Sample records for roughness slope terrain

  1. Bipedal Robotic Walking on Flat-Ground, Up-Slope and Rough Terrain with Human-Inspired Hybrid Zero Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nadubettu Yadukumar, Shishir 1986-

    2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The thesis shows how to achieve bipedal robotic walking on flat-ground, up-slope and rough terrain by using Human-Inspired control. We begin by considering human walking data and find outputs (or virtual constraints) that, when calculated from...

  2. Speed Map for Autonomous Rovers over Rough Terrain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loh, Jonathan Edau

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Grid Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .considered obstacles [27] Grid Map showing Tile Size, Cellspeed map. It also covers grid maps and terrain roughness,

  3. BAYESIAN METHOD FOR SEGMENTATION OF SAR IMAGES IN ROUGH TERRAIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, Carl von Ossietzky Universität

    BAYESIAN METHOD FOR SEGMENTATION OF SAR IMAGES IN ROUGH TERRAIN Marco Caparrini1 , Klaus Seidel1 are the basis for radiometric correction. Considering SAR images, the huge amount of processing for geographic and geometric calibration and registration that is needed prior to analysis is well established. Nonetheless

  4. Design of a chain flail mower for leveling rough terrain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flores, Aaron (Aaron N.)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The flail mower is a piece of agricultural equipment that uses bladed attachments rotating around a drum to cut down bushes and grassy terrain. One major drawback to the flail mower is the rapid wear that happens almost ...

  5. Hydrological Evaluation of Septic Disposal Field Design in Sloping Terrains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    . Steenhuis7 Abstract: The most common form of onsite domestic wastewater treatment in the United States; Slopes; Wastewater treatment; Waste disposal. Introduction The most common form of onsite wastewater treatment is the septic system Wastewater 1991 . Over 50 million people in the United States use septic

  6. MODELING OF SKID-STEERED WHEELED ROBOTIC VEHICLES ON SLOPED TERRAINS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Emmanuel

    MODELING OF SKID-STEERED WHEELED ROBOTIC VEHICLES ON SLOPED TERRAINS Camilo Ordonez Center radii. This work presents the analysis and experimental verification of a dynamic model for skid-steered for Intelligent Systems, Controls and Robotics (CISCOR) Department of Mechanical Engineering Florida A

  7. Development of a Hybrid Powered 2D Biped Walking Machine Designed for Rough Terrain Locomotion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Bryce C.

    2010-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    has built a three legged 2D biped walking machine to be used as a test stand for studying rough terrain walking. The specific aim of this research is to investigate how biped walkers can best maintain walking stability when acted upon by small...

  8. Modeling, system identication, and control for dynamic locomotion of the LittleDog robot on rough terrain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levashov, Michael Yurievich

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, I present a framework for achieving a stable bounding gait on the LittleDog robot over rough terrain. The framework relies on an accurate planar model of the dynamics, which I assembled from a model of the ...

  9. Development of the Robotic Touch foot Sensor for 2D walking Robot, for Studying Rough Terrain Locomotion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Hunwoo

    2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Development of the Robotic Touch foot Sensor for 2D walking Robot, for Studying Rough Terrain Locomotion By HUNWOO LEE Submitted to the graduate degree program in Mechanical Engineering and the Graduate Faculty of the University of Kansas... ________________________________ Professor Robert Umholtz Date Defended: June 5, 2012 ii The Thesis Committee for HUNWOO LEE certifies that this is the approved version of the following thesis: Development of the Robotic Touch Foot Sensor for 2D Walking Robot...

  10. Terrain identification methods for planetary exploration rovers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brooks, Christopher Allen, 1978-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Autonomous mobility in rough terrain is becoming increasingly important for planetary exploration rovers. Increased knowledge of local terrain properties is critical to ensure a rover's safety, especially when driving on ...

  11. Minimalistic Control of a Compass Gait Robot in Rough Terrain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iida, Fumiya

    Although there has been an increasing interest in dynamic bipedal locomotion for significant improvement of energy efficiency and dexterity of mobile robots in the real world, their locomotion capabilities are still mostly ...

  12. Good terrain geometry, cheap!

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duchaineau, M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)]|[Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Wolinsky, M.; Sigeti, D.E. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Real-time terrain rendering for interactive visualization remains a demanding task. We present a novel algorithm with several advantages over previous methods: our method is unusually stingy with polygons yet achieves real-time performance and is scalable to arbitrary regions and resolutions. The method provides a continuous terrain mesh of specified triangle count having provably minimum error in restricted but reasonably general classes of permissible meshes and error metrics. Our method provides an elegant solution to guaranteeing certain elusive types of consistency in scenes produced by multiple scene generators which share a common finest-resolution database but which otherwise operate entirely independently. This consistency is achieved by exploiting the freedom of choice of error metric allowed by the algorithm to provide, for example, multiple exact lines-of-sight in real-time. Our methods rely on an off-line pre-processing phase to construct a multi-scale data structure consisting of triangular terrain approximations enhanced ({open_quotes}thickened{close_quotes}) with world-space error information. In real time, this error data is efficiently transformed into screen-space where it is used to guide a greedy top-down triangle subdivision algorithm which produces the desired minimal error continuous terrain mesh. Our algorithm has been implemented and it operates at real-time rates.

  13. Placement of Traffic Barriers on Roadside and Median Slopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferdous, Md Rubiat

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    on the findings obtained from crash tests performed on flat terrain. For barriers placed on roadside and median slopes, vehicle impact height varies depending on the trajectory of the vehicle along the ditch section and lateral offset of the barrier. Thus...

  14. Overland flow time of concentration on flat terrains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chibber, Paramjit

    2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    /Duration...............................................................11 2.4.3 Surface Slope...................................................................................12 2.4.4 Roughness Coefficient/Flow Regime ..............................................12 2.4.5 Depression Storage..............................................................................17 2.4.6 Antecedent Moisture Content ..........................................................19 2.5 Stepwise Regression.....................................................................................20 3 METHODOLOGY...

  15. Terrainosaurus: realistic terrain synthesis using genetic algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saunders, Ryan L.

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    ), are solid evidence that believable terrain can be visualized in real-time with current technology. Terrain generation, in contrast, has received comparatively little treatment in the literature. Fractal-based techniques are the most prevalent, because... noted, fractal methods for terrain generation are limited in the types of terrain they can simulate, and one generally has to resort to elevation maps digitized from the real world to get more interesting and believable terrain models. In this thesis, I...

  16. Accurate Wind Characterization in Complex Terrain Using the Immersed Boundary Method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lundquist, K A; Chow, F K; Lundquist, J K; Kosovic, B

    2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes an immersed boundary method (IBM) that facilitates the explicit resolution of complex terrain within the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. Two different interpolation methods, trilinear and inverse distance weighting, are used at the core of the IBM algorithm. Functional aspects of the algorithm's implementation and the accuracy of results are considered. Simulations of flow over a three-dimensional hill with shallow terrain slopes are preformed with both WRF's native terrain-following coordinate and with both IB methods. Comparisons of flow fields from the three simulations show excellent agreement, indicating that both IB methods produce accurate results. However, when ease of implementation is considered, inverse distance weighting is superior. Furthermore, inverse distance weighting is shown to be more adept at handling highly complex urban terrain, where the trilinear interpolation algorithm breaks down. This capability is demonstrated by using the inverse distance weighting core of the IBM to model atmospheric flow in downtown Oklahoma City.

  17. Evaluating Hydrology Preservation of Simplified Terrain Representations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Varela, Carlos

    Evaluating Hydrology Preservation of Simplified Terrain Representations Ph. D. Student: Christopher captures the hydrology is important for determining the effectiveness of a terrain simplification technique also present a novel ter- rain simplification algorithm based on the compression of hydrology features

  18. Measurement of normal contact stiffness of fractal rough surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chongpu Zhai; Sébastien Bevand; Yixiang Gan; Dorian Hanaor; Gwénaëlle Proust; Bruno Guelorget; Delphine Retraint

    2014-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the effects of roughness and fractality on the normal contact stiffness of rough surfaces. Samples of isotropically roughened aluminium surfaces are considered. The roughness and fractal dimension were altered through blasting using different sized particles. Subsequently, surface mechanical attrition treatment (SMAT) was applied to the surfaces in order to modify the surface at the microscale. The surface topology was characterised by interferometry based profilometry. The normal contact stiffness was measured through nanoindentation with a flat tip utilising the partial unloading method. We focus on establishing the relationships between surface stiffness and roughness, combined with the effects of fractal dimension. The experimental results, for a wide range of surfaces, showed that the measured contact stiffness depended very closely on surfaces' root mean squared (RMS) slope and their fractal dimension, with correlation coefficients of around 90\\%, whilst a relatively weak correlation coefficient of 57\\% was found between the contact stiffness and RMS roughness.

  19. Controlling rough paths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    original work of Lyons [7] roughness is measured in p-variation norm, instead here we prefer to .... e.g. for cochains A; B of degree 1 and 2 respectively, we have.

  20. Roughness Tolerance Studies for the Undulator Beam Pipe Chamber of LCLS-II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bane, K

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the effect of wall roughness on the wakefield-induced energy variation in the undulator beam pipe of LCLS-II. We find that a wall roughness equivalent to an rms surface slope of 30 mr increases the total induced energy variation within the bunch (due to the resistive wall wake) by a modest 20%.

  1. Steep Slope Calculator

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary900Steep Slope Calculator Estimates Cooling and Heating

  2. Terrain Characterization and Classification with a Mobile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borenstein, Johann

    , commonly known categories, such as gravel, sand, or as- phalt. Terrain characterization, on the other hand aims at associating terrain with well-defined categories, such as gravel, sand, or dirt. A related for a turn is lower when driving over sand or wet grass than when driving on packed dirt or asphalt. In order

  3. Mathematics ON SLOPE GENERA OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ni, Yi

    Pacific Journal of Mathematics ON SLOPE GENERA OF KNOTTED TORI IN 4-SPACE YI LIU, YI NI, HONGBIN, HONGBIN SUN AND SHICHENG WANG We investigate genera of slopes of a knotted torus in the 4-sphere analogous. 117 #12;118 YI LIU, YI NI, HONGBIN SUN AND SHICHENG WANG from the torus to the 4-sphere. By slightly

  4. Alteration of Terrain Permits (New Hampshire)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This permit is required whenever a project proposes to disturb more than 100,000 square feet of contiguous terrain (50,000 square feet if any portion of project is within protected shoreland), or...

  5. Evaluating Hydrology Preservation of Simplified Terrain Representations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franklin, W. Randolph

    Evaluating Hydrology Preservation of Simplified Terrain Representations Jonathan Muckella , Marcus network. A quan- titative measurement of how accurately a drainage network captures the hydrology to preserve the important hydrology features. This method and other simplification schemes are then evaluated

  6. Terrain Trafficability Characterization with a Mobile Robot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borenstein, Johann

    for a turn is lower when driving over sand or wet grass than when driving on packed dirt or asphalt tests we collected data on a variety of different terrains, such as gravel, sand, asphalt, grass

  7. North Slope (Wahluke Slope) expedited response action cleanup plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this action is to mitigate any threat to public health and the environment from hazards on the North Slope and meet the expedited response action (ERA) objective of cleanup to a degree requiring no further action. The ERA may be the final remediation of the 100-I-3 Operable Unit. A No Action record of decision (ROD) may be issued after remediation completion. The US Department of Energy (DOE) currently owns or administers approximately 140 mi{sup 2} (about 90,000 acres) of land north and east of the Columbia River (referred to as the North Slope) that is part of the Hanford Site. The North Slope, also commonly known as the Wahluke Slope, was not used for plutonium production or support facilities; it was used for military air defense of the Hanford Site and vicinity. The North Slope contained seven antiaircraft gun emplacements and three Nike-Ajax missile positions. These military positions were vacated in 1960--1961 as the defense requirements at Hanford changed. They were demolished in 1974. Prior to government control in 1943, the North Slope was homesteaded. Since the initiation of this ERA in the summer of 1992, DOE signed the modified Hanford Federal Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) with the Washington Department of Ecology (Ecology) and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in which a milestone was set to complete remediation activities and a draft closeout report by October 1994. Remediation activities will make the North Slope area available for future non-DOE uses. Thirty-nine sites have undergone limited characterization to determine if significant environmental hazards exist. This plan documents the results of that characterization and evaluates the potential remediation alternatives.

  8. Analysis, design, and control of an omnidirectional mobile robot in rough terrain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Udengaard, Martin Richard

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An omnidirectional mobile robot is able, kinematically, to move in any direction regardless of current pose. To date, nearly all designs and analyses of omnidirectional mobile robots have considered the case of motion on ...

  9. Parallelized Distributed Embedded Control System for 2D Walking Robot for Studying Rough Terrain Locomotion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strunk, Gavin

    2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    C Bus…………………………………….31 3.3 Jaywalker GUI…………………………………………………………...38 4. JAYWALKER TESTING……………………………………………………….41 4.1 Motor Ramping…………………………………………………………..41 4.2 Range of Motion…………………………………………………………42 4.3 Data Acquisition…………………………………………………………42... cylinders…………………………………………………………..53 Figure B.4.1: Propeller wiring diagram with EEPROM and connectors corresponding to the Sensor Controller connectors………………………….54 Figure B.4.2: Regulator power source provided +3.3 VDC and +5 VDC for the Foot...

  10. High performance robotic traverse of desert terrain.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whittaker, William (Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA)

    2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents tentative innovations to enable unmanned vehicle guidance for a class of off-road traverse at sustained speeds greater than 30 miles per hour. Analyses and field trials suggest that even greater navigation speeds might be achieved. The performance calls for innovation in mapping, perception, planning and inertial-referenced stabilization of components, hosted aboard capable locomotion. The innovations are motivated by the challenge of autonomous ground vehicle traverse of 250 miles of desert terrain in less than 10 hours, averaging 30 miles per hour. GPS coverage is assumed to be available with localized blackouts. Terrain and vegetation are assumed to be akin to that of the Mojave Desert. This terrain is interlaced with networks of unimproved roads and trails, which are a key to achieving the high performance mapping, planning and navigation that is presented here.

  11. Materials Science Problems of the SCRF Q-Slope

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Insepov, Z.; Norem, J.; Hassanein, A. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Swenson, D. R. [Epion Corporation, Billerica, MA 01821 (United States)

    2006-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    None of the existing theoretical models can explain all the observed features of the Q-slope. In the present work, we review this problem and show how Atom Probe Tomography and Gas Cluster Ion Beam smoothing can study the basic mechanisms that may be involved. The gas cluster ion beam (GCIB) treatment method has recently been proposed as a new way to significantly reduce the surface roughness and the dark current from the rf-cavity surfaces. In addition to the suppression of the dark current, GCIB might also be an important treatment for mitigation of the Q-slope in superconducting cavities. Niobium surface treatment by cluster ion irradiation was studied based on atomistic and mesoscopic simulation methods and the surface modification dynamics results were compared to experiments.

  12. Drying Rough Rice in Storage.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sorenson, J. W. Jr.; Crane, L. E.

    1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Drying. Rough Rice in Storage Ih AGRf""' TURP YPERIMENT STAT10 I. TEXAS SUMMARY Research was conducted at the Rice-Pasture Experiment Station near Beaumont during 7 crop years (1952-53 through 1958-59) to determine the engineering problems... and the practicability of dry- ing rough rice in storage in Texas. Drying rice in storage means drying rice in the same bin in which it is to be stored. Rough rice, with initial moisture contents of 15.0 to 23.0 percent, was dried at depths of 4 to 10 feet...

  13. Adaptive Streaming and Rendering of Large Terrains using Strip Masks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Adaptive Streaming and Rendering of Large Terrains using Strip Masks Joachim Pouderoux Jean-Eudes Marvie IPARLA Project (LaBRI - INRIA Futurs) University of Bordeaux, France Abstract Terrain rendering is an important factor in the rendering of virtual scenes. If they are large and detailed, digital terrains can

  14. Creating Standards for Winter Terrain Parks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to engineering frame motivated creation of a 501c(3) non-profit, United States Terrain Park Council Dedicated fatalities (31 male, 6 female) mostly young J. Shealy (2000) Snowboard injury rate doubled during 1990-2000 from 3.37 to 6.97 per 1000 skier days Deaths: 50 (2007-2008) 39 (2008-2009) Compiled by California Ski

  15. Rock Slopes from Mechanics to Decision Making

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Einstein, Herbert H.

    Rock slope instabilities are discussed in the context of decision making for risk assessment and management. Hence, the state of the slope and possible failure mechanism need to be defined first. This is done with geometrical ...

  16. Biocorrosive Thermophilic Microbial Communities in Alaskan North Slope Oil Facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duncan, Kathleen E.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in Alaskan North Slope Oil Facilities Kathleen E. Duncan,in Alaskan North Slope oil production facilities. Title:in Alaskan North Slope Oil Facilities Authors: Kathleen E.

  17. TERRAIN ESTIMATION USING INTERNAL SENSORS Debangshu Sadhukhan, Carl Moore, Emmanuel Collins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Emmanuel

    was successful in identifying gravel, packed dirt, and grass. KEY WORDS Mobile robot, terrain identification. For our research "sensing terrain" means determining the type of terrain, i.e.: gravel, sand, asphalt, mud

  18. Electrokinetic transport in microchannels with random roughness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Moran [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kang, Qinjun [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a numerical framework to model the electrokinetic transport in microchannels with random roughness. The three-dimensional microstructure of the rough channel is generated by a random generation-growth method with three statistical parameters to control the number density, the total volume fraction, and the anisotropy characteristics of roughness elements. The governing equations for the electrokinetic transport are solved by a high-efficiency lattice Poisson?Boltzmann method in complex geometries. The effects from the geometric characteristics of roughness on the electrokinetic transport in microchannels are therefore modeled and analyzed. For a given total roughness volume fraction, a higher number density leads to a lower fluctuation because of the random factors. The electroosmotic flow rate increases with the roughness number density nearly logarithmically for a given volume fraction of roughness but decreases with the volume fraction for a given roughness number density. When both the volume fraction and the number density of roughness are given, the electroosmotic flow rate is enhanced by the increase of the characteristic length along the external electric field direction but is reduced by that in the direction across the channel. For a given microstructure of the rough microchannel, the electroosmotic flow rate decreases with the Debye length. It is found that the shape resistance of roughness is responsible for the flow rate reduction in the rough channel compared to the smooth channel even for very thin double layers, and hence plays an important role in microchannel electroosmotic flows.

  19. Hydrology-Aware Constrained Triangulation of Terrain Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franklin, W. Randolph

    Hydrology-Aware Constrained Triangulation of Terrain Data Jonathan Muckella , Marcus Andradeb , W present a new data structure for simplifing terrain that captures hydrology significant features using. This allows better compression ratios the standard Triangu- lated Irregular Networks with highier hydrology

  20. Innovative Gamma Ray Spectrometer Detection Systems for Conducting Scanning Surveys on Challenging Terrain - 13583

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palladino, Carl; Mason, Bryan; Engle, Matt; LeVangie, James [The Palladino Company, Inc., 720 Fillmore St., San Francisco, CA 94117 (United States)] [The Palladino Company, Inc., 720 Fillmore St., San Francisco, CA 94117 (United States); Dempsey, Gregg [United States Environmental Protection Agency, P.O. Box 98517, Las Vegas, NV 89193-8517 (United States)] [United States Environmental Protection Agency, P.O. Box 98517, Las Vegas, NV 89193-8517 (United States); Klemovich, Ron [HydroGeoLogic, Inc., 6340 Glenwood, Suite 200, Building No. 7, Overland Park, KS 66202 (United States)] [HydroGeoLogic, Inc., 6340 Glenwood, Suite 200, Building No. 7, Overland Park, KS 66202 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Santa Susana Field Laboratory located near Simi Valley, California was investigated to determine the nature and extent of gamma radiation anomalies. The primary objective was to conduct gamma scanning surveys over 100 percent of the approximately 1,906,000 square meters (471 acre) project site with the most sensitive detection system possible. The site had challenging topography that was not conducive to traditional gamma scanning detection systems. Terrain slope varied from horizontal to 48 degrees and the ground surface ranged from flat, grassy meadows to steep, rocky hillsides. In addition, the site was home to many protected endangered plant and animal species, and archaeologically significant sites that required minimal to no disturbance of the ground surface. Therefore, four innovative and unique gamma ray spectrometer detection systems were designed and constructed to successfully conduct gamma scanning surveys of approximately 1,076,000 square meters (266 acres) of the site. (authors)

  1. Stability of submerged slopes on the flanks of the Hawaiian Islands, a simplified approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, H.J.; Torresan, M.E.; McArthur, W.

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Undersea transmission lines and shoreline AC-DC conversion stations and near-shore transmission lines are being considered as part of a system for transporting energy between the Hawaiian Islands. These facilities will need to be designed so that they will not be damaged or destroyed by coastal or undersea landslides. Advanced site surveys and engineering design of these facilities will require detailed site specific analyses, including sediment sampling and laboratory testing of samples, in situ testing of sediment and rock, detailed charting of bathymetry, and two- or three-dimensional numerical analyses of the factors of safety of the slopes against failure from the various possible loading mechanisms. An intermediate approximate approach can be followed that involves gravity and piston cores, laboratory testing and the application of simplified models to determine a seismic angle of repose for actual sediment in the vicinity of the planned facility. An even simpler and more approximate approach involves predictions of angles of repose using classification of the sediment along a proposed route as either a coarse volcaniclastic sand, a calcareous ooze, or a muddy terrigenous sediment. The steepest slope that such a sediment can maintain is the static angle of repose. Sediment may be found on slopes as steep as these, but it must be considered metastable and liable to fail in the event of any disturbance, storm or earthquake. The seismic angle of repose likely governs most slopes on the Hawaiian Ridge. This declivity corresponds to the response of the slope to a continuing seismic environment. As a long history of earthquakes affects the slopes, they gradually flatten to this level. Slopes that exceed or roughly equal this value can be considered at risk to fail during future earthquakes. Seismic and static angles of repose for three sediment types are tabulated in this report.

  2. This study presents an adaptive solution to topographic feature extraction from digital terrain model. First, a slope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shan, Jie

    not directly support geospatial query and analysis. Finding interesting objects or features in DTM-based geospatial analysis such as dimension calculation and buffering. Finally, comparing with object precision drop in the adaptive method. Introduction Recent advances in geospatial data collection technology

  3. Water Dynamics at Rough Interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Markus Rosenstihl; Kerstin Kämpf; Felix Klameth; Matthias Sattig; Michael Vogel

    2014-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We use molecular dynamics computer simulations and nuclear magnetic resonance experiments to investigate the dynamics of water at interfaces of molecular roughness and low mobility. We find that, when approaching such interfaces, the structural relaxation of water, i.e., the $\\alpha$ process, slows down even when specific attractive interactions are absent. This prominent effect is accompanied by a smooth transition from Vogel to Arrhenius temperature dependence and by a growing importance of jump events. Consistently, at protein surfaces, deviations from Arrhenius behavior are weak when free water does not exist. Furthermore, in nanoporous silica, a dynamic crossover of liquid water occurs when a fraction of solid water forms near 225 K and, hence, the liquid dynamics changes from bulk-like to interface-dominated. At sufficiently low temperatures, water exhibits a quasi-universal $\\beta$ process, which is characterized by an activation energy of $E_a\\!=\\!0.5$ eV and involves anisotropic reorientation about large angles. As a consequence of its large amplitude, the faster $\\beta$ process destroys essentially all orientational correlation, rendering observation of a possible slower $\\alpha$ process difficult in standard experiments. Nevertheless, we find indications for the existence of structural relaxation down to a glass transition of interfacial water near 185 K. Hydrated proteins show a highly restricted backbone motion with an amplitude, which decreases upon cooling and vanishes at comparable temperatures, providing evidence for a high relevance of water rearrangements in the hydration shell for secondary protein relaxations.

  4. Enhanced thermoelectric performance of rough silicon nanowires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Peidong

    LETTERS Enhanced thermoelectric performance of rough silicon nanowires Allon I. Hochbaum1 *, Renkun, such that roughly 15 terawatts of heat is lost to the environment. Thermoelectric modules could potentially convert part of this low-grade waste heat to electricity. Their efficiency depends on the thermoelectric figure

  5. Environmental Remediation program to perform slope-side cleanup...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Perform slope-side cleanup Environmental Remediation program to perform slope-side cleanup near Smith's Marketplace Los Alamos National Laboratory is performing a high-angle...

  6. Decision guide for roof slope selection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharp, T.R.; Wendt, R.L.; McCorkle, J.E.

    1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This decision guide has been written for personnel who are responsible for the design, construction, and replacement of Air Force roofs. It provides the necessary information and analytical tools for making prudent and cost-effective decisions regarding the amount of slope to provide in various roofing situations. Because the expertise and experience of the decision makers will vary, the guide contains both basic slope-related concepts as well as more sophisticated technical data. This breadth of information enables the less experienced user to develop an understanding of roof slope issues before applying the more sophisticated analytical tools, while the experienced user can proceed directly to the technical sections. Although much of this guide is devoted to the analysis of costs, it is not a cost-estimating document. It does, however, provide the reader with the relative costs of a variety of roof slope options; and it shows how to determine the relative cost-effectiveness of different options. The selection of the proper roof slope coupled with good roof design, a quality installation, periodic inspection, and appropriate maintenance and repair will achieve the Air Force's objective of obtaining the best possible roofing value for its buildings. 21 refs., 17 figs., 10 tabs.

  7. Simplified models for mask roughness induced LER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McClinton, Brittany; Naulleau, Patrick

    2011-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The ITRS requires < 1.2nm line-edge roughness (LER) for the 22nm half-pitch node. Currently, we can consistently achieve only about 3nm LER. Further progress requires understanding the principle causes of LER. Much work has already been done on how both the resist and LER on the mask effect the final printed LER. What is poorly understood, however, is the extent to which system-level effects such as mask surface roughness, illumination conditions, and defocus couple to speckle at the image plane, and factor into LER limits. Presently, mask-roughness induced LER is studied via full 2D aerial image modeling and subsequent analysis of the resulting image. This method is time consuming and cumbersome. It is, therefore, the goal of this research to develop a useful 'rule-of-thumb' analytic model for mask roughness induced LER to expedite learning and understanding.

  8. Feature-based Terrain Editing From Complex Sketches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tasse, Flora Ponjou; Emilien, Arnaud; Cani, Marie-Paule; Hahmann, Stefanie; Dodgson, Neil

    2014-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    with plausible details.160 Cohen et al. [10] and Watanabe et al. [11] present the first161 terrain modelling interfaces that take as input a 2D silhouette162 stroke directly drawn on a 3D terrain model. They only han-163 dle a single silhouette stroke... -junctions. Our method is also able to han-637 dle complex mountains where ridges are not as well-defined as638 they are on smooth landscapes. An example of this is shown639 in Figure 10. Our proposed approach differs from other sketch-640 based methods...

  9. Computer Simulation of Uranyl Uptake by the Rough Lipopolysaccharide...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Computer Simulation of Uranyl Uptake by the Rough Lipopolysaccharide Membrane of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Computer Simulation of Uranyl Uptake by the Rough Lipopolysaccharide...

  10. MESOSCALE MODELLING OF WIND ENERGY OVER NON-HOMOGENEOUS TERRAIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pielke, Roger A.

    MESOSCALE MODELLING OF WIND ENERGY OVER NON-HOMOGENEOUS TERRAIN (ReviewArticle) Y. MAHRER.1. OBSERVATIONALAPPROACHES Evaluations of wind energy based on wind observations (usually surface winds) at well, the resolution of the wind energy pattern throughout an extended area by this methodology requires a large number

  11. Unsupervised Learning of Terrain Appearance for Automated Coral Reef Exploration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dudek, Gregory

    Unsupervised Learning of Terrain Appearance for Automated Coral Reef Exploration Philippe Giguere above a coral reef, without the need to maintain pose estimates. We tested the technique in simulation autonomously above a coral reef during a 20 minutes period. 1. Introduction Underwater marine environments

  12. MARS TERRAIN IMAGE CLASSIFICATION USING CARTESIAN GENETIC PROGRAMMING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Thomas

    MARS TERRAIN IMAGE CLASSIFICATION USING CARTESIAN GENETIC PROGRAMMING J. Leitner, S. Harding, A. F to human designed approaches, a great deal of progress has been made using machine learning techniques to perform classification from images. In this work, we demonstrate the first known use of Cartesian Genetic

  13. Digital Terrain Modeling Ayman F. Habib ENGO 573: Chapter 4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Habib, Ayman

    Photography (Tropical) SPOT Satellite Aerial Photography (Urban) Satellite Stereo SAR (RADARSAT) Airborne orthogonally projected maps. · Procedure: ­ Interior orientation. · Calibration procedure. ­ Exterior a calibration procedure. #12;10 Digital Terrain Modeling Ayman F. Habib 19 Test Field for Camera Calibration

  14. Viscoelastic contact mechanics between randomly rough surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michele Scaraggi; Bo N. J. Persson

    2014-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We present exact numerical results for the friction force and the contact area for a viscoelastic solid (rubber) in sliding contact with hard, randomly rough substrates. The rough surfaces are self-affine fractal with roughness over several decades in length scales. We calculate the contribution to the friction from the pulsating deformations induced by the substrate asperities. We also calculate how the area of real contact, $A(v,p) $, depends on the sliding speed $v$ and on the nominal contact pressure $p$, and we show how the contact area for any sliding speed can be obtained from a universal master curve $A(p)$. The numerical results are found to be in good agreement with the predictions of an analytical contact mechanics theory.

  15. ROUGHNESS LENGTHS FOR THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunter, C.

    2012-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Surface roughness values for the areas surrounding the H, D and N-Area meteorological towers were computed from archived 2010 meteorological data. These 15-minute-averaged data were measured with cup anemometers and bidirectional wind vanes (bivanes) 61 m above the surface. The results of the roughness calculation using the standard deviation of elevation angle {sigma}{sub E}, and applying the simple formula based on tree canopy height, gave consistent estimates for roughness around the H-Area tower in the range of 1.76 to 1.86 m (95% confidence interval) with a mean value of 1.81 m. Application of the {sigma}{sub E} method for the 61-m level at D and N-Areas gave mean values of 1.71 and 1.81 with confidence ranges of 1.62-1.81 and 1.73-1.88 meters, respectively. Roughness results are azimuth dependent, and thus are presented as averages over compass sectors spanning 22.5 degrees. Calculated values were compared to other methods of determining roughness, including the standard deviation of the azimuth direction, {sigma}{sub A}, and standard deviation of the wind speed, {sigma}{sub U}. Additional data was obtained from a sonic anemometer at 61-m on the H-Area tower during a period of a few weeks in 2010. Results from the sonic anemometer support our use of {sigma}{sub E} to calculate roughness. Based on the H-Area tower results, a surface roughness of 1.8 m using is recommended for use in dispersion modeling applications that consider the impacts of a contaminant release to individuals along the Site boundary. The canopy surrounding the H-Area tower is relatively uniform (i.e., little variance in roughness by upwind direction), and data supplied by the U.S. Forest Service at Savannah River show that the canopy height and composition surrounding the H-Area tower is reasonably representative of forested areas throughout the SRS reservation. For dispersion modeling analyses requiring assessments of a co-located worker within the respective operations area, recommended area-specific values range from 0.3 m for E Area to 0.7 m for A Area at the Savannah River National Laboratory. These area-specific values, summarized in Table 4-1, were determined using the Environmental Protection Agency's AERSURFACE computer algorithm.

  16. Influence of surface roughness on superhydrophobicity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Yang; U. Tartaglino; B. N. J. Persson

    2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Superhydrophobic surfaces, with liquid contact angle theta greater than 150 degree, have important practical applications ranging from self-cleaning window glasses, paints, and fabrics to low-friction surfaces. Many biological surfaces, such as the lotus leaf, have hierarchically structured surface roughness which is optimized for superhydrophobicity through natural selection. Here we present a molecular dynamics study of liquid droplets in contact with self-affine fractal surfaces. Our results indicate that the contact angle for nanodroplets depends strongly on the root-mean-square surface roughness amplitude but is nearly independent of the fractal dimension D_f of the surface.

  17. Side slope design based on human tolerance to vehicle response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weaver, Graeme Douglas

    1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    an investigation of simulated vehicle response to the traversal of roadside terrain features. A Texas Transportation Institute adaptation of the CALSVA model was utilized to quantify the relative lateral, longitudinal, and vertical acceleration levels generated... by traversal of roadside cross-sections commonly employed in highway design. STUDY -SOCEDURS The principal aim of this research was to investigate the vehicle dynamic response during traversal of various roadside terrain featuzes to provide a basis...

  18. A Rough Logic Formalism for Fuzzy Controllers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Tsau Young

    logic. 1. Introduction In complex systems, such as power systems, control sub­systems are the most of transformations of mathematical models. It starts with a symbolic model that describes the control system in termsA Rough Logic Formalism for Fuzzy Controllers: A Hard and Soft Computing View T.Y. Lin Department

  19. LYCEN 9721 May 1997 LOCAL NUCLEAR SLOPE and CURVATURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    LYCEN 9721 May 1997 LOCAL NUCLEAR SLOPE and CURVATURE in HIGH ENERGY pp and ¯pp ELASTIC SCATTERING The local nuclear slope B(s, t) = d dt ln dn(s,t) dt is reconstructed from the exper- imental angular agreement with the (non fitted) slope data, in particular for the evolution of B(s, t) with s as a function

  20. ROAMing terrain (Real-time Optimally Adapting Meshes)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duchaineau, M.; Wolinsky, M.; Sigeti, D.E.; Miller, M.C.; Aldrich, C.; Mineev, M.

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Terrain visualization is a difficult problem for applications requiring accurate images of large datasets at high frame rates, such as flight simulation and ground-based aircraft testing using synthetic sensor stimulation. On current graphics hardware, the problem is to maintain dynamic, view-dependent triangle meshes and texture maps that produce good images at the required frame rate. We present an algorithm for constructing triangle meshes that optimizes flexible view-dependent error metrics, produces guaranteed error bounds, achieves specified triangle counts directly, and uses frame-to-frame coherence to operate at high frame rates for thousands of triangles per frame. Our method, dubbed Real-time Optimally Adapting Meshes (ROAM), uses two priority queues to drive split and merge operations that maintain continuous triangulations built from pre-processed bintree triangles. We introduce two additional performance optimizations: incremental triangle stripping and priority-computation deferral lists. ROAM execution time is proportionate to the number of triangle changes per frame, which is typically a few percent of the output mesh size, hence ROAM performance is insensitive to the resolution and extent of the input terrain. Dynamic terrain and simple vertex morphing are supported.

  1. Wind Regimes in Complex Terrain of the Great Valley of Eastern Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Birdwell, Kevin R [ORNL

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research was designed to provide an understanding of physical wind mechanisms within the complex terrain of the Great Valley of Eastern Tennessee to assess the impacts of regional air flow with regard to synoptic and mesoscale weather changes, wind direction shifts, and air quality. Meteorological data from 2008 2009 were analyzed from 13 meteorological sites along with associated upper level data. Up to 15 ancillary sites were used for reference. Two-step complete linkage and K-means cluster analyses, synoptic weather studies, and ambient meteorological comparisons were performed to generate hourly wind classifications. These wind regimes revealed seasonal variations of underlying physical wind mechanisms (forced channeled, vertically coupled, pressure-driven, and thermally-driven winds). Synoptic and ambient meteorological analysis (mixing depth, pressure gradient, pressure gradient ratio, atmospheric and surface stability) suggested up to 93% accuracy for the clustered results. Probabilistic prediction schemes of wind flow and wind class change were developed through characterization of flow change data and wind class succession. Data analysis revealed that wind flow in the Great Valley was dominated by forced channeled winds (45 67%) and vertically coupled flow (22 38%). Down-valley pressure-driven and thermally-driven winds also played significant roles (0 17% and 2 20%, respectively), usually accompanied by convergent wind patterns (15 20%) and large wind direction shifts, especially in the Central/Upper Great Valley. The behavior of most wind regimes was associated with detectable pressure differences between the Lower and Upper Great Valley. Mixing depth and synoptic pressure gradients were significant contributors to wind pattern behavior. Up to 15 wind classes and 10 sub-classes were identified in the Central Great Valley with 67 joined classes for the Great Valley at-large. Two-thirds of Great Valley at-large flow was defined by 12 classes. Winds flowed on-axis only 40% of the time. The Great Smoky Mountains helped create down-valley pressure-driven winds, downslope mountain breezes, and divergent air flow. The Cumberland Mountains and Plateau were associated with wind speed reductions in the Central Great Valley, Emory Gap Flow, weak thermally-driven winds, and northwesterly down sloping. Ridge-and-valley terrain enhanced wind direction reversals, pressure-driven winds, as well as locally and regionally produced thermally-driven flow.

  2. Atmospheric studies in complex terrain: a planning guide for future studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orgill, M.M.

    1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this study is to assist the US Department of Energy in Conducting its atmospheric studies in complex terrain (ASCOT0 by defining various complex terrain research systems and relating these options to specific landforms sites. This includes: (1) reviewing past meteorological and diffusion research on complex terrain; (2) relating specific terrain-induced airflow phenomena to specific landforms and time and space scales; (3) evaluating the technical difficulty of modeling and measuring terrain-induced airflow phenomena; and (4) avolving severdal research options and proposing candidate sites for continuing and expanding field and modeling work. To evolve research options using variable candidate sites, four areas were considered: site selection, terrain uniqueness and quantification, definition of research problems and research plans. 36 references, 111 figures, 20 tables.

  3. A fast direct numerical simulation method for characterising hydraulic roughness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung, Daniel; MacDonald, Michael; Hutchins, Nicholas; Ooi, Andrew

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a fast direct numerical simulation (DNS) method that promises to directly characterise the hydraulic roughness of any given rough surface, from the hydraulically smooth to the fully rough regime. The method circumvents the unfavourable computational cost associated with simulating high-Reynolds-number flows by employing minimal-span channels (Jimenez & Moin 1991). Proof-of-concept simulations demonstrate that flows in minimal-span channels are sufficient for capturing the downward velocity shift, that is, the Hama roughness function, predicted by flows in full-span channels. We consider two sets of simulations, first with modelled roughness imposed by body forces, and second with explicit roughness described by roughness-conforming grids. Owing to the minimal cost, we are able to conduct DNSs with increasing roughness Reynolds numbers while maintaining a fixed blockage ratio, as is typical in full-scale applications. The present method promises a practical, fast and accurate tool for character...

  4. Mapping textures on 3d terrains: a hybrid cellular automata approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sinvhal, Swapnil

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    ?. Benati [7] showed that cellular automata can be used to model phenomena typical of living communities like reproduction, self-organization and a complex evolution. An interesting relation between fractals and cellular automata has been discussed... automata approach to represent a model. This gives the advantage of direct texture simulation on the model. II.c Terrain Generation Fractals [57] have been used to generate terrains by many terrain generation engines like fracPlanet [1] and Frac...

  5. North Slope action holds West Coast spotlight

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, H.M.

    1981-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The first oil from a North Slope reservoir outside Prudhoe Bay will begin flowing next year at rate of 80,000 bpd from Kuparuk field now under development by Atlantic Richfield Co. west of Prudhoe Bay. Just north of the Kuparuk development, Conoco Inc. has found a commercial reservoir in the Milne Point unit and will be drilling confirmation and delineation wells later this year and in 1982. Another area which very likely will be developed for production is located northeast of Prudhoe Bay, where Sohio Alaska Petroleum Co. has announced discoveries in 2 Sag Delta wells. In California's San Joaquin Valley, 3 Kern County fields - South Belridge, Elk Hills, and Lost Hills - are the sites of intensive drilling. Seven rigs are working in the Santa Barbara Channel, 3 of them developing known fields from permanent platforms.

