experimental errors in this work and an erratum has been

  10. SVMs for Vibration-based Terrain Classification Christian Weiss, Matthias Stark, and Andreas Zell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zell, Andreas

    SVMs for Vibration-based Terrain Classification Christian Weiss, Matthias Stark, and Andreas Zell mobile robot traverses different types of ground surfaces, different types of vibrations are induced in the body of the robot. These vibrations can be used to learn a discrimination between different surfaces

  11. Using Immersive 3D Terrain Models For Fusion Of UAV Surveillance Imagery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scerri, Paul

    Using Immersive 3D Terrain Models For Fusion Of UAV Surveillance Imagery Sean Owens , Katia Sycara and Paul Scerri Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA, 15213, USA Teams of small and micro UAVs a single operator to utilize data from several UAVs and interact with the data in a more natural and less

  12. Horizontal structures in granulite terrains: A record of mountain building or mountain collapse?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandiford, Mike

    Horizontal structures in granulite terrains: A record of mountain building or mountain collapse horizontal structures occurred during the metamorphic culmination and was followed by isobaric cooling that no significant erosional denudation fol- lowed the development of the horizontal structures and thus precludes

  13. Approximating the Visible Region of a Point on a Terrain Boaz Ben-Moshe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ben-Moshe, Boaz

    enough; that is, whenever the difference between the sets of visible segments along the cross sections computes the (projections of the) visible por- tions of the cross section of T in this direc§ Abstract Given a terrain T and a point p on or above it, we wish to compute the region Rp that is visible

  14. Saving the soil: AgriLife units work to improve training terrain 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orth, Melanie

    2011-01-01

    Saving the soil AgriLife units work to improve training terrain Story by Melanie Orth txH2O | pg. 9 Heavy tanks and armored vehicles that have continually rolled over the 67,000-acre West Range at Fort Hood for the past 60 years have...

  15. An Experimental Investigation on the Wake Interference of Wind Turbines Sited Over Complex Terrains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Hui

    1 An Experimental Investigation on the Wake Interference of Wind Turbines Sited Over Complex, 50011 An experimental study was conducted to investigate the interferences of wind turbines sited over conducted in a large wind tunnel with of wind turbine models sited over a flat terrain (baseline case

  16. CO2 transport over complex terrain Jielun Sun a,*, Sean P. Burns a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephens, Britton B.

    CO2 transport over complex terrain Jielun Sun a,*, Sean P. Burns a , Anthony C. Delany a , Steven P; accepted 15 February 2007 Abstract CO2 transport processes relevant for estimating net ecosystem exchange investigated during a pilot experiment. We found that cold, moist, and CO2- rich air was transported downslope

  17. Autonomous Vision-based Landing and Terrain Mapping Using an MPC-controlled Unmanned Rotorcraft

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sastry, S. Shankar

    determines the best trajectory to cover large areas of terrain or to perform closer inspection of potential by tracking the refer- ence trajectory as computed by a real-time MPC-based op- timization. This trajectory. of Aerospace Engineering, Ko- rea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon, South Korea: hcshim

  18. H.R.G.K. Hack. Slopes in rock. An overview of engineering geology in the Netherlands. pp. 111-119 SLOPES IN ROCK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hack, Robert

    H.R.G.K. Hack. Slopes in rock. An overview of engineering geology in the Netherlands. pp. 111-119 SLOPES IN ROCK H.R.G.K. Hack ITC (Int.Inst. for Aerospace Survey and Earth Sciences), Section Engineering 'the rock is hard' (normally meaning: do not bother with further study because 111 #12;H.R.G.K. Hack

  19. Effects of hydraulic roughness on surface textures of gravel-bed rivers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montgomery, David R.

    Effects of hydraulic roughness on surface textures of gravel-bed rivers John M. Buffington1 that bed-surface grain size is responsive to hydraulic roughness caused by bank irregularities, bars condition of low hydraulic roughness. For a given 0bf , channels with progressively greater hydraulic

  20. Independent External Peer Review Report Rough River Dam 18 August 2011 ii

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    #12;Independent External Peer Review Report ­ Rough River Dam 18 August 2011 ii This page intentionally blank. #12;Independent External Peer Review Report ­ Rough River Dam 18 August 2011 iii Table Panel Members B-1 Appendix C ­ Charge for IEPR Panel C-1 List of Figures Figure 1. Rough River Dam 4

  1. Scaling laws governing the roughness of the swash edge line

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ed. Bormashenko; A. Musin; R. Grynuov

    2014-02-23

    The physics of swash i.e. a layer of water that washes up on the beach after an incoming wave has broken is complicated and intriguing. It includes perplexed hydrodynamic and sediment transport events. In our paper we address to the roughness of the moving swash boundary at which a beach, water and air meet. We treat the behavior of this boundary as an interfacial phenomenon, without going into details of formation of edge waves and beach cusps, covered broadly in literature. This "crude" approach turns out to be productive and revealing the resemblance of the swash line with a broad diversity of effects arising from the random pinning of moving boundaries.

  2. Scaling laws governing the roughness of the swash edge line

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bormashenko, Ed; Grynuov, R

    2014-01-01

    The physics of swash i.e. a layer of water that washes up on the beach after an incoming wave has broken is complicated and intriguing. It includes perplexed hydrodynamic and sediment transport events. In our paper we address to the roughness of the moving swash boundary at which a beach, water and air meet. We treat the behavior of this boundary as an interfacial phenomenon, without going into details of formation of edge waves and beach cusps, covered broadly in literature. This "crude" approach turns out to be productive and revealing the resemblance of the swash line with a broad diversity of effects arising from the random pinning of moving boundaries.

  3. File:Wind rough example.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePowerEdistoWhiskey flats 100k.pdf Jump to: navigation, searchWind rough

  4. Biocorrosive Thermophilic Microbial Communities in Alaskan North Slope Oil Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duncan, Kathleen E.; Gieg, Lisa M.; Parisi, Victoria A.; Tanner, Ralph S.; Green Tringe, Susannah; Bristow, Jim; Suflita, Joseph M.

    2009-09-16

    Corrosion of metallic oilfield pipelines by microorganisms is a costly but poorly understood phenomenon, with standard treatment methods targeting mesophilic sulfatereducing bacteria. In assessing biocorrosion potential at an Alaskan North Slope oil field, we identified thermophilic hydrogen-using methanogens, syntrophic bacteria, peptideand amino acid-fermenting bacteria, iron reducers, sulfur/thiosulfate-reducing bacteria and sulfate-reducing archaea. These microbes can stimulate metal corrosion through production of organic acids, CO2, sulfur species, and via hydrogen oxidation and iron reduction, implicating many more types of organisms than are currently targeted. Micromolar quantities of putative anaerobic metabolites of C1-C4 n-alkanes in pipeline fluids were detected, implying that these low molecular weight hydrocarbons, routinely injected into reservoirs for oil recovery purposes, are biodegraded and provide biocorrosive microbial communities with an important source of nutrients.

  5. Natural gas hydrates on the North Slope of Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collett, T.S.

    1991-01-01

    Gas hydrates are crystalline substances composed of water and gas, mainly methane, in which a solid-water lattice accommodates gas molecules in a cage-like structure, or clathrate. These substances often have been regarded as a potential (unconventional) source of natural gas. Significant quantities of naturally occurring gas hydrates have been detected in many regions of the Arctic including Siberia, the Mackenzie River Delta, and the North Slope of Alaska. On the North Slope, the methane-hydrate stability zone is areally extensive beneath most of the coastal plain province and has thicknesses as great as 1000 meters in the Prudhoe Bay area. Gas hydrates have been identified in 50 exploratory and production wells using well-log responses calibrated to the response of an interval in one well where gas hydrates were recovered in a core by ARCO Alaska and EXXON. Most of these gas hydrates occur in six laterally continuous Upper Cretaceous and lower Tertiary sandstone and conglomerate units; all these gas hydrates are geographically restricted to the area overlying the eastern part of the Kuparuk River Oil Field and the western part of the Prudhoe Bay Oil Field. The volume of gas within these gas hydrates is estimated to be about 1.0 {times} 10{sup 12} to 1.2 {times} 10{sup 12} cubic meters (37 to 44 trillion cubic feet), or about twice the volume of conventional gas in the Prudhoe Bay Field. Geochemical analyses of well samples suggest that the identified hydrates probably contain a mixture of deep-source thermogenic gas and shallow microbial gas that was either directly converted to gas hydrate or first concentrated in existing traps and later converted to gas hydrate. The thermogenic gas probably migrated from deeper reservoirs along the same faults thought to be migration pathways for the large volumes of shallow, heavy oil that occur in this area. 51 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Semiclassical Theory of Integrable and Rough Andreev Billiards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. Ihra; M. Leadbeater; J. L. Vega; K. Richter

    1999-09-08

    We study the effect on the density of states in mesoscopic ballistic billiards to which a superconducting lead is attached. The expression for the density of states is derived in the semiclassical S-matrix formalism shedding insight into the origin of the differences between the semiclassical theory and the corresponding result derived from random matrix models. Applications to a square billiard geometry and billiards with boundary roughness are discussed. The saturation of the quasiparticle excitation spectrum is related to the classical dynamics of the billiard. The influence of weak magnetic fields on the proximity effect in rough Andreev billiards is discussed and an analytical formula is derived. The semiclassical theory provides an interpretation for the suppression of the proximity effect in the presence of magnetic fields as a coherence effect of time reversed trajectories, similar to the weak localisation correction of the magneto-resistance in chaotic mesoscopic systems. The semiclassical theory is shown to be in good agreement with quantum mechanical calculations.

  7. Evaluation of Single-Doppler Radar Wind Retrievals in Flat and Complex Terrain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newsom, Rob K.; Berg, Larry K.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Fast, Jerome D.; Xu, Qin; Zhang, Pengfei; Yang, Qing; Shaw, William J.; Flaherty, Julia E.

    2014-08-01

    The accuracy of winds derived from NEXRAD level II data is assessed by comparison with independent observations from 915 MHz radar wind profilers. The evaluation is carried out at two locations with very different terrain characteristics. One site is located in an area of complex terrain within the State Line Wind Energy Center in northeast Oregon. The other site is located in an area of flat terrain on the east-central Florida coast. The National Severe Storm Laboratory’s 2DVar algorithm is used to retrieve wind fields from the KPDT (Pendleton OR) and KMLB (Melbourne FL) NEXRAD radars. Comparisons between the 2DVar retrievals and the radar profilers were conducted over a period of about 6 months and at multiple height levels at each of the profiler sites. Wind speed correlations at most observation height levels fell in the range from 0.7 to 0.8, indicating that the retrieved winds followed temporal fluctuations in the profiler-observed winds reasonably well. The retrieved winds, however, consistently exhibited slow biases in the range of1 to 2 ms-1. Wind speed difference distributions were broad with standard deviations in the range from 3 to 4 ms-1. Results from the Florida site showed little change in the wind speed correlations and difference standard deviations with altitude between about 300 and 1400 m AGL. Over this same height range, results from the Oregon site showed a monotonic increase in the wind speed correlation and a monotonic decrease in the wind speed difference standard deviation with increasing altitude. The poorest overall agreement occurred at the lowest observable level (~300 m AGL) at the Oregon site, where the effects of the complex terrain were greatest.

  8. Local contact stress measurements at a rough interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Scheibert; A. Prevost; J. Frelat; P. Rey; G. Debrégeas

    2007-11-07

    An original MEMS-based force sensing device is designed which allows to measure spatially resolved normal and tangential stress fields at the base of an elastomeric film. This device is used for the study of the contact stress between a rough film and a smooth glass sphere under normal load. The measured profiles are compared to Finite Elements Method calculations for a smooth contact with boundary conditions obeying Amontons-Coulomb's friction law. The accuracy of the measurements allows to discriminate between dry and lubricated contact conditions and to evidence load-dependent deviations from Amontons-Coulomb's profiles. These deviations are qualitatively interpreted by taking into account the finite compliance of the micro-contact population.

  9. A rough analytic relation on partial differential equations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kato, Tsuyoshi

    2010-01-01

    We introduce some analytic relations on the set of partial differential equations of two variables. It relies on a new comparison method to give rough asymptotic estimates for solutions which obey different partial differential equations. It uses a kind of scale transform called tropical geometry which connects automata with real rational dynamics. Two different solutions can be considered when their defining equations are transformed to the same automata at infinity. We have a systematic way to construct related pairs of different partial differential equations, and also construct some unrelated pairs concretely. These verify that the new relations are non trivial. We also make numerical calculations and compare the results for both related and unrelated pairs of PDEs.

  10. Constraining slope parameter of symmetry energy from nuclear structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Inakura, T

    2015-01-01

    Four quantities deducible from nuclear structure experiments have been claimed to correlate to the slope parameter $L$ of the symmetry energy; the neutron skin thickness, the cross section of low-energy dipole (LED) mode, dipole polarizability $\\alpha_D$, and $\\alpha_D S_0$ (i.e. product of $\\alpha_D$ and the symmetry energy $S_0$). By the calculations in the Hartree-Fock plus random-phase approximation with various effective interactions, we compare the correlations between $L$ and these four quantities. The correlation derived from different interactions and the correlation from a class of interactions that are identical in the symmetric matter as well as in $S_0$ are simultaneously examined. These two types of correlations may behave differently, as exemplified in the correlation of $\\alpha_D$ to $L$. It is found that the neutron skin thickness and $\\alpha_DS_0$ correlate well to $L$, and therefore are suitable for narrowing down the value of $L$ via experiments. The LED emergence and upgrowth makes the $\\...

  11. Thermodynamics of sustaining gases in the roughness of submerged superhydrophobic surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neelesh A. Patankar

    2015-05-22

    Rough surfaces submerged in a liquid can remain almost dry if the liquid does not fully wet the roughness and gases are sustained in roughness grooves. Such partially dry surfaces can help reduce drag or enhance boiling. Gases sustained in roughness grooves would be composed of air and the vapor phase of the liquid itself. The thermodynamics of sustaining vapor was considered in a prior work [Patankar, Soft Matter, 2010, 6:1613]. Here, the thermodynamics of sustaining gases (e.g. air) is considered. Governing equations are presented along with a solution methodology to determine a critical condition to sustain gases. The critical roughness scale to sustain gases is estimated for different degrees of saturation of gases dissolved in the liquid. It is shown that roughness spacings of less than a micron are essential to sustain gases on surfaces submerged in water at atmospheric pressure. This is consistent with prior empirical data.

  12. Quantifying subaqueous slope stability during seismic shaking: Lake Lucerne as model for ocean margins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilli, Adrian

    Quantifying subaqueous slope stability during seismic shaking: Lake Lucerne as model for ocean failure initiation, and (iii) the quantitative assessment of subaqueous slope stability. Three detailed stable under static loading conditions (factor of safety of 1.5­2) failed along planar sliding surfaces

  13. Stability Charts for Uniform Slopes Radoslaw L. Michalowski, F.ASCE1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michalowski, Radoslaw L.

    that leads to a strict lower bound on stability number c/ H or an upper bound on the safety factor. Charts are presented for slopes subjected to pore water pressure and also for those exposed to seismic analysis; Limit states; Failures; Graphic methods. Introduction Stability assessments of earth slopes

  14. Evaluation of a CCD-based high resolution autocollimator for use as a slope sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baltisberger, Jay H.

    Evaluation of a CCD-based high resolution autocollimator for use as a slope sensor Rohan Isaac the focused beam profile to broaden and decrease its peak intensity Project: Evaluation of a compact CCD-based high resolution autocollimator with a small probe beam for potential use as a slope sensor Optics Group

  15. Estimation of wave run-up on smooth, impermeable slopes using the wave momentum flux parameter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Estimation of wave run-up on smooth, impermeable slopes using the wave momentum flux parameter-examines existing wave run-up data for regular, irregular and solitary waves on smooth, impermeable plane slopes. A simple physical argument is used to derive a new wave run-up equation in terms of a dimensionless wave

  16. FURTHER STUDIES ON FISHWAY SLOPE AND ITS EFFECT ON RATE OF . PASSAGE OF SALMONIDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that fishways with steeper slopes . pass fish equally as well as the presently accepted standard designs. Years slope shows equal fish- passing ability, fishway construction costs can be reduced. Scientists fishway. The water is supplied by two SOUl"ces a,nd con- trolled by a system of pipes and valves. Most of

  17. Numerical simulations of dense clouds on steep slopes: Application to powder-snow avalanches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saramito, Pierre

    Numerical simulations of dense clouds on steep slopes: Application to powder-snow avalanches results. The interest of the results for powder- snow avalanches is discussed, concluding that two. Introduction A powder-snow avalanche is a dense cloud of suspended snow particles moving down a steep slope

  18. Fast and accurate estimation of solar irradiance on Martian slopes Aymeric Spiga1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spiga, Aymeric

    Fast and accurate estimation of solar irradiance on Martian slopes Aymeric Spiga1 and Franc parameterization is proposed in this study to calculate, in a Mars-like dusty atmosphere, the solar irradiance better than 5 W.mÀ2 . Such a fast and accurate method to calculate solar irradiance on Martian slopes

  19. Response of the bottom boundary layer over a sloping shelf to variations in alongshore wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to a great extent by flows in the surface and bottom boundary layers (BBL). Wind forcing generates crossResponse of the bottom boundary layer over a sloping shelf to variations in alongshore wind A boundary layer over a sloping shelf to variations in alongshore wind, J. Geophys. Res., 110, C10S09, doi:10

  20. Signatures of slope failures and river-delta collapses in a perialpine lake (Lake Lucerne, Switzerland)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilli, Adrian

    Signatures of slope failures and river-delta collapses in a perialpine lake (Lake Lucerne) which caused extensive slope failures in many parts of the lake. The second event in AD 1687 signatures of the two subaqueous mass movements that probably generated the observed tsunamis. Such mass

  1. On the seismic response of deep-seated rock slope instabilities --Insights from numerical modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    On the seismic response of deep-seated rock slope instabilities -- Insights from numerical modeling 2015 Accepted 3 April 2015 Available online 15 April 2015 Keywords: Seismic landslide hazard Spectral component of seismic hazard in mountainous regions. While many seismic slope stability analysis methods

  2. Development of Alaska North Slope natural gas resources: A historical perspective and future potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lannom, D.A.; Ogbe, D.O.; Lawal, A.S.; Hatzignatiou, D.G. [Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks, AL (United States)

    1996-12-31

    This paper presents a historical analysis of plans proposed by the private sector to develop and commercialize the natural gas resources found on the North Slope of Alaska. It evaluates current proposals to commercialize North Slope gas and discusses the potential economic benefits to be derived from gas commercialization. First, we describe the natural gas resources of the North Slope. Second, a resource-allocation optimization model is presented to evaluate quantitatively the options available for gas utilization. The model is applied to the North Slope to screen the various gas utilization alternatives and to recommend the economically feasible options. The optimal decision is a major gas (LNG) sale to the Pacific Rim countries. The LNG project involves conditioning natural gas on the North Slope and transporting the gas by pipeline from Prudhoe Bay to a tidewater port where it can be liquefied and shipped by tankers to the Pacific Rim markets.

  3. Surface Roughness of Stainless Steel Bender Mirrors for Focusing Soft X-rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2005-01-01

    Surface Roughness of Stainless Steel Bender Mirrors forWe have used polished stainless steel as a mirror substratefor smooth polishing. Stainless steel is stronger and can be

  4. Exporting Alaskan North Slope crude oil: Benefits and costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    The Department of Energy study examines the effects of lifting the current prohibitions against the export of Alaskan North Slope (ANS) crude. The study concludes that permitting exports would benefit the US economy. First, lifting the ban would expand the markets in which ANS oil can be sold, thereby increasing its value. ANS oil producers, the States of California and Alaska, and some of their local governments all would benefit from increased revenues. Permitting exports also would generate new economic activity and employment in California and Alaska. The study concludes that these economic benefits would be achieved without increasing gasoline prices (either in California or in the nation as a whole). Lifting the export ban could have important implications for US maritime interests. The Merchant Marine Act of 1970 (known as the Jones Act) requires all inter-coastal shipments to be carried on vessels that are US-owned, US-crewed, and US-built. By limiting the shipment of ANS crude to US ports only, the export ban creates jobs for the seafarers and the builders of Jones Act vessels. Because the Jones Act does not apply to exports, however, lifting the ban without also changing US maritime law would jeopardize the jobs associated with the current fleet of Jones Act tankers. Therefore the report analyzes selected economic impacts of several maritime policy alternatives, including: Maintaining current law, which allows foreign tankers to carry oil where export is allowed; requiring exports of ANS crude to be carried on Jones Act vessels; and requiring exports of ANS crude to be carried on vessels that are US-owned and US-crewed, but not necessarily US-built. Under each of these options, lifting the export ban would generate economic benefits.

  5. Economics of Alaska North Slope gas utilization options

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, C.P.; Doughty, T.C.; Hackworth, J.H.; North, W.B.; Robertson, E.P.

    1996-08-01

    The recoverable natural gas available for sale in the developed and known undeveloped fields on the Alaskan North Slope (ANS) total about 26 trillion cubic feet (TCF), including 22 TCF in the Prudhoe Bay Unit (PBU) and 3 TCF in the undeveloped Point Thomson Unit (PTU). No significant commercial use has been made of this large natural gas resource because there are no facilities in place to transport this gas to current markets. To date the economics have not been favorable to support development of a gas transportation system. However, with the declining trend in ANS oil production, interest in development of this huge gas resource is rising, making it important for the U.S. Department of Energy, industry, and the State of Alaska to evaluate and assess the options for development of this vast gas resource. The purpose of this study was to assess whether gas-to-liquids (GTL) conversion technology would be an economic alternative for the development and sale of the large, remote, and currently unmarketable ANS natural gas resource, and to compare the long term economic impact of a GTL conversion option to that of the more frequently discussed natural gas pipeline/liquefied natural gas (LNG) option. The major components of the study are: an assessment of the ANS oil and gas resources; an analysis of conversion and transportation options; a review of natural gas, LNG, and selected oil product markets; and an economic analysis of the LNG and GTL gas sales options based on publicly available input needed for assumptions of the economic variables. Uncertainties in assumptions are evaluated by determining the sensitivity of project economics to changes in baseline economic variables.

  6. Lyapunov instability of rough hard-disk fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacobus A. van Meel; Harald A. Posch

    2009-04-02

    The dynamical instability of rough hard-disk fluids in two dimensions is characterized through the Lyapunov spectrum and the Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy, $h_{KS}$, for a wide range of densities and moments of inertia $I$. For small $I$ the spectrum separates into translation-dominated and rotation-dominated parts. With increasing $I$ the rotation-dominated part is gradually filled in at the expense of translation, until such a separation becomes meaningless. At any density, the rate of phase-space mixing, given by $h_{KS}$, becomes less and less effective the more the rotation affects the dynamics. However, the degree of dynamical chaos, measured by the maximum Lyapunov exponent, is only enhanced by the rotational degrees of freedom for high-density gases, but is diminished for lower densities. Surprisingly, no traces of Lyapunov modes were found in the spectrum for larger moments of inertia. The spatial localization of the perturbation vector associated with the maximum exponent however persists for any $I$.

  7. Surface roughness and geological mapping at sub-hectometer scale from the High

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cord, Aurélien

    and characterized in terms of roughness. Key words: Geological Processes, Impact Processes, Image Processing, Mars valuable insights into the characterization of and discrimination between these geological processesSurface roughness and geological mapping at sub-hectometer scale from the High Resolution Stereo

  8. Evolution of swelling pressure of cohesive-frictional, rough and elasto-plastic granulates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luding, Stefan

    with cohesive-frictional, rough and elasto-plastic "mi- croscopic" contact properties. The spherical particlesEvolution of swelling pressure of cohesive- frictional, rough and elasto-plastic granulates Stefan as function of pressure for different micro- scopic contact properties. Keywords: granular materials, discrete

  9. Computation of the drag force on a rough sphere close to a wall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gérard-Varet, David

    2011-01-01

    We consider the effect of surface roughness on solid-solid contact in a Stokes flow. Various models for the roughness are considered, and a unified methodology is given to derive the corresponding asymptotics of the drag force. In this way, we recover and clarify the various expressions that can be found in the litterature.

  10. American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Effects of Surface Roughness on Laminar Separation Bubble over a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhi Jian "ZJ"

    1 American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Effects of Surface Roughness on Laminar Engineering and CFD Center, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 Laminar separation bubbles (LSBs) are often of surface roughness on laminar separation and turbulent transition can provide insights into the design

  11. A FETCH DEPENDENT MODEL OF SEA SURFACE ROUGHNESS FOR OFFSHORE WIND POWER UTILISATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Detlev

    A FETCH DEPENDENT MODEL OF SEA SURFACE ROUGHNESS FOR OFFSHORE WIND POWER UTILISATION Bernhard Lange, Resources, Roughness, Coastal Sea Areas, Waves, Rødsand 1 INTRODUCTION Large offshore wind farms are being wind conditions of offshore sites, since the higher energy yield has to compensate the additional

  12. Internal wave generation from rough topography D. A. Aguilar and B. R. Sutherlanda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sutherland, Bruce

    Internal wave generation from rough topography D. A. Aguilar and B. R. Sutherlanda Department examine internal wave generation above and in the lee of finite-amplitude periodic topography having various degrees of roughness. We show that internal waves are generated not only by flow over the hills

  13. High-order solutions of three-dimensional rough-surface scattering problems at high frequencies.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turc, Catalin

    High-order solutions of three-dimensional rough-surface scattering problems at high frequencies. I-order numerical method for the solution of high- frequency scattering problems from rough surfaces in three dimensions. The method is based on the asymptotic solution of appropriate integral equations in the high-frequency

  14. Lyapunov instability of rough hard-disk fluids Jacobus A. van Meel*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Posch, Harald A.

    Lyapunov instability of rough hard-disk fluids Jacobus A. van Meel* FOM Institute for Atomic The dynamical instability of rough hard-disk fluids in two dimensions is characterized through the Lyapunov, measured by the maximum Lyapunov exponent, is only enhanced by the rotational degrees of freedom for high

  15. Rough Algebras and Automated Deduction Anita Wasilewska 1 and Laurent Vigneron 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rusinowitch, Michaël

    of Boole himself led to the notion which we now call Boolean algebra, but one of the turning pointsRough Algebras and Automated Deduction Anita Wasilewska 1 and Laurent Vigneron 2 1 Department algebras investigated here are particular cases of topological rough algebras introduced in [26]. We

  16. Engineering Gaussian disorder at rough interfaces for light trapping in thin-film solar cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Engineering Gaussian disorder at rough interfaces for light trapping in thin-film solar cells Piotr A theoretical study of randomly rough interfaces to obtain light trapping in thin-film silicon solar cells of thin-film solar cells. © 2012 Optical Society of America OCIS codes: 040.5350, 050.1950. Reducing

  17. An approximate model for the adhesive contact of rough viscoelastic surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guillaume Haiat; Etienne Barthel

    2007-09-05

    Surface roughness is known to easily suppress the adhesion of elastic surfaces. Here a simple model for the contact of \\emph{viscoelastic} rough surfaces with significant levels of adhesion is presented. This approach is derived from our previous model [E. Barthel and G. Haiat {\\em Langmuir}, 18 9362 2002] for the adhesive contact of viscoelastic spheres. For simplicity a simple loading/unloading history (infinitely fast loading and constant pull-out velocity) is assumed. The model provides approximate analytical expressions for the asperity response and exhibits the full viscoelastic adhesive contact phenomenology such as stress relaxation inside the contact zone and creep at the contact edges. Combining this model with a Greenwood-Williamson statistical modeling of rough surfaces, we propose a quantitative assessment of the adhesion to rough viscoelastic surfaces. We show that moderate viscoelasticity efficiently restores adhesion on rough surfaces over a wide dynamic range.

  18. Near-field heat transfer between a nanoparticle and a rough surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Svend-Age Biehs; Jean-Jacques Greffet

    2011-03-11

    In this work we focus on the surface roughness correction to the near-field radiative heat transfer between a nanoparticle and a material with a rough surface utilizing a direct perturbation theory up to second order in the surface profile. We discuss the different distance regimes for the local density of states above the rough material and the heat flux analytically and numerically. We show that the heat transfer rate is larger than that corresponding to a flat surface at short distances. At larger distances it can become smaller due to surface polariton scattering by the rough surface. For distances much smaller than the correlation length of the surface profile, we show that the results converge to a proximity approximation, whereas in the opposite limit the rough surface can be replaced by an equivalent surface layer.

  19. A case study of pipeline route selection and design through discontinuous permafrost terrain in northwestern Alberta

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiechnik, C.; Boivin, R.; Henderson, J.; Bowman, M.

    1996-12-31

    As the natural gas pipeline system in Western Canada expands northward, it traverses the discontinuous permafrost zone. As the ground temperature of the frozen soil in this zone is just below freezing, it can be expected that within the design life of a pipeline the permafrost adjacent to it will melt due to the disturbance of the insulating cover by construction activities. Differential settlement at the thawing frozen/unfrozen soil interfaces gives rise to pipeline strain. Based on the calculated settlement and resulting strain level, a cost effective mechanical or civil design solution can be selected to mitigate the differential settlement problem. Since these design solutions can be costly, it is desirable to combine them with a pipeline route that traverses the least amount of discontinuous permafrost terrain while minimizing the overall length of the pipeline. This paper will detail the framework utilized to select the routing for a package of pipeline projects in northwestern Alberta. It is believed that the increased front end effort will result in lower operating costs and an overall reduced life-cycle cost. This basic design methodology can be applied to any project that traverses discontinuous permafrost terrain.

  20. Mesoscale Characterization of Coupled Hydromechanical Behavior of a Fractured Porous Slope in Response to Free Water-Surface Movement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guglielmi, Y.

