National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for rotten salvageable dead

  1. Salvaged castings and methods of salvaging castings with defective cast cooling bumps

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, Robert Alan; Schaeffer, Jon Conrad; Lee, Ching-Pang; Abuaf, Nesim; Hasz, Wayne Charles

    2002-01-01

    Castings for gas turbine parts exposed on one side to a high-temperature fluid medium have cast-in bumps on an opposite cooling surface side to enhance heat transfer. Areas on the cooling surface having defectively cast bumps, i.e., missing or partially formed bumps during casting, are coated with a braze alloy and cooling enhancement material to salvage the part.

  2. Dead Horse Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Horse Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Development Project: Dead Horse Geothermal Project Project Location Information...

  3. Biohydrogen production from rotten orange with immobilized mixed culture: Effect of immobilization media for various composition of substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Damayanti, Astrilia; Sarto,; Syamsiah, Siti; Sediawan, Wahyudi B.

    2015-12-29

    Enriched–immobilized mixed culture was utilized to produce biohydrogen in mesophilic condition under anaerobic condition using rotten orange as substrate. The process was conducted in batch reactors for 100 hours. Microbial cultures from three different sources were subject to a series of enrichment and immobilized in two different types of media, i.e. calcium alginate (CA, 2%) and mixture of alginate and activated carbon (CAC, 1:1). The performance of immobilized culture in each media was tested for biohydrogen production using four different substrate compositions, namely orange meat (OM), orange meat added with peel (OMP), orange meat added with limonene (OML), and mixture of orange meat and peel added with limonene (OMPL). The results show that, with immobilized culture in CA, the variation of substrate composition gave significant effect on the production of biohydrogen. The highest production of biohydrogen was detected for substrate containing only orange meet, i.e. 2.5%, which was about 3-5 times higher than biohydrogen production from other compositions of substrate. The use of immobilized culture in CAC in general has increased the hydrogen production by 2-7 times depending on the composition of substrate, i.e. 5.4%, 4.8%, 5.1%, and 4.4% for OM, OMP, OML, and OMPL, respectively. The addition of activated carbon has eliminated the effect of inhibitory compounds in the substrate. The major soluble metabolites were acetic acid, propionic acid, and butyric acid.

  4. Dead-time Corrected Disdrometer Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Bartholomew, Mary Jane

    2008-03-05

    Original and dead-time corrected disdrometer results for observations made at SGP and TWP. The correction is based on the technique discussed in Sheppard and Joe, 1994. In addition, these files contain calculated radar reflectivity factor, mean Doppler velocity and attenuation for every measurement for both the original and dead-time corrected data at the following wavelengths: 0.316, 0.856, 3.2, 5, and 10cm (W,K,X,C,S bands). Pavlos Kollias provided the code to do these calculations.

  5. Effect of Dead Algae on Soil Permeability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harvey, R.S.

    2003-02-21

    Since existing basins support heavy growths of unicellular green algae which may be killed by temperature variation or by inadvertent pH changes in waste and then deposited on the basin floor, information on the effects of dead algae on soil permeability was needed. This study was designed to show the effects of successive algal kills on the permeability of laboratory soil columns.

  6. CCP Art. 49 Inquests upon dead bodies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    CCP Art. 49 Inquests upon dead bodies Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: CCP Art. 49 Inquests upon dead...

  7. Zero dead volume tube to surface seal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benett, William J.; Folta, James A.

    2000-01-01

    A method and apparatus for connecting a tube to a surface that creates a dead volume seal. The apparatus is composed of three components, a body, a ferrule, and a threaded fitting. The ferrule is compressed onto a tube and a seal is formed between the tube and a device retained in the body by threading the fitting into the body which provides pressure that seals the face of the ferrule to a mating surface on the device. This seal can be used at elevated temperatures depending on the materials used. While the invention has been developed for use with micro-machined silicon wafers used in Capillary Gas Chromatograph (GC), it can be utilized anywhere for making a gas or fluid face seal to the surface of a device that has near zero dead volume.

  8. Y-12 old salvage yard scrap metal characterization study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, L.M.; Melton, S.G.; Shaw, S.S.

    1993-11-01

    The purpose of the Y-12 Old Salvage Yard scrap metal Characterization Study is to make conservative estimates of the quantities of total uranium and the wt % {sup 235}U contained in scrap metal. The original project scope included estimates of thorium, but due to the insignificant quantities found in the yards, thorium was excluded from further analysis. Metal in three of the four Y-12 scrap metal yards were characterized. The scrap metal yard east of the PIDAS fence is managed by the Environmental Restoration Program and therefore was not included in this study. For all Y-12 Plant scrap metal shipments, Waste Transportation, Storage, and Disposal (WTSD) personnel must complete a Request for Authorization to Ship Nuclear Materials, UCN-16409, which requires the grams of total uranium, the wt % {sup 235}U, and the grams of {sup 235}U contained in the shipment. This information is necessary to ensure compliance with Department of Transportation regulations, as well as to ensure that the receiving facility is adhering to its operating license. This characterization study was designed to provide a technical basis for determining these necessary radioactive quantities.

  9. Dead-time compensation for a logarithmic display rate meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Larson, J.A.; Krueger, F.P.

    1987-10-05

    An improved circuit is provided for application to a radiation survey meter that uses a detector that is subject to dead time. The circuit compensates for dead time over a wide range of count rates by producing a dead-time pulse for each detected event, a live-time pulse that spans the interval between dead-time pulses, and circuits that average the value of these pulses over time. The logarithm of each of these values is obtained and the logarithms are subtracted to provide a signal that is proportional to a count rate that is corrected for the effects of dead time. The circuit produces a meter indication and is also capable of producing an audible indication of detected events. 5 figs.

  10. Dead-time compensation for a logarithmic display rate meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Larson, John A.; Krueger, Frederick P.

    1988-09-20

    An improved circuit is provided for application to a radiation survey meter that uses a detector that is subject to dead time. The circuit compensates for dead time over a wide range of count rates by producing a dead-time pulse for each detected event, a live-time pulse that spans the interval between dead-time pulses, and circuits that average the value of these pulses over time. The logarithm of each of these values is obtained and the logarithms are subtracted to provide a signal that is proportional to a count rate that is corrected for the effects of dead time. The circuit produces a meter indication and is also capable of producing an audible indication of detected events.

  11. Salvage Radiosurgery for Brain Metastases: Prognostic Factors to Consider in Patient Selection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurtz, Goldie; Zadeh, Gelareh; Gingras-Hill, Geneviève; Millar, Barbara-Ann; Laperriere, Normand J.; Bernstein, Mark; Jiang, Haiyan; Ménard, Cynthia; Chung, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is offered to patients for recurrent brain metastases after prior brain radiation therapy (RT), but few studies have evaluated the efficacy of salvage SRS or factors to consider in selecting patients for this treatment. This study reports overall survival (OS), intracranial progression-free survival (PFS), and local control (LC) after salvage SRS, and factors associated with outcomes. Methods and Materials: This is a retrospective review of patients treated from 2009 to 2011 with salvage SRS after prior brain RT for brain metastases. Survival from salvage SRS and from initial brain metastases diagnosis (IBMD) was calculated. Univariate and multivariable (MVA) analyses included age, performance status, recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) class, extracranial disease control, and time from initial RT to salvage SRS. Results: There were 106 patients included in the analysis with a median age of 56.9 years (range 32.5-82 years). A median of 2 metastases were treated per patient (range, 1-12) with a median dose of 21 Gy (range, 12-24) prescribed to the 50% isodose. With a median follow-up of 10.5 months (range, 0.1-68.2), LC was 82.8%, 60.1%, and 46.8% at 6 months, 1 year, and 3 years, respectively. Median PFS was 6.2 months (95% confidence interval [CI] = 4.9-7.6). Median OS was 11.7 months (95% CI = 8.1-13) from salvage SRS, and 22.1 months from IBMD (95% CI = 18.4-26.8). On MVA, age (P=.01; hazard ratio [HR] = 1.04; 95% CI = 1.01-1.07), extracranial disease control (P=.004; HR = 0.46; 95% CI = 0.27-0.78), and interval from initial RT to salvage SRS of at least 265 days (P=.001; HR = 2.46; 95% CI = 1.47-4.09) were predictive of OS. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that patients can have durable local control and survival after salvage SRS for recurrent brain metastases. In particular, younger patients with controlled extracranial disease and a durable response to initial brain RT are likely to benefit from salvage SRS.

  12. Dead Reckoning Pedometer Graphical User Interface

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2003-04-26

    The Dead Reckoning Pedometer Graphical User Interface (DRP GUI) software is tasked with maturing the technology described in a WSRC patent application. This patent application describes an electronic navigation system that records human foot movements, in three dimensions, for the purpose of determining position, distance, and speed of a walking person. The simiplest form of the apparatus consists of a magnetometer (an instrument that measures magnetic field strength) on one foot and a small permanentmore » magnet on another foot with pressure sensors on each foot. When a person takes a step, the foot will hit the ground and produce a signal on the pressure sensor. This will trigger a reading of the magnetometer so that the relative position of one foot to the other can be calculated. This same process is repeated for each step. The DRP could be very useful for tracking emergency personnel such as firemen, policemen, and paramedics when they travel within a building. Technologies such as global positioning systems to not work within buildings. The goal of the DRP GUI V1.0.0 software is to provide a three-dimensional graphical user interface that will allow WSRC to demonstrate the DRP concepts to potential patent licensees. It is hoped that a partnership will allow WSRC and another company to further develop the DRP technology and software into a commercial product.« less

  13. ARM - PI Product - Dead-time Corrected Disdrometer Data

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ProductsDead-time Corrected Disdrometer Data ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send PI Product : Dead-time Corrected Disdrometer Data Original and dead-time corrected disdrometer results for observations made at SGP and TWP. The correction is based on the technique discussed in Sheppard and Joe, 1994. In addition, these files contain calculated radar reflectivity factor, mean Doppler velocity and

  14. TCCP 49 - Inquests Upon Dead Bodies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    - Inquests Upon Dead BodiesLegal Published NA Year Signed or Took Effect 1987 Legal Citation TCCP 49 (1987) DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org...

  15. Reviving Algae from the (Almost) Dead - News Feature | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reviving Algae from the (Almost) Dead October 31, 2014 Photo of a man in a lab coat standing next to green algae bubbling in containers. NREL Research Technician Nick Sweeney...

  16. Trails and Dead Bodies: Directly Characterizing Extrasolar Planets...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Trails and Dead Bodies: Directly Characterizing Extrasolar Planets with Adaptive Optics October 2, 2015 11:00AM to 12:00PM Presenter Mark Ammons, Lawrence Livermore National...

  17. Salvage Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT) Following In-Field Failure of Initial SBRT for Spinal Metastases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thibault, Isabelle; Campbell, Mikki; Tseng, Chia-Lin; Atenafu, Eshetu G.; Letourneau, Daniel; Yu, Eugene; Cho, B.C. John; Lee, Young K.; Fehlings, Michael G.; Sahgal, Arjun

    2015-10-01

    Purpose: We report our experience in salvaging spinal metastases initially irradiated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), who subsequently progressed with imaging-confirmed local tumor progression, and were re-irradiated with a salvage second SBRT course to the same level. Methods and Materials: From a prospective database, 56 metastatic spinal segments in 40 patients were identified as having been irradiated with a salvage second SBRT course to the same level. In addition, 24 of 56 (42.9%) segments had initially been irradiated with conventional external beam radiation therapy before the first course of SBRT. Local control (LC) was defined as no progression on magnetic resonance imaging at the treated segment, and calculated according to the competing risk model. Overall survival (OS) was evaluated for each patient treated by use of the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: The median salvage second SBRT total dose and number of fractions was 30 Gy in 4 fractions (range, 20-35 Gy in 2-5 fractions), and for the first course of SBRT was 24 Gy in 2 fractions (range, 20-35 Gy in 1-5 fractions). The median follow-up time after salvage second SBRT was 6.8 months (range, 0.9-39 months), the median OS was 10.0 months, and the 1-year OS rate was 48%. A longer time interval between the first and second SBRT courses predicted for better OS (P=.02). The crude LC was 77% (43/56), the 1-year LC rate was 81%, and the median time to local failure was 3.0 months (range, 2.7-16.7 months). Of the 13 local failures, 85% (11/13) and 46% (6/13) showed progression within the epidural space and paraspinal soft tissues, respectively. Absence of baseline paraspinal disease predicted for better LC (P<.01). No radiation-induced vertebral compression fractures or cases of myelopathy were observed. Conclusion: A second course of spine SBRT, most often with 30 Gy in 4 fractions, for spinal metastases that failed initial SBRT is a feasible and efficacious salvage treatment option.

  18. EA-1177: Salvage/Demolition of 200 West Area, 200 East Area, and 300 Area Steam Plants, Richland, Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposal to salvage and demolish the 200 West Area, 200 East Area, and 300 Area steam plants and their associated steam distribution piping...

  19. MAGNETIZED ACCRETION AND DEAD ZONES IN PROTOSTELLAR DISKS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dzyurkevich, Natalia; Henning, Thomas; Turner, Neal J.; Kley, Wilhelm

    2013-03-10

    The edges of magnetically dead zones in protostellar disks have been proposed as locations where density bumps may arise, trapping planetesimals and helping form planets. Magneto-rotational turbulence in magnetically active zones provides both accretion of gas on the star and transport of mass to the dead zone. We investigate the location of the magnetically active regions in a protostellar disk around a solar-type star, varying the disk temperature, surface density profile, and dust-to-gas ratio. We also consider stellar masses between 0.4 and 2 M{sub Sun }, with corresponding adjustments in the disk mass and temperature. The dead zone's size and shape are found using the Elsasser number criterion with conductivities including the contributions from ions, electrons, and charged fractal dust aggregates. The charged species' abundances are found using the approach proposed by Okuzumi. The dead zone is in most cases defined by the ambipolar diffusion. In our maps, the dead zone takes a variety of shapes, including a fish tail pointing away from the star and islands located on and off the midplane. The corresponding accretion rates vary with radius, indicating locations where the surface density will increase over time, and others where it will decrease. We show that density bumps do not readily grow near the dead zone's outer edge, independently of the disk parameters and the dust properties. Instead, the accretion rate peaks at the radius where the gas-phase metals freeze out. This could lead to clearing a valley in the surface density, and to a trap for pebbles located just outside the metal freezeout line.

  20. Dead Zones in LX-17 and PBX 9502

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Souers, P C; Andreski, H G; Batteux, J; Bratton, B; Cabacungan, C; Cook, III, C F; Fletcher, S; Garza, R; Grimsley, D; Handly, J; Hernandez, A; McMaster, P; Molitoris, J D; Palmer, R; Prindiville, J; Rodriguez, J; Schneberk, D; Wong, B; Vitello, P

    2005-09-06

    Pin and X-ray corner-turning data have been taken on ambient LX-17 and PBX 9052, and the results are listed in tables as an aid to future modeling. The results have been modeled at 4 zones/mm with a reactive flow approach that varies the burn rate as a function of pressure. A single rate format is used to simulate failure and detonation in different pressure regimes. A pressure cut-off must also be reached to initiate the burn. Corner-turning and failure are modeled using an intermediate pressure rate region, and detonation occurs at high pressure. The TATB booster is also modeled using reactive flow, and X-ray tomography is used to partition the ram-pressed hemisphere into five different density regions. The model reasonably fits the bare corner-turning experiment but predicts a smaller dead zone with steel confinement, in contradiction with experiment. The same model also calculates the confined and unconfined cylinder detonation velocities and predicts the failure of the unconfined cylinder at 3.75 mm radius. The PBX 9502 shows a smaller dead zone than LX-17. An old experiment that showed a large apparent dead zone in Comp B was repeated with X-ray transmission and no dead zone was seen. This confirms the idea that a variable burn rate is the key to modeling. The model also produces initiation delays, which are shorter than those found in time-to-detonation.

  1. How Long Has Grandpa Been Dead and Other Forensic Mysteries

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Baden, Michael [MD, New York Police, New York, New York, United States

    2009-09-01

    Was the baby born alive? Can a child's brain really be shaken hard enough to cause death? Was the body dead before going into the water? Does a lightening strike cause any unique changes in the body? Why are hair and maggots becoming so important to the forensic scientist? Let's talk.

  2. FORMATION OF CIRCUMBINARY PLANETS IN A DEAD ZONE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, Rebecca G.; Armitage, Philip J. [JILA, University of Colorado and NIST, UCB 440, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Alexander, Richard D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom)

    2013-08-10

    Circumbinary planets have been observed at orbital radii where binary perturbations may have significant effects on the gas disk structure, on planetesimal velocity dispersion, and on the coupling between turbulence and planetesimals. Here, we note that the impact of all of these effects on planet formation is qualitatively altered if the circumbinary disk structure is layered, with a non-turbulent midplane layer (dead zone) and strongly turbulent surface layers. For close binaries, we find that the dead zone typically extends from a radius close to the inner disk edge up to a radius of around 10-20 AU from the center of mass of the binary. The peak in the surface density occurs within the dead zone, far from the inner disk edge, close to the snow line, and may act as a trap for aerodynamically coupled solids. We suggest that circumbinary planet formation may be easier near this preferential location than for disks around single stars. However, dead zones around wide binaries are less likely, and hence planet formation may be more difficult there.

  3. Physician Beliefs and Practices for Adjuvant and Salvage Radiation Therapy After Prostatectomy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Showalter, Timothy N.; Ohri, Nitin; Teti, Kristopher G.; Foley, Kathleen A.; Keith, Scott W.; Trabulsi, Edouard J.; Lallas, Costas D.; Dicker, Adam P.; Hoffman-Censits, Jean; Pizzi, Laura T.; Gomella, Leonard G.

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: Despite results of randomized trials that support adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) after radical prostatectomy (RP) for prostate cancer with adverse pathologic features (APF), many clinicians favor selective use of salvage RT. This survey was conducted to evaluate the beliefs and practices of radiation oncologists (RO) and urologists (U) regarding RT after RP. Methods and Materials: We designed a Web-based survey of post-RP RT beliefs and policies. Survey invitations were e-mailed to a list of 926 RO and 591 U. APF were defined as extracapsular extension, seminal vesicle invasion, or positive surgical margin. Differences between U and RO in adjuvant RT recommendations were evaluated by comparative statistics. Multivariate analyses were performed to evaluate factors predictive of adjuvant RT recommendation. Results: Analyzable surveys were completed by 218 RO and 92 U (overallresponse rate, 20%). Adjuvant RT was recommended based on APF by 68% of respondents (78% RO, 44% U, p <0.001). U were less likely than RO to agree that adjuvant RT improves survival and/or biochemical control (p < 0.0001). PSA thresholds for salvage RT were higher among U than RO (p < 0.001). Predicted rates of erectile dysfunction due to RT were higher among U than RO (p <0.001). On multivariate analysis, respondent specialty was the only predictor of adjuvant RT recommendations. Conclusions: U are less likely than RO to recommend adjuvant RT. Future research efforts should focus on defining the toxicities of post-RP RT and on identifying the subgroups of patients who will benefit from adjuvant vs. selective salvage RT.

  4. 2-M Probe At Dead Horse Wells Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2010) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: 2-M Probe At Dead Horse Wells Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details...

  5. THE ROLE OF DEAD WOOD IN MAINTAINING ARTHROPOD DIVERSITY ON THE FOREST FLOOR.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanula, James L.; Horn, Scott; Wade, Dale D.

    2006-08-01

    AbstractDead wood is a major component of forests and contributes to overall diversity, primarily by supporting insects that feed directly on or in it. Further, a variety of organisms benefit by feeding on those insects. What is not well known is how or whether dead wood influences the composition of the arthropod community that is not solely dependent on it as a food resource, or whether woody debris influences prey available to generalist predators. One group likely to be affected by dead wood is ground-dwelling arthropods. We studied the effect of adding large dead wood to unburned and frequently burned pine stands to determine if dead wood was used more when the litter and understory plant community are removed. We also studied the effect of annual removal of dead wood from large (10-ha) plots over a 5-year period on ground-dwelling arthropods. In related studies, we examined the relationships among an endangered woodpecker that forages for prey on live trees, its prey, and dead wood in the forest. The results of these and other studies show that dead wood can influence the abundance and diversity of the ground-dwelling arthropod community and of prey available to generalist predators not foraging directly on dead trees.