  6. Equivalent roughness height for plane bed under oscillatory flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    , the bed roughness height of a flat and fixed bed is given in terms of the Nikuradse roughness height (ks may be several orders of magnitude larger than for a fixed bed. This is probably causedEquivalent roughness height for plane bed under oscillatory flow Beno^it Camenen , Magnus Larson

  7. On-the-Fly Decompression and Rendering of Multiresolution Terrain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindstrom, P; Cohen, J D

    2009-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a streaming geometry compression codec for multiresolution, uniformly-gridded, triangular terrain patches that supports very fast decompression. Our method is based on linear prediction and residual coding for lossless compression of the full-resolution data. As simplified patches on coarser levels in the hierarchy already incur some data loss, we optionally allow further quantization for more lossy compression. The quantization levels are adaptive on a per-patch basis, while still permitting seamless, adaptive tessellations of the terrain. Our geometry compression on such a hierarchy achieves compression ratios of 3:1 to 12:1. Our scheme is not only suitable for fast decompression on the CPU, but also for parallel decoding on the GPU with peak throughput over 2 billion triangles per second. Each terrain patch is independently decompressed on the fly from a variable-rate bitstream by a GPU geometry program with no branches or conditionals. Thus we can store the geometry compressed on the GPU, reducing storage and bandwidth requirements throughout the system. In our rendering approach, only compressed bitstreams and the decoded height values in the view-dependent 'cut' are explicitly stored on the GPU. Normal vectors are computed in a streaming fashion, and remaining geometry and texture coordinates, as well as mesh connectivity, are shared and re-used for all patches. We demonstrate and evaluate our algorithms on a small prototype system in which all compressed geometry fits in the GPU memory and decompression occurs on the fly every rendering frame without any cache maintenance.

  8. alaskan north slope: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    response Geosciences Websites Summary: wind field Mountain et al., 1976; Aagaard and Roach, 1990. This led Mountain et al. 1976 to suggest the Beaufort slope, Aagaard and...

  9. Biocorrosive Thermophilic Microbial Communities in Alaskan North Slope Oil Facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duncan, Kathleen E.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in Alaskan North Slope oil production facilities. Title:Profiling Despite oil production from several major16) was isolated from oil-production water and has optimal

  10. Proposal for a Universal Test Mirror for Characterization of SlopeMeasuring Instruments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; McKinney, Wayne R.; Warwick, Tony; Noll,Tino; Siewert, Frank; Zeschke, Thomas; Geckeler, Ralf D.

    2007-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of third generation light sources like theAdvanced Light Source (ALS) or BESSY II brought to a focus the need forhigh performance synchrotron optics with unprecedented tolerances forslope error and micro roughness. Proposed beam lines at Free ElectronLasers (FEL) require optical elements up to a length of one meter,characterized by a residual slope error in the range of 0.1murad (rms),and rms values of 0.1 nm for micro roughness. These optical elements mustbe inspected by highly accurate measuring instruments, providing ameasurement uncertainty lower than the specified accuracy of the surfaceunder test. It is essential that metrology devices in use at synchrotronlaboratories be precisely characterized and calibrated to achieve thistarget. In this paper we discuss a proposal for a Universal Test Mirror(UTM) as a realization of a high performance calibration instrument. Theinstrument would provide an ideal calibration surface to replicate aredundant surface under test of redundant figure. The application of asophisticated calibration instrument will allow the elimination of themajority of the systematic error from the error budget of an individualmeasurement of a particular optical element. We present the limitationsof existing methods, initial UTM design considerations, possiblecalibration algorithms, and an estimation of the expectedaccuracy.

  11. Wavelet Analysis for a New Multiresolution Model for Large-Scale Textured Terrains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illes Balears, Universitat de les

    Wavelet Analysis for a New Multiresolution Model for Large-Scale Textured Terrains María José transmission of both geometry and textures of a terrain model. Wavelet Multiresolution Analysis is applied. An innovative texture synthesis process based on Wavelet classification is used in the reconstruction

  12. Energetically Optimal Travel across Terrain: Visualizations and a New Metric of Geographic Distance with Archaeological Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Zoë J.

    Energetically Optimal Travel across Terrain: Visualizations and a New Metric of Geographic Distance the energetically least cost path is shown in blue. This visualization shows how least cost paths often follow propose new methods for terrain visualization and analysis based on measuring paths of least caloric

  13. A Uniform Sky Illumination Model to Enhance Shading of Terrain and Urban Areas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, James

    . Brookville, NY 11050 USA (516) 299-2652 Patrick.Kennelly@liu.edu Fax: (516) 299-3945 and A. James Stewart (Foley et al. 1990). Cartographers consider the same factors when shading terrain. Imhof (1982) discussed reflector (Foley et al. 1990; Weibel and Heller 1991; Zhou 1992). Because most terrain elements behave more

  14. LESSONS LEARNED FROM A LANDFILL SLOPE FAILURE INVOLVING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LESSONS LEARNED FROM A LANDFILL SLOPE FAILURE INVOLVING GEOSYTNTHETICS Virginia L. Wilson: Geosynthetics: Lessons Learned from Failures International Geosynthetics Society editors J.P. Giroud, K.L. Soderman and G.P. Raymond November 12, 1998 #12;LESSONS LEARNED FROM A LANDFILL SLOPE FAILURE INVOLVING

  15. Extreme ultraviolet mask substrate surface roughness effects on lithography patterning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George, Simi; Naulleau, Patrick; Salmassi, Farhad; Mochi, Iacopo; Gullikson, Eric; Goldberg, Kenneth; Anderson, Erik

    2010-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    In extreme ultraviolet lithography exposure systems, mask substrate roughness induced scatter contributes to LER at the image plane. In this paper, the impact of mask substrate roughness on image plane speckle is explicitly evaluated. A programmed roughness mask was used to study the correlation between mask roughness metrics and wafer plane aerial image inspection. We find that the roughness measurements by top surface topography profile do not provide complete information on the scatter related speckle that leads to LER at the image plane. We suggest at wavelength characterization by imaging and/or scatter measurements into different frequencies as an alternative for a more comprehensive metrology of the mask substrate/multilayer roughness effects.

  16. BEHAVIOR OF RADON PROGENY NEAR OUTDOOR SURFACES IN CONTRASTING TERRAINS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. D. Schery; P. T. Wasiolek; Y. Li

    Federal legislation expresses a long-term goal of reducing indoor radon to levels comparable to those outdoors. A thorough understanding of the behavior of radon and its progeny in the outdoor environment is therefore important We report near-surface measurements of radon, attached-to-aerosol progeny, and unattachcd-toaerosol progeny in the contrasting environments of the forested hill country of Oak Ridge, TN and the desert sands of White Sands National Monument, NM. Vertical progeny gradients are greater at White Sands due to a smoother terrain, and dose levels tend to be lower due to lower radon flux from the gypsum sand. Both sites show a significant diurnal variation of dose rate with a maximum occurring usually in the early morning. Correlation of dose rate variation with radon variation is surprisingly small suggesting the importance of other factors such as progeny deposition and aerosol concentration in controlling outdoor dose.

  17. Quantitative laboratory observations of internal wave reflection on ascending slopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dauxois, Thierry

    a stratified fluid with an angle that is fixed with respect to gravity. Upon reflection on a sloping bed that for a fixed frequency, the direction in which energy propagates with respect to the horizontal, , is fixed

  18. atlantic slope waters: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ho, Mei Yung 2007-01-01 24 On alpha stable distribution of wind driven water surface wave slope CERN Preprints Summary: We propose a new formulation of the probability...

  19. Slope stability of geosynthetic clay liner test plots

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel, D.E. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States); Koerner, R.M. [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States). Geosynthetic Research Inst.; Bonaparte, R. [GeoSyntec Consultants, Atlanta, GA (United States); Landreth, R.E. [Landreth, (Robert E.), West Chester, OH (United States); Carson, D.A. [Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Scranton, H.B. [Haley and Aldrich, Boston, MA (United States)

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fourteen full-scale field test plots containing five types of geosynthetic clay liners (GCLs) were constructed on 2H:1V and 3H:1V slopes for the purpose of assessing slope stability. The test plots were designed to simulate typical final cover systems for landfills. Slides occurred in two of the 2H:1V test plots along interfaces between textured geomembranes and the woven geotextile components of internally reinforced GCLs. One additional slide occurred within the unreinforced GCL component of a 2H:1V test plot, when the GCL unexpectedly became hydrated. All 3H:1V slopes have remained stable. Results of laboratory direct shear tests compared favorably with field observations, providing support for the current design procedures that engineers are using for assessing the stability of slopes containing GCLs.

  20. Linear and nonlinear stratified spindown over sloping topography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benthuysen, Jessica A

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a stratified rotating fluid, frictionally driven circulations couple with the buoyancy field over sloping topography. Analytical and numerical methods are used to quantify the impact of this coupling on the vertical ...

  1. Equivalent Roughness Height for Plane Bed under Steady Flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    current conditions. In general, owing to dimensional reasons, the bed roughness height of a flat and fixed orders of magnitude larger than for a fixed bed. This is probably caused by the increased energyEquivalent Roughness Height for Plane Bed under Steady Flow Benoît Camenen, Ph.D.1 ; Atilla Bayram

  2. FRACTAL DESCRIPTION OF ROUGH SURFACES FOR HAPTIC DISPLAY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    FRACTAL DESCRIPTION OF ROUGH SURFACES FOR HAPTIC DISPLAY A DISSERTATION SUBMITTED TO THE DEPARTMENT system using fractals. A background on traditional methods for describing surface roughness is given. Fractals are used to characterize one- dimensional surface profiles using two parameters, the amplitude

  3. Rough-Fuzzy MLP: Modular Evolution, Rule Generation, and Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitra, Sushmita

    efficient systems in soft computing paradigm. Recently, the theory of rough sets [2], [3] has emerged, Sushmita Mitra, Senior Member, IEEE, and Pabitra Mitra, Student Member, IEEE Abstract--A methodology Terms--Soft computing, knowledge-based fuzzy networks, rough sets, genetic algorithms, pattern

  4. ORIGINAL PAPER Transient Heat Conduction Between Rough Sliding Surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barber, James R.

    ORIGINAL PAPER Transient Heat Conduction Between Rough Sliding Surfaces Yuwei Liu · J. R. Barber+Business Media New York 2014 Abstract When two rough bodies slide against each other, asperities on the opposing contact pressure as functions of the separation between reference planes in the two surfaces. We find

  5. Distributed Roughness Receptivity in a Flat Plate Boundary Layer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuester, Matthew Scott

    2014-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    for the three different unit Reynolds num- ber test conditions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 3.4 Spanwise uniformity of boundary layer integral quantities at x = 870 mm for low unit Reynolds number test condition... with the distributed roughness configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 3.5 Differential pressure across the flat plate leading edge. . . . . . . . . . 25 3.6 Roughness patch (k = 1 mm), before windowing . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 3...

  6. Fuzzy Rough Positive Region based Nearest Neighbour Classification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gent, Universiteit

    of the main subjects in machine learning and pattern recognition, with applications in fields like spam theory to improve the FNN classifier. Fuzzy rough set theory was designed to model imperfect knowledgeFuzzy Rough Positive Region based Nearest Neighbour Classification Nele Verbiest, Chris Cornelis

  7. Case Generation Using Rough Sets with Fuzzy Representation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitra, Pabitra

    , granular computing, rough-fuzzy hybridization, soft computing, pattern recognition, data mining. æ 1 for case generation. Fuzzy set theory is used for linguistic representation of patterns, thereby producing a fuzzy granulation of the feature space. Rough set theory is used to obtain dependency rules which model

  8. An Algorithm for the Visualization of a Terrain with Objects FLVIO SZENBERG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    such as houses, vehicles, and transmission lines, thus allowing a simulated flight. For the objects, described and rapidly, aerial images of terrain with objects such as houses, vehicles, and transmission lines, thus

  9. The design of a frame for an all terrain, lever propelled wheelchair

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walton, John Michael

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis outlines the process of designing a frame for the Leveraged Freedom Chair (LFC) Prime, an all-terrain levered powered wheelchair designed to improve the mobility of disabled individuals. This design allows for ...

  10. Modelling of wind turbine wakes in complex terrain using computational fluid dynamics 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Makridis, Alexandros

    2012-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis focuses on modelling of wind turbine wakes when they are affected by real complex terrain features, such as hills and forests, and also examines the effect of the rotational momentum imparted to the downstream ...

  11. Subsidence of residual soils in a karst terrain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drumm, E.C.; Kane, W.F.; Ben-Hassine, J.; Scarborough, J.A. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (USA)); Ketelle, R.H. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

    1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Siting and operating landfills for solid waste disposal in eastern Tennessee that can operate with minimum impact on groundwater is problematic. The operational requirement of thick, excavational soils and the regulatory requirement of a buffer between disposal units and an aquifer result in siting most operating East Tennessee landfills in outcrop areas of the Knox Group. However, the common occurrence of karst terrain and sinkholes in the Knox Group indicates the vulnerability of such sites to rapid groundwater recharge and flow and the potential for subsidence or collapse of soil into bedrock cavities. To address the potential for subsidence or collapse of soils at the East Chestnut Ridge site on the Department of Energy's (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), the following activities and analyses were completed: The locations of karst features on the site were determined by field reconnaissance; several sinkholes were selected for detailed examination; soil boring, sampling, and physical testing were performed in soils located within, adjacent to, and outside of sinkholes to characterize soil strength at various depths; detailed plane surveys were made for 11 sinkholes to measure accurately their dimension and shape for use in determining profile functions for subsidence basins at the site; The stress-deformation response of a typical soil profile overlying a hypothetical bedrock cavity was analyzed numerically for a range of soil thickness and a range of cavity radii. A consistent estimate of the relationship between subsidence basin dimension, soil thickness, and cavity radius has been derived. 30 refs., 41 figs., 7 tabs.

  12. Multiphase production through hilly terrain pipelines in Cusiana oilfield, Colombia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hill, T.J.; Fairhurst, C.P.; Nelson, C.J.; Becerra, H.; Bailey, R.S.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Cusiana oilfield in Colombia is currently producing about 180,000 bpd through a complex multiphase flowline network. The terrain of the area is very hilly, with substantial elevation changes along the length of the lines. Prediction of pressure drop using industry standard correlations has been very variable in its accuracy. A revised pressure drop method, including the effect of slug formation and decay, has been produced, with appreciably better performance. Field data on flow regime characteristics from several of the lines are presented to show a transition from surging/slugging to a steady {open_quote}homogeneous{close_quote} flow at relatively low mixture velocity. The effect of slug flow on slugcatcher performance has also been assessed, both by direct measurement, and by use of a dynamic simulator. The simulator is used to test new control schemes prior to implementation. At low flowing velocities one line has been seen to undergo large pressure swings and to exhibit slug production due to liquid accumulation and sweepout. This effect is described, and re-produced using a transient simulator.

  13. Ultrawideband radar clutter measurements of forested terrain, 1991--1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheen, D.M.; Severtsen, R.H.; Prince, J.M.; Davis, K.C.; Collins, H.D.

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ultrawideband (UWB) radar clutter measurements project was conducted to provide radar clutter data for new ultrawideband radar systems which are currently under development. A particular goal of this project is to determine if conventional narrow band clutter data may be extrapolated to the UWB case. This report documents measurements conducted in 1991 and additional measurements conducted in 1992. The original project consisted of clutter measurements of forested terrain in the Olympic National Forest near Sequim, WA. The impulse radar system used a 30 kW peak impulse source with a 2 Gigasample/second digitizer to form a UHF (300--1000 MHz) ultrawideband impulse radar system. Additional measurements were conducted in parallel using a Systems Planning Corporation (SPC) step-chirp radar system. This system utilized pulse widths of 1330 nanoseconds over a bandwidth of 300--1000 MHz to obtain similar resolution to the impulse system. Due to the slow digitizer data throughput in the impulse radar system, data collection rates were significantly higher using the step-chirp system. Additional forest clutter measurements were undertaken in 1992 to increase the amount of data available, and especially to increase the amount of data from the impulse radar system.

  14. Surface forces: Surface roughness in theory and experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parsons, Drew F., E-mail: Drew.Parsons@anu.edu.au; Walsh, Rick B.; Craig, Vincent S. J. [Department of Applied Mathematics, Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia)] [Department of Applied Mathematics, Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia)

    2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of incorporating surface roughness into theoretical calculations of surface forces is presented. The model contains two chief elements. First, surface roughness is represented as a probability distribution of surface heights around an average surface height. A roughness-averaged force is determined by taking an average of the classic flat-surface force, weighing all possible separation distances against the probability distributions of surface heights. Second the model adds a repulsive contact force due to the elastic contact of asperities. We derive a simple analytic expression for the contact force. The general impact of roughness is to amplify the long range behaviour of noncontact (DLVO) forces. The impact of the elastic contact force is to provide a repulsive wall which is felt at a separation between surfaces that scales with the root-mean-square (RMS) roughness of the surfaces. The model therefore provides a means of distinguishing between “true zero,” where the separation between the average centres of each surface is zero, and “apparent zero,” defined by the onset of the repulsive contact wall. A normal distribution may be assumed for the surface probability distribution, characterised by the RMS roughness measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Alternatively the probability distribution may be defined by the histogram of heights measured by AFM. Both methods of treating surface roughness are compared against the classic smooth surface calculation and experimental AFM measurement.

  15. Assessment of technologies for constructing self-drying low-slope roofs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kyle, D.M.; Desjarlais, A.O.

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Issues associated with removing excessive moisture from low-slope roofs have been assessed. The economic costs associated with moisture trapped in existing roofs have been estimated. The evidence suggests that existing moisture levels cause approximately a 40% overall reduction in the R-value of installed roofing insulation in the United States. Excess operating costs are further increased by a summertime heat transfer mode unique to wet insulation, caused by the daily migration of water within the roof. By itself, this effect can increase peak electrical demand for air conditioning by roughly 15 W/m{sup 2} of roofing, depending on the type of insulation. This effect will increase peak demand capacity required of utilities in any geographic region (e.g., 900 MW in the South). A simple formula has been derived for predicting the effect that self-drying roofs can have upon time-averaged construction costs. It is presumed that time-averaged costs depend predominantly upon (1) actual service life and (2) the likelihood that the less expensive recover membranes can be installed safely over old roofs. For example, an increase in service life from 15 to 20 years should reduce the current cost of roofing ($12 billion/year) by 21%. Another simple formula for predicting the reroofing waste volume indicates that an increase in service life from 15 to 20 years might reduce the current estimated 0.4 billion ft{sup 3}/year of waste by 25%. A finite-difference computer program has been used to study the flow of heat and moisture within typical existing roofs for a variety of US climates. Nearly all publicly available experimental drying data have been consulted. The drying times for most existing low-slope roofs in the United States are controlled largely climate and the permeability of the structural deck to water vapor.

  16. Slope Error Measurement Tool for Solar Parabolic Trough Collectors: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stynes, J. K.; Ihas, B.

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has developed an optical measurement tool for parabolic solar collectors that measures the combined errors due to absorber misalignment and reflector slope error. The combined absorber alignment and reflector slope errors are measured using a digital camera to photograph the reflected image of the absorber in the collector. Previous work using the image of the reflection of the absorber finds the reflector slope errors from the reflection of the absorber and an independent measurement of the absorber location. The accuracy of the reflector slope error measurement is thus dependent on the accuracy of the absorber location measurement. By measuring the combined reflector-absorber errors, the uncertainty in the absorber location measurement is eliminated. The related performance merit, the intercept factor, depends on the combined effects of the absorber alignment and reflector slope errors. Measuring the combined effect provides a simpler measurement and a more accurate input to the intercept factor estimate. The minimal equipment and setup required for this measurement technique make it ideal for field measurements.

  17. Development of a new generation of optical slope measuring profiler

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; Takacs, Peter Z.; McKinney, Wayne R.; Assoufid, Lahsen; Siewert, Frank; Zeschke, Thomas

    2010-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A collaboration, including all DOE synchrotron labs, industrial vendors of x-ray optics, and with active participation of the HBZ-BESSY-II optics group has been established to work together on a new slope measuring profiler -- the optical slope measuring system (OSMS). The slope measurement accuracy of the instrument is expected to be<50 nrad for the current and future metrology of x-ray optics for the next generation of light sources. The goals were to solidify a design that meets the needs of mirror specifications and also be affordable; and to create a common specification for fabrication of a multi-functional translation/scanning (MFTS) system for the OSMS. This was accomplished by two collaborative meetings at the ALS (March 26, 2010) and at the APS (May 6, 2010).

  18. Effect of Surface Roughness on Wind Turbine Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ehrmann, Robert Schaefer

    2014-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    40% for 140 µm roughness, corresponding to a 2.3% loss in annual energy production. Simulated performance loss compares well to measured performance loss on an in-service wind turbine....

  19. Influence of surface roughness and waviness upon thermal contact resistance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yovanovich, M. Michael

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work deals with the phenomenon of thermal resistance between contacting solids. Attention is directed towards contiguous solids possessing both surface roughness and waviness. When two such surfaces are brought together ...

  20. Hypersonic Measurements of Roughness-Induced Transient Growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharp, Nicole Susanne

    2014-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    but about boundary-layer stability in general. Dr. Rob Downs and Doug Kutz provided valuable assistance and code when I was designing my quasi-random periodic distributed roughness. Jason Monschke’s help has been invaluable, not only for the self- similar... simulations using the periodically-spaced discrete roughness geometry. Jason Monschke has performed the optimal disturbance calculations described in the dissertation using code kindly shared by Dr. Simone Zuccher. Jason is also working on secondary...

  1. Settlement Prediction, Gas Modeling and Slope Stability Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Politècnica de Catalunya, Universitat

    Settlement Prediction, Gas Modeling and Slope Stability Analysis in Coll Cardús Landfill Li Yu using mechanical models Simulation of gas generation, transport and extraction in MSW landfill 1 models Simulation of gas generation, transport and extraction in MSW landfill 1) Analytical solution

  2. Adverse Tunnelling Conditions Arising from Slope Instabilities A Case History

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the Hindustan-Tibet-Highway by a rock fall (LEFT). Rock slide at the dam site blocking the Satluj River (RIGHT) has been under con- struction. The project includes a 60.5 m high concrete gravity dam, an underground-side slopes. SURFACE INSTABILITIES Due to foliation parallel sliding planes and cross cutting orthogonal joint

  3. Late Holocene Radiocarbon Variability in Northwest Atlantic Slope Waters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sherwood, O; Edinger, E; Guilderson, T P; Ghaleb, B; Risk, M J; Scott, D B

    2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Deep-sea gorgonian corals secrete a 2-part skeleton of calcite, derived from dissolved inorganic carbon at depth, and gorgonin, derived from recently fixed and exported particulate organic matter. Radiocarbon contents of the calcite and gorgonin provide direct measures of seawater radiocarbon at depth and in the overlying surface waters, respectively. Using specimens collected from Northwest Atlantic slope waters, we generated radiocarbon records for surface and upper intermediate water layers spanning the pre- and post bomb-{sup 14}C eras. In Labrador Slope Water (LSW), convective mixing homogenizes the pre-bomb {Delta}{sup 14}C signature (-67 {+-} 4{per_thousand}) to at least 1000 m depth. Surface water bomb-{sup 14}C signals were lagged and damped (peaking at {approx} +45{per_thousand} in the early 1980s) relative to other regions of the northwest Atlantic, and intermediate water signals were damped further. Off southwest Nova Scotia, the vertical gradient in {Delta}{sup 14}C is much stronger. In surface water, pre-bomb {Delta}{sup 14}C averaged -75 {+-} 5{per_thousand}. At 250-475 m depth, prebomb {Delta}{sup 14}C oscillated quasi-decadally between -80 and -100{per_thousand}, likely reflecting interannual variability in the presence of Labrador Slope Water vs. Warm Slope Water (WSW). Finally, subfossil corals reveal no systematic changes in vertical {Delta}{sup 14}C gradients over the last 1200 years.

  4. Stress distribution and development within geosynthetic-reinforced soil slopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    September 2011, accepted 2 December 2011 ABSTRACT: Numerical methods combined with centrifuge tests are used by centrifuge tests of two GRS slopes with different backfill densities. Numerical results indicate that soil, Centrifuge test REFERENCE: Yang, K.-H., Zornberg, J. G., Liu, C.-N. & Lin, H.-D. (2012). Stress distribution

  5. BULK MICROMACHINED TITANIUM MICROMIRROR DEVICE WITH SLOPING ELECTRODE GEOMETRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacDonald, Noel C.

    BULK MICROMACHINED TITANIUM MICROMIRROR DEVICE WITH SLOPING ELECTRODE GEOMETRY Masa P. Rao1 , Marco micromachined hybrid torsional micromirror device composed of titanium mirror structures bonded to an underlying time, high aspect ratio micromachining capability in bulk titanium; and 2) the High Aspect Ratio

  6. Slope stability and CCF The impact of forests and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Road building and harvesting operations that are essential for forest management reduce the stabilizing of slope instability which are closely linked; surface erosion and landslides. Surface erosion is a water capacity, or ability to absorb and hold water (Schoenholtz et al., 2000). Surface flow is therefore rare

  7. The thermal Casimir effect for rough metallic plates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Bimonte

    2007-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a new theory of thermal Casimir effect, holding for the experimentally important case of metallic surfaces with a roughness having a spatial scale smaller than the skin depth. The theory is based on a simple phenomenological model for a rough conductor, that explicitly takes account of the fact that ohmic conduction in the immediate vicinity of the surface of a conductor is much impeded by surface roughness, if the amplitude of roughness is smaller than the skin depth. As a result of the new model, we find that surface roughness strongly influences the magnitude of the thermal correction to the Casimir force, independently of the plates separation. Our model, while consistent with recent accurate measurements of the Casimir force in the submicron range, leads to a new prediction for the not yet observed thermal correction to the Casimir force at large plates separation. Besides the thermal Casimir problem, our model is relevant for the correct theoretical interpretation of current experiments probing other proximity effects between conductors, like radiative heat transfer and quantum friction.

  8. Structural contribution to the roughness of supersmooth crystal surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Butashin, A. V.; Muslimov, A. E., E-mail: amuslimov@mail.ru; Kanevsky, V. M.; Deryabin, A. N.; Pavlov, V. A.; Asadchikov, V. E. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation)

    2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Technological advances in processing crystals (Si, sapphire {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, SiC, GaN, LiNbO{sub 3}, SrTiO{sub 3}, etc.) of substrate materials and X-ray optics elements make it possible to obtain supersmooth surfaces with a periodicity characteristic of the crystal structure. These periodic structures are formed by atomically smooth terraces and steps of nano- and subnanometer sizes, respectively. A model surface with such nanostructures is proposed, and the relations between its roughness parameters and the height of atomic steps are determined. The roughness parameters calculated from these relations almost coincide with the experimental atomic force microscopy (AFM) data obtained from 1 Multiplication-Sign 1 and 10 Multiplication-Sign 10 {mu}m areas on the surface of sapphire plates with steps. The minimum roughness parameters for vicinal crystal surfaces, which are due to the structural contribution, are calculated based on the approach proposed. A comparative analysis of the relief and roughness parameters of sapphire plate surfaces with different degrees of polishing is performed. A size effect is established: the relief height distribution changes from stochastic to regular with a decrease in the surface roughness.

  9. Low-cost multi-terrain autonomous vehicle for hostile environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perez, M. L., LLNL

    1996-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes an innovative and unique autonomous vehicle being developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for versatile use in hostile environments. Conventional vehicles used in decommissioning and decontaminating, police activity, and unmanned military operations typically are designed with four-wheels or track in contact with the environment. Although four-wheel and track vehicles work well, they are limited in negotiating saturated terrain, steep hills and soft soils. The Spiral Track Autonomous Robot (STAR) is a versatile and maneuverable multi-terrain mobile vehicle that uses the latest available computer technology and two Archimedes screws, in contact with the local environment to intelligently negotiate a hostile environment.

  10. Inhomogeneous Cooling of the Rough Granular Gas in Two Dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sudhir N. Pathak; Dibyendu Das; R. Rajesh

    2014-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the inhomogeneous clustered regime of a freely cooling granular gas of rough particles in two dimensions using large-scale event driven simulations and scaling arguments. During collisions, rough particles dissipate energy in both the normal and tangential directions of collision. In the inhomogeneous regime, translational kinetic energy and the rotational energy decay with time $t$ as power-laws $t^{-\\theta_T}$ and $t^{-\\theta_R}$. We numerically determine $\\theta_T \\approx 1$ and $\\theta_R \\approx 1.6$, independent of the coefficients of restitution. The inhomogeneous regime of the granular gas has been argued to be describable by the ballistic aggregation problem, where particles coalesce on contact. Using scaling arguments, we predict $\\theta_T=1$ and $\\theta_R=1$ for ballistic aggregation, $\\theta_R$ being different from that obtained for the rough granular gas. Simulations of ballistic aggregation with rotational degrees of freedom are consistent with these exponents.

  11. Engineering Applications of Artificial Intelligence 16 (2003) 465472 Predicting terrain contours using a feed-forward neural network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Sheng

    Engineering Applications of Artificial Intelligence 16 (2003) 465­472 Predicting terrain contours in pneumatic systems and they are difficult to prevent completely. This caused problems during the testing. 2. Prediction of unknown terrain The legs of the robot needed to be lifted at the end

  12. HIGH FIELD Q-SLOPE AND THE BAKING EFFECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ciovati, Gianluigi [JLAB

    2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The performance of SRF cavities made of bulk Nb at high fields (peak surface magnetic field greater than about 90 mT) is characterized by exponentially increasing RF losses (high-field Q-slope), in the absence of field emission, which are often mitigated by a low temperature (100-140 °C, 12-48h) baking. In this contribution, recent experimental results and phenomenological models to explain this effect will be briefly reviewed. New experimental results on the high-field Q-slope will be presented for cavities that had been heat treated at high temperature in the presence of a small partial pressure of nitrogen. Improvement of the cavity performances have been obtained, while surface analysis measurements on Nb samples treated with the cavities revealed significantly lower hydrogen concentration than for samples that followed standard cavity treatments.

  13. DEVELOPMENT OF SHALLOW VISCOUS OIL RESERVES IN NORTH SLOPE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kishore K. Mohanty

    2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    North Slope of Alaska has huge oil deposits in heavy oil reservoirs such as Ugnu, West Sak and Shrader Bluff etc. The viscosity of the last two reservoir oils vary from {approx}30 cp to {approx}3000 cp and the amount in the range of 10-20 billion barrels. High oil viscosity and low formation strength impose problems to high recovery and well productivity. Water-alternate-gas injection processes can be effective for the lower viscosity end of these deposits in West Sak and Shrader Bluff. Several gas streams are available in the North Slope containing NGL and CO{sub 2} (a greenhouse gas). The goal of this research is to develop tools to find optimum solvent, injection schedule and well-architecture for a WAG process in North Slope shallow sand viscous oil reservoirs. In the last quarter, we have developed streamline generation and convection subroutines for miscible gas injection. The WAG injection algorithms are being developed. We formulated a four-phase relative permeability model based on two-phase relative permeabilities. The new relative permeability formulations are being incorporated into the simulator. Wettabilities and relative permeabilities are being measured. Plans for the next quarter includes modeling of WAG injection in streamline based simulation, relative permeability studies with cores, incorporation of complex well-architecture.

  14. North Slope Decision Support for Water Resource Planning and Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schnabel, William; Brumbelow, Kelly

    2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project was to enhance the water resource decision-making process with respect to oil and gas exploration/production activities on Alaska’s North Slope. To this end, a web-based software tool was developed to allow stakeholders to assemble, evaluate, and communicate relevant information between and amongst themselves. The software, termed North Slope Decision Support System (NSDSS), is a visually-referenced database that provides a platform for running complex natural system, planning, and optimization models. The NSDSS design was based upon community input garnered during a series of stakeholder workshops, and the end product software is freely available to all stakeholders via the project website. The tool now resides on servers hosted by the UAF Water and Environmental Research Center, and will remain accessible and free-of-charge for all interested stakeholders. The development of the tool fostered new advances in the area of data evaluation and decision support technologies, and the finished product is envisioned to enhance water resource planning activities on Alaska’s North Slope.

  15. Real-time Rendering of Complex Vector Data on 3d Terrain Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Behnke, Sven

    Real-time Rendering of Complex Vector Data on 3d Terrain Models M. Schneider, M. Guthe, and R of buildings, streets and runway (from left to right). Abstract. In this paper we present a hybrid technique model. The first part of this hybrid technique is a texture-based approach that is especially suited

  16. Building Local Terrain Maps Using SpatioTemporal Classification for Semantic Robot Localization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zell, Andreas

    of the environment. We describe how to efficiently integrate the classification results of each time stepBuilding Local Terrain Maps Using Spatio­Temporal Classification for Semantic Robot Localization Stefan Laible1 and Andreas Zell1 Abstract-- The correct classification of the surrounding ter- rain

  17. LOD-Sprite Technique for Accelerated Terrain Rendering Baoquan Chen1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Baoquan

    LOD-Sprite Technique for Accelerated Terrain Rendering Baoquan Chen1 SUNY at Stony Brook J. Edward present a new rendering technique, termed LOD-sprite render- ing, which uses a combination of a level-of-detail (LOD) represen- tation of the scene together with reusing image sprites (previously rendered images

  18. A Kalman-Particle Kernel Filter and its Application to Terrain Navigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Del Moral , Pierre

    A Kalman-Particle Kernel Filter and its Application to Terrain Navigation Dinh-Tuan Pham.musso@onera.fr Abstract ­ A new nonlinear filter, the Kalman- Particle Kernel Filter (KPKF) is proposed. Compared. Keywords: Kalman filter, kernel density estimator, regularized particle filter, Inertial navigation System

  19. Simple I/O-efficient flow accumulation on grid terrains Herman Haverkort

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haverkort, Herman

    Simple I/O-efficient flow accumulation on grid terrains Herman Haverkort TU Eindhoven Jeffrey #12;Drainage network analysis 1 2­5 6­12 13­50 flooding flow routing flow accumulation compute network analysis flow routingwatershed labelling flow accumulation #12;Analysing I/O-efficiency main

  20. International Conference on Machine Control & Guidance 2008 1 Generation and Analysis of Digital Terrain Models with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1st International Conference on Machine Control & Guidance 2008 1 Generation and Analysis of Digital Terrain Models with Parallel Guidance Systems for Precision Agriculture Görres GRENZDÖRFFER models at no or little additional cost. In the paper the achievable data accuracy under different

  1. CO2 transport over complex terrain Jielun Sun a,*, Sean P. Burns a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephens, Britton B.

    CO2 transport over complex terrain Jielun Sun a,*, Sean P. Burns a , Anthony C. Delany a , Steven P; accepted 15 February 2007 Abstract CO2 transport processes relevant for estimating net ecosystem exchange investigated during a pilot experiment. We found that cold, moist, and CO2- rich air was transported downslope

  2. Saving the soil: AgriLife units work to improve training terrain 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orth, Melanie

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Saving the soil AgriLife units work to improve training terrain Story by Melanie Orth txH2O | pg. 9 Heavy tanks and armored vehicles that have continually rolled over the 67,000-acre West Range at Fort Hood for the past 60 years have...

  3. Saving the soil: AgriLife units work to improve traning terrain 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orth, Melanie

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Saving the soil AgriLife units work to improve training terrain Story by Melanie Orth txH2O | pg. 9 Heavy tanks and armored vehicles that have continually rolled over the 67,000-acre West Range at Fort Hood for the past 60 years have...

  4. GPS-FREE TERRAIN-BASED VEHICLE TRACKING PERFORMANCE AS A FUNCTION OF INERTIAL SENSOR CHARACTERISTICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brennan, Sean

    and the requirement to maintain redundancy in vehicle automation and driver assist systems necessitatesGPS-FREE TERRAIN-BASED VEHICLE TRACKING PERFORMANCE AS A FUNCTION OF INERTIAL SENSOR-free or degraded-GPS environments, achieve vehicle tracking with tactical-grade inertial sensors. However

  5. How to use CFD for Wind in Terrain ... real-life experience!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : · Turbulence modelling / numerical methods · Inclusion of wind turbine wake · Temperature stratification 2 study 3. Construction and operation 4. Wind turbine breakdown! 5. Wind measurements / CFD simulations1 How to use CFD for Wind in Terrain ... real-life experience! CFD day at Suzlon, October 2007 A

  6. Coupled Carbon/Water Fluxes in Complex Terrain, Water-Limited Forests Investigators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walden, Von P.

    Coupled Carbon/Water Fluxes in Complex Terrain, Water-Limited Forests Investigators: Karen Humes of quantifying the magnitude, timing, distribution and coupling of carbon and water fluxes in mountainous forestlands. This includes one segment of the continuum of carbon and water flow from the "forest to the sea

  7. The All Terrain Bio nano Gear for Space Radiation Detection System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mavroidis, Constantinos

    The All Terrain Bio nano Gear for Space Radiation Detection System Ajay Ummat, Constantinos and warn the astronaut of probable biological damage. A basic framework for radiation detection system which utilizes bio-nano machines is discussed. This radiation detection system is termed as "radiation

  8. An Experimental Investigation on the Wake Interference of Wind Turbines Sited Over Complex Terrains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Hui

    1 An Experimental Investigation on the Wake Interference of Wind Turbines Sited Over Complex, 50011 An experimental study was conducted to investigate the interferences of wind turbines sited over conducted in a large wind tunnel with of wind turbine models sited over a flat terrain (baseline case

  9. Interactive terrain visualization enables virtual fieldwork during rapid scientific response to the 2010 Haiti earthquake

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamann, Bernd

    response to the 2010 Haiti earthquake --Manuscript Draft-- Manuscript Number: GS687R1 Full Title: Interactive terrain visualization enables virtual fieldwork during rapid scientific response to the 2010 Haiti earthquake Short Title: Virtual fieldwork, Haiti Article Type: Research Paper Keywords: Enriquillo fault

  10. Comparison of slope stability in two Brazilian municipal landfills

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gharabaghi, B. [School of Engineering, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, N1G 2W1 (Canada)], E-mail: bgharaba@uoguelph.ca; Singh, M.K. [Department of Civil and Geological Engineering, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, S7N 5A9 (Canada); Inkratas, C. [School of Engineering, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, N1G 2W1 (Canada)], E-mail: cinkrata@uoguelph.ca; Fleming, I.R. [Department of Civil and Geological Engineering, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, S7N 5A9 (Canada)], E-mail: ian.fleming@usask.ca; McBean, E. [School of Engineering, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, N1G 2W1 (Canada)], E-mail: emcbean@uoguelph.ca

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The implementation of landfill gas to energy (LFGTE) projects has greatly assisted in reducing the greenhouse gases and air pollutants, leading to an improved local air quality and reduced health risks. The majority of cities in developing countries still dispose of their municipal waste in uncontrolled 'open dumps.' Municipal solid waste landfill construction practices and operating procedures in these countries pose a challenge to implementation of LFGTE projects because of concern about damage to the gas collection infrastructure (horizontal headers and vertical wells) caused by minor, relatively shallow slumps and slides within the waste mass. While major slope failures can and have occurred, such failures in most cases have been shown to involve contributory factors or triggers such as high pore pressures, weak foundation soil or failure along weak geosynthetic interfaces. Many researchers who have studied waste mechanics propose that the shear strength of municipal waste is sufficient such that major deep-seated catastrophic failures under most circumstances require such contributory factors. Obviously, evaluation of such potential major failures requires expert analysis by geotechnical specialists with detailed site-specific information regarding foundation soils, interface shearing resistances and pore pressures both within the waste and in clayey barrier layers or foundation soils. The objective of this paper is to evaluate the potential use of very simple stability analyses which can be used to study the potential for slumps and slides within the waste mass and which may represent a significant constraint on construction and development of the landfill, on reclamation and closure and on the feasibility of a LFGTE project. The stability analyses rely on site-specific but simple estimates of the unit weight of waste and the pore pressure conditions and use 'generic' published shear strength envelopes for municipal waste. Application of the slope stability analysis method is presented in a case study of two Brazilian landfill sites; the Cruz das Almas Landfill in Maceio and the Muribeca Landfill in Recife. The Muribeca site has never recorded a slope failure and is much larger and better-maintained when compared to the Maceio site at which numerous minor slumps and slides have been observed. Conventional limit-equilibrium analysis was used to calculate factors of safety for stability of the landfill side slopes. Results indicate that the Muribeca site is more stable with computed factors of safety values in the range 1.6-2.4 compared with computed values ranging from 0.9 to 1.4 for the Maceio site at which slope failures have been known to occur. The results suggest that this approach may be useful as a screening-level tool when considering the feasibility of implementing LFGTE projects.

  11. Journal of Differential Equations Ramification of rough paths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Dec 1, 2009 ... B-series. The stack of iterated integrals of a path is embedded in a larger al- gebraic structure ... iterated integrals [18,19] which is at the base of Lyons theory of rough paths [20]. Lyons theory ...... ?|b| ? g(|b|)(rs), see e.g. [5, p.