    2008-01-01

    Mesoscale Characterization of Coupled Hydromechanicalinstrumented for mesoscale hydraulic and mechanicalwords: Fracture; Rock slope; Mesoscale; In situ poroelastic

  1. Alaska North Slope Tundra Travel Model and Validation Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harry R. Bader; Jacynthe Guimond

    2006-03-01

    The Alaska Department of Natural Resources (DNR), Division of Mining, Land, and Water manages cross-country travel, typically associated with hydrocarbon exploration and development, on Alaska's arctic North Slope. This project is intended to provide natural resource managers with objective, quantitative data to assist decision making regarding opening of the tundra to cross-country travel. DNR designed standardized, controlled field trials, with baseline data, to investigate the relationships present between winter exploration vehicle treatments and the independent variables of ground hardness, snow depth, and snow slab thickness, as they relate to the dependent variables of active layer depth, soil moisture, and photosynthetically active radiation (a proxy for plant disturbance). Changes in the dependent variables were used as indicators of tundra disturbance. Two main tundra community types were studied: Coastal Plain (wet graminoid/moist sedge shrub) and Foothills (tussock). DNR constructed four models to address physical soil properties: two models for each main community type, one predicting change in depth of active layer and a second predicting change in soil moisture. DNR also investigated the limited potential management utility in using soil temperature, the amount of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) absorbed by plants, and changes in microphotography as tools for the identification of disturbance in the field. DNR operated under the assumption that changes in the abiotic factors of active layer depth and soil moisture drive alteration in tundra vegetation structure and composition. Statistically significant differences in depth of active layer, soil moisture at a 15 cm depth, soil temperature at a 15 cm depth, and the absorption of photosynthetically active radiation were found among treatment cells and among treatment types. The models were unable to thoroughly investigate the interacting role between snow depth and disturbance due to a lack of variability in snow depth cover throughout the period of field experimentation. The amount of change in disturbance indicators was greater in the tundra communities of the Foothills than in those of the Coastal Plain. However the overall level of change in both community types was less than expected. In Coastal Plain communities, ground hardness and snow slab thickness were found to play an important role in change in active layer depth and soil moisture as a result of treatment. In the Foothills communities, snow cover had the most influence on active layer depth and soil moisture as a result of treatment. Once certain minimum thresholds for ground hardness, snow slab thickness, and snow depth were attained, it appeared that little or no additive effect was realized regarding increased resistance to disturbance in the tundra communities studied. DNR used the results of this modeling project to set a standard for maximum permissible disturbance of cross-country tundra travel, with the threshold set below the widely accepted standard of Low Disturbance levels (as determined by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service). DNR followed the modeling project with a validation study, which seemed to support the field trial conclusions and indicated that the standard set for maximum permissible disturbance exhibits a conservative bias in favor of environmental protection. Finally DNR established a quick and efficient tool for visual estimations of disturbance to determine when investment in field measurements is warranted. This Visual Assessment System (VAS) seemed to support the plot disturbance measurements taking during the modeling and validation phases of this project.

  2. Automated suppression of errors in LTP-II slope measurements with x-ray optics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ali, Zulfiqar

    2011-01-01

    slope measurements with x-ray optics Zulfiqar Ali, Curtis L.with state-of-the-art x-ray optics. Significant suppressionscanning, metrology of x-ray optics, deflectometry Abstract

  3. Engineering properties of Resedimented Ugnu Clay from the Alaskan North Slope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Cullen A. (Cullen Albert)

    2010-01-01

    This research determined the engineering properties of laboratory Resedimented Ugnu Clay (RUC) specimens created using recovered material from 3800 ft below the surface of the Alaskan Northern Slope to aid with future ...

  4. New evidence of slope instability in the Outardes Bay delta area, Quebec, Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, Bernard

    features are in direct relationship with the seismic interpretation of the data collected upslope multibeam sonar (95 kHz) on the slope to provide high-resolution seismic and bathy- metric data. The seismic

  5. Clay mineralogy and its effect on physical properties in the Gulf of Mexico northwestern continental slope 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berti, Debora

    2005-02-17

    The clay mineral composition of sediments deposited in the last six oxygen isotope stages in the Gulf of Mexico continental slope was characterized. Smectite and illite were found to be the two major clay minerals of the ...

  6. Scanning-laser glint measurements of sea-surface slope statistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaw, Joseph A.

    for the wave slope corre- sponding to solar specular reflection. This tech- nique worked well but required an airplane at about a 600-m altitude during periods of neutral equal air and water temperatures and positive

  7. MONITORING STRATIFICATION AND CURRENTS AT THE CONTINENTAL SLOPE OF THE SCOTIA SEA, ANTARCTICA 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thornton, Melanie 1989-

    2011-05-02

    fulfillment of the requirements for the designation as UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH SCHOLAR A Senior Scholars Thesis by MELANIE R. THORNTON MONITORING STRATIFICATION AND CURRENTS AT THE CONTINENTAL SLOPE OF THE SCOTIA SEA, ANTARCTICA Approved by... of the requirements for the designation as UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH SCHOLAR A Senior Scholars Thesis by MELANIE R. THORNTON iii ABSTRACT Monitoring Stratification and Currents at the Continental Slope of the Scotia Sea, Antarctica. (April 2011...

  8. The relation between the optical spectral slope and the luminosity for 17 Palomar-Green QSOs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    X. Pu; W. Bian; K. Huang

    2006-07-29

    Using 7.5-year spectroscopic monitoring data of a sample of 17 Palomar-Green QSOs (PG QSOs) (z=0.061-0.371), we obtain the optical spectral slope for each object at all epochs by a power-law fit to the spectra in continuum bands. All of these 17 PG QSOs exhibit obvious spectral slope variability. Most of the 17 objects show anti-correlation between the spectral slope and the rest-frame 5100$\\AA$ continuum flux while five of them exist strong anti-correlation (correlation coefficient R larger than 0.5). For the ensemble of these 17 PG QSOs, a strong anti-correlation between the average spectral slope and the average rest-frame 5100$\\AA$ luminosity is found while no correlation is found between the spectral slope and the Eddington ratio. A median anti-correlation between spectral slope changes and continuum flux variations is also found which indicates a hardening of the spectrum during bright phases. Accretion disk (jet) instability models with other mechanisms associated with changes in the accretion processes are promising.

  9. Geologic reconnaissance of natural fore-reef slope and a large submarine rockfall exposure, Enewetak Atoll

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halley, R.B.; Slater, R.A.

    1987-05-01

    In 1958 a submarine rockfall exposed a cross section through the reef and fore-reef deposits along the northwestern margin of Enewetak Atoll, Marshall Islands. Removal of more than 10/sup 8/ MT of rock left a cirque-shaped submarine scarp 220 m high, extending back 190 m into the modern reef, and 1000 m along the reef trend. The scarp exposed older, steeply dipping beds below 220 m along which the rockfall detached. They sampled this exposure and the natural fore-reef slope surrounding it in 1984 and 1985 using a manned submersible. The natural slope in this area is characterized by three zone: (1) the reef plate, crest, and near fore reef that extends from sea level to -16 m, with a slope of less than 10/sup 0/, (2) the bypass slope that extends from -16 to -275 m, with slopes of 55/sup 0/ decreasing to 35/sup 0/ near the base, and (3) a debris slope of less than 35/sup 0/ below -275 m. Vertical walls, grooves, and chutes, common on other fore-reef slopes, are sparse on the northwestern slope of Enewetak. The scarp exposes three stratigraphic units that are differentiated by surficial appearance: (1) a near-vertical wall from the reef crest to 76 m that appears rubbly, has occasional debris-covered ledges, and is composed mainly of coral; (2) a vertical to overhanging wall from -76 m to -220 m that is massive and fractured, and has smooth, blocky surfaces; and (3) inclined bedding below -220 m along which the slump block has fractured, exposing a dip slope of hard, dense, white limestone and dolomite that extends below -400 m. Caves occur in all three units. Open cement-lined fractures and voids layered with cements are most common in the middle unit, which now lies within the thermocline. Along the sides of the scarp are exposed fore-reef boulder beds dipping at 30/sup 0/ toward the open sea; the steeper (55/sup 0/) dipping natural surface truncates these beds, which gives evidence of the erosional nature of the bypass slope.

  10. Development of an Integrated Sensor System for Obstacle Detection and Terrain Evaluation for Application to Unmanned Ground

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    Development of an Integrated Sensor System for Obstacle Detection and Terrain Evaluation field of view of 50 degrees and 38 degrees, respectively. Two sensor systems were utilized to evaluate., Wexford Pennsylvania ABSTRACT This paper describes the development and performance of a sensor system

  11. Shear Wave Velocity Structure of Southern African Crust: Evidence for Compositional Heterogeneity within Archaean and Proterozoic Terrains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kgaswane, E M; Nyblade, A A; Julia, J; Dirks, P H H M; Durrheim, R J; Pasyanos, M E

    2008-11-11

    Crustal structure in southern Africa has been investigated by jointly inverting receiver functions and Rayleigh wave group velocities for 89 broadband seismic stations spanning much of the Precambrian shield of southern Africa. 1-D shear wave velocity profiles obtained from the inversion yield Moho depths that are similar to those reported in previous studies and show considerable variability in the shear wave velocity structure of the lower part of the crust between some terrains. For many of the Archaean and Proterozoic terrains in the shield, S velocities reach 4.0 km/s or higher over a substantial part of the lower crust. However, for most of the Kimberley terrain and adjacent parts of the Kheis Province and Witwatersrand terrain, as well as for the western part of the Tokwe terrain, mean shear wave velocities of {le} 3.9 km/s characterize the lower part of the crust along with slightly ({approx}5 km) thinner crust. These findings indicate that the lower crust across much of the shield has a predominantly mafic composition, except for the southwest portion of the Kaapvaal Craton and western portion of the Zimbabwe Craton, where the lower crust is intermediate-to-felsic in composition. The parts of the Kaapvaal Craton underlain by intermediate-to-felsic lower crust coincide with regions where Ventersdorp rocks have been preserved, and thus we suggest that the intermediate-to-felsic composition of the lower crust and the shallower Moho may have resulted from crustal melting during the Ventersdorp tectonomagmatic event at c. 2.7 Ga and concomitant crustal thinning caused by rifting.

  12. Very high efficiency phosphorescent organic light-emitting devices by using rough indium tin oxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Yingjie; Aziz, Hany, E-mail: h2aziz@uwaterloo.ca [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Waterloo Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada)

    2014-07-07

    The efficiency of organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) is shown to significantly depend on the roughness of the indium tin oxide (ITO) anode. By using rougher ITO, light trapped in the ITO/organic wave-guided mode can be efficiently extracted, and a light outcoupling enhancement as high as 40% is achieved. Moreover, contrary to expectations, the lifetime of OLEDs is not affected by ITO roughness. Finally, an OLED employing rough ITO anode that exhibits a current efficiency of 56?cd/A at the remarkably high brightness of 10{sup 5}?cd/m{sup 2} is obtained. This represents the highest current efficiency at such high brightness to date for an OLED utilizing an ITO anode, without any external light outcoupling techniques. The results demonstrate the significant efficiency benefits of using ITO with higher roughness in OLEDs.

  13. Comprehensive Evaluation Model of Building Energy Efficiency Based on Rough Sets Theory 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ding, L.; Ruan, X.; Huang, J.; Li, Y.

    2006-01-01

    In order to improve the objectivity of building energy efficiency evaluation, this paper uses a new method to evaluate building energy efficiency on the basis of rough sets theory. The contribution of different subentry evaluation indicators...

  14. Significance of the Casimir force and surface roughness for actuation dynamics of MEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wijnand Broer; George Palasantzas; Jasper Knoester; Vitaly B. Svetovoy

    2013-03-14

    Using the measured optical response and surface roughness topography as inputs, we perform realistic calculations of the combined effect of Casimir and electrostatic forces on the actuation dynamics of micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS). In contrast with the expectations, roughness can influence MEMS dynamics even at distances between bodies significantly larger than the root-mean-square roughness. This effect is associated with statistically rare high asperities that can be locally close to the point of contact. It is found that, even though surface roughness appears to have a detrimental effect on the availability of stable equilibria, it ensures that those equilibria can be reached more easily than in the case of flat surfaces. Hence our findings play a principal role for the stability of microdevices such as vibration sensors, switches, and other related MEM architectures operating at distances below 100 nm.

  15. Reduction of vortex induced forces and motion through surface roughness control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bernitsas, Michael M; Raghavan, Kamaldev

    2014-04-01

    Roughness is added to the surface of a bluff body in a relative motion with respect to a fluid. The amount, size, and distribution of roughness on the body surface is controlled passively or actively to modify the flow around the body and subsequently the Vortex Induced Forces and Motion (VIFM). The added roughness, when designed and implemented appropriately, affects in a predetermined way the boundary layer, the separation of the boundary layer, the level of turbulence, the wake, the drag and lift forces, and consequently the Vortex Induced Motion (VIM), and the fluid-structure interaction. The goal of surface roughness control is to decrease/suppress Vortex Induced Forces and Motion. Suppression is required when fluid-structure interaction becomes destructive as in VIM of flexible cylinders or rigid cylinders on elastic support, such as underwater pipelines, marine risers, tubes in heat exchangers, nuclear fuel rods, cooling towers, SPAR offshore platforms.

  16. Enhancement of vortex induced forces and motion through surface roughness control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bernitsas, Michael M. (Saline, MI); Raghavan, Kamaldev (Houston, TX)

    2011-11-01

    Roughness is added to the surface of a bluff body in a relative motion with respect to a fluid. The amount, size, and distribution of roughness on the body surface is controlled passively or actively to modify the flow around the body and subsequently the Vortex Induced Forces and Motion (VIFM). The added roughness, when designed and implemented appropriately, affects in a predetermined way the boundary layer, the separation of the boundary layer, the level of turbulence, the wake, the drag and lift forces, and consequently the Vortex Induced Motion (VIM), and the fluid-structure interaction. The goal of surface roughness control is to increase Vortex Induced Forces and Motion. Enhancement is needed in such applications as harnessing of clean and renewable energy from ocean/river currents using the ocean energy converter VIVACE (Vortex Induced Vibration for Aquatic Clean Energy).

  17. Solid Deuterium-Tritium Surface Roughness In A Beryllium Inertial Confinement Fusion Shell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kozioziemski, B J; Sater, J D; Moody, J D; Montgomery, D S; Gautier, C

    2006-04-19

    Solid deuterium-tritium (D-T) fuel layers for inertial confinement fusion experiments were formed inside of a 2 mm diameter beryllium shell and were characterized using phase-contrast enhanced x-ray imaging. The solid D-T surface roughness is found to be 0.4 {micro}m for modes 7-128 at 1.5 K below the melting temperature. The layer roughness is found to increase with decreasing temperature, in agreement with previous visible light characterization studies. However, phase-contrast enhanced x-ray imaging provides a more robust surface roughness measurement than visible light methods. The new x-ray imaging results demonstrate clearly that the surface roughness decreases with time for solid D-T layers held at 1.5 K below the melting temperature.

  18. hp-finite-elements for simulating electromagnetic fields in optical devices with rough textures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burger, S; Hammerschmidt, M; Herrmann, S; Pomplun, J; Schmidt, F; Wohlfeil, B; Zschiedrich, L

    2015-01-01

    The finite-element method is a preferred numerical method when electromagnetic fields at high accuracy are to be computed in nano-optics design. Here, we demonstrate a finite-element method using hp-adaptivity on tetrahedral meshes for computation of electromagnetic fields in a device with rough textures. The method allows for efficient computations on meshes with strong variations in element sizes. This enables to use precise geometry resolution of the rough textures. Convergence to highly accurate results is observed.

  19. A water balance study of four landfill cover designs varying in slope for semiarid regions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nyhan, J.W.; Schofield, T.G.; Salazar, J.A.

    1997-02-01

    The goal of disposing of radioactive and hazardous waste in shallow landfills is to reduce risk to human health and to the environment by isolating contaminants until they no longer pose a hazard. In order to achieve this, the performance of a landfill cover design without an engineered barrier (Conventional Design) was compared with three designs containing either a hydraulic barrier (EPA Design) or a capillary barrier (Loam and Clay Loam Capillary Barrier Designs). Water balance parameters were measured since 1991 at six-hour intervals for four different landfill cover designs in 1.0- by 10.0-m plots with downhill slopes of 5, 10, 15, and 25%. Whereas runoff generally accounted for only 2-3% of the precipitation losses on these designs, similar values for evapotranspiration ranged from 86% to 91%, with increased evapotranspiration occurring with increases in slope. Consequently, interflow and seepage usually decreased with increasing slope for each landfill cover design. Seepage consisted of up to 10% of the precipitation on the Conventional Design, whereas the hydraulic barrier in the EPA Design effectively controlled seepage at all slopes, and both of the capillary designs worked effectively to eliminate seepage at the higher slopes.

  20. Development of an Immersed Boundary Method to Resolve Complex Terrain in the Weather Research and Forecasting Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lunquist, K A; Chow, F K; Lundquist, J K; Mirocha, J D

    2007-09-04

    Flow and dispersion processes in urban areas are profoundly influenced by the presence of buildings which divert mean flow, affect surface heating and cooling, and alter the structure of turbulence in the lower atmosphere. Accurate prediction of velocity, temperature, and turbulent kinetic energy fields are necessary for determining the transport and dispersion of scalars. Correct predictions of scalar concentrations are vital in densely populated urban areas where they are used to aid in emergency response planning for accidental or intentional releases of hazardous substances. Traditionally, urban flow simulations have been performed by computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes which can accommodate the geometric complexity inherent to urban landscapes. In these types of models the grid is aligned with the solid boundaries, and the boundary conditions are applied to the computational nodes coincident with the surface. If the CFD code uses a structured curvilinear mesh, then time-consuming manual manipulation is needed to ensure that the mesh conforms to the solid boundaries while minimizing skewness. If the CFD code uses an unstructured grid, then the solver cannot be optimized for the underlying data structure which takes an irregular form. Unstructured solvers are therefore often slower and more memory intensive than their structured counterparts. Additionally, urban-scale CFD models are often forced at lateral boundaries with idealized flow, neglecting dynamic forcing due to synoptic scale weather patterns. These CFD codes solve the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations and include limited options for representing atmospheric processes such as surface fluxes and moisture. Traditional CFD codes therefore posses several drawbacks, due to the expense of either creating the grid or solving the resulting algebraic system of equations, and due to the idealized boundary conditions and the lack of full atmospheric physics. Meso-scale atmospheric boundary layer simulations, on the other hand, are performed by numerical weather prediction (NWP) codes, which cannot handle the geometry of the urban landscape, but do provide a more complete representation of atmospheric physics. NWP codes typically use structured grids with terrain-following vertical coordinates, include a full suite of atmospheric physics parameterizations, and allow for dynamic synoptic scale lateral forcing through grid nesting. Terrain following grids are unsuitable for urban terrain, as steep terrain gradients cause extreme distortion of the computational cells. In this work, we introduce and develop an immersed boundary method (IBM) to allow the favorable properties of a numerical weather prediction code to be combined with the ability to handle complex terrain. IBM uses a non-conforming structured grid, and allows solid boundaries to pass through the computational cells. As the terrain passes through the mesh in an arbitrary manner, the main goal of the IBM is to apply the boundary condition on the interior of the domain as accurately as possible. With the implementation of the IBM, numerical weather prediction codes can be used to explicitly resolve urban terrain. Heterogeneous urban domains using the IBM can be nested into larger mesoscale domains using a terrain-following coordinate. The larger mesoscale domain provides lateral boundary conditions to the urban domain with the correct forcing, allowing seamless integration between mesoscale and urban scale models. Further discussion of the scope of this project is given by Lundquist et al. [2007]. The current paper describes the implementation of an IBM into the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, which is an open source numerical weather prediction code. The WRF model solves the non-hydrostatic compressible Navier-Stokes equations, and employs an isobaric terrain-following vertical coordinate. Many types of IB methods have been developed by researchers; a comprehensive review can be found in Mittal and Iaccarino [2005]. To the authors knowledge, this is the first IBM approach that is able to

  1. Process of Equiaxed Grains of RE-Al Alloy under Slope Vibration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xie Shikun; Yi Rongxi; Pan Xiaoliang; Zheng Xiaoqiu; Guo Xiuyan [School of Engineering, Jinggangshan University, Ji'an, 343009 (China)

    2010-06-15

    A new technique using slope vibration casting process during heating and isothermal holding period to prepare Al-7Si-2RE alloy has been studied. The small, near-spherical and non-dendritic microstructure with the semi-solid processing requirements has been obtained. Experiments show that the cooling method, pouring process and the convection of melt caused by slope vibration had significant effects on the formation of near-spherical primary gains. The water-cooled copper mold casting with slope vibration at the temperature near liquidus can obtain Al-7Si-2RE alloy with small homogeneous equiaxed grains, the average grain diameter is 48.3 mum, and the average grain roundness is 1.92.

  2. Benthic study of the continental slope off Cape Hatteras, North Carolina. Volume 2. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diaz, R.J.; Blake, J.A.; Lohse, D.P.

    1993-03-01

    A number of blocks off Cape Hatteras have been leased by Mobil Oil, which has requested permission to drill an exploratory well, at 820-m depth, in a block identified as Manteo 467. The proposed well location is 39 miles from the coast of North Carolina. The possibility of extracting gas from the continental slope off the coast of North Carolina, particularly at slope depths, has raised a number of environmental concerns that cannot be addressed from existing data. The present study was developed by the Minerals Management Service to better define the nature of the continental slope benthic communities off Cape Hatteras and to delineate their areal extent. Emphasis was placed on the area around the proposed drill site in the Manteo 467 lease block.

  3. Bringing Alaska North Slope Natural Gas to Market (released in AEO2009)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2009-01-01

    At least three alternatives have been proposed over the years for bringing sizable volumes of natural gas from Alaska's remote North Slope to market in the lower 48 states: a pipeline interconnecting with the existing pipeline system in central Alberta, Canada; a gas-to-liquids (GTL) plant on the North Slope; and a large liquefied natural gas (LNG) export facility at Valdez, Alaska. The National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) explicitly models the pipeline and GTL options. The what if LNG option is not modeled in NEMS.

  4. Large-eddy simulations of surface roughness parameter sensitivity to canopy-structure characteristics

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Maurer, K. D.; Bohrer, G.; Kenny, W. T.; Ivanov, V. Y.

    2015-04-30

    Surface roughness parameters, namely the roughness length and displacement height, are an integral input used to model surface fluxes. However, most models assume these parameters to be a fixed property of plant functional type and disregard the governing structural heterogeneity and dynamics. In this study, we use large-eddy simulations to explore, in silico, the effects of canopy-structure characteristics on surface roughness parameters. We performed a virtual experiment to test the sensitivity of resolved surface roughness to four axes of canopy structure: (1) leaf area index, (2) the vertical profile of leaf density, (3) canopy height, and (4) canopy gap fraction.more »We found roughness parameters to be highly variable, but uncovered positive relationships between displacement height and maximum canopy height, aerodynamic canopy height and maximum canopy height and leaf area index, and eddy-penetration depth and gap fraction. We also found negative relationships between aerodynamic canopy height and gap fraction, as well as between eddy-penetration depth and maximum canopy height and leaf area index. We generalized our model results into a virtual "biometric" parameterization that relates roughness length and displacement height to canopy height, leaf area index, and gap fraction. Using a decade of wind and canopy-structure observations in a site in Michigan, we tested the effectiveness of our model-driven biometric parameterization approach in predicting the friction velocity over heterogeneous and disturbed canopies. We compared the accuracy of these predictions with the friction-velocity predictions obtained from the common simple approximation related to canopy height, the values calculated with large-eddy simulations of the explicit canopy structure as measured by airborne and ground-based lidar, two other parameterization approaches that utilize varying canopy-structure inputs, and the annual and decadal means of the surface roughness parameters at the site from meteorological observations. We found that the classical representation of constant roughness parameters (in space and time) as a fraction of canopy height performed relatively well. Nonetheless, of the approaches we tested, most of the empirical approaches that incorporate seasonal and interannual variation of roughness length and displacement height as a function of the dynamics of canopy structure produced more precise and less biased estimates for friction velocity than models with temporally invariable parameters.« less

  5. Terramechanical analysis of rover wheel mobility over simulated Martian terrain at various slip conditions and vertical loads

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Puszko, Gregory D

    2013-01-01

    Unmanned Mars rovers are presented with the unique challenge of requiring autonomous driving control over rough, adverse territory. A software package, dubbed Artemis, was developed in order to model the expected forces ...

  6. Approximating the Visible Region of a Point on a Terrain Boaz BenMoshe # Paz Carmi + Matthew J. Katz #

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katz, Matthew "Matya"

    supporting ray shooting queries from p, due to Cole and Sharir [5], and its running time is O(n log 2 n. Katz # Abstract Given a terrain and a point p on or above it, we wish to compute the region R p that is visible from p. We present a generic radar­like algorithm for computing an approxima­ tion of R p

  7. A SLIPPERY SLOPE: HOW MUCH GLOBAL WARMING CONSTITUTES "DANGEROUS ANTHROPOGENIC INTERFERENCE"?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    A SLIPPERY SLOPE: HOW MUCH GLOBAL WARMING CONSTITUTES "DANGEROUS ANTHROPOGENIC INTERFERENCE on the global warming that can be tolerated without risking dangerous anthropogenic interference with climate. I" mainly as a metaphor for the danger posed by global warming. So I changed "Hell" to "disaster." What

  8. PHYSICS OF FLUIDS 25, 086604 (2013) Gravity currents shoaling on a slope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sutherland, Bruce

    2013-01-01

    water rivers into the saline ocean form surface gravity currents. The study of gravity currents is also spills in the ocean.6 Gravity currents in a channel have been well studied through lockPHYSICS OF FLUIDS 25, 086604 (2013) Gravity currents shoaling on a slope Bruce R. Sutherland,1,2,a

  9. SLOPE STABILITY ANALYSIS OF THE ILIAMNA VOLCANO, ALASKA, USING ASTER TIR, SRTM DEM, AND AEROMAGNETIC DATA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    areas at risk for slope failure, which correlate well to the geologic field studies. These scripts can. al. 1997). These seismic stations work well but require maintenance; after the 1996 seismic swarm risk. Many of these volcanoes will be mapped geologically for the first time during the set up

  10. Process-Based Coastal Erosion Modeling for Drew Point, North Slope, Alaska

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Jinlun

    Process-Based Coastal Erosion Modeling for Drew Point, North Slope, Alaska Thomas M. Ravens1, Beaufort Sea, Alaska. This coastal setting has experienced a dramatic increase in erosion since the early, coastal erosion/shoreline change model has been developed for a small coastal segment near Drew Point

  11. EVIDENCE OF ELEVATED OZONE CONCENTRATIONS ON FORESTED SLOPES OF THE LOWER FRASER VALLEY, BRITISH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKendry, Ian

    EVIDENCE OF ELEVATED OZONE CONCENTRATIONS ON FORESTED SLOPES OF THE LOWER FRASER VALLEY, BRITISH, hourly average ozone concentrations were mea- sured at three sites of differing elevation (188, 588. Sites experienced ozone concentrations ranging from 0 to 88 ppb in 2001, and 0 to 96 ppb in 2002. Daily

  12. NOWCAST WITH A FORESCAST SNOW COVER SIMULATIONS ON SLOPES Sascha Bellaire

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jamieson, Bruce

    NOWCAST WITH A FORESCAST ­ SNOW COVER SIMULATIONS ON SLOPES Sascha Bellaire 1* , Bruce Jamieson 1 of Calgary, AB, Canada ABSTRACT: The snow cover model SNOWPACK simulates the snow cover formation plot. Meteorological key parameters for the snow cover formation and evolution, e.g. precipitation

  13. Slope design and implementation in open pit mines; geological and geomechanical Jean-Alain FLEURISSON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 GHGT-9 Slope design and implementation in open pit mines; geological and geomechanical approach all natural geological and geomechanical features and the geological structures as well and geomechanical data; 2) determination of the potential mechanisms of deformation and failure, and their numerical

  14. Geophysically consistent values of the perovskite to post-perovskite transition Clapeyron slope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geophysically consistent values of the perovskite to post-perovskite transition Clapeyron slope J February 2007; published 15 March 2007. [1] The double-crossing hypothesis posits that post- perovskite in Earth's deep mantle and the temperature of Earth's inner core boundary, we show that a post-perovskite

  15. High-frequency internal waves on a sloping shelf James M. Pringle1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pringle, James "Jamie"

    1 High-frequency internal waves on a sloping shelf James M. Pringle1 and Kenneth H. Brink Woods field propagating across a shelf and hence control the high- frequency variability on the shelf. This analysis exam- ines the evolution of the high-frequency internal wave field on the shelf as it is modified

  16. Down the Slippery Slope: Plastid Genome Evolution in Convolvulaceae Sas a Stefanovic ,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Correspondence to: Sas a Stefanovic´ ; email: sstefano@utm. utoronto.ca J Mol Evol (2005) 61:292­305 DOI: 10Down the Slippery Slope: Plastid Genome Evolution in Convolvulaceae Sas a Stefanovic´ ,1,2 Richard, Canada Received: 30 August 2004 / Accepted: 10 March 2005 [Reviewing Editor: Dr. Debashish Bhattacharya

  17. A chronostratigraphic framework for the northwestern slope of the gulf of mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elston, Kristen Eileen

    2007-04-25

    Sediments from two cores, JPC31 and JPC46, were analyzed to better understand the relationship between climate and sediment deposition on the continental slope of the northwestern Gulf of Mexico. These two cores were selected from a suite of cores...

  18. Probabilistic slope stability analysis by finite elements D.V. Griffiths*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Probabilistic slope stability analysis by finite elements D.V. Griffiths* and Gordon A. Fenton. The advanced method, called the random finite element method (RFEM), uses elasto- plasticity combined nonlinear finite element methods are combined with ran- dom field generation techniques. This method, called

  19. Shock wave propagation along constant sloped ocean bottoms Joseph T. Maestasa)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shock wave propagation along constant sloped ocean bottoms Joseph T. Maestasa) Department wave equation (NPE) is a time-domain model used to calculate long- range shock propagation using a wave waves generated by explosives buried beneath mud line. VC 2014 Acoustical Society of America. [http

  20. Runoff and Sedimentation Potentials Influenced by Litter and Slope on a Chaparral

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    it essential to better understand the potential on-site runoff-sedimenta- tion relationships. This study varied from 9.2 to 27.1 metric tons per ha (Pase 1972). The physical properties and infiltration but which can be highly erosive on steep slopes because it lacks soil structure. Although the infiltration

  1. The Formation of Nonzonal Jets over Sloped Topography EMMA J. D. BOLAND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Andrew

    The Formation of Nonzonal Jets over Sloped Topography EMMA J. D. BOLAND The University of Cambridge, in final form 26 March 2012) ABSTRACT Coherent jets are ubiquitous features of the ocean's circulation tilted nonzonal jets that are aligned per- pendicular to the barotropic potential vorticity (PV) gradient

  2. Comparative study of sterols in shelf and slope sediments o northeastern Taiwan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huh, Chih-An

    Comparative study of sterols in shelf and slope sediments o northeastern Taiwan Woei-Lih Jenga Editorial handling by B.R.T. Simoneit Abstract Bottom sediments and suspended matter from the shelf(algal sterols/cholesterol) ratios (mean21s) were 1.0020.31 (n = 7) for the shelf sediments, 3.2920.61 (n = 7

  3. Density slope of the nuclear symmetry energy from the neutron skin thickness of heavy nuclei 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Lie-Wen; Ko, Che Ming; Li, Bao-An; Xu, Jun.