  6. Upfront Androgen Deprivation Therapy With Salvage Radiation May Improve Biochemical Outcomes in Prostate Cancer Patients With Post-Prostatectomy Rising PSA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jang, Joanne W.; Hwang, Wei-Ting; Guzzo, Thomas J.; Wein, Alan J.; Haas, Naomi B.; Both, Stefan; Vapiwala, Neha

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: The addition of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) to definitive external beam radiation therapy (RT) improves outcomes in higher-risk prostate cancer patients. However, the benefit of ADT with salvage RT in post-prostatectomy patients is not clearly established. Our study compares biochemical outcomes in post-prostatectomy patients who received salvage RT with or without concurrent ADT. Methods and Materials: Of nearly 2,000 post-prostatectomy patients, we reviewed the medical records of 191 patients who received salvage RT at University of Pennsylvania between 1987 and 2007. Follow-up data were obtained by chart review and electronic polling of the institutional laboratory database and Social Security Death Index. Biochemical failure after salvage RT was defined as a prostate-specific antigen of 2.0 ng/mL above the post-RT nadir or the initiation of ADT after completion of salvage RT. Results: One hundred twenty-nine patients received salvage RT alone, and 62 patients received combined ADT and salvage RT. Median follow-up was 5.4 years. Patients who received combined ADT and salvage RT were younger, had higher pathologic Gleason scores, and higher rates of seminal vesicle invasion, lymph node involvement, and pelvic nodal irradiation compared with patients who received salvage RT alone. Patients who received combined therapy had improved biochemical progression-free survival (bPFS) compared with patients who received RT alone (p = 0.048). For patients with pathologic Gleason scores {<=}7, combined RT and ADT resulted in significantly improved bPFS compared to RT alone (p = 0.013). Conclusions: These results suggest that initiating ADT during salvage RT in the post-prostatectomy setting may improve bPFS compared with salvage RT alone. However, prospective randomized data are necessary to definitively determine whether hormonal manipulation should be used with salvage RT. Furthermore, the optimal nature and duration of ADT and the patient subgroups in

  7. Metagenome of a Versatile Chemolithoautotroph from Expanding Oceanic Dead Zones

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walsh, David A.; Zaikova, Elena; Howes, Charles L.; Song, Young; Wright, Jody; Tringe, Susannah G.; Tortell, Philippe D.; Hallam, Steven J.

    2009-07-15

    Oxygen minimum zones (OMZs), also known as oceanic"dead zones", are widespread oceanographic features currently expanding due to global warming and coastal eutrophication. Although inhospitable to metazoan life, OMZs support a thriving but cryptic microbiota whose combined metabolic activity is intimately connected to nutrient and trace gas cycling within the global ocean. Here we report time-resolved metagenomic analyses of a ubiquitous and abundant but uncultivated OMZ microbe (SUP05) closely related to chemoautotrophic gill symbionts of deep-sea clams and mussels. The SUP05 metagenome harbors a versatile repertoire of genes mediating autotrophic carbon assimilation, sulfur-oxidation and nitrate respiration responsive to a wide range of water column redox states. Thus, SUP05 plays integral roles in shaping nutrient and energy flow within oxygen-deficient oceanic waters via carbon sequestration, sulfide detoxification and biological nitrogen loss with important implications for marine productivity and atmospheric greenhouse control.

  8. Salvage/Adjuvant Brachytherapy After Ophthalmic Artery Chemosurgery for Intraocular Retinoblastoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Francis, Jasmine H.; Barker, Christopher A.; Wolden, Suzanne L.; McCormick, Beryl; Segal, Kira; Cohen, Gil; Gobin, Y. Pierre; Marr, Brian P.; Brodie, Scott E.; Dunkel, Ira J.; Abramson, David H.

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of brachytherapy after ophthalmic artery chemosurgery (OAC) for retinoblastoma. Methods and Materials: This was a single-arm, retrospective study of 15 eyes in 15 patients treated with OAC followed by brachytherapy at (blinded institution) between May 1, 2006, and December 31, 2012, with a median 19 months' follow-up from plaque insertion. Outcome measurements included patient and ocular survival, visual function, and retinal toxicity measured by electroretinogram (ERG). Results: Brachytherapy was used as adjuvant treatment in 2 eyes and as salvage therapy in 13 eyes of which 12 had localized vitreous seeding. No patients developed metastasis or died of retinoblastoma. The Kaplan-Meier estimate of ocular survival was 79.4% (95% confidence interval 48.7%-92.8%) at 18 months. Three eyes were enucleated, and an additional 6 eyes developed out-of-target volume recurrences, which were controlled with additional treatments. Patients with an ocular complication had a mean interval between last OAC and plaque of 2.5 months (SD 2.3 months), which was statistically less (P=.045) than patients without ocular complication who had a mean interval between last OAC and plaque of 6.5 months (SD 4.4 months). ERG responses from pre- versus postplaque were unchanged or improved in more than half the eyes. Conclusions: Brachytherapy following OAC is effective, even in the presence of vitreous seeding; the majority of eyes maintained stable or improved retinal function following treatment, as assessed by ERG.

  9. A grateful dead analysis: the relationship between concert and listening behavior

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodriguez, Marko A; Gintautas, Vadas; Pepe, Alberto

    2008-01-01

    The Grateful Dead was an American band born out of the 1960s San Francisco, California psychedelic movement, that played music together from 1965 to 1995. Despite relatively little popular radio airtime, while on tour the Grateful Dead enjoyed a cult-like following from a fan base that numbered in the millions. Still today, some ten years after dissolution, the band remains popular according to online music services, such as last.fm. This article presents a comparative analysis between 1,590 of the Grateful Dead's live concert set lists from 1972 to 1995 and 2,616,990 Grateful Dead listening events by last.fm users from August 2005 to October 2007. While there is a strong correlation between how songs were played in concert and how they were listened to by last.fm members, the outlying songs in this trend identify interesting aspects of the band and their present-day fans.

  10. Boom And Bust With The Latest 2M Temperature Surveys- Dead Horse...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of the use of two-meter temperature (2m) surveys to quickly and inexpensively reveal blind geothermal systems were documented at Dead Horse Wells, the Hawthorne Army Depot, and...

  11. The Effects of Metallic Implants on Electroporation Therapies: Feasibility of Irreversible Electroporation for Brachytherapy Salvage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neal, Robert E.; Smith, Ryan L.; Kavnoudias, Helen; Rosenfeldt, Franklin Ou, Ruchong; Mclean, Catriona A.; Davalos, Rafael V.; Thomson, Kenneth R.

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Electroporation-based therapies deliver brief electric pulses into a targeted volume to destabilize cellular membranes. Nonthermal irreversible electroporation (IRE) provides focal ablation with effects dependent on the electric field distribution, which changes in heterogeneous environments. It should be determined if highly conductive metallic implants in targeted regions, such as radiotherapy brachytherapy seeds in prostate tissue, will alter treatment outcomes. Theoretical and experimental models determine the impact of prostate brachytherapy seeds on IRE treatments. Materials and Methods: This study delivered IRE pulses in nonanimal, as well as in ex vivo and in vivo tissue, with and in the absence of expired radiotherapy seeds. Electrical current was measured and lesion dimensions were examined macroscopically and with magnetic resonance imaging. Finite-element treatment simulations predicted the effects of brachytherapy seeds in the targeted region on electrical current, electric field, and temperature distributions. Results: There was no significant difference in electrical behavior in tissue containing a grid of expired radiotherapy seeds relative to those without seeds for nonanimal, ex vivo, and in vivo experiments (all p > 0.1). Numerical simulations predict no significant alteration of electric field or thermal effects (all p > 0.1). Histology showed cellular necrosis in the region near the electrodes and seeds within the ablation region; however, there were no seeds beyond the ablation margins. Conclusion: This study suggests that electroporation therapies can be implemented in regions containing small metallic implants without significant changes to electrical and thermal effects relative to use in tissue without the implants. This supports the ability to use IRE as a salvage therapy option for brachytherapy.

  12. Relationships between dead wood and arthropods in the Southeastern United States.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ulyshen, Michael, Darragh

    2009-05-01

    The importance of dead wood to maintaining forest diversity is now widely recognized. However, the habitat associations and sensitivities of many species associated with dead wood remain unknown, making it difficult to develop conservation plans for managed forests. The purpose of this research, conducted on the upper coastal plain of South Carolina, was to better understand the relationships between dead wood and arthropods in the southeastern United States. In a comparison of forest types, more beetle species emerged from logs collected in upland pine-dominated stands than in bottomland hardwood forests. This difference was most pronounced for Quercus nigra L., a species of tree uncommon in upland forests. In a comparison of wood postures, more beetle species emerged from logs than from snags, but a number of species appear to be dependent on snags including several canopy specialists. In a study of saproxylic beetle succession, species richness peaked within the first year of death and declined steadily thereafter. However, a number of species appear to be dependent on highly decayed logs, underscoring the importance of protecting wood at all stages of decay. In a study comparing litter-dwelling arthropod abundance at different distances from dead wood, arthropods were more abundant near dead wood than away from it. In another study, grounddwelling arthropods and saproxylic beetles were little affected by large-scale manipulations of dead wood in upland pine-dominated forests, possibly due to the suitability of the forests surrounding the plots.

  13. Dead layer on silicon p-i-n diode charged-particle detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wall, B. L.; Amsbaugh, John F.; Beglarian, A.; Bergmann, T.; Bichsel, H. C.; Bodine, L. I.; Boyd, N. M.; Burritt, Tom H.; Chaoui, Z.; Corona, T. J.; Doe, Peter J.; Enomoto, S.; Harms, F.; Harper, Gregory; Howe, M. A.; Martin, E. L.; Parno, D. S.; Peterson, David; Petzold, Linda; Renschler, R.; Robertson, R. G. H.; Schwarz, J.; Steidl, M.; Van Wechel, T. D.; VanDevender, Brent A.; Wustling, S.; Wierman, K. J.; Wilkerson, J. F.

    2014-04-21

    Abstract Semiconductor detectors in general have a dead layer at their surfaces that is either a result of natural or induced passivation, or is formed during the process of making a contact. Charged particles passing through this region produce ionization that is incompletely collected and recorded, which leads to departures from the ideal in both energy deposition and resolution. The silicon p-i-n diode used in the KATRIN neutrinomass experiment has such a dead layer. We have constructed a detailed Monte Carlo model for the passage of electrons from vacuum into a silicon detector, and compared the measured energy spectra to the predicted ones for a range of energies from 12 to 20 keV. The comparison provides experimental evidence that a substantial fraction of the ionization produced in the "dead" layer evidently escapes by discussion, with 46% being collected in the depletion zone and the balance being neutralized at the contact or by bulk recombination. The most elementary model of a thinner dead layer from which no charge is collected is strongly disfavored.

  14. Online Robot Dead Reckoning Localization Using Maximum Relative Entropy Optimization With Model Constraints

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Urniezius, Renaldas

    2011-03-14

    The principle of Maximum relative Entropy optimization was analyzed for dead reckoning localization of a rigid body when observation data of two attached accelerometers was collected. Model constraints were derived from the relationships between the sensors. The experiment's results confirmed that accelerometers each axis' noise can be successfully filtered utilizing dependency between channels and the dependency between time series data. Dependency between channels was used for a priori calculation, and a posteriori distribution was derived utilizing dependency between time series data. There was revisited data of autocalibration experiment by removing the initial assumption that instantaneous rotation axis of a rigid body was known. Performance results confirmed that such an approach could be used for online dead reckoning localization.

  15. Role of Salvage Radiation Therapy for Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma Who Failed Autologous Stem Cell Transplant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goda, Jayant S.; Massey, Christine; Kuruvilla, John; Gospodarowicz, Mary K.; Wells, Woodrow; Hodgson, David C.; Sun, Alexander; Keating, Armand; Crump, Michael; Tsang, Richard W.

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To analyze, through chart review, the efficacy of salvage radiation therapy (sRT) for relapsed or progressive Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) patients who failed autologous stem cell transplant (ASCT). Patients and Methods: Among 347 patients with recurrent/refractory HL who received ASCT from 1986-2006, 163 had post-ASCT progression or relapse. Of these, 56 received sRT and form the basis of this report. Median age at sRT was 30 years (range, 17-59 years). Disease was confined to lymph nodes in 27 patients, whereas 24 had both nodal and extranodal disease. Salvage radiation therapy alone was given in 34 patients (61%), and sRT plus chemotherapy was given in 22 (39%). Median interval from ASCT to sRT was 0.8 years (range, 0.1-5.6 years). The median dose was 35 Gy (range, 8-40.3 Gy). The sRT technique was extended-field in 14 patients (25%) and involved-field in 42 (75%). Results: The median follow-up from sRT was 31.3 months (range, 0.2-205.5 months). Overall response rate was 84% (complete response: 36%; partial response: 48%). The median overall survival was 40.8 months (95% confidence interval, 34.2-56.3 months). The 5-year overall survival was 29% (95% confidence interval, 14%-44%). The 2-year progression-free survival (PFS) was 16%; the 2-year local PFS was 65%, whereas the 2-year systemic PFS was 17%. The 1-year PFS was higher in patients in whom all diseased sites were irradiated (49%) compared with those in whom only the symptomatic site was treated (22%, P=.07). Among 20 alive patients, 5 were disease free (at 6.4, 6.8, 7.4, 7.9, and 17.1 years). Conclusion: For patients with HL who fail ASCT, a selective use of RT provides a durable local control rate of 65% at 2 years and should be considered as part of the standard management plan for the palliation of incurable HL. Occasionally irradiation of truly localized disease can lead to long-term survival.

  16. SURVEY REPORT FOR THE CHARACTERIZATION OF THE FIVE TANKS LOCATED NEAR THE OLD SALVAGE YARD AT THE Y-12 NATIONAL SECURITY COMPLEX, OAK RIDGE, TENNESSEE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rollow, Kathy

    2012-08-23

    This summary report presents analytical results, radiological survey data, and other data/information for disposition planning of the five tanks located west of the Old Salvage Yard (OSY) at the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Field personnel from Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU) and URS?CH2M Oak Ridge LLC completed data collection in May 2012 per the project-specific plan (PSP) (ORAU 2012). Deviations from the PSP are addressed in the body of this report. Characterization activities included three data collection modes: visual inspection, radiological survey, and volumetric sampling/analysis. This report includes the final validated dataset and updates associated with the Tank 2 residues originally thought to be a biological bloom (e.g., slime mold) but ultimately identified as iron sulfate crystals.

  17. Cable Effects Study. Tangents, Rabbit Holes, Dead Ends, and Valuable Results

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ardelean, Emil V.; Babuška, Vít; Goodding, James C.; Coombs, Douglas M.; Robertson, Lawrence M.; Lane, Steven A.

    2014-08-04

    Lessons learned during a study on the effects that electrical power and signal wiring harness cables introduce on the dynamic response of precision spacecraft is presented, along with the most significant results. Our study was a three year effort to discover a set of practical approaches for updating well-defined dynamic models of harness-free structures where knowledge of the cable type, position, and tie-down method are known. Although cables are found on every satellite, the focus was on precision, low damping, and very flexible structures. Obstacles encountered, classified as tangents, rabbit holes, and dead ends, offer practical lessons for structural dynamicsmore » research. The paper traces the historical, experiential progression of the project, describing how the obstacles affected the project. Methods were developed to estimate cable properties. Problems were encountered because of the flexible, highly damped nature of cables. A beam was used as a test article to validate experimentally derived cable properties and to refine the assumptions regarding boundary conditions. Furthermore, a spacecraft bus-like panel with cables attached was designed, and finite element models were developed and validated through experiment. Various paths were investigated at each stage before a consistent test and analysis methodology was developed« less

  18. Cable Effects Study. Tangents, Rabbit Holes, Dead Ends, and Valuable Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ardelean, Emil V.; Babuška, Vít; Goodding, James C.; Coombs, Douglas M.; Robertson, Lawrence M.; Lane, Steven A.

    2014-08-04

    Lessons learned during a study on the effects that electrical power and signal wiring harness cables introduce on the dynamic response of precision spacecraft is presented, along with the most significant results. Our study was a three year effort to discover a set of practical approaches for updating well-defined dynamic models of harness-free structures where knowledge of the cable type, position, and tie-down method are known. Although cables are found on every satellite, the focus was on precision, low damping, and very flexible structures. Obstacles encountered, classified as tangents, rabbit holes, and dead ends, offer practical lessons for structural dynamics research. The paper traces the historical, experiential progression of the project, describing how the obstacles affected the project. Methods were developed to estimate cable properties. Problems were encountered because of the flexible, highly damped nature of cables. A beam was used as a test article to validate experimentally derived cable properties and to refine the assumptions regarding boundary conditions. Furthermore, a spacecraft bus-like panel with cables attached was designed, and finite element models were developed and validated through experiment. Various paths were investigated at each stage before a consistent test and analysis methodology was developed

  19. Windrow co-composting of natural casings waste with sheep manure and dead leaves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makan, Abdelhadi

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • Waste management opportunities in small and medium companies were highlighted. • Pilot scale program for windrow co-composting of natural casings was investigated. • Compost preparation, characterization and application phases were discussed. • Natural casings co-composting has proved more viable and cost effective solution. - Abstract: After studying the waste management opportunities in small and medium companies of natural casings, composting has proved more viable and cost effective solution for the valorization of these types of waste, but its feasibility depends on the final product value. This paper investigated a pilot scale program for the windrow co-composting of natural casings waste with sheep manure and dead leaves incorporation. Processing, characterization and application of the final compost were described and the final compost was analyzed for pathogens, metals, nutrients, maturity, and agronomic parameters. The results showed that all test result levels were below the limits specified in the EPA regulations published in Title 40, Section 503, of the Code of Federal Regulations (40 CFR 503). Moreover, the agronomic value tests which include nutrients, organic matter, pH, electrical conductivity, etc. showed that the compost had high organic-matter content and low salt content, all of which indicate good compost characteristics. The ratio of nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and potassium (K), or NPK ratio, was measured at 1.6–0.9–0.7. Reported units are consistent with those found on fertilizer formulations.

  20. SRS 2010 Vegetation Inventory GeoStatistical Mapping Results for Custom Reaction Intensity and Total Dead Fuels.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, Lloyd A.; Paresol, Bernard

    2014-09-01

    This report of the geostatistical analysis results of the fire fuels response variables, custom reaction intensity and total dead fuels is but a part of an SRS 2010 vegetation inventory project. For detailed description of project, theory and background including sample design, methods, and results please refer to USDA Forest Service Savannah River Site internal report “SRS 2010 Vegetation Inventory GeoStatistical Mapping Report”, (Edwards & Parresol 2013).

  1. {sup 18}F-Choline Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography–Driven High-Dose Salvage Radiation Therapy in Patients With Biochemical Progression After Radical Prostatectomy: Feasibility Study in 60 Patients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D'Angelillo, Rolando M.; Sciuto, Rosa; Ramella, Sara; Papalia, Rocco; Jereczek-Fossa, Barbara A.; Trodella, Luca E.; Fiore, Michele; Gallucci, Michele; Maini, Carlo L.; Trodella, Lucio

    2014-10-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively review data of a cohort of patients with biochemical progression after radical prostatectomy, treated according to a uniform institutional treatment policy, to evaluate toxicity and feasibility of high-dose salvage radiation therapy (80 Gy). Methods and Materials: Data on 60 patients with biochemical progression after radical prostatectomy between January 2009 and September 2011 were reviewed. The median value of prostate-specific antigen before radiation therapy was 0.9 ng/mL. All patients at time of diagnosis of biochemical recurrence underwent dynamic {sup 18}F-choline positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT), which revealed in all cases a local recurrence. High-dose salvage radiation therapy was delivered up to total dose of 80 Gy to 18F-choline PET/CT-positive area. Toxicity was recorded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0, scale. Results: Treatment was generally well tolerated: 54 patients (90%) completed salvage radiation therapy without any interruption. Gastrointestinal grade ≥2 acute toxicity was recorded in 6 patients (10%), whereas no patient experienced a grade ≥2 genitourinary toxicity. No grade 4 acute toxicity events were recorded. Only 1 patient (1.7%) experienced a grade 2 gastrointestinal late toxicity. With a mean follow-up of 31.2 months, 46 of 60 patients (76.6%) were free of recurrence. The 3-year biochemical progression-free survival rate was 72.5%. Conclusions: At early follow-up, {sup 18}F-choline PET/CT-driven high-dose salvage radiation therapy seems to be feasible and well tolerated, with a low rate of toxicity.