  12. A CONSTRUCTION OF THE ROUGH PATH ABOVE FRACTIONAL ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    fractional Brownian motion B with any Hurst parameter H ? (0,1), by means ... Rough paths analysis is a theory introduced by Terry Lyons in the pioneering ... functions with finite p-variation with p > 1, or by Hölder continuous functions of order ...

  13. Technical Briefs A Compact Model for Spherical Rough

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahrami, Majid

    of rough spheres includes two problems, i the bulk compression and ii deformation of asperities. Different index as a criterion for plastic flow of mi- crocontacts. They reported that the load has little effect on the deformation regime. Based on the plasticity index, they concluded that except for especially smooth surfaces

  14. Studies of the 3D surface roughness height

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Avisane, Anita; Rudzitis, Janis; Kumermanis, Maris [Institute of Mechanical Engineering, Riga Technical University, Ezermalas str. 6k, Riga (Latvia)

    2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Nowadays nano-coatings occupy more and more significant place in technology. Innovative, functional coatings acquire new aspects from the point of view of modern technologies, considering the aggregate of physical properties that can be achieved manipulating in the production process with the properties of coatings’ surfaces on micro- and nano-level. Nano-coatings are applied on machine parts, friction surfaces, contacting parts, corrosion surfaces, transparent conducting films (TCF), etc. The equipment available at present for the production of transparent conducting oxide (TCO) coatings with highest quality is based on expensive indium tin oxide (ITO) material; therefore cheaper alternatives are being searched for. One such offered alternative is zink oxide (ZnO) nano-coatings. Evaluating the TCF physical and mechanical properties and in view of the new ISO standard (EN ISO 25178) on the introduction of surface texture (3D surface roughness) in the engineering calculations, it is necessary to examine the height of 3D surface roughness, which is one of the most significant roughness parameters. The given paper studies the average values of 3D surface roughness height and the most often applied distribution laws are as follows: the normal distribution and Rayleigh distribution. The 3D surface is simulated by a normal random field.

  15. Large deviations for rough paths of fractional Brownian motion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Millet, Annie

    limit theorem. Stochastic modeling deals basically with rough path controls. Indeed, the ground-breaking It^o's theory on stochastic differential equations is based on Brownian motion, which has almost surely nowhere differentiable sam- ple paths but only -H¨older continuous ones, with ]0, 1 2 [. Note

  16. Hypersonic Measurements of Roughness-Induced Transient Growth 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharp, Nicole Susanne

    2014-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    streaks may play a key role in roughness-induced transition but has not previously been deliberately observed in hypersonic flow. To make such measurements, the present work studies the boundary layer of a 5° half-angle smooth cone paired with a slightly...

  17. Discussion of ``Atmospheric Momentum Roughness Applied to Stage-Discharge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the Darcy-Weisbach equation and conventional log law and derive an alternative log law equation to calculate discussion. Concerning the resistance equations, if their Eq. 2 holds, the Darcy-Weisbach friction factor f equation and the selection of appropriate roughness param- eters. They discuss the merits of different

  18. Calculating Very Rough Market Share Using the Canadian Business Database

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Michael

    Calculating Very Rough Market Share Using the Canadian Business Database If you cannot find market market share using the company information provided in the Canadian Business Database (CBD), an online - it should be considered a last resort for this information. STEP 1: ACCESS THE CANADIAN BUSINESS DATABASE 1a

  19. The effect of roughness on aerosol deposition in tubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chavez, Mario Cesar

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental measurements of simulated roughness within tubes and the subsequent aerosol penetration performance through these tubes were conducted for a aerosol particle size range of 5 nm to 20 nm and a flow rate range of 28 L/min to 169.9 L...

  20. Dropwise condensation on superhydrophobic surfaces with two-tier roughness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Chuan-Hua

    Dropwise condensation on superhydrophobic surfaces with two-tier roughness Chuan-Hua Chen,a Qingjun condensation. Superhydrophobicity appears ideal to promote continued dropwise condensation which requires rapid. This letter reports continuous dropwise condensation on a superhydrophobic surface with short carbon nanotubes

  1. Los Alamos Lab to perform slope-side cleanup near Smith's Marketplace

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Los Alamos Lab to perform slope-side cleanup near Smith's Marketplace Los Alamos National Laboratory to perform slope-side cleanup near Smith's Marketplace The Lab is performing a...

  2. Quantifying subaqueous slope stability during seismic shaking: Lake Lucerne as model for ocean margins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilli, Adrian

    Quantifying subaqueous slope stability during seismic shaking: Lake Lucerne as model for ocean-deltaic lateral slopes in perialpine, fjord-type Lake Lucerne (Central Switzerland); (ii) their control

  3. ORIGINAL RESEARCH PAPER Mapping basin-wide subaquatic slope failure susceptibility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilli, Adrian

    Science+Business Media B.V. 2010 Abstract This study of subaquatic slope failures in Lake Lucerne, central. Keywords Submarine landslides Á Slope stability Á Limit equilibrium Á Paleoseismology Á Lake Lucerne

  4. Slope stability analysis by nite elements D. V. GRIFFITHS and P. A. LANE{

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , regarding the failure mechanism. Slope failure in the ®nite element model occurs `naturally' through methods, including the in¯uence of a free surface on slope and dam stability. Graphical output is included to illustrate defor- mations and mechanisms of failure. It is argued that the ®nite element method of slope

  5. PVT Compensation for Wilkinson Single-Slope Measurement Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Britton Jr, Charles L [ORNL; Ericson, Milton Nance [ORNL; Blalock, Benjamin [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Tham, Kevin [Intel Corporation; Ulaganathan, Chandradevi [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Greenwell, Robert E [ORNL; Holleman, Jeremy [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A pulse-width locked loop (PWLL) circuit is reported that compensates for process, voltage, and temperature (PVT) variations of a linear ramp generator within a 12-bit multi-channel Wilkinson (single-slope integrating) Analog-to-Digital (ADC). This PWLL was designed and fabricated in a 0.5- m Silicon Germanium (SiGe) BiCMOS process. Simulation and silicon measurement data are shown that demonstrate a large improvement in the accuracy of the PVT-compensated ADC over the uncompensated ADC.

  6. West Slope, Oregon: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown ofNationwideWTED JumpHills, New York: EnergyMountain,PuenteSimsbury,Slope,

  7. The 2004 North Slope of Alaska Arctic Winter Radiometric Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructureProposedPAGESafetyTed Donat AboutTextiles2004 North Slope of

  8. Heat transfer between elastic solids with randomly rough surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. N. J. Persson; B. Lorenz; A. I. Volokitin

    2009-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the heat transfer between elastic solids with randomly rough surfaces. We include both the heat transfer from the area of real contact, and the heat transfer between the surfaces in the noncontact regions. We apply a recently developed contact mechanics theory, which accounts for the hierarchical nature of the contact between solids with roughness on many different length scales. For elastic contact, at the highest (atomic) resolution the area of real contact typically consists of atomic (nanometer) sized regions, and we discuss the implications of this for the heat transfer. For solids with very smooth surfaces, as is typical in many modern engineering applications, the interfacial separation in the non-contact regions will be very small, and for this case we show the importance of the radiative heat transfer associated with the evanescent electromagnetic waves which exist outside of all bodies.

  9. Precision Tiltmeter as a Reference for Slope MeasuringInstruments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirschman, Jonathan L.; Domning, Edward E.; Morrison, Gregory Y.; Smith, Brian V.; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The next generation of synchrotrons and free electron lasers require extremely high-performance x-ray optical systems for proper focusing. The necessary optics cannot be fabricated without the use of precise optical metrology instrumentation. In particular, the Long Trace Profiler (LTP) based on the pencil-beam interferometer is a valuable tool for low-spatial-frequency slope measurement with x-ray optics. The limitations of such a device are set by the amount of systematic errors and noise. A significant improvement of LTP performance was the addition of an optical reference channel, which allowed to partially account for systematic errors associated with wiggling and wobbling of the LTP carriage. However, the optical reference is affected by changing optical path length, non-homogeneous optics, and air turbulence. In the present work, we experimentally investigate the questions related to the use of a precision tiltmeter as a reference channel. Dependence of the tiltmeter performance on horizontal acceleration, temperature drift, motion regime, and kinematical scheme of the translation stage has been investigated. It is shown that at an appropriate experimental arrangement, the tiltmeter provides a slope reference for the LTP system with accuracy on the level of 0.1 {micro}rad (rms).

  10. Separate effects of surface roughness, wettability, and porosity on the boiling critical heat flux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Hanley, Harry

    The separate effects of surface wettability, porosity, and roughness on the critical heat flux (CHF) of water were examined using engineered surfaces. Values explored were 0, 5, 10, and 15??m for Rz (roughness), <5°, ?75°, ...

  11. CITPUFF: a gaussian puff model for estimating pollutant concentration in complex terrain. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ross, D.G.; Fox, D.G.; Dietrich, D.L.; Childs, J.E.; Marlatt, W.E.

    1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CITPUFF, is a puff-type dispersion model that uses a wind field calculated from a complex-terrain wind model. It accommodates a variety of source types including point, area, and line sources; calculates plume rise where applicable; and outputs a graphic display of puff trajectories and concentrations. The model is compared against models currently used for assessing air quality impacts in complex topography.

  12. Evaluation of Single-Doppler Radar Wind Retrievals in Flat and Complex Terrain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newsom, Rob K.; Berg, Larry K.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Fast, Jerome D.; Xu, Qin; Zhang, Pengfei; Yang, Qing; Shaw, William J.; Flaherty, Julia E.

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The accuracy of winds derived from NEXRAD level II data is assessed by comparison with independent observations from 915 MHz radar wind profilers. The evaluation is carried out at two locations with very different terrain characteristics. One site is located in an area of complex terrain within the State Line Wind Energy Center in northeast Oregon. The other site is located in an area of flat terrain on the east-central Florida coast. The National Severe Storm Laboratory’s 2DVar algorithm is used to retrieve wind fields from the KPDT (Pendleton OR) and KMLB (Melbourne FL) NEXRAD radars. Comparisons between the 2DVar retrievals and the radar profilers were conducted over a period of about 6 months and at multiple height levels at each of the profiler sites. Wind speed correlations at most observation height levels fell in the range from 0.7 to 0.8, indicating that the retrieved winds followed temporal fluctuations in the profiler-observed winds reasonably well. The retrieved winds, however, consistently exhibited slow biases in the range of1 to 2 ms-1. Wind speed difference distributions were broad with standard deviations in the range from 3 to 4 ms-1. Results from the Florida site showed little change in the wind speed correlations and difference standard deviations with altitude between about 300 and 1400 m AGL. Over this same height range, results from the Oregon site showed a monotonic increase in the wind speed correlation and a monotonic decrease in the wind speed difference standard deviation with increasing altitude. The poorest overall agreement occurred at the lowest observable level (~300 m AGL) at the Oregon site, where the effects of the complex terrain were greatest.

  13. Adding Complex Terrain and Stable Atmospheric Condition Capability to the Simulator for On/Offshore Wind Farm Applications (SOWFA) (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Churchfield, M. J.

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation describes changes made to NREL's OpenFOAM-based wind plant aerodynamics solver so that it can compute the stably stratified atmospheric boundary layer and flow over terrain. Background about the flow solver, the Simulator for Off/Onshore Wind Farm Applications (SOWFA) is given, followed by details of the stable stratification/complex terrain modifications to SOWFA, along with some preliminary results calculations of a stable atmospheric boundary layer and flow over a simple set of hills.

  14. ROUGH THIN PAVEMENT THICKNESS ESTIMATION BY GPR N. Pinel, L. Liu, C. Bourlier, Y. Wang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ROUGH THIN PAVEMENT THICKNESS ESTIMATION BY GPR N. Pinel, L. Liu, C. Bourlier, Y. Wang IREENA pavements consider flat interfaces for simpli- fication. In this paper, the roughness of the surfaces is taken into account. First, the amplitudes of the first two echoes from the rough thin pavement

  15. Effects of hydraulic roughness on surface textures of gravel-bed rivers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Effects of hydraulic roughness on surface textures of gravel-bed rivers John M. Buffington1 that bed-surface grain size is responsive to hydraulic roughness caused by bank irregularities, bars condition of low hydraulic roughness. For a given 0bf , channels with progressively greater hydraulic

  16. Independent External Peer Review Report Rough River Dam 18 August 2011 ii

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    #12;Independent External Peer Review Report ­ Rough River Dam 18 August 2011 ii This page intentionally blank. #12;Independent External Peer Review Report ­ Rough River Dam 18 August 2011 iii Table Panel Members B-1 Appendix C ­ Charge for IEPR Panel C-1 List of Figures Figure 1. Rough River Dam 4

  17. Research on the seasonal snow of the Arctic Slope

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benson, C.S.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The original objectives of this research included a regional study of snow on the entire Arctic Slope. During the first year the scope was restricted to the R{sub 4}D area. In the second and third years the primary focus was also on the R{sub 4}D area,but measurements were made at Prudhoe Bay, Atgasuk and Wainwright to determine the flux of wind-blown snow on a wider scale. Additional broadening of scope was discussed at the San Diego R{sub 4}D meetings in April 1986 and 1987 and at the extrapolation workshop held at Penn State University in Spring 1987. The broadening of scope has also included detailed studies of chemistry and controls exerted by large-scale advection of air masses on the longwave, thermal IR, and radiation. The latter phenomena are critical in initiating snowmelt.

  18. Biocorrosive Thermophilic Microbial Communities in Alaskan North Slope Oil Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duncan, Kathleen E.; Gieg, Lisa M.; Parisi, Victoria A.; Tanner, Ralph S.; Green Tringe, Susannah; Bristow, Jim; Suflita, Joseph M.

    2009-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrosion of metallic oilfield pipelines by microorganisms is a costly but poorly understood phenomenon, with standard treatment methods targeting mesophilic sulfatereducing bacteria. In assessing biocorrosion potential at an Alaskan North Slope oil field, we identified thermophilic hydrogen-using methanogens, syntrophic bacteria, peptideand amino acid-fermenting bacteria, iron reducers, sulfur/thiosulfate-reducing bacteria and sulfate-reducing archaea. These microbes can stimulate metal corrosion through production of organic acids, CO2, sulfur species, and via hydrogen oxidation and iron reduction, implicating many more types of organisms than are currently targeted. Micromolar quantities of putative anaerobic metabolites of C1-C4 n-alkanes in pipeline fluids were detected, implying that these low molecular weight hydrocarbons, routinely injected into reservoirs for oil recovery purposes, are biodegraded and provide biocorrosive microbial communities with an important source of nutrients.

  19. The slopes determined by n points in the plane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Jeremy L.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    field k,andletG be a graph with vertices V and edges E.Apicture P of G consists of a point P(v)for each vertex and a line P(e) for each edge, subject to the condition that P(v) ? P(e) whenever v is an endpoint of e.Thusthedataofn points and parenleftbig... of generic pictures is called the picture variety V(G). This is an irreducible component of X(G) of dimension 2|V |. Passing to an affine open subset ˜ V(G) ? V(G) and projecting onto an affine space A |E| k whose coordinates correspond to the slopes of lines...

  20. Graphene thickness dependent adhesion force and its correlation to surface roughness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pourzand, Hoorad [Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 (United States); Tabib-Azar, Massood, E-mail: azar.m@utah.edu [Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 (United States); Biomedical Engineering, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 (United States)

    2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, adhesion force of graphene layers on 300?nm silicon oxide is studied. A simple model for measuring adhesion force for a flat surface with sub-nanometer roughness was developed and is shown that small surface roughness decreases adhesion force while large roughness results in an effectively larger adhesion forces. We also show that surface roughness over scales comparable to the tip radius increase by nearly a factor of two, the effective adhesion force measured by the atomic force microscopy. Thus, we demonstrate that surface roughness is an important parameter that should be taken into account in analyzing the adhesion force measurement results.

  1. Sub-microradian Surface Slope Metrology with the ALS Developmental Long Trace Profiler

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yashchuk, Valeriy V; Barber, Samuel; Domning, Edward E.; Kirschman, Jonathan L.; Morrison, Gregory Y.; Smith, Brian V; Siewert, Frank; Zeschke, Thomas; Geckeler, Ralf; Just, Andreas

    2009-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A new low budget slope measuring instrument, the Developmental Long Trace Profiler (DLTP), was recently brought to operation at the ALS Optical Metrology Laboratory. The design, instrumental control and data acquisition system, initial alignment and calibration procedures, as well as the developed experimental precautions and procedures are described in detail. The capability of the DLTP to achieve sub-microradian surface slope metrology is verified via cross-comparison measurements with other high performance slope measuring instruments when measuring the same high quality test optics. The directions of future work to develop a surface slope measuring profiler with nano-radian performance are also discussed.

  2. Semiclassical Theory of Integrable and Rough Andreev Billiards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. Ihra; M. Leadbeater; J. L. Vega; K. Richter

    1999-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the effect on the density of states in mesoscopic ballistic billiards to which a superconducting lead is attached. The expression for the density of states is derived in the semiclassical S-matrix formalism shedding insight into the origin of the differences between the semiclassical theory and the corresponding result derived from random matrix models. Applications to a square billiard geometry and billiards with boundary roughness are discussed. The saturation of the quasiparticle excitation spectrum is related to the classical dynamics of the billiard. The influence of weak magnetic fields on the proximity effect in rough Andreev billiards is discussed and an analytical formula is derived. The semiclassical theory provides an interpretation for the suppression of the proximity effect in the presence of magnetic fields as a coherence effect of time reversed trajectories, similar to the weak localisation correction of the magneto-resistance in chaotic mesoscopic systems. The semiclassical theory is shown to be in good agreement with quantum mechanical calculations.

  3. DEVELOPMENT OF SHALLOW VISCOUS OIL RESERVES IN NORTH SLOPE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kishore K. Mohanty

    2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    North Slope of Alaska has huge oil deposits in heavy oil reservoirs such as Ugnu, West Sak and Shrader Bluff etc. The viscosity of the last two reservoir oils vary from {approx}30 cp to {approx}3000 cp and the amount in the range of 10-20 billion barrels. High oil viscosity and low formation strength impose problems to high recovery and well productivity. Water-alternate-gas injection processes can be effective for the lower viscosity end of these deposits in West Sak and Shrader Bluff. Several gas streams are available in the North Slope containing NGL and CO{sub 2} (a greenhouse gas). The goal of this research is to develop tools to find optimum solvent, injection schedule and well-architecture for a WAG process in North Slope shallow sand viscous oil reservoirs. Coreflood, quarter 5-spot study, compositional simulation, wettability, relative permeability study and streamline-based simulation were conducted in this project. 1D compositional simulation results agree reasonably well with those of the slim tube experiments. Injection of CO{sub 2}-NGL is preferable over that of PBG-NGL. MME is sensitive to pressure (in the range of 1300-1800 psi) for the injection of PBG-NGL, but not for CO{sub 2}-NGL. Three hydrocarbon phases form in this pressure range. As the mean thickness of the adsorbed organic layer on minerals increases, the oil-water contact angle increases. The adsorbed organic films left behind after extraction of oil by common aromatic solvents used in core studies, such as toluene and decalin, are thinner than those left behind by non-aromatic solvents, such as cyclohexane. The force of adhesion for minerals aged with just the asphaltene fraction is similar to that of the whole oil implying that asphaltenes are responsible for the mixed-wettability in this reservoir. A new relative permeability model for a four-phase, mixed-wet system has been proposed. A streamline module is developed which can be incorporated in an existing finite-difference based compositional simulator to model water flood, gas flood and WAG flood. Horizontal wells increase well deliverability over vertical wells, but sweep efficiency can decrease. The well performance depends on the well length, position, heterogeneity, and viscosity ratio. The productivity increase due to electromagnetic heating is a function of power intensity, flow rate, and frequency etc. The productivity of a well can be doubled by electromagnetic heating. A high-pressure quarter 5-spot model has been constructed to evaluate the sweep efficiency of miscible WAG floods. WAG displacement reduces bypassing compared to gas floods and improves oil recovery in cores. As the WAG ratio decreased and slug size increased, oil recovery increased. Oil was recovered faster with increased slug size and decreased WAG ratio in the simulations for field cases studied.

  4. Saving the soil: AgriLife units work to improve training terrain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orth, Melanie

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Saving the soil AgriLife units work to improve training terrain Story by Melanie Orth txH2O | pg. 9 Heavy tanks and armored vehicles that have continually rolled over the 67,000-acre West Range at Fort Hood for the past 60 years have... accelerated soil erosion. Fort Hood, the largest active duty armored post in the U.S. Armed Services and located near Killeen in central Texas, uses the range as the primary training and maneuver area for two armored divisions. The Texas Water...

  5. Final Report of the Grant: ''Vertical Transport and Mixing in Complex Terrain Airsheds''

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harindra Joseph Fernando James Anderson Don Boyer Neil Berman

    2004-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Stable stratification associated with nocturnal thermal circulation in areas of complex terrain leads to interesting and important phenomena that govern local meteorology and contaminant dispersion. Given that most urban areas are in complex topography, understanding and prediction of such phenomena are of immediate practical importance. This project dealt with theoretical, laboratory, numerical and field experimental studies aimed at understanding stratified flow and turbulence phenomena in urban areas, with particular emphasis on flow, turbulence and contaminant transport and diffusion in such flows. A myriad of new results were obtained and some of these results were used to improve the predictive capabilities of the models.

  6. BACK-ANALYSES OF LANDFILL SLOPE FAILURES Nejan Huvaj-Sarihan Timothy D. Stark

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BACK-ANALYSES OF LANDFILL SLOPE FAILURES Nejan Huvaj-Sarihan Timothy D. Stark University strength of MSW. The back-analysis of failed waste slopes in the Gnojna Grora landfill in Poland, Istanbul Landfill in Turkey, Hiriya Landfill in Israel, and Payatas Landfill in Philippines are presented

  7. Control of a Mobile Modular Manipulator Moving on a Slope Yangmin Li, Yugang Liu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Yangmin

    Control of a Mobile Modular Manipulator Moving on a Slope Yangmin Li, Yugang Liu Department. An effective control method is applied to the ntobile mudular manipulator control in case of moving on a slope mobile basis and manipulator were studied in [I]. A hybrid control idea was presented for robot control

  8. Stability Charts for Uniform Slopes Radoslaw L. Michalowski, F.ASCE1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michalowski, Radoslaw L.

    . Charts are presented for slopes subjected to pore water pressure and also for those exposed to seismic analysis; Limit states; Failures; Graphic methods. Introduction Stability assessments of earth slopes require limit state calcula- tions, which differ significantly from those in structural engineer- ing

  9. Evaluation of a CCD-based high resolution autocollimator for use as a slope sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baltisberger, Jay H.

    Evaluation of a CCD-based high resolution autocollimator for use as a slope sensor Rohan Isaac the focused beam profile to broaden and decrease its peak intensity Project: Evaluation of a compact CCD-based high resolution autocollimator with a small probe beam for potential use as a slope sensor Optics Group

  10. THIN FILM EPITAXY WITH OR WITHOUT SLOPE SELECTION BO LI AND JIAN-GUO LIU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soatto, Stefano

    THIN FILM EPITAXY WITH OR WITHOUT SLOPE SELECTION BO LI AND JIAN-GUO LIU Abstract. Two nonlinear diffusion equations for thin film epitaxy, with or without slope se- lection, are studied in this work = - · h 1 + | h|2 + h (1.1) and th = - · 1 - | h|2 h + h (1.2) that model epitaxial growth of thin films

  11. Northsouth topographic slope asymmetry on Mars: Evidence for insolation-related erosion at high obliquity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Head III, James William

    asymmetry. Specifically, we suggest that summertime melting of ground ice on pole-facing slopes occurred, asymmetric troughs in the polar cap deposits of Mars have been interpreted to be due to insolation derived from the gridded topo- graphic map are affected by strongly anisotropic errors. The slopes along

  12. Local contact stress measurements at a rough interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Scheibert; A. Prevost; J. Frelat; P. Rey; G. Debrégeas

    2007-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    An original MEMS-based force sensing device is designed which allows to measure spatially resolved normal and tangential stress fields at the base of an elastomeric film. This device is used for the study of the contact stress between a rough film and a smooth glass sphere under normal load. The measured profiles are compared to Finite Elements Method calculations for a smooth contact with boundary conditions obeying Amontons-Coulomb's friction law. The accuracy of the measurements allows to discriminate between dry and lubricated contact conditions and to evidence load-dependent deviations from Amontons-Coulomb's profiles. These deviations are qualitatively interpreted by taking into account the finite compliance of the micro-contact population.

  13. Thermodynamics of sustaining gases in the roughness of submerged superhydrophobic surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neelesh A. Patankar

    2015-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Rough surfaces submerged in a liquid can remain almost dry if the liquid does not fully wet the roughness and gases are sustained in roughness grooves. Such partially dry surfaces can help reduce drag or enhance boiling. Gases sustained in roughness grooves would be composed of air and the vapor phase of the liquid itself. The thermodynamics of sustaining vapor was considered in a prior work [Patankar, Soft Matter, 2010, 6:1613]. Here, the thermodynamics of sustaining gases (e.g. air) is considered. Governing equations are presented along with a solution methodology to determine a critical condition to sustain gases. The critical roughness scale to sustain gases is estimated for different degrees of saturation of gases dissolved in the liquid. It is shown that roughness spacings of less than a micron are essential to sustain gases on surfaces submerged in water at atmospheric pressure. This is consistent with prior empirical data.

  14. Economics of Alaska North Slope gas utilization options

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, C.P.; Doughty, T.C.; Hackworth, J.H.; North, W.B.; Robertson, E.P.

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The recoverable natural gas available for sale in the developed and known undeveloped fields on the Alaskan North Slope (ANS) total about 26 trillion cubic feet (TCF), including 22 TCF in the Prudhoe Bay Unit (PBU) and 3 TCF in the undeveloped Point Thomson Unit (PTU). No significant commercial use has been made of this large natural gas resource because there are no facilities in place to transport this gas to current markets. To date the economics have not been favorable to support development of a gas transportation system. However, with the declining trend in ANS oil production, interest in development of this huge gas resource is rising, making it important for the U.S. Department of Energy, industry, and the State of Alaska to evaluate and assess the options for development of this vast gas resource. The purpose of this study was to assess whether gas-to-liquids (GTL) conversion technology would be an economic alternative for the development and sale of the large, remote, and currently unmarketable ANS natural gas resource, and to compare the long term economic impact of a GTL conversion option to that of the more frequently discussed natural gas pipeline/liquefied natural gas (LNG) option. The major components of the study are: an assessment of the ANS oil and gas resources; an analysis of conversion and transportation options; a review of natural gas, LNG, and selected oil product markets; and an economic analysis of the LNG and GTL gas sales options based on publicly available input needed for assumptions of the economic variables. Uncertainties in assumptions are evaluated by determining the sensitivity of project economics to changes in baseline economic variables.

  15. Terrain and vegetation structural influences on local avian species richness in two mixed-conifer forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    avian species richness in two mixed conifer forests, Moscow Mountain and Slate Creek, containing included height variability and canopy density whereas at Slate Creek they included slope, elevation, patch at Moscow Mountain but were strong predictors of avian species richness at the higher elevation Slate Creek

  16. Nanoscale Surface and Interface Mechanics of Elastic-Plastic Media with Smooth, Patterned, and Rough Surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yin, Xi

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    patterning, rough surface topography, interfacial adhesion,media with fractal surface topographies. J. Tribol. 123,representative of the 3D surface topography. A 2D profile of

  17. Lyapunov instability of rough hard-disk fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacobus A. van Meel; Harald A. Posch

    2009-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The dynamical instability of rough hard-disk fluids in two dimensions is characterized through the Lyapunov spectrum and the Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy, $h_{KS}$, for a wide range of densities and moments of inertia $I$. For small $I$ the spectrum separates into translation-dominated and rotation-dominated parts. With increasing $I$ the rotation-dominated part is gradually filled in at the expense of translation, until such a separation becomes meaningless. At any density, the rate of phase-space mixing, given by $h_{KS}$, becomes less and less effective the more the rotation affects the dynamics. However, the degree of dynamical chaos, measured by the maximum Lyapunov exponent, is only enhanced by the rotational degrees of freedom for high-density gases, but is diminished for lower densities. Surprisingly, no traces of Lyapunov modes were found in the spectrum for larger moments of inertia. The spatial localization of the perturbation vector associated with the maximum exponent however persists for any $I$.

  18. Mesoscale Characterization of Coupled Hydromechanical Behavior of a Fractured Porous Slope in Response to Free Water-Surface Movement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guglielmi, Y.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mesoscale Characterization of Coupled Hydromechanicalinstrumented for mesoscale hydraulic and mechanicalwords: Fracture; Rock slope; Mesoscale; In situ poroelastic

  19. Introduction to the Special Issue on Rough Sets and Soft Computing.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Tsau Young

    of information systems. From the outset, rough set theory has been a methodology of database mining or knowledge, neighborhood systems, neural network, and soft computing. In real world applications, we see papers in Introduction to the Special Issue on Rough Sets and Soft Computing. T. Y. Lin Department

  20. EFFECT OF CONTACT VISCOSITY AND ROUGHNESS ON INTERFACE STIFFNESS AND WAVE PROPAGATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    EFFECT OF CONTACT VISCOSITY AND ROUGHNESS ON INTERFACE STIFFNESS AND WAVE PROPAGATION Anil Misra1 and asperity properties compete in determining the stiffness behavior, and consequently, the wave propagation widely used to investigate plane wave propagation through contacts between two rough solids [see

  1. Surface roughness and geological mapping at sub-hectometer scale from the High

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cord, Aurélien

    and characterized in terms of roughness. Key words: Geological Processes, Impact Processes, Image Processing, Mars valuable insights into the characterization of and discrimination between these geological processesSurface roughness and geological mapping at sub-hectometer scale from the High Resolution Stereo

  2. A FETCH DEPENDENT MODEL OF SEA SURFACE ROUGHNESS FOR OFFSHORE WIND POWER UTILISATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Detlev

    , Resources, Roughness, Coastal Sea Areas, Waves, Rødsand 1 INTRODUCTION Large offshore wind farms are beingA FETCH DEPENDENT MODEL OF SEA SURFACE ROUGHNESS FOR OFFSHORE WIND POWER UTILISATION Bernhard Lange wind conditions of offshore sites, since the higher energy yield has to compensate the additional

  3. Dependence of friction on roughness, velocity, and temperature Martin Dub,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grant, Martin

    - faces were discovered long ago by Da Vinci, Amonton, and Coulomb. They found that friction is i, and friction at the macroscopic level is now well understood, for both dry rough 3 and lubricated surfaces 4Dependence of friction on roughness, velocity, and temperature Yi Sang,1 Martin Dubé,2 and Martin

  4. Lyapunov instability of rough hard-disk fluids Jacobus A. van Meel*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Posch, Harald A.

    Lyapunov instability of rough hard-disk fluids Jacobus A. van Meel* FOM Institute for Atomic The dynamical instability of rough hard-disk fluids in two dimensions is characterized through the Lyapunov, measured by the maximum Lyapunov exponent, is only enhanced by the rotational degrees of freedom for high

  5. 11.1 DEVELOPMENT OF AN IMMERSED BOUNDARY METHOD TO RESOLVE COMPLEX TERRAIN IN THE WEATHER RESEARCH AND FORECASTING MODEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chow, Fotini Katopodes

    11.1 DEVELOPMENT OF AN IMMERSED BOUNDARY METHOD TO RESOLVE COMPLEX TERRAIN IN THE WEATHER RESEARCH AND FORECASTING MODEL Katherine A. Lundquist1 , Fotini K. Chow 2 , Julie K. Lundquist 3 , and Jeffery D. Mirocha 3 in urban areas are profoundly influenced by the presence of build- ings which divert mean flow, affect

  6. A Survey of Procedural Methods for Terrain Modelling Ruben M. Smelik, Klaas Jan de Kraker and Saskia A. Groenewegen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bidarra, Rafael

    such as terrain elevation and growth of plants in the 1980s and 1990s and extended its focus to urban environments or not at all. The integration and adjustment of existing procedural methods in such a way that they can Research (NWO) and the Netherlands ICT Research and Innovation Authority (ICT Regie). #12;current modelling

  7. Tornadoes over complex terrain: an analysis of the 28th August 1999 tornadic event in eastern Spain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romero, Romu

    Tornadoes over complex terrain: an analysis of the 28th August 1999 tornadic event in eastern Spain Fi´sica, Universitat de les Illes Balears, Palma de Mallorca 07071, Spain b Instituto Nacional de Meteorologi´a, Centre Meteorolo`gic a les Illes Balears, Palma de Mallorca, Spain c IMEDEA, UIB-CSIC, Palma de

  8. Rear-Projecting Virtual Data onto Physical Terrain: An Exercise in Two Senses Being Better Than One

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bailey, Mike

    a computer-displayed 3D terrain map were not sufficient. We wanted to create more insight data set for POW that could be used for the 3D model, we had to merge seven USGS quads (Figure 3): Port shuttle (courtesy of the Earthrise project) showing POW Island from 182 nautical miles. Figure 2: POW

  9. Development of an Integrated Sensor System for Obstacle Detection and Terrain Evaluation for Application to Unmanned Ground

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    Development of an Integrated Sensor System for Obstacle Detection and Terrain Evaluation field of view of 50 degrees and 38 degrees, respectively. Two sensor systems were utilized to evaluate., Wexford Pennsylvania ABSTRACT This paper describes the development and performance of a sensor system

  10. The new WAsP flow model: a fast, linearized Mixed Spectral-Integration model applicable to complex terrain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . There is interest in placing wind turbines in hilly and mountainous areas, due to the potentially high speed commercial PC-based tool to estimate wind resources at a potential wind turbine site, given a set of wind challenge for the wind energy industry is the prediction of the wind resource in complex terrain

  11. Geotechnical in situ characterization of subaquatic slopes: The role of pore pressure transients versus frictional strength in landslide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilli, Adrian

    -triggered slope deposits in Lake Lucerne (Switzerland) in addition to geophysical characterization and laboratory-induced subaquatic slope failure in Lake Lucerne (Switzerland) using in situ vane shear and Cone Penetrating Testing- overdeepened Lake Lucerne, central Switzerland (Figure 1). A detailed description of the slope and sediment

  12. Evolution of depositional and slope instability processes on Bryant Canyon area, Northwest Gulf of Mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tripsanas, Efthymios

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    . At about 11 ky B.P. the melt water discharges of the North America switched from Mississippi River to St Lawrence Seaway, causing the domination of hemipelagic sedimentation on the continental slope of the northwest Gulf of Mexico....

  13. Clay mineralogy and its effect on physical properties in the Gulf of Mexico northwestern continental slope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berti, Debora

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The clay mineral composition of sediments deposited in the last six oxygen isotope stages in the Gulf of Mexico continental slope was characterized. Smectite and illite were found to be the two major clay minerals of the clay fraction while...

  14. ,Altitudinal distribution of monthly norms of precipitation on the northern slope of the Kyrgyz range (Kyrgyzstan)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    range (Kyrgyzstan) Korobitsina . 1. Introduction Our main task was to identify territorial distribution of precipitation on the northern slope of the Kyrgyz range (NSKR) (within Kyrgyzstan), where over 30 rivers, widely

  15. Automated suppression of errors in LTP-II slope measurements with x-ray optics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ali, Zulfiqar

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    slope measurements with x-ray optics Zulfiqar Ali, Curtis L.with state-of-the-art x-ray optics. Significant suppressionscanning, metrology of x-ray optics, deflectometry Abstract

  16. New evidence of slope instability in the Outardes Bay delta area, Quebec, Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, Bernard

    features are in direct relationship with the seismic interpretation of the data collected upslope multibeam sonar (95 kHz) on the slope to provide high-resolution seismic and bathy- metric data. The seismic

  17. Sub-microradian Surface Slope Metrology with the ALS Developmental Long Trace Profiler

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yashchuk, Valeriy V.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Device for X-ray Optics at BESSY,” Proc. AIP 705, [2] R.D.Elektronenspeicherring BESSY-II, Albert- Einstein-Str. 15,Machine) slope profiler at BESSY (Germany) [1] and the

  18. Engineering properties of Resedimented Ugnu Clay from the Alaskan North Slope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Cullen A. (Cullen Albert)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research determined the engineering properties of laboratory Resedimented Ugnu Clay (RUC) specimens created using recovered material from 3800 ft below the surface of the Alaskan Northern Slope to aid with future ...

  19. Spatial distribution of geotechnical properties in surficial marine sediments-Northwestern slope region, Gulf of Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyer, Matthew Kael

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    recent periods of geologic time. The only silty sediments encountered in this study were retrieved from these three general locations. In general, the study illustrated that highly localized sedimentation environments occur along the continental slope...

  20. Interpretation of side-scan sonar images from hydrocarbon seep areas of the Louisiana continental slope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hou, Rusheng

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Side-scan sonar images from the Louisiana continental slope were examined to study hydrocarbon seepage and related surficial geologic seafloor features. Three study areas are located in the Green Canyon area and the Garden Bank area. Hydrocarbon...

  1. Evolution of depositional and slope instability processes on Bryant Canyon area, Northwest Gulf of Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tripsanas, Efthymios

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    . At about 11 ky B.P. the melt water discharges of the North America switched from Mississippi River to St Lawrence Seaway, causing the domination of hemipelagic sedimentation on the continental slope of the northwest Gulf of Mexico....

  2. Near-field heat transfer between a nanoparticle and a rough surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Svend-Age Biehs; Jean-Jacques Greffet

    2011-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work we focus on the surface roughness correction to the near-field radiative heat transfer between a nanoparticle and a material with a rough surface utilizing a direct perturbation theory up to second order in the surface profile. We discuss the different distance regimes for the local density of states above the rough material and the heat flux analytically and numerically. We show that the heat transfer rate is larger than that corresponding to a flat surface at short distances. At larger distances it can become smaller due to surface polariton scattering by the rough surface. For distances much smaller than the correlation length of the surface profile, we show that the results converge to a proximity approximation, whereas in the opposite limit the rough surface can be replaced by an equivalent surface layer.

  3. MONITORING STRATIFICATION AND CURRENTS AT THE CONTINENTAL SLOPE OF THE SCOTIA SEA, ANTARCTICA 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thornton, Melanie 1989-

    2011-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    fulfillment of the requirements for the designation as UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH SCHOLAR A Senior Scholars Thesis by MELANIE R. THORNTON MONITORING STRATIFICATION AND CURRENTS AT THE CONTINENTAL SLOPE OF THE SCOTIA SEA, ANTARCTICA Approved by... of the requirements for the designation as UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH SCHOLAR A Senior Scholars Thesis by MELANIE R. THORNTON iii ABSTRACT Monitoring Stratification and Currents at the Continental Slope of the Scotia Sea, Antarctica. (April 2011...

  4. Shear Wave Velocity Structure of Southern African Crust: Evidence for Compositional Heterogeneity within Archaean and Proterozoic Terrains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kgaswane, E M; Nyblade, A A; Julia, J; Dirks, P H H M; Durrheim, R J; Pasyanos, M E

    2008-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Crustal structure in southern Africa has been investigated by jointly inverting receiver functions and Rayleigh wave group velocities for 89 broadband seismic stations spanning much of the Precambrian shield of southern Africa. 1-D shear wave velocity profiles obtained from the inversion yield Moho depths that are similar to those reported in previous studies and show considerable variability in the shear wave velocity structure of the lower part of the crust between some terrains. For many of the Archaean and Proterozoic terrains in the shield, S velocities reach 4.0 km/s or higher over a substantial part of the lower crust. However, for most of the Kimberley terrain and adjacent parts of the Kheis Province and Witwatersrand terrain, as well as for the western part of the Tokwe terrain, mean shear wave velocities of {le} 3.9 km/s characterize the lower part of the crust along with slightly ({approx}5 km) thinner crust. These findings indicate that the lower crust across much of the shield has a predominantly mafic composition, except for the southwest portion of the Kaapvaal Craton and western portion of the Zimbabwe Craton, where the lower crust is intermediate-to-felsic in composition. The parts of the Kaapvaal Craton underlain by intermediate-to-felsic lower crust coincide with regions where Ventersdorp rocks have been preserved, and thus we suggest that the intermediate-to-felsic composition of the lower crust and the shallower Moho may have resulted from crustal melting during the Ventersdorp tectonomagmatic event at c. 2.7 Ga and concomitant crustal thinning caused by rifting.