    2010-01-01

    of finite nuclei and nuclear matter properties. We find that existing data on neutron skin thickness Delta r(np) of Sn isotopes give an important constraint on the symmetry energy E(sym)(rho(0)) and its density slope L at saturation density rho(0). Combining...

  4. The friction factor of two-dimensional rough-boundary turbulent soap film flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicholas Guttenberg; Nigel Goldenfeld

    2009-03-25

    We use momentum transfer arguments to predict the friction factor $f$ in two-dimensional turbulent soap-film flows with rough boundaries (an analogue of three-dimensional pipe flow) as a function of Reynolds number Re and roughness $r$, considering separately the inverse energy cascade and the forward enstrophy cascade. At intermediate Re, we predict a Blasius-like friction factor scaling of $f\\propto\\textrm{Re}^{-1/2}$ in flows dominated by the enstrophy cascade, distinct from the energy cascade scaling of $\\textrm{Re}^{-1/4}$. For large Re, $f \\sim r$ in the enstrophy-dominated case. We use conformal map techniques to perform direct numerical simulations that are in satisfactory agreement with theory, and exhibit data collapse scaling of roughness-induced criticality, previously shown to arise in the 3D pipe data of Nikuradse.

  5. Rough surface electrical contact resistance considering scale dependent properties and quantum effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, Robert L.; Crandall, Erika R.; Bozack, Michael J.

    2015-05-21

    The objective of this work is to evaluate the effect of scale dependent mechanical and electrical properties on electrical contact resistance (ECR) between rough surfaces. This work attempts to build on existing ECR models that neglect potentially important quantum- and size-dependent contact and electrical conduction mechanisms present due to the asperity sizes on typical surfaces. The electrical conductance at small scales can quantize or show a stepping trend as the contact area is varied in the range of the free electron Fermi wavelength squared. This work then evaluates if these effects remain important for the interface between rough surfaces, which may include many small scale contacts of varying sizes. The results suggest that these effects may be significant in some cases, while insignificant for others. It depends on the load and the multiscale structure of the surface roughness.

  6. General contact mechanics theory for randomly rough surfaces with application to rubber friction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michele Scaraggi; Bo N. J. Persson

    2015-06-23

    We generalize the Persson contact mechanics and rubber friction theory to the case where both surfaces have surface roughness. The solids can be rigid, elastic or viscoelastic, and can be homogeneous or layered. We calculate the contact area, the viscoelastic contribution to the friction force, and the average interfacial separation as a function of the sliding speed and the nominal contact pressure. We illustrate the theory with numerical results for a rubber block sliding on a road surface. We find that with increasing sliding speed, the influence of the roughness on the rubber block decreases, and for typical sliding speeds involved in tire dynamics it can be neglected.

  7. Effect of surface roughness and polymeric additive on nucleate pool boiling at subatmospheric pressures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tewari, P.K.; Verma, R.K.; Ramani, M.P.S.; Mahajan, S.P.

    1986-09-01

    This investigation pertains to boiling heat transfer from a submerged flat surface at subatmospheric and atmospheric pressures in the presence of hydroxy ethyl cellulose (HEC) as a polymeric additive in small doses. Boiling was carried out in presence of the additive on smooth and rough aluminium surfaces having effective cavity size within the range as predicted by Hsu model and the pressure was kept in the range of 8 - 100 KN/sq.m (abs). Effects of surface roughness, saturation pressure and polymer concentration on boiling heat transfer were studied and the results were compared with Rohsenow's correlation.

  8. A trapped Philippine Sea plate origin for MORB from the inner slope of the Izu^Bonin trench

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Brian

    A trapped Philippine Sea plate origin for MORB from the inner slope of the Izu^Bonin trench Susan M Pacific plate or a trapped remnant of Philippine Sea plate on which the Izu^Bonin arc was built. Although clearly support a Philippine Sea plate origin. The isotopic signature of the inner trench slope samples

  9. Effective thermal conductivity of rough spherical packed beds Majid Bahrami *, M. Michael Yovanovich, J. Richard Culham

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahrami, Majid

    exchangers, heat storage sys- tems, the breeder blanket about fusion reactors [1], and insulators and asperities slope. The present model is compared with experimental data with the sphere diameter of 19.05, 25 to volume. This property is useful in applications such as catalytic reactors, heat recovery processes, heat

  10. Atmospheric Momentum Roughness Applied to Stage-Discharge Relationships in Flood Plains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atmospheric Momentum Roughness Applied to Stage-Discharge Relationships in Flood Plains Jennifer M and discharge relationship for turbulent flows over vegetated flood plains. The model is based on the turbulent sites. The model estimates of the flood flow discharges from a natural site are compared to observed

  11. Numerical method for calculating the apparent eddy current conductivity loss on randomly rough surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagy, Peter B.

    Numerical method for calculating the apparent eddy current conductivity loss on randomly rough Because of their frequency-dependent penetration depth, eddy current measurements are capable of mapping of eddy current conductivity, thereby decreasing the accuracy of the measurements, especially in thermally

  12. A simple numerical model of the apparent loss of eddy current conductivity due to surface roughness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagy, Peter B.

    A simple numerical model of the apparent loss of eddy current conductivity due to surface roughness of eddy current conductivity has been suggested as a possible means to allow the nondestructive evaluation, the path of the eddy current must follow a more tortuous route in the material, which produces a reduction

  13. Importance of thermal effects and sea surface roughness for offshore wind resource assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Detlev

    Importance of thermal effects and sea surface roughness for offshore wind resource assessment National Laboratory, Roskilde, Denmark Abstract The economic feasibility of offshore wind power utilisation depends on the favourable wind conditions offshore compared to sites on land, which have to compensate

  14. FRICTION FACTOR IN HIGH PRESSURE NATURAL GAS PIPELINES FROM ROUGHNESS MEASUREMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gudmundsson, Jon Steinar

    FRICTION FACTOR IN HIGH PRESSURE NATURAL GAS PIPELINES FROM ROUGHNESS MEASUREMENTS DETERMINATION DU and Technology, Norway ABSTRACT Pressure drop experiments on natural gas flow at 80 to 120 bar pressure and high of natural gas at typical operating pressures (100-180 bar). At such Reynolds numbers the classical Colebrook

  15. Flow over rough topography. A preliminary study with high resolution topography at Ormen Lange

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Avlesen, Helge

    Flow over rough topography. A preliminary study with high resolution topography at Ormen Lange not able to march as long in time as desired, due to stability issues. On the given topography for selected horizontal sections, after im- posing a constant velocity flow over the given topography

  16. Under consideration for publication in J. Fluid Mech. 1 Nonlinear dynamics over rough topography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vanneste, Jacques

    Under consideration for publication in J. Fluid Mech. 1 Nonlinear dynamics over rough topography-dimensional, pe- riodic or random, small-scale topography is investigated using an asymptotic approach. Averaged (or homogenised) evolution equations which account for the flow-topography in- teraction are derived

  17. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON GEOSCIENCE AND REMOTE SENSING 1 A Simplified Formulation for Rough Surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IEEEProof IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON GEOSCIENCE AND REMOTE SENSING 1 A Simplified Formulation for Rough paper. To download the IEEE Taxonomy, go to http://www.30 ieee.org/documents/taxonomy_v101.pdf.31 I, OH 43210 USA. Color versions of one or more of the figures in this paper are available online at http://ieeexplore.ieee

  18. Effect of Substrate Roughness on D Spacing Supports Theoretical Resolution of Vapor Pressure Paradox

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagle, John F.

    Effect of Substrate Roughness on D Spacing Supports Theoretical Resolution of Vapor Pressure with and provides experimental support for a recently proposed theoretical resolution of the vapor pressure paradox has been called the vapor pressure paradox (Rand and Parsegian, 1989). Resolving this paradox

  19. Stress Drop during Earthquakes: Effect of Fault Roughness Scaling by Thibault Candela, Franois Renard,*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmittbuhl, Jean

    Stress Drop during Earthquakes: Effect of Fault Roughness Scaling by Thibault Candela, François parameter of static stress drop during an earthquake is related to the scaling properties of the fault and focusing on elastic deformation of the topography, which is the dominant mode at large scales, the stress

  20. Hydrothermal coupling in a self-affine rough fracture A. Neuville,* R. Toussaint, and J. Schmittbuhl

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmittbuhl, Jean

    - thermics is an intensively developing field. Deep enhanced geothermal systems EGSs are based on the energy the hydraulic flow and subse- quently to enhance the thermal exchange. Fracture roughness might, in the opposite as an ellipse or a poly- hedron. This is the case in most fracture network models used for geothermal 10

  1. Roughly 120 years ago, an incon-spicuous pest took a ride on a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Latchininsky, Alexandre

    Roughly 120 years ago, an incon- spicuous pest took a ride on a ship from Europe bound discussed the projects he had avail- able, the horn fly project fit best with my background. Horn Fly First, the cattle use costly energy meant for growth to rid themselves of the flies. Some of the behavioral changes

  2. Hydro-thermal flow in a rough fracture EC Contract SES6-CT-2003-502706

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toussaint, Renaud

    Hydro-thermal flow in a rough fracture EC Contract SES6-CT-2003-502706 PARTICIPANT ORGANIZATION NAME: CNRS Synthetic 2nd year report Related with Work Package............ HYDRO-THERMAL FLOW in the influence of a realistic geometry of the fracture on its hydro-thermal response. Several studies have

  3. Relations in Mathematical Morphology with applications to Graphs and Rough Sets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stell, John

    School of Computing, University of Leeds Leeds, LS2 9JT, U.K. jgs@comp.leeds.ac.uk Abstract. Rough sets of morphology for graphs. The structure of the paper is as follows. I begin in Section 2 with a brief review

  4. Light trapping in thin-film solar cells with randomly rough and hybrid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Light trapping in thin-film solar cells with randomly rough and hybrid textures Piotr Kowalczewski. M. Smets, and M. Zeman, "Plasmonic light trapping in thin-film silicon solar cells with improved Lambertian limits in thin film silicon solar cells with 1D and 2D periodic patterns," Opt. Express 20, A224­A

  5. ENGINEERED SUBSTRATES FOR THIN-FILM SOLAR CELLS: SCATTERING PROPERTIES OF 1D ROUGHNESS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ENGINEERED SUBSTRATES FOR THIN-FILM SOLAR CELLS: SCATTERING PROPERTIES OF 1D ROUGHNESS S. Del Sorbo, Optical Properties, Substrates, Texturisation, Thin Film Solar Cells 1 MOTIVATION OF THIS WORK The aim of thin film technology is to reduce both the electrical transport losses in the bulk region of a solar

  6. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Thin Films with Rough and Asymmetric Interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, D. Greg

    Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Thin Films with Rough and Asymmetric Interfaces N.A. Roberts with the use of interfaces and shows that pristine, imperfect and asymmetric interfaces in thin films can interface whose features are of the order of the phonon wavelength. At a constant temperature difference

  7. Gravitational quantum states of neutrons in a rough waveguide A. E. Meyerovich

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyerovich, Alex

    of such states is indeed a major experimental challenge. What is more, the measure- ments in this energy range/absorber. The analysis is based on a recently developed theory of quantum transport along random rough walls which and are more efficient than the processes involving the intermediate states. The theoretical results

  8. Effect of surface roughness on magnetic domain wall thickness, domain size, and coercivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Gwo-Ching

    , Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180-3590 G. Palasantzas and J. Th. M. De Hosson Department nm thick deposited on plasma etched Si 100 substrates showed that, by increasing surface rough- ness nearly linearly with film thickness. Such an increase of the thickness fluctuations5 was attributed

  9. Phreatic flow on sloping soil layers from a finite source: An analytical solution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Filley, T.H.

    1991-09-01

    Sloping clay layers beneath percolation ponds can cause infiltrating wastewater to pond and move in directions not predicted by vertical infiltration equations. This report presents a method for estimating the potential of wastewater from percolation sumps located over sloping clay layers to interact with nearby groundwater resources. The analytical solution developed is for steady-state conditions and includes a procedure to estimate the time needed to reach steady state. The fundamental assumption used in the mathematical development requires that elevation-head gradients be much larger than pressure-head gradients. A method for testing the validity of this assumption is also included. An example calculation was performed for percolation sumps on the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 in Elk Hills, California. That analysis showed that, under the assumptions used, the sumps may have enabled oil field wastewater to reach groundwater resources within the adjacent San Joaquin Valley. 9 refs., 10 figs.

  10. Large eddy simulations of surface roughness parameter sensitivity to canopy-structure characteristics

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Maurer, K. D.; Bohrer, G.; Ivanov, V. Y.

    2014-11-27

    Surface roughness parameters are at the core of every model representation of the coupling and interactions between land-surface and atmosphere, and are used in every model of surface fluxes. However, most models assume these parameters to be a fixed property of plant functional type and do not vary them in response to spatial or temporal changes to canopy structure. In part, this is due to the difficulty of reducing the complexity of canopy structure and its spatiotemporal dynamic and heterogeneity to less than a handful of parameters describing its effects of atmosphere–surface interactions. In this study we use large-eddy simulationsmore »to explore, in silico, the effects of canopy structure characteristics on surface roughness parameters. We performed a virtual experiment to test the sensitivity of resolved surface roughness to four axes of canopy structure: (1) leaf area index, (2) the vertical profile of leaf density, (3) canopy height, and (4) canopy gap fraction. We found roughness parameters to be highly variable, but were able to find positive relationships between displacement height and maximum canopy height, aerodynamic canopy height and maximum canopy height and leaf area index, and eddy-penetration depth and gap fraction. We also found negative relationships between aerodynamic canopy height and gap fraction, and between eddy-penetration depth and maximum canopy height and leaf area index. Using a decade of wind and canopy structure observations in a site in Michigan, we tested the effectiveness of our model-resolved parameters in predicting the frictional velocity over heterogeneous and disturbed canopies. We compared it with three other semi-empirical models and with a decade of meteorological observations. We found that parameterizations with fixed representations of roughness performed relatively well. Nonetheless, some empirical approaches that incorporate seasonal and inter-annual changes to the canopy structure performed even better than models with temporally fixed parameters.« less

  11. Sensitivity of Low Sloped Roofs Designs to Initial Water and Air Leakage 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karagiozis, A.; Desjarlais, A.; Salonvaara, M.

    2002-01-01

    , Espoo, Finland Andre Desjarlais. B.Sc.E Program Manager, Oak Ridge National Laboratory 1 Bethel Valley Rd, Oak Ridge TN, 37831-6070 ABSTRACT Liquid water in low sloped roofs almost always causes problems. Roofs are designed only... in Finland (area varying from 200 m2 up to 5 000 m2). A laboratory hot box apparatus (Kouhia and Nieminen, 1999) was also used to further quantify the performance of the grooved roof ventilation system and to show the thermal consequences...

  12. SPECTRAL SLOPE VARIATION AT PROTON SCALES FROM FAST TO SLOW SOLAR WIND

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruno, R.; Trenchi, L.; Telloni, D.

    2014-09-20

    We investigated the behavior of the spectral slope of interplanetary magnetic field fluctuations at proton scales for selected high-resolution time intervals from the WIND and MESSENGER spacecraft at 1 AU and 0.56 AU, respectively. The analysis was performed within the profile of high-speed streams, moving from fast to slow wind regions. The spectral slope showed a large variability between –3.75 and –1.75 and a robust tendency for this parameter to be steeper within the trailing edge, where the speed is higher, and to be flatter within the subsequent slower wind, following a gradual transition between these two states. The value of the spectral index seems to depend firmly on the power associated with the fluctuations within the inertial range; the higher the power, the steeper the slope. Our results support previous analyses suggesting that there must be some response of the dissipation mechanism to the level of the energy transfer rate along the inertial range.

  13. Optimal tuning and calibration of bendable mirrors with slope measuring profilers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKinney, Wayne; Kirschman, Jonathan; MacDowell, Alastair; Warwick, Tony; Yashchuk, Valeriy

    2009-06-22

    We describe a technique to optimally tune and calibrate bendable x-ray optics for sub-micron focusing. The focusing is divided between two elliptically cylindrical reflecting elements, a Kirkpatrick-Baez (KB) pair. Each optic is shaped by applying unequal bending couples to each end of a flat mirror. The developed technique allowsoptimal tuning of these systems using surface slope data obtained with a slope measuring instrument, the long trace profiler (LTP). Due to the near linearity of the problem, the minimal set of data necessary for the tuning of each bender, consists of only three slope traces measured before and after a single adjustment of each bending couple. The data are analyzed with software realizing a method of regression analysis with experimentally found characteristic functions of the benders. The resulting approximation to the functional dependence of the desired shape provides nearly final settings. Moreover, the characteristic functions of the benders found in the course of tuning, can be used for retuning to a new desired shape without removal from the beamline and re-measuring. We perform a ray trace, using profiler data for the finally tuned optics, predicting the performance to be expected during use of the optics on the beamline.

  14. The bends in the slopes of radial abundance gradients in the disks of spiral galaxies -- do they exist?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. S. Pilyugin

    2002-10-17

    Spiral galaxies with a reported bend in the slope of gradient in the oxygen abundances (O/H)_R23, derived with traditionally used R23 - method, were examined. It is shown that the artificial origin of the reported bends can be naturally explained. Two reasons that result in a false bend in the slope of (O/H)_R23 gradient are indicated. It is concluded that at the present time there is no example of a galaxy with an undisputable established bend in the slope of the oxygen abundance gradient.

  15. Macrofaunal community structure on the gulf of mexico continental slope: the role of disturbance and habitat heterogeneity at local and regional scales 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ammons, Archie Wood

    2007-09-17

    and reduced particulate organic carbon levels. Upper-slope submarine canyons possess some of the highest abundances. Less mobile macrofauna, such as poriferans, bivalves, and scaphopods, dominate slope communities above the 500 meter contour. Sediments...

  16. Surface roughness and interface width scaling of magnetron sputter deposited Ni/Ti multilayers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maidul Haque, S.; Biswas, A.; Tokas, R. B.; Bhattacharyya, D.; Sahoo, N. K.; Bhattacharya, Debarati

    2013-09-14

    Using an indigenously built r.f. magnetron sputtering system, several single layer Ti and Ni films have been deposited at varying deposition conditions. All the samples have been characterized by Grazing Incidence X-ray Reflectivity (GIXR) and Atomic Force Microscopy to estimate their thickness, density, and roughness and a power law dependence of the surface roughness on the film thickness has been established. Subsequently, at optimized deposition condition of Ti and Ni, four Ni/Ti multilayers of 11-layer, 21-layer, 31-layer, and 51-layer having different bilayer thickness have been deposited. The multilayer samples have been characterized by GIXR and neutron reflectivity measurements and the experimental data have been fitted assuming an appropriate sample structure. A power law correlation between the interface width and bilayer thickness has been observed for the multilayer samples, which was explained in the light of alternate roughening/smoothening of multilayers and assuming that at the interface the growth “restarts” every time.

  17. Wetting Transitions of Condensed Droplets on Superhydrophobic Surfaces with Two-Tier Roughness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lv, Cunjing; Zhang, Xiwen; He, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Although realizing wetting transitions of droplets spontaneously on solid rough surfaces is quite challenging, it is becoming a key research topic in many practical applications which require highly efficient removal of liquid. We report wetting transitions of condensed droplets occurring spontaneously on pillared surfaces with two-tier roughness owing to excellent superhydrophobicity. The phenomenon results from further decreased Laplace pressure on the top side of the individual droplet when its size becomes comparable to the scale of the micropillars, which leads to a surprising robust spontaneous wetting transition, from valleys to tops of the pillars. A simple scaling law is derived theoretically, which demonstrates that the critical size of the droplet is determined by the space of the micropillars. For this reason, highly efficient removal of water benefits greatly from smaller micropillar space. Furthermore, three wetting transition modes exist, in which the in situ wetting behaviors are in good agree...

  18. Interfacial Friction in Gas-Liquid Annular Flow: Analogies to Full and Transition Roughness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bauer, R.C.; Beus, S.G.; Fore, L.B.

    1999-03-01

    New film thickness and pressure gradient data were obtained in a 5.08 by 101.6 mm duct for nitrogen and water in annular flow. Pressures of 3.4 and 17 atm and temperatures of 38 and 93 C were used to vary the gas density and liquid viscosity. These data are used to compute interfacial shear stresses and interfacial friction factors for comparison with several accepted literature correlations. These comparisons are reasonable for small values of the relative film thickness. However, the new data cover conditions not approached by the data used to construct those correlations. By combining the current data with the results of two other comprehensive modern experimental studies, a new correlation for the interfacial friction factor has been developed. This correlation adds elements of transition roughness to Wallis' fully-rough analogy to better predict interfacial friction factors over a wide range of gas Reynolds numbers and liquid film thicknesses.

  19. Electrochemical machining process for forming surface roughness elements on a gas turbine shroud

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, Ching-Pang (Cincinnati, OH); Johnson, Robert Alan (Simpsonville, SC); Wei, Bin (Mechanicville, NY); Wang, Hsin-Pang (Rexford, NY)

    2002-01-01

    The back side recessed cooling surface of a shroud defining in part the hot gas path of a turbine is electrochemically machined to provide surface roughness elements and spaces therebetween to increase the heat transfer coefficient. To accomplish this, an electrode with insulating dielectric portions and non-insulating portions is disposed in opposition to the cooling surface. By passing an electrolyte between the cooling surface and electrode and applying an electrical current between the electrode and a shroud, roughness elements and spaces therebetween are formed in the cooling surface in opposition to the insulating and non-insulating portions of the electrode, hence increasing the surface area and heat transfer coefficient of the shroud.

  20. Surface circulation in the Gulf of Cadiz: 2. Inflow-outflow coupling and the Gulf of Cadiz slope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brest, Université de

    that of the atmospheric forcing in driving the upper slope currents. The Mediteranean outflow forces a surface open ocean filaments con- touring Cape St. Vincent and penetrating eastward into the warmer GoC waters that suggest

  1. Energy production rates in fluid mixtures of inelastic rough hard spheres

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrés Santos; Gilberto M. Kremer; Vicente Garzó

    2010-07-16

    The aim of this work is to explore the combined effect of polydispersity and roughness on the partial energy production rates and on the total cooling rate of a granular fluid mixture. We consider a mixture of inelastic rough hard spheres of different number densities, masses, diameters, moments of inertia, and mutual coefficients of normal and tangential restitution. Starting from the first equation of the BBGKY hierarchy, the collisional energy production rates associated with the translational and rotational temperatures ($T_i^\\text{tr}$ and $T_i^\\text{rot}$) are expressed in terms of two-body average values. Next, those average values are estimated by assuming a velocity distribution function based on maximum-entropy arguments, allowing us to express the energy production rates and the total cooling rate in terms of the partial temperatures and the parameters of the mixture. Finally, the results are applied to the homogeneous cooling state of a binary mixture and the influence of inelasticity and roughness on the temperature ratios $T_1^\\text{tr}/T_1^\\text{rot}$, $T_2^\\text{tr}/T_1^\\text{tr}$, and $T_2^\\text{rot}/T_1^\\text{rot}$ is analyzed.

  2. Molecular Dynamics Simulation Study of Interaction between Model Rough Hydrophobic Surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Changsun Eun; Max L. Berkowitz

    2011-06-01

    We study some aspects of hydrophobic interaction between molecular rough and flexible model surfaces. The model we use in this work is based on a model we used previously (Eun, C.; Berkowitz, M. L. J. Phys. Chem. B 2009, 113, 13222-13228), when we studied the interaction between model patches of lipid membranes. Our original model consisted of two graphene plates with attached polar headgroups; the plates were immersed in a water bath. The interaction between such plates can be considered as an example of a hydrophilic interaction. In the present work we modify our previous model by removing the charge from the zwitterionic headgroups. As a result of this procedure, the plate character changes; it becomes hydrophobic. By separating the total interaction (or potential of mean force, PMF) between plates into the direct and the water-mediated interactions we observe that the latter changes from repulsive to attractive, clearly emphasizing the important role of water as a medium. We also investigate the effect of roughness and flexibility of the headgroups on the interaction between plates and observe that roughness enhances the character of the hydrophobic interaction. The presence of a dewetting transition in a confined space between charge-removed plates confirms that the interaction between plates is strongly hydrophobic. In addition, we notice that there is a shallow local minimum in the PMF in case of charge-removed plates. We find that this minimum is associated with the configurational changes that flexible headgroups undergo, as the two plates are brought together.

  3. The Effect of Excimer Laser Treatment on the Surface Roughness and Fracture Strength of Alumina Substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smoot, J.E.

    1998-05-13

    The microelectronics industry requires alumina substrates with exceptionally smooth surfaces and few surface defects to allow successful deposition of metallic films for reliable electronic performance. Irradiation by a 248-nm wavelength excimer laser beam (KrF) at a fluence of 125 mJ/mm{sup 2} and at various angles of incidence is shown to significantly reduce the surface roughness of alumina substrates. However, irradiation also creates a fine particulate deposit of alumina that only partially adheres to the substrate and impedes deposition of metal films. Annealing in air between 1350 C and 1450 C was found to remove the particles by sintering. As-received material showed surface roughness average (R{sub a}) mean values of 457 nm, which was reduced to 60 nm (mean) following irradiation and 71 nm (mean) following irradiation and annealing at 1350 C. Irradiation also produced a decrease in the number and severity of surface defects. The flexural strength and Weibull modulus were both increased by laser irradiation and thermal treatment. Flexural strength went from an as-received value of 450 MPa to 560 MPa following irradiation/sintering, measured at 10% probability of failure. The Weibull modulus was increased from the as-received value of about 9, to about 13 following irradiation/sintering. It was concluded that irradiation at an angle of incidence of 60{degree} from perpendicular was most effective in producing a low surface roughness.

  4. Lamellar Diblock Copolymers on Rough Substrates: Self-consistent Field Theory Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xingkun Man; Jiuzhou Tang; Pan Zhou; Dadong Yan; David Andelman

    2015-08-18

    We present numerical calculations of lamellar phases of di-block copolymers (BCP) confined between two surfaces, where the top surface is flat and the bottom one is corrugated. The corrugated substrate is assumed to have a single $q$-mode of lateral undulations with a wavenumber q_s and amplitude R. We focus on the effects of substrate roughness, parameterized by the dimensionless quantity, q_sR, on the relative stability between parallel and perpendicular orientations of the lamellar phase. The competition between film confinement, energy cost of elastic deformation and gain in surface energy induces a parallel-to-perpendicular transition of the BCP lamellae. Employing self-consistent field theory (SCFT), we study the critical substrate roughness value corresponding to this transition. The critical value increases as function of the surface preference towards one of the two BCP components, and as function of film thickness. But, it decreases with increasing values of the Flory-Huggins parameter. Our findings are equivalent to stating that the critical value decreases as the BCP molecular weight or the natural BCP periodicity increases. We further show that the rough substrate can overcome the formation of parallel lamellae in cases where the top surface has a preference towards one of the two BCP components. Our results are in good agreement with previous experiments, and highlight the physical conditions behind the perpendicular orientation of lamellar phases, as is desired in nanolithography and other industrial applications.

  5. The shallow geologic features of the upper continental slope, northern Gulf of Mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buck, Arvo Viktor

    1981-01-01

    region of the upper continental slope in the Gulf of Mexico lying immediately west of the Mississippi Trough (Fig. 1). water depths range from 150 m (500 ft) to a maximum of 1200 m (4000 ft). The area is centered on 28 00'N, 90'30'W, with the eastern... extremity being the western margin of the Mississippi Trough. The area is approximately 155 km by 55 km (96 mi by 33 mi) in size. The seismic data within the region were collected along lines of a 6. 4 km by 6. 4 km grid. +30~ 88' 0/I, ' oo goo ooo...

  6. STUDY OF TRANSPORTATION OF GTL PRODUCTS FROM ALASKAN NORTH SLOPE (ANS) TO MARKETS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Godwin A. Chukwu, Ph.D., P.E.

    2002-09-01

    The Alaskan North Slope is one of the largest hydrocarbon reserves in the US where Gas-to-Liquids (GTL) technology can be successfully implemented. The proven and recoverable reserves of conventional natural gas in the developed and undeveloped fields in the Alaskan North Slope (ANS) are estimated to be 38 trillion standard cubic feet (TCF) and estimates of additional undiscovered gas reserves in the Arctic field range from 64 TCF to 142 TCF. Transportation of the natural gas from the remote ANS is the key issue in effective utilization of this valuable and abundance resource. The throughput of oil through the Trans Alaska Pipeline System (TAPS) has been on decline and is expected to continue to decline in future. It is projected that by the year 2015, ANS crude oil production will decline to such a level that there will be a critical need for pumping additional liquid from GTL process to provide an adequate volume for economic operation of TAPS. The pumping of GTL products through TAPS will significantly increase its economic life. Transporting GTL products from the North Slope of Alaska down to the Marine terminal at Valdez is no doubt the great challenge facing the Gas to Liquids options of utilizing the abundant natural gas resource of the North Slope. The primary purpose of this study was to evaluate and assess the economic feasibility of transporting GTL products through the TAPS. Material testing program for GTL and GTL/Crude oil blends was designed and implemented for measurement of physical properties of GTL products. The measurement and evaluation of the properties of these materials were necessary so as to access the feasibility of transporting such materials through TAPS under cold arctic conditions. Results of the tests indicated a trend of increasing yield strength with increasing wax content. GTL samples exhibited high gel strengths at temperatures as high as 20 F, which makes it difficult for cold restart following winter shutdowns. Simplified analytical models were developed to study the flow of GTL and GTL/crude oil blends through TAPS in both commingled and batch flow models. The economics of GTL transportations by either commingled or batching mode were evaluated. The choice of mode of transportation of GTL products through TAPS would depend on the expected purity of the product and a trade-off between loss in product value due to contamination and cost of keeping the product pure at the discharge terminal.

  7. Benthic study of the continental slope off Cape Hatteras, North Carolina. Volume 3. Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diaz, R.J.; Blake, J.A.; Lohse, D.P.

    1993-03-01

    The Point is an area that supports a most productive pelagic fishery, including tuna, swordfish, marlin, and more. The objective of the study is to analyze video tapes from near the Point, in order to provide data on epibenthic, megafaunal invertebrates including species composition, relative abundances, and large scale (1 km) distribution. The Point is not a defined spot on a chart. Although fishermen do use the steep shelf break for location, they generally look for the west wall of the Gulf Stream. The Point and the oil lease site coincidentally occur where the Gulf Stream parts the continental slope, just north of the eastern-most tip of Cape Hatteras.