  2. DEAD, UNDEAD, AND ZOMBIE ZONES IN PROTOSTELLAR DISKS AS A FUNCTION OF STELLAR MASS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohanty, Subhanjoy; Ercolano, Barbara; Turner, Neal J. E-mail: ercolano@usm.lmu.de

    2013-02-10

    We investigate the viability of the magnetorotational instability (MRI) in X-ray ionized viscous accretion disks around both solar-type stars and very low mass stars. In particular, we determine the disk regions where the MRI can be shut off either by Ohmic resistivity (the so-called dead and undead zones) or by ambipolar diffusion (a region we term the zombie zone). We consider two stellar masses: M {sub *} = 0.7 M {sub Sun} and 0.1 M {sub Sun }. In each case, we assume that: the disk surface density profile is that of a scaled Minimum Mass Solar Nebula, with M {sub disk}/M {sub *} = 0.01 as suggested by current data; disk ionization is driven primarily by stellar X-rays, complemented by cosmic rays and radionuclides; and the stellar X-ray luminosity scales with bolometric luminosity as L{sub X} /L {sub *} Almost-Equal-To 10{sup -3.5}, as observed. Ionization rates are calculated with the MOCCASIN Monte Carlo X-ray transport code, and ionization balance determined using a simplified chemical network, including well-mixed 0.1 {mu}m grains at various levels of depletion. We find that (1) ambipolar diffusion is the primary factor controlling MRI activity in disks around both solar-type and very low mass classical T Tauri stars. Assuming that the MRI yields the maximum possible field strength at each radius, we further find that: (2) the MRI-active layer constitutes only {approx}5%-10% of the total disk mass; (3) the accretion rate ( M-dot ) varies radially in both magnitude and sign (inward or outward), implying time-variable accretion as well as the creation of disk gaps and overdensities, with consequences for planet formation and migration; (4) achieving the empirical accretion rates in solar-type and very low mass stars requires a depletion of well-mixed small grains (via grain growth and/or settling) by a factor of 10-1000 relative to the standard dust-to-gas mass ratio of 10{sup -2}; and (5) the current non-detection of polarized emission from field

  3. Gamma Knife Stereotactic Radiosurgery as Salvage Therapy After Failure of Whole-Brain Radiotherapy in Patients With Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, Sunit; Chan, Michael D.; Lovato, James F.; Ellis, Thomas L.; Tatter, Stephen B.; Bourland, J. Daniel; Munley, Michael T.; Guzman, Allan F. de; Shaw, Edward G.; Urbanic, James J.; McMullen, Kevin P.

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: Radiosurgery has been successfully used in selected cases to avoid repeat whole-brain irradiation (WBI) in patients with multiple brain metastases of most solid tumor histological findings. Few data are available for the use of radiosurgery for small-cell lung cancer (SCLC). Methods and Materials: Between November 1999 and June 2009, 51 patients with SCLC and previous WBI and new brain metastases were treated with GammaKnife stereotactic radiosurgery (GKSRS). A median dose of 18 Gy (range, 10-24 Gy) was prescribed to the margin of each metastasis. Patients were followed with serial imaging. Patient electronic records were reviewed to determine disease-related factors and clinical outcomes after GKSRS. Local and distant brain failure rates, overall survival, and likelihood of neurologic death were determined based on imaging results. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to determine survival and local and distant brain control. Cox proportional hazard regression was performed to determine strength of association between disease-related factors and survival. Results: Median survival time for the entire cohort was 5.9 months. Local control rates at 1 and 2 years were 57% and 34%, respectively. Distant brain failure rates at 1 and 2 years were 58% and 75%, respectively. Fifty-three percent of patients ultimately died of neurologic death. On multivariate analysis, patients with stable (hazard ratio [HR] = 2.89) or progressive (HR = 6.98) extracranial disease (ECD) had worse overall survival than patients without evidence of ECD (p = 0.00002). Concurrent chemotherapy improved local control (HR = 89; p = 0.006). Conclusions: GKSRS represents a feasible salvage option in patients with SCLC and brain metastases for whom previous WBI has failed. The status of patients' ECD is a dominant factor predictive of overall survival. Local control may be inferior to that seen with other cancer histological results, although the use of concurrent chemotherapy may help to improve

  4. Dead reckoning pedometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Eakle, Jr., Robert F.; Hofstetter, Kenneth J.

    2003-04-15

    A system to determine the location of a person within a structure utilizes a magnetometer, magnets, pressure sensors and a CPU to calculate the length and direction of each step. The data may be displayed to the wearer, preferably on a map or floorplan and may be broadcast to persons outside the structure.

  5. Regulator Interface Strategies Implemented at the Y-12 National Security Complex Old Salvage Yard Soils Remediation Project, Oak Ridge, TN - 12162

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albrecht, Linda; Wilkerson, Laura; Skinner, Ralph; Birchfield, Joseph W. III

    2012-07-01

    The Oak Ridge Y-12 National Security Complex housed an area known as the Old Salvage Yard (OSY) that was approximately 7 acres. The OSY was used as an area for the accumulation, processing and storage of scrap metal and equipment from Y-12 operations extending from 1968 until 2009. Areas in the northern sections of OSY also have been used for the storage of used oils containing solvents and the accumulation and recycling or de-heading and crushing of 55-gal metal drums. Scrap metal operations historically involved the accumulation, sorting, storage, public sale or disposal of scrap metal and equipment. Non-containerised storage of scrap metal was routine until 1995 when scrap metal received at OSY was placed in B-24 and B-25 boxes. Under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), approximately 26,759 cubic meters of scrap metal and debris were removed and disposed at both on and off-site disposal facilities including the on-site, Oak Ridge Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) landfill in 2010 and 2011. This removal action was performed in accordance with a CERCLA Record of Decision (ROD) and a close working relationship with both the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region IV and Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC). Due to efficiencies and the excellent cooperative relationship forged with EPA Region IV and TDEC for Y-12 ARRA Cleanup Projects, a surplus of funding was available for additional remediation work that was completed in fiscal year (FY) 2011. The underlying OSY soils were targeted for characterization and potential remediation. To expedite these important activities, the U.S. Department of Energy Oak Ridge Environmental Management partnered with the regulators during detailed planning sessions through a variety of means to quickly and efficiently characterize and pinpoint areas requiring remediation according to previous ROD commitments. Data Quality Objectives (DQOs

  6. Competing Risk Analysis of Neurologic versus Nonneurologic Death in Patients Undergoing Radiosurgical Salvage After Whole-Brain Radiation Therapy Failure: Who Actually Dies of Their Brain Metastases?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucas, John T.; Colmer, Hentry G.; White, Lance; Fitzgerald, Nora; Isom, Scott; Bourland, John D.; Laxton, Adrian W.; Tatter, Stephen B.; Chan, Michael D.

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: To estimate the hazard for neurologic (central nervous system, CNS) and nonneurologic (non-CNS) death associated with patient, treatment, and systemic disease status in patients receiving stereotactic radiosurgery after whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT) failure, using a competing risk model. Patients and Methods: Of 757 patients, 293 experienced recurrence or new metastasis following WBRT. Univariate Cox proportional hazards regression identified covariates for consideration in the multivariate model. Competing risks multivariable regression was performed to estimate the adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for both CNS and non-CNS death after adjusting for patient, disease, and treatment factors. The resultant model was converted into an online calculator for ease of clinical use. Results: The cumulative incidence of CNS and non-CNS death at 6 and 12 months was 20.6% and 21.6%, and 34.4% and 35%, respectively. Patients with melanoma histology (relative to breast) (aHR 2.7, 95% CI 1.5-5.0), brainstem location (aHR 2.1, 95% CI 1.3-3.5), and number of metastases (aHR 1.09, 95% CI 1.04-1.2) had increased aHR for CNS death. Progressive systemic disease (aHR 0.55, 95% CI 0.4-0.8) and increasing lowest margin dose (aHR 0.97, 95% CI 0.9-0.99) were protective against CNS death. Patients with lung histology (aHR 1.3, 95% CI 1.1-1.9) and progressive systemic disease (aHR 2.14, 95% CI 1.5-3.0) had increased aHR for non-CNS death. Conclusion: Our nomogram provides individual estimates of neurologic death after salvage stereotactic radiosurgery for patients who have failed prior WBRT, based on histology, neuroanatomical location, age, lowest margin dose, and number of metastases after adjusting for their competing risk of death from other causes.

  7. Salvage Values Determines Reliability of Used Photovoltaics ...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Presented at the PV Module Reliability Workshop, February 26 - 27 2013, Golden, Colorado PDF icon pvmrw13ps1energyideasmccabe.pdf More Documents & Publications Revitalizing ...

  8. Crystal structure, mutational analysis and RNA-dependent ATPase activity of the yeast DEAD-box pre-mRNA splicing factor Prp28

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jacewicz, Agata; Schwer, Beate; Smith, Paul; Shuman, Stewart

    2014-10-10

    Yeast Prp28 is a DEAD-box pre-mRNA splicing factor implicated in displacing U1 snRNP from the 5' splice site. Here we report that the 588-aa Prp28 protein consists of a trypsin-sensitive 126-aa N-terminal segment (of which aa 1–89 are dispensable for Prp28 function in vivo) fused to a trypsin-resistant C-terminal catalytic domain. Purified recombinant Prp28 and Prp28-(127–588) have an intrinsic RNA-dependent ATPase activity, albeit with a low turnover number. The crystal structure of Prp28-(127–588) comprises two RecA-like domains splayed widely apart. AMPPNP•Mg2+ is engaged by the proximal domain, with proper and specific contacts from Phe194 and Gln201 (Q motif) to themore » adenine nucleobase. The triphosphate moiety of AMPPNP•Mg2+ is not poised for catalysis in the open domain conformation. Guided by the Prp28•AMPPNP structure, and that of the Drosophila Vasa•AMPPNP•Mg2+•RNA complex, we targeted 20 positions in Prp28 for alanine scanning. ATP-site components Asp341 and Glu342 (motif II) and Arg527 and Arg530 (motif VI) and RNA-site constituent Arg476 (motif Va) are essential for Prp28 activity in vivo. Synthetic lethality of double-alanine mutations highlighted functionally redundant contacts in the ATP-binding (Phe194-Gln201, Gln201-Asp502) and RNA-binding (Arg264-Arg320) sites. As a result, overexpression of defective ATP-site mutants, but not defective RNA-site mutants, elicited severe dominant-negative growth defects.« less

  9. Crystal structure, mutational analysis and RNA-dependent ATPase activity of the yeast DEAD-box pre-mRNA splicing factor Prp28

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacewicz, Agata; Schwer, Beate; Smith, Paul; Shuman, Stewart

    2014-10-10

    Yeast Prp28 is a DEAD-box pre-mRNA splicing factor implicated in displacing U1 snRNP from the 5' splice site. Here we report that the 588-aa Prp28 protein consists of a trypsin-sensitive 126-aa N-terminal segment (of which aa 189 are dispensable for Prp28 function in vivo) fused to a trypsin-resistant C-terminal catalytic domain. Purified recombinant Prp28 and Prp28-(127588) have an intrinsic RNA-dependent ATPase activity, albeit with a low turnover number. The crystal structure of Prp28-(127588) comprises two RecA-like domains splayed widely apart. AMPPNPMg2+ is engaged by the proximal domain, with proper and specific contacts from Phe194 and Gln201 (Q motif) to the adenine nucleobase. The triphosphate moiety of AMPPNPMg2+ is not poised for catalysis in the open domain conformation. Guided by the Prp28AMPPNP structure, and that of the Drosophila VasaAMPPNPMg2+RNA complex, we targeted 20 positions in Prp28 for alanine scanning. ATP-site components Asp341 and Glu342 (motif II) and Arg527 and Arg530 (motif VI) and RNA-site constituent Arg476 (motif Va) are essential for Prp28 activity in vivo. Synthetic lethality of double-alanine mutations highlighted functionally redundant contacts in the ATP-binding (Phe194-Gln201, Gln201-Asp502) and RNA-binding (Arg264-Arg320) sites. As a result, overexpression of defective ATP-site mutants, but not defective RNA-site mutants, elicited severe dominant-negative growth defects.

  10. Salvage Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT) Following In-Field...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, ... of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, ...

  11. RECOVERY AND SEPARATION OF LITHIUM VALUES FROM SALVAGE SOLUTIONS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hansford, D.L.; Raabe, E.W.

    1963-08-20

    Lithium values can be recovered from an aqueous basic solution by reacting the values with a phosphate salt soluble in the solution, forming an aqueous slurry of the resultant aqueous insoluble lithium phosphate, contacting the slurry with an organic cation exchange resin in the acid form until the slurry has been clarified, and thereafter recovering lithium values from the resin. (AEC)

  12. Dead Horse Wells Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Transition Zone Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: USGS Mean Reservoir Temp: USGS...

  13. Reviving Algae from the (Almost) Dead - News Feature | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... is to separate the liquid from the solids, using a centrifuge to spin the pellets rapidly. ... After the pellets are re-suspended in the growth medium, they're placed in a subdued ...

  14. Deadly Carcinogen Unraveled: The Molecular Origami of Fungal...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    solved. In the first structure, a fortuitously bound palmitic acid molecule (from E. coli purification) established the long, hydrophobic pocket and suggested that the 20-carbon...

  15. Zero dead volume tube to surface seal (Patent) | DOEPatents

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    provides pressure that seals the face of the ferrule to a mating surface on the device. ... threading; fitting; provides; pressure; seals; ferrule; mating; surface; device; seal; ...

  16. Percutaneous fenestration of aortic dissection: Salvage of an ischemic solitary left kidney

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Jae Hyung; Chung, Jin Wook; Cho, Yoon Koo; Kim, Sun Ho; Ahn, Hyuk; Oh, Byung Hee

    1997-03-15

    The false channel of a type III aortic dissection caused acute renal ischemia by compression of the origin of the left renal artery in a patient with status post-right nephrectomy. To relieve the ischemia and restore renal function, percutaneous balloon fenestration was performed successfully.

  17. Resolving Radiological Classification and Release Issues for Many DOE Solid Wastes and Salvageable Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hochel, R.C.

    1999-06-14

    The cost effective radiological classification and disposal of solid materials with potential volume contamination, in accordance with applicable U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Orders, suffers from an inability to unambiguously distinguish among transuranic waste, low-level waste, and unconditional-release materials. Depending on the classification, disposal costs can vary by a hundred-fold. But in many cases, the issues can be easily resolved by a combination of process information, some simple measurements, and calculational predictions from a computer model for radiation shielding.The proper classification and disposal of many solid wastes requires a measurement regime that is able to show compliance with a variety of institutional and regulatory contamination limits. Although this is not possible for all solid wastes, there are many that do lend themselves to such measures. Several examples are discussed which demonstrate the possibilities, including one which was successfully applied to bulk contamination.The only barriers to such broader uses are the slow-to-change institutional perceptions and procedures. For many issues and materials, the measurement tools are available; they need only be applied.

  18. Acyl-chain remodeling of dioctanoyl-phosphatidylcholine in Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant defective in de novo and salvage phosphatidylcholine synthesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kishino, Hideyuki; Eguchi, Hiroki; Takagi, Keiko; Horiuchi, Hiroyuki; Fukuda, Ryouichi; Ohta, Akinori

    2014-03-07

    Highlights: Dioctanoyl-PC (diC8PC) supported growth of a yeast mutant defective in PC synthesis. diC8PC was converted to PC species containing longer acyl residues in the mutant. Both acyl residues of diC8PC were replaced by longer fatty acids in vitro. This system will contribute to the elucidation of the acyl chain remodeling of PC. - Abstract: A yeast strain, in which endogenous phosphatidylcholine (PC) synthesis is controllable, was constructed by the replacement of the promoter of PCT1, encoding CTP:phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase, with GAL1 promoter in a double deletion mutant of PEM1 and PEM2, encoding phosphatidylethanolamine methyltransferase and phospholipid methyltransferase, respectively. This mutant did not grow in the glucose-containing medium, but the addition of dioctanoyl-phosphatidylcholine (diC8PC) supported its growth. Analyses of the metabolism of {sup 13}C-labeled diC8PC ((methyl-{sup 13}C){sub 3}-diC8PC) in this strain using electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry revealed that it was converted to PC species containing acyl residues of 16 or 18 carbons at both sn-1 and sn-2 positions. In addition, both acyl residues of (methyl-{sup 13}C){sub 3}-diC8PC were replaced with 16:1 acyl chains in the in vitro reaction using the yeast cell extract in the presence of palmitoleoyl-CoA. These results indicate that PC containing short acyl residues was remodeled to those with acyl chains of physiological length in yeast.

  19. Stranded Fuel, Orphan Sites, Dead Plants: Transportation Planning Considerations After the BRC Report - 13393

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thrower, Alex W.

    2013-07-01

    The author explores transportation, packaging and storage questions related to a primary recommendation of the Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future; i.e., that fuel from shutdown plants be removed to consolidated storage as soon as possible to enable final decommissioning and beneficial re-use of those sites. The paper discusses the recommendations of the BRC, the implications and challenges that implementing those recommendations present, and provides recommended solutions for beginning the multi-year planning, coordination, material acquisition, and communications processes that will be needed to move fuel from shutdown plants when a destination site becomes available. Removal of used nuclear fuel from shutdown reactor sites (which are serving no other purpose other than storing SNF and GTCC, at considerable expense) was a central recommendation of the BRC, for a number of reasons. This recommendation was one of the most widely acclaimed that the Commission put forward. However, there are significant challenges (such as availability of fuel canister overpacks, lack of infrastructure, handling constraints and others) that will need to be addressed, apart from the critically important identification of a suitable and workable storage destination site. Resolving these logistical challenges will need to begin even before a destination site is identified, given the long lead-times required for planning and procurement. Based on information available today, it is possible to make informed predictions about what will be needed to modify existing contractual arrangements with utilities, address equipment and infrastructure needs, and begin working with states, tribes and local governments to start initial preparation needs. If DOE, working with industry and other experienced parties, can begin planning and acquisition activities in the near term, overall schedule risk can be reduced and potential cost avoidance achieved. The most immediate benefit will accrue to the operators of the shutdown plants, but beginning to accept fuel as required under the NWPA will reduce the liability to the federal government, and also offer some assurance to other utilities and the public that DOE (or another entity if one is established) is capable of meeting its obligations under the NWPA. The indirect benefits, therefore, will be quite broad. (authors)

  20. DEGREE-SCALE GeV 'JETS' FROM ACTIVE AND DEAD TeV BLAZARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neronov, A.; Semikoz, D.; Kachelriess, M.; Ostapchenko, S.; Elyiv, A.

    2010-08-20

    We show that images of TeV blazars in the GeV energy band should contain, along with point-like sources, degree-scale jet-like extensions. These GeV extensions are the result of electromagnetic cascades initiated by TeV {gamma}-rays interacting with extragalactic background light and the deflection of the cascade electrons/positrons in extragalactic magnetic fields (EGMFs). Using Monte Carlo simulations, we study the spectral and timing properties of the degree-scale extensions in simulated GeV band images of TeV blazars. We show that the brightness profile of such degree-scale extensions can be used to infer the light curve of the primary TeV {gamma}-ray source over the past 10{sup 7} yr, i.e., over a time scale comparable to the lifetime of the parent active galactic nucleus. This implies that the degree-scale jet-like GeV emission could be detected not only near known active TeV blazars, but also from 'TeV blazar remnants', whose central engines were switched off up to 10 million years ago. Since the brightness profile of the GeV 'jets' depends on the strength and the structure of the EGMF, their observation provides additional information about the EGMF.

  1. THE FATE OF PLANETESIMALS IN TURBULENT DISKS WITH DEAD ZONES. I. THE TURBULENT STIRRING RECIPE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Okuzumi, Satoshi [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Ormel, Chris W., E-mail: okuzumi@geo.titech.ac.jp [Astronomy Department, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Turbulence in protoplanetary disks affects planet formation in many ways. While small dust particles are mainly affected by the aerodynamical coupling with turbulent gas velocity fields, planetesimals and larger bodies are more affected by gravitational interaction with gas density fluctuations. For the latter process, a number of numerical simulations have been performed in recent years, but a fully parameter-independent understanding has not been yet established. In this study, we present simple scaling relations for the planetesimal stirring rate in turbulence driven by magnetorotational instability (MRI), taking into account the stabilization of MRI due to ohmic resistivity. We begin with order-of-magnitude estimates of the turbulence-induced gravitational force acting on solid bodies and associated diffusion coefficients for their orbital elements. We then test the predicted scaling relations using the results of recent ohmic-resistive MHD simulations by Gressel et al. We find that these relations successfully explain the simulation results if we properly fix order-of-unity uncertainties within the estimates. We also update the saturation predictor for the density fluctuation amplitude in MRI-driven turbulence originally proposed by Okuzumi and Hirose. Combination of the scaling relations and saturation predictor allows us to know how the turbulent stirring rate of planetesimals depends on disk parameters such as the gas column density, distance from the central star, vertical resistivity distribution, and net vertical magnetic flux. In Paper II, we apply our recipe to planetesimal accretion to discuss its viability in turbulent disks.

  2. In search of the dead zone: Use of otoliths for tracking fish exposure to hypoxia

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Limburg, Karin E.; Walther, Benjamin D.; Lu, Zunli; Jackman, George; Mohan, John; Walther, Yvonne; Nissling, Anders; Weber, Peter K.; Schmitt, Axel K.