  5. Sub-microradian Surface Slope Metrology with the ALS Developmental Long Trace Profiler

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; Barber, Samuel; Domning, Edward E.; Kirschman, Jonathan L.; Morrison, Gregory Y.; Smith, Brian V.; Siewert, Frank; Zeschke, Thomas; Geckeler, Ralf; Just, Andreas

    2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Development of X-ray optics for 3rd and 4th generation X-ray light sources with a level of surface slope precision of 0.1-0.2 {micro}rad requires the development of adequate fabrication technologies and dedicated metrology instrumentation and methods. Currently, the best performance of surface slope measurement has been achieved with the NOM (Nanometer Optical Component Measuring Machine) slope profiler at BESSY (Germany) [1] and the ESAD (Extended Shear Angle Difference) profiler at the PTB (Germany) [2]. Both instruments are based on electronic autocollimators (AC) precisely calibrated for the specific application [3] with small apertures of 2.5-5 mm in diameter. In the present work, we describe the design, initial alignment and calibration procedures, the instrumental control and data acquisition system, as well as the measurement performance of the Developmental Long Trace Profiler (DLTP) slope measuring instrument recently brought into operation at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) Optical Metrology Laboratory (OML). Similar to the NOM and ESAD, the DLTP is based on a precisely calibrated autocollimator. However, this is a reasonably low budget instrument used at the ALS OML for the development and testing of new measuring techniques and methods. Some of the developed methods have been implemented into the ALS LTP-II (slope measuring long trace profiler [4]) which was recently upgraded and has demonstrated a capability for 0.25 {micro}rad surface metrology [5]. Performance of the DLTP was verified via a number of measurements with high quality reference mirrors. A comparison with the corresponding results obtained with the world's best slope measuring instrument, the BESSY NOM, proves the accuracy of the DLTP measurements on the level of 0.1-0.2 {micro}rad depending on the curvature of a surface under test. The directions of future work to develop a surface slope measuring profiler with nano-radian performance are also discussed.

  6. The effect of ice crystal surface roughness on the retrieval of ice cloud microphysical and optical properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Yu

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of the surface roughness of ice crystals is not routinely accounted for in current cloud retrieval algorithms that are based on pre-computed lookup libraries. In this study, we investigate the effect of ice crystal surface roughness...

  7. Reduction of vortex induced forces and motion through surface roughness control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bernitsas, Michael M; Raghavan, Kamaldev

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Roughness is added to the surface of a bluff body in a relative motion with respect to a fluid. The amount, size, and distribution of roughness on the body surface is controlled passively or actively to modify the flow around the body and subsequently the Vortex Induced Forces and Motion (VIFM). The added roughness, when designed and implemented appropriately, affects in a predetermined way the boundary layer, the separation of the boundary layer, the level of turbulence, the wake, the drag and lift forces, and consequently the Vortex Induced Motion (VIM), and the fluid-structure interaction. The goal of surface roughness control is to decrease/suppress Vortex Induced Forces and Motion. Suppression is required when fluid-structure interaction becomes destructive as in VIM of flexible cylinders or rigid cylinders on elastic support, such as underwater pipelines, marine risers, tubes in heat exchangers, nuclear fuel rods, cooling towers, SPAR offshore platforms.

  8. Boundary-Layer Receptivity to Three-Dimensional Roughness Arrays on a Swept-Wing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunt, Lauren Elizabeth

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    is required. This study uses detailed hotwire boundary-layer velocity scans to quantify the relationship between roughness height and initial disturbance amplitude. Naphthalene flow visualization provides insight into how transition changes as a result...

  9. Thermoelectric characteristic of the rough InN/GaN core-shell nanowires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Chao-Wei; Wu, Yuh-Renn, E-mail: yrwu@ntu.edu.tw [Graduate Institute of Photonics and Optoelectronics and Department of Electrical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China)

    2014-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    An analysis to model the thermoelectric (TE) effects of the rough InN/GaN core-shell nanowires (NWs) with wire diameter ranging from 25?nm to 100?nm is proposed. The elastic continuum model is employed to calculate the phonon dispersion relation curves and the related phonon group velocity. Within the framework of Boltzmann transport equations and relaxation time approximation, the electrical conductivity, Seebeck coefficient, electronic thermal conductivity, and the lattice thermal conductivity is obtained. Simulation results indicate that TE properties of the rough InN/GaN core-shell NWs are strongly affected by the surface roughness and the diameter of NWs. The optimized condition of the proposed rough InN/GaN core-shell TE NWs is studied in this paper and the highest ZT obtained in the calculation is 0.8598 at 300?K and 1.713 at 1000?K.

  10. A construction of the rough path above fractional Brownian motion using Volterra’s representation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nualart, David; Tindel, Samy

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This note is devoted to construct a rough path above a multidimensional fractional Brownian motion B with any Hurst parameter H?(0,?1), by means of its representation as a Volterra Gaussian process. This approach yields ...

  11. Enhancement of vortex induced forces and motion through surface roughness control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bernitsas, Michael M. (Saline, MI); Raghavan, Kamaldev (Houston, TX)

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Roughness is added to the surface of a bluff body in a relative motion with respect to a fluid. The amount, size, and distribution of roughness on the body surface is controlled passively or actively to modify the flow around the body and subsequently the Vortex Induced Forces and Motion (VIFM). The added roughness, when designed and implemented appropriately, affects in a predetermined way the boundary layer, the separation of the boundary layer, the level of turbulence, the wake, the drag and lift forces, and consequently the Vortex Induced Motion (VIM), and the fluid-structure interaction. The goal of surface roughness control is to increase Vortex Induced Forces and Motion. Enhancement is needed in such applications as harnessing of clean and renewable energy from ocean/river currents using the ocean energy converter VIVACE (Vortex Induced Vibration for Aquatic Clean Energy).

  12. Dual frequency microwave radiometer measurements of soil moisture for bare and vegetated rough surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Siu Lim

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DUAL FREQUENCY MICROWAVE RADIOMETER MEASUREMENTS OF SOIL MOISTURE FOR BARE AND VEGETATED ROUGH SURFACES A Thesis by SIU LIM LEE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A(M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1974 Major Subject: Electrical Engineering DUAL FREQUENCY MICROWAVE RADIOMETER MEASUREMENTS OF' SOIL MOISTURE FOR BARE AND VEGETATED ROUGH SURFACES A Thesis by SIU LIM LEE Approved as to style and content by: (C rman...

  13. Spotlight SAR interferometry for terrain elevation mapping and interferometric change detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eichel, P.H.; Ghiglia, D.C.; Jakowatz, C.V. Jr. [and others

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this report, we employ an approach quite different from any previous work; we show that a new methodology leads to a simpler and clearer understanding of the fundamental principles of SAR interferometry. This methodology also allows implementation of an important collection mode that has not been demonstrated to date. Specifically, we introduce the following six new concepts for the processing of interferometric SAR (INSAR) data: (1) processing using spotlight mode SAR imaging (allowing ultra-high resolution), as opposed to conventional strip-mapping techniques; (2) derivation of the collection geometry constraints required to avoid decorrelation effects in two-pass INSAR; (3) derivation of maximum likelihood estimators for phase difference and the change parameter employed in interferometric change detection (ICD); (4) processing for the two-pass case wherein the platform ground tracks make a large crossing angle; (5) a robust least-squares method for two-dimensional phase unwrapping formulated as a solution to Poisson`s equation, instead of using traditional path-following techniques; and (6) the existence of a simple linear scale factor that relates phase differences between two SAR images to terrain height. We show both theoretical analysis, as well as numerous examples that employ real SAR collections to demonstrate the innovations listed above.

  14. Bringing Alaska North Slope Natural Gas to Market (released in AEO2009)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At least three alternatives have been proposed over the years for bringing sizable volumes of natural gas from Alaska's remote North Slope to market in the lower 48 states: a pipeline interconnecting with the existing pipeline system in central Alberta, Canada; a gas-to-liquids (GTL) plant on the North Slope; and a large liquefied natural gas (LNG) export facility at Valdez, Alaska. The National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) explicitly models the pipeline and GTL options. The what if LNG option is not modeled in NEMS.

  15. Slope design and implementation in open pit mines; geological and geomechanical Jean-Alain FLEURISSON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 GHGT-9 Slope design and implementation in open pit mines; geological and geomechanical approach all natural geological and geomechanical features and the geological structures as well and geomechanical data; 2) determination of the potential mechanisms of deformation and failure, and their numerical

  16. A chronostratigraphic framework for the northwestern slope of the gulf of mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elston, Kristen Eileen

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Sediments from two cores, JPC31 and JPC46, were analyzed to better understand the relationship between climate and sediment deposition on the continental slope of the northwestern Gulf of Mexico. These two cores were selected from a suite of cores...

  17. Density slope of the nuclear symmetry energy from the neutron skin thickness of heavy nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Lie-Wen; Ko, Che Ming; Li, Bao-An; Xu, Jun.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of finite nuclei and nuclear matter properties. We find that existing data on neutron skin thickness Delta r(np) of Sn isotopes give an important constraint on the symmetry energy E(sym)(rho(0)) and its density slope L at saturation density rho(0). Combining...

  18. EVIDENCE OF ELEVATED OZONE CONCENTRATIONS ON FORESTED SLOPES OF THE LOWER FRASER VALLEY, BRITISH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKendry, Ian

    EVIDENCE OF ELEVATED OZONE CONCENTRATIONS ON FORESTED SLOPES OF THE LOWER FRASER VALLEY, BRITISH, hourly average ozone concentrations were mea- sured at three sites of differing elevation (188, 588. Sites experienced ozone concentrations ranging from 0 to 88 ppb in 2001, and 0 to 96 ppb in 2002. Daily

  19. The epibenthic megafauna of the northern Gulf of Mexico continental slope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ziegler, Matthew Peek

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The epibenthic megafauna of the continental slope and abyssal plain of the northern Gulf of Mexico have been investigated using multi-shot bottom photography. A total of 10,388 photographs were analyzed from 100 sites encompassing a total area...

  20. DRAFT TECHNICAL GUIDANCE DOCUMENT ON STATIC AND SEISMIC SLOPE STABILITY FOR SOLID WASTE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DRAFT TECHNICAL GUIDANCE DOCUMENT ON STATIC AND SEISMIC SLOPE STABILITY FOR SOLID WASTE CONTAINMENT FACILITIES PRODUCED BY THE SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT PROGRAM DIVISION OF ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY MISSOURI IN GEOSYNTHETIC MATERIALS Page 33 5.0 ENGINEERING PROPERTIES OF MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE Page 36 I. STATIC PROPERTIES

  1. Recent glacially influenced sedimentary processes on the East Greenland continental slope and deep Greenland Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jakobsson, Martin

    Recent glacially influenced sedimentary processes on the East Greenland continental slope and deep Greenland Basin Marga García a,*, Julian A. Dowdeswell a , Gemma Ercilla b , Martin Jakobsson c a Scott June 2012 Available online xxx Keywords: Greenland Basin Glacially influenced sedimentary processes

  2. Probabilistic slope stability analysis by finite elements D.V. Griffiths*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Probabilistic slope stability analysis by finite elements D.V. Griffiths* and Gordon A. Fenton. The advanced method, called the random finite element method (RFEM), uses elasto- plasticity combined nonlinear finite element methods are combined with ran- dom field generation techniques. This method, called

  3. Microbial carbon sources on the shelf and slope of the northwestern Gulf of Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rauschenberg, Carlton David

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    , hypoxic regions that occur seasonally and deep slope and abyssal plain sediments of the Gulf of Mexico (GOM). Previous reports using the Laguna Madre data as examples, have been used to make comparisons of PLFA 16:0 and PLFA 15:0 isotope ratios and PLFA 16...

  4. 1 INTRODUCTION Geosynthetic clay liners (GCLs) with geomembranes (GMs) placed on slopes as part of composite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    143 1 INTRODUCTION Geosynthetic clay liners (GCLs) with geomembranes (GMs) placed on slopes as part and interface shear strength of geosynthetic clay liners J.G. ZORNBERG The University of Texas at Austin, Austin of composite liner systems may be subject to a complex, time-dependent state of stresses. Stability is a major

  5. A SLIPPERY SLOPE: HOW MUCH GLOBAL WARMING CONSTITUTES "DANGEROUS ANTHROPOGENIC INTERFERENCE"?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    A SLIPPERY SLOPE: HOW MUCH GLOBAL WARMING CONSTITUTES "DANGEROUS ANTHROPOGENIC INTERFERENCE on the global warming that can be tolerated without risking dangerous anthropogenic interference with climate. I" mainly as a metaphor for the danger posed by global warming. So I changed "Hell" to "disaster." What

  6. Stochastic modeling of random roughness in shock scattering problems: theory and simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Guang; Su, Chau-Hsing; Karniadakis, George E.

    2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Random rougness is omnipresent in engineering applications and may often affect performance in unexpected way. Here, we employ synergistically stochastic simulations and second-order stochastic perturbation analysis to study supersonic flow past a wedge with random rough surface. The roughness (of length $d$) starting at the wedge apex is modeled as stochastic process (with zero mean and correlation length $A$) obtained from a new stochastic differential equation. A multi-element probabilistic collocation method (ME-PCM) based on {\\em sparse grids} is employed to solve the stochastic Euler equations while a WENO scheme is used to discretize the equations in two spatial dimensions. The perturbation analysis is used to verify the stochastic simulations and to provide insight for small values of $A$, where stochastic simulations become prohibitively expensive. % We show that the random roughness enhances the lift and drag forces on the wedge beyond the rough region, and this enhancement is proportional to $(d/A)^2$. The effects become more pronounced as the Mach number increases. These results can be used in designing smart rough skins for airfoils for maxiumum lift enhancement at a minimum drag penalty.

  7. The friction factor of two-dimensional rough-boundary turbulent soap film flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicholas Guttenberg; Nigel Goldenfeld

    2009-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We use momentum transfer arguments to predict the friction factor $f$ in two-dimensional turbulent soap-film flows with rough boundaries (an analogue of three-dimensional pipe flow) as a function of Reynolds number Re and roughness $r$, considering separately the inverse energy cascade and the forward enstrophy cascade. At intermediate Re, we predict a Blasius-like friction factor scaling of $f\\propto\\textrm{Re}^{-1/2}$ in flows dominated by the enstrophy cascade, distinct from the energy cascade scaling of $\\textrm{Re}^{-1/4}$. For large Re, $f \\sim r$ in the enstrophy-dominated case. We use conformal map techniques to perform direct numerical simulations that are in satisfactory agreement with theory, and exhibit data collapse scaling of roughness-induced criticality, previously shown to arise in the 3D pipe data of Nikuradse.

  8. Multiscale characterization method for line edge roughness based on redundant second generation wavelet transform

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang Fei; Zhao Xuezeng [School of Mechanical and Electronic Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Li Ning [Shanghai Second Polytechnic University, Shanghai 201209 (China)

    2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce a multiscale characterization method for line edge roughness (LER) based on redundant second generation wavelet transform. This method involves decomposing LER characteristics into independent bands with different spatial frequency components at different scales, and analyzing the reconstructed signals to work out the roughness exponent, the spatial frequency distribution characteristics, as well as the rms value. The effect of noise can be predicted using detailed signals in the minimum space of scale. This method was applied to numerical profiles for validation. Results show that according to the line edge profiles with similar amplitudes, the roughness exponent R can effectively reflect the degree of irregularity of LER and intuitively provide information on LER spatial frequency distribution.

  9. Validity of the thin mask approximation in extreme ultraviolet mask roughness simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naulleau, Patrick; George, Simi

    2011-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    In the case of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography, modeling has shown that reflector phase roughness on the lithographic mask is a significant concern due to the image plan speckle it causes and the resulting line-edge roughness on imaged features. Modeling results have recently been used to determine the requirements for future production worthy masks yielding the extremely stringent specification of 50 pm rms roughness. Owing to the scale of the problem in terms of memory requirements, past modeling results have all been based on the thin mask approximation. EUV masks, however, are inherently three dimensional in nature and thus the question arises as to the validity of the thin mask approximation. Here we directly compare image plane speckle calculation results using the fast two dimensional thin mask model to rigorous finite-difference time-domain results and find the two methods to be comparable.

  10. A guidebook for insulated low-slope roof systems. IEA Annex 19, Low-slope roof systems: International Energy Agency Energy Conservation in Buildings and Community Systems Programme

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Low-slope roof systems are common on commercial and industrial buildings and, to a lesser extent, on residential buildings. Although insulating materials have nearly always been a component of low-slope roofs, the amount of insulation used has increased in the past two decades because of escalation of heating and cooling costs and increased awareness of the need for energy conservation. As the amount of insulation has increased, the demand has intensified for design, installation, and maintenance information specifically for well-insulated roofs. Existing practices for design, installation, and maintenance of insulated roofs have evolved from experience. Typically, these practices feature compromises due to the different properties of materials making up a given roof system. Therefore, they should be examined from time to time to ensure that they are appropriate as new materials continue to enter the market and as the data base on existing systems expands. A primary purpose of this International Energy Agency (IEA) study is to assess current roofing insulation practices in the context of an accumulating data base on performance.

  11. Surface roughness of stainless-steel mirrors for focusing soft x rays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; Gullikson, Eric M.; Howells, Malcolm R.; Irick, Steve C.; MacDowell, Alastair A.; McKinney, Wayne R.; Salmassi, Farhad; Warwick, Tony; Metz, James P.; Tonnessen, Thomas W

    2006-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We have used polished stainless steel as a mirror substrate to provide focusing of soft x rays in grazing-incidence reflection. The critical issue of the quality of the steel surface,polished and coated with gold, is discussed in detail. A comparison is made to a polished,gold-coated, electroless nickel surface, which provides a smoother finish. We used the surface height distributions, measured with an interferometric microscope and complemented by atomic-force microscope measurements, to compute power spectral densities and then to evaluate the surface roughness. The effects of roughness in reducing the specular reflectivity were verified by soft-x-ray measurements.

  12. Phreatic flow on sloping soil layers from a finite source: An analytical solution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Filley, T.H.

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sloping clay layers beneath percolation ponds can cause infiltrating wastewater to pond and move in directions not predicted by vertical infiltration equations. This report presents a method for estimating the potential of wastewater from percolation sumps located over sloping clay layers to interact with nearby groundwater resources. The analytical solution developed is for steady-state conditions and includes a procedure to estimate the time needed to reach steady state. The fundamental assumption used in the mathematical development requires that elevation-head gradients be much larger than pressure-head gradients. A method for testing the validity of this assumption is also included. An example calculation was performed for percolation sumps on the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 in Elk Hills, California. That analysis showed that, under the assumptions used, the sumps may have enabled oil field wastewater to reach groundwater resources within the adjacent San Joaquin Valley. 9 refs., 10 figs.

  13. Is the friction angle the maximum slope of a free surface of a non cohesive material?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Modaressi; P. Evesque

    2005-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Starting from a symmetric triangular pile with a horizontal basis and rotating the basis in the vertical plane, we have determined the evolution of the stress distribution as a function of the basis inclination using Finite Elements method with an elastic-perfectly plastic constitutive model, defined by its friction angle, without cohesion. It is found that when the yield function is the Drucker-Prager one, stress distribution satisfying equilibrium can be found even when one of the free-surface slopes is larger than the friction angle. This means that piles with a slope larger than the friction angle can be (at least) marginally stable and that slope rotation is not always a destabilising perturbation direction. On the contrary, it is found that the slope cannot overpass the friction angle when a Mohr-Coulomb yield function is used. Theoretical explanation of these facts is given which enlightens the role plaid by the intermediate principal stress in both cases of the Mohr-Coulomb criterion and of the Drucker-Prager one. It is then argued that the Mohr-Coulomb criterion assumes a spontaneous symmetry breaking, as soon as the two smallest principal stresses are different ; this is not physical most likely; so this criterion shall be replaced by a Drucker-Prager criterion in the vicinity of the equality, which leads to the previous anomalous behaviour ; so these numerical computations enlighten the avalanche process: they show that no dynamical angle larger than the static one is needed to understand avalanching. It is in agreement with previous experimental results. Furthermore, these results show that the maximum angle of repose can be modified using cyclic rotations; we propose a procedure that allows to achieve a maximum angle of repose to be equal to the friction angle .

  14. A probabilistic investigation of slope stability in the Wasatch Range, Davis County, Utah

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eblen, James Storey

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . LISA (Level I Stability Analysis), a U. S. Forest Service probabilistic, slope stability model, and a deterministic model, dLISA, will be used in this study. The applicability of the two models will be established as follows: 1) Establish parametric... processes. Keaton (1988) developed a probabilistic model to evaluate hazards that are associated with alluvial fan sedimentation in Davis County, Utah. Keaton concluded that most of the canyons which yielded large volumes of sediment in 1983 and 1984 had...

  15. Distribution of high molecular weight hydrocarbons in northern Gulf of Mexico continental slope sediments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sericano, Jose Luis

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Department of Energy's Strategic Petroleum Reserve Program (SPR). This program plans to store one billion barrels of oil in solution-mined salt cavities near existing petroleum distribution facilities along the Gulf of Mexico coast. This study, conducted... of petroleum on the deep ocean benthos. The outer continental shelf and slope in many areas of the world include sites of potential oil and gas reserves which have not been previously developed due to technological constraints. However, new technology...

  16. Microstructure and conductance-slope of InAs/GaSb tunnel diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iutzi, Ryan M., E-mail: iutzi@mit.edu; Fitzgerald, Eugene A. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2014-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    InAs/GaSb and similar materials systems have generated great interest as a heterojunction for tunnel field effect transistors (TFETs) due to favorable band alignment. However, little is currently understood about how such TFETs are affected by materials defects and nonidealities. We present measurements of the conductance slope for various InAs/GaSb heterojunctions via two-terminal electrical measurements, which removes three-terminal parasitics and enables direct study on the effect of microstructure on tunnelling. Using this, we can predict how subthreshold swings in TFETs can depend on microstructure. We also demonstrate growth and electrical characterization for structures grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD)—a generally more scalable process compared with molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). We determine that misfit dislocations and point defects near the interface can lead to energy states in the band-gap and local band bending that result in trap-assisted leakage routes and nonuniform band alignment across the junction area that lower the steepness of the conductance slope. Despite the small lattice mismatch, misfit dislocations still form in InAs on GaSb due to relaxation as a result of large strain from intermixed compositions. This can be circumvented by growing GaSb on InAs, straining the GaSb underlayer, or lowering the InAs growth temperature in the region of the interface. The conductance slope can also be improved by annealing the samples at higher temperatures, which we believe acts to annihilate point defects and average out major fluctuations in band alignment across the interface. Using a combination of these techniques, we can greatly improve the steepness of the conductance slope which could result in steeper subthreshold swings in TFETs in the future.

  17. VEHICLE 1vlOBILITY TES'J'S SOFT SOIL SLOPES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    VEHICLE 1vlOBILITY TES'J'S SOFT SOIL SLOPES June 2 5 , 1970 J E T P R O P U L S I O N L A B C A L f;760-51 FOREWORD The investigation documented in this report constitutes part of the Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV. :;: These vehicle mobility tests have been performed to develop :: National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  18. Optimal tuning and calibration of bendable mirrors with slope measuring profilers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKinney, Wayne; Kirschman, Jonathan; MacDowell, Alastair; Warwick, Tony; Yashchuk, Valeriy

    2009-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a technique to optimally tune and calibrate bendable x-ray optics for sub-micron focusing. The focusing is divided between two elliptically cylindrical reflecting elements, a Kirkpatrick-Baez (KB) pair. Each optic is shaped by applying unequal bending couples to each end of a flat mirror. The developed technique allowsoptimal tuning of these systems using surface slope data obtained with a slope measuring instrument, the long trace profiler (LTP). Due to the near linearity of the problem, the minimal set of data necessary for the tuning of each bender, consists of only three slope traces measured before and after a single adjustment of each bending couple. The data are analyzed with software realizing a method of regression analysis with experimentally found characteristic functions of the benders. The resulting approximation to the functional dependence of the desired shape provides nearly final settings. Moreover, the characteristic functions of the benders found in the course of tuning, can be used for retuning to a new desired shape without removal from the beamline and re-measuring. We perform a ray trace, using profiler data for the finally tuned optics, predicting the performance to be expected during use of the optics on the beamline.

  19. Numerical method for calculating the apparent eddy current conductivity loss on randomly rough surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagy, Peter B.

    Numerical method for calculating the apparent eddy current conductivity loss on randomly rough Because of their frequency-dependent penetration depth, eddy current measurements are capable of mapping of eddy current conductivity, thereby decreasing the accuracy of the measurements, especially in thermally

  20. A simple numerical model of the apparent loss of eddy current conductivity due to surface roughness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagy, Peter B.

    A simple numerical model of the apparent loss of eddy current conductivity due to surface roughness of eddy current conductivity has been suggested as a possible means to allow the nondestructive evaluation, the path of the eddy current must follow a more tortuous route in the material, which produces a reduction

  1. Geometrical and transport properties of single fractures: influence of the roughness of the fracture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    and more particularly in the design and safety of nuclear power plants or cryotechnic rocket engines, where space is found to be crucially function of the failure mechanism (brittle, quasi brittle or plastic influencing the structure of the void space. Studies devoted to the characterization of the surface roughness

  2. Optimization of Hard Material Roughing by means of a Stability , M. Zatarain2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Self-excited vibrations limit the productivity of aluminium and steel roughing. During aluminium they are associated to the structure of the machine tool (low frequency). For aluminium, the dynamic characterisation the usual one applied in light alloys. The proposed model is verified experimentally in a practical case

  3. Hydro-thermal flow in a rough fracture EC Contract SES6-CT-2003-502706

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmittbuhl, Jean

    Hydro-thermal flow in a rough fracture EC Contract SES6-CT-2003-502706 PARTICIPANT ORGANIZATION NAME: CNRS Synthetic 2nd year report Related with Work Package............ HYDRO-THERMAL FLOW in the influence of a realistic geometry of the fracture on its hydro-thermal response. Several studies have

  4. Tsunami generated by a granular collapse down a rough inclined S. Viroulet1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    epl draft Tsunami generated by a granular collapse down a rough inclined plane S. Viroulet1 , A Jersey 08544, USA PACS 47.57.Gc ­ Granular flow, complex fluids PACS 92.10.hl ­ Tsunamis PACS 45.70.Ht wave and the evolution of its amplitude during the propagation. The experiments show that whereas

  5. Measurement of friction noise versus contact area of rough surfaces weakly loaded

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    contact area. The friction-induced vibration is generated by the sliding of two rough surfaces. The normal load is low leading to a weak contact. The normal load and the sliding velocity are maintained constant], friction noises can be classified in two types depending on the contact pressure. When the contact pressure

  6. Sensitivity of Swept-Wing, Boundary-Layer Transition to Spanwise-Periodic Discrete Roughness Elements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    West, David Edward

    2014-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Micron-sized, spanwise-periodic, discrete roughness elements (DREs) were applied to and tested on a 30° swept-wing model in order to study their effects on boundary-layer transition in flight where stationary crossflow waves are the dominant...

  7. Atmospheric Momentum Roughness Applied to Stage-Discharge Relationships in Flood Plains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to Manning's formula. The Task Force on Friction Factors in Open Channel 1963 found that Manning's formula's formula in heavily vegetated or urbanized areas is particularly problematic Task Force on Friction Factors is the relationship among wind speed, friction velocity, and the surface roughness that was developed from Prandtl

  8. Importance of thermal effects and sea surface roughness for offshore wind resource assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Detlev

    sites. The first large offshore wind farms are currently being built in several countries in EuropeImportance of thermal effects and sea surface roughness for offshore wind resource assessment National Laboratory, Roskilde, Denmark Abstract The economic feasibility of offshore wind power utilisation

  9. ROUGH SURFACES OF TITANIUM AND TITANIUM ALLOYS FOR IMPLANTS AND PROSTHESES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    ROUGH SURFACES OF TITANIUM AND TITANIUM ALLOYS FOR IMPLANTS AND PROSTHESES 1 E. Conforto, 2 B. Abstract Titanium and titanium alloys for dental implants and hip prostheses were surface-treated and and the stability of the implant. The microstructure of titanium and titanium alloys submitted to these treatments

  10. Rough-Fuzzy C-Medoids Algorithm and Selection of Bio-Basis for Amino Acid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pal, Sankar Kumar

    of protein data sets. Index Terms--Pattern recognition, data mining, c-medoids algorithm, fuzzy sets, rough Pradipta Maji and Sankar K. Pal, Fellow, IEEE Abstract--In most pattern recognition algorithms, amino acids pattern recognition algorithms to analyze these biological subsequences is that they cannot recognize

  11. Soft data mining, computational theory of perceptions, and rough-fuzzy approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pal, Sankar Kumar

    is described from pattern recognition point of view along with the relevance of soft computing. Key features of the computational theory of perceptions and its significance in pattern recognition and knowledge dis- covery, and its modeling through rough-fuzzy integration are discussed. Merits of fuzzy granular computation

  12. Class-dependent rough-fuzzy granular space, dispersion index and classification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pal, Sankar Kumar

    granular computing Soft computing Pattern recognition Remote sensing a b s t r a c t A new rough-fuzzy model for pattern classification based on granular computing is described in the present article. In this model, we propose the formulation of class-dependent granules in fuzzy environment. Fuzzy membership

  13. FRICTION FACTOR IN HIGH PRESSURE NATURAL GAS PIPELINES FROM ROUGHNESS MEASUREMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gudmundsson, Jon Steinar

    FRICTION FACTOR IN HIGH PRESSURE NATURAL GAS PIPELINES FROM ROUGHNESS MEASUREMENTS DETERMINATION DU and Technology, Norway ABSTRACT Pressure drop experiments on natural gas flow at 80 to 120 bar pressure and high of natural gas at typical operating pressures (100-180 bar). At such Reynolds numbers the classical Colebrook

  14. An FDTD Method for Analysis of Scattering from Rough FluidFluid Interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schneider, John B.

    results are presented for fluid­fluid cases modeling water­sediment inter­ faces. Two different roughness speeds in shallow­water sediment bottoms are relatively slow, a fluid­ fluid model is a reasonable to the interface, and a correc­ tion for the numerical dispersion inherent to the FDTD algorithm. Numeri­ cal

  15. The bends in the slopes of radial abundance gradients in the disks of spiral galaxies -- do they exist?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. S. Pilyugin

    2002-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Spiral galaxies with a reported bend in the slope of gradient in the oxygen abundances (O/H)_R23, derived with traditionally used R23 - method, were examined. It is shown that the artificial origin of the reported bends can be naturally explained. Two reasons that result in a false bend in the slope of (O/H)_R23 gradient are indicated. It is concluded that at the present time there is no example of a galaxy with an undisputable established bend in the slope of the oxygen abundance gradient.

  16. Cite as: Lundquist, J.K., F. K. Chow, J. D. Mirocha, and K.A. Lundquist, 2007: An Improved WRF for Urban-Scale and Complex-Terrain Applications. American Meteorological Society's 7

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chow, Fotini Katopodes

    method (IBM) approach to account for the effects of urban geometries and complex terrain. Companion of flow and dispersion in complex geometries such as urban areas, as well as new simulation capabilities for Urban-Scale and Complex-Terrain Applications. American Meteorological Society's 7 th Symposium

  17. Equivalent roughness height for plane bed under oscillatory flow Benoi^t Camenen a,*, Magnus Larson b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    of a flat and fixed bed is given in terms of the Nikuradse roughness height (ks). For flat beds larger than for a fixed bed. This is probably caused by the increased energy dissipation in the sheetEquivalent roughness height for plane bed under oscillatory flow Benoi^t Camenen a,*, Magnus Larson

  18. 486 IEEE MICROWAVE AND WIRELESS COMPONENTS LETTERS, VOL. 17, NO. 7, JULY 2007 Estimation of Roughness-Induced Power Absorption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Leung

    it to predict the roughness effect on power loss. Index Terms--Power absorption, power spectral density (PSD significant additional power loss that can be detrimental for insertion loss limited designs. We recently interconnect surfaces and use it to estimate corresponding roughness-induced power loss. The 2-D PSD

  19. The effect of ice crystal surface roughness on the retrieval of ice cloud microphysical and optical properties 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Yu

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    on the retrieval of ice cloud effective particle size, optical thickness and cloud-top temperature. Three particle surface conditions, smooth, moderately rough and deeply rough, are considered in the visible and near-infrared channels (0.65 and 3.75 Ã...

  20. Surface circulation in the Gulf of Cadiz: 2. Inflow-outflow coupling and the Gulf of Cadiz slope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brest, Université de

    that of the atmospheric forcing in driving the upper slope currents. The Mediteranean outflow forces a surface open ocean filaments con- touring Cape St. Vincent and penetrating eastward into the warmer GoC waters that suggest

  1. Vegetation patterns of Pine Canyon, Big Bend National Park, Texas, in relation to elevation and slope aspect 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Bryan Joseph

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and richness, and stem density are also analyzed. Communities encountered on the south-facing slope, from low to high elevation, are: Chihuahuan Desert shrubland, sotol grassland, open oak shrubland, mixed shrubland, and oak-pinyon-juniper woodland. Communities...

  2. The Component Slope Linear Model for Calculating Intensive Partial Molar Properties: Application to Waste Glasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reynolds, Jacob G. [Washington River Protection Solutions, Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Partial molar properties are the changes occurring when the fraction of one component is varied while the fractions of all other component mole fractions change proportionally. They have many practical and theoretical applications in chemical thermodynamics. Partial molar properties of chemical mixtures are difficult to measure because the component mole fractions must sum to one, so a change in fraction of one component must be offset with a change in one or more other components. Given that more than one component fraction is changing at a time, it is difficult to assign a change in measured response to a change in a single component. In this study, the Component Slope Linear Model (CSLM), a model previously published in the statistics literature, is shown to have coefficients that correspond to the intensive partial molar properties. If a measured property is plotted against the mole fraction of a component while keeping the proportions of all other components constant, the slope at any given point on a graph of this curve is the partial molar property for that constituent. Actually plotting this graph has been used to determine partial molar properties for many years. The CSLM directly includes this slope in a model that predicts properties as a function of the component mole fractions. This model is demonstrated by applying it to the constant pressure heat capacity data from the NaOH-NaAl(OH{sub 4}H{sub 2}O system, a system that simplifies Hanford nuclear waste. The partial molar properties of H{sub 2}O, NaOH, and NaAl(OH){sub 4} are determined. The equivalence of the CSLM and the graphical method is verified by comparing results detennined by the two methods. The CSLM model has been previously used to predict the liquidus temperature of spinel crystals precipitated from Hanford waste glass. Those model coefficients are re-interpreted here as the partial molar spinel liquidus temperature of the glass components.

  3. Slump dominated upper slope reservoir facies, Intra Qua Iboe (Pliocene), Edop Field, offshore Nigeria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shanmugam, G. [Mobil Research and Development Corp., Dallas, TX (United States); Hermance, W.E.; Olaifa, J.O. [Mobil Producing Nigeria, Lagos (Nigeria)

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An integration of sedimentologic and 3D seismic data provides a basis for unraveling complex depositional processes and sand distribution of the Intra Qua Iboe (IQI) reservoir (Pliocene), Edop Field, offshore Nigeria. Nearly 3,000 feet of conventional core was examined in interpreting slump/slide/debris flow, bottom current, turbidity current, pelagic/hemipelagic, wave and tide dominated facies. The IQI was deposited on an upper slope in close proximity to the shelf edge. Through time, as the shelf edge migrated seaward, deposition began with a turbidite channel dominated slope system (IQI 1 and 2) and progressed through a slump/debris flow dominated slope system (IQI 3, the principal reservoir) to a tide and wave dominated, collapsed shelf-edge deltaic system (IQI 4). Using seismic time slices and corresponding depositional facies in the core, a sandy {open_quotes}fairway{open_quotes} has been delineated in the IQI 3. Because of differences in stacking patterns of sandy and muddy slump intervals, seismic facies show: (1) both sheet-like and mounded external forms (geometries), and (2) parallel/continuous as well as chaotic/hummocky internal reflections. In wireline logs, slump facies exhibits blocky, coarsening-up, fining-up, and serrated motifs. In the absence of conventional core, slump facies may be misinterpreted and even miscorrelated because seismic facies and log motifs of slumps and debris flows tend to mimic properties of turbidite fan deposits. The slump dominated reservoir facies is composed of unconsolidated fine-grained sand. Thickness of individual units varies from 1 to 34 feet, but amalgamated intervals reach a thickness of up to 70 feet and apparently form connected sand bodies. Porosity commonly ranges from 20 to 35%. Horizontal permeability commonly ranges from 1,000 to 3,000 md.

  4. Electrochemical machining process for forming surface roughness elements on a gas turbine shroud

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, Ching-Pang (Cincinnati, OH); Johnson, Robert Alan (Simpsonville, SC); Wei, Bin (Mechanicville, NY); Wang, Hsin-Pang (Rexford, NY)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The back side recessed cooling surface of a shroud defining in part the hot gas path of a turbine is electrochemically machined to provide surface roughness elements and spaces therebetween to increase the heat transfer coefficient. To accomplish this, an electrode with insulating dielectric portions and non-insulating portions is disposed in opposition to the cooling surface. By passing an electrolyte between the cooling surface and electrode and applying an electrical current between the electrode and a shroud, roughness elements and spaces therebetween are formed in the cooling surface in opposition to the insulating and non-insulating portions of the electrode, hence increasing the surface area and heat transfer coefficient of the shroud.

  5. The Complexity of Rivers in Triangulated Terrains Pankaj Agarwal 1 Mark de Berg 2 Prosenjit Bose 3 Katrin Dobrint 2 Marc van Kreveld 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bose, Prosenjit

    The Complexity of Rivers in Triangulated Terrains Pankaj Agarwal 1 Mark de Berg 2 Prosenjit Bose 3 \\Theta(n 3 ) worst­case complexity, where complexity is measured in the number of line segments that make into the stream. Road building, logging, or other activities carried out in a watershed all have the potential

  6. Proceedings IEEE Visualization '99, pages 291298, cIEEE Computer Society Press, 1999. LOD-Sprite Technique for Accelerated Terrain Rendering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swan II, J. Edward

    -Sprite Technique for Accelerated Terrain Rendering Baoquan Chen½ SUNY at Stony Brook J. Edward Swan II¾ Naval rendering technique, termed LOD-sprite render- ing, which uses a combination of a level-of-detail (LOD) represen- tation of the scene together with reusing image sprites (previously rendered images). Our primary

  7. The shallow geologic features of the upper continental slope, northern Gulf of Mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buck, Arvo Viktor

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    region of the upper continental slope in the Gulf of Mexico lying immediately west of the Mississippi Trough (Fig. 1). water depths range from 150 m (500 ft) to a maximum of 1200 m (4000 ft). The area is centered on 28 00'N, 90'30'W, with the eastern... extremity being the western margin of the Mississippi Trough. The area is approximately 155 km by 55 km (96 mi by 33 mi) in size. The seismic data within the region were collected along lines of a 6. 4 km by 6. 4 km grid. +30~ 88' 0/I, ' oo goo ooo...

  8. The shallow geologic features of the upper continental slope, northern Gulf of Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buck, Arvo Viktor

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    region of the upper continental slope in the Gulf of Mexico lying immediately west of the Mississippi Trough (Fig. 1). water depths range from 150 m (500 ft) to a maximum of 1200 m (4000 ft). The area is centered on 28 00'N, 90'30'W, with the eastern... extremity being the western margin of the Mississippi Trough. The area is approximately 155 km by 55 km (96 mi by 33 mi) in size. The seismic data within the region were collected along lines of a 6. 4 km by 6. 4 km grid. +30~ 88' 0/I, ' oo goo ooo...

  9. STUDY OF TRANSPORTATION OF GTL PRODUCTS FROM ALASKAN NORTH SLOPE (ANS) TO MARKETS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Godwin A. Chukwu, Ph.D., P.E.