  8. Effect of the porosity on the fracture surface roughness of sintered materials: From anisotropic to isotropic self-affine scaling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tristan Cambonie; Jonathan Bares; Lamine Hattali; Daniel Bonamy; Véronique Lazarus; Harold Auradou

    2015-01-16

    To unravel how the microstructure affects the fracture surface roughness in heterogeneous brittle solids like rocks or ceramics, we characterized the roughness statistics of post-mortem fracture surfaces in home-made materials of adjustable microstructure length-scale and porosity, obtained by sintering monodisperse polystyrene beads. Beyond the characteristic size of disorder, the roughness profiles are found to exhibit self-affine scaling features evolving with porosity. Starting from a null value and increasing the porosity, we quantitatively modify the self-affine scaling properties from anisotropic (at low porosity) to isotropic (for porosity larger than 10 %).

  9. The Effects of Roof Membrane Color on Moisture Accumulation in Low-slope Commercial Roof Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kehrer, Manfred [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    The use of highly reflective roof membrane systems is being promoted and in some cases required in energy codes and green building codes and standards. Highly reflective membranes, which typically are light in color, have demonstrated reduced overall energy consumption in cooling dominated climate. These membranes also are theorized to reduce the heat island effect. Concern has been expressed about using highly reflective roof membrane systems in cool to cold climate zones because they potentially increase moisture accumulation in roof systems. Roof membranes are vapor retarders. The theory is that highly reflective membranes reflect the heat that could enter the roof assembly, potentially providing a condensing surface on the cold side of the roof assembly during winter months. The other concern is that roof systems using highly reflective membranes will not get hot enough during the summer months to dry out moisture that may have condensed or otherwise entered the roof assembly. This study focuses on mechanically attached, highly reflective, single-ply roof systems installed on low-slope (less than 2:12) structures in cool to cold climate zones. Three sources of data are considered when determining the moisture accumulation potential of these systems. 1.Test roof cuts taken during the winter months 2.Modeling data from a building envelope model specifically designed to evaluate moisture accumulation 3.Data from previous studies to determine the effects of roof membrane color on the drying rate of low-slope roof assemblies

  10. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from the North Slope Alaska (NSA) Site

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is the largest global change research program supported by the U.S. Department of Energy. The primary goal of the ARM Program is to improve the treatment of cloud and radiation physics in global climate models in order to improve the climate simulation capabilities of these models. To achieve this goal, ARM scientists and researchers around the world use continuous data obtained through the ARM Climate Research Facility. ARM maintains four major, permanent sites for data collection and deploys the ARM Mobile Facility to other sites as determined. The North Slope of Alaska (NSA) site is a permanent site providing data about cloud and radiative processes at high latitudes. These data are being used to refine models and parameterizations as they relate to the Arctic. Centered at Barrow and extending to the south (to the vicinity of Atqasuk), west (to the vicinity of Wainwright), and east (towards Oliktok), the NSA site has become a focal point for atmospheric and ecological research activity on the North Slope. Approximately 300,000 NSA data sets from 1993 to the present reside in the ARM Archive at http://www.archive.arm.gov/. Users will need to register for a password, but all files are then free for viewing or downloading. The ARM Archive physically resides at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  11. Determination of Limit Cycles Using Both the Slope of Correlation Integral and Dominant Lyapunov Methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Castillo, Rogelio; Alonso, Gustavo; Palacios, Javier C. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (Mexico)

    2004-02-15

    A method for nonlinear analysis of instabilities in boiling water reactors (BWRs) is presented. Both the Dominant Lyapunov Exponent method and the Slope of the Correlation Integral (SOCI) method are used to analyze the average power reactor monitor (APRM) signals from a BWR. The main advantage of using the two methods in a complementary manner is that doing so results in an enhancement of the capability to analyze noisy systems, such as the APRM signals in a BWR. Previously, such nonlinear analysis had been performed using independently either the Dominant Lyapunov Exponent Method or the SOCI method. These two methods are sensitive to noise in a signal and normally require large amounts of data for a reliable analysis.This proposed system for nonlinear analysis is composed first of a home-developed computer program called 'SLOPE', which is based on the SOCI method. Then, the signal analysis is also performed by the 'LENNS' code, which is used to obtain the dominant Lyapunov exponent. Since only the dominant Lyapunov exponent is computed, there is no need to acquire large amounts of data; thus, computational processing time is greatly reduced, even in the case of noisy data.The system was used to analyze BWR signals containing stationary and nonstationary limit cycles. It was found that this method satisfactorily calculates the limit cycles, extracting useful information from noisy signals.

  12. Single-layer MoS{sub 2} roughness and sliding friction quenching by interaction with atomically flat substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quereda, J.; Castellanos-Gomez, A.; Agraït, N.; Rubio-Bollinger, G.

    2014-08-04

    We experimentally study the surface roughness and the lateral friction force in single-layer MoS{sub 2} crystals deposited on different substrates: SiO{sub 2}, mica, and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN). Roughness and sliding friction measurements are performed by atomic force microscopy. We find a strong dependence of the MoS{sub 2} roughness on the underlying substrate material, being h-BN the substrate which better preserves the flatness of the MoS{sub 2} crystal. The lateral friction also lowers as the roughness decreases, and attains its lowest value for MoS{sub 2} flakes on h-BN substrates. However, it is still higher than for the surface of a bulk MoS{sub 2} crystal, which we attribute to the deformation of the flake due to competing tip-to-flake and flake-to-substrate interactions.

  13. Rough contact mechanics for graded bulk rheology: The role of small-scale wavelengths on rubber friction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michele Scaraggi; Davide Comingio

    2015-10-13

    We present a numerical model for the prediction of the rough contact mechanics of a viscoelastic block, with graded rheology, in steady sliding contact with a randomly rough rigid surface. In particular, we derive the effective surface response of a stepwise or continuously-graded block in the Fourier domain, which is then embedded in a Fourier-based residuals molecular dynamic formulation of the contact mechanics. Finally we discuss on the role of small-scale wavelengths on rubber friction and contact area, and we demonstrate that the rough contact mechanics exhibits effective interface properties which converge to asymptotes upon increase of the small-scale roughness content, when a realistic rheology of the confinement is taken into account.

  14. MEMS-based contact stress field measurements at a rough elastomeric layer: local test of Amontons' friction law in static

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adda-Bedia, Mokhtar

    MEMS-based contact stress field measurements at a rough elastomeric layer: local test of Amontons/Universit´e Paris 6, Paris, France Abstract. We present the results of recent friction experiments in which a MEMS

  15. Effects of Terrain Heights and Sizes on Island-Scale Circulations and Rainfall for the Island of Hawaii during HaRP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yi-Leng

    of Hawaii during HaRP YANG YANG AND YI-LENG CHEN Department of Meteorology, SOEST, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, Hawaii (Manuscript received 9 August 2006, in final form 23 April 2007) ABSTRACT Islands in Hawaii have different sizes and terrain heights with notable differences in climate and weather

  16. Assessing Terrain Stability in a GIS using SINMAP Pack, R.T. Research Associate Professor, Tarboton, D.G., Associate Professor1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tarboton, David

    Assessing Terrain Stability in a GIS using SINMAP Pack, R.T. Research Associate Professor, Tarboton State University, Logan, UT 84322-5230 Presented at the 15th annual GIS conference, GIS 2001, February 19-22, Vancouver, British Columbia Abstract SINMAP (Stability Index MAPping) is an ArcView GIS

  17. Effects of grit roughness and pitch oscillations on the S814 airfoil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janiszewska, J.M.; Ramsay, R.R.; Hoffmann, M.J.; Gregorek, G.M. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

    1996-07-01

    Horizontal-axis wind turbine rotors experience unsteady aerodynamics when the rotor is yawed, when rotor blades pass through the support tower wake, and when the wind is gusting. An understanding of this unsteady behavior is necessary to assist in the design of new rotor airfoils. The rotors also experience performance degradation due to surface roughness. These surface irregularities are due to the accumulation of insect debris, ice, and/or the aging process. Wind tunnel studies that examine both the steady and unsteady behavior of airfoils can help define pertinent flow phenomena, and the resultant data can also be used to validate analytical computer codes. An S814 airfoil model was tested in The Ohio State University Aeronautical and Astronautical Research Laboratory (OSU/AARL) 3 X 5 subsonic wind tunnel (3 X 5) under steady flow with both stationary model conditions and pitch oscillations. To study the extent of performance loss due to surface roughness, a leading edge grit roughness pattern (LEGR) was used to simulate leading edge contamination. After baseline cases were completed, the LEGR was applied for both steady state and model pitch oscillation cases. The Reynolds numbers for steady state conditions were 0.75, 1, 1.25 and 1.5 million, while the angle of attack ranged from -20{degrees} to +40{degrees}. While the model underwent pitch oscillations, data were acquired at Reynolds numbers of 0.75, 1, 1.25, and 1.5 million, at frequencies of 0.6, 1.2, and 1.8 Hz. Two sine wave forcing functions {+-}5.5{degrees} and {+-}10{degrees}, were used; at mean angles of attack of 8{degrees}, 14{degrees}, and 20{degrees}. For purposes herein, any reference to unsteady conditions means the model was in pitch oscillation.

  18. EFFECTS OF GRAPHITE SURFACE ROUGHNESS ON BYPASS FLOW COMPUTATIONS FOR AN HTGR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rich Johnson; Yu-Hsin Tung; Hiroyuki Sato

    2011-07-01

    Bypass flow in a prismatic high temperature gas reactor (HTGR) occurs between graphite blocks as they sit side by side in the core. Bypass flow is not intentionally designed to occur in the reactor, but is present because of tolerances in manufacture, imperfect installation and expansion and shrinkage of the blocks from heating and irradiation. It is desired to increase the knowledge of the effects of such flow, which has been estimated to be as much as 20% of the total helium coolant flow. Computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations can provide estimates of the scale and impacts of bypass flow. Previous CFD calculations have examined the effects of bypass gap width, level and distribution of heat generation and effects of shrinkage. The present contribution examines the effects of graphite surface roughness on the bypass flow for different relative roughness factors on three gap widths. Such calculations should be validated using specific bypass flow measurements. While such experiments are currently underway for the specific reference prismatic HTGR design for the next generation nuclear plant (NGNP) program of the U. S. Dept. of Energy, the data are not yet available. To enhance confidence in the present calculations, wall shear stress and heat transfer results for several turbulence models and their associated wall treatments are first compared for flow in a single tube that is representative of a coolant channel in the prismatic HTGR core. The results are compared to published correlations for wall shear stress and Nusselt number in turbulent pipe flow. Turbulence models that perform well are then used to make bypass flow calculations in a symmetric onetwelfth sector of a prismatic block that includes bypass flow. The comparison of shear stress and Nusselt number results with published correlations constitutes a partial validation of the CFD model. Calculations are also compared to ones made previously using a different CFD code. Results indicate that increasing surface roughness increases the maximum fuel and helium temperatures as do increases in gap width. However, maximum coolant temperature variation due to increased gap width is not changed by surface roughness.

  19. Tsunami generated by a granular collapse down a rough inclined plane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viroulet, Sylvain; Kimmoun, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    In this Letter, we experimentally investigate the collapse of initially dry granular media into water and the subsequent impulse waves. We systematically characterize the influence of the slope angle and the granular material on the initial amplitude of the generated leading wave and the evolution of its amplitude during the propagation. The experiments show that whereas the evolution of the leading wave during the propagation is well predicted by a solution of the linearized Korteweg-de Vries equation, the generation of the wave is more complicated to describe. Our results suggest that the internal properties of the granular media and the interplay with the surrounding fluid are important parameters for the generation of waves at low velocity impacts. Moreover, the amplitude of the leading wave reaches a maximum value at large slope angle. The runout distance of the collapse is also shown to be smaller in the presence of water than under totally dry conditions. This study provides a first insight into tsunam...

  20. Wave breaking over sloping beaches using a coupled boundary integral-level set method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garzon, M.; Adalsteinsson, D.; Gray, L.; Sethian, J.A.

    2003-12-08

    We present a numerical method for tracking breaking waves over sloping beaches. We use a fully non-linear potential model for in-compressible, irrotational and inviscid flow, and consider the effects of beach topography on breaking waves. The algorithm uses a Boundary Element Method (BEM) to compute the velocity at the interface, coupled to a Narrow Band Level Set Method to track the evolving air/water interface, and an associated extension equation to update the velocity potential both on and off the interface. The formulation of the algorithm is applicable to two and three dimensional breaking waves; in this paper, we concentrate on two-dimensional results showing wave breaking and rollup, and perform numerical convergence studies and comparison with previous techniques.

  1. Physical and Chemical Implications of Mid-Winter Pumping of Trunda Lakes - North Slope, Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hinzman, Larry D.; Lilly, Michael R.; Kane, Douglas L.; Miller, D. Dan; Galloway, Braden K.; Hilton, Kristie M.; White, Daniel M.

    2005-09-30

    Tundra lakes on the North Slope, Alaska, are an important resource for energy development and petroleum field operations. A majority of exploration activities, pipeline maintenance, and restoration activities take place on winter ice roads that depend on water availability at key times of the winter operating season. These same lakes provide important fisheries and ecosystem functions. In particular, overwintering habitat for fish is one important management concern. This study focused on the evaluation of winter water use in the current field operating areas to provide a better understanding of the current water use practices. It found that under the current water use practices, there were no measurable negative effects of winter pumping on the lakes studied and current water use management practices were appropriately conservative. The study did find many areas where improvements in the understanding of tundra lake hydrology and water usage would benefit industry, management agencies, and the protection of fisheries and ecosystems.

  2. Prediction of Seismic Slope Displacements by Dynamic Stick-Slip Analyses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ausilio, Ernesto [University of Calabria (Italy); Costanzo, Antonio [University of Calabria (Italy); Silvestri, Francesco [University of Naples 'Federico II' (Italy); Tropeano, Giuseppe [University of Calabria (Italy)

    2008-07-08

    A good-working balance between simplicity and reliability in assessing seismic slope stability is represented by displacement-based methods, in which the effects of deformability and ductility can be either decoupled or coupled in the dynamic analyses. In this paper, a 1D lumped mass 'stick-slip' model is developed, accounting for soil heterogeneity and non-linear behaviour, with a base sliding mechanism at a potential rupture surface. The results of the preliminary calibration show a good agreement with frequency-domain site response analysis in no-slip conditions. The comparison with rigid sliding block analyses and with the decoupled approach proves that the stick-slip procedure can result increasingly unconservative for soft soils and deep sliding depths.

  3. Force and torque acting on particles in a transitionally rough open channel flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan-Braun, Clemens; Uhlmann, Markus

    2011-01-01

    Direct numerical simulation of open channel flow over a geometrically rough wall has been performed at a bulk Reynolds number of approximately 2900. The wall consisted of a layer of spheres in a square arrangement. Two cases have been considered. In the first case the spheres are small (with diameter equivalent to 10.7 wall units) and the limit of the hydraulically smooth flow regime is approached. In the second case the spheres are more than three times larger (49.3 wall units) and the flow is in the transitionally rough flow regime. Special emphasis is given on the characterisation of the force and torque acting on a particle due to the turbulent flow. It is found that in both cases the mean drag, lift and spanwise torque are to a large extent produced at the top region of the particle surface. The intensity of the particle force fluctuations is significantly larger in the large-sphere case, while the trend differs for the fluctuations of the individual components of the torque. A simplified model is used t...

  4. Steady state in a gas of inelastic rough spheres heated by a uniform stochastic force

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francisco Vega Reyes; Andrés Santos

    2015-11-04

    We study here the steady state attained in a granular gas of inelastic rough spheres that is subject to a spatially uniform random volume force. The stochastic force has the form of the so-called white noise and acts by adding impulse to the particle translational velocities. We work out an analytical solution of the corresponding velocity distribution function from a Sonine polynomial expansion that displays energy non-equipartition between the translational and rotational modes, translational and rotational kurtoses, and translational-rotational velocity correlations. By comparison with a numerical solution of the Boltzmann kinetic equation (by means of the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo method) we show that our analytical solution provides a good description that is quantitatively very accurate in certain ranges of inelasticity and roughness. We also find three important features that make the forced granular gas steady state very different from the homogeneous cooling state (attained by an unforced granular gas). First, the marginal velocity distributions are always close to a Maxwellian. Second, there is a continuous transition to the purely smooth limit (where the effects of particle rotations are ignored). And third, the angular translational-rotational velocity correlations show a preference for a quasiperpendicular mutual orientation (which is called "lifted-tennis-ball" behavior).

  5. Alaska North Slope National Energy Strategy initiative: Analysis of five undeveloped fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, C.P.; Allaire, R.B.; Doughty, T.C.; Faulder, D.D.; Irving, J.S.; Jamison, H.C.; White, G.J.

    1993-05-01

    The US Department of Energy was directed in the National Energy Strategy to establish a federal interagency task force to identify specific technical and regulatory barriers to the development of five undeveloped North Slope Alaska fields and make recommendations for their resolution. The five fields are West Sak, Point Thomson, Gwydyr Bay, Seal Island/Northstar, and Sandpiper Island. Analysis of environmental, regulatory, technical, and economic information, and data relating to the development potential of the five fields leads to the following conclusions: Development of the five fields would result in an estimated total of 1,055 million barrels of oil and 4.4 trillion cubic feet of natural gas and total investment of $9.4 billion in 1992 dollars. It appears that all five of the fields will remain economically marginal developments unless there is significant improvement in world oil prices. Costs of regulatory compliance and mitigation, and costs to reduce or maintain environmental impacts at acceptable levels influence project investments and operating costs and must be considered in the development decision making process. The development of three of the fields (West Sak, Point Thomson, and Gwydyr Bay) that are marginally feasible would have an impact on North Slope production over the period from about 2000 to 2014 but cannot replace the decline in Prudhoe Bay Unit production or maintain the operation of the Trans-Alaska Pipeline System (TAPS) beyond about 2014 with the assumption that the TAPS will shut down when production declines to the range of 400 to 200 thousand barrels of oil/day. Recoverable reserves left in the ground in the currently producing fields and soon to be developed fields, Niakuk and Point McIntyre, would range from 1 billion to 500 million barrels of oil corresponding to the time period of 2008 to 2014 based on the TAPS shutdown assumption.

  6. The Wahluke (North) Slope of the Hanford Site: History and present challenges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerber, M.S.

    1996-04-16

    The Hanford Site was founded in early 1943 for the top secret government mission of producing plutonium for the world`s first atomic weapons. A great deal of land was needed, both to separate various Site facilities from each other, and to provide buffer zones for safety and security purposes. In total, 640 square miles were occupied by the original Hanford Site and its buffer zones. Much of this land had been earmarked for inclusion in the Columbia Basin Irrigation Project (CBP). After World War II ended, a series of national decisions led to a long-term mission for the Hanford Site, and area residents learned that the Site lands they had hoped to farm would be withheld from agricultural production for the foreseeable future. A long set of negotiations commenced between the federal management agency responsible for Hanford (the Atomic Energy Commission -- AEC), and the Bureau of Reclamation (BOR), Department of the Interior that managed the CBP. Some lands were turned back to agriculture, and other compromises made, in the Site`s far northern buffer lands known as the Wahluke Slope, during the 1950s. In the mid-1960s, further negotiations were about to allow farming on lands just north of the Columbia River, opposite Hanford`s reactors, when studies conducted by the BOR found drainage barriers to irrigation. As a result of these findings, two wildlife refuges were created on that land in 1971. Today, after the Hanford Site plutonium production mission has ended and as Site cleanup goes forward, the possibility of total release of Wahluke Slope lands from the control of the Department of Energy (DOE -- a successor agency to the AEC) is under discussion. Such discussion encompasses not just objective and clearly visible criteria, but it resurrects historical debates about the roles of farming and government presence in the Columbia Basin.

  7. Erosion control on a steeply sloped pipeline right-of-way in southwestern Pennsylvania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zellmer, S.D.; Edgar, D.E. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA)); Isaacson, H.R. (Gas Research Inst., Chicago, IL (USA))

    1991-01-01

    The results of precipitation on steeply sloped pipeline rights-of-way (ROWs) during the time between ROW rehabilitation and the establishment of a dense, self-sustaining vegetative ground cover can cause locally severe soil erosion. This erosion results in elevated sediment loads in receiving streams and increases the difficulty and costs of ROW maintenance. A field study was completed that compared the environmental effectiveness of nine treatments on a 28% ROW slope in southwestern Pennsylvania. The six erosion-control methods investigated in the study, selected to represent a wide range in material type and installation cost, were (1) heavy application of straw mulch, (2) light application of straw mulch, (3) processed wood fiber, (4) chemical soil binder, (5) paper strips in netting, and (6) light straw mulch with a tacking agent. Each of the test plots also received the basic treatment of limestone, fertilizer, and a seed mixture commonly used to rehabilitate ROWs in the region. Precipitation, runoff volumes, and sediment yields were measured on each of 51 plots for 45 precipitation events during the 18-month study. Vegetation data were collected by the point-intercept method four times during the study to determine the amount of plant cover and species composition. Differences in sediment yield were observed among methods and between ROW location, but plant cover development was not influenced by erosion-control method or location. The relationship between environmental and cost data indicated that, of the six erosion-control methods tested, a light application of straw mulch was the most effective erosion-control treatment. 19 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  8. Theoretical analysis of reflected ray error from surface slope error and their application to the solar concentrated collector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Weidong

    2011-01-01

    Surface slope error of concentrator is one of the main factors to influence the performance of the solar concentrated collectors which cause deviation of reflected ray and reduce the intercepted radiation. This paper presents the general equation to calculate the standard deviation of reflected ray error from slope error through geometry optics, applying the equation to calculate the standard deviation of reflected ray error for 5 kinds of solar concentrated reflector, provide typical results. The results indicate that the slope error is transferred to the reflected ray in more than 2 folds when the incidence angle is more than 0. The equation for reflected ray error is generally fit for all reflection surfaces, and can also be applied to control the error in designing an abaxial optical system.

  9. Study of biological processes on the US South Atlantic slope and rise. Phase 1: Benthic characterization. Volume 2. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blake, J.A.; Hecker, B.; Grassle, J.F.; Maciolek-Blake, N.; Brown, B.

    1985-06-01

    Concerns about the potential effects of oil and gas exploration on the U.S. Continental Slope and Rise led to the initiation of a deep-sea characterization study off North Carolina. The biological communities off North Carolina were poorly known, and prior to any drilling activities, a limited regional data base was required. The program included a seasonal characterization of biological and surficial geological properties at a limited number of slope and rise sites, with special emphasis on areas of high oil industry interest. A rich and highly diverse benthic infauna was discovered, with a large percentage of the 877 species being new to science. Annelids were the dominant taxa both in terms of density, numbers of species, and biomass. Foraminiferan tests comprised most of the sand fraction. Hydrographic data indicated some intrusion of colder water on the upper slope benthos from deeper water.

  10. An analysis of cattle-farming in the coffee producing area of the Pacific Slope in Guatemala 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cordon, Oscar Humberto

    1967-01-01

    AN ANALYSIS OF CATTLE-FARMING IN THE COFFEE PRODUCING AREA OF THE PACIFIC SLOPE IN GUATEMALA A Thesis By OSCAR HUMBERTO CORDON Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE January 1967 Ma]or Sub]ect: Animal Science AN ANALYSIS OF CATTLE-FARMING IN THE COFFEE PRODUCING AREA OF THE PACIFIC SLOPE IN GUATEMALA A Thesis By OSCAR HUMBERTO CORDON Approved as to style and content by: airman...

  11. Improved detection of rough defects for ultrasonic NDE inspections based on finite element modeling of elastic wave scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pettit, J. R. [Rolls-Royce Nuclear, PO BOX 2000, Derby, UK, DE21 7XX and Research Centre for NDE, Imperial College London, Exhibition Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Walker, A. [Rolls-Royce Nuclear, PO BOX 2000, Derby DE21 7XX (United Kingdom); Lowe, M. J. S. [Research Centre for NDE, Imperial College London, Exhibition Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2014-02-18

    Defects which posses rough surfaces greatly affect ultrasonic wave scattering behaviour, often reducing the magnitude of reflected signals. Ultrasonic inspections rely upon this response for detecting and sizing flaws. For safety critical components reliable characterisation is crucial. Therefore, providing an accurate means to predict reductions in signal amplitude is essential. An extension of Kirchhoff theory has formed the basis for the UK power industry inspection justifications. However, it is widely recognised that these predictions are pessimistic owing to analytical approximations. A numerical full field modelling approach does not fall victim to such limitations. Here, a Finite Element model is used to aid in setting a non-conservative reporting threshold during the inspection of a large pressure vessel forging that might contain embedded rough defects. The ultrasonic response from multiple rough surfaces defined by the same statistical class is calculated for normal incident compression waves. The approach is validated by comparing coherent scattering with predictions made by Kirchhoff theory. At lower levels of roughness excellent agreement is observed, whilst higher values confirm the pessimism of Kirchhoff theory. Furthermore, the mean amplitude in the specular direction is calculated. This represents the information obtained during an inspection, indicating that reductions due to increasing roughness are significantly less than the coherent component currently being used.

  12. The Complex Influences of Backbarrier Deposition, Substrate Slope and Underlying Stratigraphy in Barrier Island Response to Sea Level Rise: Insights from the Virginia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Deborah

    The Complex Influences of Backbarrier Deposition, Substrate Slope and Underlying Stratigraphy stratigraphy on barrier island behavior. Results from late-Holocene sensitivity analyses indicate

  13. Water-waves modes trapped in a canal by a body with the rough surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Cardone; T. Durante; S. A. Nazarov

    2009-10-06

    The problem about a body in a three dimensional infinite channel is considered in the framework of the theory of linear water-waves. The body has a rough surface characterized by a small parameter $\\epsilon>0$ while the distance of the body to the water surface is also of order $\\epsilon$. Under a certain symmetry assumption, the accumulation effect for trapped mode frequencies is established, namely, it is proved that, for any given $d>0$ and integer $N>0$, there exists $\\epsilon(d,N)>0$ such that the problem has at least $N$ eigenvalues in the interval $(0,d)$ of the continuous spectrum in the case $\\epsilon\\in(0,\\epsilon(d,N)) $. The corresponding eigenfunctions decay exponentially at infinity, have finite energy, and imply trapped modes.

  14. Light emitting diode with high aspect ratio submicron roughness for light extraction and methods of forming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Ting (Ventura, CA)

    2011-04-26

    The surface morphology of an LED light emitting surface is changed by applying a reactive ion etch (RIE) process to the light emitting surface. High aspect ratio, submicron roughness is formed on the light emitting surface by transferring a thin film metal hard-mask having submicron patterns to the surface prior to applying a reactive ion etch process. The submicron patterns in the metal hard-mask can be formed using a low cost, commercially available nano-patterned template which is transferred to the surface with the mask. After subsequently binding the mask to the surface, the template is removed and the RIE process is applied for time duration sufficient to change the morphology of the surface. The modified surface contains non-symmetric, submicron structures having high aspect ratio which increase the efficiency of the device.

  15. The apparent roughness of a sand surface blown by wind from an analytical model of saltation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Pähtz; Jasper F. Kok; Hans J. Herrmann

    2015-03-16

    We present an analytical model of aeolian sand transport. The model quantifies the momentum transfer from the wind to the transported sand by providing expressions for the thickness of the saltation layer and the apparent surface roughness. These expressions are derived from basic physical principles and a small number of assumptions. The model further predicts the sand transport rate (mass flux) and the impact threshold (the smallest value of the wind shear velocity at which saltation can be sustained). We show that, in contrast to previous studies, the present model's predictions are in very good agreement with a range of experiments, as well as with numerical simulations of aeolian saltation. Because of its physical basis, we anticipate that our model will find application in studies of aeolian sand transport on both Earth and Mars.

  16. Light emitting diode with high aspect ratio submicron roughness for light extraction and methods of forming

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Li, Ting

    2013-08-13

    The surface morphology of an LED light emitting surface is changed by applying a reactive ion etch (RIE) process to the light emitting surface. High aspect ratio, submicron roughness is formed on the light emitting surface by transferring a thin film metal hard-mask having submicron patterns to the surface prior to applying a reactive ion etch process. The submicron patterns in the metal hard-mask can be formed using a low cost, commercially available nano-patterned template which is transferred to the surface with the mask. After subsequently binding the mask to the surface, the template is removed and the RIE process is applied for time duration sufficient to change the morphology of the surface. The modified surface contains non-symmetric, submicron structures having high aspect ratio which increase the efficiency of the device.

  17. Adhesion between elastic solids with randomly rough surfaces: comparison of analytical theory with molecular dynamics simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Mulakaluri; B. N. J. Persson

    2011-12-22

    The adhesive contact between elastic solids with randomly rough, self affine fractal surfaces is studied by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The interfacial binding energy obtained from the simulations of nominally flat and curved surfaces is compared with the predictions of the contact mechanics theory by Persson. Theoretical and simulation results agree rather well, and most of the differences observed can be attributed to finite size effects and to the long-range nature of the interaction between the atoms in the block and the substrate in the MD model, as compared to the analytical theory which is for an infinite system with interfacial contact interaction. For curved surfaces (JKR-type of problem) the effective interfacial energy exhibit a weak hysteresis which may be due to the influence of local irreversible detachment processes in the vicinity of the opening crack tip during pull-off.

  18. A study of pitch oscillation and roughness on airfoils used for horizontal axis wind turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregorek, G.M.; Hoffmann, M.J.; Ramsay, R.R.; Janiszewska, J.M. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

    1995-12-01

    Under subcontract XF-1-11009-3 the Ohio State University Aeronautical and Astronautical Research Laboratory (OSU/AARL) with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) developed an extensive database of empirical aerodynamic data. These data will assist in the development of analytical models and in the design of new airfoils for wind turbines. To accomplish the main objective, airfoil models were designed, built and wind tunnel tested with and without model leading edge grit roughness (LEGR). LEGR simulates surface irregularities due to the accumulation of insect debris, ice, and/or the aging process. This report is a summary of project project activity for Phase III, which encompasses the time period from September 17, 1 993 to September 6, 1 994.