    2015-01-01

    Otolith chemistry is often useful for tracking provenance of fishes, as well as examining migration histories. Whereas elements such as strontium and barium correlate well with salinity and temperature, experiments that examine manganese uptake as a function of these parameters have found no such correlation. Instead, dissolved manganese is available as a redox product, and as such, is indicative of low-oxygen conditions. Here we present evidence for that mechanism in a range of habitats from marine to freshwater, across species, and also present ancillary proxies that support the mechanism as well. For example, iodine is redox-sensitive and varies inversely withmore » Mn; and sulfur stable isotope ratios provide evidence of anoxic sulfate reduction in some circumstances.« less

  3. In search of the dead zone: Use of otoliths for tracking fish exposure to hypoxia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Limburg, Karin E.; Walther, Benjamin D.; Lu, Zunli; Jackman, George; Mohan, John; Walther, Yvonne; Nissling, Anders; Weber, Peter K.; Schmitt, Axel K.

    2015-01-01

    Otolith chemistry is often useful for tracking provenance of fishes, as well as examining migration histories. Whereas elements such as strontium and barium correlate well with salinity and temperature, experiments that examine manganese uptake as a function of these parameters have found no such correlation. Instead, dissolved manganese is available as a redox product, and as such, is indicative of low-oxygen conditions. Here we present evidence for that mechanism in a range of habitats from marine to freshwater, across species, and also present ancillary proxies that support the mechanism as well. For example, iodine is redox-sensitive and varies inversely with Mn; and sulfur stable isotope ratios provide evidence of anoxic sulfate reduction in some circumstances.

  4. Scientists Find Ocean 'Dead' Zones Teeming with Life | U.S. DOE...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    waters of the ocean combine nutrients, water, and carbon dioxide in the presence of ... In regions of the ocean where water circulation is constrained and nutrient input is ...

  5. A zero dead-time multi-particle time and position sensitive detector based on correlation between brightness and amplitude

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Urbain, X. Bech, D.; Van Roy, J.-P.; Gloc, M.; Weber, S. J.

    2015-02-15

    A new multi-particle time and position sensitive detector using only a set of microchannel plates, a waveform digitizer, a phosphor screen, and a CMOS camera is described. The assignment of the timing information, as taken from the microchannel plates by fast digitizing, to the positions, as recorded by the camera, is based on the COrrelation between the BRightness of the phosphor screen spots, defined as their integrated intensity and the Amplitude of the electrical signals (COBRA). Tests performed by observing the dissociation of HeH, the fragmentation of H{sub 3} into two or three fragments, and the photo-double-ionization of Xenon atoms are presented, which illustrate the performances of the COBRA detection scheme.

  6. AUTOMATED DEAD-END ULTRAFILTRATION FOR ENHANCED SURVEILLANCE OF LEGIONELLA 2 PNEUMOPHILA AND LEGIONELLA SPP. IN COOLING TOWER WATERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brigmon, R.; Leskinen, S.; Kearns, E.; Jones, W.; Miller, R.; Betivas, C.; Kingsley, M.; Lim, D.

    2011-10-10

    Detection of Legionella pneumophila in cooling towers and domestic hot water systems involves concentration by centrifugation or membrane filtration prior to inoculation onto growth media or analysis using techniques such as PCR or immunoassays. The Portable Multi-use Automated Concentration System (PMACS) was designed for concentrating microorganisms from large volumes of water in the field and was assessed for enhancing surveillance of L. pneumophila at the Savannah River Site, SC. PMACS samples (100 L; n = 28) were collected from six towers between August 2010 and April 2011 with grab samples (500 ml; n = 56) being collected before and after each PMACS sample. All samples were analyzed for the presence of L. pneumophila by direct fluorescence immunoassay (DFA) using FITC-labeled monoclonal antibodies targeting serogroups 1, 2, 4 and 6. QPCR was utilized for detection of Legionella spp. in the same samples. Counts of L. pneumophila from DFA and of Legionella spp. from qPCR were normalized to cells/L tower water. Concentrations were similar between grab and PMACS samples collected throughout the study by DFA analysis (P = 0.4461; repeated measures ANOVA). The same trend was observed with qPCR. However, PMACS concentration proved advantageous over membrane filtration by providing larger volume, more representative samples of the cooling tower environment, which led to reduced variability among sampling events and increasing the probability of detection of low level targets. These data highlight the utility of the PMACS for enhanced surveillance of L. pneumophila by providing improved sampling of the cooling tower environment.

  7. Special Assessment for Wind Energy Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    *The law states that up to 79% of the total property may be assigned salvage value. Salvage value of a pollution control facility, of which a wind turbine is considered for assessment purposes, is...

  8. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    up to 79% of the total property may be assigned salvage value. Salvage value of a pollution control facility, of which a wind turbine is considered for assessment purposes,...

  9. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to 79% of the total property may be assigned salvage value. Salvage value of a pollution control facility, of which a wind turbine is considered for assessment purposes, is......

  10. Long-term follow-up of {sup 111}In-capromab pendetide (ProstaScint) scan as pretreatment assessment in patients who undergo salvage radiotherapy for rising prostate-specific antigen after radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nagda, Suneel N. . E-mail: snagda@gmail.com; Mohideen, Najeeb; Lo, Simon S.; Khan, Usman B.S.; Dillehay, Gary; Wagner, Robert; Campbell, Steven; Flanigan, Robert

    2007-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the long-term failure patterns in patients who underwent an {sup 111}In-capromab pendetide (ProstaScint) scan as part of their pretreatment assessment for a rising prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level after prostatectomy and subsequently received local radiotherapy (RT) to the prostate bed. Methods: Fifty-eight patients were referred for evaluation of a rising PSA level after radical prostatectomy. All patients had negative findings for metastatic disease after abdominal/pelvis imaging with CT and isotope bone scans. All patients underwent a capromab pendetide scan, and the sites of uptake were noted. All patients were treated with local prostate bed RT (median dose 66.6 Gy). Results: Of the 58 patients, 20 had biochemical failure (post-RT PSA level >0.2 ng/mL or a rise to greater than the nadir PSA), including 6 patients with positive uptake outside the bed (positive elsewhere). The 4-year biochemical relapse-free survival (bRFS) rates for patients with negative (53%), positive in the prostate bed alone (45%), or positive elsewhere (74%) scan findings did not differ significantly (p = 0.51). The positive predictive value of the capromab pendetide scan in detecting disease outside the bed was 27%. The capromab pendetide scan status had no effect on bRFS. Those with a pre-RT PSA level of <1 ng/mL had improved bRFS (p = 0.003). Conclusion: The capromab pendetide scan has a low positive predictive value in patients with positive elsewhere uptake and the 4-year bRFS was similar to that for those who did not exhibit positive elsewhere uptake. Therefore, patients with a postprostatectomy rising PSA level should considered for local RT on the basis of clinicopathologic factors.

  11. Berkeley Lab Space

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Space Committee Charter Articles Presentations Feedback Contact Us ANNOUNCEMENTS Feb. 13, 2014 Courtesy Salvage Pickup Factsheet To assist the community in disposing of "no longer...

  12. Targeted Review of Site Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    with enriched uranium. Operations include wet chemistry, oxide conversion reduction, casting, machining and forming, and salvage treatment. These operations do not require forced...

  13. DOE Announces Start of Recovery Act Funded Cleanup Projects at Y-12

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE announces that cleanup of the Old Salvage Yard at the Y-12 National Security Complex has started using funding received from the Recovery Act.

  14. Uranium Processing Facility | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Site Readiness-complete Site Infrastructure and Services-underway Substation Mechanical Electrical Building Process Support Facility Salvage and Accountability Building Main ...

  15. STATES GOVERNMENT S. R. Sapirle~, Manager, Oak Ridge Operations

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Laboratories, Frankford Arsenal, Fhiladelphia 37, Pa. This material will be used in experimental research. It s ex,- petted that all material will be salvaged and returned td your...

  16. Ingenuity by Kalispell crew saves millions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Falls Aluminum Co. in Columbia Falls, Mont., notified BPA of its intention to end operations and maintenance agreements with BPA in advance of salvage operations at the...

  17. DOE Challenge Home, Washington Program Requirements

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... documentation of maximum allowable dead load and live load ratings of the roof, ... documentation of maximum allowable dead load and live load ratings of the roof, ...

  18. Wetland and Sensitive Species Survey Report for Y-12: Proposed Uranium Processing Facility (UPF)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giffen, N.; Peterson, M.; Reasor, S.; Pounds, L.; Byrd, G.; Wiest, M. C.; Hill, C. C.

    2009-11-01

    This report summarizes the results of an environmental survey conducted at sites associated with the proposed Uranium Processing Facility (UPF) at the Y-12 National Security Complex in September-October 2009. The survey was conducted in order to evaluate potential impacts of the overall project. This project includes the construction of a haul road, concrete batch plant, wet soil storage area and dry soil storage area. The environmental surveys were conducted by natural resource experts at ORNL who routinely assess the significance of various project activities on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). Natural resource staff assistance on this project included the collection of environmental information that can aid in project location decisions that minimize impacts to sensitive resource such as significant wildlife populations, rare plants and wetlands. Natural resources work was conducted in various habitats, corresponding to the proposed areas of impact. Thc credentials/qualifications of the researchers are contained in Appendix A. The proposed haul road traverses a number of different habitats including a power-line right-of-way. wetlands, streams, forest and mowed areas. It extends from what is known as the New Salvage Yard on the west to the Polaris Parking Lot on the east. This haul road is meant to connect the proposed concrete batch plant to the UPF building site. The proposed site of the concrete batch plant itself is a highly disturbed fenced area. This area of the project is shown in Fig. 1. The proposed Wet Soils Disposal Area is located on the north side of Bear Creek Road at the former Control Burn Study Area. This is a second growth arce containing thick vegetation, and extensive dead and down woody material. This area of the project is shown in Fig. 2. Thc dry soils storage area is proposed for what is currently known as the West Borrow Area. This site is located on the west side of Reeves Road south of Bear Creek Road. The site is an early successional

  19. CX-011220: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Timber Salvage from Pine Ridge Storm Damage CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 09/17/2013 Location(s): Tennessee Offices(s): Oak Ridge Office

  20. Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Now a new project is salvaging and mining these deteriorating films for fresh-and crucial- ... Yield estimates also help forecast the extent of damage an adversary's missile or a ...

  1. Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    July 2015 Films of the U.S. atmospheric nuclear tests provide breathtaking reminders of the power of nuclear weapons. Now a new project is salvaging and mining these deteriorating films for fresh-and crucial- scientific data about the weapons' yields. To understand why Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory nuclear weapons physicist Greg Spriggs is spearheading, in partnership with Los Alamos, an urgent search-and-rescue mission to salvage several thousand films documenting U.S. atmospheric

  2. Validating Computer-Designed Proteins for Vaccines

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Computed As strange as it sounds, most vaccines are composed of actual dead viruses and bacteria. The idea is that presenting a dead form of the pathogen will fake your body into...

  3. Radiological Control Technician Training

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Material Resolving Time Resolving time (or dead time) is the time interval which must ... In a non-paralyzable detector, an event happening during the dead time since the previous ...

  4. GreenGov Presidential Awards

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... in the 1980's, the lack of natural burns, dead combustible trees, higher temperatures and ... trees per acre; this tenfold increase in dead fuel load has led to the more intense ...

  5. DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2011-0517-DNA | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    7-DNA Jump to: navigation, search NEPA Document Collection for: DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2011-0517-DNA DNA at Dead Horse Wells Geothermal Area for GeothermalExploration DNA at Dead Horse...

  6. DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2012-0028-DNA | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    DNA at Dead Horse Wells Geothermal Area for GeothermalWell Field DNA for Flow Test Well 85-11 and Simultaneously Injection Test Well 68-1 and 24A-6 at Dead Horse Wells...

  7. Military MOJO | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Majorly Awesome Military Energy Savers: We Salute You Majorly Awesome Military Energy Savers: We Salute You November 11, 2015 - 12:09pm Addthis A historic hangar at the Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in Ohio was salvaged and restored with window films to reduce solar heat gain, occupancy sensors to control interior lighting, and daylight sensors to maximize energy savings and enhance productivity. A historic hangar at the Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in Ohio was salvaged and

  8. Majorly Awesome Military Energy Savers: We Salute You | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Majorly Awesome Military Energy Savers: We Salute You Majorly Awesome Military Energy Savers: We Salute You November 11, 2015 - 12:09pm Addthis A historic hangar at the Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in Ohio was salvaged and restored with window films to reduce solar heat gain, occupancy sensors to control interior lighting, and daylight sensors to maximize energy savings and enhance productivity. A historic hangar at the Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in Ohio was salvaged and

  9. Maker Faire Tour Part 1 | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Majorly Awesome Military Energy Savers: We Salute You Majorly Awesome Military Energy Savers: We Salute You November 11, 2015 - 12:09pm Addthis A historic hangar at the Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in Ohio was salvaged and restored with window films to reduce solar heat gain, occupancy sensors to control interior lighting, and daylight sensors to maximize energy savings and enhance productivity. A historic hangar at the Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in Ohio was salvaged and

  10. BPA-2013-01283-FOIA Correspondence

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    requested the following: Winning bids and specifications of purchases of HV Power Transformers (step up & step down), Circuit Breakers (live & dead tank), and Gas Insulated...

  11. Distribution plate for recirculating fluidized bed

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yang, Wen-ching; Vidt, Edward J.; Keairns, Dale L.

    1977-01-01

    A distribution plate for a recirculating fluidized bed has a centrally disposed opening and a plurality of apertures adjacent the periphery to eliminate dead spots within the bed.

  12. RAPID/BulkTransmission/Environment/Texas | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to Electric Power Transmission CCP Art. 49 Inquests upon dead bodies Fact Sheet - Air Quality Permitting Form PI-1 General Application for Air Preconstruction Permit RRC -...

  13. SREL Reprint #3092

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and in relation to individual sex and body size within species. Keywords: Alive on Road, Body Size, Dead on Road, Ecology, Highway, Mortality, Sex Ratio, Snakes, Suburban, Urban ...

  14. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    matter physics, superconductivity and superfluidity (1) conversion (1) copper compounds (1) copper ions (1) cuprates (1) dead time (1) diffraction (1) domain structure (1) ...

  15. Autonomous Realtime Threat-Hunting Robot (ARTHR

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    INL

    2009-09-01

    Idaho National Laboratory researchers developed an intelligent plug-and-play robot payload that transforms commercial robots into effective first responders for deadly chemical, radiological and explosive threats.

  16. Stanford Nitrogen Group | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ammonia to water bodies causes dead zones, but many wastewater treatment facilities do not have the current capability to economically meet the increasingly stringent standards. ...

  17. Biological Safety | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Biological Select Agents Inspection Report: IG-0681, Concerns Regarding a Non-Viable (Dead) "Anthrax Sport" Research Project at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Inspection ...

  18. TITLE AUTHORS SUBJECT SUBJECT RELATED DESCRIPTION PUBLISHER AVAILABILI...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Folding KineticsFinal Report Cover Page Bakajin O BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES ENGINEERING CONSUMPTION RATES DEAD TIME DETECTION DIFFUSION DNA ENERGY TRANSFER FABRICATION...

  19. KineticsFinal Report Cover Page Bakajin, O 59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    KineticsFinal Report Cover Page Bakajin, O 59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; 42 ENGINEERING; CONSUMPTION RATES; DEAD TIME; DETECTION; DIFFUSION; DNA; ENERGY TRANSFER; FABRICATION;...

  20. DNA-Binding Mechanism in Prokaryotic Partition Complex Formation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    other invaders from outside our bodies can be deadly foes that bring disease and death. In either case, understanding how bacteria multiply and grow not only increases our...

  1. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    tremendous progress in removing a potentially deadly hazard from all corners of the globe. Los Alamos helped usher in the nuclear age, so it's quite appropriate that this...

  2. Impacts | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Algal Pretreatment Improves Biofuels Yield and Value Reviving Algae from the (Almost) Dead Unique Bioreactor Finds Algae's Sweet Spot Rewiring Algae's Catalytic Circuits Biomass ...

  3. Peter L. Andresen | Inventors | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    What does he mean? In part, that structural design codes today reflect deadly 19th-century steam boiler explosions, the first widespread impact of environmentally assisted ...

  4. DOE/EA-1728-F Environmental Assessment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... with more wildfire tolerant shrubs, 23 grasses, and forbs). ... (i.e., buildup of wildfire fuels, including dead plant ... would exist. 21 Accident and fatality statistics ...

  5. Environmental Assessment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... with more wildfire 8 tolerant shrubs, grasses, and forbs). ... (i.e., buildup of wildfire fuels, including dead plant ... would exist. 30 Accident and fatality statistics ...

  6. Argonne researchers create more accurate model for greenhouse...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    carbon dioxide emissions from these regions. Peatlands, common in the Arctic, are wetlands filled with dead and decaying organic matter. They are the result of millions of...

  7. Remedial Investigation Work Plan for Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Operable Unit 3 at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    Upper East Fork Popular Creek Operable Unit 3 (UEFPC OU 3) is a source term OU composed of seven sites, and is located in the western portion of the Y-12 Plant. For the most part, the UEFPC OU 3 sites served unrelated purposes and are geographically removed from one another. The seven sites include the following: Building 81-10, the S-2 Site, Salvage Yard oil storage tanks, the Salvage Yard oil/solvent drum storage area, Tank Site 2063-U, the Salvage Yard drum deheader, and the Salvage Yard scrap metal storage area. All of these sites are contaminated with at least one or more hazardous and/or radioactive chemicals. All sites have had some previous investigation under the Y-12 Plant RCRA Program. The work plan contains summaries of geographical, historical, operational, geological, and hydrological information specific to each OU 3 site. The potential for release of contaminants to receptors through various media is addressed, and a sampling and analysis plan is presented to obtain objectives for the remedial investigation. Proposed sampling activities are contingent upon the screening level risk assessment, which includes shallow soil sampling, soil borings, monitoring well installation, groundwater sampling, and surface water sampling. Data from the site characterization activities will be used to meet the above objectives. A Field Sampling Investigation Plan, Health and Safety Plan, and Waste Management Plan are also included in this work plan.

  8. Ring laser scatterometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ackermann, Mark; Diels, Jean-Claude

    2005-06-28

    A scatterometer utilizes the dead zone resulting from lockup caused by scatter from a sample located in the optical path of a ring laser at a location where counter-rotating pulses cross. The frequency of one pulse relative to the other is varied across the lockup dead zone.

  9. Highly efficient 6-stroke engine cycle with water injection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Szybist, James P; Conklin, James C

    2012-10-23

    A six-stroke engine cycle having improved efficiency. Heat is recovered from the engine combustion gases by using a 6-stroke engine cycle in which combustion gases are partially vented proximate the bottom-dead-center position of the fourth stroke cycle, and water is injected proximate the top-dead-center position of the fourth stroke cycle.

  10. Acyclic Immucillin Phosphonates. Second-Generation Inhibitors of Plasmodium falciparum Hypoxanthine- Guanine-Xanthine Phosphoribosyltransferase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hazelton, Keith Z.; Ho, Meng-Chaio; Cassera, Maria B.; Clinch, Keith; Crump, Douglas R.; Rosario Jr., Irving; Merino, Emilio F.; Almo, Steve C.; Tyler, Peter C.; Schramm, Vern L.

    2012-06-22

    We found that Plasmodium falciparum is the primary cause of deaths from malaria. It is a purine auxotroph and relies on hypoxanthine salvage from the host purine pool. Purine starvation as an antimalarial target has been validated by inhibition of purine nucleoside phosphorylase. Hypoxanthine depletion kills Plasmodium falciparum in cell culture and in Aotus monkey infections. Hypoxanthine-guanine-xanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGXPRT) from P. falciparum is required for hypoxanthine salvage by forming inosine 5'-monophosphate, a branchpoint for all purine nucleotide synthesis in the parasite. We present a class of HGXPRT inhibitors, the acyclic immucillin phosphonates (AIPs), and cell permeable AIP prodrugs. The AIPs are simple, potent, selective, and biologically stable inhibitors. The AIP prodrugs block proliferation of cultured parasites by inhibiting the incorporation of hypoxanthine into the parasite nucleotide pool and validates HGXPRT as a target in malaria.