    2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Alaskan North Slope is one of the largest hydrocarbon reserves in the US where Gas-to-Liquids (GTL) technology can be successfully implemented. The proven and recoverable reserves of conventional natural gas in the developed and undeveloped fields in the Alaskan North Slope (ANS) are estimated to be 38 trillion standard cubic feet (TCF) and estimates of additional undiscovered gas reserves in the Arctic field range from 64 TCF to 142 TCF. Transportation of the natural gas from the remote ANS is the key issue in effective utilization of this valuable and abundance resource. The throughput of oil through the Trans Alaska Pipeline System (TAPS) has been on decline and is expected to continue to decline in future. It is projected that by the year 2015, ANS crude oil production will decline to such a level that there will be a critical need for pumping additional liquid from GTL process to provide an adequate volume for economic operation of TAPS. The pumping of GTL products through TAPS will significantly increase its economic life. Transporting GTL products from the North Slope of Alaska down to the Marine terminal at Valdez is no doubt the great challenge facing the Gas to Liquids options of utilizing the abundant natural gas resource of the North Slope. The primary purpose of this study was to evaluate and assess the economic feasibility of transporting GTL products through the TAPS. Material testing program for GTL and GTL/Crude oil blends was designed and implemented for measurement of physical properties of GTL products. The measurement and evaluation of the properties of these materials were necessary so as to access the feasibility of transporting such materials through TAPS under cold arctic conditions. Results of the tests indicated a trend of increasing yield strength with increasing wax content. GTL samples exhibited high gel strengths at temperatures as high as 20 F, which makes it difficult for cold restart following winter shutdowns. Simplified analytical models were developed to study the flow of GTL and GTL/crude oil blends through TAPS in both commingled and batch flow models. The economics of GTL transportations by either commingled or batching mode were evaluated. The choice of mode of transportation of GTL products through TAPS would depend on the expected purity of the product and a trade-off between loss in product value due to contamination and cost of keeping the product pure at the discharge terminal.

  10. Sandia Energy - Alaskan North Slope Climate: Hard Data from a Hard Place

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection245C Unlimited ReleaseWelcome ton6 thCONTRACTORSAlaskan North Slope

  11. Energy production rates in fluid mixtures of inelastic rough hard spheres

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrés Santos; Gilberto M. Kremer; Vicente Garzó

    2010-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The aim of this work is to explore the combined effect of polydispersity and roughness on the partial energy production rates and on the total cooling rate of a granular fluid mixture. We consider a mixture of inelastic rough hard spheres of different number densities, masses, diameters, moments of inertia, and mutual coefficients of normal and tangential restitution. Starting from the first equation of the BBGKY hierarchy, the collisional energy production rates associated with the translational and rotational temperatures ($T_i^\\text{tr}$ and $T_i^\\text{rot}$) are expressed in terms of two-body average values. Next, those average values are estimated by assuming a velocity distribution function based on maximum-entropy arguments, allowing us to express the energy production rates and the total cooling rate in terms of the partial temperatures and the parameters of the mixture. Finally, the results are applied to the homogeneous cooling state of a binary mixture and the influence of inelasticity and roughness on the temperature ratios $T_1^\\text{tr}/T_1^\\text{rot}$, $T_2^\\text{tr}/T_1^\\text{tr}$, and $T_2^\\text{rot}/T_1^\\text{rot}$ is analyzed.

  12. Construction of an innovative retaining wall and slope protection for controlling erosion of asbestos in soil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lynn, C.G.

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental Resources Management (ERM) is constructing an innovative H-Pile retaining wall and slope protection to control erosion of soil mixed with asbestos-containing material (ACM) along a half-mile long section of a flowing creek in a metropolitan area. Former manufacturing plants adjacent to the creek historically produced ACM-reinforced construction materials. ACM was apparently used as subgrade fill consistent with industry practices at the time, and when manufacturing ceased, the site was closed with approval by the state and the U.S. EPA. Erosion along the creek has resulted in exposure of the ACM and the need to stabilize the bank due to backwater flooding and storm water discharge from a large urban area. Through a cooperative effort among the state regulatory agency, the municipal sewer district, the U.S. Army Corps. of Engineers (USACOE), and the local community, construction is in progress for an H-Pile beam and concrete lagging wall that extends the length of the project reach. Behind the wall, cabled concrete mats are placed over the graded slope to stabilize ACM-bearing soil. Premier to the success of the project is protecting the environment from release of ACM during construction, and minimizing the disturbance of ACM-bearing soil. Unique soil sampling, testing, and handling procedures were negotiated through the state's voluntary cleanup program, with the intent of receiving a No Further Action letter for the completed project.

  13. TRANSPORTATION ISSUES IN THE DELIVERY OF GTL PRODUCTS FROM ALASKAN NORTH SLOPE TO MARKET

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Godwin Chukwu

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Alaskan North Slope (ANS) is one of the largest hydrocarbon reserves in the United States where Gas-to-Liquids (GTL) technology can be successfully implemented. The proven and recoverable reserves of conventional natural gas in the developed and undeveloped fields in the Alaskan North Slope (ANS) are estimated to be 38 trillion standard cubic feet (TCF) and estimates of additional undiscovered gas reserves in the Arctic field range from 64 TCF to 142 TCF. Because the domestic gas market in the continental United States is located thousands of miles from the ANS, transportation of the natural gas from the remote ANS to the market is the key issue in effective utilization of this valuable and abundant resource. The focus of this project is to study the operational challenges involved in transporting the gas in converted liquid (GTL) form through the existing Trans Alaska Pipeline System (TAPS). A three-year, comprehensive research program was undertaken by the Petroleum Development Laboratory, University of Alaska Fairbanks, under cooperative agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40016 to study the feasibility of transporting GTL products through TAPS. Cold restart of TAPS following an extended winter shutdown and solids deposition in the pipeline were identified as the main transportation issues in moving GTL products through the pipeline. The scope of work in the current project (Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-01NT41248) included preparation of fluid samples for the experiments to be conducted to augment the comprehensive research program.

  14. The Effects of Roof Membrane Color on Moisture Accumulation in Low-slope Commercial Roof Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kehrer, Manfred [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of highly reflective roof membrane systems is being promoted and in some cases required in energy codes and green building codes and standards. Highly reflective membranes, which typically are light in color, have demonstrated reduced overall energy consumption in cooling dominated climate. These membranes also are theorized to reduce the heat island effect. Concern has been expressed about using highly reflective roof membrane systems in cool to cold climate zones because they potentially increase moisture accumulation in roof systems. Roof membranes are vapor retarders. The theory is that highly reflective membranes reflect the heat that could enter the roof assembly, potentially providing a condensing surface on the cold side of the roof assembly during winter months. The other concern is that roof systems using highly reflective membranes will not get hot enough during the summer months to dry out moisture that may have condensed or otherwise entered the roof assembly. This study focuses on mechanically attached, highly reflective, single-ply roof systems installed on low-slope (less than 2:12) structures in cool to cold climate zones. Three sources of data are considered when determining the moisture accumulation potential of these systems. 1.Test roof cuts taken during the winter months 2.Modeling data from a building envelope model specifically designed to evaluate moisture accumulation 3.Data from previous studies to determine the effects of roof membrane color on the drying rate of low-slope roof assemblies

  15. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from the North Slope Alaska (NSA) Site

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is the largest global change research program supported by the U.S. Department of Energy. The primary goal of the ARM Program is to improve the treatment of cloud and radiation physics in global climate models in order to improve the climate simulation capabilities of these models. To achieve this goal, ARM scientists and researchers around the world use continuous data obtained through the ARM Climate Research Facility. ARM maintains four major, permanent sites for data collection and deploys the ARM Mobile Facility to other sites as determined. The North Slope of Alaska (NSA) site is a permanent site providing data about cloud and radiative processes at high latitudes. These data are being used to refine models and parameterizations as they relate to the Arctic. Centered at Barrow and extending to the south (to the vicinity of Atqasuk), west (to the vicinity of Wainwright), and east (towards Oliktok), the NSA site has become a focal point for atmospheric and ecological research activity on the North Slope. Approximately 300,000 NSA data sets from 1993 to the present reside in the ARM Archive at http://www.archive.arm.gov/. Users will need to register for a password, but all files are then free for viewing or downloading. The ARM Archive physically resides at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  16. Photoisomerization for a model protonated Schiff base in solution: Sloped/peaked conical intersection perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malhado, Joao Pedro [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, CP 66318, 05314-970 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Hynes, James T. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0215 (United States); Chemistry Department, Ecole Normale Superieure, UMR ENS-CNRS-UPMC 8640, 24 rue Lhomond, 75005 Paris (France)

    2012-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The topographical character of conical intersections (CIs)-either sloped or peaked-has played a fundamental and important role in the discussion of the efficiency of CIs as photochemical 'funnels.' Here this perspective is employed in connection with a recent study of a model protonated Schiff base (PSB) cis to trans photoisomerization in solution [Malhado et al., J. Phys. Chem. A 115, 3720 (2011)]. In that study, the calculated reduced photochemical quantum yield for the successful production of trans product versus cis reactant in acetonitrile solvent compared to water was interpreted in terms of a dynamical solvent effect related to the dominance, for the acetonitrile case, of S{sub 1} to S{sub 0} nonadiabatic transitions prior to the reaching the seam of CIs. The solvent influence on the quantum yield is here re-examined in the sloped/peaked CI topographical perspective via conversion of the model's two PSB internal coordinates and a nonequilibrium solvent coordinate into an effective branching space description, which is then used to re-analyze the generalized Langevin equation/surface hopping results. The present study supports the original interpretation and enriches it in terms of topographical detail.

  17. Determination of Limit Cycles Using Both the Slope of Correlation Integral and Dominant Lyapunov Methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Castillo, Rogelio; Alonso, Gustavo; Palacios, Javier C. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (Mexico)

    2004-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for nonlinear analysis of instabilities in boiling water reactors (BWRs) is presented. Both the Dominant Lyapunov Exponent method and the Slope of the Correlation Integral (SOCI) method are used to analyze the average power reactor monitor (APRM) signals from a BWR. The main advantage of using the two methods in a complementary manner is that doing so results in an enhancement of the capability to analyze noisy systems, such as the APRM signals in a BWR. Previously, such nonlinear analysis had been performed using independently either the Dominant Lyapunov Exponent Method or the SOCI method. These two methods are sensitive to noise in a signal and normally require large amounts of data for a reliable analysis.This proposed system for nonlinear analysis is composed first of a home-developed computer program called 'SLOPE', which is based on the SOCI method. Then, the signal analysis is also performed by the 'LENNS' code, which is used to obtain the dominant Lyapunov exponent. Since only the dominant Lyapunov exponent is computed, there is no need to acquire large amounts of data; thus, computational processing time is greatly reduced, even in the case of noisy data.The system was used to analyze BWR signals containing stationary and nonstationary limit cycles. It was found that this method satisfactorily calculates the limit cycles, extracting useful information from noisy signals.

  18. Effect of the porosity on the fracture surface roughness of sintered materials: From anisotropic to isotropic self-affine scaling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tristan Cambonie; Jonathan Bares; Lamine Hattali; Daniel Bonamy; Véronique Lazarus; Harold Auradou

    2015-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    To unravel how the microstructure affects the fracture surface roughness in heterogeneous brittle solids like rocks or ceramics, we characterized the roughness statistics of post-mortem fracture surfaces in home-made materials of adjustable microstructure length-scale and porosity, obtained by sintering monodisperse polystyrene beads. Beyond the characteristic size of disorder, the roughness profiles are found to exhibit self-affine scaling features evolving with porosity. Starting from a null value and increasing the porosity, we quantitatively modify the self-affine scaling properties from anisotropic (at low porosity) to isotropic (for porosity larger than 10 %).

  19. Single-layer MoS{sub 2} roughness and sliding friction quenching by interaction with atomically flat substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quereda, J. [Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Madrid E-28049 (Spain); Castellanos-Gomez, A. [Kavli Institute of Nanoscience, Delft University of Technology, Lorentzweg 1, 2628 CJ Delft (Netherlands); Agraït, N. [Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Madrid E-28049 (Spain); Instituto Madrileño de Estudios Avanzados en Nanociencia, IMDEA-Nanociencia, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales Nicolás Cabrera, Campus de Cantoblanco, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Condensed Matter Physics Center (IFIMAC), Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Rubio-Bollinger, G., E-mail: gabino.rubio@uam.es [Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Madrid E-28049 (Spain); Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales Nicolás Cabrera, Campus de Cantoblanco, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Condensed Matter Physics Center (IFIMAC), Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, E-28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We experimentally study the surface roughness and the lateral friction force in single-layer MoS{sub 2} crystals deposited on different substrates: SiO{sub 2}, mica, and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN). Roughness and sliding friction measurements are performed by atomic force microscopy. We find a strong dependence of the MoS{sub 2} roughness on the underlying substrate material, being h-BN the substrate which better preserves the flatness of the MoS{sub 2} crystal. The lateral friction also lowers as the roughness decreases, and attains its lowest value for MoS{sub 2} flakes on h-BN substrates. However, it is still higher than for the surface of a bulk MoS{sub 2} crystal, which we attribute to the deformation of the flake due to competing tip-to-flake and flake-to-substrate interactions.

  20. A New Multi-Gaussian Auto-Correlation Function for the Modeling of Realistic Shot Peened Random Rough Surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hassan, W. [Honeywell Aerospace, 111 S. 34th Street, M/S 503-118 Phoenix, AZ 85034 (United States); Blodgett, M. [Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL/MLLP), 2230 10th Street, Suite 1, Dayton, OH 45433 (United States)

    2006-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Shot peening is the primary surface treatment used to create a uniform, consistent, and reliable sub-surface compressive residual stress layer in aero engine components. A by-product of the shot peening process is random surface roughness that can affect the measurements of the resulting residual stresses and therefore impede their NDE assessment. High frequency eddy current conductivity measurements have the potential to assess these residual stresses in Ni-base super alloys. However, the effect of random surface roughness is expected to become significant in the desired measurement frequency range of 10 to 100 MHz. In this paper, a new Multi-Gaussian (MG) auto-correlation function is proposed for modeling the resulting pseudo-random rough profiles. Its use in the calculation of the Apparent Eddy Current Conductivity (AECC) loss due to surface roughness is demonstrated. The numerical results presented need to be validated with experimental measurements.

  1. Physical and Chemical Implications of Mid-Winter Pumping of Trunda Lakes - North Slope, Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hinzman, Larry D. (University of Alaska Fairbanks, Water and Environmental Research Center); Lilly, Michael R. (Geo-Watersheds Scientific); Kane, Douglas L. (University of Alaska Fairbanks, Water and Environmental Research Center); Miller, D. Dan (University of Alaska Fairbanks, Water and Environmental Research Center); Galloway, Braden K. (University of Alaska Fairbanks, Water and Environmental Research Center); Hilton, Kristie M. (Geo-Watersheds Scientific); White, Daniel M. (University of Alaska Fairbanks, Water and Environmental Research Center)

    2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Tundra lakes on the North Slope, Alaska, are an important resource for energy development and petroleum field operations. A majority of exploration activities, pipeline maintenance, and restoration activities take place on winter ice roads that depend on water availability at key times of the winter operating season. These same lakes provide important fisheries and ecosystem functions. In particular, overwintering habitat for fish is one important management concern. This study focused on the evaluation of winter water use in the current field operating areas to provide a better understanding of the current water use practices. It found that under the current water use practices, there were no measurable negative effects of winter pumping on the lakes studied and current water use management practices were appropriately conservative. The study did find many areas where improvements in the understanding of tundra lake hydrology and water usage would benefit industry, management agencies, and the protection of fisheries and ecosystems.

  2. Turbulent Friction in Rough Pipes and the Energy Spectrum of the Phenomenological Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Gioia; Pinaki Chakraborty

    2005-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The classical experiments on turbulent friction in rough pipes were performed by J. Nikuradse in the 1930's. Seventy years later, they continue to defy theory. Here we model Nikuradse's experiments using the phenomenological theory of Kolmog\\'orov, a theory that is widely thought to be applicable only to highly idealized flows. Our results include both the empirical scalings of Blasius and Strickler, and are otherwise in minute qualitative agreement with the experiments; they suggest that the phenomenological theory may be relevant to other flows of practical interest; and they unveil the existence of close ties between two milestones of experimental and theoretical turbulence.

  3. Investigation of wall friction in noncircular ducts with a rough liner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tyler, John Charles

    1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    section Density Viscosity Dimensions L5/Q L/Q m/L& m/LQ 1. The friction factors, Reynolds numbers, and. abso- lute roughnesses for fluid flow in ducts having a glass fiber liner have been calculated and plotted in the form of characteristic... distributed, it is essential that the wall friction phenomena associated with the particular duct design be understood. When fluid is passed through a duct, a static pressure drop occurs due to the friction forces which act between the fluid. particles...

  4. Ant Colony Optimization of Rough Set for HV Bushings Fault Detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mpanza, J L

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Most transformer failures are attributed to bushings failures. Hence it is necessary to monitor the condition of bushings. In this paper three methods are developed to monitor the condition of oil filled bushing. Multi-layer perceptron (MLP), Radial basis function (RBF) and Rough Set (RS) models are developed and combined through majority voting to form a committee. The MLP performs better that the RBF and the RS is terms of classification accuracy. The RBF is the fasted to train. The committee performs better than the individual models. The diversity of models is measured to evaluate their similarity when used in the committee.

  5. Laboratory measurements of the drying rates of low-slope roofing systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Desjarlais, A.O.; Kyle, D.M.; Childs, P.W.; Christian, J.E.

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The service life of a roofing system typically ends when excessive amounts of water have entered the system. Roofing professionals determine whether the existing failed roofing system can be repaired or salvaged by recovering. A key element in this decision is whether the accumulated water will be able to leave the roofing system in a time frame that will prevent irreparable structural damage. There are several combined heat and mass transfer models that can be used to predict drying times for low-slope roofing systems. Very little experimental data exists that can be used to validate the performance of these models. To satisfy these needs, a series of laboratory experiments has been performed. Five test panels, comprised of a plywood deck, four types of roofing insulation, and a single ply membrane were installed in a climate simulator. The test panels were outfitted with temperature sensors and heat flux transducers, and were mounted on load cells. Water was added to the test panels and they were subjected to external diurnal cycles representative of summer and winter conditions for a southern US continental climate. The load cells supplied continuous records of the weights of the test panels; these data were used to compute the drying rates of the test panels. When these experiments were completed, the test panels were ``recovered`` with different thicknesses of insulation and the environmental conditions were reapplied to the test panels. This paper reports on the design and performance of these experiments. The data compiled during these tests supply insight into the effects of meteorological conditions, insulation R-value, insulation water vapor permeance, and roof recover on the rate that water will be removed from low-slope roofing systems.

  6. Alaska North Slope National Energy Strategy initiative: Analysis of five undeveloped fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, C.P.; Allaire, R.B.; Doughty, T.C.; Faulder, D.D.; Irving, J.S.; Jamison, H.C.; White, G.J.

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy was directed in the National Energy Strategy to establish a federal interagency task force to identify specific technical and regulatory barriers to the development of five undeveloped North Slope Alaska fields and make recommendations for their resolution. The five fields are West Sak, Point Thomson, Gwydyr Bay, Seal Island/Northstar, and Sandpiper Island. Analysis of environmental, regulatory, technical, and economic information, and data relating to the development potential of the five fields leads to the following conclusions: Development of the five fields would result in an estimated total of 1,055 million barrels of oil and 4.4 trillion cubic feet of natural gas and total investment of $9.4 billion in 1992 dollars. It appears that all five of the fields will remain economically marginal developments unless there is significant improvement in world oil prices. Costs of regulatory compliance and mitigation, and costs to reduce or maintain environmental impacts at acceptable levels influence project investments and operating costs and must be considered in the development decision making process. The development of three of the fields (West Sak, Point Thomson, and Gwydyr Bay) that are marginally feasible would have an impact on North Slope production over the period from about 2000 to 2014 but cannot replace the decline in Prudhoe Bay Unit production or maintain the operation of the Trans-Alaska Pipeline System (TAPS) beyond about 2014 with the assumption that the TAPS will shut down when production declines to the range of 400 to 200 thousand barrels of oil/day. Recoverable reserves left in the ground in the currently producing fields and soon to be developed fields, Niakuk and Point McIntyre, would range from 1 billion to 500 million barrels of oil corresponding to the time period of 2008 to 2014 based on the TAPS shutdown assumption.

  7. Erosion control on a steeply sloped pipeline right-of-way in southwestern Pennsylvania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zellmer, S.D.; Edgar, D.E. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA)); Isaacson, H.R. (Gas Research Inst., Chicago, IL (USA))

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of precipitation on steeply sloped pipeline rights-of-way (ROWs) during the time between ROW rehabilitation and the establishment of a dense, self-sustaining vegetative ground cover can cause locally severe soil erosion. This erosion results in elevated sediment loads in receiving streams and increases the difficulty and costs of ROW maintenance. A field study was completed that compared the environmental effectiveness of nine treatments on a 28% ROW slope in southwestern Pennsylvania. The six erosion-control methods investigated in the study, selected to represent a wide range in material type and installation cost, were (1) heavy application of straw mulch, (2) light application of straw mulch, (3) processed wood fiber, (4) chemical soil binder, (5) paper strips in netting, and (6) light straw mulch with a tacking agent. Each of the test plots also received the basic treatment of limestone, fertilizer, and a seed mixture commonly used to rehabilitate ROWs in the region. Precipitation, runoff volumes, and sediment yields were measured on each of 51 plots for 45 precipitation events during the 18-month study. Vegetation data were collected by the point-intercept method four times during the study to determine the amount of plant cover and species composition. Differences in sediment yield were observed among methods and between ROW location, but plant cover development was not influenced by erosion-control method or location. The relationship between environmental and cost data indicated that, of the six erosion-control methods tested, a light application of straw mulch was the most effective erosion-control treatment. 19 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  8. Theoretical analysis of reflected ray error from surface slope error and their application to the solar concentrated collector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Weidong

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Surface slope error of concentrator is one of the main factors to influence the performance of the solar concentrated collectors which cause deviation of reflected ray and reduce the intercepted radiation. This paper presents the general equation to calculate the standard deviation of reflected ray error from slope error through geometry optics, applying the equation to calculate the standard deviation of reflected ray error for 5 kinds of solar concentrated reflector, provide typical results. The results indicate that the slope error is transferred to the reflected ray in more than 2 folds when the incidence angle is more than 0. The equation for reflected ray error is generally fit for all reflection surfaces, and can also be applied to control the error in designing an abaxial optical system.

  9. A comparison of cloud properties at a coastal and inland site at the North Slope of Alaska

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jakob, Christian

    (Barrow) and an inland (Atqasuk) location on the North Slope of Alaska using microwave radiometer (MWR) data collected by the U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program contaminated by wet windows on the MWRs were employed to extract high-quality data suitable for this study

  10. Radiation dose reduction in medical CT through equally sloped tomography Benjamin P. Fahimian1,2,6

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soatto, Stefano

    Council on Radiation Protection & Measurements10 , CT accounts for about 15% of the total radiological50Radiation dose reduction in medical CT through equally sloped tomography Benjamin P. Fahimian1 Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 3 Biomedical Physics

  11. Quadratic Program based Control of Fully-Actuated Transfemoral Prosthesis for Flat-Ground and Up-Slope Locomotion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ames, Aaron

    Quadratic Program based Control of Fully-Actuated Transfemoral Prosthesis for Flat-Ground and Up to achieve flat-ground and up-slope walking on a fully-actuated above-knee prosthesis. CLF based quadratic--implemented as a feed-forward term--the end result is a prosthesis controller that utilizes only local information while

  12. DESIGN OF A FAILED LANDFILL SLOPE By: Timothy D. Stark, W. Douglas Evans-, and Paul E. Sherry'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DESIGN OF A FAILED LANDFILL SLOPE 1 ~) ~ ~ By: Timothy D. Stark, W. Douglas Evans-, and Paul E solid waste landfill in which lateral displacements of up to 900 ft (275 m) and vertical settlements municipal solid waste landfill occupies 135 acres (546 km 2 ) approximately 9 miles (15.3 km) n

  13. An analysis of cattle-farming in the coffee producing area of the Pacific Slope in Guatemala

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cordon, Oscar Humberto

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    new native species which can be es- tablished and to maintain grass-legume mixtures for the production of herbage with higher protein and mineral con- tent. Thus far, the most promising legume in the Pacific slope is Tropical Kudzu (Pueraria...

  14. Resonant Generation of Internal Waves on a Model Continental Slope H. P. Zhang, B. King, and Harry L. Swinney

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin. University of

    within a thin boundary layer above the bottom surface. The resonant wave is unstable because of strong for the intense boundary flows on continental slopes. DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.100.244504 PACS numbers: 47.35.Bb waves in the oceans are generated by oscillatory tides flowing over ocean to- pography

  15. Seasonal variability of water masses and transport on the Antarctic continental shelf and slope in the southeastern Weddell Sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    transport of cold, fresh surface waters onto the continental shelf. Offshore, the warmer, saltier Warm DeepSeasonal variability of water masses and transport on the Antarctic continental shelf and slope masses and transport in the region. Rapid fluctuations in temperature and salinity throughout the year

  16. Effect of roof slope and thickness on the performance of a saltstone vault

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, A.D.; Lam, Poh-Sang; Hsu, R.H.

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At the Savannah River Site, low-level radioactive decontaminated salt solution is mixed with slag, flyash, and cement to form a grout-like material called ``Saltstone.`` The Saltstone is poured into concrete vaults constructed at the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF). The SDF is designed for the release of contaminants in a slow, controlled manner over thousands of years. The impact of SDF on groundwater has been studied in a radiological performance assessment (PA). Groundwater models were used to predict the fluid flow and contaminant transport at SDF. The models predicted a spatial contaminant concentration distribution in groundwater as a function of time. This study focuses on the roof configuration of Saltstone vault, with special interests in cost-effectiveness. We conducted a study to evaluate the effect of roof slope and thickness on the performance of a Saltstone vault. Four roof configurations were simulated. The tool used for the simulation was ECLIPSE, a finite-difference petroleum reservoir engineering code with an environmental tracer option. Nitrate was used as the ``tracer`` contaminant. In this study, ECLIPSE solves the two-phase two-dimensional flow and transport problem up to 10,000 years. This paper describes a modeling study used to evaluate roof design options for the Saltstone vault.

  17. Geology, reservoir engineering and methane hydrate potential of the Walakpa Gas Field, North Slope, Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glenn, R.K.; Allen, W.W.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Walakpa Gas Field, located near the city of Barrow on Alaska's North Slope, has been proven to be methane-bearing at depths of 2000--2550 feet below sea level. The producing formation is a laterally continuous, south-dipping, Lower Cretaceous shelf sandstone. The updip extent of the reservoir has not been determined by drilling, but probably extends to at least 1900 feet below sea level. Reservoir temperatures in the updip portion of the reservoir may be low enough to allow the presence of in situ methane hydrates. Reservoir net pay however, decreases to the north. Depths to the base of permafrost in the area average 940 feet. Drilling techniques and production configuration in the Walakpa field were designed to minimize formation damage to the reservoir sandstone and to eliminate methane hydrates formed during production. Drilling development of the Walakpa field was a sequential updip and lateral stepout from a previously drilled, structurally lower confirmation well. Reservoir temperature, pressure, and gas chemistry data from the development wells confirm that they have been drilled in the free-methane portion of the reservoir. Future studies in the Walakpa field are planned to determine whether or not a component of the methane production is due to the dissociation of updip in situ hydrates.

  18. Steep-Slope Assembly Testing of Clay and Concrete Tile With and Without Cool Pigmented Colors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, William A [ORNL

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cool color pigments and sub-tile venting of clay and concrete tile roofs significantly impact the heat flow crossing the roof deck of a steep-slope roof. Field measures for the tile roofs revealed a 70% drop in the peak heat flow crossing the deck as compared to a direct-nailed asphalt shingle roof. The Tile Roofing Institute (TRI) and its affiliate members are keenly interested in documenting the magnitude of the drop for obtaining solar reflectance credits with state and federal "cool roof" building efficiency standards. Tile roofs are direct-nailed or are attached to a deck with batten or batten and counter-batten construction. S-Misson clay and concrete tile roofs, a medium-profile concrete tile roof, and a flat slate tile roof were installed on fully nstrumented attic test assemblies. Temperature measures of the roof, deck, attic, and ceiling, heat flows, solar reflectance, thermal emittance, and the ambient weather were recorded for each of the tile roofs and also on an adjacent attic cavity covered with a conventional pigmented and directnailed asphalt shingle roof. ORNL measured the tile's underside temperature and the bulk air temperature and heat flows just underneath the tile for batten and counter-batten tile systems and compared the results to the conventional asphalt shingle.

  19. Organic photosensitive cells grown on rough electrode with nano-scale morphology control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yang, Fan (Piscataway, NJ); Forrest, Stephen R. (Ann Arbor, MI)

    2011-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    An optoelectronic device and a method for fabricating the optoelectronic device includes a first electrode disposed on a substrate, an exposed surface of the first electrode having a root mean square roughness of at least 30 nm and a height variation of at least 200 nm, the first electrode being transparent. A conformal layer of a first organic semiconductor material is deposited onto the first electrode by organic vapor phase deposition, the first organic semiconductor material being a small molecule material. A layer of a second organic semiconductor material is deposited over the conformal layer. At least some of the layer of the second organic semiconductor material directly contacts the conformal layer. A second electrode is deposited over the layer of the second organic semiconductor material. The first organic semiconductor material is of a donor-type or an acceptor-type relative to the second organic semiconductor material, which is of the other material type.

  20. Light emitting diode with high aspect ratio submicron roughness for light extraction and methods of forming

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Li, Ting (Ventura, CA)

    2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The surface morphology of an LED light emitting surface is changed by applying a reactive ion etch (RIE) process to the light emitting surface. High aspect ratio, submicron roughness is formed on the light emitting surface by transferring a thin film metal hard-mask having submicron patterns to the surface prior to applying a reactive ion etch process. The submicron patterns in the metal hard-mask can be formed using a low cost, commercially available nano-patterned template which is transferred to the surface with the mask. After subsequently binding the mask to the surface, the template is removed and the RIE process is applied for time duration sufficient to change the morphology of the surface. The modified surface contains non-symmetric, submicron structures having high aspect ratio which increase the efficiency of the device.

  1. Light emitting diode with high aspect ratio submicron roughness for light extraction and methods of forming

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Li, Ting

    2013-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The surface morphology of an LED light emitting surface is changed by applying a reactive ion etch (RIE) process to the light emitting surface. High aspect ratio, submicron roughness is formed on the light emitting surface by transferring a thin film metal hard-mask having submicron patterns to the surface prior to applying a reactive ion etch process. The submicron patterns in the metal hard-mask can be formed using a low cost, commercially available nano-patterned template which is transferred to the surface with the mask. After subsequently binding the mask to the surface, the template is removed and the RIE process is applied for time duration sufficient to change the morphology of the surface. The modified surface contains non-symmetric, submicron structures having high aspect ratio which increase the efficiency of the device.

  2. Water-waves modes trapped in a canal by a body with the rough surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Cardone; T. Durante; S. A. Nazarov

    2009-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The problem about a body in a three dimensional infinite channel is considered in the framework of the theory of linear water-waves. The body has a rough surface characterized by a small parameter $\\epsilon>0$ while the distance of the body to the water surface is also of order $\\epsilon$. Under a certain symmetry assumption, the accumulation effect for trapped mode frequencies is established, namely, it is proved that, for any given $d>0$ and integer $N>0$, there exists $\\epsilon(d,N)>0$ such that the problem has at least $N$ eigenvalues in the interval $(0,d)$ of the continuous spectrum in the case $\\epsilon\\in(0,\\epsilon(d,N)) $. The corresponding eigenfunctions decay exponentially at infinity, have finite energy, and imply trapped modes.

  3. Surface Roughness of Stainless Steel Bender Mirrors for FocusingSoft X-rays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; Gullikson, Eric M.; Howells, Malcolm R.; Irick, Steve C.; MacDowell, Alastair A.; McKinney, Wayne R.; Salmassi,Farhad; Warwick, Tony; Metz, James P.; Tonnessen, Thomas W.

    2005-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We have used polished stainless steel as a mirror substrate to provide focusing of soft x-rays in grazing incidence reflection. The substrate is bent to an elliptical shape with large curvature and high stresses in the substrate require a strong elastic material. Conventional material choices of silicon or of glass will not withstand the stress required. The use of steel allows the substrates to be polished and installed flat, using screws in tapped holes. The ultra-high-vacuum bender mechanism is motorized and computer controlled. These mirrors are used to deliver focused beams of soft x-rays onto the surface of a sample for experiments at the Advanced Light Source (ALS). They provide an illumination field that can be as small as the mirror demagnification allows, for localized study, and can be enlarged, under computer control,for survey measurements over areas of the surface up to several millimeters. The critical issue of the quality of the steel surface, polished and coated with gold, which limits the minimum achievable focused spot size is discussed in detail. Comparison is made to a polished, gold coated, electroless nickel surface, which provides a smoother finish. Surface measurements are presented as power spectral densities, as a function of spatial frequency. The surface height distributions measured with an interferometric microscope, and complemented by atomic force microscope measurements, are used to compute power spectral densities and then to evaluate the surface roughness. The effects of roughness in reducing the specular reflectivity are verified by soft x-ray measurements.

  4. Roughness of the SiC/SiO{sub 2} vicinal interface and atomic structure of the transition layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Peizhi; Li, Guoliang; Duscher, Gerd, E-mail: gduscher@utk.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States); Sharma, Yogesh K.; Ahyi, Ayayi C.; Isaacs-Smith, Tamara; Williams, John R.; Dhar, Sarit [Department of Physics, Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama 36849 (United States)

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The SiC/SiO{sub 2} interface is generally considered to be the cause for the reduced electron mobility of SiC power devices. Previous studies have shown a correlation between the mobility and the transition layer width at the SiC/SiO{sub 2} interface. The authors investigated this interface with atomic resolution Z-contrast imaging and electron energy-loss spectroscopy, and discovered that this transition region was due to the roughness of the vicinal interface. The roughness of a vicinal interface consisted of atomic steps and facets deviating from the ideal off-axis cut plane. The authors conclude that this roughness is limiting the mobility in the channels of SiC MOSFETs.

  5. Detailed comparative study and a mechanistic model of resuspension of spherical particles from rough and smooth surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shnapp, Ron

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Resuspension of solid particles by a tornado-like vortex from surfaces of different roughness is studied using a three-dimensional particle tracking velocimetry (3D-PTV) method. By utilizing the three-dimensional information on particle positions, velocities and accelerations before, during and after the resuspension (lift-off) event, we demonstrate that the resuspension efficiency is significantly higher from the rough surface, and propose a mechanistic model of this peculiar effect. The results indicate that for all Reynolds numbers tested, the resuspension rate, as well as particle velocities and accelerations, are higher over the rough surface, as compared to the smooth counterpart. The results and the model can help to improve modeling and analysis of resuspension rates in engineering and environmental applications.

  6. Backfill Stress and Strain Information within a Centrifuge Geosynthetic-Reinforced Slope Model under Working Stress and Large Soil Strain Conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    Backfill Stress and Strain Information within a Centrifuge Geosynthetic-Reinforced Slope Model with a centrifuge test are used to investigate the mobilization of backfill stress and strain within a geosynthetic a centrifuge GRS slope model. Numerical results indicate that soil stress mobilization can be described

  7. An alternative to the determination of the effective zero point in instrumented indentation: use of the slope of the indentation curve at indentation load values

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    of the slope of the indentation curve at indentation load values P. Brammer1,2,* , O. Bartier1 , X. Hernot1 , G on instrumented indentation rely on the knowledge of the indentation load-penetration depth curve corresponding which is based on the slope of the indentation curve at indentation load values and provides accurate

  8. Design of robotic quadruped legs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKenzie, Jacob Elijah

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Prized for their performance on prepared surfaces, wheeled vehicles are often limited in mobility by rough and unstructured terrain. Conversely, systems that rely on legs have shown promising rough terrain performance but ...

  9. The impact of new short season rice varieties on drying and storage of rough rice in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhagia, Gobind Shewakram

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE IMPACT OF NEW SHORT SEASON RICE VARIETIES ON DRYING AND STORAGE OF ROUGH RICE IN TEXAS A Thesis by GOBIND SHEWAKRAM BHAGIA Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE January 1967 Ma)or Sub/ect: Agricultural Economics THE IMPACT OF NEW SHORT SEASON RICE VARIETIES ON DRYING AND STORAGE OF ROUGH RICE IN TEXAS A Thesis by GOBIND SHEWAKIUiM BHAGIA Approved as to style and oontent by...

  10. Evaluation of Wax Deposition and Its Control During Production of Alaska North Slope Oils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tao Zhu; Jack A. Walker; J. Liang

    2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Due to increasing oil demand, oil companies are moving into arctic environments and deep-water areas for oil production. In these regions of lower temperatures, wax deposits begin to form when the temperature in the wellbore falls below wax appearance temperature (WAT). This condition leads to reduced production rates and larger pressure drops. Wax problems in production wells are very costly due to production down time for removal of wax. Therefore, it is necessary to develop a solution to wax deposition. In order to develop a solution to wax deposition, it is essential to characterize the crude oil and study phase behavior properties. The main objective of this project was to characterize Alaskan North Slope crude oil and study the phase behavior, which was further used to develop a dynamic wax deposition model. This report summarizes the results of the various experimental studies. The subtasks completed during this study include measurement of density, molecular weight, viscosity, pour point, wax appearance temperature, wax content, rate of wax deposition using cold finger, compositional characterization of crude oil and wax obtained from wax content, gas-oil ratio, and phase behavior experiments including constant composition expansion and differential liberation. Also, included in this report is the development of a thermodynamic model to predict wax precipitation. From the experimental study of wax appearance temperature, it was found that wax can start to precipitate at temperatures as high as 40.6 C. The WAT obtained from cross-polar microscopy and viscometry was compared, and it was discovered that WAT from viscometry is overestimated. From the pour point experiment it was found that crude oil can cease to flow at a temperature of 12 C. From the experimental results of wax content, it is evident that the wax content in Alaskan North Slope crude oil can be as high as 28.57%. The highest gas-oil ratio for a live oil sample was observed to be 619.26 SCF/STB. The bubblepoint pressure for live oil samples varied between 1600 psi and 2100 psi. Wax precipitation is one of the most important phenomena in wax deposition and, hence, needs to be modeled. There are various models present in the literature. Won's model, which considers the wax phase as a non-ideal solution, and Pedersen's model, which considers the wax phase as an ideal solution, were compared. Comparison indicated that Pedersen's model gives better results, but the assumption of wax phase as an ideal solution is not realistic. Hence, Won's model was modified to consider different precipitation characteristics of the various constituents in the hydrocarbon fraction. The results obtained from the modified Won's model were compared with existing models, and it was found that predictions from the modified model are encouraging.

  11. Ordovician platform, slope, and basin facies in subsurface of southern North America

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alberstadt, L.P.; Colvin, G.; Sauve, J.

    1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ordovician carbonates of the Nashville dome and Ozark dome regions have long been considered typical shelf deposits. In the subsurface to the south, in the Black Warrior basin, Mississippi Embayment, and Arkoma basin, these shelf carbonate units changed facies. The most significant change is the occurrence of a thick limestone unit characterized by a faunal and floral assemblage of Nuia, Girvanella (isolated long strands), Sphaerocodium, a delicate stacked-chambered organism (.algal), and sponge spicules and sponge mudstone clumps. In ascending order, the complete Ordovician sequence consists of: a lower dolostone, the Nuia-sponge limestone, a dolostone, and a limestone. The upper part of this four-fold sequence changes character westward into the Arkoma basin. The lower two units maintain their character for long distances along depositional strike and occur in parts of the Appalachians as far north as Newfoundland, and on the opposite side of the continent in Nevada. The Nuia-sponge assemblage is a distinctive petrographic marker and seems to be a persistent Ordovician rock and fossil assemblage of widespread occurrence. In Nevada, it occurs on the surface where it is associated with slump and slide features that suggest that it is an outer shelf or upper slope deposit. Coeval carbonates in the Ouachita Mountains are different and show indications of being deep water (basinal). Biostratigraphic evidence indicates that the succession in the subsurface is continuous; the regional Lower Ordovician-Middle Ordovician unconformity is absent. The Lower Ordovician-Middle Ordovician boundary falls near the top of the Nuia-sponge mudstone unit and not at the top of the underlying thick dolostone unit.