  19. Transverse slope of bed and turbid-clear water interface of channelized turbidity currents flowing around bends

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, Gary

    1 Transverse slope of bed and turbid-clear water interface of channelized turbidity currents Production Research Company Houston, Texas USA ABSTRACT Turbidity currents are sediment-laden bottom flows in lakes and the ocean that derive their momentum from the force of gravity acting on the sediment held

  20. DESIGN OF A FAILED LANDFILL SLOPE By: Timothy D. Stark, W. Douglas Evans-, and Paul E. Sherry'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Central Office, Division of Solid and Infectious Waste Management, Ohio Environmental Protection Agency solid waste landfill in which lateral displacements of up to 900 ft (275 m) and vertical settlements.1 million m~) of waste making it the largest slope failure in a municipal solid waste facility

  1. Disaster Mitigation of Debris Flows, Slope Failures and Landslides 159 Estimating Magnitude-Frequency Relationships for Debris Flows on Forested

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Butler, David R. - Department of Geography, Texas State University

    Disaster Mitigation of Debris Flows, Slope Failures and Landslides 159 Estimating Magnitude for the assessment of hazards and risks as well as for the design of e.g., torrent control works or retention basins. 2005a). However, data from tree-ring records have only exceptionally been coupled with data from ground

  2. Landslides and Engineered Slopes Chen et al. (eds) 2008 Taylor & Francis Group, London, ISBN 978-0-415-41196-7

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -quality data sets for understanding the initiation and movement of landslides. Typical components of ground applications have determined the groundwater conditions controlling slow- moving landslides, detected 3-D of past slope failures. Such stud- ies, however, reveal little about the dynamics of active landslides

  3. Resonant Generation of Internal Waves on a Model Continental Slope H. P. Zhang, B. King, and Harry L. Swinney

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Resonant Generation of Internal Waves on a Model Continental Slope H. P. Zhang, B. King, and Harry wave generation in a laboratory model of oscillating tidal flow on a continental margin. Waves waves in the oceans are generated by oscillatory tides flowing over ocean to- pography

  4. Geotechnical in situ characterization of subaquatic slopes: The role of pore pressure transients versus frictional strength in landslide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilli, Adrian

    Geotechnical in situ characterization of subaquatic slopes: The role of pore pressure transients; published 11 April 2007. [1] Mineralogical composition and pore fluid pressure are the crucial controls facilitates an upward pore pressure pulse to the base of the softer, less stable unit. Here, excess pore

  5. Study of biological processes on the US South Atlantic slope and rise. Phase 1: Benthic characterization. Volume 1. Executive Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blake, J.A.; Hecker, B.; Grassle, J.F.; Maciolek-Blake, N.; Brown, B.

    1985-06-01

    Concerns about the potential effects of oil and gas exploration on the U.S. Continental Slope and Rise led to the initiation of a deep-sea characterization study off North Carolina. The program included a seasonal characterization of biological and surficial geological properties at a limited number of slope and rise sites, with special emphasis on areas of high oil industry interest. A five-station transect was established off Cape Lookout in depths of 600 m, 1000 m, 1500 m, 2000 m and 3000 m. A rich and highly diverse benthic infauna was discovered, with a large percentage of the 877 species being new to science. Faunal density was highest on the upper slope (600 m) and lowest on the continental rise (3000 m). Species diversity values were all higher than 6.0, indicating a very diverse fauna, with the highest values at 3000 m. Foraminiferan tests comprised most of the sand fraction. Hydrographic data indicated some intrusion of colder water on the upper slope benthos from deeper water.

  6. Seasonal variability of water masses and transport on the Antarctic continental shelf and slope in the southeastern Weddell Sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    transport of cold, fresh surface waters onto the continental shelf. Offshore, the warmer, saltier Warm DeepSeasonal variability of water masses and transport on the Antarctic continental shelf and slope masses and transport in the region. Rapid fluctuations in temperature and salinity throughout the year

  7. Detailed comparative study and a mechanistic model of resuspension of spherical particles from rough and smooth surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shnapp, Ron

    2014-01-01

    Resuspension of solid particles by a tornado-like vortex from surfaces of different roughness is studied using a three-dimensional particle tracking velocimetry (3D-PTV) method. By utilizing the three-dimensional information on particle positions, velocities and accelerations before, during and after the resuspension (lift-off) event, we demonstrate that the resuspension efficiency is significantly higher from the rough surface, and propose a mechanistic model of this peculiar effect. The results indicate that for all Reynolds numbers tested, the resuspension rate, as well as particle velocities and accelerations, are higher over the rough surface, as compared to the smooth counterpart. The results and the model can help to improve modeling and analysis of resuspension rates in engineering and environmental applications.

  8. Roughness of the SiC/SiO{sub 2} vicinal interface and atomic structure of the transition layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Peizhi; Li, Guoliang; Duscher, Gerd, E-mail: gduscher@utk.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States); Sharma, Yogesh K.; Ahyi, Ayayi C.; Isaacs-Smith, Tamara; Williams, John R.; Dhar, Sarit [Department of Physics, Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama 36849 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    The SiC/SiO{sub 2} interface is generally considered to be the cause for the reduced electron mobility of SiC power devices. Previous studies have shown a correlation between the mobility and the transition layer width at the SiC/SiO{sub 2} interface. The authors investigated this interface with atomic resolution Z-contrast imaging and electron energy-loss spectroscopy, and discovered that this transition region was due to the roughness of the vicinal interface. The roughness of a vicinal interface consisted of atomic steps and facets deviating from the ideal off-axis cut plane. The authors conclude that this roughness is limiting the mobility in the channels of SiC MOSFETs.

  9. Steep-Slope Assembly Testing of Clay and Concrete Tile With and Without Cool Pigmented Colors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, William A [ORNL

    2005-11-01

    Cool color pigments and sub-tile venting of clay and concrete tile roofs significantly impact the heat flow crossing the roof deck of a steep-slope roof. Field measures for the tile roofs revealed a 70% drop in the peak heat flow crossing the deck as compared to a direct-nailed asphalt shingle roof. The Tile Roofing Institute (TRI) and its affiliate members are keenly interested in documenting the magnitude of the drop for obtaining solar reflectance credits with state and federal "cool roof" building efficiency standards. Tile roofs are direct-nailed or are attached to a deck with batten or batten and counter-batten construction. S-Misson clay and concrete tile roofs, a medium-profile concrete tile roof, and a flat slate tile roof were installed on fully nstrumented attic test assemblies. Temperature measures of the roof, deck, attic, and ceiling, heat flows, solar reflectance, thermal emittance, and the ambient weather were recorded for each of the tile roofs and also on an adjacent attic cavity covered with a conventional pigmented and directnailed asphalt shingle roof. ORNL measured the tile's underside temperature and the bulk air temperature and heat flows just underneath the tile for batten and counter-batten tile systems and compared the results to the conventional asphalt shingle.

  10. Cost-effective temporary microirrigation system for grass establishment on environmentally sensitive steep slopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gyasi-Agyei, Y. [University of Central Queensland, Rockhampton, Qld. (Australia). James Goldston Faculty of Engineering & Physical Systems

    2004-05-15

    An advanced technology cost-effective drip irrigation system design and setup on environmentally sensitive elevated steep slopes (batters) of a coal train derailment site in Central Queensland, Australia, are presented. The final profile of the coal burial site consists of six batters and associated berms with a drop in elevation of about 35 m. A small dam constructed downstream of the confluence of the two main drainage channels at the site supplied water for irrigation of the batters to aid the establishment of grass to control erosion. Water was periodically pumped from the small dam to three storage tanks using a petrol (gas) pump. Three solar pumps drew water from the storage tanks and dam to irrigate the top four batters. Contactors, pressure switches and irrigation control valves in turn shared a single solar power source between the solar pumps. Level balls (floating switches) placed in the storage tanks cut the solar power supply to the pumps when the storage tanks were nearly empty. On the whole, the irrigation system worked very well and excellent grass cover was established within 12 weeks. Given the environmental risks associated with the on-site burying of coal, and the estimated cost of about AU$11.73/m{sup 2} (every 10 years) in maintenance if the railway batters are not treated, the estimated total cost of AU$4.61/m{sup 2} of batter area treated with irrigation, including AU$3.08/m{sup 2} in irrigation cost, is justified.

  11. Marine carbonate embayment system in an Eolian dune terrain, Permian Upper Minnelusa Formation, Rozet Area, Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Achauer, C.W.

    1987-05-01

    The eolian origin for Minnelusa sandstones has been stressed in numerous published articles. However, the dolomites that are interbedded with the eolian sandstones have received little attention. Isopach mapping of one of the dolomite units (Dolomite I) reflects a marine embayment system whose individual embayments range from 1/2 to 1 mi in width and trend primarily in a northwest direction. Consistently the embayment dolomites pinch out against the flanks of reworked, low relief, broad, eolian dune ridges. So far, 108 mi/sup 2/ of the Dolomite I marine embayment system have been mapped, but the overall extent of the system is undoubtedly much greater. Dolomite I is rarely cored, but cores from stratigraphically higher embayment dolomites in the upper Minnelusa show that these dolomites display the following, shoaling-upward sequence: (1) subtidal, sparingly fossiliferous dolomite; (2) intertidal, algal-laminated or brecciated or mud-cracked dolomite; and (3) very thin, supratidal, nodular anhydrite. The embayments, therefore, became the sites of marine sabkhas located between eolian dunes. Two main conclusions emerge from this study: (1) the juxtaposition of eolian sandstones and marine dolomites in a tectonically stable area suggests that eustatic sea level changes and a very arid climate were responsible for the marked environmental and lithologic changes observed in the upper Minnelusa, and (2) arid, coastal, evaporitic sabkhas bordered by eolian dunes are known from a number of modern and ancient cases, but marine carbonate embayments and associated evaporitic sabkhas that penetrate deeply into eolian sandstone terrains are rare.

  12. Evaluation of WRF predicted near hub-height winds and ramp events over a Pacific Northwest site with complex terrain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Qing; Berg, Larry K.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Fast, Jerome D.; Newsom, Rob K.; Stoelinga, Mark; Finley, Cathy

    2013-08-16

    The WRF model version 3.3 is used to simulate near hub-height winds and power ramps utilizing three commonly used planetary boundary-layer (PBL) schemes: Mellor-Yamada-Janji? (MYJ), University of Washington (UW), and Yonsei University (YSU). The predicted winds have small mean biases compared with observations. Power ramps and step changes (changes within an hour) consistently show that the UW scheme performed better in predicting up ramps under stable conditions with higher prediction accuracy and capture rates. Both YSU and UW scheme show good performance predicting up- and down- ramps under unstable conditions with YSU being slightly better for ramp durations longer than an hour. MYJ is the most successful simulating down-ramps under stable conditions. The high wind speed and large shear associated with low-level jets are frequently associated with power ramps, and the biases in predicted low-level jet explain some of the shown differences in ramp predictions among different PBL schemes. Low-level jets were observed as low as ~200 m in altitude over the Columbia Basin Wind Energy Study (CBWES) site, located in an area of complex terrain. The shear, low-level peak wind speeds, as well as the height of maximum wind speed are not well predicted. Model simulations with 3 PBL schemes show the largest variability among them under stable conditions.

  13. Backfill Stress and Strain Information within a Centrifuge Geosynthetic-Reinforced Slope Model under Working Stress and Large Soil Strain Conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    Backfill Stress and Strain Information within a Centrifuge Geosynthetic-Reinforced Slope Model with a centrifuge test are used to investigate the mobilization of backfill stress and strain within a geosynthetic a centrifuge GRS slope model. Numerical results indicate that soil stress mobilization can be described

  14. Evaluation of Wax Deposition and Its Control During Production of Alaska North Slope Oils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tao Zhu; Jack A. Walker; J. Liang

    2008-12-31

    Due to increasing oil demand, oil companies are moving into arctic environments and deep-water areas for oil production. In these regions of lower temperatures, wax deposits begin to form when the temperature in the wellbore falls below wax appearance temperature (WAT). This condition leads to reduced production rates and larger pressure drops. Wax problems in production wells are very costly due to production down time for removal of wax. Therefore, it is necessary to develop a solution to wax deposition. In order to develop a solution to wax deposition, it is essential to characterize the crude oil and study phase behavior properties. The main objective of this project was to characterize Alaskan North Slope crude oil and study the phase behavior, which was further used to develop a dynamic wax deposition model. This report summarizes the results of the various experimental studies. The subtasks completed during this study include measurement of density, molecular weight, viscosity, pour point, wax appearance temperature, wax content, rate of wax deposition using cold finger, compositional characterization of crude oil and wax obtained from wax content, gas-oil ratio, and phase behavior experiments including constant composition expansion and differential liberation. Also, included in this report is the development of a thermodynamic model to predict wax precipitation. From the experimental study of wax appearance temperature, it was found that wax can start to precipitate at temperatures as high as 40.6 C. The WAT obtained from cross-polar microscopy and viscometry was compared, and it was discovered that WAT from viscometry is overestimated. From the pour point experiment it was found that crude oil can cease to flow at a temperature of 12 C. From the experimental results of wax content, it is evident that the wax content in Alaskan North Slope crude oil can be as high as 28.57%. The highest gas-oil ratio for a live oil sample was observed to be 619.26 SCF/STB. The bubblepoint pressure for live oil samples varied between 1600 psi and 2100 psi. Wax precipitation is one of the most important phenomena in wax deposition and, hence, needs to be modeled. There are various models present in the literature. Won's model, which considers the wax phase as a non-ideal solution, and Pedersen's model, which considers the wax phase as an ideal solution, were compared. Comparison indicated that Pedersen's model gives better results, but the assumption of wax phase as an ideal solution is not realistic. Hence, Won's model was modified to consider different precipitation characteristics of the various constituents in the hydrocarbon fraction. The results obtained from the modified Won's model were compared with existing models, and it was found that predictions from the modified model are encouraging.

  15. Lattice Boltzmann simulations in microfluidics: probing the no-slip boundary condition in hydrophobic, rough, and surface nanobubble laden microchannels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jens Harting; Christian Kunert; Jari Hyväluoma

    2009-10-19

    In this contribution we review recent efforts on investigations of the effect of (apparent) boundary slip by utilizing lattice Boltzmann simulations. We demonstrate the applicability of the method to treat fundamental questions in microfluidics by investigating fluid flow in hydrophobic and rough microchannels as well as over surfaces covered by nano- or microscale gas bubbles.

  16. Interpretation of recent seismic data from a frontier hydrocarbon province: western Rough Creek graben, southern Illinois and western Kentucky

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bertagne, A.J.; Pisasale, E.T.; Leising, T.C.

    1986-05-01

    The northern basement fault of the Rough Creek graben is seismically discernible and has surface expression in the Rough Creek fault zone. The southern basement fault is not clearly defined seismically, but can be inferred from shallow faulting and gravity data. This fault is roughly coincident with the Pennyrile fault zone. Extensional faults that formed the rift boundaries were the sites of late-stage compressional and extensional tectonics. Flower structures observed along the graben boundaries probably indicate post-Pennsylvanian wrench faulting. The basement within the graben plunges north-northwest, with the lowest point occurring south of the Rough Creek fault zone. Pre-Knox sediments thicken to approximately 12,000 in this area. The Knox Megagroup thickens toward the Mississippi Embayment, ranging from 4800 ft (southeastern graben area) to more than 7000 ft (west end of graben). Upper Ordovician to Devonian units also display westward thickening. The top of the Meramecian, New Albany, Maquoketa, and the base of the Knox generate continuous, high-amplitude seismic reflections due to large impedance contrasts between clastic and carbonate units. Shallow oil and gas production (Mississippian and Pennsylvanian) is present in this area. However, deep horizons (Knox, Lower Cambrian) remain relatively untested. Potential hydrocarbon traps in the pre-Knox sequence observed on seismic include fault blocks and updip pinch-outs.

  17. Effect of edge roughness on electronic transport in graphene nanoribbon channel metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbert, Matthew

    Effect of edge roughness on electronic transport in graphene nanoribbon channel metal-oxide-semiconductor on transport in graphene nanoribbon metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors MOSFETs are reported of Physics. DOI: 10.1063/1.2839330 Graphene has recently generated considerable interest as a semiconductor

  18. High-order solutions of three-dimensional rough-surface scattering problems at high-frequencies.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turc, Catalin

    High-order solutions of three-dimensional rough-surface scattering problems at high-frequencies. II with the capability of delivering very accurate results from low to high frequencies at a cost that is independent and polarizations. Submitted to: Waves Random Media #12;High-order high-frequency scattering solutions 2 1

  19. September 15, 2003 / Vol. 28, No. 18 / OPTICS LETTERS 1665 Heat treatment for reduction of surface roughness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Avrutsky, Ivan

    September 15, 2003 / Vol. 28, No. 18 / OPTICS LETTERS 1665 Heat treatment for reduction of surface postdevelopment heat treatment of the photoresist polymer used in the preparation of holographic gratings has been the postdevelopment heat treatment to reduce the surface roughness, the setup shown in Fig. 1 was used. The diffracted

  20. GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 28, NO. 5, PAGES 811-814, MARCH 1, 2001 Parameterizing Tidal Dissipation over Rough

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jayne, Steven

    of barotropic tidal energy. The first line of evidence comes from observations of mix- ing in the abyssal Brazil ocean, the energy flux carried by internal waves generated over rough topog- raphy dominates the energy issues. The first is whether including a parameterization for internal wave energy-flux in a model

  1. Assessment of Alaska's North Slope Oil Field Capacity to Sequester CO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Umekwe, Pascal; Mongrain, Joanna; Ahmadi, Mohabbat; Hanks, Catherine

    2013-03-15

    The capacity of 21 major fields containing more than 95% of the North Slope of Alaska's oil were investigated for CO{sub 2} storage by injecting CO{sub 2} as an enhanced oil recovery (EOR) agent. These fields meet the criteria for the application of miscible and immiscible CO{sub 2}-EOR methods and contain about 40 billion barrels of oil after primary and secondary recovery. Volumetric calculations from this study indicate that these fields have a static storage capacity of 3 billion metric tons of CO{sub 2}, assuming 100% oil recovery, re-pressurizing the fields to pre-fracturing pressure and applying a 50% capacity reduction to compensate for heterogeneity and for water invasion from the underlying aquifer. A ranking produced from this study, mainly controlled by field size and fracture gradient, identifies Prudhoe, Kuparuk, and West Sak as possessing the largest storage capacities under a 20% safety factor on pressures applied during storage to avoid over-pressurization, fracturing, and gas leakage. Simulation studies were conducted using CO{sub 2} Prophet to determine the amount of oil technically recoverable and CO{sub 2} gas storage possible during this process. Fields were categorized as miscible, partially miscible, and immiscible based on the miscibility of CO{sub 2} with their oil. Seven sample fields were selected across these categories for simulation studies comparing pure CO{sub 2} and water-alternating-gas injection. Results showed that the top two fields in each category for recovery and CO{sub 2} storage were Alpine and Point McIntyre (miscible), Prudhoe and Kuparuk (partially miscible), and West Sak and Lisburne (immiscible). The study concludes that 5 billion metric tons of CO{sub 2} can be stored while recovering 14.2 billion barrels of the remaining oil.

  2. Image Formation by Incoherent and Coherent Transition Radiation from Flat and Rough Surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stupakov, Gennady; /SLAC

    2012-03-01

    In this paper we derive equations for the image formation of transverse profile of a relativistic beam obtained by means of optical transition radiation (OTR) from flat and rough metal surfaces. The motivation behind this study lies in the desire to suppress coherent transition radiation (COTR) observed in experiments at modern free electron lasers. The physical mechanism behind the problem of COTR is that the OTR is predominantly radiated at small angles of order of 1/{gamma} where {gamma} is the relativistic factor of the beam. This means that the transverse formation size of the image is of order of {bar {lambda}}{gamma} where {bar {lambda}} = {lambda}/2{pi} with {lambda} the radiation wavelength. For relativistic beams this can be comparable or even exceed the transverse size of the beam, which would mean that the image of the beam has very little to do with its transverse profile. It is fortuitous, however, that the incoherent image is formed by adding radiation energy of electrons and results in the transverse formation size being of order of {bar {lambda}}/{theta}{sub a}, with {theta}{sub a} is the aperture angle of the optical system. The COTR image, in contrast, is formed by adding electromagnetic field of electrons, and leads to the formation size {bar {lambda}}{gamma}. In situations when the COTR intensity exceeds that of OTR the COTR imaging makes the diagnostic incapable of measuring the beam profile.

  3. IDC Reengineering Phase 2 & 3 Rough Order of Magnitude (ROM) Cost Estimate Summary (Leveraged NDC Case).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, James M.; Prescott, Ryan; Dawson, Jericah M.; Huelskamp, Robert M.

    2014-11-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has prepared a ROM cost estimate for budgetary planning for the IDC Reengineering Phase 2 & 3 effort, based on leveraging a fully funded, Sandia executed NDC Modernization project. This report provides the ROM cost estimate and describes the methodology, assumptions, and cost model details used to create the ROM cost estimate. ROM Cost Estimate Disclaimer Contained herein is a Rough Order of Magnitude (ROM) cost estimate that has been provided to enable initial planning for this proposed project. This ROM cost estimate is submitted to facilitate informal discussions in relation to this project and is NOT intended to commit Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) or its resources. Furthermore, as a Federally Funded Research and Development Center (FFRDC), Sandia must be compliant with the Anti-Deficiency Act and operate on a full-cost recovery basis. Therefore, while Sandia, in conjunction with the Sponsor, will use best judgment to execute work and to address the highest risks and most important issues in order to effectively manage within cost constraints, this ROM estimate and any subsequent approved cost estimates are on a 'full-cost recovery' basis. Thus, work can neither commence nor continue unless adequate funding has been accepted and certified by DOE.

  4. Effects of refraction on transmission spectra of gas giants: decrease of the Rayleigh scattering slope and breaking of retrieval degeneracies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bétrémieux, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Detection of the signature of Rayleigh scattering in the transmission spectrum of an exoplanet is increasingly becoming the target of observational campaigns because the spectral slope of the Rayleigh continuum enables one to determine the scaleheight of its atmosphere in the absence of hazes. However, this is only true when one ignores the refractive effects of the exoplanet's atmosphere. I illustrate with a suite of simple isothermal clear Jovian H2-He atmosphere models with various abundances of water that refraction can decrease significantly the spectral slope of the Rayleigh continuum and that it becomes flat in the infrared. This mimics a surface, or an optically thick cloud deck, at much smaller pressures than one can probe in the non-refractive case. Although the relative impact of refraction on an exoplanet's transmission spectrum increases with decreasing atmospheric temperatures as well as increasing stellar temperature, it is still quite important from a retrieval's perspective even for a Jovian-...

  5. Assessment of primary production and optical variability in shelf and slope waters near Cape Hatteras, North Carolina. Final project report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Redalje, Donald G.; Lohrenz, Stevern E.

    2001-02-12

    In this project we determined primary production and optical variability in the shelf and slope waters off of Cape Hatteras, N.C. These processes were addressed in conjunction with other Ocean Margins Program investigators, during the Spring Transition period and during Summer. We found that there were significant differences in measured parameters between Spring and Summer, enabling us to develop seasonally specific carbon production and ecosystem models as well as seasonal and regional algorithm improvements for use in remote sensing applications.

  6. Geologic interrelations relative to gas hydrates within the North Slope of Alaska: Task No. 6, Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collett, T.S.; Bird, K.J.; Kvenvolden, K.A.; Magoon, L.B.

    1988-01-01

    The five primary objectives of the US Geological Survey North Slope Gas Hydrate Project were to: (1) Determine possible geologic controls on the occurrence of gas hydrate; (2) locate and evaluate possible gas-hydrate-bearing reservoirs; (3) estimate the volume of gas within the hydrates; (4) develop a model for gas-hydrate formation; and (5) select a coring site for gas-hydrate sampling and analysis. Our studies of the North Slope of Alaska suggest that the zone in which gas hydrates are stable is controlled primarily by subsurface temperatures and gas chemistry. Other factors, such as pore-pressure variations, pore-fluid salinity, and reservior-rock grain size, appear to have little effect on gas hydrate stability on the North Slope. Data necessary to determine the limits of gas hydrate stability field are difficult to obtain. On the basis of mud-log gas chromatography, core data, and cuttings data, methane is the dominant species of gas in the near-surface (0--1500 m) sediment. Gas hydrates were identified in 34 wells utilizing well-log responses calibrated to the response of an interval in one well where gas hydrates were actually recovered in a core by an oil company. A possible scenario describing the origin of the interred gas hydrates on the North Slope involves the migration of thermogenic solution- and free-gas from deeper reservoirs upward along faults into the overlying sedimentary rocks. We have identified two (dedicated) core-hole sites, the Eileen and the South-End core-holes, at which there is a high probability of recovering a sample of gas hydrate. At the Eileen core-hole site, at least three stratigraphic units may contain gas hydrate. The South-End core-hole site provides an opportunity to study one specific rock unit that appears to contain both gas hydrate and oil. 100 refs., 72 figs., 24 tabs.

  7. Design of robotic quadruped legs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKenzie, Jacob Elijah

    2012-01-01

    Prized for their performance on prepared surfaces, wheeled vehicles are often limited in mobility by rough and unstructured terrain. Conversely, systems that rely on legs have shown promising rough terrain performance but ...

  8. Light trapping and electrical transport in thin-film solar cells with randomly rough Piotr Kowalczewski, Angelo Bozzola, Marco Liscidini, and Lucio Claudio Andreani

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Light trapping and electrical transport in thin-film solar cells with randomly rough textures Piotr solar cells J. Appl. Phys. 105, 094511 (2009); 10.1063/1.3108689 Local versus global absorption in thin-film in thin-film solar cells with randomly rough textures Piotr Kowalczewski,a) Angelo Bozzola, Marco

  9. Chemical and Microbial Characterization of North Slope Viscous Oils to Assess Viscosity Reduction and Enhanced Recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shirish Patil; Abhijit Dandekar; Mary Beth Leigh

    2008-12-31

    A large proportion of Alaska North Slope (ANS) oil exists in the form of viscous deposits, which cannot be produced entirely using conventional methods. Microbially enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) is a promising approach for improving oil recovery for viscous deposits. MEOR can be achieved using either ex situ approaches such as flooding with microbial biosurfactants or injection of exogenous surfactant-producing microbes into the reservoir, or by in situ approaches such as biostimulation of indigenous surfactant-producing microbes in the oil. Experimental work was performed to analyze the potential application of MEOR to the ANS oil fields through both ex situ and in situ approaches. A microbial formulation containing a known biosurfactant-producing strain of Bacillus licheniformis was developed in order to simulate MEOR. Coreflooding experiments were performed to simulate MEOR and quantify the incremental oil recovery. Properties like viscosity, density, and chemical composition of oil were monitored to propose a mechanism for oil recovery. The microbial formulation significantly increased incremental oil recovery, and molecular biological analyses indicated that the strain survived during the shut-in period. The indigenous microflora of ANS heavy oils was investigated to characterize the microbial communities and test for surfactant producers that are potentially useful for biostimulation. Bacteria that reduce the surface tension of aqueous media were isolated from one of the five ANS oils (Milne Point) and from rock oiled by the Exxon Valdez oil spill (EVOS), and may prove valuable for ex situ MEOR strategies. The total bacterial community composition of the six different oils was evaluated using molecular genetic tools, which revealed that each oil tested possessed a unique fingerprint indicating a diverse bacterial community and varied assemblages. Collectively we have demonstrated that there is potential for in situ and ex situ MEOR of ANS oils. Future work should focus on lab and field-scale testing of ex situ MEOR using Bacillus licheniformis as well as the biosurfactant-producing strains we have newly isolated from the Milne Point reservoir and the EVOS environment.

  10. Stranski-Krastanow islanding initiated on the stochastic rough surfaces of the epitaxially strained thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tarik Ogurtani, Omer; Celik, Aytac; Emre Oren, Ersin

    2014-06-14

    Quantum dots (QD) have discrete energy spectrum, which can be adjusted over a wide range by tuning composition, density, size, lattice strain, and morphology. These features make quantum dots attractive for the design and fabrication of novel electronic, magnetic and photonic devices and other functional materials used in cutting-edge applications. The formation of QD on epitaxially strained thin film surfaces, known as Stranski-Krastanow (SK) islands, has attracted great attention due to their unique electronic properties. Here, we present a systematic dynamical simulation study for the spontaneous evolution of the SK islands on the stochastically rough surfaces (nucleationless growth). During the development of SK islands through the mass accumulation at randomly selected regions of the film via surface drift-diffusion (induced by the capillary and mismatch stresses) with and/or without growth, one also observes the formation of an extremely thin wetting layer having a thickness of a few Angstroms. Above a certain threshold level of the mismatch strain and/or the size of the patch, the formation of multiple islands separated by shallow wetting layers is also observed as metastable states such as doublets even multiplets. These islands are converted into a distinct SK islands after long annealing times by coalescence through the long range surface diffusion. Extensive computer simulation studies demonstrated that after an initial transient regime, there is a strong quadratic relationship between the height of the SK singlet and the intensity of the lattice mismatch strain (in a wide range of stresses up to 8.5?GPa for germanium thin crystalline films), with the exception at those critical points where the morphological (shape change with necking) transition takes place.

  11. Effects of grit roughness and pitch oscillations on the S809 airfoil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramsay, R.F.; Hoffman, M.J.; Gregorek, G.M. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

    1995-12-01

    An S809 airfoil model was tested in The Ohio State University Aeronautical and Astronautical Research Laboratory (OSU/AARL) 3{times}5 subsonic wind tunnel (3{times}5) under steady flow and stationary model conditions, and also with the model undergoing pitch oscillations. To study the possible extent of performance loss due to surface roughness, a standard grit pattern (LEGR) was developed to simulate leading edge contamination. After baseline cases were completed, the LEGR was applied for both steady state and model pitch oscillation cases. The Reynolds numbers for steady state conditions were 0.75, 1, 1.25, and 1.5 million, while the angle of attack ranged from {minus}20, to +40 {degrees}. With the model undergoing pitch oscillations, data were acquired at Reynolds numbers of 0.75, 1, 1.25, and 1.4 million, at frequencies of 0.6, 1.2, and 1.8 Hz. Two sine wave forcing functions were used; {plus_minus} 5.5{degrees} and {plus_minus} 10{degrees}, at mean angles of attack of 8{degrees}, 14{degrees}, and 20{degrees}. For purposes herein, any reference to unsteady conditions means the model was in pitch oscillation about the quarter chord. In general, the unsteady maximum lift coefficient was from 4% to 86% higher than the steady state maximum lift coefficient, and variation in the quarter chord pitching moment coefficient magnitude was from {minus}83% to 195% relative to steady state values at high angles of attack. These findings indicate the importance of considering the unsteady flow behavior occurring in wind turbine operation to obtain accurate load estimates.

  12. Wall-slip of highly filled powder injection molding compounds: Effect of flow channel geometry and roughness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hausnerova, Berenika; Sanetrnik, Daniel [Dept. of Production Engineering, Faculty of Technology, Tomas Bata University in Zlin, nám. T.G. Masaryka 5555, 760 01 Zlín, Czech Republic and Centre of Polymer Systems, University Institute, Tomas Bata University in Zlin, Nad Ovc (Czech Republic); Paravanova, Gordana [Centre of Polymer Systems, University Institute, Tomas Bata University in Zlin, Nad Ovcírnou 3685, 760 01 Zlín (Czech Republic)

    2014-05-15

    The paper deals with the rheological behavior of highly filled compounds proceeded via powder injection molding (PIM) and applied in many sectors of industry (automotive, medicine, electronic or military). Online rheometer equipped with slit dies varying in surface roughness and dimensions was applied to investigate the wall-slip as a rheological phenomenon, which can be considered as a parameter indicating the separation of compound components (polymer binder and metallic powder) during high shear rates when injection molded.