  11. News about Rare Earths, New or Critical Materials, and Their Uses: |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Critical Materials Institute Rare Earths, New or Critical Materials, and Their Uses: 2016 Rare earth materials: Developing a comprehensive approach could help DOD better manage national security risks in the supply chain, Feb. 11, 2016 New request for information to inform Department of Energy Critical Materials Strategy, Feb. 10, 2016 2015 UK gets federal funds to research coal-based rare earth elements, Dec. 20, 2015 Salvage neodymium magnets from an old hard drive, Dec. 10, 2015 Battery

  12. Material Recycle and Recovery | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Recycle and ... Material Recycle and Recovery Y-12 recycles and recovers enriched uranium from retired weapons and other excess or salvage materials, including some retired fuel elements and nuclear materials from other countries. This mission ensures that excess materials from Y-12 and other parts of the world are processed to a safer form for long-term storage or reuse. Recycled material is used for such things as feedstock for the Naval Reactors Program or for research reactors that produce

  13. Learning from (Near) Disaster

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Learning National Security Science Latest Issue:April 2016 past issues All Issues » submit Learning from (Near) Disaster Weapons designers look to past nuclear accidents to develop safer modern-day explosives. March 22, 2016 Learning from (Near) Disaster In the Palomares incident, three nuclear bombs crashed into the ground and a fourth vanished into the sea. Sailors recovered the fourth weapon two months later in the most expensive U.S. Navy salvage operation in history. The casing is

  14. CX-010735: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Grand Coulee-Bell No.5 Dead End Insulator Replacement Project CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 07/19/2013 Location(s): Washington, Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  15. Autonomous Realtime Threat-Hunting Robot (ARTHR)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Idaho National Laboratory - David Bruemmer, Curtis Nielsen

    2010-01-08

    Idaho National Laboratory researchers developed an intelligent plug-and-play robot payload that transforms commercial robots into effective first responders for deadly chemical, radiological and explosive threats. To learn more, visit

  16. DOE - Fossil Energy: How Fossil Fuels Were Formed

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fossil Fuel Formation Fossil Energy Study Guides How Fossil Fuels were Formed Contrary to what many people believe, fossil fuels are not the remains of dead dinosaurs. In fact,...

  17. Microsoft Word - Final Mitigated Action Plan - CNMI.docx

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... In addition, an initial report will be submitted six months after turbine operations begins. 6 | P a g e Dead Marian swiftlets found under a wind turbine will be collected by ...

  18. Sacrificial Protective Coating Materials that can be Regenerated...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... temperature and chemistry >2x increase in flux Complete flux recovery from dead end to crossflow mode Composition A Composition B Pure Polymer t 30 min t 24 hours

  19. Dear Mr. Cohen,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    31, 2012 Office of the General Counsel, Department of Energy Dear Mr. Cohen, Unfortunately we missed the dead line for the first set of comments regarding regulatory burden. We've ...

  20. Screening

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Screening is typically performed by an outside party or an independent renewable energy expert or team. It is a review of the possible technology options that identifies dead-ends and further...

  1. 2015 Annual Site Inspection and Monitoring Report for Uranium...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... under the maximum circumference of each of the live plants within the plot. In addition to estimating the cover of live plants, litter (organic detritus often consisting of dead ...

  2. Trestle Bay Restoration Project Final Feasibility Study and Environmen...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Nesting begins in late March and continues into June and consists of a shallow depression built in the open or near a grass clump and lined with fine dead grasses. The streaked ...

  3. Webinar: Evaluating Roof Structures for Solar PV

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This webinar provides an overview of Connecticut's Structural Review Worksheet for Residential Rooftop Solar PV Systems. The webinar explains how the worksheet should be used and common concerns with wind and dead loads for rooftop solar PV.

  4. Fast pandemic detection tool ready to fight flu

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    biological pathogens that could give rise to potentially deadly pandemics such as Influenza A (H1N1). June 9, 2009 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote...

  5. Validating Computer-Designed Proteins for Vaccines

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    apply to a variety of other vaccine targets, such as human immunodeficiency virus and influenza. Wanted: Dead or Computed As strange as it sounds, most vaccines are composed of...

  6. Microsoft PowerPoint - C_pol_lightning_summary.ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    * no dead time * no signals rejected - TOA Method for lightning location IC - CG discrimination - Height of IC events Network Configuration Nov 05 - Feb 06 BoM C-POL and Berrimah...

  7. Italian Physicist Named Deputy Associate Director at JLab (Daily Press) |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jefferson Lab Italian Physicist Named Deputy Associate Director at JLab (Daily Press) External Link: http://www.dailypress.com/news/science/dead-rise-blog/dp-italian-physicist-named... By jlab_admin on Tue, 2012-02-1

  8. Climate change cripples forests

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate change cripples forests Climate change cripples forests A team of scientists concluded that in the warmer and drier Southwest of the near future, widespread tree mortality will cause forest and species distributions to change substantially. October 1, 2012 A dead pinon at the edge of the Grand Canyon, harbinger of the future for trees in the Southwest United States. Photo courtesy A. Park Williams. A dead pinon at the edge of the Grand Canyon, harbinger of the future for trees in the

  9. SSRL HEADLINES August 2004

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 August, 2004 __________________________________________________________________________ Contents of this Issue: Science Highlight - Resurrecting the Dead and the Deadly Science Highlight - Understanding the Role of Thiolate Ligation in Nature's Hydroxylating Heme Enzymes SPEAR3 Receives DOE Excellence in Project Acquisition Award SSRLUOEC and SSRL Plan Annual Users' Meeting and Workshops, October 20-26 LCLS Division Formed at SLAC Report on the ICFA Future Light Sources Subpanel on XFEL Short

  10. Climate change cripples forests

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate Change Cripples Forests Climate change cripples forests A team of scientists concluded that in the warmer and drier Southwest of the near future, widespread tree mortality will cause forest and species distributions to change substantially. October 1, 2012 A dead pinon at the edge of the Grand Canyon, harbinger of the future for trees in the Southwest United States. Photo courtesy A. Park Williams. A dead pinon at the edge of the Grand Canyon, harbinger of the future for trees in the

  11. Climate change cripples forests

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate Change Cripples Forests Climate change cripples forests A team of scientists concluded that in the warmer and drier Southwest of the near future, widespread tree mortality will cause forest and species distributions to change substantially. October 1, 2012 A dead pinon at the edge of the Grand Canyon, harbinger of the future for trees in the Southwest United States. Photo courtesy A. Park Williams. A dead pinon at the edge of the Grand Canyon, harbinger of the future for trees in the

  12. Insecticide Transfer Efficiency and Lethal Load in Argentine Ants

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hooper-Bui, L. M.; Kwok, E S.C.; Buchholz, B. A.; Rust, M. K.; Eastmond, D. A.; Vogel, J. S.

    2015-07-03

    Trophallaxis between individual worker ants and the toxicant load in dead and live Argentine ants (Linepithema humile) in colonies exposed to fipronil and hydramethylnon experimental baits were examined using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). About 50% of the content of the crop containing trace levels of 14C-sucrose, 14C-hydramethylnon, and 14C-fipronil was shared between single donor and recipient ants. Dead workers and queens contained significantly more hydramethylnon (122.7 and 22.4 amol/μg ant, respectively) than did live workers and queens (96.3 and 10.4 amol/μg ant, respectively). Dead workers had significantly more fipronil (420.3 amol/μg ant) than did live workers (208.5 amol/μg ant), butmore » dead and live queens had equal fipronil levels (59.5 and 54.3 amol/μg ant, respectively). Moreover, the distribution of fipronil differed within the bodies of dead and live queens; the highest amounts of fipronil were recovered in the thorax of dead queens whereas live queens had the highest levels in the head. Resurgence of polygynous ant colonies treated with hydramethylnon baits may be explained by queen survival resulting from sublethal doses due to a slowing of trophallaxis throughout the colony. The bait strategies and dose levels for controlling insect pests need to be based on the specific toxicant properties and trophic strategies for targeting the entire colony.« less

  13. Insecticide Transfer Efficiency and Lethal Load in Argentine Ants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hooper-Bui, L. M.; Kwok, E S.C.; Buchholz, B. A.; Rust, M. K.; Eastmond, D. A.; Vogel, J. S.

    2015-07-03

    Trophallaxis between individual worker ants and the toxicant load in dead and live Argentine ants (Linepithema humile) in colonies exposed to fipronil and hydramethylnon experimental baits were examined using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). About 50% of the content of the crop containing trace levels of 14C-sucrose, 14C-hydramethylnon, and 14C-fipronil was shared between single donor and recipient ants. Dead workers and queens contained significantly more hydramethylnon (122.7 and 22.4 amol/μg ant, respectively) than did live workers and queens (96.3 and 10.4 amol/μg ant, respectively). Dead workers had significantly more fipronil (420.3 amol/μg ant) than did live workers (208.5 amol/μg ant), but dead and live queens had equal fipronil levels (59.5 and 54.3 amol/μg ant, respectively). Moreover, the distribution of fipronil differed within the bodies of dead and live queens; the highest amounts of fipronil were recovered in the thorax of dead queens whereas live queens had the highest levels in the head. Resurgence of polygynous ant colonies treated with hydramethylnon baits may be explained by queen survival resulting from sublethal doses due to a slowing of trophallaxis throughout the colony. The bait strategies and dose levels for controlling insect pests need to be based on the specific toxicant properties and trophic strategies for targeting the entire colony.

  14. Postoperative Stereotactic Radiosurgery Without Whole-Brain Radiation Therapy for Brain Metastases: Potential Role of Preoperative Tumor Size

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartford, Alan C.; Paravati, Anthony J.; Spire, William J.; Li, Zhongze; Jarvis, Lesley A.; Fadul, Camilo E.; Erkmen, Kadir; Friedman, Jonathan; Gladstone, David J.; Hug, Eugen B.; Roberts, David W.; Simmons, Nathan E.

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: Radiation therapy following resection of a brain metastasis increases the probability of disease control at the surgical site. We analyzed our experience with postoperative stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) as an alternative to whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT), with an emphasis on identifying factors that might predict intracranial disease control and overall survival (OS). Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed all patients through December 2008, who, after surgical resection, underwent SRS to the tumor bed, deferring WBRT. Multiple factors were analyzed for time to intracranial recurrence (ICR), whether local recurrence (LR) at the surgical bed or “distant” recurrence (DR) in the brain, for time to WBRT, and for OS. Results: A total of 49 lesions in 47 patients were treated with postoperative SRS. With median follow-up of 9.3 months (range, 1.1-61.4 months), local control rates at the resection cavity were 85.5% at 1 year and 66.9% at 2 years. OS rates at 1 and 2 years were 52.5% and 31.7%, respectively. On univariate analysis (preoperative) tumors larger than 3.0 cm exhibited a significantly shorter time to LR. At a cutoff of 2.0 cm, larger tumors resulted in significantly shorter times not only for LR but also for DR, ICR, and salvage WBRT. While multivariate Cox regressions showed preoperative size to be significant for times to DR, ICR, and WBRT, in similar multivariate analysis for OS, only the graded prognostic assessment proved to be significant. However, the number of intracranial metastases at presentation was not significantly associated with OS nor with other outcome variables. Conclusions: Larger tumor size was associated with shorter time to recurrence and with shorter time to salvage WBRT; however, larger tumors were not associated with decrements in OS, suggesting successful salvage. SRS to the tumor bed without WBRT is an effective treatment for resected brain metastases, achieving local control particularly for tumors up to

  15. Patterns of Failure After Concurrent Bevacizumab and Hypofractionated Stereotactic Radiation Therapy for Recurrent High-Grade Glioma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shapiro, Lauren Q.; Beal, Kathryn; Goenka, Anuj; Karimi, Sasan; Iwamoto, Fabio M.; Yamada, Yoshiya; Zhang, Zhigang; Lassman, Andrew B.; Abrey, Lauren E.; Gutin, Philip H.

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: Concurrent bevacizumab with hypofractionated stereotactic radiation therapy (HSRT) is safe and effective for the treatment of recurrent high-grade gliomas (HGG). The objective of this study was to characterize the patterns of failure after this treatment regimen. Methods and Materials: Twenty-four patients with recurrent enhancing HGG were previously treated on an institutional review board-approved protocol of concurrent bevacizumab and reirradiation. Patients received 30 Gy in 5 fractions to the recurrent tumor with HSRT. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed every 2 cycles, and bevacizumab was continued until clinical or radiographic tumor progression according to the criteria of Macdonald et al. MRI at the time of progression was fused to the HSRT treatment plan, and the location of recurrence was classified on the basis of volume within the 95% isodose line. Outcomes based on patient characteristics, tumor grade, recurrence pattern, and best response to treatment were analyzed by the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Twenty-two patients experienced either clinical or radiographic progression. Recurrent tumor was enhancing in 15 (71.4%) and nonenhancing in 6 (28.6%) patients. Eleven patients (52.4%) had recurrence within the radiation field, 5 patients (23.8%) had marginal recurrence, and 5 patients had recurrence outside the radiation field. Pattern of enhancement and location of failure did not correlate with overall survival or progression-free survival. Radiographic response was the only variable to significantly correlate with progression-free survival. Conclusions: Despite the promising initial response seen with the addition of HSRT to bevacizumab as salvage treatment for recurrent HGG, approximately half of patients ultimately still experience failure within the radiation field. The rate of local failure with the addition of HSRT seems to be lower than that seen with bevacizumab alone in the salvage setting. Our data underscore the

  16. Prince William Sound disabled tanker towing study. Part 1. Evaluation of existing equipment, personnel and procedures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    The study has been undertaken by the Glosten Associates, Inc., to evaluate the existing capability for emergency towing at Prince William Sound and to examine alternatives that could enhance the escort and assist capabilities for disabled tankers within the waterway from the Alyeska Oil Terminal at the Port of Valdez to the Gulf of Alaska outside Hinchinbrook Entrance. Part 1, reported herein, is an objective evaluation by an experienced salvage towing master of the existing tugs, emergency towing equipment, towing practices, and discussion of alternative tug types.

  17. Federal Energy and Water Management Awards 2014

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Jeffrey DeVore, Stephen Grimes, Gerry Mitchell, Alfonso Sanchez U.S. Air Force Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio In FY 2013 a team of architects and engineers from Wright-Patterson's 88 Air Base Wing Civil Engineering Division successfully salvaged and renovated an underused, historic 53,000 square foot hangar built in 1934, increasing usable laboratory space by 60% while reducing water use by 45% and energy use by about 30%. The new energy efficient building allowed the Air Force Research

  18. CX-005991: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    5991: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-005991: Categorical Exclusion Determination Prairie Village, Kansas Ground Source Heat Pump Relocation CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 05/25/2011 Location(s): Prairie Village, Kansas Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office A prior categorical exclusion was awarded to this ground source heat pump (GSHP) system/project on 9/7/2010. The location of the project has been changed to accommodate salvage of mature trees to a new

  19. Link Alpha S

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    s A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z Filter by alpha... A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z Safety Advisory Committee Safety and Hazardous Waste (Facilities Division) Safety Awards Safety Concerns Safety Culture Improvement Safety Data Sheets (SDS) Safety Walkthrough Management Salary Ranges Salvage (Waste Minimization) Scientific Cluster Support Scientific Networking Division Scientific Programs Seaborg: Glenn Seaborg's Life & Contributions Search lab-wide web

  20. U.S. Department of Energy Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    This activity targets the salvageable and reusability of equipment and entails the removal of diesel generators, air compressors, and related electrical items. The proposed action would take place at DOE/PORTS at Piketon, Ohio. Number and Title of the Categorical Exclusions Applied: PORTS CX: Removal of Excess DOE Material in the X-326, X-330 & X-333 Process Buildings PORTS CX: Utility and Electrical System Optimization 10 CFR 1021, Appendix B to Subpart D: B1.3: Routine maintenance B1.27:

  1. Internal combustion engine using premixed combustion of stratified charges

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marriott, Craig D.; Reitz, Rolf D. (Madison, WI

    2003-12-30

    During a combustion cycle, a first stoichiometrically lean fuel charge is injected well prior to top dead center, preferably during the intake stroke. This first fuel charge is substantially mixed with the combustion chamber air during subsequent motion of the piston towards top dead center. A subsequent fuel charge is then injected prior to top dead center to create a stratified, locally richer mixture (but still leaner than stoichiometric) within the combustion chamber. The locally rich region within the combustion chamber has sufficient fuel density to autoignite, and its self-ignition serves to activate ignition for the lean mixture existing within the remainder of the combustion chamber. Because the mixture within the combustion chamber is overall premixed and relatively lean, NO.sub.x and soot production are significantly diminished.

  2. Adaptive engine injection for emissions reduction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reitz, Rolf D. : Sun, Yong

    2008-12-16

    NOx and soot emissions from internal combustion engines, and in particular compression ignition (diesel) engines, are reduced by varying fuel injection timing, fuel injection pressure, and injected fuel volume between low and greater engine loads. At low loads, fuel is injected during one or more low-pressure injections occurring at low injection pressures between the start of the intake stroke and approximately 40 degrees before top dead center during the compression stroke. At higher loads, similar injections are used early in each combustion cycle, in addition to later injections which preferably occur between about 90 degrees before top dead center during the compression stroke, and about 90 degrees after top dead center during the expansion stroke (and which most preferably begin at or closely adjacent the end of the compression stroke). These later injections have higher injection pressure, and also lower injected fuel volume, than the earlier injections.

  3. The neutrino turns 60

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A fusion-powered rocket to deflect deadly comets A fusion-powered rocket to deflect deadly comets Glen Wurden, a plasma physicist at Los Alamos has conceived a comet-buster that would work like this: Harnessing the tremendous energy of fusion, the process in which two atomic nuclei collide to form a new nucleus, could propel a rocket to more than 100 kilometers per second. June 27, 2016 Glen Wurden, a plasma physicist at Los Alamos has conceived a comet-buster that would work like this:

  4. High-pressure liquid chromatographic gradient mixer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Daughton, C.G.; Sakaji, R.H.

    1982-09-08

    A gradient mixer effects the continuous mixing of any two miscible solvents without excessive decay or dispersion of the resultant isocratic effluent or of a linear or exponential gradient. The two solvents are fed under low or high pressure by means of two high performance liquid chromatographic pumps. The mixer comprises a series of ultra-low dead volume stainless steel tubes and low dead volume chambers. The two solvent streams impinge head-on at high fluxes. This initial nonhomogeneous mixture is then passed through a chamber packed with spirally-wound wires which cause turbulent mixing thereby homogenizing the mixture with minimum band-broadening.

  5. Life history and habitat associations of the broad wood cockroach, Parcoblatta lata (Blattaria: Blattellidae) and other native cockroaches in the Coastal Plain of South Carolina.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horn, Scott; Hanula, James, L.

    2002-06-18

    Wood cockroaches are an important prey of the red-cockaded woodpecker, Picoides borealis, an endangered species inhabiting pine forests in the southern United States. These woodpeckers forage on the boles of live pine trees, but their prey consists of a high proportion of wood cockroaches, Parcoblatta spp., that are more commonly associated with dead plant material. Cockroach population density samples were conducted on live pine trees, dead snags and coarse woody debris on the ground. The studies showed that snags and logs are also important habitats of wood cockroaches in pine forests.

  6. High pressure liquid chromatographic gradient mixer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Daughton, Christian G.; Sakaji, Richard H.

    1985-01-01

    A gradient mixer which effects the continuous mixing of any two miscible solvents without excessive decay or dispersion of the resultant isocratic effluent or of a linear or exponential gradient. The two solvents are fed under low or high pressure by means of two high performance liquid chromatographic pumps. The mixer comprises a series of ultra-low dead volume stainless steel tubes and low dead volume chambers. The two solvent streams impinge head-on at high fluxes. This initial nonhomogeneous mixture is then passed through a chamber packed with spirally-wound wires which cause turbulent mixing thereby homogenizing the mixture with minimum "band-broadening".

  7. Science Summary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    25, 2008 » Links Scientific Highlight Saphire Website Scripps Press Release Tracking Ebola, Scripps At the Forefront » Share this Article Laboratree Ologeez SciLink LabSpaces Revealing a Structural Weakness of the Deadly Ebolavirus summary written by Brad Plummer, SLAC Communication Office Scientists are one step closer to conquering the deadly Ebolavirus, thanks to research conducted at SSRL structural biology Beam Lines 9-2 and 11-1 and ALS Beam Line 5.02 by a team of researchers led by

  8. Energy and materials flows in the copper industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaines, L.L.

    1980-12-01

    The copper industry comprises both the primary copper industry, which produces 99.9%-pure copper from copper ore, and the secondary copper industry, which salvages and recycles copper-containing scrap metal to extract pure copper or copper alloys. The United States uses about 2 million tons of copper annually, 60% of it for electrical applications. Demand is expected to increase less than 4% annually for the next 20 years. The primary copper industry is concentrated in the Southwest; Arizona produced 66% of the 1979 total ore output. Primary production uses about 170 x 10/sup 12/ Btu total energy annually (about 100 x 10/sup 6/ Btu/ton pure copper produced from ore). Mining and milling use about 60% of the total consumption, because low-grade ore (0.6% copper) is now being mined. Most copper is extracted by smelting sulfide ores, with concomitant production of sulfur dioxide. Clean air regulations will require smelters to reduce sulfur emissions, necessitating smelting process modifications that could also save 20 x 10/sup 12/ Btu (10 x 10/sup 6/ Btu/ton of copper) in smelting energy. Energy use in secondary copper production averages 20 x 10/sup 6/ Btu/ton of copper. If all copper products were recycled, instead of the 30% now salvaged, the energy conservation potential would be about one-half the total energy consumption of the primary copper industry.