  12. Assessment of Alaska's North Slope Oil Field Capacity to Sequester CO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Umekwe, Pascal, E-mail: wpascals@gmail.com [Baker Hughes (United States)] [Baker Hughes (United States); Mongrain, Joanna, E-mail: Joanna.Mongrain@shell.com [Shell International Exploration and Production Co (United States)] [Shell International Exploration and Production Co (United States); Ahmadi, Mohabbat, E-mail: mahmadi@alaska.edu [University of Alaska Fairbanks, Petroleum Engineering Department (United States)] [University of Alaska Fairbanks, Petroleum Engineering Department (United States); Hanks, Catherine, E-mail: chanks@gi.alaska.edu [University of Alaska Fairbanks, Geophysical Institute (United States)] [University of Alaska Fairbanks, Geophysical Institute (United States)

    2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The capacity of 21 major fields containing more than 95% of the North Slope of Alaska's oil were investigated for CO{sub 2} storage by injecting CO{sub 2} as an enhanced oil recovery (EOR) agent. These fields meet the criteria for the application of miscible and immiscible CO{sub 2}-EOR methods and contain about 40 billion barrels of oil after primary and secondary recovery. Volumetric calculations from this study indicate that these fields have a static storage capacity of 3 billion metric tons of CO{sub 2}, assuming 100% oil recovery, re-pressurizing the fields to pre-fracturing pressure and applying a 50% capacity reduction to compensate for heterogeneity and for water invasion from the underlying aquifer. A ranking produced from this study, mainly controlled by field size and fracture gradient, identifies Prudhoe, Kuparuk, and West Sak as possessing the largest storage capacities under a 20% safety factor on pressures applied during storage to avoid over-pressurization, fracturing, and gas leakage. Simulation studies were conducted using CO{sub 2} Prophet to determine the amount of oil technically recoverable and CO{sub 2} gas storage possible during this process. Fields were categorized as miscible, partially miscible, and immiscible based on the miscibility of CO{sub 2} with their oil. Seven sample fields were selected across these categories for simulation studies comparing pure CO{sub 2} and water-alternating-gas injection. Results showed that the top two fields in each category for recovery and CO{sub 2} storage were Alpine and Point McIntyre (miscible), Prudhoe and Kuparuk (partially miscible), and West Sak and Lisburne (immiscible). The study concludes that 5 billion metric tons of CO{sub 2} can be stored while recovering 14.2 billion barrels of the remaining oil.

  13. Moisture effects in low-slope roofs: Drying rates after water addition with various vapor retarders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pedersen, C.R. [Technical Univ. of Denmark, Lyngby (Denmark); Petrie, T.W. [Marquette Univ., Milwaukee, WI (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Courville, G.E.; Desjarlais, A.O.; Childs, P.W.; Wilkes, K.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tests have been conducted in the Large Scale Climate Simulator (LSCS) of the US. Building Envelope Research Center at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to investigate downward drying rates of various unvented, low-slope roof systems. A secondary objective was to study heat flow patterns so as to understand how to control latent heat effects on impermeable heat flux transducers. Nine test sections were tested simultaneously. The sections had a p deck above fibrous-glass insulation and were examples of cold-deck systems. These five sections had various vapor retarder systems on a gypsum board ceiling below the insulation. The other four sections had a lightweight insulating concrete deck below expanded polystyrene insulation and the same vapor retarder systems, and were examples of warm-deck systems. The cold-deck systems had materials that were relatively permeable to water vapor, while the materials in the warm-deck systems were less permeable. All test sections were topped by an impermeable roofing membrane. The test sections were instrumented with thermocouples between all layers and with small heat flux transducers at the bottom and top of the fibrous-glass insulation and in the middle of the expanded polystyrene insulation. Two different kinds of moisture probes were used to qualitatively monitor the movement of the moisture. The heat flux measurements showed that heat conduction dominates the system using impermeable insulation materials, with only a slight increase due to increased thermal conductivity of wet expanded polystyrene. There was significant transfer of latent heat in the test sections with permeable insulation, causing the peak heat fluxes to increase by as much as a factor of two. With temperatures imposed that are typical of summer days, latent heat transfer associated with condensation and evaporation of moisture in the test sections was measured to be as important as the heat transfer by conduction.

  14. Tailoring interlayer coupling and coercivity in Co/Mn/Co trilayers by controlling the interface roughness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Bin; Wu, Chii-Bin; Kuch, Wolfgang, E-mail: kuch@physik.fu-berlin.de [Institut für Experimentalphysik, Freie Universität Berlin, Arnimallee 14, 14195 Berlin (Germany)

    2014-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Epitaxial Co/Mn/Co trilayers with a wedged Mn layer were grown on Cu(001) and studied by magneto-optical Kerr effect measurements. The bottom Co film as well as the Mn film exhibits a layer-by-layer growth mode, which allows to modify both interface roughnesses on the atomic scale by tuning the thicknesses of the films to achieve a certain filling of their topmost atomic layers. The onset of antiferromagnetic order in the Mn layer at room temperature was found at thicknesses of 4.1 (4.8) and 3.4 (4.0) atomic monolayers (ML) for a filled (half-filled) topmost atomic layer of the bottom Co film in Mn/Co bilayers and Co/Mn/Co trilayers, respectively. Magnetization loops with only one step were found for a trilayer with half-filled topmost atomic layer of the bottom Co film, while loops with two separate steps have been observed in trilayers with an integer number of atomic layers in the bottom Co film. The coercivity of the top Co film shows an oscillation with 1 ML period as a function of the Mn thickness above 10 ML, which is interpreted as the influence of the atomic-scale control of the interface roughness on the interface exchange coupling between the antiferromagnetic Mn and the top ferromagnetic (FM) Co layer. The strength of the magnetic interlayer coupling between the top and bottom Co layers through the Mn layer for an integer number of atomic layers in the bottom Co layer, deduced from minor-loop measurements, exhibits an oscillation with a period of 2 ML Mn thickness, indicative of direct exchange coupling through the antiferromagnetic Mn layer. In addition, a long-period interlayer coupling of the two FM layers with antiparallel coupling maxima at Mn thicknesses of 2.5, 8.2, and 13.7 ML is observed and attributed to indirect exchange coupling of the Rudermann-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida type.

  15. In-flight Receptivity Experiments on a 30-degree Swept-wing using Micron-sized Discrete Roughness Elements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carpenter, Andrew L.

    2010-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    and operated at a chord Reynolds number of 6.5 to 7.5 million. Spanwise-periodic, micronsized discrete roughness elements were applied at the leading edge of the swept-wing in order to excite the most unstable crossflow wavelength and promote early boundary...

  16. Impact of surface roughness of Au core in Au/Pd coreeshell nanoparticles toward formic acid oxidation e Experiment and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Fuqiang

    Impact of surface roughness of Au core in Au/Pd coreeshell nanoparticles toward formic acid h t s Unique Au/Pd coreeshell nanoparticles were synthesized via a galvanic replacement of Cu by Pd on hollow Au. Au/Pd coreeshell nanoparticles with smooth Au surface by adding Na2SO3 demonstrated highly

  17. The Effect of Inner Surface Roughness on Friction Factor in Horizontal Micro-A. J. Ghajar1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghajar, Afshin J.

    The Effect of Inner Surface Roughness on Friction Factor in Horizontal Micro- tubes A. J. Ghajar1 1 blood vessels, a sound understanding of fluid flow in micro- scale channels and tubes is required of the transition region. II. LITERATURE REVIEW To fully understand the flow phenomenon inside of micro-tubes

  18. Polycrystal modelling of fatigue: pre-hardening and surface roughness effects on damage initiation for 304L stainless steel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    of residual heat removal circuits of pressurized water reactors (PWR).The main purpose of this study surface (pre- hardening gradient, residual stresses and scratches), at the scale of the microstructure properties (roughness, residual stress and pre-hardening) and to the microstructure of the material

  19. 1216 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON MICROWAVE THEORY AND TECHNIQUES, VOL. 57, NO. 5, MAY 2009 Wave Propagation in a Randomly Rough

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Leung

    and the power loss. The derived result is expressed in terms of a double Sommerfeld integral. The double propagation and power loss are illustrated as a function of roughness characteristics and waveguide thickness thickness, the waveguide model shows signif- icantly different power loss as compared to the plane

  20. Linear Algebra Research Project Rough Draft Nick Davis Camera Transformations in OpenGL ES 2.0

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marzuola, Jeremy

    Linear Algebra Research Project Rough Draft Nick Davis Camera Transformations in OpenGL ES 2.0 Since the advent of the analog computer the power of visual display has played an integral part graphical output, including components designed solely for calculating graphics (Graphics Processing Units

  1. Lattice Boltzmann simulations in microfluidics: probing the no-slip boundary condition in hydrophobic, rough, and surface nanobubble laden microchannels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jens Harting; Christian Kunert; Jari Hyväluoma

    2009-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    In this contribution we review recent efforts on investigations of the effect of (apparent) boundary slip by utilizing lattice Boltzmann simulations. We demonstrate the applicability of the method to treat fundamental questions in microfluidics by investigating fluid flow in hydrophobic and rough microchannels as well as over surfaces covered by nano- or microscale gas bubbles.

  2. GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 28, NO. 5, PAGES 811-814, MARCH 1, 2001 Parameterizing Tidal Dissipation over Rough

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jayne, Steven

    of barotropic tidal energy. The first line of evidence comes from observations of mix- ing in the abyssal Brazil ocean, the energy flux carried by internal waves generated over rough topog- raphy dominates the energy issues. The first is whether including a parameterization for internal wave energy-flux in a model

  3. Cleanup Verification Package for the 118-F-8:4 Fuel Storage Basin West Side Adjacent and Side Slope Soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. D. Habel

    2008-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action, sampling activities, and compliance with cleanup criteria for the 118-F-8:4 Fuel Storage Basin West Side Adjacent and Side Slope Soils. The rectangular-shaped concrete basin on the south side of the 105-F Reactor building served as an underwater collection, storage, and transfer facility for irradiated fuel elements discharged from the reactor.

  4. IDC Reengineering Phase 2 & 3 Rough Order of Magnitude (ROM) Cost Estimate Summary (Leveraged NDC Case).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, James M.; Prescott, Ryan; Dawson, Jericah M.; Huelskamp, Robert M.

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories has prepared a ROM cost estimate for budgetary planning for the IDC Reengineering Phase 2 & 3 effort, based on leveraging a fully funded, Sandia executed NDC Modernization project. This report provides the ROM cost estimate and describes the methodology, assumptions, and cost model details used to create the ROM cost estimate. ROM Cost Estimate Disclaimer Contained herein is a Rough Order of Magnitude (ROM) cost estimate that has been provided to enable initial planning for this proposed project. This ROM cost estimate is submitted to facilitate informal discussions in relation to this project and is NOT intended to commit Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) or its resources. Furthermore, as a Federally Funded Research and Development Center (FFRDC), Sandia must be compliant with the Anti-Deficiency Act and operate on a full-cost recovery basis. Therefore, while Sandia, in conjunction with the Sponsor, will use best judgment to execute work and to address the highest risks and most important issues in order to effectively manage within cost constraints, this ROM estimate and any subsequent approved cost estimates are on a 'full-cost recovery' basis. Thus, work can neither commence nor continue unless adequate funding has been accepted and certified by DOE.

  5. Systematic analysis of Persson's contact mechanics theory of randomly rough elastic surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolf B. Dapp; Nikolay Prodanov; Martin H. Müser

    2014-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We systematically check explicit and implicit assumptions of Persson's contact mechanics theory. It casts the evolution of the pressure distribution ${\\rm Pr}(p)$ with increasing resolution of surface roughness as a diffusive process, in which resolution plays the role of time. The tested key assumptions of the theory are: (a) the diffusion coefficient is independent of pressure $p$, (b) the diffusion process is drift-free at any value of $p$, (c) the point $p=0$ acts as an absorbing barrier, i.e., once a point falls out of contact, it never reenters again, (d) the Fourier component of the elastic energy is only populated if the appropriate wave vector is resolved, and (e) it no longer changes when even smaller wavelengths are resolved. Using high-resolution numerical simulations, we quantify deviations from these approximations and find quite significant discrepancies in some cases. For example, the drift becomes substantial for small values of $p$, which typically represent points in real space close to a contact line. On the other hand, there is a significant flux of points reentering contact. These and other identified deviations cancel each other to a large degree, resulting in an overall excellent description for contact area, contact geometry, and gap distribution functions. Similar fortuitous error cancellations cannot be guaranteed under different circumstances, for instance when investigating rubber friction. The results of the simulations may provide guidelines for a systematic improvement of the theory.

  6. Chemical and Microbial Characterization of North Slope Viscous Oils to Assess Viscosity Reduction and Enhanced Recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shirish Patil; Abhijit Dandekar; Mary Beth Leigh

    2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A large proportion of Alaska North Slope (ANS) oil exists in the form of viscous deposits, which cannot be produced entirely using conventional methods. Microbially enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) is a promising approach for improving oil recovery for viscous deposits. MEOR can be achieved using either ex situ approaches such as flooding with microbial biosurfactants or injection of exogenous surfactant-producing microbes into the reservoir, or by in situ approaches such as biostimulation of indigenous surfactant-producing microbes in the oil. Experimental work was performed to analyze the potential application of MEOR to the ANS oil fields through both ex situ and in situ approaches. A microbial formulation containing a known biosurfactant-producing strain of Bacillus licheniformis was developed in order to simulate MEOR. Coreflooding experiments were performed to simulate MEOR and quantify the incremental oil recovery. Properties like viscosity, density, and chemical composition of oil were monitored to propose a mechanism for oil recovery. The microbial formulation significantly increased incremental oil recovery, and molecular biological analyses indicated that the strain survived during the shut-in period. The indigenous microflora of ANS heavy oils was investigated to characterize the microbial communities and test for surfactant producers that are potentially useful for biostimulation. Bacteria that reduce the surface tension of aqueous media were isolated from one of the five ANS oils (Milne Point) and from rock oiled by the Exxon Valdez oil spill (EVOS), and may prove valuable for ex situ MEOR strategies. The total bacterial community composition of the six different oils was evaluated using molecular genetic tools, which revealed that each oil tested possessed a unique fingerprint indicating a diverse bacterial community and varied assemblages. Collectively we have demonstrated that there is potential for in situ and ex situ MEOR of ANS oils. Future work should focus on lab and field-scale testing of ex situ MEOR using Bacillus licheniformis as well as the biosurfactant-producing strains we have newly isolated from the Milne Point reservoir and the EVOS environment.

  7. Colloid deposition on non-ideal porous media: The influences of collector shape and roughness on the single-collector efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saiers, James

    Colloid deposition on non-ideal porous media: The influences of collector shape and roughness on the single-collector efficiency James E. Saiers School of Environmental Studies, Yale University, New Haven changes in mineral-grain shape and surface roughness influence the single-collector contact efficiency (h

  8. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON GEOSCIENCE AND REMOTE SENSING, VOL. 40, NO. 7, JULY 2002 1605 Surface Roughness Characterizations of Sea Ice and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    , surface roughness data from airborne laser altimeter transects correlate well with MISR-derived estimates of surface roughness. In Antarctica, ablation-related blue-ice areas, which are difficult to distinguish from bare ice exposed by crevasses, are easily detected using multiangular data. These unusual ablation

  9. RENFORCEMENT ET CONTROLE DE PAREMENTS DANS UNE MINE A CffiL OUVERT DE CHARBON REINFORCEMENT AND CONTROL OF FOOTWALL SLOPES IN AN OPEN PIT COAL MINE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    AND CONTROL OF FOOTWALL SLOPES IN AN OPEN PIT COAL MINE VERSTÄRKUNG UND KONTROLLE VON STOSSER IM KOHLETAGEBAU to exploit the stephanian coal.TheNorth West area ofthis open pit is composed of an overthrust fold. The coal

  10. Geochemical assessment of gaseous hydrocarbons: mixing of bacterial and thermogenic methane in the deep subsurface petroleum system, Gulf of Mexico continental slope 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ozgul, Ercin

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Mixtures of bacterial and thermogenic methane are found both at vents at the seafloor and in reservoirs in the deep subsurface of the Gulf of Mexico continental slope. The C1-C5 gas that most recently charged reservoirs ...

  11. Atomic intermixing and interface roughness in short-period InAs/GaSb superlattices for infrared photodetectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashuach, Y.; Lakin, E.; Kaufmann, Y. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Technion—Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel); Saguy, C. [Solid State Institute, Technion—Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel); Zolotoyabko, E., E-mail: zloto@tx.technion.ac.il [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Technion—Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel); Solid State Institute, Technion—Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel)

    2014-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A set of advanced characterization methods, including high-resolution X-ray diffraction (measurements and simulations), cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy, and high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy is applied to quantify the interface roughness and atomic intermixing (in both cation and anion sub-lattices) in short period (6–7?nm) InAs/GaSb superlattices intended for mid-wavelength (M) and long-wavelength (L) infrared detectors. The undesired atomic intermixing and interface roughness in the L-samples were found to be considerably lower than in the M-samples. In all specimens, anion intermixing is much higher than that in the cation sub-lattice. Possible origins of these findings are discussed.

  12. An experimental investigation of silicon wafer surface roughness and its effect on the full strength of plated metals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spiers, G.D.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Plated silicon wafers with surface roughness ranging from 0.4 to 130 microinches were subjected to tensile pull strength tests. Electroless Ni/electroless Cu/electroplated Cu and electroless Ni/electroplated Cu were the two types of plate contacts tested. It was found that smoother surfaces had higher pull strength than rougher, chemically etched surfaces. The presence of the electroless Cu layer was found to be important to adhesion. The mode of fracture of the contact as it left the silicon was studied, and it was found that in almost all cases separation was due to fracture of the bulk silicon phase. The correlation between surface roughness and mode of contact failure is presented and interpreted.

  13. The component slope linear model for calculating intensive partial molar properties /application to waste glasses and aluminate solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reynolds, Jacob G. [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC, Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Partial molar properties are the changes occurring when the fraction of one component is varied while the fractions of all other component mole fractions change proportionally. They have many practical and theoretical applications in chemical thermodynamics. Partial molar properties of chemical mixtures are difficult to measure because the component mole fractions must sum to one, so a change in fraction of one component must be offset with a change in one or more other components. Given that more than one component fraction is changing at a time, it is difficult to assign a change in measured response to a change in a single component. In this study, the Component Slope Linear Model (CSLM), a model previously published in the statistics literature, is shown to have coefficients that correspond to the intensive partial molar properties. If a measured property is plotted against the mole fraction of a component while keeping the proportions of all other components constant, the slope at any given point on a graph of this curve is the partial molar property for that constituent. Actually plotting this graph has been used to determine partial molar properties for many years. The CSLM directly includes this slope in a model that predicts properties as a function of the component mole fractions. This model is demonstrated by applying it to the constant pressure heat capacity data from the NaOH-NaAl(OH){sub 4}-H{sub 2}O system, a system that simplifies Hanford nuclear waste. The partial molar properties of H{sub 2}O, NaOH, and NaAl(OH){sub 4} are determined. The equivalence of the CSLM and the graphical method is verified by comparing results determined by the two methods. The CSLM model has been previously used to predict the liquidus temperature of spinel crystals precipitated from Hanford waste glass. Those model coefficients are re-interpreted here as the partial molar spinel liquidus temperature of the glass components.

  14. Separate effects of surface roughness, wettability and porosity on boiling heat transfer and critical heat flux and optimization of boiling surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Hanley, Harrison Fagan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The separate effects of surface wettability, porosity, and roughness on critical heat flux (CHF) and heat transfer coefficient (HTC) were examined using carefully-engineered surfaces. All test surfaces were prepared on ...

  15. Leukemia Prediction from Gene Expression Data---A Rough Set Approach Jianwen Fang, Jerzy W. Grzymala-Busse, Information and Telecommunication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kansas, University of

    . Grzymala-Busse, Information and Telecommunication Technology Center, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS Data---A Rough Set Approach Jianwen Fang1,2 and Jerzy W. Grzymala-Busse1,3 1Bioinformatics Core

  16. The role of an interface on Ni film removal and surface roughness after irradiation by femtosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, Ryan D. [Applied Physics Program, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)] [Applied Physics Program, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Torralva, Ben [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)] [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Yalisove, Steven M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)

    2013-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We have observed thin film removal from glass substrates after the irradiation of Ni films with femtosecond laser pulses in air. It was found that the material removal threshold and laser-induced morphology are dependent on film thickness. With decreasing thickness, material removal transitions from intra-film separation to removal at the Ni-glass interface. The Gaussian energy distribution of the laser pulse allows for intra-film separation in the annular region of the crater and interface separation in the center. We propose a model to explain these data as well as the observed increased surface roughness in the interfacial removal regions.

  17. Gas Production From a Cold, Stratigraphically Bounded Hydrate Deposit at the Mount Elbert Site, North Slope, Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moridis, G.J.; Silpngarmlert, S.; Reagan, M. T.; Collett, T.S.; Zhang, K.

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of an effort to identify suitable targets for a planned long-term field test, we investigate by means of numerical simulation the gas production potential from unit D, a stratigraphically bounded (Class 3) permafrost-associated hydrate occurrence penetrated in the ount Elbert well on North Slope, Alaska. This shallow, low-pressure deposit has high porosities, high intrinsic permeabilities and high hydrate saturations. It has a low temperature because of its proximity to the overlying permafrost. The simulation results indicate that vertical ells operating at a constant bottomhole pressure would produce at very low rates for a very long period. Horizontal wells increase gas production by almost two orders of magnitude, but production remains low. Sensitivity analysis indicates that the initial deposit temperature is y the far the most important factor determining production performance (and the most effective criterion for target selection) because it controls the sensible heat available to fuel dissociation.

  18. Research on the seasonal snow of the Arctic Slope. Annual progress report, January 16, 1988--December 31, 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benson, C.S.

    1988-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The original objectives of this research included a regional study of snow on the entire Arctic Slope. During the first year the scope was restricted to the R{sub 4}D area. In the second and third years the primary focus was also on the R{sub 4}D area,but measurements were made at Prudhoe Bay, Atgasuk and Wainwright to determine the flux of wind-blown snow on a wider scale. Additional broadening of scope was discussed at the San Diego R{sub 4}D meetings in April 1986 and 1987 and at the extrapolation workshop held at Penn State University in Spring 1987. The broadening of scope has also included detailed studies of chemistry and controls exerted by large-scale advection of air masses on the longwave, thermal IR, and radiation. The latter phenomena are critical in initiating snowmelt.

  19. Full-Wave Algorithm to Model Effects of Bedding Slopes on the Response of Subsurface Electromagnetic Geophysical Sensors near Unconformities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sainath, Kamalesh

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a full-wave pseudo-analytical numerical electromagnetic (EM) algorithm to model subsurface induction sensors, traversing planar-layered geological formations of arbitrary EM material anisotropy and loss, which are used, for example, in the exploration of hydrocarbon reserves. Unlike past pseudo-analytical planar-layered modeling algorithms that impose parallelism between the formation's bed junctions however, our method involves judicious employment of Transformation Optics techniques to address challenges related to modeling arbitrarily-oriented, relative slope (i.e., tilting) between said junctions. The algorithm exhibits this flexibility, both with respect to anisotropy in the formation layers as well as junction tilting, via employing special planar slabs that coat each "flattened" (i.e., originally tilted) planar interface, locally redirecting the incident wave within the coating slabs to cause wave fronts to interact with the flattened interfaces as if they were still tilted with a specific, ...

  20. Correlations between the nuclear matter symmetry energy, its slope, and curvature from a nonrelativistic solvable approach and beyond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. M. Santos; M. Dutra; O. Lourenço; A. Delfino

    2014-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    By using point-coupling versions of finite range nuclear relativistic mean field models containing cubic and quartic self interactions in the scalar field $\\sigma$, a nonrelativistic limit is achieved. This approach allows an analytical expression for the symmetry energy ($J$) as a function of its slope ($L$) in a unified form, namely, $\\,L\\,=\\,3J\\,+f(m^{*},\\rho_{o},B_{o},K_{o})$, where the quantities $m^{*}$, $\\rho_{o}$, $B_{o}$ and $K_{o}$ are bulk parameters at the nuclear matter saturation density $\\rho_{o}$. This result establishes a linear correlation between $L$ and $J$ which is reinforced by exact relativistic calculations. An analogous analytical correlation is also found for $J$, $L$ and the symmetry energy curvature ($K_{sym}$). Based on these results, we propose graphic constraints in $L\\times J$ and $K_{sym}\\times L$ planes which finite range models must satisfy.

  1. Theoretical analysis of error transfer from surface slope to refractive ray and their application to the solar concentrated collector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Weidong

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the general equation to calculate the standard deviation of reflected ray error from optical error through geometry optics, applying the equation to calculate the standard deviation of reflected ray error for 8 kinds of solar concentrated reflector, provide typical results. The results indicate that the slope errors in two direction is transferred to any one direction of the focus ray when the incidence angle is more than 0 for solar trough and heliostats reflector; for point focus Fresnel lens, point focus parabolic glass mirror, line focus parabolic galss mirror, the error transferring coefficient from optical to focus ray will increase when the rim angle increase; for TIR-R concentrator, it will decrease; for glass heliostat, it relates to the incidence angle and azimuth of the reflecting point. Keywords: optic error, standard deviation, refractive ray error, concentrated solar collector

  2. Spectral analysis of the efficiency of vertical mixing in the deep ocean due to interaction of tidal currents with a ridge running down a continental slope

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ibragimov, Ranis N.; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.

    2014-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Efficiency of mixing, resulting from the reflection of an internal wave field imposed on the oscillatory background flow with a three-dimensional bottom topography, is investigated using a linear approximation. The radiating wave field is associated with the spectrum of the linear model, which consists of those mode numbers n and slope values ?, for which the solution represents the internal waves of frequencies ? = n?0 radiating upwrad of the topography, where ?0 is the fundamental frequency at which internal waves are generated at the topography. The effects of the bottom topography and the earth’s rotation on the spectrum is analyzed analytically and numerically in the vicinity of the critical slope, which is a slope with the same angle to the horizontal as the internal wave characteristic. In this notation, ? is latitude, f is the Coriolis parameter and N is the buoyancy frequency, which is assumed to be a constant, which corresponds to the uniform stratification.

  3. Comparison of slope and height profiles for flat synchrotron x-ray mirrors measured with a long trace profiler and a Fizeau interferometer.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qian, J.; Assoufid, L.; Macrander, A.; X-Ray Science Division

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Long trace profilers (LTPS) have been used at many synchrotron radiation laboratories worldwide for over a decade to measure surface slope profiles of long grazing incidence x-ray mirrors. Phase measuring interferometers (PMIs) of the Fizeau type, on the other hand, are being used by most mirror manufacturers to accomplish the same task. However, large mirrors whose dimensions exceed the aperture of the Fizeau interferometer require measurements to be carried out at grazing incidence, and aspheric optics require the use of a null lens. While an LTP provides a direct measurement of ID slope profiles, PMIs measure area height profiles from which the slope can be obtained by a differentiation algorithm. Measurements of the two types of instruments have been found by us to be in good agreement, but to our knowledge there is no published work directly comparing the two instruments. This paper documents that comparison. We measured two different nominally flat mirrors with both the LTP in operation at the Advanced Photon Source (a type-II LTP) and a Fizeau-type PMI interferometer (Wyko model 6000). One mirror was 500 mm long and made of Zerodur, and the other mirror was 350 mm long and made of silicon. Slope error results with these instruments agree within nearly 100% (3.11 {+-} 0.15 {micro}rad for the LTP, and 3.11 {+-} 0.02 {micro}rad for the Fizeau PMI interferometer) for the medium quality Zerodur mirror with 3 {micro}rad rms nominal slope error. A significant difference was observed with the much higher quality silicon mirror. For the Si mirror, slope error data is 0.39 {+-} 0.08 {micro}rad from LTP measurements but it is 0.35 {+-} 0.01 {micro}rad from PMI interferometer measurements. The standard deviations show that the Fizeau PMI interferometer has much better measurement repeatability.

  4. Roughness analysis applied to niobium thin films grown on MgO(001) surfaces for superconducting radio frequency cavity applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. B. Beringer, W. M. Roach, C. Clavero, C. E. Reece, R. A. Lukaszew

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes surface studies to address roughness issues inherent to thin film coatings deposited onto superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities. This is particularly relevant for multilayered thin film coatings that are being considered as a possible scheme to overcome technical issues and to surpass the fundamental limit of ?50??MV/m accelerating gradient achievable with bulk niobium. In 2006, a model by Gurevich [ Appl. Phys. Lett. 88 012511 (2006)] was proposed to overcome this limit that involves coating superconducting layers separated by insulating ones onto the inner walls of the cavities. Thus, we have undertaken a systematic effort to understand the dynamic evolution of the Nb surface under specific deposition thin film conditions onto an insulating surface in order to explore the feasibility of the proposed model. We examine and compare the morphology from two distinct Nb/MgO series, each with its own epitaxial registry, at very low growth rates and closely examine the dynamical scaling of the surface features during growth. Further, we apply analysis techniques such as power spectral density to the specific problem of thin film growth and roughness evolution to qualify the set of deposition conditions that lead to successful SRF coatings.

  5. Exports of Alaskan north slope oil. Introduced in the House of Representatives, One Hundred Fourth Congress, First Session, June 15, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The bill addresses H.R. 70 a bill to permit exports of certain domestically produced oil. The background and need for the legislation is provided. The bill would amend the Mineral Leasing Act to allow exports of Alaskan North Slope oil under certain conditions.

  6. The Cascade of Tidal Energy from Low to High Modes on a Continental Slope SAMUEL M. KELLY* AND JONATHAN D. NASH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    affiliation: University of Western Australia, Crawley, Australia. Corresponding author address: Samuel M. Kelly, University of Western Australia, M015 SESE, 35 Stirling Hwy., Crawley, WA 6009, Australia. EThe Cascade of Tidal Energy from Low to High Modes on a Continental Slope SAMUEL M. KELLY

  7. Last spring, an Ohio waste slope collapsed, displacing 1.5 million cu yd of waste. Remedial measures can prevent similar failures at ~~grandfathered" landfills.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    measures can prevent similar failures at ~~grandfathered" landfills. r I n the early morning hours of March of "grandfathered" landfill slopes. (Grandfathered landfills do not have an engineered liner system.) Because following case history are ap- plicable to the design, operation and expan- sion of many landfills. BEFORE

  8. Dynamic Modeling and Adaptive Neural-Fuzzy Control for Nonholonomic Mobile Manipulators Moving on a Slope 1 Dynamic Modeling and Adaptive Neural-Fuzzy Control for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Yangmin

    Dynamic Modeling and Adaptive Neural-Fuzzy Control for Nonholonomic Mobile Manipulators Moving on a Slope 1 Dynamic Modeling and Adaptive Neural-Fuzzy Control for Nonholonomic Mobile Manipulators Moving manipulator, neural-fuzzy control, nonholonomic. 1. INTRODUCTION Intelligent and autonomous mobile

  9. Where does a glacier end ? GPR measurements to identify the limits between the slopes and the real glacier area. Application to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Where does a glacier end ? GPR measurements to identify the limits between the slopes and the real glacier area. Application to the Austre Lov´enbreen, Spitsbergen Bernard ´E. Th´eMA, CNRS/Universit´e de, Orsay, France Abstract Glacier limits are usually mapped according to a spatial discrimination based

  10. Geochemical assessment of gaseous hydrocarbons: mixing of bacterial and thermogenic methane in the deep subsurface petroleum system, Gulf of Mexico continental slope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ozgul, Ercin

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Mixtures of bacterial and thermogenic methane are found both at vents at the seafloor and in reservoirs in the deep subsurface of the Gulf of Mexico continental slope. The C1-C5 gas that most recently charged reservoirs of Jolliet (GC 184), Genesis...

  11. Association of coal metamorphism and hydrothermal mineralization in Rough Creek fault zone and Fluorspar District, Western Kentucky

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hower, J.C.; Fiene, F.L.; Trinkle, E.J.

    1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ambient coal rank (metamorphism) of the Carboniferous coals in the Western Kentucky coalfield ranges from high volatile A bituminous (vitrinite maximum reflectance up to 0.75% R/sub max/) in the Webster syncline (Webster and southern Union Counties) to high volatile C bituminous (0.45 to 0.60% R/sub max/) over most of the remainder of the area. Anomalous patterns of metamorphism, however, have been noted in coals recovered from cores and mines in fault blocks of the Rough Creek fault zone and Fluorspar District. Coals in Gil-30 borehole (Rough Creek faults, Bordley Quadrangle, Union County) vary with no regard for vertical position, from high volatile C(0.55% R/sub max/) to high volatile A (0.89%R/sub max) bituminous. Examination of the upper Sturgis Formation (Missourian/Virgilian) coals revealed that the higher rank (generally above 0.75% R/sub max/) coals had vein mineral assemblages of sphalerite, twinned calcite, and ferroan dolomite. Lower rank coals had only untwinned calcite. Several sites in Webster County contain various coals (Well (No. 8) to Coiltwon (No. 14)) with vitrinite reflectances up to 0.83% R/sub max/ and associated sphalerite mineralization. Mississippian and Lower Pennsylvanian (Caseyville Formation Gentry coal) coals in the mineralized Fluorspar District have ranks to nearly medium volatile bituminous (1.03% R/sub max/). The regional rank trend exhibited by the fualt zones is generally higher rank than the surrounding areas. Sphalerite mineralization in itself is not unique within Illinois basin coals, but if it was partly responsible for the metamorphism of these coals, then the fluid temperature must have been higher within the above mentioned fault complexes.

  12. Geology, reservoir engineering and methane hydrate potential of the Walakpa Gas Field, North Slope, Alaska. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glenn, R.K.; Allen, W.W.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Walakpa Gas Field, located near the city of Barrow on Alaska`s North Slope, has been proven to be methane-bearing at depths of 2000--2550 feet below sea level. The producing formation is a laterally continuous, south-dipping, Lower Cretaceous shelf sandstone. The updip extent of the reservoir has not been determined by drilling, but probably extends to at least 1900 feet below sea level. Reservoir temperatures in the updip portion of the reservoir may be low enough to allow the presence of in situ methane hydrates. Reservoir net pay however, decreases to the north. Depths to the base of permafrost in the area average 940 feet. Drilling techniques and production configuration in the Walakpa field were designed to minimize formation damage to the reservoir sandstone and to eliminate methane hydrates formed during production. Drilling development of the Walakpa field was a sequential updip and lateral stepout from a previously drilled, structurally lower confirmation well. Reservoir temperature, pressure, and gas chemistry data from the development wells confirm that they have been drilled in the free-methane portion of the reservoir. Future studies in the Walakpa field are planned to determine whether or not a component of the methane production is due to the dissociation of updip in situ hydrates.

  13. The determination of the Reynolds shear stress distribution in the transition region resulting from a sudden increase in wall roughness in a two-dimensional channel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heilhecker, Joe Keith

    1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE DETERMINATION OF THE REYNOLDS SHEAR STRESS DISTRIBUTION IN THE TRANSITION REGION RESULTING FROM A SUDDEN INCREASE IN WALL ROUGHNESS IN A TWO-DIMENSIONAL CHANNEL A Thesis By JOE K. HEI LHE CKER Submitted to the Graduate School... REGION RESULTING FROM A SUDDEN INCREASE IN WALL ROUGHNESS IN A TWO-DIMEN4$ONAL CHANNEL A Thesis By JOE K. HEI LHE CKER Approved as to style and content by: (Chairm o C mittee) (Head of Department) May 1962 TAB LE OF CONTE NT S Page List...

  14. Pattern Alteration: Shoulder Slope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurement Chart, for basic instructions. For additional information, refer to E-380, Shoulder Length. Square shoulders are higher than average (Fig. 1). They usually cause a garment to wrinkle and pull from the end of the shoulder toward the center front... the neck for the length of your own shoulder measurement (Fig. 7). Refer to line 8, shoulder length, on your Personal Measurement Chart. 2. Cut the pattern apart along this line, separating the armhole section from the rest of the pattern. To raise...

  15. North Slope of Alaska

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > The EnergyCenterDioxideDocumentationThreeNewsfuel combustion

  16. Paleo-reconstruction of shelf-slope margin along San Emigdio Mountains, southern San Joaquin Valley, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Butler, K.R.

    1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Deformation along the San Emigdio Mountains, California, is characterized by large overthrust sheets that carried Eocene through Miocene nonmarine to shallow marine strata over their deeper marine equivalents. The Pleito thrust has at least 20,000 ft of throw and is the major structural feature of this overthrust belt. The upper plate of the Pleito thrust carries an extensively exposed block of three prograding sequences and, along strike, partially exposes the shelf-slope boundaries of these units. Equivalent changes are observed in the subsurface beneath the overthrust. Total crustal shortening along this region ranges from 25 to 50%, with most of the shortening taken up by the Pleito thrust. The thrust has a low-angle, ramp-and-glide configuration, but on the south, the strata eventually extend downward into basement. The northern boundary to the deformation belt is the White Wolf and Pioneer fold and thrust structures. These features form a transfer zone, where one structure ends and the other feature begins. The amplitude of these folds can be up to 10,000 ft from crest to trough. Because of the large overthrust of the Pleito thrust, reservoir rocks are found up to 7 mi south of the fault's surface trace in the lower plate. The buried strata lie south and west of producing fields along the White Wolf fault and the Tejon embayment. The complicated stratigraphic changes combined with the thrust-belt structures require retrodeformable crustal profiles to take into account the facies distributions to model the hydrocarbon potential of this lightly explored province.

  17. Using a Neural Network to Determine the Hatch Status of the AERI at the ARM North Slope of Alaska Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zwink, AB; Turner, DD

    2012-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The fore-optics of the Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) are protected by an automated hatch to prevent precipitation from fouling the instrument's scene mirror (Knuteson et al. 2004). Limit switches connected with the hatch controller provide a signal of the hatch state: open, closed, undetermined (typically associated with the hatch being between fully open or fully closed during the instrument's sky view period), or an error condition. The instrument then records the state of the hatch with the radiance data so that samples taken when the hatch is not open can be removed from any subsequent analysis. However, the hatch controller suffered a multi-year failure for the AERI located at the ARM North Slope of Alaska (NSA) Central Facility in Barrow, Alaska, from July 2006-February 2008. The failure resulted in misreporting the state of the hatch in the 'hatchOpen' field within the AERI data files. With this error there is no simple solution to translate what was reported back to the correct hatch status, thereby making it difficult for an analysis to determine when the AERI was actually viewing the sky. As only the data collected when the hatch is fully open are scientifically useful, an algorithm was developed to determine whether the hatch was open or closed based on spectral radiance data from the AERI. Determining if the hatch is open or closed in a scene with low clouds is non-trivial, as low opaque clouds may look very similar spectrally as the closed hatch. This algorithm used a backpropagation neural network; these types of neural networks have been used with increasing frequency in atmospheric science applications.

  18. Effect of discharge current and deposition temperature on roughness and density of NbC films fabricated by ion beam sputtering technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dhawan, Rajnish, E-mail: rajnish@rrcat.gov.in; Rai, Sanjay, E-mail: rajnish@rrcat.gov.in; Lodha, G. S., E-mail: rajnish@rrcat.gov.in [X-ray optics Section, Indus Synchrotron Utilization Division, Raja Ramanna Center for Advanced Technology, Indore-452013 (India)

    2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    NbC films were prepared using Ion beam sputtering system at various discharges current from 0.4 amps to 1.2 amps at room temperature. Effect of temperature on NbC films were also studied by depositing NbC films at various temperatures from room temperature to 200,300,400 and 600°C. X-ray reflectivity (XRR) study shows that surface roughness of the film decreases with decrease in discharge current. The optimum lowest roughness 3.2Å having density 92% of bulk was achieved at discharge current 0.6 amps at 3.0 cm{sup 3}/min Ar gas flow. X-ray study also shows that film roughness decreases with increase in temperature of the film and after a certain temperature it increases with increase in temperature. The lowest surface roughness 2.1Å was achieved at 300°C with density 83% of bulk NbC at constant discharge current 0.6 amps.