  13. RENFORCEMENT ET CONTROLE DE PAREMENTS DANS UNE MINE A CffiL OUVERT DE CHARBON REINFORCEMENT AND CONTROL OF FOOTWALL SLOPES IN AN OPEN PIT COAL MINE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    AND CONTROL OF FOOTWALL SLOPES IN AN OPEN PIT COAL MINE VERSTÄRKUNG UND KONTROLLE VON STOSSER IM KOHLETAGEBAU to exploit the stephanian coal.TheNorth West area ofthis open pit is composed of an overthrust fold. The coal

  14. Improving single slope ADC and an example implemented in FPGA with 16.7 GHz equivalent counter clook frequency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Jinyuan; /Fermilab; Odeghe, John; /South Carolina State U.; Stackley, Scott; /Boston U.; Zha, Charles; /Rice U.

    2011-11-01

    Single slope ADC is a common building block in many ASCI or FPGA based front-end systems due to its simplicity, small silicon footprint, low noise interference and low power consumption. In single slope ADC, using a Gray code counter is a popular scheme for time digitization, in which the comparator output drives the clock (CK) port of a register to latch the bits from the Gray code counter. Unfortunately, feeding the comparator output into the CK-port causes unnecessary complexities and artificial challenges. In this case, the propagation delays of all bits from the counter to the register inputs must be matched and the counter must be a Gray code one. A simple improvement on the circuit topology, i.e., feeding the comparator output into the D-port of a register, will avoid these unnecessary challenges, eliminating the requirement of the propagation delay match of the counter bits and allowing the use of regular binary counters. This scheme not only simplifies current designs for low speeds and resolutions, but also opens possibilities for applications requiring higher speeds and resolutions. A multi-channel single slope ADC based on a low-cost FPGA device has been implemented and tested. The timing measurement bin width in this work is 60 ps, which would need a 16.7 GHz counter clock had it implemented with the conventional Gray code counter scheme. A 12-bit performance is achieved using a fully differential circuit making comparison between the input and the ramping reference, both in differential format.

  15. MAPPING CLOUDS AND TERRAIN OF EARTH-LIKE PLANETS FROM PHOTOMETRIC VARIABILITY: DEMONSTRATION WITH PLANETS IN FACE-ON ORBITS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kawahara, Hajime [Department of Physics, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0397 (Japan); Fujii, Yuka, E-mail: kawa_h@tmu.ac.jp [Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2011-10-01

    We develop an inversion technique of annual scattered light curves to sketch a two-dimensional albedo map of exoplanets in face-on orbits. As a test bed for future observations of extrasolar terrestrial planets, we apply this mapping technique to simulated light curves of a mock Earth-twin at a distance of 10 pc in a face-on circular orbit. A primary feature in recovered albedo maps traces the annual mean distribution of clouds. To extract information of other surface types, we attempt to reduce the cloud signal by taking the difference of two bands. We find that the inversion of reflectivity difference between 0.8-0.9 and 0.4-0.5 {mu}m bands roughly recovers the continental distribution, except for high latitude regions persistently covered with clouds and snow. The inversion of the reflectivity difference across the red edge (0.8-0.9 and 0.6-0.7 {mu}m) emphasizes the vegetation features near the equator. The planetary obliquity and equinox can be estimated simultaneously with the mapping under the presence of clouds. We conclude that the photometric variability of the scattered light will be a powerful means for exploring the habitat of a second Earth.

  16. Surface smoothing effect of an amorphous thin film deposited by atomic layer deposition on a surface with nano-sized roughness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lau, W. S. Wan, X.; Xu, Y.; Wong, H.; Zhang, J.; Luo, J. K.; Institute of Renewable Energy and Environment Technology, Bolton University, Deane Road, Bolton BL3 5 AB

    2014-02-15

    Previously, Lau (one of the authors) pointed out that the deposition of an amorphous thin film by atomic layer deposition (ALD) on a substrate with nano-sized roughness probably has a surface smoothing effect. In this letter, polycrystalline zinc oxide deposited by ALD onto a smooth substrate was used as a substrate with nano-sized roughness. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (XTEM) were used to demonstrate that an amorphous aluminum oxide thin film deposited by ALD can reduce the surface roughness of a polycrystalline zinc oxide coated substrate.

  17. Project test plan for runoff and erosion on fine-soil barrier surfaces and rock-covered side slopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walters, W.H.; Hoover, K.A.; Cadwell, L.L.

    1990-06-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and Westinghouse Hanford Company are working together to develop protective barriers to isolate near-surface radioactive waste. The purpose of the barriers is to protect defense wastes at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site from infiltration of precipitation, biointrusion, and surficial erosion for up to 10,000 years without the need for long-term monitoring, maintenance, or institutional control. The barriers will be constructed of layered earth and rock material designed to direct surface and groundwater pathways away from the buried waste. To address soil erosion as it applies to barrier design and long-term stability, a task designed to study this problem has been included in the Protective Barriers Program at PNL. The barrier soil-erosion task will investigate the ability of the soil cover and side slopes to resist the erosional and destabilizing processes from externally applied water. The study will include identification and field testing of the dominant processes contributing to erosion and barrier failure. The effects of rock mulches, vegetation cover on the top fine-grained soil surface, as well as the stability of rock armoring on the side slopes, will be evaluated. Some of the testing will include the effects of animal intrusion on barrier erosion, and these will be coordinated with other animal intrusion studies. 6 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Experimental and Computational Study of the Effect of the System Size on Rough Surfaces Formed by Sedimenting Particles in Quasi-Two-Dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. V. McCloud; U. Cardak; M. L. Kurnaz

    2004-08-22

    The roughness exponent of surfaces obtained by dispersing silica spheres into a quasi-two-dimensional cell is examined using experimental and computational methods. The cell consists of two glass plates separated by a gap, which is comparable in size to the diameter of the beads. We have studied the effect of changing the gap between the plates to a limit of about twice the diameter of the beads. If the conventional scaling analysis is performed, the roughness exponent is found to be robust against changes in the gap between the plates. The surfaces formed have two roughness exponents in two length scales, which have a crossover length about 1 cm.; however, the computational results do not show the same crossover behavior. The single exponent obtained from the simulations stays between the two roughness exponents obtained in the experiments.

  19. Gas Production From a Cold, Stratigraphically Bounded Hydrate Deposit at the Mount Elbert Site, North Slope, Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moridis, G.J.; Silpngarmlert, S.; Reagan, M. T.; Collett, T.S.; Zhang, K.

    2009-09-01

    As part of an effort to identify suitable targets for a planned long-term field test, we investigate by means of numerical simulation the gas production potential from unit D, a stratigraphically bounded (Class 3) permafrost-associated hydrate occurrence penetrated in the ount Elbert well on North Slope, Alaska. This shallow, low-pressure deposit has high porosities, high intrinsic permeabilities and high hydrate saturations. It has a low temperature because of its proximity to the overlying permafrost. The simulation results indicate that vertical ells operating at a constant bottomhole pressure would produce at very low rates for a very long period. Horizontal wells increase gas production by almost two orders of magnitude, but production remains low. Sensitivity analysis indicates that the initial deposit temperature is y the far the most important factor determining production performance (and the most effective criterion for target selection) because it controls the sensible heat available to fuel dissociation.

  20. Theoretical analysis of error transfer from surface slope to refractive ray and their application to the solar concentrated collector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Weidong

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the general equation to calculate the standard deviation of reflected ray error from optical error through geometry optics, applying the equation to calculate the standard deviation of reflected ray error for 8 kinds of solar concentrated reflector, provide typical results. The results indicate that the slope errors in two direction is transferred to any one direction of the focus ray when the incidence angle is more than 0 for solar trough and heliostats reflector; for point focus Fresnel lens, point focus parabolic glass mirror, line focus parabolic galss mirror, the error transferring coefficient from optical to focus ray will increase when the rim angle increase; for TIR-R concentrator, it will decrease; for glass heliostat, it relates to the incidence angle and azimuth of the reflecting point. Keywords: optic error, standard deviation, refractive ray error, concentrated solar collector

  1. Spectral analysis of the efficiency of vertical mixing in the deep ocean due to interaction of tidal currents with a ridge running down a continental slope

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ibragimov, Ranis N.; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.

    2014-10-29

    Efficiency of mixing, resulting from the reflection of an internal wave field imposed on the oscillatory background flow with a three-dimensional bottom topography, is investigated using a linear approximation. The radiating wave field is associated with the spectrum of the linear model, which consists of those mode numbers n and slope values ?, for which the solution represents the internal waves of frequencies ? = n?0 radiating upwrad of the topography, where ?0 is the fundamental frequency at which internal waves are generated at the topography. The effects of the bottom topography and the earth’s rotation on the spectrum is analyzed analytically and numerically in the vicinity of the critical slope, which is a slope with the same angle to the horizontal as the internal wave characteristic. In this notation, ? is latitude, f is the Coriolis parameter and N is the buoyancy frequency, which is assumed to be a constant, which corresponds to the uniform stratification.

  2. Experimental study of laser-oxygen cutting of low-carbon steel using fibre and CO{sub 2} lasers under conditions of minimal roughness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Golyshev, A A; Malikov, A G; Orishich, A M; Shulyatyev, V B [S.A. Khristianovich Institute of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2014-10-31

    The results of an experimental study of laser-oxygen cutting of low-carbon steel using fibre and CO{sub 2} lasers are generalised. The dependence of roughness of the cut surface on the cutting parameters is investigated, and the conditions under which the surface roughness is minimal are formulated. It is shown that for both types of lasers these conditions can be expressed in the same way in terms of the dimensionless variables – the Péclet number Pe and the output power Q of laser radiation per unit thickness of the cut sheet – and take the form of the similarity laws: Pe = const, Q = const. The optimal values of Pe and Q are found. We have derived empirical expressions that relate the laser power and cutting speed with the thickness of the cut sheet under the condition of minimal roughness in the case of cutting by means of radiation from fibre and CO{sub 2} lasers. (laser technologies)

  3. The Cascade of Tidal Energy from Low to High Modes on a Continental Slope SAMUEL M. KELLY* AND JONATHAN D. NASH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Cascade of Tidal Energy from Low to High Modes on a Continental Slope SAMUEL M. KELLY 25 March 2012) ABSTRACT The linear transfer of tidal energy from large to small scales is quantified. Observed transfer of tidal energy into high-mode internal tides is quantitatively consistent with observed

  4. Geochemical assessment of gaseous hydrocarbons: mixing of bacterial and thermogenic methane in the deep subsurface petroleum system, Gulf of Mexico continental slope 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ozgul, Ercin

    2004-09-30

    Mixtures of bacterial and thermogenic methane are found both at vents at the seafloor and in reservoirs in the deep subsurface of the Gulf of Mexico continental slope. The C1-C5 gas that most recently charged reservoirs of Jolliet (GC 184), Genesis...

  5. Exports of Alaskan north slope oil. Introduced in the House of Representatives, One Hundred Fourth Congress, First Session, June 15, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    The bill addresses H.R. 70 a bill to permit exports of certain domestically produced oil. The background and need for the legislation is provided. The bill would amend the Mineral Leasing Act to allow exports of Alaskan North Slope oil under certain conditions.

  6. Advanced Oil Recovery Technologies for Improved Recovery from Slope Basin Clastic Reservoirs, Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool, Eddy County, NM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, Mark B.

    1999-02-24

    The Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool in Eddy County New Mexico is a cost-shared field demonstration project in the US Department of Energy Class II Program. A major goal of the Class III Program is to stimulate the use of advanced technologies to increase ultimate recovery from slope-basin clastic reservoirs. Advanced characterization techniques are being used at the Nash Draw project to develop reservoir management strategies for optimizing oil recovery from this Delaware reservoir. Analysis, interpretation, and integration of recently acquired geologic, geophysical, and engineering data revealed that the initial reservoir characterization was too simplistic to capture the critical features of this complex formation. Contrary to the initial characterization, a new reservoir description evolved that provided sufficient detail regarding the complexity of the Brushy Canyon interval at Nash Draw. This new reservoir description is being used as a risk reduction tool to identify ''sweet spots'' for a development drilling program as well as to evaluate pressure maintenance strategies. The reservoir characterization, geological modeling, 3-D seismic interpretation, and simulation studies have provided a detailed model of the Brushy Canyon zones. This model was used to predict the success of different reservoir management scenarios and to aid in determining the most favorable combination of targeted drilling, pressure maintenance, well simulation, and well spacing to improve recovery from this reservoir.

  7. Absolute magnitudes and slope parameters for 250,000 asteroids observed by Pan-STARRS PS1 - preliminary results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vereš, Peter; Denneau, Larry; Granvik, Mikael; Bolin, Bryce; Chastel, Serge; Wainscoat, Richard; Burgett, William; Chambers, Ken; Flewelling, Heather; Kaiser, Nick; Magnier, Eugen; Morgan, Jeff; Price, Paul; Tonry, John; Waters, Chris

    2015-01-01

    We present the results of a Monte Carlo technique to calculate the absolute magnitudes (H) and slope parameters (G) of about 240,000 asteroids observed by the Pan-STARRS1 telescope during the first 15 months of its 3-year all-sky survey mission. The system's exquisite photometry with photometric errors filter and photometric system, allowed us to derive accurate H and G even with a limited number of observations and restricted range in phase angles. Our Monte Carlo method simulates each asteroid's rotation period, amplitude and color to derive the most-likely H and G, but its major advantage is in estimating realistic statistical+systematic uncertainties and errors on each parameter. The method was confirmed by comparison with the well-established and accurate results for about 500 asteroids provided by Pravec et al. (2012) and then applied to determining H and G for the Pan-STARRS1 asteroids using both the Muinonen et al. (2010) and Bowell et al. (1989) phase functions.

  8. Formal deduction of the Saint-Venant-Exner model including arbitrarily sloping sediment beds and associated energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernández-Nieto, E D; Narbona-Reina, G; Zabsonré, J D

    2015-01-01

    In this work we present a deduction of the Saint-Venant-Exner model through an asymptotic analysis of the Navier-Stokes equations. A multi-scale analysis is performed in order to take into account that the velocity of the sediment layer is smaller than the one of the fluid layer. This leads us to consider a shallow water type system for the fluid layer and a lubrication Reynolds equation for the sediment one. This deduction provides some improvements with respect to the classical Saint-Venant-Exner model: (i) the deduced model has an associated energy. Moreover, it allows us to explain why classical models do not have an associated energy and how to modify them in order to recover a model with this property. (ii) The model incorporates naturally a necessary modification that must be taken into account in order to be applied to arbitrarily sloping beds. Furthermore, we show that this modification is different of the ones considered classically, and that it coincides with a classical one only if the solution ha...

  9. Constraining the density slope of nuclear symmetry energy at subsaturation densities using electric dipole polarizability in $^{208}$Pb

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhen Zhang; Lie-Wen Chen

    2014-12-11

    Nuclear structure observables usually most effectively probe the properties of nuclear matter at subsaturation densities rather than at saturation density. We demonstrate that the electric dipole polarizibility $\\alpha _ {\\text{D}}$ in $^{208}$Pb is sensitive to both the magnitude $E_{\\text{sym}}(\\rho_{\\text{c}})$ and density slope $L(\\rho_{\\text{c}})$ of the symmetry energy at a subsaturation cross density $\\rho_{\\text{c}} = 0.11$ fm$^{-3}$. Using the experimental data of $\\alpha _ {\\text{D}}$ in $^{208}$Pb from RCNP and the recent accurate constraint of $E_{\\text{sym}}(\\rho_{\\text{c}})$ from the binding energy difference of heavy isotope pairs, we extract a value of $L(\\rho_{\\text{c}}) = 47.3 \\pm 7.8$ MeV. The implication of the present constraint of $L(\\rho_{\\text{c}})$ to the symmetry energy at saturation density, the neutron skin thickness of $^{208}$Pb and the core-crust transition density in neutron stars is discussed.

  10. Steep Slope Calculator

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Islands Puerto Rico Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington Wisconsin West Virginia Wyoming Canadian Cities Enter A City:...

  11. North Slope of Alaska

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDid you notHeatMaRIEdioxideUser Work Featured onNewsNews andSites

  12. COMPARISON OF SEA SURFACE ROUGHNESS MODELS FOR OFFSHORE WIND POWER UTILISATION Bernhard Lange(1), Jrgen Hjstrup(2), Sren Larsen(2), Rebecca Barthelmie(2)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Detlev

    COMPARISON OF SEA SURFACE ROUGHNESS MODELS FOR OFFSHORE WIND POWER UTILISATION Bernhard Lange(1 Large offshore wind farms are being built in several countries in Europe. The economic viability of such projects depends on the favourable wind conditions of offshore sites, since the higher energy yield has

  13. 44 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ELECTRONICS PACKAGING MANUFACTURING, VOL. 24, NO. 1, JANUARY 2001 Rough Set Theory: A Data Mining Tool for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kusiak, Andrew

    Theory: A Data Mining Tool for Semiconductor Manufacturing Andrew Kusiak, Member, IEEE Abstract of data. Data mining has emerged as a discipline that contributes tools for data analysis, discovery and other aspects of data mining are introduced. The rough set theory offers a viable approach

  14. Suppression of thermal conductivity in graphene nanoribbons with rough edges Alexander V. Savin,1,2 Yuri S. Kivshar,2 and Bambi Hu3,4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Moscow 119991, Russia 2Nonlinear Physics Center, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian, the thermal properties of graphene are also of both fundamental and practical im- portance. SeveralSuppression of thermal conductivity in graphene nanoribbons with rough edges Alexander V. Savin,1

  15. Using a Neural Network to Determine the Hatch Status of the AERI at the ARM North Slope of Alaska Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zwink, AB; Turner, DD

    2012-03-19

    The fore-optics of the Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) are protected by an automated hatch to prevent precipitation from fouling the instrument's scene mirror (Knuteson et al. 2004). Limit switches connected with the hatch controller provide a signal of the hatch state: open, closed, undetermined (typically associated with the hatch being between fully open or fully closed during the instrument's sky view period), or an error condition. The instrument then records the state of the hatch with the radiance data so that samples taken when the hatch is not open can be removed from any subsequent analysis. However, the hatch controller suffered a multi-year failure for the AERI located at the ARM North Slope of Alaska (NSA) Central Facility in Barrow, Alaska, from July 2006-February 2008. The failure resulted in misreporting the state of the hatch in the 'hatchOpen' field within the AERI data files. With this error there is no simple solution to translate what was reported back to the correct hatch status, thereby making it difficult for an analysis to determine when the AERI was actually viewing the sky. As only the data collected when the hatch is fully open are scientifically useful, an algorithm was developed to determine whether the hatch was open or closed based on spectral radiance data from the AERI. Determining if the hatch is open or closed in a scene with low clouds is non-trivial, as low opaque clouds may look very similar spectrally as the closed hatch. This algorithm used a backpropagation neural network; these types of neural networks have been used with increasing frequency in atmospheric science applications.

  16. Review of the margins for ASME code fatigue design curve - effects of surface roughness and material variability.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chopra, O. K.; Shack, W. J.; Energy Technology

    2003-10-03

    The ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code provides rules for the construction of nuclear power plant components. The Code specifies fatigue design curves for structural materials. However, the effects of light water reactor (LWR) coolant environments are not explicitly addressed by the Code design curves. Existing fatigue strain-vs.-life ({var_epsilon}-N) data illustrate potentially significant effects of LWR coolant environments on the fatigue resistance of pressure vessel and piping steels. This report provides an overview of the existing fatigue {var_epsilon}-N data for carbon and low-alloy steels and wrought and cast austenitic SSs to define the effects of key material, loading, and environmental parameters on the fatigue lives of the steels. Experimental data are presented on the effects of surface roughness on the fatigue life of these steels in air and LWR environments. Statistical models are presented for estimating the fatigue {var_epsilon}-N curves as a function of the material, loading, and environmental parameters. Two methods for incorporating environmental effects into the ASME Code fatigue evaluations are discussed. Data available in the literature have been reviewed to evaluate the conservatism in the existing ASME Code fatigue evaluations. A critical review of the margins for ASME Code fatigue design curves is presented.

  17. Controlling rough paths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-03-05

    and observe that all the terms are in OCd. 2?I; V. #2. ? so that QAZ d. 2?I; V. #2. ? is in the domain of L; then. jjLQjjd;I p. 1. 2d ? 2. ½jjRZjjZ;I jjWjjg;I jjZ0jjN;I jjXjjg;I ...

  18. Advanced Oil Recovery Technologies for Improved Recovery from Slope Basin Clastic Reservoirs, Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool, Eddy County, NM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark B. Murphy

    2005-09-30

    The Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool in Eddy County New Mexico was a cost-shared field demonstration project in the U.S. Department of Energy Class III Program. A major goal of the Class III Program was to stimulate the use of advanced technologies to increase ultimate recovery from slope-basin clastic reservoirs. Advanced characterization techniques were used at the Nash Draw Pool (NDP) project to develop reservoir management strategies for optimizing oil recovery from this Delaware reservoir. The objective of the project was to demonstrate that a development program, which was based on advanced reservoir management methods, could significantly improve oil recovery at the NDP. Initial goals were (1) to demonstrate that an advanced development drilling and pressure maintenance program can significantly improve oil recovery compared to existing technology applications and (2) to transfer these advanced methodologies to other oil and gas producers. Analysis, interpretation, and integration of recently acquired geological, geophysical, and engineering data revealed that the initial reservoir characterization was too simplistic to capture the critical features of this complex formation. Contrary to the initial characterization, a new reservoir description evolved that provided sufficient detail regarding the complexity of the Brushy Canyon interval at Nash Draw. This new reservoir description was used as a risk reduction tool to identify 'sweet spots' for a development drilling program as well as to evaluate pressure maintenance strategies. The reservoir characterization, geological modeling, 3-D seismic interpretation, and simulation studies have provided a detailed model of the Brushy Canyon zones. This model was used to predict the success of different reservoir management scenarios and to aid in determining the most favorable combination of targeted drilling, pressure maintenance, well stimulation, and well spacing to improve recovery from this reservoir. An Advanced Log Analysis technique developed from the NDP project has proven useful in defining additional productive zones and refining completion techniques. This program proved to be especially helpful in locating and evaluating potential recompletion intervals, which has resulted in low development costs with only small incremental increases in lifting costs. To develop additional reserves at lower costs, zones behind pipe in existing wells were evaluated using techniques developed for the Brushy Canyon interval. These techniques were used to complete uphole zones in thirteen of the NDP wells. A total of 14 recompletions were done: four during 1999, four during 2000, two during 2001, and four during 2002-2003. These workovers added reserves of 332,304 barrels of oil (BO) and 640,363 MCFG (thousand cubic feet of gas) at an overall weighted average development cost of $1.87 per BOE (barrel of oil equivalent). A pressure maintenance pilot project in a developed area of the field was not conducted because the pilot area was pressure depleted, and the reservoir in that area was found to be compartmentalized and discontinuous. Economic analyses and simulation studies indicated that immiscible injection of lean hydrocarbon gas for pressure maintenance was not warranted at the NDP and would need to be considered for implementation in similar fields very soon after production has started. Simulation studies suggested that the injection of miscible carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) could recover significant quantities of oil at the NDP, but a source of low-cost CO{sub 2} was not available in the area. Results from the project indicated that further development will be under playa lakes and potash areas that were beyond the regions covered by well control and are not accessible with vertical wells. These areas, covered by 3-D seismic surveys that were obtained as part of the project, were accessed with combinations of deviated/horizontal wells. Three directional/horizontal wells have been drilled and completed to develop reserves under surface-restricted areas and potash mines. The third

  19. Advanced Oil Recovery Technologies for Improved Recovery from Slope Basin Clastic Reservoirs, Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool, Eddy County, New Mexico, Class III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, Mark B.

    2000-10-25

    The Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool (NDP) is southeast New Mexico is one of the nine projects selected in 1995 by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for participation in the Class III Reservoir Field Demonstration Program. The goals of the DOE cost-shared Class Program are to: (1) extend economic production, (2) increase ultimate recovery, and (3) broaden information exchange and technology application. Reservoirs in the Class III Program are focused on slope-basin and deep-basin clastic depositional types.

  20. Study of biological processes on the US South Atlantic slope and rise. Phase 2. Volume 1. Executive summary. Report for November 1985-March 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blake, J.A.; Hecker, B.; Grassle, J.F.; Brown, B.; Wade, M.

    1987-03-30

    A total of 16 stations were sampled during a 2-year field program designed to characterize the biological, chemical, and sedimentary processes on the slope and rise off North and South Carolina. Box cores were taken along 4 transects at depths of 600-3500 m. The infauna yielded a total of 1202 species, 520 of which were new to science. Annelids were the dominant taxa in terms of density and numbers of species. Species diversity was highest at an 800 m site off Charleston. Higher than normal lead and hydrocarbon inventories suggest enhanced scavenging processes in the area.

  1. Application of Advanced Reservoir Characterization, Simulation, and Production Optimization Strategies to Maximize Recovery in Slope and Basin Clastic Reservoirs, West Texas (Delaware Basin), Class III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dutton, Shirley P.; Flanders, William A.

    2001-11-04

    The objective of this Class III project was demonstrate that reservoir characterization and enhanced oil recovery (EOR) by CO2 flood can increase production from slope and basin clastic reservoirs in sandstones of the Delaware Mountain Group in the Delaware Basin of West Texas and New Mexico. Phase 1 of the project, reservoir characterization, focused on Geraldine Ford and East Ford fields, which are Delaware Mountain Group fields that produce from the upper Bell Canyon Formation (Ramsey sandstone). The demonstration phase of the project was a CO2 flood conducted in East Ford field, which is operated by Orla Petco, Inc., as the East Ford unit.

  2. Reassessing Wind Potential Estimates for India: Economic and Policy Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phadke, Amol

    2012-01-01

    Wind Power Development Parameter Criteria for Exclusion Terrain slope Greater than 20 percent Elevation Greater than 1,500 m Protected areas 100 percent Water

  3. New Terrain for Rural Politics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, Jonathan A

    1992-01-01

    sobrevivir en Santa Maria. Democracia social en un sindicato5. Maruja Barrig, "Democracia Emergente y Movimiento dein Movimientos Sociales y Democracia: Lafundacidnde un nuevo

  4. The Evolution of the Galaxy Stellar Mass Function at z= 4-8: A Steepening Low-mass-end Slope with Increasing Redshift

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, Mimi; Ashby, Matthew L N; Grazian, A; Lu, Yu; Papovich, Casey; Salmon, Brett; Somerville, Rachel S; Dickinson, Mark; Duncan, K; Faber, Sandy M; Fazio, Giovanni G; Ferguson, Henry C; Fontana, Adriano; Guo, Yicheng; Hathi, Nimish; Lee, Seong-Kook; Merlin, Emiliano; Willner, S P

    2015-01-01

    We present galaxy stellar mass functions (GSMFs) at $z=$ 4-8 from a rest-frame ultraviolet (UV) selected sample of $\\sim$4,500 galaxies, found via photometric redshifts over an area of $\\sim$280 arcmin$^2$ in the CANDELS/GOODS fields and the Hubble Ultra Deep Field. The deepest Spitzer/IRAC data yet-to-date from the Spitzer-CANDELS (26.5 mag, 3$\\sigma$) and the IRAC Ultra Deep Field 2010 (26.4-27.1 mag, 3$\\sigma$) surveys allow us to place robust constraints on the low-mass-end slope of the GSMFs, while the relatively large volume provides a better constraint at higher masses compared to previous space-based studies. Supplemented by a stacking analysis, we find a linear correlation between the rest-frame UV absolute magnitude at 1500\\AA\\ ($M_{\\rm UV}$) and logarithmic stellar mass ($\\log M_*$). We use simulations to validate our method of measuring the slope of the $\\log M_*$-$M_{\\rm UV}$ relation, finding that the bias is minimized with a hybrid technique combining photometry of individual bright galaxies wi...

  5. DISCLAIMER

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    the pollutants away from their source and by turbulent air motion that results from solar heating of the earth's surface and air movement over rough terrain and surfaces....

  6. Phase Behavior, Solid Organic Precipitation, and Mobility Characterization Studies in Support of Enhanced Heavy Oil Recovery on the Alaska North Slope

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shirish Patil; Abhijit Dandekar; Santanu Khataniar

    2008-12-31

    The medium-heavy oil (viscous oil) resources in the Alaska North Slope are estimated at 20 to 25 billion barrels. These oils are viscous, flow sluggishly in the formations, and are difficult to recover. Recovery of this viscous oil requires carefully designed enhanced oil recovery processes. Success of these recovery processes is critically dependent on accurate knowledge of the phase behavior and fluid properties, especially viscosity, of these oils under variety of pressure and temperature conditions. This project focused on predicting phase behavior and viscosity of viscous oils using equations of state and semi-empirical correlations. An experimental study was conducted to quantify the phase behavior and physical properties of viscous oils from the Alaska North Slope oil field. The oil samples were compositionally characterized by the simulated distillation technique. Constant composition expansion and differential liberation tests were conducted on viscous oil samples. Experiment results for phase behavior and reservoir fluid properties were used to tune the Peng-Robinson equation of state and predict the phase behavior accurately. A comprehensive literature search was carried out to compile available compositional viscosity models and their modifications, for application to heavy or viscous oils. With the help of meticulously amassed new medium-heavy oil viscosity data from experiments, a comparative study was conducted to evaluate the potential of various models. The widely used corresponding state viscosity model predictions deteriorate when applied to heavy oil systems. Hence, a semi-empirical approach (the Lindeloff model) was adopted for modeling the viscosity behavior. Based on the analysis, appropriate adjustments have been suggested: the major one is the division of the pressure-viscosity profile into three distinct regions. New modifications have improved the overall fit, including the saturated viscosities at low pressures. However, with the limited amount of geographically diverse data, it is not possible to develop a comprehensive predictive model. Based on the comprehensive phase behavior analysis of Alaska North Slope crude oil, a reservoir simulation study was carried out to evaluate the performance of a gas injection enhanced oil recovery technique for the West Sak reservoir. It was found that a definite increase in viscous oil production can be obtained by selecting the proper injectant gas and by optimizing reservoir operating parameters. A comparative analysis is provided, which helps in the decision-making process.

  7. Evaluation of a deposit in the vicinity of the PBU L-106 Site, North Slope, Alaska, for a potential long-term test of gas production from hydrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moridis, G.J.; Reagan, M.T.; Boyle, K.L.; Zhang, K.