  9. Piston rod seal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lindskoug, Stefan

    1984-01-01

    In a piston rod seal of the type comprising a gland through which the piston rod is passed the piston is provided with a sleeve surrounding the piston rod and extending axially so as to axially partly overlap the gland when the piston is in its bottom dead center position.

  10. Double slotted socket spherical joint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bieg, Lothar F.; Benavides, Gilbert L.

    2001-05-22

    A new class of spherical joints is disclosed. These spherical joints are capable of extremely large angular displacements (full cone angles in excess of 270.degree.), while exhibiting no singularities or dead spots in their range of motion. These joints can improve or simplify a wide range of mechanical devices.

  11. Comparison of the spectral response of a thinned, backside illuminated CCD with a CsI coated MCP system and Kodak 101 film

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li Yuelin; Crespo Lopex-Urrutia, J. R.; Tsakiris, G. D.; Sigel, R.; Volk, R.; Pina, L.

    1995-05-01

    A thinned backside illuminated CCD chip was calibrated by self consistently determining the thickness of its dead layer. Its spectral response and sensitivity were then compared with those of the calibrated Kodak 101 photographic plates and of a CsI coated microchannel plate detection system.

  12. Geek-Up[09.17.2010]-- Water Blades, Biomass Conversion and Antineutrino Detection

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Scientists have engineered a blade of water that’s strong enough and fast enough to penetrate through steel, which will help soldiers in Afghanistan disable deadly IEDs, plus researchers are currently testing an aboveground water-based antineutrino detector that will improve monitoring capabilities at nuclear facilities.

  13. Controls on terrestrial carbon feedbacks by productivity vs. turnover in the CMIP5 Earth System Models

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Koven, C. D.; Chambers, J. Q.; Georgiou, K.; Knox, R.; Negron-Juarez, R.; Riley, W. J.; Arora, V. K.; Brovkin, V.; Friedlingstein, P.; Jones, C. D.

    2015-04-16

    To better understand sources of uncertainty in projections of terrestrial carbon cycle feedbacks, we present an approach to separate the controls on modeled carbon changes. We separate carbon changes into 4 categories using a linearized, equilibrium approach: those arising from changed inputs (productivity-driven changes), and outputs (turnover-driven changes), and apply the analysis separately to the live and dead carbon pools. Using Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) simulations for 5 models, we find that changes to the live pools are primarily explained by productivity-driven changes, with only one model showing large compensating changes to live carbon turnover times. Formore » dead carbon pools, the situation is more complex as all models predict a large reduction in turnover times in response to increases in productivity. This responses arises from the common representation of a broad spectrum of decomposition turnover times via a multi-pool approach, in which flux-weighted turnover times are faster than mass-weighted turnover times. This leads to a shift in the distribution of carbon among dead pools in response to changes in inputs, and therefore a transient but long-lived reduction in turnover times in response to increases in productivity. Since this behavior, a reduction in inferred turnover times resulting from an increase in inputs, is superficially similar to priming processes, but occurring without the mechanisms responsible for priming, we call the phenomenon "false priming", and show that it masks much of the intrinsic changes to dead carbon turnover times as a result of changing climate. These patterns hold across the fully-coupled, biogeochemically-coupled, and radiatively-coupled 1% yr−1 increasing CO2 experiments. We disaggregate inter-model uncertainty in the globally-integrated equilibrium carbon responses to initial turnover times, inital productivity, fractional changes in turnover, and fractional changes in

  14. Controls on terrestrial carbon feedbacks by productivity versus turnover in the CMIP5 Earth System Models

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Koven, C. D.; Chambers, J. Q.; Georgiou, K.; Knox, R.; Negron-Juarez, R.; Riley, W. J.; Arora, V. K.; Brovkin, V.; Friedlingstein, P.; Jones, C. D.

    2015-09-07

    To better understand sources of uncertainty in projections of terrestrial carbon cycle feedbacks, we present an approach to separate the controls on modeled carbon changes. We separate carbon changes into four categories using a linearized, equilibrium approach: those arising from changed inputs (productivity-driven changes), and outputs (turnover-driven changes), of both the live and dead carbon pools. Using Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) simulations for five models, we find that changes to the live pools are primarily explained by productivity-driven changes, with only one model showing large compensating changes to live carbon turnover times. For dead carbon pools, themore » situation is more complex as all models predict a large reduction in turnover times in response to increases in productivity. This response arises from the common representation of a broad spectrum of decomposition turnover times via a multi-pool approach, in which flux-weighted turnover times are faster than mass-weighted turnover times. This leads to a shift in the distribution of carbon among dead pools in response to changes in inputs, and therefore a transient but long-lived reduction in turnover times. Since this behavior, a reduction in inferred turnover times resulting from an increase in inputs, is superficially similar to priming processes, but occurring without the mechanisms responsible for priming, we call the phenomenon "false priming", and show that it masks much of the intrinsic changes to dead carbon turnover times as a result of changing climate. These patterns hold across the fully coupled, biogeochemically coupled, and radiatively coupled 1 % yr−1 increasing CO2 experiments. We disaggregate inter-model uncertainty in the globally integrated equilibrium carbon responses to initial turnover times, initial productivity, fractional changes in turnover, and fractional changes in productivity. For both the live and dead carbon pools, inter

  15. EVAPORITE MICROBIAL FILMS, MATS, MICROBIALITES AND STROMATOLITES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brigmon, R; Penny Morris, P; Garriet Smith, G

    2008-01-28

    Evaporitic environments are found in a variety of depositional environments as early as the Archean. The depositional settings, microbial community and mineralogical composition vary significantly as no two settings are identical. The common thread linking all of the settings is that evaporation exceeds precipitation resulting in elevated concentrations of cations and anions that are higher than in oceanic systems. The Dead Sea and Storrs Lake are examples of two diverse modern evaporitic settings as the former is below sea level and the latter is a coastal lake on an island in the Caribbean. Each system varies in water chemistry as the Dead Sea dissolved ions originate from surface weathered materials, springs, and aquifers while Storrs Lake dissolved ion concentration is primarily derived from sea water. Consequently some of the ions, i.e., Sr, Ba are found at significantly lower concentrations in Storrs Lake than in the Dead Sea. The origin of the dissolved ions are ultimately responsible for the pH of each system, alkaline versus mildly acidic. Each system exhibits unique biogeochemical properties as the extreme environments select certain microorganisms. Storrs Lake possesses significant biofilms and stromatolitic deposits and the alkalinity varies depending on rainfall and storm activity. The microbial community Storrs Lake is much more diverse and active than those observed in the Dead Sea. The Dead Sea waters are mildly acidic, lack stromatolites, and possess a lower density of microbial populations. The general absence of microbial and biofilm fossilization is due to the depletion of HCO{sub 3} and slightly acidic pH.

  16. Landlord project multi-year program plan, fiscal year 1999, WBS 1.5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dallas, M.D.

    1998-09-22

    The MYWP technical baseline describes the work to be accomplished by the Project and the technical standards which govern that work. The mission of Landlord Project is to provide more maintenance replacement of general infrastructure facilities and systems to facilitate the Hanford Site cleanup mission. Also, once an infrastructure facility or system is no longer needed the Landlord Project transitions the facility to final closure/removal through excess, salvage or demolition. Landlord Project activities will be performed in an environmentally sound, safe, economical, prudent, and reliable manner. The Landlord Project consists of the following facilities systems: steam, water, liquid sanitary waste, electrical distribution, telecommunication, sanitary landfill, emergency services, general purpose offices, general purpose shops, general purpose warehouses, environmental supports facilities, roads, railroad, and the site land. The objectives for general infrastructure support are reflected in two specific areas, (1) Core Infrastructure Maintenance, and (2) Infrastructure Risk Mitigation.

  17. Electron beam melting of charge based on titanium sponge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tikhonovsky, A.L.; Tikhonovsky, K.A.

    1995-12-31

    An experience of 0.8 MW consumable box melting furnace operation and theoretical simulation have led to the further development of the FIKO plant under construction on the base of melting of two consumable box-like bullets which move opposite each other and form narrow heated space between melted butt ends. It allows to reduce vaporization, spatter and radiation losses by several times and to reach two times increase in melting rate and 99%(97%) yield for c.p. titanium (alloys) without furnace power add. Future furnace design will provide the optimum protection of vacuum pumps against chlorides, the safety when melting titanium sponge and will permit hot ingots to move to the special furnace for EB surface conditioning. The maximum productivity is to be 18,000 t/year. The furnace can be used for the manufacture of aluminum-, copper-, iron-, nickel-, tungsten-based alloys and others of any charge including salvage.

  18. AmeriFlux US-Me6 Metolius Young Pine Burn

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Law, Bev

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-Me6 Metolius Young Pine Burn. Site Description - The study site is located east of the Cascade mountains, near Sisters, Central Oregon and is part of the Metolius cluster sites with different age and disturbance classes within the AmeriFlux network. After a severe fire in 1979, the site was salvage logged, was acquired by the US Forest Service land and re-forested in 1990. The dominant overstory vegetation are 20-year old ponderosa pine trees with an average height of 5.2 +/- 1.1 m. The season maximum overstory half-sided LAI was 0.6 m2 m-2 in 2010. Tree density is low, with ca. 162 trees ha-1.

  19. Phlegmasia Caerulea Dolens in a Patient With an Inferior Vena Cava Filter: Treatment of Massive Iliocaval Thrombosis Using Local Intravenous Catheter-Directed Thrombolysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cookson, Daniel; Caldwell, Stuart

    2012-10-15

    Phlegmasia caerulea dolens (PCD) is a potentially disastrous complication of inferior vena cava filter insertion, and its optimum management has not been clearly established. We present a case report of a patient with pulmonary embolism and acute adrenal haemorrhage who developed PCD secondary to massive iliocaval thrombosis after insertion of a Cook Celect removable filter. Local intravenous catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT), followed by systemic anticoagulation, achieved limb salvage and virtual resolution of symptoms at 3 months without complications. CDT can be a successful primary treatment of filter-associated PCD and can be safe in selected patients with acute nontraumatic haemorrhage. Systemic anticoagulation may subsequently restore complete venous patency and may therefore be a useful approach to postthrombolysis management of residual iliocaval thrombus when filter removal is indicated.

  20. Combined Pharmacomechanical Thrombolysis of Complete Portomesenteric Thrombosis in a Liver Transplant Recipient

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lorenz, Jonathan M. Bennett, Shelby; Patel, Jay; Ha, Thuong G. Van; Funaki, Brian

    2013-01-30

    Treatment options for portomesenteric venous thrombosis range from anticoagulation to surgery, depending on chronicity, severity of symptoms, extent of thrombosis, and the availability of local expertise. For acute and subacute cases, a variety of endovascular options have been described in limited published series and case reports, including thrombolysis and mechanical thrombectomy. We report what is to our knowledge the first case in which the Trellis pharmacomechanical thrombolysis device was used successfully to treat complete acute thrombosis of the entire superior mesenteric vein and the entire portal vein with extension into all segmental intrahepatic portal branches in a young adult after liver transplantation. This device, coupled with adjunctive techniques using balloon catheters, facilitated complete restoration of flow, resulting in graft salvage and long-term patency.

  1. High-speed photography of the first hydrogen-bomb explosion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brixner, B.

    1992-09-01

    Obtaining detailed photographs of the early stages of the first hydrogen bomb explosion in 1952 posed a number of problems. First, it was necessary to invent a continuous-access camera which could solve the problem that existing million-picture-per-second cameras were blind most of the time. The solution here was to alter an existing camera design so that two modified cameras could be mounted around a single high-speed rotating mirror. A second problem, acquiring the necessary lenses of precisely specified focal lengths, was solved by obtaining a large number of production lenses from war surplus salvage. A third hurdle to be overcome was to test the new camera at an A-bomb explosion. Finally, it was necessary to solve the almost impossible difficulty of building a safe camera shelter close to a megaton explosion. This paper describes the way these problems were solved. Unfortunately the successful pictures that were taken are sill classified.

  2. High-speed photography of the first hydrogen-bomb explosion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brixner, B.

    1992-01-01

    Obtaining detailed photographs of the early stages of the first hydrogen bomb explosion in 1952 posed a number of problems. First, it was necessary to invent a continuous-access camera which could solve the problem that existing million-picture-per-second cameras were blind most of the time. The solution here was to alter an existing camera design so that two modified cameras could be mounted around a single high-speed rotating mirror. A second problem, acquiring the necessary lenses of precisely specified focal lengths, was solved by obtaining a large number of production lenses from war surplus salvage. A third hurdle to be overcome was to test the new camera at an A-bomb explosion. Finally, it was necessary to solve the almost impossible difficulty of building a safe camera shelter close to a megaton explosion. This paper describes the way these problems were solved. Unfortunately the successful pictures that were taken are sill classified.

  3. Long-Term Outcomes of Vestibular Schwannomas Treated With Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy: An Institutional Experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kapoor, Sumit; Batra, Sachin; Carson, Kathryn; Shuck, John; Kharkar, Siddharth; Gandhi, Rahul; Jackson, Juan; Wemmer, Jan; Terezakis, Stephanie; Shokek, Ori; Kleinberg, Lawrence; Rigamonti, Daniele

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: We assessed clinical outcome and long-term tumor control after fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) for unilateral schwannoma. Methods and Materials: Between 1995 and 2007, 496 patients were treated with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy at Johns Hopkins Hospital (Baltimore, MD); 385 patients had radiologic follow-up that met the inclusion criteria. The primary endpoint was treatment failure. Secondary endpoints were radiologic progression and clinical outcome. Logistic regression analysis assessed the association of age, race, tumor side, sex, and pretreatment symptoms. Results: In 11 patients (3%) treatment failed, and they required salvage (microsurgical) treatment. Radiologic progression was observed in 116 patients (30.0%), including 35 patients (9%) in whom the treatment volume more than doubled during the follow-up period, although none required surgical resection. Tumors with baseline volumes of less than 1 cm{sup 3} were 18.02 times more likely to progress than those with tumor volumes of 1 cm{sup 3} or greater (odds ratio, 18.02; 95% confidence interval, 4.25-76.32). Treatment-induced neurologic morbidity included 8 patients (1.6%) with new facial weakness, 12 patients (2.8%) with new trigeminal paresthesias, 4 patients (0.9%) with hydrocephalus (1 communicating and 3 obstructive), and 2 patients (0.5%) with possibly radiation-induced neoplasia. Conclusions: Although the rate of treatment failure is low (3%), careful follow-up shows that radiologic progression occurs frequently. When reporting outcome, the 'no salvage surgery needed' and 'no additional treatment needed' criteria for treatment success need to be complemented by the radiologic data.

  4. Multifocal Glioblastoma Multiforme: Prognostic Factors and Patterns of Progression

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Showalter, Timothy N.; Andrel, Jocelyn; Andrews, David W.; Curran, Walter J.; Daskalakis, Constantine; Werner-Wasik, Maria

    2007-11-01

    Purpose: To assess the progression patterns in patients with multifocal glioblastoma multiforme who had undergone whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT), the historical standard, versus three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, and to identify predictive treatment and pretreatment factors. Methods and Materials: The records of 50 patients with multifocal glioblastoma multiforme treated with RT were reviewed. Univariate analyses were performed using survival methods and the Cox proportional hazards regression method. Multivariate analyses were performed using the Cox proportional hazards regression method. Results: The mean age was 61 years, and 71% had a Karnofsky performance status (KPS) score of {>=}70. Of the 50 patients, 32% underwent WBRT and 68%, three-dimensional conformal RT. Progression was local in all evaluable patients, as determined by imaging in 38 patients and early neurologic progression in 12. The median time to progression (TTP) was 3.1 months, and the median survival time (MST) was 8.1 months. The significant independent predictors of TTP on multivariate analysis were a KPS score <70 (p = 0.001), the extent of surgery (p = 0.040), a radiation dose <60 Gy (p = 0.027), and the lack of chemotherapy (p = 0.001). The significant independent predictors of a reduced MST were a KPS score <70 (p = 0.022) and the absence of salvage surgery (p = 0.011) and salvage chemotherapy (p = 0.003). Conclusion: Local progression was observed in all patients. On multivariate analysis, no significant difference was found in the TTP or MST between three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and WBRT. The KPS was a consistent independent predictor of both TTP and MST. On the basis of the progression pattern, we do not recommend WBRT as a mandatory component of the treatment of multifocal glioblastoma multi0011for.

  5. Alternative Techniques for Treatment of Complex Below-the Knee Arterial Occlusions in Diabetic Patients With Critical Limb Ischemia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gandini, Roberto; Uccioli, Luigi; Spinelli, Alessio; Del Giudice, Costantino Ros, Valerio Da; Volpi, Tommaso; Meloni, Marco; Simonetti, Giovanni

    2013-02-15

    The purpose of this study was to describe alternative endovascular (EV) techniques and assess their feasibility and efficacy in minimizing failure rates in limb salvage for the treatment of complex below-the knee (BTK) occlusions that could not be crossed with a conventional antegrade access. Between December 2007 and November 2010, 1,035 patients (557 male) underwent EV treatment for critical limb ischemia in our institution. In 124 (12% [83 male], mean age 68.2 {+-} 0.5 years) patients, transfemoral antegrade revascularization attempt failed, and an alternative approach was used. Follow-up was performed at 1 and 6 months. Results were compared with 56 patients treated between November 2002 and November 2007, in whom conventional technique was unsuccessful and unconventional techniques were not adopted. Technical success was achieved in 119 (96%) patients. The limb-salvage rates were 96.8% and 83% at 1- and 6-month follow-up, respectively. Sixteen (12.9%) and 33 (26.6%) patients underwent reintervention at 1- and 6-month follow-up, respectively. Transcutaneous oxygen tension increased at 1 month (44.7 {+-} 1.1 vs. 15.7 {+-} 0.8 mmHg; p < 0.001) and remained stable at follow-up. Twenty (16.1%) patients required major amputation. Thirteen (10.4%) patients died during follow-up. In our previous experience, percutaneous transluminal angioplasty failure, amputation, and death rates were 10.9, 39.2, and 23.2%, respectively. Alternative techniques allowed a significant decrease of major amputation and death rates (p = 0.0001 and p = 0.02, respectively). The use of alternative techniques seems feasible in case of a failed antegrade BTK revascularization attempt and could minimize failure rates in the treatment of complex occlusions while providing satisfying clinical success rates at 6 months.

  6. Accelerated Radiotherapy, Carbogen, and Nicotinamide (ARCON) in the Treatment of Advanced Bladder Cancer: Mature Results of a Phase II Nonrandomized Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoskin, Peter; Rojas, Ana Ph.D. Saunders, Michele

    2009-04-01

    Purpose: We previously showed that accelerated radiotherapy combined with carbogen and nicotinamide (ARCON) was an effective approach to use in the radical treatment of patients with advanced bladder carcinoma. Interim analysis from this Phase II study showed that it achieved a high level of locoregional control and overall survival (OS) and an acceptable level of adverse events. Methods and Materials: From 1994 to 2000, a total of 105 consecutive patients with high-grade superficial or muscle-invasive bladder carcinoma were given accelerated radiotherapy (50-55 Gy in 4 weeks) with carbogen alone or ARCON. End points of the study were OS, disease-specific, and local regional relapse-free survival, and for late adverse events, urinary (altered urination frequency, incontinence, hematuria, and urgency) and bowel dysfunction (stool frequency and blood loss). Results: At 5 and 10 years, local regional relapse-free survival rates were 44% after ARCON excluding the effect of salvage treatment and 62% after ARCON including the effect of salvage treatment (p = 0.04). Five- and 10-year rates were 35% and 27% for OS and 47% and 46% for disease-specific survival. The highest actuarial rate for Grade 3 or worse late urinary or bowel dysfunction was observed for altered urinary frequency (44% of patients had urinary events every 1 hour or less) and stool frequency of four or more events (26% at 5 years). Conclusions: Historic comparisons with other studies indicate no evidence of an increase in severe or worse adverse events and good permanent control of bladder disease after ARCON radiotherapy.

  7. Optimization of a low noise detection circuit for probing the structure of damage cascades with IBIC

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Auden, Elizabeth C.; Doyle, Barney L.; Bielejec, Edward; Vizkelethy, Gyorgy; Wampler, William R.