  19. COMPARISON OF SEA SURFACE ROUGHNESS MODELS FOR OFFSHORE WIND POWER UTILISATION Bernhard Lange(1), Jrgen Hjstrup(2), Sren Larsen(2), Rebecca Barthelmie(2)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Detlev

    Large offshore wind farms are being built in several countries in Europe. The economic viabilityCOMPARISON OF SEA SURFACE ROUGHNESS MODELS FOR OFFSHORE WIND POWER UTILISATION Bernhard Lange(1 of such projects depends on the favourable wind conditions of offshore sites, since the higher energy yield has

  20. D etailed m odeling ofreactive flow s th rough geologicm edia is necessary to understand a num ber of environm entalproblem s of national

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mills, Richard

    fluids and geologic seq uestration of CO2 in deep reservoirs. Such problem s generally req uire sim s to th e surface , for e xam ple , th rough abandone d w e lls and fracture s in cap rock s. Accurate

  1. The Impact of Above-Sheathing Ventilation on the Thermal and Moisture Performance of Steep-Slope Residential Roofs and Attics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, W.; Karagiozis, A.; Wilson, J.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE IMPACT OF ABOVE-SHEATHING VENTILATION ON THE THERMAL AND MOISTURE PERFORMANCE OF STEEP-SLOPE RESIDENTIAL ROOFS AND ATTICS William (Bill) Miller Research Scientist Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee Joe Wilson Product... with and without infrared blocking color pigments (IrBCPs) and with and without above-sheathing ventilation. The combination of increased solar reflectance and above-sheathing ventilation reduced the heat flow penetrating the attic floor by 70% as compared...

  2. The Impact of Above-Sheathing Ventilation on the Thermal and Moisture Performance of Steep-Slope Residential Roofs and Attics 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, W.; Karagiozis, A.; Wilson, J.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE IMPACT OF ABOVE-SHEATHING VENTILATION ON THE THERMAL AND MOISTURE PERFORMANCE OF STEEP-SLOPE RESIDENTIAL ROOFS AND ATTICS William (Bill) Miller Research Scientist Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee Joe Wilson Product... Manager Metro Roof Products Oceanside, California Achilles Karagiozis Research Scientist Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee ABSTRACT Field studies were conducted on several attic assemblies having stone-coated metal shake roofs...

  3. Local changes of work function near rough features on Cu surfaces operated under high external electric field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Djurabekova, Flyura, E-mail: flyura.djurabekova@helsinki.fi; Ruzibaev, Avaz; Parviainen, Stefan [Helsinki Institute of Physics and Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 43, FI-00014 Helsinki (Finland); Holmström, Eero [Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 64, FIN-00014 Helsinki (Finland); Department of Earth Sciences, Faculty of Maths and Physical Sciences, UCL Earth Sciences, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Hakala, Mikko [Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 64, FIN-00014 Helsinki (Finland)

    2013-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Metal surfaces operated under high electric fields produce sparks even if they are held in ultra high vacuum. In spite of extensive research on the topic of vacuum arcs, the mystery of vacuum arc origin still remains unresolved. The indications that the sparking rates depend on the material motivate the research on surface response to extremely high external electric fields. In this work by means of density-functional theory calculations we analyze the redistribution of electron density on (100) Cu surfaces due to self-adatoms and in presence of high electric fields from ?1?V/nm up to ?2?V/nm (?1 to ?2 GV/m, respectively). We also calculate the partial charge induced by the external field on a single adatom and a cluster of two adatoms in order to obtain reliable information on charge redistribution on surface atoms, which can serve as a benchmarking quantity for the assessment of the electric field effects on metal surfaces by means of molecular dynamics simulations. Furthermore, we investigate the modifications of work function around rough surface features, such as step edges and self-adatoms.

  4. The Disruption of Vessel-Spanning Bubbles with Sloped Fins in Flat-Bottom and 2:1 Elliptical-Bottom Vessels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Buchmiller, William C.; Jenks, Jeromy WJ; Chun, Jaehun; Russell, Renee L.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Mastor, Michael M.

    2010-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Radioactive sludge was generated in the K-East Basin and K-West Basin fuel storage pools at the Hanford Site while irradiated uranium metal fuel elements from the N Reactor were being stored and packaged. The fuel has been removed from the K Basins, and currently, the sludge resides in the KW Basin in large underwater Engineered Containers. The first phase to the Sludge Treatment Project being led by CH2MHILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) is to retrieve and load the sludge into sludge transport and storage containers (STSCs) and transport the sludge to T Plant for interim storage. The STSCs will be stored inside T Plant cells that are equipped with secondary containment and leak-detection systems. The sludge is composed of a variety of particulate materials and water, including a fraction of reactive uranium metal particles that are a source of hydrogen gas. If a situation occurs where the reactive uranium metal particles settle out at the bottom of a container, previous studies have shown that a vessel-spanning gas layer above the uranium metal particles can develop and can push the overlying layer of sludge upward. The major concern, in addition to the general concern associated with the retention and release of a flammable gas such as hydrogen, is that if a vessel-spanning bubble (VSB) forms in an STSC, it may drive the overlying sludge material to the vents at the top of the container. Then it may be released from the container into the cell’s secondary containment system at T Plant. A previous study demonstrated that sloped walls on vessels, both cylindrical coned-shaped vessels and rectangular vessels with rounded ends, provided an effective approach for disrupting a VSB by creating a release path for gas as a VSB began to rise. Based on the success of sloped-wall vessels, a similar concept is investigated here where a sloped fin is placed inside the vessel to create a release path for gas. A key potential advantage of using a sloped fin compared to a vessel with a sloped wall is that a small fin decreases the volume of a vessel available for sludge storage by a very small fraction compared to a cone-shaped vessel. The purpose of this study is to quantify the capability of sloped fins to disrupt VSBs and to conduct sufficient tests to estimate the performance of fins in full-scale STSCs. Experiments were conducted with a range of fin shapes to determine what slope and width were sufficient to disrupt VSBs. Additional tests were conducted to demonstrate how the fin performance scales with the sludge layer thickness and the sludge strength, density, and vessel diameter based on the gravity yield parameter, which is a dimensionless ratio of the force necessary to yield the sludge to its weight.( ) Further experiments evaluated the difference between vessels with flat and 2:1 elliptical bottoms and a number of different simulants, including the KW container sludge simulant (complete), which was developed to match actual K-Basin sludge. Testing was conducted in 5-in., 10-in., and 23-in.-diameter vessels to quantify how fin performance is impacted by the size of the test vessel. The most significant results for these scale-up tests are the trend in how behavior changes with vessel size and the results from the 23-in. vessel. The key objective in evaluating fin performance is to determine the conditions that minimize the volume of a VSB when disruption occurs because this reduces the potential for material inside the STSC from being released through vents.

  5. Advanced Oil Recovery Technologies for Improved Recovery from Slope Basin Clastic Reservoirs, Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool, Eddy County, NM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark B. Murphy

    2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool in Eddy County New Mexico was a cost-shared field demonstration project in the U.S. Department of Energy Class III Program. A major goal of the Class III Program was to stimulate the use of advanced technologies to increase ultimate recovery from slope-basin clastic reservoirs. Advanced characterization techniques were used at the Nash Draw Pool (NDP) project to develop reservoir management strategies for optimizing oil recovery from this Delaware reservoir. The objective of the project was to demonstrate that a development program, which was based on advanced reservoir management methods, could significantly improve oil recovery at the NDP. Initial goals were (1) to demonstrate that an advanced development drilling and pressure maintenance program can significantly improve oil recovery compared to existing technology applications and (2) to transfer these advanced methodologies to other oil and gas producers. Analysis, interpretation, and integration of recently acquired geological, geophysical, and engineering data revealed that the initial reservoir characterization was too simplistic to capture the critical features of this complex formation. Contrary to the initial characterization, a new reservoir description evolved that provided sufficient detail regarding the complexity of the Brushy Canyon interval at Nash Draw. This new reservoir description was used as a risk reduction tool to identify 'sweet spots' for a development drilling program as well as to evaluate pressure maintenance strategies. The reservoir characterization, geological modeling, 3-D seismic interpretation, and simulation studies have provided a detailed model of the Brushy Canyon zones. This model was used to predict the success of different reservoir management scenarios and to aid in determining the most favorable combination of targeted drilling, pressure maintenance, well stimulation, and well spacing to improve recovery from this reservoir. An Advanced Log Analysis technique developed from the NDP project has proven useful in defining additional productive zones and refining completion techniques. This program proved to be especially helpful in locating and evaluating potential recompletion intervals, which has resulted in low development costs with only small incremental increases in lifting costs. To develop additional reserves at lower costs, zones behind pipe in existing wells were evaluated using techniques developed for the Brushy Canyon interval. These techniques were used to complete uphole zones in thirteen of the NDP wells. A total of 14 recompletions were done: four during 1999, four during 2000, two during 2001, and four during 2002-2003. These workovers added reserves of 332,304 barrels of oil (BO) and 640,363 MCFG (thousand cubic feet of gas) at an overall weighted average development cost of $1.87 per BOE (barrel of oil equivalent). A pressure maintenance pilot project in a developed area of the field was not conducted because the pilot area was pressure depleted, and the reservoir in that area was found to be compartmentalized and discontinuous. Economic analyses and simulation studies indicated that immiscible injection of lean hydrocarbon gas for pressure maintenance was not warranted at the NDP and would need to be considered for implementation in similar fields very soon after production has started. Simulation studies suggested that the injection of miscible carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) could recover significant quantities of oil at the NDP, but a source of low-cost CO{sub 2} was not available in the area. Results from the project indicated that further development will be under playa lakes and potash areas that were beyond the regions covered by well control and are not accessible with vertical wells. These areas, covered by 3-D seismic surveys that were obtained as part of the project, were accessed with combinations of deviated/horizontal wells. Three directional/horizontal wells have been drilled and completed to develop reserves under surface-restricted areas and potash mines. The third

  6. Validated heat-transfer and pressure-drop prediction methods based on the discrete-element method: Phase 2, two-dimensional rib roughness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James, C.A.; Hodge, B.K.; Taylor, R.P. [Mississippi State Univ., MS (United States). Dept. of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Surface roughness is a commonly used approach for enhancing the rate of heat transfer of surfaces, such as in heat-exchanger tubes. Because the improved thermal performance of roughened surfaces is at the expense of increased flow resistance (increased pressure drop or friction factor), accurate prediction techniques for determining the friction factors and Nusselt numbers for roughened surfaces are required if such features are to be considered as design options. This report presents the results of the second phase of a research program sponsored by Argonne National Laboratory to validate models for the prediction of friction factors and Nusselt numbers for fully developed turbulent flow in enhanced heat-exchanger tubes. The first phase was concerned with validating a roughness model for turbulent flow in tubes internally roughened with three-dimensional distributed roughness elements, such as sandgrains, spheres, hemispheres, and cones. The second phase is concerned with devising and validating methods for the prediction of friction factors and Nusselt numbers for turbulent flow in tubes internally roughened with repeated, two-dimensional ribs aligned perpendicular to the flow. The ribs are spaced sufficiently far apart that the leeward-side separated flow reattaches to the wall before again separating in order to negotiate the next rib. This heat-transfer enhancement mechanism is called the separation and reattachment mechanism, after Rabas (1989). This work is limited to rectangular rib shapes.

  7. Comprehensive magnetotransport characterization of two dimensional electron gas in AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor structures leading to the assessment of interface roughness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mishra, Manna Kumari [Solid State Physics Laboratory, Lucknow Road, Timarpur, Delhi-110054 (India); Netaji Subhas Institute of Technology, Dwarka, New Delhi-110078 (India); Sharma, Rajesh K., E-mail: rksharma@sspl.drdo.in; Manchanda, Rachna; Bag, Rajesh K.; Muralidharan, Rangarajan [Solid State Physics Laboratory, Lucknow Road, Timarpur, Delhi-110054 (India); Thakur, Om Prakash [Netaji Subhas Institute of Technology, Dwarka, New Delhi-110078 (India)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetotransport in two distinct AlGaN/GaN HEMT structures grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE) on Fe-doped templates is investigated using Shubnikov de-Haas Oscillations in the temperature range of 1.8–6 K and multicarrier fitting in the temperature range of 1.8–300 K. The temperature dependence of the two dimensional electron gas mobility is extracted from simultaneous multicarrier fitting of transverse and longitudinal resistivity as a function of magnetic field and the data is utilized to estimate contribution of interface roughness to the mobility and the corresponding transport lifetime. The quantum scattering time obtained from the analysis of Shubnikov de Haas Oscillations in transverse magnetoresistance along with the transport lifetime time were used to estimate interface roughness amplitude and lateral correlation length. The results indicate that the insertion of AlN over layer deposited prior to the growth of GaN base layer on Fe doped GaN templates for forming HEMT structures reduced the parallel conduction but resulted in an increase in interface roughness.

  8. Resource Characterization and Quantification of Natural Gas-Hydrate and Associated Free-Gas Accumulations in the Prudhoe Bay - Kuparuk River Area on the North Slope of Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shirish Patil; Abhijit Dandekar

    2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural gas hydrates have long been considered a nuisance by the petroleum industry. Hydrates have been hazards to drilling crews, with blowouts a common occurrence if not properly accounted for in drilling plans. In gas pipelines, hydrates have formed plugs if gas was not properly dehydrated. Removing these plugs has been an expensive and time-consuming process. Recently, however, due to the geologic evidence indicating that in situ hydrates could potentially be a vast energy resource of the future, research efforts have been undertaken to explore how natural gas from hydrates might be produced. This study investigates the relative permeability of methane and brine in hydrate-bearing Alaska North Slope core samples. In February 2007, core samples were taken from the Mt. Elbert site situated between the Prudhoe Bay and Kuparuk oil fields on the Alaska North Slope. Core plugs from those core samples have been used as a platform to form hydrates and perform unsteady-steady-state displacement relative permeability experiments. The absolute permeability of Mt. Elbert core samples determined by Omni Labs was also validated as part of this study. Data taken with experimental apparatuses at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, ConocoPhillips laboratories at the Bartlesville Technology Center, and at the Arctic Slope Regional Corporation's facilities in Anchorage, Alaska, provided the basis for this study. This study finds that many difficulties inhibit the ability to obtain relative permeability data in porous media-containing hydrates. Difficulties include handling unconsolidated cores during initial core preparation work, forming hydrates in the core in such a way that promotes flow of both brine and methane, and obtaining simultaneous two-phase flow of brine and methane necessary to quantify relative permeability using unsteady-steady-state displacement methods.

  9. Slope parameter for the differential cross-section for the reaction p + d. -->. X + d in the region of small momentum transfer at Fermilab energies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akimov, Yu.K.; Bartenev, V.D.; Izyurov, V.M.

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A deuterium gas jet target was used in the circulating beam of the Fermilab accelerator to study the M/sup 2//sub x/ and s dependence and the slope parameter for pd ..-->.. Xd in the region 0.025 less than or equal to vertical bar t vertical bar less than or equal to 0.17 (GeV/c)/sup 2/ and 5 less than or equal to M/sup 2//sub x/ less than or equal to 0.068s GeV/sup 2/. A simple parametrization in terms of the variable (1 - x) is found.

  10. Application of Advanced Reservoir Characterization, Simulation, and Production Optimization Strategies to Maximize Recovery in Slope and Basin Clastic Reservoirs, West Texas (Delaware Basin), Class III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dutton, Shirley P.; Flanders, William A.

    2001-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this Class III project was demonstrate that reservoir characterization and enhanced oil recovery (EOR) by CO2 flood can increase production from slope and basin clastic reservoirs in sandstones of the Delaware Mountain Group in the Delaware Basin of West Texas and New Mexico. Phase 1 of the project, reservoir characterization, focused on Geraldine Ford and East Ford fields, which are Delaware Mountain Group fields that produce from the upper Bell Canyon Formation (Ramsey sandstone). The demonstration phase of the project was a CO2 flood conducted in East Ford field, which is operated by Orla Petco, Inc., as the East Ford unit.

  11. Application of Advanced Reservoir Characterization, Simulation, and Production Optimization Strategies to Maximize Recovery in Slope and Basin Clastic Reservoirs, West Texas (Delaware Basin), Class III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dutton, Shirley P.; Flanders, William A.; Mendez, Daniel L.

    2001-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this Class 3 project was demonstrate that detailed reservoir characterization of slope and basin clastic reservoirs in sandstone's of the Delaware Mountain Group in the Delaware Basin of West Texas and New Mexico is a cost effective way to recover oil more economically through geologically based field development. This project was focused on East Ford field, a Delaware Mountain Group field that produced from the upper Bell Canyon Formation (Ramsey sandstone). The field, discovered in 9160, is operated by Oral Petco, Inc., as the East Ford unit. A CO2 flood was being conducted in the unit, and this flood is the Phase 2 demonstration for the project.

  12. Phase Behavior, Solid Organic Precipitation, and Mobility Characterization Studies in Support of Enhanced Heavy Oil Recovery on the Alaska North Slope

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shirish Patil; Abhijit Dandekar; Santanu Khataniar

    2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The medium-heavy oil (viscous oil) resources in the Alaska North Slope are estimated at 20 to 25 billion barrels. These oils are viscous, flow sluggishly in the formations, and are difficult to recover. Recovery of this viscous oil requires carefully designed enhanced oil recovery processes. Success of these recovery processes is critically dependent on accurate knowledge of the phase behavior and fluid properties, especially viscosity, of these oils under variety of pressure and temperature conditions. This project focused on predicting phase behavior and viscosity of viscous oils using equations of state and semi-empirical correlations. An experimental study was conducted to quantify the phase behavior and physical properties of viscous oils from the Alaska North Slope oil field. The oil samples were compositionally characterized by the simulated distillation technique. Constant composition expansion and differential liberation tests were conducted on viscous oil samples. Experiment results for phase behavior and reservoir fluid properties were used to tune the Peng-Robinson equation of state and predict the phase behavior accurately. A comprehensive literature search was carried out to compile available compositional viscosity models and their modifications, for application to heavy or viscous oils. With the help of meticulously amassed new medium-heavy oil viscosity data from experiments, a comparative study was conducted to evaluate the potential of various models. The widely used corresponding state viscosity model predictions deteriorate when applied to heavy oil systems. Hence, a semi-empirical approach (the Lindeloff model) was adopted for modeling the viscosity behavior. Based on the analysis, appropriate adjustments have been suggested: the major one is the division of the pressure-viscosity profile into three distinct regions. New modifications have improved the overall fit, including the saturated viscosities at low pressures. However, with the limited amount of geographically diverse data, it is not possible to develop a comprehensive predictive model. Based on the comprehensive phase behavior analysis of Alaska North Slope crude oil, a reservoir simulation study was carried out to evaluate the performance of a gas injection enhanced oil recovery technique for the West Sak reservoir. It was found that a definite increase in viscous oil production can be obtained by selecting the proper injectant gas and by optimizing reservoir operating parameters. A comparative analysis is provided, which helps in the decision-making process.

  13. IMPACT OF DIELECTRIC PARAMETERS ON THE REFLECTIVITY OF 3C-SiC WAFERS WITH A ROUGH SURFACE MORPHOLOGY IN THE RESTSTRAHLEN REGION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.A.A. Engelbrecht; E. Janzén; A. Henry; I.J. van Rooyen

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A layer-on-substrate model is used to obtain the infrared reflectance for 3C-SiC with a rough surface morphology. The effect of varying dielectric parameters of the “damaged layer” on the observed reflectivity of the 3C-SiC in the reststrahlen region is assessed. Different simulated reflectance spectra are obtained to those if the dielectric parameters of the “substrate” were varied. Most notable changes in the shape of the simulated reststrahlen peak are observed for changes in the high frequency dielectric constant, the phonon damping constant, the phonon frequencies and “thickness” of damaged surface layer.

  14. The determination of the turbulent intensities in a transitional flow from a smooth to a rough wall with zero pressure gradient in a two-dimensional channel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Islam, Obaidul

    1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE DETERMINATION OF THE TURBULENT INTENSITIES IN A TRANSITIONAL FLOW FROM A SMOOTH TO A ROUGH WALL WITH ZERO PRESSURE GRADIENT IN A TWO-DIMENSIONAL CHANNEL A Thesis By Ol3AIDU I. ISLAM Submitted to the Graduate School of. tire Agricultural... WALL WITH ZERO PRESSURE GRADIENT IN A TWO DIMENSIONAL. GHANNEL A Thesis By OBAIDUL ISLAM Approved as to style and content by: F / F Ghairma p'f mm tg Head of Department May 1963 ACKNOWLEDGMENTS Grateful acknowledgment is made to the Texas...

  15. Seed rain and seed bank of third- and fifth-order streams on the western slope of the cascade range. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harmon, J.M.; Franklin, J.F.

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors compared the composition and density of the on-site vegetation, seed bank, and seed rain of three geomorphic and successional surfaces along third- and fifth- order streams on the western slope of the Cascade Range in Oregon. The on-site vegetation generally was dominated by tree species, the seed bank by herb species, and the seed rain by tree and herb species. Seed rain density generally correspond to the successional stage of the geomorphic surface and frequency of site disturbance, with the youngest and least vegetatively stable geomorphic surfaces having the highest density of trapped viable seeds. The highest density and greatest species richness of seed germinants were found on the intermediate-aged geomorphic surfaces, which had moderate levels of disturbance.

  16. Application of advanced reservoir characterization, simulation, and production optimization strategies to maximize recovery in slope and basin clastic reservoirs, West Texas (Delaware Basin), Class III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dutton, Shirley P.; Flanders, William A.; Zirczy, Helena H.

    2000-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this Class 3 project was to demonstrate that detailed reservoir characterization of slope and basin clastic reservoirs in sandstones of the Delaware Mountain Group in the Delaware Basin of West Texas and New Mexico is a cost effective way to recover a higher percentage of the original oil in place through strategic placement of infill wells and geologically based field development. Phase 1 of the project, reservoir characterization, was completed this year, and Phase 2 began. The project is focused on East Ford field, a representative Delaware Mountain Group field that produces from the upper Bell Canyon Formation (Ramsey sandstone). The field, discovered in 1960, is operated by Oral Petco, Inc., as the East Ford unit. A CO{sub 2} flood is being conducted in the unit, and this flood is the Phase 2 demonstration for the project.

  17. Evaluation of a deposit in the vicinity of the PBU L-106 Site, North Slope, Alaska, for a potential long-term test of gas production from hydrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moridis, G.J.; Reagan, M.T.; Boyle, K.L.; Zhang, K.

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the effort to investigate the technical feasibility of gas production from hydrate deposits, a long-term field test (lasting 18-24 months) is under consideration in a project led by the U.S. Department of Energy. We evaluate a candidate deposit involving the C-Unit in the vicinity of the PBU-L106 site in North Slope, Alaska. This deposit is stratigraphically bounded by impermeable shale top and bottom boundaries (Class 3), and is characterized by high intrinsic permeabilities, high porosity, high hydrate saturation, and a hydrostatic pressure distribution. The C-unit deposit is composed of two hydrate-bearing strata separated by a 30-ft-thick shale interlayer, and its temperatrure across its boundaries ranges between 5 and 6.5 C. We investigate by means of numerical simulation involving very fine grids the production potential of these two deposits using both vertical and horizontal wells. We also explore the sensitivity of production to key parameters such as the hydrate saturation, the formation permeability, and the permeability of the bounding shale layers. Finally, we compare the production performance of the C-Unit at the PBU-L106 site to that of the D-Unit accumulation at the Mount Elbert site, a thinner, single-layer Class 3 deposit on the North Slope of Alaska that is shallower, less-pressurized and colder (2.3-2.6 C). The results indicate that production from horizontal wells may be orders of magnitude larger than that from vertical ones. Additionally, production increases with the formation permeability, and with a decreasing permeability of the boundaries. The effect of the hydrate saturation on production is complex and depends on the time frame of production. Because of higher production, the PBU-L106 deposit appears to have an advantage as a candidate for the long-term test.

  18. Impact of surface roughness on the electrical parameters of industrial high efficiency NaOH-NaOCl textured multicrystalline silicon solar cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basu, P.K. [Department of Physics, Echelon Institute of Technology, Faridabad 121002, Haryana (India); Pujahari, R.M. [Department of Physics, Echelon Institute of Technology, Faridabad 121002, Haryana (India); Department of Physics, Manav Rachna International University, Faridabad 121001, Haryana (India); Kaur, Harpreet [Department of Physics, Manav Rachna International University, Faridabad 121001, Haryana (India); Department of Physics, Advanced Institute of Technology and Management, Palwal 121105, Haryana (India); Singh, Devi [Department of Physics, Manav Rachna International University, Faridabad 121001, Haryana (India); Varandani, D.; Mehta, B.R. [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology, New Delhi 110016 (India)

    2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Sodium hydroxide (NaOH) and sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) solution (1:1 ratio by volume) based texturization process at 80-82 C is an easy, low cost and comparatively new and convenient option for fabrication of any multicrystalline silicon (mC-Si) solar cell. In the present study atomic force microscope is used to observe the intragrain surface in a miniscule area (3 {mu}m x 3 {mu}m) of NaOH-NaOCl textured surface by two and three dimensional analysis, roughness analysis and section analysis. The r.m.s value of the surface parameter of 7.0 nm ascertains the smoothness of the textured surface and further the surface reflectivity is minimized to 4-6% in the 500-1000 nm wavelength range by a proper silicon nitride anti-reflection coating. Comparing with the standard HF-HNO{sub 3}-CH{sub 3}COOH acid textured cell, the NaOH-NaOCl textured cell shows a comparatively lower value of series resistance of 7.17 m{omega}, higher value of shunt resistance of 18.4 {omega} to yield a fill factor of 0.766 leading to more than 15% cell efficiency in the industrial cell processing line. This AFM study yields different surface roughness parameters for the NaOH-NaOCl textured wafers which can be used as a reference standard for optimized texturing. (author)

  19. Assessment of costs and benefits of flexible and alternative fuel use in the US transportation sector. Technical report twelve: Economic analysis of alternative uses for Alaskan North Slope natural gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the Altemative Fuels Assessment, the Department of Energy (DOE) is studying the use of derivatives of natural gas, including compressed natural gas and methanol, as altemative transportation fuels. A critical part of this effort is determining potential sources of natural gas and the economics of those sources. Previous studies in this series characterized the economics of unutilized gas within the lower 48 United States, comparing its value for methanol production against its value as a pipelined fuel (US Department of Energy 1991), and analyzed the costs of developing undeveloped nonassociated gas reserves in several countries (US Department of Energy 1992c). This report extends those analyses to include Alaskan North Slope natural gas that either is not being produced or is being reinjected. The report includes the following: A description of discovered and potential (undiscovered) quantities of natural gas on the Alaskan North Slope. A discussion of proposed altemative uses for Alaskan North Slope natural gas. A comparison of the economics of the proposed alternative uses for Alaskan North Slope natural gas. The purpose of this report is to illustrate the costs of transporting Alaskan North Slope gas to markets in the lower 48 States as pipeline gas, liquefied natural gas (LNG), or methanol. It is not intended to recommend one alternative over another or to evaluate the relative economics or timing of using North Slope gas in new tertiary oil recovery projects. The information is supplied in sufficient detail to allow incorporation of relevant economic relationships (for example, wellhead gas prices and transportation costs) into the Altemative Fuels Trade Model, the analytical framework DOE is using to evaluate various policy options.

  20. Surface figure and roughness tolerances for NIF optics and the interpretation of the gradient, P-V wavefront and RMS specifications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aikens, D M; English, R E; House, W; Lawson, J K; Nichols, M A; Whistler, W T

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a high energy laser system such as the National Ignition Facility (NIF), the ability to focus light into as small a spot as possible at the highest possible fluence is highly dependent on the quality of the optics used in the system. Typically, surface form errors and transmitted and reflected wavefront errors are specified in terms of a peak-to-valley wavefront error (P-V), or occasionally in terms of an RMS wavefront error (RMS) 1 . It has been shown, however, that the parameter that most closely correlates with beam focusability is neither of these, but the RMS of the gradients of the wavefront error (RMS Gradient). Further, the spatial frequency of the wavefront error plays a significant role in the way that a given error effects the performance of the laser system, so careful attention must be paid to how the spatial filtering is both specified and accomplished. Since ISO 10110 has no specific provisions for a gradient specification, LLNL has developed its own notation and procedures for these critical specifications. In evaluating surface figure errors as specified by the NIF drawings, modern phase modulating interferometers (PMI) will be used. In addition to performing QA testing of the optics, LLNL intends to utilize the software capabilities of the instruments to obtain the information to model the wavefront of the 131 passes through various optical elements comprising the NIF front end. Tests will be performed and documented after coating and as installed in the specified mechanical mounts. This paper describes the evaluation of the wavefront error for NIF small optics including specifications over a given spatial period callout, the proper low pass filtering of the data and the allowable filtering and settings that can be applied to obtain proper wavefront data. This paper also describes the origin and evolution of other NIF wavefront and roughness specifications, and gives examples. Since the wavefront requirements and hence the specifications vary for the different systems in the NIF, we will focus on one system, the injection laser system (ILS) or ''front end''. Also discussed will be the metrology and data manipulation requirements for the large aperture optics. Finally, clarification will be given to the differences between various versions of the RMS wavefront and roughness specifications allowed in ISO 10110, and how they contrast to the RMS roughness specifications used in ANSI-Y14.5.

  1. IJOPE Paper No JC-343AB-final 9/26/04 Biausser Page number 1 Numerical Analysis of the Internal Kinematics and Dynamics of 3D Breaking Waves on Slopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grilli, Stéphan T.

    Kinematics and Dynamics of 3D Breaking Waves on Slopes Benjamin Biausser1 , Stéphan T. Grilli2 , Philippe and internal kinematics (velocity, vorticity, pressure) are presented. KEY WORDS: breaking ocean waves years, our understanding of wave breaking dynamics and kinematics is still quite incomplete. Due

  2. Geometric frequency shift for electric dipole searches with trapped spin-1/2 particles in general fields and measurement cells of arbitrary shape with smooth or rough walls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steyerl, A; Müller, G; Golub, R

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The important role of geometric phases in searches for a permanent electric dipole moment of the neutron, using Ramsey separated oscillatory field nuclear magnetic resonance, was first investigated by Pendlebury $\\textit{et al.}$ [Phys. Rev. A $\\mathbf{70}$, 032102 (2004)]. Their analysis was based on the Bloch equations. In subsequent work using the spin density matrix Lamoreaux and Golub [Phys. Rev. A $\\mathbf{71}$, 032104 (2005)] showed the usual relation between the frequency shifts and the correlation functions of the fields seen by trapped particles in general fields (Redfield theory). More recently we presented a solution of the Schr\\"odinger equation for spin-$1/2$ particles in circular cylindrical traps with smooth walls and exposed to arbitrary fields [Steyerl $\\textit{et al.}$, Phys.Rev. A $\\mathbf{89}$, 052129 (2014)]. Here we extend this work to show how the Redfield theory follows directly from the Schr\\"odinger equation solution and include wall roughness, cylindrical trap geometry with arbitra...

  3. Simulations of Variable Bottomhole Pressure Regimes to Improve Production from the Double-Unit Mount Elbert, Milne Point Unit, North Slope Alaska Hydrate Deposit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myshakin, Evgeniy; Anderson, Brian; Rose, Kelly; Boswell, Ray

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas production was predicted from a reservoir model based on the Mount Elbert gas hydrate accumulation located on the Alaska North slope at various simulator submodels and production scenarios. Log, core, and fluid measurements were used to provide a comprehensive reservoir description. These data were incorporated with experimentally derived saturations, porosities, permeability values, parameters for capillary pressure, and relative permeability functions. The modeled reservoir exposed to depressurization at a constant bottomhole pressure (2.7 MPa) has shown limited production potential due to its low temperature profile. To improve production the bottomhole pressure was allowed to vary from 2.7 (above the quadruple point) to 2.0 MPa over a 15-year period. The results indicate that gas production was nearly doubled in comparison with a constant-pressure regime. Extensive ice formation and hydrate reformation that could severely hinder gas production were avoided in the variable-pressure regime system. A use of permeability variation coupled with porosity change is shown to be crucial to predict those phenomena at a reservoir scale.

  4. A study of the turbulent intensities and correlation coefficients in the incompressible flow of air in transition from a smooth to a rough wall in a two-dimensional channel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carper, Herbert Jackson

    1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A STUDY OF THE TURBULENT INTENSITIES AND CORRELATION COEFFICIENTS IN THE INCOMPRESSIBLE FLOW OF AIR IN TRANSITION FROM A SMOOTH TO A ROUGH WALL IN A TWO-DIMENSIONAL CHANNEL A Thesis By HERBERT JACKSON CARPER JR. Submitted to the Graduate... COEFFICIENTS IN THE INCOMPRESSIBLE FLOW OF AIR IN TRANSITION FROM A SMOOTH TO A ROUGH WALL IN A TWO-DIMENSIONAL CHANNEL A Thesis By HERBERT JACKSON CARPER JR. Approved as to style and content by: (Chairm of o e) (Head of Department) August 1962 853958...

  5. Evaluating benefits of slope rounding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Jichuan

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Unrounded Option, d?= 0 ft (0 m) 2. HVOSM Simulation of Constant Rounding, d, = 2 ft (0. 61 m) 15 16 3. HVOSM Simulation of Optimum Rounding 17 4. HVOSM Simulation of Unrounded Option, Honda Civic with a "Return-to-the-Road" Steer Angle of 8 Degrees 24... 5. HVOSM Simulation of 2 ft (0. 61 m) Constant Rounding, Honda Civic with a "Return-to-the-Road" Steer Angle of 8 Degrees 25 6. HVOSM Simulation of 4 ft (1. 22 m) Constant Rounding, Honda Civic with a "Return-to-the-Road" Steer Angle of 8 Degrees...

  6. Source Characterization and Temporal Variation of Methane Seepage from Thermokarst Lakes on the Alaska North Slope in Response to Arctic Climate Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The goals of this research were to characterize the source, magnitude and temporal variability of methane seepage from thermokarst lakes (TKL) within the Alaska North Slope gas hydrate province, assess the vulnerability of these areas to ongoing and future arctic climate change and determine if gas hydrate dissociation resulting from permafrost melting is contributing to the current lake emissions. Analyses were focused on four main lake locations referred to in this report: Lake Qalluuraq (referred to as Lake Q) and Lake Teshekpuk (both on Alaska?s North Slope) and Lake Killarney and Goldstream Bill Lake (both in Alaska?s interior). From analyses of gases coming from lakes in Alaska, we showed that ecological seeps are common in Alaska and they account for a larger source of atmospheric methane today than geologic subcap seeps. Emissions from the geologic source could increase with potential implications for climate warming feedbacks. Our analyses of TKL sites showing gas ebullition were complemented with geophysical surveys, providing important insight about the distribution of shallow gas in the sediments and the lake bottom manifestation of seepage (e.g., pockmarks). In Lake Q, Chirp data were limited in their capacity to image deeper sediments and did not capture the thaw bulb. The failure to capture the thaw bulb at Lake Q may in part be related to the fact that the present day lake is a remnant of an older, larger, and now-partially drained lake. These suggestions are consistent with our analyses of a dated core of sediment from the lake that shows that a wetland has been present at the site of Lake Q since approximately 12,000 thousand years ago. Chemical analyses of the core indicate that the availability of methane at the site has changed during the past and is correlated with past environmental changes (i.e. temperature and hydrology) in the Arctic. Discovery of methane seeps in Lake Teshekpuk in the northernmost part of the lake during 2009 reconnaissance surveys provided a strong impetus to visit this area in 2010. The seismic methods applied in Lake Teshekpuk were able to image pockmarks, widespread shallow gas in the sediments, and the relationship among different sediment packages on the lake?s bottom, but even boomer seismics did not detect permafrost beneath the northern part of the lake. By characterizing the biogeochemistry of shallow TKL with methane seeps we showed that the radical seasonal shifts in ice cover and temperature. These seasonal environmental differences result in distinct consumption and production processes of biologically-relevant compounds. The combined effects of temperature, ice-volume and other lithological factors linked to seepage from the lake are manifest in the distribution of sedimentary methane in Lake Q during icecovered and ice-free conditions. The biogeochemistry results illustrated very active methanotrophy in TKLs. Substantial effort was subsequently made to characterize the nature of methanotrophic communities in TKLs. We applied stable isotope probing approaches to genetically characterize the methanotrophs most active in utilizing methane in TKLs. Our study is the first to identify methane oxidizing organisms active in arctic TKLs, and revealing that type I methanotrophs and type II methanotrophs are abundant and active in assimilating methane in TKLs. These organisms play an important role in limiting the flux of methane from these sites. Our investigations indicate that as temperatures increase in the Arctic, oxidation rates and active methanotrophic populations will also shift. Whether these changes can offset predicted increases in methanogenesis is an important question underlying models of future methane flux and resultant climate change. Overall our findings indicate that TKLs and their ability to act as both source and sink of methane are exceedingly sensitive to environmental change.

  7. Solid bitumen at Atigun Gorge, central Brooks Range front: Implications for oil exploration in the North Slope fold and thrust belt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howell, D.G.; Johnsson, M.J.; Bird, K.J. (U.S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States))

    1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Atigun Gorge area of the north-central Brooks range is a structurally complex region in which a sequence of north-verging duplex structures involving Paleozoic and Mesozoic Ellesmerian continental margin deposits are structurally overlain by a south-verging thrust of Brookian foreland basin deposits of Albian age. The resulting structural triangle zone is marked by numerous small-scale thrusts involving Permian and Triassic strata in which solid bitumen, occupying fissures up to 10 cm wide and several meters in length, has been found. The presence of aromatics in the odorless, black material was confirmed by ultraviolet fluorescence following extraction in dichloromethane. The occurrence of solid bitumen at Atigun Gorge adds to a growing inventory of hydrocarbon-filled fractures found mostly in Cretaceous rocks in the Brooks Range foothills. These occurrences are consistent with a model of hydrocarbon generation beneath the northern margin of the Brooks Range. The regional distribution of vitrinite reflectance isograds suggests that the northern margin of the Brooks Range and the adjoining foreland basin deposits of the North Slope have experienced similar thermal histories. The 0.6% vitrinite reflectance isograd intersects the land surface along the southern margin of the foreland and the 2.0% isograd lies within the northern part of the range. Although these relations suggest the possibility of petroleum resources at shallow depths beneath the Brooks Range foothills, they also indicate that a considerable amount of differential uplift has occurred, probably resulting in redistribution and some leakage of any oil and gas accumulations.

  8. RESOURCE CHARACTERIZATION AND QUANTIFICATION OF NATURAL GAS-HYDRATE AND ASSOCIATED FREE-GAS ACCUMULATIONS IN THE PRUDHOE BAY - KUPARUK RIVER AREA ON THE NORTH SLOPE OF ALASKA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Hunter; Shirish Patil; Robert Casavant; Tim Collett

    2003-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Interim results are presented from the project designed to characterize, quantify, and determine the commercial feasibility of Alaska North Slope (ANS) gas-hydrate and associated free-gas resources in the Prudhoe Bay Unit (PBU), Kuparuk River Unit (KRU), and Milne Point Unit (MPU) areas. This collaborative research will provide practical input to reservoir and economic models, determine the technical feasibility of gas hydrate production, and influence future exploration and field extension of this potential ANS resource. The large magnitude of unconventional in-place gas (40-100 TCF) and conventional ANS gas commercialization evaluation creates industry-DOE alignment to assess this potential resource. This region uniquely combines known gas hydrate presence and existing production infrastructure. Many technical, economical, environmental, and safety issues require resolution before enabling gas hydrate commercial production. Gas hydrate energy resource potential has been studied for nearly three decades. However, this knowledge has not been applied to practical ANS gas hydrate resource development. ANS gas hydrate and associated free gas reservoirs are being studied to determine reservoir extent, stratigraphy, structure, continuity, quality, variability, and geophysical and petrophysical property distribution. Phase 1 will characterize reservoirs, lead to recoverable reserve and commercial potential estimates, and define procedures for gas hydrate drilling, data acquisition, completion, and production. Phases 2 and 3 will integrate well, core, log, and long-term production test data from additional wells, if justified by results from prior phases. The project could lead to future ANS gas hydrate pilot development. This project will help solve technical and economic issues to enable government and industry to make informed decisions regarding future commercialization of unconventional gas-hydrate resources.

  9. Application of Advanced Reservoir Characterization, Simulation, and Production Optimization Strategies to Maximize Recovery in Slope and Basin Clastic Reservoirs, West Texas (Delaware Basin).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dutton, S.P.