    2010-05-01

    As part of the effort to investigate the technical feasibility of gas production from hydrate deposits, a long-term field test (lasting 18-24 months) is under consideration in a project led by the U.S. Department of Energy. We evaluate a candidate deposit involving the C-Unit in the vicinity of the PBU-L106 site in North Slope, Alaska. This deposit is stratigraphically bounded by impermeable shale top and bottom boundaries (Class 3), and is characterized by high intrinsic permeabilities, high porosity, high hydrate saturation, and a hydrostatic pressure distribution. The C-unit deposit is composed of two hydrate-bearing strata separated by a 30-ft-thick shale interlayer, and its temperatrure across its boundaries ranges between 5 and 6.5 C. We investigate by means of numerical simulation involving very fine grids the production potential of these two deposits using both vertical and horizontal wells. We also explore the sensitivity of production to key parameters such as the hydrate saturation, the formation permeability, and the permeability of the bounding shale layers. Finally, we compare the production performance of the C-Unit at the PBU-L106 site to that of the D-Unit accumulation at the Mount Elbert site, a thinner, single-layer Class 3 deposit on the North Slope of Alaska that is shallower, less-pressurized and colder (2.3-2.6 C). The results indicate that production from horizontal wells may be orders of magnitude larger than that from vertical ones. Additionally, production increases with the formation permeability, and with a decreasing permeability of the boundaries. The effect of the hydrate saturation on production is complex and depends on the time frame of production. Because of higher production, the PBU-L106 deposit appears to have an advantage as a candidate for the long-term test.

  8. Assessment of costs and benefits of flexible and alternative fuel use in the US transportation sector. Technical report twelve: Economic analysis of alternative uses for Alaskan North Slope natural gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    As part of the Altemative Fuels Assessment, the Department of Energy (DOE) is studying the use of derivatives of natural gas, including compressed natural gas and methanol, as altemative transportation fuels. A critical part of this effort is determining potential sources of natural gas and the economics of those sources. Previous studies in this series characterized the economics of unutilized gas within the lower 48 United States, comparing its value for methanol production against its value as a pipelined fuel (US Department of Energy 1991), and analyzed the costs of developing undeveloped nonassociated gas reserves in several countries (US Department of Energy 1992c). This report extends those analyses to include Alaskan North Slope natural gas that either is not being produced or is being reinjected. The report includes the following: A description of discovered and potential (undiscovered) quantities of natural gas on the Alaskan North Slope. A discussion of proposed altemative uses for Alaskan North Slope natural gas. A comparison of the economics of the proposed alternative uses for Alaskan North Slope natural gas. The purpose of this report is to illustrate the costs of transporting Alaskan North Slope gas to markets in the lower 48 States as pipeline gas, liquefied natural gas (LNG), or methanol. It is not intended to recommend one alternative over another or to evaluate the relative economics or timing of using North Slope gas in new tertiary oil recovery projects. The information is supplied in sufficient detail to allow incorporation of relevant economic relationships (for example, wellhead gas prices and transportation costs) into the Altemative Fuels Trade Model, the analytical framework DOE is using to evaluate various policy options.

  9. The galaxy UV luminosity function at z ~ 2 - 4; new results on faint-end slope and the evolution of luminosity density

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parsa, Shaghayegh; McLure, Ross J; Mortlock, Alice

    2015-01-01

    We present a new, robust measurement of the evolving rest-frame UV galaxy luminosity function (LF) over the key redshift range z = 2 - 4. Our results are based on the high dynamic range provided by combining the HUDF, CANDELS/GOODS-South, and UltraVISTA/COSMOS surveys. We utilise the unparalleled multi-frequency photometry available in this survey `wedding cake' to compile complete galaxy samples at z ~ 2,3,4 via photometric redshifts (calibrated against the latest spectroscopy) rather than colour-colour selection, and to determine accurate rest-frame UV absolute magnitudes from SED fitting. Our new determinations of the UV LF extend from M_{1500} ~ -22 down to M_{1500} = -14.5, -15.5 and -16 at z ~ 2, 3 and 4 respectively (thus reaching ~ 3 - 4 magnitudes fainter than previous blank-field studies at z ~ 2 - 3). At z ~ 2 - 3 we find a much shallower faint-end slope (alpha = -1.32 +- 0.03) than the steeper values (alpha ~ -1.7) reported by Reddy & Steidel (2009) or by Alavi et al. (2014), and show that thi...

  10. ARM North Slope of Alaska

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsicloudden Documentation Data Management Facility PlotsProducts

  11. Roughly 15,000 patents a month are issued by the US Patent and Trademark Office (PTO).1 By law, these are supposed to cover only "novel" and "nonobvious" inventions, but an average

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadoulet, Elisabeth

    1347 Roughly 15,000 patents a month are issued by the US Patent and Trademark Office (PTO).1 By law­20 hours of patent examiner time,2 and a substantial proportion of the few patents later fully evaluated the issuance of many ques- tionable patents. Responding to such concerns, the Supreme Court recently made

  12. Source Characterization and Temporal Variation of Methane Seepage from Thermokarst Lakes on the Alaska North Slope in Response to Arctic Climate Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-09-30

    The goals of this research were to characterize the source, magnitude and temporal variability of methane seepage from thermokarst lakes (TKL) within the Alaska North Slope gas hydrate province, assess the vulnerability of these areas to ongoing and future arctic climate change and determine if gas hydrate dissociation resulting from permafrost melting is contributing to the current lake emissions. Analyses were focused on four main lake locations referred to in this report: Lake Qalluuraq (referred to as Lake Q) and Lake Teshekpuk (both on Alaska?s North Slope) and Lake Killarney and Goldstream Bill Lake (both in Alaska?s interior). From analyses of gases coming from lakes in Alaska, we showed that ecological seeps are common in Alaska and they account for a larger source of atmospheric methane today than geologic subcap seeps. Emissions from the geologic source could increase with potential implications for climate warming feedbacks. Our analyses of TKL sites showing gas ebullition were complemented with geophysical surveys, providing important insight about the distribution of shallow gas in the sediments and the lake bottom manifestation of seepage (e.g., pockmarks). In Lake Q, Chirp data were limited in their capacity to image deeper sediments and did not capture the thaw bulb. The failure to capture the thaw bulb at Lake Q may in part be related to the fact that the present day lake is a remnant of an older, larger, and now-partially drained lake. These suggestions are consistent with our analyses of a dated core of sediment from the lake that shows that a wetland has been present at the site of Lake Q since approximately 12,000 thousand years ago. Chemical analyses of the core indicate that the availability of methane at the site has changed during the past and is correlated with past environmental changes (i.e. temperature and hydrology) in the Arctic. Discovery of methane seeps in Lake Teshekpuk in the northernmost part of the lake during 2009 reconnaissance surveys provided a strong impetus to visit this area in 2010. The seismic methods applied in Lake Teshekpuk were able to image pockmarks, widespread shallow gas in the sediments, and the relationship among different sediment packages on the lake?s bottom, but even boomer seismics did not detect permafrost beneath the northern part of the lake. By characterizing the biogeochemistry of shallow TKL with methane seeps we showed that the radical seasonal shifts in ice cover and temperature. These seasonal environmental differences result in distinct consumption and production processes of biologically-relevant compounds. The combined effects of temperature, ice-volume and other lithological factors linked to seepage from the lake are manifest in the distribution of sedimentary methane in Lake Q during icecovered and ice-free conditions. The biogeochemistry results illustrated very active methanotrophy in TKLs. Substantial effort was subsequently made to characterize the nature of methanotrophic communities in TKLs. We applied stable isotope probing approaches to genetically characterize the methanotrophs most active in utilizing methane in TKLs. Our study is the first to identify methane oxidizing organisms active in arctic TKLs, and revealing that type I methanotrophs and type II methanotrophs are abundant and active in assimilating methane in TKLs. These organisms play an important role in limiting the flux of methane from these sites. Our investigations indicate that as temperatures increase in the Arctic, oxidation rates and active methanotrophic populations will also shift. Whether these changes can offset predicted increases in methanogenesis is an important question underlying models of future methane flux and resultant climate change. Overall our findings indicate that TKLs and their ability to act as both source and sink of methane are exceedingly sensitive to environmental change.

  13. Collaborative Proposal -AnSlope: Cross-slope exchanges at the Antarctic Slope Front I INTRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    into the adjacent deep ocean. This outflow provides the kernel for Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW) formation. Onshore transport of relatively warm and saline deep water and surface water and ice exchange across the shelf break- density Antarctic Surface Water to the south from the denser, relatively warm and salty water of the deep

  14. RESOURCE CHARACTERIZATION AND QUANTIFICATION OF NATURAL GAS-HYDRATE AND ASSOCIATED FREE-GAS ACCUMULATIONS IN THE PRUDHOE BAY - KUPARUK RIVER AREA ON THE NORTH SLOPE OF ALASKA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Hunter; Shirish Patil; Robert Casavant; Tim Collett

    2003-06-02

    Interim results are presented from the project designed to characterize, quantify, and determine the commercial feasibility of Alaska North Slope (ANS) gas-hydrate and associated free-gas resources in the Prudhoe Bay Unit (PBU), Kuparuk River Unit (KRU), and Milne Point Unit (MPU) areas. This collaborative research will provide practical input to reservoir and economic models, determine the technical feasibility of gas hydrate production, and influence future exploration and field extension of this potential ANS resource. The large magnitude of unconventional in-place gas (40-100 TCF) and conventional ANS gas commercialization evaluation creates industry-DOE alignment to assess this potential resource. This region uniquely combines known gas hydrate presence and existing production infrastructure. Many technical, economical, environmental, and safety issues require resolution before enabling gas hydrate commercial production. Gas hydrate energy resource potential has been studied for nearly three decades. However, this knowledge has not been applied to practical ANS gas hydrate resource development. ANS gas hydrate and associated free gas reservoirs are being studied to determine reservoir extent, stratigraphy, structure, continuity, quality, variability, and geophysical and petrophysical property distribution. Phase 1 will characterize reservoirs, lead to recoverable reserve and commercial potential estimates, and define procedures for gas hydrate drilling, data acquisition, completion, and production. Phases 2 and 3 will integrate well, core, log, and long-term production test data from additional wells, if justified by results from prior phases. The project could lead to future ANS gas hydrate pilot development. This project will help solve technical and economic issues to enable government and industry to make informed decisions regarding future commercialization of unconventional gas-hydrate resources.

  15. Numerical simulation studies of the long-term evolution of a CO2 plume in a saline aquifer with a sloping caprock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pruess, K.; Nordbotten, J.

    2010-12-28

    We have used the TOUGH2-MP/ECO2N code to perform numerical simulation studies of the long-term behavior of CO{sub 2} stored in an aquifer with a sloping caprock. This problem is of great practical interest, and is very challenging due to the importance of multi-scale processes. We find that the mechanism of plume advance is different from what is seen in a forced immiscible displacement, such as gas injection into a water-saturated medium. Instead of pushing the water forward, the plume advances because the vertical pressure gradients within the plume are smaller than hydrostatic, causing the groundwater column to collapse ahead of the plume tip. Increased resistance to vertical flow of aqueous phase in anisotropic media leads to reduced speed of updip plume advancement. Vertical equilibrium models that ignore effects of vertical flow will overpredict the speed of plume advancement. The CO{sub 2} plume becomes thinner as it advances, yet the speed of advancement remains constant over the entire simulation period of up to 400 years, with migration distances of more than 80 km. Our simulations include dissolution of CO{sub 2} into the aqueous phase and associated density increase, and molecular diffusion. However, no convection develops in the aqueous phase because it is suppressed by the relatively coarse (sub-) horizontal gridding required in a regional-scale model. A first crude sub-grid-scale model was developed to represent convective enhancement of CO{sub 2} dissolution. This process is found to greatly reduce the thickness of the CO{sub 2} plume, but, for the parameters used in our simulations, does not affect the speed of plume advancement.

  16. Geometric frequency shift for electric dipole searches with trapped spin-1/2 particles in general fields and measurement cells of arbitrary shape with smooth or rough walls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Steyerl; C. Kaufman; G. Müller; R. Golub

    2015-05-13

    The important role of geometric phases in searches for a permanent electric dipole moment of the neutron, using Ramsey separated oscillatory field nuclear magnetic resonance, was first investigated by Pendlebury $\\textit{et al.}$ [Phys. Rev. A $\\mathbf{70}$, 032102 (2004)]. Their analysis was based on the Bloch equations. In subsequent work using the spin density matrix Lamoreaux and Golub [Phys. Rev. A $\\mathbf{71}$, 032104 (2005)] showed the usual relation between the frequency shifts and the correlation functions of the fields seen by trapped particles in general fields (Redfield theory). More recently we presented a solution of the Schr\\"odinger equation for spin-$1/2$ particles in circular cylindrical traps with smooth walls and exposed to arbitrary fields [Steyerl $\\textit{et al.}$, Phys.Rev. A $\\mathbf{89}$, 052129 (2014)]. Here we extend this work to show how the Redfield theory follows directly from the Schr\\"odinger equation solution and include wall roughness, cylindrical trap geometry with arbitrary cross section, and field perturbations that do not, in the frame of the moving particles, average to zero in time and which, therefore, do not satisfy the prerequisites of the statistical approach based on the spin-density matrix. We show by direct, detailed, calculation the agreement of the results from the Schr\\"odinger equation with the Redfield theory for the cases of a rectangular cell with specular walls and of a circular cell with diffuse reflecting walls.

  17. A Unifying Framework to Quantify the Effects of Substrate Interactions, Stiffness, and Roughness on the Dynamics of Thin Supported Polymer Films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul Z. Hanakata; Beatriz A. Pazmiño Betancourt; Jack F. Douglas; Francis W. Starr

    2015-02-10

    Changes in the dynamics of supported polymer films in comparison to bulk materials involve a complex convolution of effects, such as substrate interactions, roughness and compliance, in addition to film thickness. We consider molecular dynamics simulations of substrate-supported, coarse-grained polymer films where these parameters are tuned separately to determine how each of these variables influence the molecular dynamics of thin polymer films. We find that all these variables significantly influence the film dynamics, leading to a seemingly intractable degree of complexity in describing these changes. However, by considering how these constraining variables influence string-like collective motion within the film, we show that all our observations can be understood in a unified and quantitative way. More specifically, the string model for glass-forming liquids implies that the changes in the structural relaxation of these films are governed by the changes in the average length of string-like cooperative motions and this model is confirmed under all conditions considered in our simulations. Ultimately, these changes are parameterized in terms of just the activation enthalpy and entropy for molecular organization, which have predictable dependences on substrate properties and film thickness, offering a promising approach for the rational design of film properties.

  18. Pressure-dependent transition from atoms to nanoparticles in magnetron sputtering: Effect on WSi{sub 2} film roughness and stress

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou Lan; Wang Yiping; Zhou Hua; Li Minghao; Headrick, Randall L.; MacArthur, Kimberly; Shi Bing; Conley, Ray; Macrander, Albert T. [Department of Physics and Materials Science Program, University of Vermont, Burlington, Vermont 05405 (United States); Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2010-08-15

    We report on the transition between two regimes from several-atom clusters to much larger nanoparticles in Ar magnetron sputter deposition of WSi{sub 2}, and the effect of nanoparticles on the properties of amorphous thin films and multilayers. Sputter deposition of thin films is monitored by in situ x-ray scattering, including x-ray reflectivity and grazing incidence small-angle x-ray scattering. The results show an abrupt transition at an Ar background pressure P{sub c}; the transition is associated with the threshold for energetic particle thermalization, which is known to scale as the product of the Ar pressure and the working distance between the magnetron source and the substrate surface. Below P{sub c} smooth films are produced while above P{sub c} roughness increases abruptly, consistent with a model in which particles aggregate in the deposition flux before reaching the growth surface. The results from WSi{sub 2} films are correlated with in situ measurement of stress in WSi{sub 2}/Si multilayers, which exhibits a corresponding transition from compressive to tensile stress at P{sub c}. The tensile stress is attributed to coalescence of nanoparticles and the elimination of nanovoids.

  19. Pavement roughness on expansive clays 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Velasco, Manuel O

    1980-01-01

    available weather station data over 20 years. b The roadway sections within this area are located in two different counties. IQ O'I CC O O 0 O CA O c I I- I/I I/I 0 0 0 0 0 /Q Ql 0 0 Z I/I C/I I/I IO 3: Z Z E tJJ Ql 0 O 0 I/I 0 CL m IQ QI... L Qt O V '?C Ct J N ~K 0 Vl ' /U 3 Ct I/I O Ct V E IU UD l- CU O V I CZI IU J O V N tV E Qt IJ- 0 3: C I/I O IU V E tll 5- N CU CJ X N tt- IL 0 Vl ' CU I/I O IU ' V E IU l- Cl N IU C J D N tt- U 0 I/I CJ I/I O...

  20. Controlled Rough Paths on Manifolds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Semko, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    23] L. C. Young, An inequality of H¨older type connectedI. An extension of an inequality of L. C. Young, Math. Res.now that p Inequality (see [23]) along with an

  1. Drying Rough Rice in Storage. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sorenson, J. W. Jr.; Crane, L. E.

    1960-01-01

    feet columna erating schedule is drying at a rate fast enou 7.2 8 1.80 to prevent mold development. Another importa : 10 3.00 consideration is simplicity of operating instrr : 9.0 8 2.50 tions requiring a minimumjof supervision of i ( 10 4....25 drying operation. Other desirable features in : 10.8 6 1.80 fan operating schedule are maximum drying eE : 8 3.25 ciency and use of minimum air flow rates. . 'Based on data presented by C. K. Shedd (2). The direction of air movement through ri a...

  2. Fundamental Mechanisms of Interface Roughness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Randall L. Headrick

    2009-01-06

    Publication quality results were obtained for several experiments and materials systems including: (i) Patterning and smoothening of sapphire surfaces by energetic Ar+ ions. Grazing Incidence Small Angle X-ray Scattering (GISAXS) experiments were performed in the system at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) X21 beamline. Ar+ ions in the energy range from 300 eV to 1000 eV were used to produce ripples on the surfaces of single-crystal sapphire. It was found that the ripple wavelength varies strongly with the angle of incidence of the ions, which increase significantly as the angle from normal is varied from 55° to 35°. A smooth region was found for ion incidence less than 35° away from normal incidence. In this region a strong smoothening mechanism with strength proportional to the second derivative of the height of the surface was found to be responsible for the effect. The discovery of this phase transition between stable and unstable regimes as the angle of incidence is varied has also stimulated new work by other groups in the field. (ii) Growth of Ge quantum dots on Si(100) and (111). We discovered the formation of quantum wires on 4° misoriented Si(111) using real-time GISAXS during the deposition of Ge. The results represent the first time-resolved GISAXS study of Ge quantum dot formation. (iii) Sputter deposition of amorphous thin films and multilayers composed of WSi2 and Si. Our in-situ GISAXS experiments reveal fundamental roughening and smoothing phenomena on surfaces during film deposition. The main results of this work is that the WSi2 layers actually become smoother during deposition due to the smoothening effect of energetic particles in the sputter deposition process.

  3. New and Improved Data Logging and Collection System for Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility, Tropical Western Pacific, and North Slope of Alaska Sky Radiation, Ground Radiation, and MET Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ritsche, M.T.; Holdridge, D.J.; Pearson, R.

    2005-03-18

    Aging systems and technological advances mandated changes to the data collection systems at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program's Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) and North Slope of Alaska (NSA) ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF) sites. Key reasons for the upgrade include the following: achieve consistency across all ACRF sites for easy data use and operational maintenance; minimize the need for a single mentor requiring specialized knowledge and training; provide local access to real-time data for operational support, intensive operational period (IOP) support, and public relations; eliminate problems with physical packaging (condensation, connectors, etc.); and increase flexibility in programming and control of the data logger.

  4. Pattern classification of terrain during amputee walking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farrell, Matthew Todd

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis I study the role of extrinsic (sensors placed on the body) versus intrinsic sensing (instruments placed on an artificial limb) and determine a robust set of sensors from physical and reliability constraints ...

  5. 18-20 2547 -A Leg-Wheel Hybrid Mobile Robot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laksanacharoen, Sathaporn

    improve rough terrain locomotion in a hexapod robot," in Robotics and Autonomous System, vol.18, 1996, pp. Watson, "Design and simulation of a cockroach-like hexapod robot," in Proceedcings ICRA 1997 IEEE

  6. Failure and Redemption of Multifilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR)/Normal Incidence Multifilter Radiometer (NIMFR) Cloud Screening: Contrasting Algorithm Performance at Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) North Slope of Alaska (NSA) and Southern Great Plains (SGP) Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Flynn, Connor J.; Koontz, Annette S.; Sivaraman, Chitra; Barnard, James C.

    2013-09-11

    Well-known cloud-screening algorithms, which are designed to remove cloud-contaminated aerosol optical depths (AOD) from AOD measurements, have shown great performance at many middle-to-low latitude sites around the world. However, they may occasionally fail under challenging observational conditions, such as when the sun is low (near the horizon) or when optically thin clouds with small spatial inhomogeneity occur. Such conditions have been observed quite frequently at the high-latitude Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) North Slope of Alaska (NSA) sites. A slightly modified cloud-screening version of the standard algorithm is proposed here with a focus on the ARM-supported Multifilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) and Normal Incidence Multifilter Radiometer (NIMFR) data. The modified version uses approximately the same techniques as the standard algorithm, but it additionally examines the magnitude of the slant-path line of sight transmittance and eliminates points when the observed magnitude is below a specified threshold. Substantial improvement of the multi-year (1999-2012) aerosol product (AOD and its Angstrom exponent) is shown for the NSA sites when the modified version is applied. Moreover, this version reproduces the AOD product at the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site, which was originally generated by the standard cloud-screening algorithms. The proposed minor modification is easy to implement and its application to existing and future cloud-screening algorithms can be particularly beneficial for challenging observational conditions.

  7. ARM - Lesson Plans: North Slope of Alaska

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Comments?govInstrumentsnoaacrnBarrow, Alaska Outreach Home Room News PublicationsClimate inMakingMoving Water

  8. Slope Electric Coop Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc JumpHeter Battery Technology CoWanpingSilveira deScienceSkySlinger

  9. North Slope Co. Northwest Arctic Co.

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next20, 200820087 DOE/NASEONABOE

  10. North Slope Co. Northwest Arctic Co.

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next20, 200820087 DOE/NASEONABOEGas

  11. North Slope Co. Northwest Arctic Co.

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next20, 200820087

  12. Mask Roughness Induced LER in EUV Lithography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McClinton, Brittany

    2011-01-01

    focus…………………………………… Alt-PSM……………………………………………………………… 5.2.122-nm……………………….. 5.2.2 Alt-PSM vs. Lines and Spaces at 22-Simplified LER, alt-psm……………………………… Simulated LER, 22nm alt-

  13. A Rough Road Leads To The Stars

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode Design to Improve Lithium-Ion Batteries PrintA New SolarA Present . .A Review ofA

  14. Effect of Roughness Geometry on Wetting and Dewetting of Rough PDMS Surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel, Susan

    was studied as model for print surfaces used in additive manufacturing and printed electronics. A smooth PDMS on decline for over a decade,9 printing has evolved and has become a manufacturing technology for flexible are keys to a successful implementation of ink printing in manufacturing. Arias et al.4 showed that balance

  15. Resisting globalization- ATTAC in France: local discourses, global terrain 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonard, Marie des Neiges

    2007-04-25

    The debate over the "globalization" process has been influenced by the emergence of social movements who deplore this process. This research focuses on the French social movement ATTAC (Action for a Tobin Tax for the Aid of Citizens...

  16. Three dimensional terrain editing in StarLogo TNG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D'Ambrosio, Michael (Michael A.)

    2009-01-01

    StarLogo TNG is a block based programming language designed to create models and simulations that are used to help middle and high school students understand mathematical and scientific concepts. However, there is a desire ...

  17. High-Resolution Aeromagnetic Mapping Of Volcanic Terrain, Yellowstone...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    differences in rock composition, types and degree of alteration, and crustal structures that mirror the variable geology of the Yellowstone Plateau. The older, Eocene,...

  18. Ultrasensitive directional microphone arrays for military operations in urban terrain.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, Neal A.; Peterson, Kenneth Allen; Parker, Eric Paul; Resnick, Paul James; Okandan, Murat; Serkland, Darwin Keith

    2007-11-01

    Acoustic sensing systems are critical elements in detection of sniper events. The microphones developed in this project enable unique sensing systems that benefit significantly from the enhanced sensitivity and extremely compact foot-print. Surface and bulk micromachining technologies developed at Sandia have allowed the design, fabrication and characterization of these unique sensors. We have demonstrated sensitivity that is only available in 1/2 inch to 1 inch studio reference microphones--with our devices that have only 1 to 2mm diameter membranes in a volume less than 1cm{sup 3}.

  19. Learning to visually predict terrain properties for planetary rovers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brooks, Christopher Allen, 1978-

    2009-01-01

    For future planetary exploration missions, improvements in autonomous rover mobility have the potential to increase scientific data return by providing safe access to geologically interesting sites that lie in rugged ...

  20. Pathfinder: A Relational Query Optimizer Explores XQuery Terrain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teubner, Jens

    :outer, pos:pos1, item) ROW# (pos1:pos>/outer) |X| (iter = inner) @ (pos), val: #1 ¶ (outer:iter, sort:pos, inner) ROOTS NUMBER (inner) ELEM (iter, item:pos, item>) ELEM_TAG @ (item), val: item ¶ (iter, pos:pos1, item) @ (pos), val: #1 ROW# (pos1:pos>/iter) ¶ (iter) @ (pos), val: #1 ¶ (iter

  1. Mythical Terrain and the Building of Mexico’s UNAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davids, René

    2008-01-01

    and the Environment in Mexico, 2005. No. 14: Kevin P.Trueba, El Pedregal de San Angel. Mexico City: UniversidadNacional Autónoma de Mexico (1995). 5. See Mario Pani and

  2. The Flat Map: A Perception Approach To Modeling Flat Terrain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campbell, Josh

    2009-11-18

    Goals Define a conceptually and computationally compatible definition of flat one based on the perception of flat can be applied globally Test the feasibility of open source software for conducting large-scale geographic analysis Produce a ‘flat...Goals Define a conceptually and computationally compatible definition of flat one based on the perception of flat can be applied globally Test the feasibility of open source software for conducting large-scale geographic analysis Produce a ‘flat...

  3. Multiple Simultaneous Acoustic Source Localization in Urban Terrain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maróti, Miklós

    acoustic sources, eliminate multipath effects, tolerate multiple sensor failures while providing good civilian infrastructure (power and communication network), and robustness against node failures. Figure 1. depicts the acoustic events generated by a typical rifle shot. The muzzle blast produces a spherical wave

  4. Local Terrain Mapping for Obstacle Avoidance using Monocular Vision

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langelaan, Jack W.

    a potential field obstacle avoidance routine are presented. Introduction Currently, many unmanned aerial Vehicles Specialist's Forum 1 #12;2 MARLOW AHS UNMANNED VEHICLES SPECIALIST'S FORUM all classes of unmanned unmanned rotorcraft through an unsurveyed envi- ronment consisting of forest and urban canyons. Optical

  5. High-Resolution Aeromagnetic Mapping Of Volcanic Terrain, Yellowstone

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy Resources Jump to:Hershey, Pennsylvania:HiddenTemperature

  6. PRODUCING SATELLITE-DERIVED IRRADIANCES IN COMPLEX ARID TERRAIN

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPIProtectio Program | OpenWisconsin:NewOverPPS Enviro Power Pvt Ltd Jump

  7. ARM - Field Campaign - Cloud, Aerosol, and Complex Terrain Interactions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode Design to Improve4AJ01) (See22,Microphysical PropertiesgovCampaignsCloud Radar IOP

  8. Outline DARTS lab Introduction SimScape Large terrain modeling CLOD visualization Conclusion Scalable Large, Multi-Resolution Terrain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -Time Simulation (DARTS) EDL simulations (DSENDS) Rover simulations (ROAMS) Airship simulations Robotic arm

  9. Numerical errors in the presence of steep topography: analysis and alternatives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lundquist, K A; Chow, F K; Lundquist, J K

    2010-04-15

    It is well known in computational fluid dynamics that grid quality affects the accuracy of numerical solutions. When assessing grid quality, properties such as aspect ratio, orthogonality of coordinate surfaces, and cell volume are considered. Mesoscale atmospheric models generally use terrain-following coordinates with large aspect ratios near the surface. As high resolution numerical simulations are increasingly used to study topographically forced flows, a high degree of non-orthogonality is introduced, especially in the vicinity of steep terrain slopes. Numerical errors associated with the use of terrainfollowing coordinates can adversely effect the accuracy of the solution in steep terrain. Inaccuracies from the coordinate transformation are present in each spatially discretized term of the Navier-Stokes equations, as well as in the conservation equations for scalars. In particular, errors in the computation of horizontal pressure gradients, diffusion, and horizontal advection terms have been noted in the presence of sloping coordinate surfaces and steep topography. In this work we study the effects of these spatial discretization errors on the flow solution for three canonical cases: scalar advection over a mountain, an atmosphere at rest over a hill, and forced advection over a hill. This study is completed using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. Simulations with terrain-following coordinates are compared to those using a flat coordinate, where terrain is represented with the immersed boundary method. The immersed boundary method is used as a tool which allows us to eliminate the terrain-following coordinate transformation, and quantify numerical errors through a direct comparison of the two solutions. Additionally, the effects of related issues such as the steepness of terrain slope and grid aspect ratio are studied in an effort to gain an understanding of numerical domains where terrain-following coordinates can successfully be used and those domains where the solution would benefit from the use of the immersed boundary method.

  10. Headcut retreat resulting from plunge pool erosion in a 3D landscape evolution model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flores Cervantes, Javier Homero, 1977-

    2004-01-01

    Headcut retreat produced by plunge pools is represented using existing concepts about this type of erosion. The model estimates retreat rates, given flow, height of the headcut, upstream slope and Manning's roughness, and ...

  11. www.ext.vt.edu Produced by Communications and Marketing, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    ? ___________________ 7.SOIL: Type Terrain Drainage Soil-less Mulch q sandy q sloped q good q pinebark q bark chips q clay q level q moderate q peat moss q plastic q loam q low q poor q other _________q other _________ q

  12. West Slope, Oregon: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEtGeorgia: Energy Resources JumpChicago,Islip,PointSimsbury,

  13. LESSONS LEARNED FROM A LANDFILL SLOPE FAILURE INVOLVING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Protection Agency Division of Solid & Infectious Waste Management Central Office, 122 South Front St Ohio Environmental Protection Agency Division of Solid & Infectious Waste Management Central Office Environmental Engineer Ohio Environmental Protection Agency Division of Solid & Infectious Waste Northeast

  14. LESSONS LEARNED FROM AN IMPOUNDMENT SLOPE FAILURE INVOLVING GEOSYNTHETICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    underwent final closure construction in the summer of 1994. The landfill previously accepted an average for the sedimentation pond and the landfill closure was completed by 31 December 1994. The GCL used at this site, Shearbox test, Failure, Landfill, Sedimentation pond AUTHORS: Kyle E. Nay, Environmental Specialist, Ohio

  15. Precision Tiltmeter as a Reference for Slope Measuring Instruments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirschman, Jonathan L.; Domning, Edward E.; Morrison, Gregory Y.; Smith, Brian V.; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.