    2015-06-18

    Optimal detector / pre-amplifier combinations have been identified for the use of light ion IBIC (ion beam induced charge) to probe the physical structure of electrically active defects in damage cascades caused by heavy ion implantation. The ideal detector must have a sufficiently thin dead layer that incident ions will produce the majority of damage cascades in the depletion region of the detector rather than the dead layer. Detector and circuit noise must be low enough to detect the implantation of a single heavy ion as well as the decrease in the light ion IBIC signal caused by Shockley-Read-Hall recombinationmore » when the beam scans regions of the detector damaged by the heavy ion. The IBIC signals from three detectors irradiated with 750 keV He⁺ ions are measured with commercial and bespoke charge sensitive pre-amplifiers to identify the combination with the lowest noise.« less

  8. Optical coupler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Majewski, Stanislaw; Weisenberger, Andrew G.

    2004-06-15

    In a camera or similar radiation sensitive device comprising a pixilated scintillation layer, a light guide and an array of position sensitive photomultiplier tubes, wherein there exists so-called dead space between adjacent photomultiplier tubes the improvement comprising a two part light guide comprising a first planar light spreading layer or portion having a first surface that addresses the scintillation layer and optically coupled thereto at a second surface that addresses the photomultiplier tubes, a second layer or portion comprising an array of trapezoidal light collectors defining gaps that span said dead space and are individually optically coupled to individual position sensitive photomultiplier tubes. According to a preferred embodiment, coupling of the trapezoidal light collectors to the position sensitive photomultiplier tubes is accomplished using an optical grease having about the same refractive index as the material of construction of the two part light guide.

  9. AmeriFlux CA-SF3 Saskatchewan - Western Boreal, forest burned in 1998.

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Amiro, Brian [University of Manitoba; Canadian Forest Service

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site CA-SF3 Saskatchewan - Western Boreal, forest burned in 1998.. Site Description - The 1998 burn site (F98) was in the east part of Prince Albert National Park, Saskatchewan, in the Waskesiu Fire, ignited by lightning that burned about 1700 ha in July 1998. The pre-fire forest consisted of jack pine and black spruce stands, with some intermixed aspen. The fire was severe, consuming much of the top layer of organic soil and killing all trees. In 2001, much of the regenerating vegetation consisted of aspen saplings about 1 m tall and shorter jack pine and black spruce seedlings. An overstory of dead, leafless jack pine trees dominated at a height of 18 m. Sparse grass and herbs, such as fireweed (Epilobium angustifolium L.) covered the ground. There were a large number of fallen dead trees, mostly perched above the ground and not decomposing quickly.

  10. Homogenous charge compression ignition engine having a cylinder including a high compression space

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Agama, Jorge R.; Fiveland, Scott B.; Maloney, Ronald P.; Faletti, James J.; Clarke, John M.

    2003-12-30

    The present invention relates generally to the field of homogeneous charge compression engines. In these engines, fuel is injected upstream or directly into the cylinder when the power piston is relatively close to its bottom dead center position. The fuel mixes with air in the cylinder as the power piston advances to create a relatively lean homogeneous mixture that preferably ignites when the power piston is relatively close to the top dead center position. However, if the ignition event occurs either earlier or later than desired, lowered performance, engine misfire, or even engine damage, can result. Thus, the present invention divides the homogeneous charge between a controlled volume higher compression space and a lower compression space to better control the start of ignition.

  11. Variable valve timing in a homogenous charge compression ignition engine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Keith E.; Faletti, James J.; Funke, Steven J.; Maloney, Ronald P.

    2004-08-03

    The present invention relates generally to the field of homogenous charge compression ignition engines, in which fuel is injected when the cylinder piston is relatively close to the bottom dead center position for its compression stroke. The fuel mixes with air in the cylinder during the compression stroke to create a relatively lean homogeneous mixture that preferably ignites when the piston is relatively close to the top dead center position. However, if the ignition event occurs either earlier or later than desired, lowered performance, engine misfire, or even engine damage, can result. The present invention utilizes internal exhaust gas recirculation and/or compression ratio control to control the timing of ignition events and combustion duration in homogeneous charge compression ignition engines. Thus, at least one electro-hydraulic assist actuator is provided that is capable of mechanically engaging at least one cam actuated intake and/or exhaust valve.

  12. Variable displacement blower

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bookout, Charles C.; Stotts, Robert E.; Waring, Douglass R.; Folsom, Lawrence R.

    1986-01-01

    A blower having a stationary casing for rotatably supporting a rotor assembly having a series of open ended chambers arranged to close against the surrounding walls of the casing. Pistons are slidably mounted within each chamber with the center of rotation of the pistons being offset in regard to the center of rotation of the rotor assembly whereby the pistons reciprocate in the chambers as the rotor assembly turns. As inlet port communicates with the rotor assembly to deliver a working substance into the chamber as the pistons approach a top dead center position in the chamber while an outlet port also communicates with the rotor to exhaust the working substance as the pistons approach a bottom dead center position. The displacement of the blower is varied by adjusting the amount of eccentricity between the center of rotation of the pistons and the center of rotation of the rotor assembly.

  13. Nondimensional Schmidt analysis for optimal design of Stirling engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Impero Abenavoli, R.I.; Sciaboni, A.; Carlini, M.; Kormanski, H.; Rudzinska, K.

    1996-01-01

    General directions for rough optimal calibration of Stirling machines can be given by a non-dimensional Schmidt model (nDSM). Since different relative parameters and performance indices have been analyzed by nDSM models, there is lack of uniform conclusions in the literature. This paper describes a new nDSM of six parameters and compares four performance indices as functions of relative parameters. Two optimization tasks of two and five parameters are formulated and solved using the nDSM. Maximized criterion is cycle work per unit of mean pressure and total swept volume. An optimization code based on the algorithm of conjugate gradients with projection on linear constraints is described. The optimal values of volume phase angle, nondimensional swept volume, and dead volume are presented for different constraints imposed on temperature ratio and relative dead volumes.

  14. No Job Name

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dielectrophoretic Concentration and Separation of Live and Dead Bacteria in an Array of Insulators Blanca H. Lapizco-Encinas, † Blake A. Simmons, ‡ Eric B. Cummings, † and Yolanda Fintschenko* ,† Microfluidics Department, Sandia National Laboratories, P.O. Box 969, MS 9951, Livermore, California 94551, and Materials Chemistry Department, Sandia National Laboratories, P.O. Box 969, MS 9403, Livermore, California 94551 Insulator-based (electrodeless) dielectrophoresis (iDEP) is an

  15. Microsoft Word - RC_fnl.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    SITE-WIDE RISK ASSESSMENT, VOLUME I: HUMAN HEALTH RISK ASSESSMENT (PART B-RISK CHARACTERIZATION FOR DOE AREAS) at the: LABORATORY FOR ENERGY-RELATED HEALTH RESEARCH UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, DAVIS Prepared for: United States Department of Energy Oakland Environmental Programs 1301 Clay Street Oakland, California 94612-5208 Prepared by: Weiss Associates 5801 Christie Avenue, Suite 600 Emeryville, California 94608-1827 September 30, 2005 Rev. 0 DOE Delivery Order DE-AD03-04NA99610

  16. Firearms Qualification Courses Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1992-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requires all protective force personnel authorized to carry firearms to receive proper firearms training and qualification. The most important part of such training is the proper use of deadly force, which is included in the DOE Basic Security policy officer Program and is available as a separate program through the Safeguards and Security Central Training Academy. Canceled by DOE M 473.2-1 dated 07/08/1997.

  17. Direct Observation of SEI and Dendrite Dynamics by Operando Electrochemical

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy - Joint Center for Energy Storage Research February 23, 2015, Research Highlights Direct Observation of SEI and Dendrite Dynamics by Operando Electrochemical Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (Top) Li deposited on the Pt anode at the beginning (left), during (middle) and end (right) of the second cycle. Residual "dead Li" can be seen around the anode. (Center) Simultaneous cyclic voltammetry of the second Li deposition/dissolution

  18. Extending operating range of a homogeneous charge compression ignition engine via cylinder deactivation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hergart, Carl-Anders; Hardy, William L.; Duffy, Kevin P.; Liechty, Michael P.

    2008-05-27

    An HCCI engine has the ability to operate over a large load range by utilizing a lower cetane distillate diesel fuel to increase ignition delay. This permits more stable operation at high loads by avoidance of premature combustion before top dead center. During low load conditions, a portion of the engines cylinders are deactivated so that the remaining cylinders can operate at a pseudo higher load while the overall engine exhibits behavior typical of a relatively low load.

  19. Proceedings of the international symposium on engineering in complex rock formations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    This book contains over 100 papers. Some of the titles are: Rheology of rock-salt and its application for radioactive waste disposal purposes; A scale model study on the deformation around the drift in Korean inclined coal seam; Stabilization of a landslide in fractured marls and limestone; Dead Sea underground hydroelectric power station; and Rock mechanics in design of underground power house of lubuge hydropower project.

  20. Memorial Day

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Three years after the Civil War ended, on May 5, 1868, the head of an organization of Union veterans, the Grand Army of the Republic (GAR), established Decoration Day as a time for the nation to decorate the graves of the war dead with flowers. Maj. Gen. John A. Logan declared that Decoration Day should be observed on May 30. It is believed that date was chosen because flowers would be in bloom all over the country.

  1. Code System for Static and Dynamic Piping System Analysis.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2000-07-07

    EPIPE is used for design or design evaluation of complex large piping systems. The piping systems can be viewed as a network of straight pipe elements (or tangents) and curved elements (pipe bends) interconnected at joints (or nodes) with intermediate supports and anchors. The system may be subject to static loads such as thermal, dead weight, internal pressure, or dynamic loads such as earthquake motions and flow-induced vibrations, or any combination of these.

  2. UNCLASSIFIED Los Alamos Astrophysics Distinguished Seminar Series

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Los Alamos Astrophysics Distinguished Seminar Series Ryan Miranda Cornell University Sustained Dust Asymmetries At Dead Zone Edges in Protoplanetary Disks Thursday, July 21, 2016 2:00 PM - 3:00 PM T-DO Conf Room (TA-03, Building 123, Room 121) Abstract. Protoplanetary disks, consisting of gas and dust in orbit around a newly formed star, are the birthplaces of planetary systems. Several observations of transition disks, a class of protoplanetary disks in which the first stages of planet

  3. US Army Corps of Engineers BUILDING STRONG

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Harry S. Truman Dam Dissolved Oxygen Working Group Presenter BUILDING STRONG ® * May 29, 2013 fish kill in the tailrace and dead channel below Truman Dam. * August 26, 2013 fish kill in unit 5 draft tube after emergency shut down. * April 22, 2014 violation letter from DNR for 2013 fish kills. * March 22, 2015 Environmental Protection Specialist Hired. * June 8, 2015 Fish Kill Meeting at Jefferson City, established a need for a work group. Background 2 BUILDING STRONG ® DO Work Group Members

  4. Scientific Objective

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biogenic Aerosols - Effects on Clouds and Climate Scientific Objective Aerosols in the sky are essential to Earth's climate because they can reflect light into space, cooling the atmosphere, or they can combine with other particles to create clouds that have both warming and cooling effects. Biogenic aerosols are emitted by the biosphere directly, or are formed from biogenic volatile gases in gas-to-particle conversion. Examples include dead cells and pollen spores. Boreal forests are among the

  5. Deputy Secretary Poneman's Remarks at the Third Annual Nuclear Deterrence

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Summit - As Prepared for Delivery | Department of Energy the Third Annual Nuclear Deterrence Summit - As Prepared for Delivery Deputy Secretary Poneman's Remarks at the Third Annual Nuclear Deterrence Summit - As Prepared for Delivery February 17, 2011 - 3:49pm Addthis Third Annual Nuclear Deterrence Summit Thursday, February 17, 2011 Arlington, Virginia "Nuclear Energy and Nonproliferation" "We face a choice between the quick and the dead." These are the words that

  6. Light Show

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9 Lightning - Nature's Light Show Lightning provides one of nature's most spectacular displays of energy. Though fascinating to observe, lightning can be dangerous and deadly. Protecting ARM instruments from lightning damage is vital. Putting equipment worth millions of dollars into open fields (Photo: NOAA) ARM Facilities Newsletter is published by Argonne National Laboratory, a multiprogram laboratory operated by The University of Chicago under contract W-31-109-Eng-38 with the U.S. Department

  7. Software optimized on Mira advances design of mini-proteins for medicines,

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    materials | Argonne National Laboratory Software optimized on Mira advances design of mini-proteins for medicines, materials By Katie Elyce Jones * February 12, 2016 Tweet EmailPrint When diseases like cancer and AIDS affect millions of people each year and rare but deadly infections like Ebola move faster than treatment, the race to make effective drugs becomes a sprint. That's why University of Washington (UW) researchers are using one of the nation's most powerful supercomputers, the

  8. Sensitivity analysis of Stirling engine design parameters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naso, V.; Dong, W.; Lucentini, M.; Capata, R.

    1998-07-01

    In the preliminary Stirling engine design process, the values of some design parameters (temperature ratio, swept volume ratio, phase angle and dead volume ratio) have to be assumed; as a matter of fact it can be difficult to determine the best values of these parameters for a particular engine design. In this paper, a mathematical model is developed to analyze the sensitivity of engine's performance variations corresponding to variations of these parameters.

  9. Biomass growth restriction in a packed bed reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Griffith, William L.; Compere, Alicia L.

    1978-01-01

    When carrying out continuous biologically catalyzed reactions with anaerobic microorganisms attached to a support in an upflow packed bed column, growth of the microorganisms is restricted to prevent the microorganisms from plugging the column by limiting the availability of an essential nutrient and/or by the presence of predatory protozoa which consume the anaerobic microorganisms. A membrane disruptive detergent may be provided in the column to lyse dead microorganisms to make them available as nutrients for live microorganisms.

  10. TMACS test procedure TP001: Alarm management. Revision 6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scanlan, P.K.

    1994-09-01

    The TMACS Software Project Test Procedures translate the project`s acceptance criteria into test steps. Software releases are certified when the affected Test Procedures are successfully performed and the customers authorize installation of these changes. This Test Procedure addresses the Alarm Management requirements of the TMACS. The features to be tested are: real-time alarming on high and low level and discrete alarms, equipment alarms, dead-band filtering, alarm display color coding, alarm acknowledgement, and alarm logging.

  11. SSRL HEADLINES November 2008

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 November, 2008 __________________________________________________________________________ Contents of this Issue: Science Highlight - Revealing a Structural Weakness of the Deadly Ebolavirus Another Successful Start-Up Beam Line 4 Update X-RAY/VUV Beam Time Requests due December 12 Visitors from Shanghai SSRL Users' Organization Update Biology - Now in 3-D! ID Badges Needed to Enter SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory SLAC Linear Café Lunchtime Service Extended

  12. labnews04-15-16.qxp_la02_02-20-04

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    up disease-carrying mosquitoes RED MEANS A DISEASE is present to Sandia researchers Cameron Ball and Robert Meagher as they test their QUASR, quenching of unincorporated amplification signal reporters, a technique to detect the presence of malaria and viruses like West Nile. Simple enough for field labs and handheld devices, QUASR's positive signal is 10 times brighter than a negative signal. (Photo by Dino Vournas) M osquitoes are deadly efficient at spreading disease. Despite vaccines and

  13. Jefferson Lab scientists set to test germ-killing fabrics | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    scientists set to test germ-killing fabrics Germ-killing fabrics Nylon-surfaced fabrics will be treated with deep UV light already shown to impart antimicrobial activity. Treated materials will be exposed to the range of conditions and operations expected for fire and safety personnel garments. Post- testing will verify that microbes are dead. Jefferson Lab scientists set to test germ-killing fabrics September 26, 2005 The Department of Energy's Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

  14. LANL to certify automated influenza surveillance system

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LANL to certify automated influenza surveillance system LANL to certify automated influenza surveillance system A compact automated system for surveillance and screening of potential pandemic strains of influenza and other deadly infectious diseases is a step closer to reality. January 31, 2011 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience,

  15. Alamos National Laboratory theoretical biologists Bette Korber, Will Fischer, Sydeaka

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    strategy expands immune responses March 3, 2010 Mosaic vaccines show promise in reducing the spread of deadly virus LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, March 3, 2010-Two teams of researchers-including Los Alamos National Laboratory theoretical biologists Bette Korber, Will Fischer, Sydeaka Watson, and James Szinger-have announced an HIV vaccination strategy that has been shown to expand the breadth and depth of immune responses in rhesus monkeys. Rhesus monkeys provide the best animal model currently

  16. Anthrax Lethal Factor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Thiang Yian Wong, Robert Schwarzenbacher and Robert C. Liddington The Burnham Institute, 10901 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, CA 92037. Anthrax Toxin is a major virulence factor in the infectious disease, Anthrax1. This toxin is produced by Bacillus anthracis, which is an encapsulated, spore-forming, rod-shaped bacterium. Inhalation anthrax, the most deadly form, is contracted through breathing spores. Once spores germinate within cells of the immune system called macrophages2, bacterial

  17. Inspection Report: IG-0681 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    81 Inspection Report: IG-0681 March 24, 2005 Concerns Regarding a Non-Viable (Dead)"Anthrax Spore" Research Project at theOak Ridge National Laboratory The Office of Inspector General (OIG) received an anonymous complaint involving an "anthrax" (Bacillus anthracis, Ames strain) spore research project at the Department of Energy's (DOE) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Specifically, it was alleged that: * A former ORNL employee who returned to ORNL as a Guest Researcher

  18. 2014 News | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 News Below are news stories related to Bioenergy. RSS Learn about RSS. October 31, 2014 Reviving Algae from the (Almost) Dead NREL's cryogenic tank holds 500 dormant algae samples, and each must ease back into life. October 30, 2014 Industry Growth Forum Cultivates Clean Energy Entrepreneurship NREL's Industry Growth Forum brings together clean energy entrepreneurs and investors to facilitate the movement of innovation into the marketplace. September 19, 2014 NREL Industry Growth Forum

  19. PSH-16-0005 - In the Matter of Personnel Security Hearing | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy 5 - In the Matter of Personnel Security Hearing PSH-16-0005 - In the Matter of Personnel Security Hearing On March 29, 2016, an Administrative Judge issued a decision in which she concluded that an individual's security clearance should not be restored. In July 2015, a Local Security Office (LSO) conducted a personnel security interview (PSI) of the individual to address concerns regarding his arrest and charge for Aggravated Assault Against a Household Member with a Deadly Weapon, a

  20. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cheryl Kuske-Microbiology expertise aids in biothreat detection March 14, 2014 Microbiology expertise aids in biothreat detection The soil beneath our feet may seem inanimate, but it houses trillions of microscopic organisms that break down matter such as fallen trees and dead leaves, protect (and even prey on) crops and filter groundwater. One gram of soil may contain at least a billion microorganisms; critically important to the ecological system, less than one percent of these organisms have

  1. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    climate model predicts likelihood of Greenland ice melt, sea level rise and dangerous temperatures November 20, 2015 LOS ALAMOS, N.M., Nov. 16, 2015-A new computer model of accumulated carbon emissions predicts the likelihood of crossing several dangerous climate change thresholds. These include global temperature rise sufficient to lose the Greenland Ice Sheet and generate seven meters of long-term sea level rise, or tropical region warming to a level that is deadly to humans and other

  2. In a mining accident, first responders are working against

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a mining accident, first responders are working against the clock and against a myriad of dangers such as debris, poisonous gases, flooding, explosive vapors, and unstable structures to assess the situation and rescue trapped miners. These unknown and potentially deadly conditions create a challenge for first responders and often limit their ability to assess the situation and respond in a timely matter. There is a need for a robotic system that could be used to support a mine rescue team,

  3. LX-17 Corner-Turning and Reactive Flow Failure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Souers, P C; Andreski, H; Cook III, C F; Garza, R; Pastrone, R; Phillips, D; Roeske, F; Vitello, P; Molitoris, J

    2004-03-11

    We have performed a series of highly-instrumented experiments examining corner-turning of detonation. A TATB booster is inset 15 mm into LX-17 (92.5% TATB, 7.5% kel-F) so that the detonation must turn a right angle around an air well. An optical pin located at the edge of the TATB gives the start time of the corner-turn. The breakout time on the side and back edges is measured with streak cameras. Three high-resolution X-ray images were taken on each experiment to examine the details of the detonation. We have concluded that the detonation cannot turn the corner and subsequently fails, but the shock wave continues to propagate in the unreacted explosive, leaving behind a dead zone. The detonation front farther out from the corner slowly turns and eventually reaches the air well edge 180{sup o} from its original direction. The dead zone is stable and persists 7.7 {micro}s after the corner-turn, although it has drifted into the original air well area. Our regular reactive flow computer models sometimes show temporary failure but they recover quickly and are unable to model the dead zones. We present a failure model that cuts off the reaction rate below certain detonation velocities and reproduces the qualitative features of the corner-turning failure.