    1997-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate that detailed reservoir characterization of slope and basin clastic reservoirs in sandstones of the Delaware Mountain Group in the Delaware Basin of West Texas and New Mexico is a cost effective way to recover a higher percentage of the original oil in place through strategic placement of infill wells and geologically based field development. Project objectives are divided into two major phases. The objectives of the reservoir characterization phase of the project are to provide a detailed understanding of the architecture and heterogeneity of two fields, the Ford Geraldine unit and Ford West field, which produce from the Bell Canyon and Cherry Canyon Formations, respectively, of the Delaware Mountain Group and to compare Bell Canyon and Cherry Canyon reservoirs. Reservoir characterization will utilize 3-D seismic data, high-resolution sequence stratigraphy, subsurface field studies, outcrop characterization, and other techniques. Once the reservoir- characterization study of both fields is completed, a pilot area of approximately 1 mi{sup 2} in one of the fields will be chosen for reservoir simulation. The objectives of the implementation phase of the project are to (1) apply the knowledge gained from reservoir characterization and simulation studies to increase recovery from the pilot area, (2) demonstrate that economically significant unrecovered oil remains in geologically resolvable untapped compartments, and (3) test the accuracy of reservoir characterization and flow simulation as predictive tools in resource preservation of mature fields. A geologically designed, enhanced-recovery program (CO{sub 2} flood, water flood, or polymer flood) and well-completion program will be developed, and one to three infill wells will be drilled and cored. Through technology transfer workshops and other present at ions, the knowledge gained in the comparative study of these two fields can then be applied to increase product ion from the more than 100 other Delaware Mountain Group reservoirs.

  10. 27th European Photovoltaic Solar Energy Conference, Frankfurt, Germany, 24-28 September 2012, 2AO.1.5 IMPACT OF THE REAR SURFACE ROUGHNESS ON INDUSTRIAL-TYPE PERC SOLAR CELLS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -generation industrial solar cells as stated in the International Technology Roadmap [3]. An industrial PERC process flow27th European Photovoltaic Solar Energy Conference, Frankfurt, Germany, 24-28 September 2012, 2AO.1.5 IMPACT OF THE REAR SURFACE ROUGHNESS ON INDUSTRIAL-TYPE PERC SOLAR CELLS C.Kranz1 , S. Wyczanowski1 , S

  11. Roughly 15,000 patents a month are issued by the US Patent and Trademark Office (PTO).1 By law, these are supposed to cover only "novel" and "nonobvious" inventions, but an average

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadoulet, Elisabeth

    1347 Roughly 15,000 patents a month are issued by the US Patent and Trademark Office (PTO).1 By law­20 hours of patent examiner time,2 and a substantial proportion of the few patents later fully evaluated the issuance of many ques- tionable patents. Responding to such concerns, the Supreme Court recently made

  12. Geometric frequency shift for electric dipole searches with trapped spin-1/2 particles in general fields and measurement cells of arbitrary shape with smooth or rough walls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Steyerl; C. Kaufman; G. Müller; R. Golub

    2015-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The important role of geometric phases in searches for a permanent electric dipole moment of the neutron, using Ramsey separated oscillatory field nuclear magnetic resonance, was first investigated by Pendlebury $\\textit{et al.}$ [Phys. Rev. A $\\mathbf{70}$, 032102 (2004)]. Their analysis was based on the Bloch equations. In subsequent work using the spin density matrix Lamoreaux and Golub [Phys. Rev. A $\\mathbf{71}$, 032104 (2005)] showed the usual relation between the frequency shifts and the correlation functions of the fields seen by trapped particles in general fields (Redfield theory). More recently we presented a solution of the Schr\\"odinger equation for spin-$1/2$ particles in circular cylindrical traps with smooth walls and exposed to arbitrary fields [Steyerl $\\textit{et al.}$, Phys.Rev. A $\\mathbf{89}$, 052129 (2014)]. Here we extend this work to show how the Redfield theory follows directly from the Schr\\"odinger equation solution and include wall roughness, cylindrical trap geometry with arbitrary cross section, and field perturbations that do not, in the frame of the moving particles, average to zero in time and which, therefore, do not satisfy the prerequisites of the statistical approach based on the spin-density matrix. We show by direct, detailed, calculation the agreement of the results from the Schr\\"odinger equation with the Redfield theory for the cases of a rectangular cell with specular walls and of a circular cell with diffuse reflecting walls.

  13. A Unifying Framework to Quantify the Effects of Substrate Interactions, Stiffness, and Roughness on the Dynamics of Thin Supported Polymer Films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul Z. Hanakata; Beatriz A. Pazmiño Betancourt; Jack F. Douglas; Francis W. Starr

    2015-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Changes in the dynamics of supported polymer films in comparison to bulk materials involve a complex convolution of effects, such as substrate interactions, roughness and compliance, in addition to film thickness. We consider molecular dynamics simulations of substrate-supported, coarse-grained polymer films where these parameters are tuned separately to determine how each of these variables influence the molecular dynamics of thin polymer films. We find that all these variables significantly influence the film dynamics, leading to a seemingly intractable degree of complexity in describing these changes. However, by considering how these constraining variables influence string-like collective motion within the film, we show that all our observations can be understood in a unified and quantitative way. More specifically, the string model for glass-forming liquids implies that the changes in the structural relaxation of these films are governed by the changes in the average length of string-like cooperative motions and this model is confirmed under all conditions considered in our simulations. Ultimately, these changes are parameterized in terms of just the activation enthalpy and entropy for molecular organization, which have predictable dependences on substrate properties and film thickness, offering a promising approach for the rational design of film properties.

  14. Temperature-dependent tensile strength, surface roughness diagnostics, and magnetic support and positioning of polymer ICF shells. Final report, October 1, 1993--April 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Honig, A.

    1995-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    During the course of this grant, we perfected emissivity and accommodation coefficient measurements on polymer ICF shells in the temperature range 250 to 350 K. Values for polystyrene shells are generally between 10{sup -2} and 10{sup -3}, which are very advantageous for ICF at cryogenic temperatures. Preliminary results on Br doped target shells indicate an accommodation coefficient, presumably associated with surface roughness on an atomic scale, about an order of magnitude larger than for ordinary polystyrene target shells. We also constructed apparatus with optical access for low temperature tensile strength and emissivity measurements, and made preliminary tests on this system. Magnetic shells were obtained both from GDP coating and from doping styrene with 10 manometer size ferromagnetic particles. The magnetic properties were measured through electron spin resonance (ESR). These experiments confirm the applicability of the Curie law, and establish the validity of using ESR measurements to determine shell temperature in the low temperature regime from 4K to 250K, thus complementing our presently accessible range. The high electron spin densities (> 10{sup 20}/CM{sup 3}) suggest magnetic levitation should be feasible at cryogenic temperatures. This work has resulted in two conference presentations, a Technical Report, a paper to be published in Fusion Technology, and a Master`s Thesis.

  15. Rough Paths Theory Fabrice Baudoin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Let p > 2. If xn : [0,1] ? Rd is a sequence of bounded variation paths ... The fundamental theorem of Lyons is the following: ... Brownian motion (B(t))t?0.

  16. Fundamental Mechanisms of Interface Roughness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Randall L. Headrick

    2009-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Publication quality results were obtained for several experiments and materials systems including: (i) Patterning and smoothening of sapphire surfaces by energetic Ar+ ions. Grazing Incidence Small Angle X-ray Scattering (GISAXS) experiments were performed in the system at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) X21 beamline. Ar+ ions in the energy range from 300 eV to 1000 eV were used to produce ripples on the surfaces of single-crystal sapphire. It was found that the ripple wavelength varies strongly with the angle of incidence of the ions, which increase significantly as the angle from normal is varied from 55° to 35°. A smooth region was found for ion incidence less than 35° away from normal incidence. In this region a strong smoothening mechanism with strength proportional to the second derivative of the height of the surface was found to be responsible for the effect. The discovery of this phase transition between stable and unstable regimes as the angle of incidence is varied has also stimulated new work by other groups in the field. (ii) Growth of Ge quantum dots on Si(100) and (111). We discovered the formation of quantum wires on 4° misoriented Si(111) using real-time GISAXS during the deposition of Ge. The results represent the first time-resolved GISAXS study of Ge quantum dot formation. (iii) Sputter deposition of amorphous thin films and multilayers composed of WSi2 and Si. Our in-situ GISAXS experiments reveal fundamental roughening and smoothing phenomena on surfaces during film deposition. The main results of this work is that the WSi2 layers actually become smoother during deposition due to the smoothening effect of energetic particles in the sputter deposition process.

  17. Pavement roughness on expansive clays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Velasco, Manuel O

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    0 I/I Ql 0 Z 0 V- IU 0 Soil samples were taken adjacent to the roadway segments using a manual auger, in general at depths of 1, 2, and 3 feet. A total of 60 samples were brought to the laboratory, where the following tests have been...

  18. New and Improved Data Logging and Collection System for Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility, Tropical Western Pacific, and North Slope of Alaska Sky Radiation, Ground Radiation, and MET Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ritsche, M.T.; Holdridge, D.J.; Pearson, R.

    2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Aging systems and technological advances mandated changes to the data collection systems at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program's Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) and North Slope of Alaska (NSA) ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF) sites. Key reasons for the upgrade include the following: achieve consistency across all ACRF sites for easy data use and operational maintenance; minimize the need for a single mentor requiring specialized knowledge and training; provide local access to real-time data for operational support, intensive operational period (IOP) support, and public relations; eliminate problems with physical packaging (condensation, connectors, etc.); and increase flexibility in programming and control of the data logger.

  19. Similarity Dimension of a Glaciated Terrain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Daniel R.

    rate of movement. #12;Data Acquisition · The topography of a formerly glaciated surface the proportionality constant b from the previous equation. #12;Application to Topography · The topography of a region, it becomes possible to evaluate the length and similarity dimension of topography as Richardson

  20. Modles Numriques de Terrain Interpolation Numrique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delacourt, Christophe

    Scanner : http://www.riegl.com/ Scanner photogrammétrique : http://atm3d.free.fr/v5/html : Interférométrie : SRTM (Shuttle Radar Topography Mission) : http://srtm.csi.cgiar.org Interférométrie Radar multi

  1. Pattern classification of terrain during amputee walking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farrell, Matthew Todd

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis I study the role of extrinsic (sensors placed on the body) versus intrinsic sensing (instruments placed on an artificial limb) and determine a robust set of sensors from physical and reliability constraints ...

  2. Asynchronous deterministic rendezvous in bounded terrains$

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ilcinkas, David

    . c LIF, Universit´e de Provence, 13453 Marseille, France. Abstract Two mobile agents (robots) have. Robots are modeled as points, and each of them is equipped with a compass. Compasses of robots may be incoherent. Robots construct their routes, but the actual walk of each robot is decided by the adversary

  3. Antonio Diaz-Calderon Jet Propulsion Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelly, Alonzo

    @jpl.nasa.gov Alonzo Kelly The Robotics Institute Carnegie Mellon University On-Line Stability Margin and Attitude which move heavy loads, accelerate or brake aggressively, turn at speed, or operate on sloped terrain

  4. Assessing the frictional and baroclinic contributions to stratified wake formation: a parameter space study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Jamie Brooke

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    of the - parameter space, including both unstratified ( = 0) and highly stratified ( = 4) flows and for terrain slopes characteristic of both geophysical ( = 0.1) and laboratory scale ( = 2.0) obstacles. Simulations both with and without applied surface stresses...

  5. North Slope Co. Northwest Arctic Co.

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire Solar541,9337,2AprilBigtoDepartment of Energy NorthBOE

  6. North Slope Co. Northwest Arctic Co.

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire Solar541,9337,2AprilBigtoDepartment of Energy

  7. North Slope Co. Northwest Arctic Co.

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire Solar541,9337,2AprilBigtoDepartment of EnergyLiquids

  8. ARM - Lesson Plans: North Slope of Alaska

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP : XDC documentationBarrow, Alaska OutreachMaking CloudsMoving Water

  9. Slope Electric Coop Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with form HistoryRistmaSinosteel Corporation Jump to:Sleepy Eye

  10. A Rough Road Leads To The Stars

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    launch. Additional support equipment necessary to open the flight unit after recovery including a special saw, a radiation shield, and other necessary tools and radiation...

  11. X-ray reflectivity and surface roughness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ocko, B.M.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the advent of high brightness synchrotron radiation sources there has been a phenomenal growth in the use of x-rays as a probe of surface structure. The technique of x-ray reflectivity is particularly relevant to electrochemists since it is capable of probing the structure normal to an electrode surface in situ. In this paper the theoretical framework for x-ray reflectivity is reviewed and the results from previous non-electrochemistry measurements are summarized. These measurements are from the liquid/air interface (CCl/sub 4/), the metal crystal vacuum interface (Au(100)), and from the liquid/solid interface(liquid crystal/silicon). 34 refs., 5 figs.

  12. Diffusion in a rough potential revisited

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banerjee, Saikat; Seki, Kazuhiko; Bagchi, Biman

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rugged energy landscapes find wide applications in diverse fields ranging from astrophysics to protein folding. We study the dependence of diffusion coefficient $(D)$ of a Brownian particle on the distribution width $(\\varepsilon)$ of randomness in a Gaussian random landscape by simulations and theoretical analysis. We first show that the elegant expression of Zwanzig [PNAS, 85, 2029 (1988)] for $D(\\varepsilon)$ can be reproduced exactly by using the Rosenfeld diffusion-entropy scaling relation. Our simulations show that Zwanzig's expression overestimates $D$ in an uncorrelated Gaussian random lattice - differing by almost an order of magnitude at moderately high ruggedness. The disparity originates from the presence of "three-site traps" (TST) on the landscape -- which are formed by the presence of deep minima flanked by high barriers on either side. Using mean first passage time formalism, we derive a general expression for the effective diffusion coefficient in the presence of TST, that quantitatively repr...

  13. Effect of Roughness Geometry on Wetting and Dewetting of Rough PDMS Surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel, Susan

    was studied as model for print surfaces used in additive manufacturing and printed electronics. A smooth PDMS on decline for over a decade,9 printing has evolved and has become a manufacturing technology for flexible are keys to a successful implementation of ink printing in manufacturing. Arias et al.4 showed that balance

  14. Adaptive Resampling for Mobile, Real-Time Terrain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mower, James E.

    TinVariance scans the high-res TIN, searching for samples that exceed the variable local tolerance Scanning works about 3 minutes on a 700 mHz laptop #12;LocalTinVariance Speed Factors Worst-case performance is linear, triangular decomposition of a grid GridToTinVT adds a variable tolerance increasing with distance from

  15. FLIGHT TEST RESULTS OF THE CONTROLLED FLIGHT INTO TERRAIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ladkin, Peter B.

    versus soft Fly-By-Wire (FBW) flight control systems. To obtain this data, simulated CFIT avoidance........................................................................................................................................2 B. Ground Proximity Warning Systems

  16. High-Resolution Aeromagnetic Mapping Of Volcanic Terrain, Yellowstone...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    anomalies coincides with the mapped extent of several post-caldera rhyolitic lavas. Linear magnetic anomalies reflect the rectilinear fault systems characteristic of...

  17. Ultrasensitive directional microphone arrays for military operations in urban terrain.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, Neal A.; Peterson, Kenneth Allen; Parker, Eric Paul; Resnick, Paul James; Okandan, Murat; Serkland, Darwin Keith

    2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Acoustic sensing systems are critical elements in detection of sniper events. The microphones developed in this project enable unique sensing systems that benefit significantly from the enhanced sensitivity and extremely compact foot-print. Surface and bulk micromachining technologies developed at Sandia have allowed the design, fabrication and characterization of these unique sensors. We have demonstrated sensitivity that is only available in 1/2 inch to 1 inch studio reference microphones--with our devices that have only 1 to 2mm diameter membranes in a volume less than 1cm{sup 3}.

  18. Near Time-optimal Constrained Trajectory Planning on Outdoor Terrain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sukhatme, Gaurav S.

    interactions are usually unaccounted for. Kinodynamic planning in real-time is also difficult and currently

  19. Topological Landscapes: A Terrain Metaphor for Scientific Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weber, Gunther H.; Bremer, Peer-Timo; Pascucci, Valerio

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    engine and nu- cleon datasets. In both cases considerations similar to those for the hydrogenengine dataset and the largest average error (error weighted by size of the area) is 1.4% for the hydrogen

  20. Learning to visually predict terrain properties for planetary rovers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brooks, Christopher Allen, 1978-

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For future planetary exploration missions, improvements in autonomous rover mobility have the potential to increase scientific data return by providing safe access to geologically interesting sites that lie in rugged ...

  1. Benthic Terrain Modeler: Interpreting the Bathymetric Environment Shaun Walbridge1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Dawn Jeannine

    interactively with an environment such as IPython 6 . Finally, the project now includes an extensive testing

  2. Resisting globalization- ATTAC in France: local discourses, global terrain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonard, Marie des Neiges

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The debate over the "globalization" process has been influenced by the emergence of social movements who deplore this process. This research focuses on the French social movement ATTAC (Action for a Tobin Tax for the Aid of Citizens...

  3. Intelligent terrain avoidance agent for General Aviation Free Flight

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gesting, Paul

    2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to reduce the workload of Air Traffic Controllers, a new concept called Free Flight has emerged for General Aviation. This system takes the load off of the air traffic controller and puts the responsibility on the pilot. In order to help...

  4. Soil Moisture Measurement in Heterogeneous Terrain Merlin, O.1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Jeff

    , uncertainty assessment, soil moisture patterns. EXTENDED ABSTRACT Reliable soil moisture measurement over such data, portable electronic sensors offer a practical alternative to gravimetric measurements % v/v in clay. On the other hand, the real component of the measured relative DC is found to be more

  5. Terrain relative localization for lunar entry, descent, and landing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hale, Matthew J., S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As exploration of the solar system continues, the need for the capability to land a spacecraft very accurately on a planetary body has become apparent. Due to limitations on the achievable accuracy of inertial navigation ...

  6. ASRS Database Report Set Controlled Flight Toward Terrain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    be limited. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration and its ASRS current contractor, Booz Allen Hamilton, specifically disclaim any responsibility for any interpretation which may be made by others

  7. Walking and Running of a Quadruped Robot on Irregular Terrain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kimura, Hiroshi

    -Communications Tokyo, Japan #12;2 Aichi Expo. Prototype Robot Exhib. Jun.9-19, 2005 House keeping dog in a garden (rush bound of the cyclic period of walking TomCat [Jul. 2003] #12;11 Passive Dynamic Walking A walking CPG? ·passive dynamic walk ·spring-damper neural system model (CPG + reflexes) passive dynamics

  8. Mythical Terrain and the Building of Mexico’s UNAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davids, René

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and the Environment in Mexico, 2005. No. 14: Kevin P.Trueba, El Pedregal de San Angel. Mexico City: UniversidadNacional Autónoma de Mexico (1995). 5. See Mario Pani and

  9. High-Resolution Aeromagnetic Mapping Of Volcanic Terrain, Yellowstone

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetecGtel Jump to: navigation, search Name:HidraliaWells Geothermal

  10. PRODUCING SATELLITE-DERIVED IRRADIANCES IN COMPLEX ARID TERRAIN

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall,Missouri:EnergyOssian, New York:Ozark, Alabama:ASES 2003, Austin TX and

  11. Outline DARTS lab Introduction SimScape Large terrain modeling CLOD visualization Conclusion Scalable Large, Multi-Resolution Terrain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -Time Simulation (DARTS) EDL simulations (DSENDS) Rover simulations (ROAMS) Airship simulations Robotic arm

  12. Survey of Terrain Guarding and Art Gallery The terrain guarding problem and art gallery problem are two ar-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krohn, Erik

    show how this strategy has to be changed for molecules with a large hyperpolarizability. Finally, we 2

  13. Laboratory measurements of the temporal and cross-shore variation of the wave-induced bed stress

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sukumaran, Ashok

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Detailed laboratory measurements of horizontal velocity above a rough, fixed, impermeable slope were made to determine the effect of varying wave conditions on the shear stress in the swash zone. The research involved the design, construction...

  14. Headcut retreat resulting from plunge pool erosion in a 3D landscape evolution model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flores Cervantes, Javier Homero, 1977-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Headcut retreat produced by plunge pools is represented using existing concepts about this type of erosion. The model estimates retreat rates, given flow, height of the headcut, upstream slope and Manning's roughness, and ...

  15. The Interruption of Alpine Foehn by a Cold Front. Part I: Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gohm, Alexander

    propagation speed wf 1 m/s Inclination of the frontal surface is wf /uf 1/7.5 8° Freitag (1990 in valleys Interaction with local winds (e.g., foehn) foehn cold front Cold front in complex terrain ? ? #12 in Inn and Wipp Valley Temperature slope profile Doppler wind lidar in Wipp Valley #12;6 of 13 Case study

  16. www.ext.vt.edu Produced by Communications and Marketing, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    ? ___________________ 7.SOIL: Type Terrain Drainage Soil-less Mulch q sandy q sloped q good q pinebark q bark chips q clay q level q moderate q peat moss q plastic q loam q low q poor q other _________q other _________ q

  17. Visualization of Membrane Fusion, One Particle at a Time Jason Otterstrom,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to a number of model systems have resulted in a new experimental paradigm and open up considerable membranes from two initially separate bilayers is an energetically favorable one, there are many energetic. Significant energetic barriers separating these intermediates make the energetic landscape a rough terrain

  18. Wireless Networks in Rural Areas: Challenges and Solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dyer, Bill

    Wireless Networks in Rural Areas: Challenges and Solutions Shen Wan April 25, 2009 Abstract In this thesis proposal, we discuss the current limitations and chal- lenges in wireless networks, especially in rural, remote or areas with rough terrains. Although traditional wireless networking technologies have

  19. Towards Realization of Adaptive Running of a Quadruped Robot Using Delayed Feedback Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kimura, Hiroshi

    the following results: 1) When a robot runs on flat terrain without disturbance causing energy loss, the selfTowards Realization of Adaptive Running of a Quadruped Robot Using Delayed Feedback Control Zu and efficient running on flat and rough ter- rain. The Rush robot is a compact, kneed, four legged machine

  20. From R. Zoebel and D. Moeller, eds., 1998, Proceedings of the 12th European Simulation Multiconference, University of Manchester, p.437-442 A SIMULATION TESTBED FOR BIOLOGICALLY INSPIRED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delcomyn, Fred

    transmission properties such as delay, sampling rate, and noise. INTRODUCTION A key issue in the field robots can handle obstacles, but cannot easily move quickly over rough terrain or right themselves a way around these impediments. In the remainder of this paper, we describe a dynamics simulator

  1. Mars Robotic Outpost Papers "We can all go to Mars-the Mars Outpost Proposal" Louis Friedman and Bruce Murray, the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dennis, Robert G.

    and handling -ISRU plant deployment -internal habitat servicing "Automation and Robotics for Human Mars sampling from aerial vehicles -in situ propellants and vehicles that use them -subsurface and submersible vehicle concepts -high speed, rough terrain, sensing and processing for autonomous navigation and data

  2. Analyzing the connectivity potential of landscape geomorphic systems: a radar remote sensing and GIS approach, Estufa Canyon, Texas, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ibrahim, ElSayed Ali Hermas

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Estufa Canyon????????????. 70 19 The landscape gradient of Estufa Canyon?????????????... 74 20 A graph showing the rate of changes in the landscape gradients in the downstream direction of Estufa Canyon??????????????.. 77 21 A graph... steep slopes whereas fine surfaces occur in lower elevations and have low slopes. A surface of high elevation and with a steep slope (high surface roughness) is characterized by a high potential for mass movement. A surface of low elevation and a 21...

  3. Uranium - thorium series study on Yucatan slope cores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Exner, Mary Elizabeth

    1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    substance and a corresponding enrichment in another. Soils, on being eroded, 14 adhorb dissolved uranium from runoff and ocean water and show a progressive change in U "/U activity ratios from 0. 9 in soils to 0, 95 in river muds to 1. 15 in recently... concluded that uranium is mainly associated with the non- carbonate fraction and reported his uranium and thorium concentra- tions on a calcium carbonate-free basis. His sediments were from the major oceans of the world; none were from the Gulf of Mexico...

  4. Biocorrosive Thermophilic Microbial Communities in Alaskan North Slope Oil Facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duncan, Kathleen E.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methanogenic sludge High temperature Dagang oil field (Ekofisk oil field Mesophilic digested sludge Kamchatka hotoil field (DQ647105) FJ469331 Uncultured bacterium Bacteroidetes Anaerobic sludge

  5. Precision Tiltmeter as a Reference for Slope Measuring Instruments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirschman, Jonathan L.; Domning, Edward E.; Morrison, Gregory Y.; Smith, Brian V.; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LSBL-798, (2006). Applied Geomechanics Technical Note: “this volume. Applied Geomechanics 755-1172 Miniature Tiltof a tiltmeter, Applied Geomechanics Model 755-1172, 11 for

  6. Biocorrosive Thermophilic Microbial Communities in Alaskan North Slope Oil Facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duncan, Kathleen E.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrosion of metallic oilfield pipelines by microorganismsbiodegradation processes in the oilfield environment can beand is typical of ANS oilfields that collectively have

  7. Natural thermal strains close to surface of rock slopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    'Environnement Industriel et des Risques (INERIS), Ecole des Mines de Nancy, Nancy, France. Present address: ANTEA, 1 rue du, Nancy-Université, Parc de Saurupt, CS 14234, F-54042 Nancy, France ** Institut National de l parc de Brabois, F-54500 Vandoeuvre, France Corresponding author: V. Merrien-Soukatchoff - Phone: (+33

  8. Development of a new generation of optical slope measuring profiler

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yashchuk, Valeriy V.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Free Electron Laser (FEL), LCLS, National Synchrotron Light1-3]. The beamlines for LCLS, NSLS-II, and planned upgrade

  9. Biocorrosive Thermophilic Microbial Communities in Alaskan North Slope Oil Facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duncan, Kathleen E.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Springs Thermophilic microbial fuel cell Horse manure "Natronoanaerobium sp. microbial fuel cell clone SHBZ503 (Clostridia" Tropical tree Microbial fuel cell Horse manure ?

  10. Probabilistic Management of Slope Disaster Detection Systems for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hespanha, João Pedro

    will be sent to a base station through wireless interactions between the nodes, and each sensor node can also with lithium-ion batteries and is expected to work for more than two years. However, the running life is still

  11. Conversion economics for Alaska North Slope natural gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, C.P.; Robertson, E.P.

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For the Prudhoe Bay field, this preliminary analysis provides an indication that major gas sales using a gas pipeline/LNG plant scenario, such as Trans Alaska Gas System, or a gas-to-liquids process with the cost parameters assumed, are essentially equivalent and would be viable and profitable to industry and beneficial to the state of Alaska and the federal government. The cases are compared for the Reference oil price case. The reserves would be 12.7 BBO for the base case without major gas sales, 12.3 BBO and 20 Tcf gas for the major gas sales case, and 14.3 BBO for the gas-to-liquids conversion cases. Use of different parameters will significantly alter these results; e.g., the low oil price case would result in the base case for Prudhoe Bay field becoming uneconomic in 2002 with the operating costs and investments as currently estimated.

  12. alaska north slope: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: integrated hunter observations on wind with statistical analysis of daily wind speed data collectedARCTIC VOL. 66, NO. 4 (DECEMBER 2013) P. 448-458 Changing Daily Wind...

  13. Development of a new generation of optical slope measuring profiler

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yashchuk, Valeriy V.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Elektronenspeicherring BESSY- II, Albert-Einstein-Str. 15,participation of the HBZ-BESSY-II optics group has beenZentrum Berlin (HZB)/BESSY-II [5-8] and at the Diamond Light

  14. Development of a new generation of optical slope measuring profiler

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yashchuk, Valeriy V.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    participation of HBZ- BESSY-II optics group, on developmentsystem developed at HBZ-BESSY-II. However, the OSMS MFTS

  15. Development of a new generation of optical slope measuring profiler

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yashchuk, Valeriy V.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    synchrotron labs, vendors of x-ray optics with active participation of the HBZ/BESSY-synchrotron labs, industrial vendors of x-ray optics, and with active participation of the HBZ-BESSY-

  16. The distribution of dibenzothiophenes in Gulf of Mexico slope sediments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lacerda, Carla Pauline

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -Dibenzothiophene). 18 4. Molecular structure of dibenzothiophene (A) and gas chromatogram showing the 1, 2, 3, 4 - Cl positional isomers of dibenzothiophene (B). 19 5. Distribution of aromatic sulfur compounds (DBTs) with depth (m) in a core taken in Garden Banks... as aromatic hydrocarbons. These are benzothiophene, dibenzothiophene, and their alkylated homologs (methyl, dimethyl, trimethyl, etc. ), and the benzonaphthothiophenes (Hughes, 1984). In most studies, these compounds are overlooked due to their low...

  17. CRITICAL ITINERARIES OF MAPS WITH CONSTANT SLOPE AND ONE DISCONTINUITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -differentiable transformations, used in digital imaging and 3D printing applications, can be constructed using conjugate pairs

  18. CRITICAL ITINERARIES OF MAPS WITH CONSTANT SLOPE AND ONE DISCONTINUITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ­di#erentiable transformations, used in digital imaging and 3D printing applications, can be constructed using conjugate pairs

  19. Two-dimensional granular slumps down slopes Andrew J. Hogg

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hogg, Andrew

    is modelled as a Coulomb drag with a constant coefficient of friction. The flows leave a thin layer with laboratory observations of the slumping of four dry granular materials. It is shown the coefficient of friction only varies slightly for each of the materials used. Mathematical modelling

  20. Fully Nonlinear Properties of Periodic Waves Shoaling over Slopes1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grilli, Stéphan T.

    ; detailed wave kinematics at the BP is also needed for surfzone models which are increasingly used after. In most wave transformation models used so far, shoaling of deep water waves is calculated based and intermediate water, may not be sufficiently accurate close to the BP where wave height reaches a significant

  1. LESSONS LEARNED FROM AN IMPOUNDMENT SLOPE FAILURE INVOLVING GEOSYNTHETICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    failure involving a reinforced geosynthetic clay liner in a sedimentation pond at a waste containment. KEYWORDS: Geosynthetic clay liners, Interface Shear Strength, Waste containment, Strength, Stability to illustrate the importance of (i) properly storing geosynthetic clay liners (GCLs) to reduce the amount

  2. Biocorrosive Thermophilic Microbial Communities in Alaskan North Slope Oil Facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duncan, Kathleen E.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    due to corrosion are expensive problems in the oil industrycorrosion. The similarity of core taxa in these samples and those from other thermophilic oil

  3. north-slope-resources | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron4 Self-Scrubbing:,, , (Energy97,1996Micro-XCTFastnopnproliferationNorth

  4. Newly Installed Alaska North Slope Well Will Test Innovative Hydrate

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of Contamination in Many DevilsForumEngines |NewState EnergyNewarkProduction Technologies

  5. Slope County, North Dakota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt LtdShawangunk, New York:SiG SolarSkykomish,New York:Lake,

  6. North Slope of Alaska ARM Climate Research Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire Solar541,9337,2AprilBigtoDepartment of EnergyLiquids3

  7. Project Aids Development of Legacy Oilfield on Alaska's North Slope |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014, an OHASeptember 2010 | Department ofPlant |

  8. North Slope Borough Power & Light | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall,Missouri: Energy ResourcesGranby,Plains, Oregon:Sea, New York: Energy

  9. TDX North Slope Generating Co | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with formSoutheastern ILSunseeker EnergySuzhouSynergy Biofuels LLCT I PTCTTDXTDX

  10. Procedure for estimating fracture energy from fracture surface roughness

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Williford, Ralph E. (Kennewick, WA)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The fracture energy of a material is determined by first measuring the length of a profile of a section through a fractured surface of the material taken on a plane perpendicular to the mean plane of that surface, then determining the fractal dimensionality of the surface. From this, the yield strength of the material, and the Young's Modulus of that material, the fracture energy is calculated.

  11. On the rough folding landscape of green fluorescent protein

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrews, Benjamin Thomas

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    H. (2008). Understanding protein folding: small proteins inG. (1997). Theory of protein folding: the energy landscapeenergy landscape of protein folding: a synthesis. Proteins

  12. Analysis of the Scattering by an Unbounded Rough Surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    [27] for solving the two- and three-dimensional bounded obstacle .... It is clear that the dual space associated with Hs(?t) is the space H-s(?t). ...... n (?,0) + K-.

  13. Elastic–Plastic Spherical Contact Modeling Including Roughness Effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, L.; Etsion, I.; Talke, F. E.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A multilevel model for elastic–plastic contact between ajunction growth of an elastic–plastic spherical contact. J.nite element based elastic–plastic model for the contact of

  14. Roughness variability estimation of microscopic surfaces during engineering wear process-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    consists of a femoral stem with a femoral head placed on the upper part of the stem, made of stainless, UMR CNRS 5037 Ecole Nationale Sup´erieure des Mines de Saint-Etienne 158 cours Fauriel, 42023, Saint strongly the bone structure, [2], such as changing the osteoclast, and osteoblast activity which might lead

  15. Pressure Drop of Fully Developed, Laminar Flow in Rough Microtubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahrami, Majid

    Mem. ASME e-mail: majid@mhtlab.uwaterloo.ca M. M. Yovanovich Distinguished Professor Emeritus Fellow ASME J. R. Culham1 Associate Professor Mem. ASME Microelectronics Heat Transfer Laboratory, Department be supplied to their numerical code. These parameters cannot be measured directly; no relationship

  16. Analysis of the scattering by an unbounded rough surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Jun 7, 2012 ... Specifically, we consider the scattering of a time-harmonic wave field, ... of analytical solution in the form of an infinite series but also to an ...

  17. Modeling rough energy landscapes in defected condensed matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monasterio Velásquez, Paul Rene

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation is a computational and theoretical investigation of the behavior of defected condensed matter and its evolution over long time scales. The thesis provides original contributions to the methodology used ...

  18. Statistics of ultrasonic speckles reflected from a rough surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qin, Qinghua

    interface between water and aluminium alloy. The numerical results are compared with the experimental ones

  19. What rough beast? Synthetic Biology and the Future of Biosecurity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohr, Scott C.

    Synthetic biology seeks to create modular biological parts that can be assembled into useful devices, allowing the modification of biological systems with greater reliability, at lower cost, with greater speed, and by a ...

  20. Classical Control Using H 1 Methods Rough Draft

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helton, J. William

    : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 17 3 Frequency domain performance requirements 19 3.1 Introduction : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 19 3.1.1 The closed loop system S : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 19 3.1.2 Frequency domain performance : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 32 3.4.4 Disturbance rejection : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 33 3.4.5 More on tracking error

  1. File:Wind rough example.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489 NoEuropeStrat.pdf JumpNotificationWhiskey flats 100k.pdfrough

  2. Impact of Ice Crystal Roughness on Satellite Retrieved Cloud Properties

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh School footballHydrogenIT |HotImpact of Generator Flexibility

  3. Rough Rock, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt Ltd Jump to:Roscommon County, Michigan:Rotokawa Geothermal Power Plant Jump

  4. Rough and Ready Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt Ltd Jump to:Roscommon County, Michigan:Rotokawa Geothermal Power Plant

  5. Momentum roughness and view-angle dependent heat roughness at a Southern Great Plains test-site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    14853, USA Received 9 January 1998; received in revised form 9 July 1998; accepted 9 July 1998 Abstract Department of Energy's Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site in north-central Oklahoma. Measurements of wind speed and temperature were made by radiosondes and instruments mounted on 2 and 10 m towers during

  6. Prescribed Range Burning in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Larry D.; Hanselka, C. Wayne

    2000-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    to level terrain. Wind is chan- neled up canyons with increasing speed. In addition, wind in valleys and on slopes moves upward during the day because of surface heating and downward at night because of surface cooling unless prevailing winds are strong... under the canopy of a shrub or tree to generate the necessary heat to kill plant tissue. Mechanically cleared firelines and roads in brush or trees create openings that produce unusual wind movements. Figure 2. Prevailing wind direction depends...

  7. Considering river structure and stability in the light of evolution: feedbacks between riparian vegetation and hydrogeomorphology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corenblit, Dov; Davies, Neil S.; Steiger, Johannes; Gibling, Martin R.; Bornette, Gudrun

    2014-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    roughness, cohesiveness, surface slope and discharge. Landscape roughness and 216 cohesiveness are defined by factors such as bedrock properties, sediment grain size, 217 topography, and local factors that include cohesive permafrost or clays, whereas 218... 45 Introduction 46 47 Riparian ecosystems, developing at the interface between water and land, are among 48 the most geomorphologically dynamic and variable environments on the Earth surface in 49 terms of (i) structure, function and diversity...

  8. Effects of climate, physical erosion, parent mineralogy, and dust on chemical erosion rates in mountainous terrain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrier, Ken

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bryan, K. , 1927. The ”Palouse soil” problem. USGS Bulletinin the Channeled Scablands and Palouse of Washington State.dust-producing engine of the Palouse loess, USA. Quaternary

  9. The coupled development of terrain and vegetation : the case of semiarid grasslands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flores Cervantes, Javier Homero, 1977-

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The distribution of vegetation in semiarid landscapes organizes as a function of moisture availability, which is often mediated by the form of the land surface. Simultaneously the processes that shape the land surface are ...

  10. Optimal Complete Terrain Coverage using an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Anqi Xu, Chatavut Viriyasuthee, and Ioannis Rekleitis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rekleitis, Ioannis

    in a bounded environment, while: · avoiding a set of obstacle regions with arbitrary shape · preventing from of coverage using an aerial vehicle has many applications, including: environmental inspection, search] for the general class of non-holonomic robots. We compute a set of waypoints outlining the desired cover- age path

  11. Coastal Wave Generation and Wave Breaking over Terrain: Two Problems in Mesoscale Wave Dynamics 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qian, Tingting

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Two problems in mesoscale wave dynamics are addressed: (i) wave-turbulence interaction in a breaking mountain wave and (ii) gravity wave generation associated with coastal heating gradients. The mean and turbulent structures in a breaking mountain...

  12. Measurement of advection and surface-atmosphere exchange in complex terrain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Kevin H.

    Accurate observations of the carbon cycle are essential as inputs to global climate models. Observations made by the micrometeorological technique of eddy covariance, whist widespread, may be incorrect if air is advected ...

  13. A Benthic Terrain Classification Scheme for American Samoa Accepted for publication in Marine Geodesy, 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Dawn Jeannine

    , invasive species, security training activities, offshore oil and gas exploration, and coral bleaching on earth, continually face destruction from anthropogenic and natural threats. The U.S. Coral Reef Task to increasing coastal populations (Culliton 1998). Natural and anthropogenic processes threaten natural

  14. Effects of climate, physical erosion, parent mineralogy, and dust on chemical erosion rates in mountainous terrain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrier, Ken

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    kinetics. In: Reviews in Mineralogy. Vol. 31 of Developmentsthe tropical North Atlantic – Mineralogy. Marine Geology 37,and single-particle mineralogy of a thick Chinese loess-

  15. all-terrain vehicle injuries: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and efficiency can be observed depending on the size of compressors. Typically, a larger compressor results in higher fuel cell power density at the cost of fuel cell efficiency...

  16. all-terrain vehicle accidents: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Accident Investigation 33 Nighttime Analysis 34 Before-and-After Study with Control Odds Ratio 34 35 Nighttime Investigation Results 40 Evaluation of Intersections with Zero...

  17. all-terrain vehicle crashes: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    This strains electrical grid components, especially low-voltage transformers which can overheat and fail while serving consumers ' homes. Meanwhile, the EVs ' electrical storage...

  18. The Inverting Effect of Curvature in Winter Terrain Park Jump Takeoffs J. A. McNeil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    especially hazardous situation is when the jumper lands in an inverted position which can lead as "intrinsic" to snowboarding. The National Ski Areas Association reported approximately 16 million snowboarder

  19. Low Altitude Wind Simulation Over Mount Saint Helens Using NASA SRTM Digital Terrain Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alberta, University of

    . Using a new radar sweep- ing technique most of the Earth's surfaces was digitized in 3D in approximately Medellin, Colombia Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6J 2E8 Abstract On February 11, 2000, the Shuttle Radar Topography Mis- sion (SRTM) was launched into space as part of one of the payload of the Shuttle Endeavor

  20. Mapping textures on 3d terrains: a hybrid cellular automata approach 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sinvhal, Swapnil

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    generated by cellular automata has been studied by Crutchfield et al. [16] and Melanie et al. [60], [61]. A ?chaotic? system has been described [99] as one in which ?activity doesn't die down into a regular pattern, but yet it also doesn't explode all... volumetric data structure to simulate weathering of stone incorporating effects like flow of moisture and mineral dissolution. Jensen et al. [62] illustrate the rendering of wet materials by taking into account the water on the surface and a concentration...