    2008-01-01

    LSBL-798, (2006). Applied Geomechanics Technical Note: “this volume. Applied Geomechanics 755-1172 Miniature Tiltof a tiltmeter, Applied Geomechanics Model 755-1172, 11 for

  16. The slopes determined by n points in the plane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Jeremy L.

    2006-01-01

    field k,andletG be a graph with vertices V and edges E.Apicture P of G consists of a point P(v)for each vertex and a line P(e) for each edge, subject to the condition that P(v) ? P(e) whenever v is an endpoint of e.Thusthedataofn points and parenleftbig... n 2 parenrightbig lines described earlier is a picture of the complete graph K n on n vertices. The set of all pictures of G is called the picture space X(G). A picture is generic if the points P(v) are all different; the closure of the locus...

  17. Infragravity energy is dependent on beach slope and incident wave

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olszewski Jr., Edward A.

    CHAOTIC SWASH FRONT INTERACTIONS Zachary Williams UNC Wilmington Department of Physics and Physical of nonlinearity ·Natural horn appears linear #12;Thank you to.... Dr. Dylan McNamara Dr. Brian Davis Dr. Daniel Guo Dr. John Morrison Dr. Bill Atwill Dr. Russell Herman #12;

  18. Adverse Tunnelling Conditions Arising from Slope Instabilities A Case History

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eberhardt, Erik

    ) has been under con- struction. The project includes a 60.5 m high concrete gravity dam, an underground 17 - 21 June 2001 Davos, Switzerland 2 and an underground power house which will eventually generate of the Hindustan-Tibet-Highway by a rock fall (LEFT). Rock slide at the dam site blocking the Satluj River (RIGHT

  19. Updown numbers and the initial monomials of the slope variety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Jeremy L.; Wagner, Jennifer D.

    2009-01-01

    . For integers m ? n, we put [n] = {1,2,...,n} and [m,n] = {m,m + 1,...,n}. The set of all permutations of an integer set P will be denoted SP, and the nth symmetric group is Sn (= S[n]). We will write each permutation w ? SP as a word with n = |P| digits, w = w1......wn, where {w1,...,wn} = P. If necessary for clarity, we will separate the digits with commas. Concatenation will also be denoted with commas; for instance, if w = 12 and w? = 34, then (w,w?,5) = 12345. The reversal w? of w1w2...wn?1wn is the word wnwn...

  20. Biocorrosive Thermophilic Microbial Communities in Alaskan North Slope Oil Facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duncan, Kathleen E.

    2010-01-01

    ethane, propane or butane. Concentrations of metabolitesacid COO - CH 3 O H 3 C Butane (C 4 H 10 ) H 3 C CH 3 O - O

  1. Oceanic Isopycnal Slope Spectra. Part II: Turbulence JODY M. KLYMAK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California JAMES N. MOUM College of Oceanic the rate of turbulence dissipation in the ocean, either by direct measurement (Osborn and Cox 1972 of Victoria, P.O. Box 3055, STN CSC, Victoria, BC V8W 3P6, Canada. E-mail: jklymak@ uvic.ca 1232 J O U R N A L

  2. Development of a new generation of optical slope measuring profiler

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yashchuk, Valeriy V.

    2010-01-01

    Free Electron Laser (FEL), LCLS, National Synchrotron Light1-3]. The beamlines for LCLS, NSLS-II, and planned upgrade

  3. CRITICAL ITINERARIES OF MAPS WITH CONSTANT SLOPE AND ONE DISCONTINUITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -differentiable transformations, used in digital imaging and 3D printing applications, can be constructed using conjugate pairs

  4. CRITICAL ITINERARIES OF MAPS WITH CONSTANT SLOPE AND ONE DISCONTINUITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ­di#erentiable transformations, used in digital imaging and 3D printing applications, can be constructed using conjugate pairs

  5. Biocorrosive Thermophilic Microbial Communities in Alaskan North Slope Oil Facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duncan, Kathleen E.

    2010-01-01

    known to exacerbate corrosion of pipeline surfaces (3, 27).Canada. Abstract Corrosion of metallic oilfield pipelines bypipeline failure. In fact, it has long been known that microbes contribute to corrosion

  6. Water budgets of martian recurring slope lineae Robert E. Grimm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stillman, David E.

    . Stillman Southwest Research Institute, 1050 Walnut St. #300, Boulder, CO 80403, United States a r t i c l e near the equator are reached earlier in the day than measured by orbital flyovers and so it cannot, 2009). However, this code is too slow to examine in detail the parameter space spanning hydraulic

  7. Research Associate, Cambridge University Engineering Department LATERAL SPREADING OF SLOPES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haigh, Stuart

    ) 2 Table 3: Instrumentation coordinates for test SKH-5 5 Table 4: Instrumentation coordinates for test SKH-8 6 Table 5: Instrumentation coordinates for test SKH-9 6 Table 6: Instrumentation coordinates for test SKH-10 7 Table 7: Instrumentation coordinates for test SKH-11 8 Table 8: Instrumentation

  8. BULK MICROMACHINED TITANIUM MICROMIRROR DEVICE WITH SLOPING ELECTRODE GEOMETRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacDonald, Noel C.

    micromachining. This has enabled the development large, rigid, highly planar MicroElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS

  9. Biocorrosive Thermophilic Microbial Communities in Alaskan North Slope Oil Facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duncan, Kathleen E.

    2010-01-01

    thermoacetica Methanogenic sludge AMP (AY884087) PS4SGXI910Bacteroidetes Anaerobic sludge gene (AB195893) FJ469332LCFA enrichment Methanogenic sludge High temperature Dagang

  10. Sensitivity of soil loss equations to slope classifications 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Hong-Wen

    1995-01-01

    Q is measured as inches of direct runoff when calculating q. Q must be expressed in acre feet when calculating the Rw factor. A storm event having a rainfall intensity of 7. 62 cm (3 inches) per hour was assumed for this study. Under this storm... Calibration of L factor 27 Calibration of S factor. 29 MUSLE. . . . . . . 30 Calibration of Rw factor. 31 Calibration of C factor. 31 Calibration of P factor. . 32 Simulation of soil erosions. . . . . 34 IV RESULTS AND DISCUSSION. . 35 Representation...

  11. Slopes of overconvergent modular forms Lloyd James Peter Kilford

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kilford, Lloyd James Peter

    applied to number theory, in solving problems which can be described concretely* *. It also shows at Imperial College for help* *ful conversations and good company, especially Dan Jacobs and Ed Nevens. I would like also to thank my family, my friends and the members of ICSF, esp* *ecially Vivienne White

  12. Slope County, North Dakota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-Enhancing Capacity forSilicium de ProvenceSolar JumpSloan, New York: EnergyCounty,

  13. North Slope Borough Power & Light | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPI VenturesNew Hampshire:source HistoryRoyalton, Ohio: EnergySea, New

  14. ARM Airborne Carbon Measurement on the North Slope

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsicloudden Documentation Data Management Facility PlotsProducts (VAP) VAP

  15. North Slope of Alaska ARM Climate Research Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shinesSolarNew scholarshipThreeFebruaryMuseum LobbyThousand Cubic3 Emergency

  16. Project Aids Development of Legacy Oilfield on Alaska's North Slope |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy Bills andOrderNATIONALofDefine Review Purpose50(S3TEC )(DOE)

  17. TDX North Slope Generating Co | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc JumpHeter BatterySolarfinMarketMemberI P Rural Electric Coop JumpTDX

  18. Newly Installed Alaska North Slope Well Will Test Innovative Hydrate

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nAand DOEDepartmentNew Jersey isDepartment of Energy <SanHZProduction

  19. The 2004 North Slope of Alaska Arctic Winter Radiometric Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking With U.S. CoalMexicoConferencePriceshielding evaluation for the2004

  20. north-slope-resources | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26th AnnualHistoryMIII:National1-2130 1 ANnopnproliferationNorth

  1. Wireless Networks in Rural Areas: Challenges and Solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dyer, Bill

    Wireless Networks in Rural Areas: Challenges and Solutions Shen Wan April 25, 2009 Abstract In this thesis proposal, we discuss the current limitations and chal- lenges in wireless networks, especially in rural, remote or areas with rough terrains. Although traditional wireless networking technologies have

  2. OmniTread OT-4 Serpentine Robot new Features and Experiments Johann Borenstein* and Malik Hansen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borenstein, Johann

    " is a multi-segment mechanism that derives propulsion from undulations (a wave-like motion of the joints only joints to cross gaps and compliant joints to conform to rough terrain for effective propulsion. Another) joints. The segments typically have powered wheels, tracks, or legs to propel the vehicle forward, while

  3. Climate Response to Irrigation in the American West Benjamin J. Wauer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maryland at College Park, University of

    Plains, and concentrated in the valleys of the Sacramento River in California, and Columbia and Snake suggests that in the western plains the dominance of positive or negative feedback is determined West has undergone significant changes over the last 200 years. A rough terrain of woodlands, plains

  4. 116 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON SYSTEMS, MAN, AND CYBERNETICS--PART B: CYBERNETICS, VOL. 28, NO. 1, FEBRUARY 1998 [1] R. B. McGhee and A. Frank, "On the stability of quadruped creeping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Yuan F.

    -preview information in rough-terrain locomotion by a hexapod walking machine," Int. J. Robot. Res., vol. 3, pp. 134 in a hexapod robot," IEEE Trans. Robot. Automat., vol. 8, pp. 293­303, June 1992. [10] P. V. Nagy, S. Desa, C. M. Liao, and T. K. Chen, "On the stability properties of hexapod tripod gait," IEEE J. Robot

  5. Biologically-Inspired Locomotion of a 2g Hexapod Robot Andrew T. Baisch, Student Member, IEEE, Pratheev S. Sreetharan, and Robert J. Wood, Member, IEEE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Robert

    Biologically-Inspired Locomotion of a 2g Hexapod Robot Andrew T. Baisch, Student Member, IEEE-scale fabrication techniques, a 5.7cm hexapod robot with sprawled posture has been created, and is capable over rough terrain [2], and can scale vertical or in- verted surfaces [3]. Two fundamental hexapod

  6. Adhesion between weakly rough beads F. Restagno* and J. Crassous

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud 11, Université de

    granular media, and they are encountered as well in geophys- ics problems, in soil mechanics, and in the industrial process- ing of powders. In the field of soil mechanics, cohesive ef- fects are usually taken

  7. On the rough folding landscape of green fluorescent protein

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrews, Benjamin Thomas

    2008-01-01

    W. A. (2004). The protein folding 'speed limit'. CurrentG. (1997). Theory of protein folding: the energy landscapeenergy landscape of protein folding: a synthesis. Proteins

  8. EARTHQUAKE RUPTURES ON ROUGH FAULTS Eric M. Dunham1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunham, Eric M.

    .): Multiscale and Multiphysics Processes in Geomechanics, SSGG, pp. 145­148. springerlink.com c Springer

  9. Elastic–Plastic Spherical Contact Modeling Including Roughness Effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, L.; Etsion, I.; Talke, F. E.

    2010-01-01

    A multilevel model for elastic–plastic contact between ajunction growth of an elastic–plastic spherical contact. J.nite element based elastic–plastic model for the contact of

  10. NEAR-FIELD IMAGING OF INFINITE ROUGH SURFACES 1 ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-09-03

    cal exploration (e.g., oil and gas exploration), and medical imaging (e.g., breast cancer detection). ... The method can be naturally extended to solve the trans-.

  11. Analysis of the scattering by an unbounded rough surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-11-10

    Jun 7, 2012 ... outdoor ground and sea surfaces, optical scattering from the surface of materials in near-field optics or nano-optics, and detection of underwater ... ined by researchers in the engineering community. .... A simple calculation yields an explicit characterization of the norm in ...... Wave Motion 1996; 24:421–433.

  12. Immersive Planar Display using Roughly Aligned Projectors Ramesh Raskar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fuchs, Henry

    ://www.cs.unc.edu/~raskar/Planar/ Abstract When a projector is oblique with respect to a planar dis- playsurface, it creates keystoning is not perpendicular to the display screen, the resultant image is keystoned and ap- pears distorted (Fig 1). We rectangular images (b) Oblique projectors create keystoned images. positioned in large display systems, after

  13. Modeling rough energy landscapes in defected condensed matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monasterio Velásquez, Paul Rene

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation is a computational and theoretical investigation of the behavior of defected condensed matter and its evolution over long time scales. The thesis provides original contributions to the methodology used ...

  14. What rough beast? Synthetic Biology and the Future of Biosecurity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohr, Scott C.

    Synthetic biology seeks to create modular biological parts that can be assembled into useful devices, allowing the modification of biological systems with greater reliability, at lower cost, with greater speed, and by a ...

  15. Pressure Drop of Fully Developed, Laminar Flow in Rough Microtubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahrami, Majid

    in fabrication methods in microelectromechanical systems MEMS have generated significant interest in the area Mem. ASME e-mail: majid@mhtlab.uwaterloo.ca M. M. Yovanovich Distinguished Professor Emeritus Fellow ASME J. R. Culham1 Associate Professor Mem. ASME Microelectronics Heat Transfer Laboratory, Department

  16. On the rough folding landscape of green fluorescent protein

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrews, Benjamin Thomas

    2008-01-01

    H. (2008). Understanding protein folding: small proteins inmultiple pathways of protein folding. Chem Biol 2, 255-60.Polymer principles and protein folding. Protein Sci 8, 1166-

  17. Dropwise condensation on superhydrophobic surfaces with two-tier roughness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Chuan-Hua

    . This letter reports continuous dropwise condensation on a superhydrophobic surface with short carbon nanotubes, mimicking that on the surface of lotus leaves,11 was prepared by depositing carbon nanotubes CNTs of chromium Cr, 100 nm and then nickel Ni, 20 nm as catalyst, and CNTs were grown by plasma enhanced chemical

  18. Classical Control Using H 1 Methods Rough Draft

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helton, J. William

    : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 17 3 Frequency domain performance requirements 19 3.1 Introduction : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 19 3.1.1 The closed loop system S : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 19 3.1.2 Frequency domain performance : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 32 3.4.4 Disturbance rejection : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 33 3.4.5 More on tracking error

  19. To our roughly 6,800 new and continuing international

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ginzel, Matthew

    Boiler Out! The Boiler Out! Volunteer Program provides interna- tional students with opportu- nities. Currently, the Boiler Out! cohort repre- sents the diversity of Pur- due's student body, consist- ing of more than 100 stu- dents and representing 19 countries! To learn more about Boiler Out!, view

  20. NEAR-FIELD IMAGING OF INFINITE ROUGH SURFACES 1 ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-09-03

    mine the scattered field from the incident field and the differential equation ... design an efficient computational method for solving the surface scattering problem ... propagation of acoustic waves or the transverse magnetic polarization of ...... the periodicity of the solutions, we modified a simple mesh generator in MATLAB by.

  1. Procedure for estimating fracture energy from fracture surface roughness

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Williford, Ralph E. (Kennewick, WA)

    1989-01-01

    The fracture energy of a material is determined by first measuring the length of a profile of a section through a fractured surface of the material taken on a plane perpendicular to the mean plane of that surface, then determining the fractal dimensionality of the surface. From this, the yield strength of the material, and the Young's Modulus of that material, the fracture energy is calculated.

  2. Rough Rock, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/ColoradoRemsenburg-Speonk, NewMichigan: EnergyRocklinRohmRoshniRotokawa Geothermal

  3. Rough and Ready Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/ColoradoRemsenburg-Speonk, NewMichigan: EnergyRocklinRohmRoshniRotokawa Geothermaland Ready

  4. Surface Orbital 'Roughness' in Colossal Magnetoresistive Oxide | Advanced

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking With Livermore National LabSupplierNSTPhoton Source More

  5. Enhanced Tissue Adhesion by Increased Porosity and Surface Roughness of

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(Journal Article) | SciTech(Journal(Patent) |(Journal Article) | SciTechCarbon Based

  6. Impact of Ice Crystal Roughness on Satellite Retrieved Cloud Properties

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACT EVALUATION PLAN FOR THE SITE- SPECIFIC SAVINGS PORTFOLIOImpactIce

  7. Eight underground designs: underground plans Book No. 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wells, M.; Wells, S.G.

    1981-01-01

    Eight different designs are given for earth-sheltered houses. Each design is depicted thoroughly, with floor plans, cross sections, views from the several sides, and some general comments. The plans are intended as a planning tool to be adapted to individual needs, budgets, sites and local ordinances. Each plan expresses a different idea, with terrain varying from flat land to south and north slopes. Conventional and novel construction and design methods are demonstrated.

  8. University of Delaware Technical Analysis for On-Site Wind Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    at the identified wind turbine locations and subsequent foundation design. #12;Final Report ­ Technical Analysis.3 TERRAIN AND ROUGHNESS MAPS 12 2.4 RESOURCE GRID 13 2.5 WIND TURBINE POWER CURVE 14 2.6 SUMMMARY OF MODEL-LEWES ELECTRICITY DATA 19 3.2 NET METERING 19 3.3 USAGE AND RATES 20 3.4 WHOLESALE POWER SALES 22 3.5 WIND DATA 25 3

  9. Nutritional Value of Range Plants in Edwards Plateau Region of Texas. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huston, J.E.; Rector, B.S.; Merrill, L.B.; Engdahl, B.S.

    1981-01-01

    .S. Rector, L.B. Merrill, and B.S. Engdahl* The Edwards Plateau region of Texas comprises .about 24 million acres of mostly rough terrain, well suitkd for production of cattle, sheep, and goats. The region also supports large populations of deer, tur..., re- spectively, with no distinct boundary. Soils are most- ly calcareous clays and clay loams derived from lime- stone, with the exception of one fairly large area, the Central Basin, which is typified by sandy, granitic soils. Average annual...

  10. QLOD: A Data Structure for Interative Terrain Visualization RODRIGO TOLEDO1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Figueiredo, Luiz Henrique

    a geographic information system. These models can represent a broad area of the Earth's surface with detailed geographical information. The development of tech- niques and equipment made data collection more precise information, thus yielding very large datasets. For this reason, it is necessary to use a compatible structure

  11. Design and editing 2.5-dimensional terrain in StarLogo TNG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wendel, Daniel J

    2006-01-01

    StarLogo TNG is "The Next Generation" in block-based decentralized programming for modeling and simulation software. Its aim is to make computer programming more appealing for students in middle school and high school. ...

  12. Active Ankle Response for a 2-D Biped Robot with Terrain Contact Sensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hitschmann, Francis Lee

    2009-11-18

    . 8. Palm(III), W.J., Mechanical Vibration. 1 ed. 2007, Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, Inc. 3. 9. Collins, S.H., A Bipedal Walking Robot with Efficient and Human-Like Gait*. 10. Yamaguchi, Multisensor Foot Mechanism with Shock Absorbing Material.... 8. Palm(III), W.J., Mechanical Vibration. 1 ed. 2007, Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, Inc. 3. 9. Collins, S.H., A Bipedal Walking Robot with Efficient and Human-Like Gait*. 10. Yamaguchi, Multisensor Foot Mechanism with Shock Absorbing Material...

  13. The research and design of a low cost, all terrain, mechanically advantageous wheelchair for developed markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Judge, Benjamin Michael

    2011-01-01

    This thesis presents a case for a paradigm shift in the way mobility technology is approached in the United States. Spawning from the research of developing world wheelchair technology, a conceptual design for a capable ...

  14. Human-Inspired Motion Primitives and Transitions for Bipedal Robotic Locomotion in Diverse Terrain 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Huihua

    2015-04-27

    This thesis presents a control design approach, which uses human data in the development of bipedal robotic control techniques for multiple locomotion behaviors. Insight into the fundamental behaviors of human locomotion is obtained through...

  15. A Benthic Terrain Classification Scheme for American Samoa Accepted for publication in Marine Geodesy, 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Dawn Jeannine

    , invasive species, security training activities, offshore oil and gas exploration, and coral bleaching on earth, continually face destruction from anthropogenic and natural threats. The U.S. Coral Reef Task to increasing coastal populations (Culliton 1998). Natural and anthropogenic processes threaten natural

  16. Improved Fast Replanning for Robot Navigation in Unknown Terrain Sven Koenig

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    often operate in domains that are only incom- pletely known, for example, when they have to move from Georgia Institute of Technology Atlanta, GA 30312-0280 skoenig@cc.gatech.edu Maxim Likhachev School of Computer Science Carnegie Mellon University Pittsburgh, PA 15213 maxim+@cs.cmu.edu Abstract Mobile robots

  17. Improved Fast Replanning for Robot Navigation in Unknown Terrain Sven Koenig

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mobile robots often operate in domains that are only incom­ pletely known, for example, when they have of Computing Georgia Institute of Technology Atlanta, GA 30312­0280 skoenig@cc.gatech.edu Maxim Likhachev School of Computer Science Carnegie Mellon University Pittsburgh, PA 15213 maxim+@cs.cmu.edu Abstract

  18. Curiosity Based Exploration for Learning Terrain Models Yogesh Girdhar, David Whitney, and Gregory Dudek

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dudek, Gregory

    . We posit that observation data collected from such paths that seek novelty and maximize information and temporal distribution of the data. Moreover, ROST can process the incoming observation data in real time0E9, Canada {yogesh,dwhitney,dudek}@cim.mcgill.ca Fig. 1. Example of an exploratory path (top

  19. Terrain Influences on Synoptic Storm Structure and Mesoscale Precipitation Distribution during IPEX IOP3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monteverdi, John

    , University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah W. James Steenburgh NOAA Cooperative Institute for Regional Prediction and Department of Meteorology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah Justin A. W. Cox NOAA

  20. Adjusting lidar-derived digital terrain models in coastal marshes based on estimated aboveground biomass density

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Medeiros, Stephen; Hagen, Scott; Weishampel, John; Angelo, James

    2015-03-25

    Digital elevation models (DEMs) derived from airborne lidar are traditionally unreliable in coastal salt marshes due to the inability of the laser to penetrate the dense grasses and reach the underlying soil. To that end, we present a novel processing methodology that uses ASTER Band 2 (visible red), an interferometric SAR (IfSAR) digital surface model, and lidar-derived canopy height to classify biomass density using both a three-class scheme (high, medium and low) and a two-class scheme (high and low). Elevation adjustments associated with these classes using both median and quartile approaches were applied to adjust lidar-derived elevation values closer tomore »true bare earth elevation. The performance of the method was tested on 229 elevation points in the lower Apalachicola River Marsh. The two-class quartile-based adjusted DEM produced the best results, reducing the RMS error in elevation from 0.65 m to 0.40 m, a 38% improvement. The raw mean errors for the lidar DEM and the adjusted DEM were 0.61 ± 0.24 m and 0.32 ± 0.24 m, respectively, thereby reducing the high bias by approximately 49%.« less

  1. Vision-based terrain classification and classifier fusion for planetary exploration rovers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Halatci, Ibrahim

    2006-01-01

    Autonomous rover operation plays a key role in planetary exploration missions. Rover systems require more and more autonomous capabilities to improve efficiency and robustness. Rover mobility is one of the critical components ...

  2. Building model generation project : generating a model of the MIT campus terrain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kulikov, Vitaliy Y. (Vitaliy Yurievich), 1981-

    2004-01-01

    Possession of a complete, automatically generated and frequently updated model of the MIT campus leads the way to many valuable applications, ranging from three-dimensional navigation to virtual tours. In this thesis, we ...

  3. Effects of climate, physical erosion, parent mineralogy, and dust on chemical erosion rates in mountainous terrain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrier, Ken

    2009-01-01

    in the Idaho Batholith Abstract Chemical weathering promoteschemical weathering rates over millennial timescales: Measurements at Rio Icacos, Puerto Rico Abstract . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .chemical erosion rates: Measurements along two altitudinal transects in the Idaho Batholith Abstract . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

  4. Real -Time Rendering of Photo-Textured Terrain Height Fields LUIZ CARLOS GUEDES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Figueiredo, Luiz Henrique

    can be found in Geographical Information Systems and computer games. Both applications share the need requirement in applications such as flight simulators, action games or geographic information systems. Particularly, geographic information systems deal with large scale virtual worlds and require the integration

  5. INVESTIGATION OF A DYNAMIC POWER LINE RATING CONCEPT FOR IMPROVED WIND ENERGY INTEGRATION OVER COMPLEX TERRAIN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jake P. Gentle; Kurt S Myers; Tyler B Phillips; Inanc Senocak; Phil Anderson

    2014-08-01

    Dynamic Line Rating (DLR) is a smart grid technology that allows the rating of power line to be based on real-time conductor temperature dependent on local weather conditions. In current practice overhead power lines are generally given a conservative rating based on worst case weather conditions. Using historical weather data collected over a test bed area, we demonstrate there is often additional transmission capacity not being utilized with the current static rating practice. We investigate a new dynamic line rating methodology using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to determine wind conditions along transmission lines at dense intervals. Simulated results are used to determine conductor temperature by calculating the transient thermal response of the conductor under variable environmental conditions. In calculating the conductor temperature, we use both a calculation with steady-state assumption and a transient calculation. Under low wind conditions, steady-state assumption predicts higher conductor temperatures that could lead to curtailments, whereas transient calculations produce conductor temperatures that are significantly lower, implying the availability of additional transmission capacity.

  6. Live Webinar on the Funding Opportunity for Wind Forecasting Improvement Project in Complex Terrain

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On April 21, 2014 from 3:00 to 5:00 PM EST the Wind Program will hold a live webinar to provide information to potential applicants for this Funding Opportunity Announcement. There is no cost to...

  7. Local Adjustment of the Background Error Correlation for Surface Analyses over Complex Terrain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Capecchi, Mario R.

    , FL Revision Submitted to: Weather and Forecasting August 23, 2004 1. Corresponding author address quantities are of great importance to weather forecasters. The need for analyses of meteorological surface variables (temperature, wind, etc.) over mountainous regions for applications such as forest fire

  8. Rotor and Subrotor Dynamics in the Lee of Three-Dimensional Terrain JAMES D. DOYLE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frierson, Dargan

    circulation, where they dissipate and contribute their vorticity toward the maintenance of the main rotor of their intensity, such subrotor circulations likely pose the greatest hazard to aviation. 1. Introduction and shear, and have been sug- gested to contribute to numerous aviation incidents and accidents (e.g., NTSB

  9. Near Optimal Location of Two Landings on Flat, Uniform Terrain Francis E. Greulich

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greulich, Francis E.

    to be the originator of the alternate location and allocation algorithm, hereafter referred to as the location-allocation region is a strictly convex function. Parenthetically it is noted that this proof is

  10. TOWARDS SEMANTIC INTERACTION IN HIGH-DETAIL REALTIME TERRAIN AND CITY VISUALIZATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Behnke, Sven

    to the availability of huge high-resolution 2.5d digital surface models (Hirschm¨uller, 2005). As sensors also record. Reconstructions from these aerial data will help to match and integrate data obtained from terrestrial sensors (Fr in that they add more and finer semantic categories and metadata (Kolbe et al., 2005). Se- mantic models based

  11. Flight Simulator Evaluation of an Integrated Synthetic and Enhanced Vision System for Terrain Avoidance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaber, David B.

    to the requirements for route awareness and guidance. 3. Research compared a perspective pathway HUD with a conventional 2-D HUD. The results showed the perspective pathway HUD was better for guidance. Overall, pathway HUDs combine the independent advantages of pathway displays and head-up displays, particularly during

  12. The coupled development of terrain and vegetation : the case of semiarid grasslands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flores Cervantes, Javier Homero, 1977-

    2010-01-01

    The distribution of vegetation in semiarid landscapes organizes as a function of moisture availability, which is often mediated by the form of the land surface. Simultaneously the processes that shape the land surface are ...

  13. Hydrologic modeling using triangulated irregular networks : terrain representation, flood forecasting and catchment response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vivoni, Enrique R. (Enrique Rafael), 1975-

    2003-01-01

    Numerical models are modern tools for capturing the spatial and temporal variability in the land-surface hydrologic response to rainfall and understanding the physical relations between internal watershed processes and ...

  14. Saving the soil: AgriLife units work to improve traning terrain 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orth, Melanie

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this dissertation is to contribute in three ways to the literature on son preference and fertility through a comparative perspective. First, I examine the impact of son preference on fertility in China and South ...

  15. Coastal Wave Generation and Wave Breaking over Terrain: Two Problems in Mesoscale Wave Dynamics 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qian, Tingting

    2010-07-14

    Two problems in mesoscale wave dynamics are addressed: (i) wave-turbulence interaction in a breaking mountain wave and (ii) gravity wave generation associated with coastal heating gradients. The mean and turbulent structures in a breaking mountain...

  16. Effects of all-terrain vehicle trails on stream channel characteristics, Ouachita National Forest, Arkansas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohrer, Deven Michelle

    2001-01-01

    Research shows that road and trail crossings have negative impacts on forest streams, and that off-road vehicles are detrimental to the environment. However, little information is available concerning the effects of such vehicles on stream channels...

  17. A system to place observers in a polyhedral terrain in polynomial time?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Draper, Bruce A.

    was developed focusing on the military context. The Daedalus project 21 has as one of its goals to provide

  18. Placing observers to cover a polyhedral terrain in polynomial time cio Marengoniy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Draper, Bruce A.

    on the mili- tary context. The Daedalus project 17 has as one of its goals to provide battle eld commanders

  19. Pathfinder: A Relational Query Optimizer Explores XQuery Terrain Torsten Grust Jan Rittinger Jens Teubner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teubner, Jens

    -Lifting: Turning XQuery into Relational Plans SERIALIZE FRAG_UNION ¶ (iter:outer, pos:pos1, item) EMPTY_FRAG FRAGs ROW# (pos1:pos>/outer) ELEM (iter, item:pos, item>) FRAG_UNION ELEM_TAG FRAG_UNION FRAGs @ (item), val: item ¶ (iter, pos:pos1, item) FRAGs TEXT (res:) ATTR (res:) |X

  20. The effects of cultural noise on controlled source electromagnetic resonses of subsurface fractures in resistive terrain 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandes, Roland Anthony Savio

    2009-05-15

    Page 2.1 Transient smoke ring diffusion into a conducting halfspace, conductivity ? = 0.1 S/m. .............................................................................. 10 2.2 The relation of transmitter current with induced emf... generated by this switch-off is shown in figure 2.2. The magnetic flux threads through the earth and the emf associated with its abrupt switch off generates eddy currents within the subsurface. The geometry of the eddy current distribution is approximated...