  4. Implementation and Initial Testing of Advanced Processing and Analysis Algorithms for Correlated Neutron Counting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santi, Peter Angelo; Cutler, Theresa Elizabeth; Favalli, Andrea; Koehler, Katrina Elizabeth; Henzl, Vladimir; Henzlova, Daniela; Parker, Robert Francis; Croft, Stephen

    2015-12-01

    In order to improve the accuracy and capabilities of neutron multiplicity counting, additional quantifiable information is needed in order to address the assumptions that are present in the point model. Extracting and utilizing higher order moments (Quads and Pents) from the neutron pulse train represents the most direct way of extracting additional information from the measurement data to allow for an improved determination of the physical properties of the item of interest. The extraction of higher order moments from a neutron pulse train required the development of advanced dead time correction algorithms which could correct for dead time effects in all of the measurement moments in a self-consistent manner. In addition, advanced analysis algorithms have been developed to address specific assumptions that are made within the current analysis model, namely that all neutrons are created at a single point within the item of interest, and that all neutrons that are produced within an item are created with the same energy distribution. This report will discuss the current status of implementation and initial testing of the advanced dead time correction and analysis algorithms that have been developed in an attempt to utilize higher order moments to improve the capabilities of correlated neutron measurement techniques.

  5. Half-life determination for {sup 108}Ag and {sup 110}Ag

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zahn, Guilherme S.; Genezini, Frederico A.

    2014-11-11

    In this work, the half-life of the short-lived silver radionuclides {sup 108}Ag and {sup 110}Ag were measured by following the activity of samples after they were irradiated in the IEA-R1 reactor. The results were then fitted using a non-paralizable dead time correction to the regular exponential decay and the individual half-life values obtained were then analyzed using both the Normalized Residuals and the Rajeval techniques, in order to reach the most exact and precise final values. To check the validity of dead-time correction, a second correction method was also employed by means of counting a long-lived {sup 60}Co radioactive source together with the samples as a livetime chronometer. The final half-live values obtained using both dead-time correction methods were in good agreement, showing that the correction was properly assessed. The results obtained are partially compatible with the literature values, but with a lower uncertainty, and allow a discussion on the last ENSDF compilations' values.

  6. DUST TRANSPORT IN PROTOSTELLAR DISKS THROUGH TURBULENCE AND SETTLING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, N. J.; Carballido, A. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Sano, T., E-mail: neal.turner@jpl.nasa.go [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2010-01-01

    We apply ionization balance and magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) calculations to investigate whether magnetic activity moderated by recombination on dust grains can account for the mass accretion rates and the mid-infrared spectra and variability of protostellar disks. The MHD calculations use the stratified shearing-box approach and include grain settling and the feedback from the changing dust abundance on the resistivity of the gas. The two-decade spread in accretion rates among solar-mass T Tauri stars is too large to result solely from variations in the grain size and stellar X-ray luminosity, but can plausibly be produced by varying these parameters together with the disk magnetic flux. The diverse shapes and strengths of the mid-infrared silicate bands can come from the coupling of grain settling to the distribution of the magnetorotational turbulence, through the following three effects. First, recombination on grains 1 mum or smaller yields a magnetically inactive dead zone extending more than two scale heights from the midplane, while turbulent motions in the magnetically active disk atmosphere overshoot the dead zone boundary by only about one scale height. Second, grains deep in the dead zone oscillate vertically in wave motions driven by the turbulent layer above, but on average settle at the rates found in laminar flow, so that the interior of the dead zone is a particle sink and the disk atmosphere will become dust-depleted unless resupplied from elsewhere. Third, with sufficient depletion, the dead zone is thinner and mixing dredges grains off the midplane. The last of these processes enables evolutionary signatures such as the degree of settling to sometimes decrease with age. The MHD results also show that the magnetic activity intermittently lifts clouds of small grains into the atmosphere. Consequently the photosphere height changes by up to one-third over timescales of a few orbits, while the extinction along lines of sight grazing the disk surface

  7. FK866-induced NAMPT inhibition activates AMPK and downregulates mTOR signaling in hepatocarcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schuster, Susanne; Penke, Melanie; Gorski, Theresa; Gebhardt, Rolf; Weiss, Thomas S.; Kiess, Wieland; Garten, Antje

    2015-03-06

    Background: Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) is the key enzyme of the NAD salvage pathway starting from nicotinamide. Cancer cells have an increased demand for NAD due to their high proliferation and DNA repair rate. Consequently, NAMPT is considered as a putative target for anti-cancer therapies. There is evidence that AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) become dysregulated during the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Here, we investigated the effects of NAMPT inhibition by its specific inhibitor FK866 on the viability of hepatocarcinoma cells and analyzed the effects of FK866 on the nutrient sensor AMPK and mTOR complex1 (mTORC1) signaling. Results: FK866 markedly decreased NAMPT activity and NAD content in hepatocarcinoma cells (Huh7 cells, Hep3B cells) and led to delayed ATP reduction which was associated with increased cell death. These effects could be abrogated by administration of nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN), the enzyme product of NAMPT. Our results demonstrated a dysregulation of the AMPK/mTOR pathway in hepatocarcinoma cells compared to non-cancerous hepatocytes with a higher expression of mTOR and a lower AMPKα activation in hepatocarcinoma cells. We found that NAMPT inhibition by FK866 significantly activated AMPKα and inhibited the activation of mTOR and its downstream targets p70S6 kinase and 4E-BP1 in hepatocarcinoma cells. Non-cancerous hepatocytes were less sensitive to FK866 and did not show changes in AMPK/mTOR signaling after FK866 treatment. Conclusion: Taken together, these findings reveal an important role of the NAMPT-mediated NAD salvage pathway in the energy homeostasis of hepatocarcinoma cells and suggest NAMPT inhibition as a potential treatment option for HCC. - Highlights: • FK866 increases cell death in p53-deficient hepatocarcinoma cells. • AMPK/mTOR signaling is dysregulated in hepatocarcinoma cells. • FK866-induced NAMPT inhibition activates AMPK

  8. Mapping {sup 15}O Production Rate for Proton Therapy Verification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grogg, Kira; Alpert, Nathaniel M.; Zhu, Xuping; Min, Chul Hee; Testa, Mauro; Winey, Brian; Normandin, Marc D.; Shih, Helen A.; Paganetti, Harald; Bortfeld, Thomas; El Fakhri, Georges

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: This work was a proof-of-principle study for the evaluation of oxygen-15 ({sup 15}O) production as an imaging target through the use of positron emission tomography (PET), to improve verification of proton treatment plans and to study the effects of perfusion. Methods and Materials: Dynamic PET measurements of irradiation-produced isotopes were made for a phantom and rabbit thigh muscles. The rabbit muscle was irradiated and imaged under both live and dead conditions. A differential equation was fitted to phantom and in vivo data, yielding estimates of {sup 15}O production and clearance rates, which were compared to live versus dead rates for the rabbit and to Monte Carlo predictions. Results: PET clearance rates agreed with decay constants of the dominant radionuclide species in 3 different phantom materials. In 2 oxygen-rich materials, the ratio of {sup 15}O production rates agreed with the expected ratio. In the dead rabbit thighs, the dynamic PET concentration histories were accurately described using {sup 15}O decay constant, whereas the live thigh activity decayed faster. Most importantly, the {sup 15}O production rates agreed within 2% (P>.5) between conditions. Conclusions: We developed a new method for quantitative measurement of {sup 15}O production and clearance rates in the period immediately following proton therapy. Measurements in the phantom and rabbits were well described in terms of {sup 15}O production and clearance rates, plus a correction for other isotopes. These proof-of-principle results support the feasibility of detailed verification of proton therapy treatment delivery. In addition, {sup 15}O clearance rates may be useful in monitoring permeability changes due to therapy.

  9. Liquid-Filled Piping System Analysis

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1993-07-07

    WHAM6 is used to calculate pressure and velocity transients in liquid-filled piping networks. It can be applied to multiloop complex piping networks consisting of dead ends, elbows, orifices, multiple-branch tees, changes of flow passage cross section, check valves, pumps, pressurizers or tanks, and exit valves or breaks. Hydraulic losses are considered. Transients can be initiated either by closure or opening of one or more exit valves (equivalent to system ruptures) or by a prescribed gasmore » pressure history in a pressurizer tank.« less

  10. Radiolytic gas generation from cement-based waste hosts for DOE low-level radioactive wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dole, L.R.; Friedman, H.A.

    1986-01-01

    Using cement-based immobilization binders with simulated radioactive waste containing sulfate, nitrate, nitrite, phosphate, and fluoride anions, the gamma- and alpha-radiolytic gas generation factors (G/sub t/, molecules/100 eV) and gas compositions were measured on specimens of cured grouts. These tests studied the effects of; (1) waste composition; (2) the sample surface-to-volume ratio; (3) the waste slurry particle size; and (4) the water content of the waste host formula. The radiolysis test vessels were designed to minimize the ''dead'' volume and to simulate the configuration of waste packages.

  11. Multiple channel programmable coincidence counter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Arnone, Gaetano J.

    1990-01-01

    A programmable digital coincidence counter having multiple channels and featuring minimal dead time. Neutron detectors supply electrical pulses to a synchronizing circuit which in turn inputs derandomized pulses to an adding circuit. A random access memory circuit connected as a programmable length shift register receives and shifts the sum of the pulses, and outputs to a serializer. A counter is input by the adding circuit and downcounted by the seralizer, one pulse at a time. The decoded contents of the counter after each decrement is output to scalers.

  12. Characteristics of Signals Originating Near the Lithium-Diffused N+ Contact of High Purity Germanium P-Type Point Contact Detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aguayo Navarrete, Estanislao; Amman, M.; Avignone, F. T.; Barabash, A.; Barton, P. J.; Beene, Jim; Bertrand, F.; Boswell, M.; Brudanin, V.; Busch, Matthew; Chan, Yuen-Dat; Christofferson, Cabot-Ann; Collar, Juan; Combs, Dustin C.; Cooper, R. J.; Detwiler, Jason A.; Doe, Peter J.; Efremenko, Yuri; Egorov, Viatcheslav; Ejiri, H.; Elliott, S. R.; Esterline, James H.; Fast, James E.; Fields, N.; Finnerty, P.; Fraenkle, Florian; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Gehman, Victor M.; Giovanetti, G. K.; Green, Matthew P.; Guiseppe, Vincente; Gusey, K.; Hallin, A. L.; Hazama, R.; Henning, Reyco; Hoppe, Eric W.; Horton, Mark; Howard, Stanley; Howe, Mark; Johnson, R. A.; Keeter, K.; Kidd, Mary; Knecht, A.; Kochetov, Oleg; Konovalov, S.; Kouzes, Richard T.; LaFerriere, Brian D.; Leon, Jonathan D.; Leviner, L.; Loach, J. C.; Looker, Ron L.; Luke, P.; MacMullin, S.; Marino, Michael G.; Martin, R. D.; Merriman, Jason H.; Miller, M. L.; Mizouni, Leila K.; Nomachi, Masaharu; Orrell, John L.; Overman, Nicole R.; Perumpilly, Gopakumar; Phillips, D.; Poon, Alan; Radford, Davis; Rielage, Keith; Robertson, R. G. H.; Ronquest, M. C.; Schubert, Alexis G.; Shima, T.; Shirchenko, M.; Snavely, Kyle J.; Steele, David; Strain, J.; Timkin, V.; Tornow, W.; Varner, R. L.; Vetter, Kai; Vorren, Kris R.; Wilkerson, J. F.; Yakushev, E.; Yaver, Harold; Young, A.; Yu, Chang-Hong; Yumatov, Vladimir

    2013-02-11

    A study of signals originating near the lithium-diffused n+ contact of p-type point contact (PPC) high purity germanium detectors (HPGe) is presented. The transition region between the active germanium and the fully dead layer of the n+ contact is examined. Energy depositions in this transition region are shown to result in partial charge collection. This provides a mechanism for events with a well defined energy to contribute to the continuum of the energy spectrum at lower energies. A novel technique to quantify the contribution from this source of background is introduced. Experiments that operate germanium detectors with a very low energy threshold may benefit from the methods presented herein.

  13. Microsoft Word - S05993_CY2009 Annual Rpt.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    4 3.2.3.3 Additional Wildlife Observations In September, a dead crow (Corvus brachyrhynchos) was observed dangling from the top of a spruce tree at the Site. Closer inspection revealed there was fishing line wrapped around the foot of the bird. Evidently the crow picked up the fishing line on its foot at one of the nearby reservoirs (since fishing is not allowed at the Site). The line was probably dangling from its foot when it landed on the branch. When it attempted to take off the line

  14. Power control for heat engines

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dineen, John J.

    1984-01-01

    A power control arrangement for a Stirling engine includes a sleeve mounted in each cylinder for axial movement and a port in the sleeve leading to a dead space. The port is covered by the piston at a position that is determined by the piston position and the axial adjustment of the sleeve. The compression phase of the Stirling cycle for that piston begins when the port is covered, so the position of the sleeve is used to set the Stirling engine power level.

  15. Development of a custom monolithic device for data acquisition from a scintillating calorimeter at the superconducting super collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ekenberg, T.; Dawson, J.W.; Talaga, R.L.; Stevens, A.E.; Haberichter, W.N.

    1991-01-01

    A clock-driven continuous sequential write/random read data acquisition architecture for a scintillating calorimeter at the SSC is presented. Simplicity of design and operation as well as potentially dead time-less operation are the motivations of this effort. The architecture minimizes the number of fast control signals, thereby reducing pickup from digital control lines by sensitive analog circuits in the front-end device. This architecture also reduces the logic necessary on the front-end device improving reliability and easing design and operation. Operation and design of the front-end device are discussed. 3 refs., 7 figs.

  16. Method and apparatus for strip casting

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Follstaedt, D.W.; Powell, J.C.; Sussman, R.C.; Williams, R.S.

    1991-11-12

    Casting nozzles will provide improved flow conditions with the parameters controlled according to the present invention. The gap relationships between the nozzle slot and exit orifice must be controlled in combination with converging exit passageway to provide a smooth flow without shearing and turbulence in the stream. The nozzle lips are also rounded to improve flow and increase refractory life of the lips of the nozzle. The tundish walls are tapered to provide improve flow for supplying the melt to the nozzle. The nozzle is located about 45[degree] below top dead center for optimum conditions. 2 figures.

  17. Method and apparatus for strip casting

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Follstaedt, Donald W.; Powell, John C.; Sussman, Richard C.; Williams, Robert S.

    1991-01-01

    Casting nozzles will provide improved flow conditions with the parameters controlled according to the present invention. The gap relationships between the nozzle slot and exit orifice must be controlled in combination with converging exit passageway to provide a smooth flow without shearing and turbulence in the stream. The nozzle lips are also rounded to improve flow and increase refractory life of the lips of the nozzle. The tundish walls are tapered to provide improve flow for supplying the melt to the nozzle. The nozzle is located about 45.degree. below top dead center for optimum conditions.

  18. Low emission internal combustion engine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Karaba, Albert M.

    1979-01-01

    A low emission, internal combustion compression ignition engine having a cylinder, a piston movable in the cylinder and a pre-combustion chamber communicating with the cylinder near the top thereof and in which low emissions of NO.sub.x are achieved by constructing the pre-combustion chamber to have a volume of between 70% and 85% of the combined pre-chamber and main combustion chamber volume when the piston is at top dead center and by variably controlling the initiation of fuel injection into the pre-combustion chamber.

  19. Method of combustion for dual fuel engine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hsu, B.D.; Confer, G.L.; Zujing Shen; Hapeman, M.J.; Flynn, P.L.

    1993-12-21

    Apparatus and a method of introducing a primary fuel, which may be a coal water slurry, and a high combustion auxiliary fuel, which may be a conventional diesel oil, into an internal combustion diesel engine comprises detecting the load conditions of the engine, determining the amount of time prior to the top dead center position of the piston to inject the main fuel into the combustion chamber, and determining the relationship of the timing of the injection of the auxiliary fuel into the combustion chamber to achieve a predetermined specific fuel consumption, a predetermined combustion efficiency, and a predetermined peak cylinder firing pressure. 19 figures.

  20. Science and Technology Review March 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Pruneda, J H

    2000-03-01

    The contents of this Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory newsletter include the following: (1) The Laboratory in the News; (2) Commentary by George Miller--Reaping Unexpected Benefits from the Petawatt Laser Breakthrough; (3) The Amazing Power of the Petawatt--For three years, the Petawatt laser was the most powerful laser in the world, pushing electrons toward the speed of light and accomplishing some remarkable science in the process; (4) Building a Virtual Time Machine--A powerful new computer code simulates geologic changes eons into the future at Yucca Mountain, a potential underground nuclear waste repository; (5) Research Highlight: Dead Sea Explosions Trigger International Cooperation; and (6) Patents and Awards; (7) Abstracts.

  1. Fabrication of the GLAST Silicon Tracker Readout Electronics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baldini, Luca; Brez, Alessandro; Himel, Thomas; Johnson, R.P.; Latronico, Luca; Minuti, Massimo; Nelson, David; Sadrozinski, H.F.-W.; Sgro, Carmelo; Spandre, Gloria; Sugizaki, Mutsumi; Tajima, Hiro; Cohen Tanugi, Johann; Young, Charles; Ziegler, Marcus; /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /SLAC /UC, Santa Cruz

    2006-03-03

    A unique electronics system has been built and tested for reading signals from the silicon-strip detectors of the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope mission. The system amplifies and processes signals from 884,736 36-cm long silicon strips in a 4 x 4 array of tower modules. An aggressive mechanical design fits the readout electronics in narrow spaces between the tower modules, to minimize dead area. This design and the resulting departures from conventional electronics packaging led to several fabrication challenges and lessons learned. This paper describes the fabrication processes and how the problems peculiar to this design were overcome.

  2. Passive injection control for microfluidic systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Paul, Phillip H.; Arnold, Don W.; Neyer, David W.

    2004-12-21

    Apparatus for eliminating siphoning, "dead" regions, and fluid concentration gradients in microscale analytical devices. In its most basic embodiment, the present invention affords passive injection control for both electric field-driven and pressure-driven systems by providing additional fluid flow channels or auxiliary channels disposed on either side of a sample separation column. The auxiliary channels are sized such that volumetric fluid flow rate through these channels, while sufficient to move the sample away from the sample injection region in a timely fashion, is less than that through the sample separation channel or chromatograph.

  3. Javelina

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2004-10-19

    Javelina is an advanced code coverage tool. It allows complex logic to be applied to code coverage data. This logic allows lines executed during end user runs of an appliction to be compared to lines executed during standard test cases. This "application coverage" is arguably more relevant than "source code coverage." The logical operations can also be used to identify "dead code" that is never run by end users. In addition, Javelina provides a GUImore » to visually inspect the results of applying logic to code coverage data. The GUI color codes lines based upon whether the lines were or were not marked as executed.« less

  4. Rotary engine cooling system with flow balancing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, C.

    1987-05-12

    This patent describes a rotary internal combustion engine having a trochoid rotor housing section and having a group of cooling passages extending through a top-dead-center (TDC) region. The engine is characterized by: at least one passage of the group following a curved path which extends through a first hotter portion of the TDC region, by at least one further passage of the group following a substantially uncurved path through a second cooler portion of the TDC region, and by a fluid restriction for restricting fluid flow through the at least one further passage to balance coolant flow between the passages.

  5. Science & Technology Review January/February 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bearinger, J P

    2009-11-30

    This month's issue has the following articles: (1) Innovative Materials Rise to the Radiation Challenge - Commentary by Bruce Warner; (2) The Hunt for Better Radiation Detection - New materials will help radiation detectors pick up weak signals and accurately identify illicit radioactive sources; (3) Time-Critical Technology Identifies Deadly Bloodborne Pathogens - A portable device can simultaneously distinguish up to five bloodborne pathogens in just minutes; (4) Defending Computer Networks against Attack - A Laboratory effort takes a new approach to detecting increasingly sophisticated cyber attacks; and (5) Imaging Cargo's Inner Secrets - Livermore-University of California collaborators are modeling a new radiographic technique for identifying nuclear materials concealed inside cargo containers.

  6. Dear Ms

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    31, 2012 Office of the General Counsel, Department of Energy Dear Mr. Cohen, Unfortunately we missed the dead line for the first set of comments regarding regulatory burden. We've searched the web at http://www.regulations.gov for any comments from the first round due on January 5, 2012 and could not find any. The situation we described last year (see below) has not improved. We are waiting for additional rules from DOE but don't believe they'll provide the needed relief from regulatory burden.

  7. Probability of pipe fracture in the primary coolant loop of a PWR plant. Volume 2: primary coolant loop model. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eberhardt, A.C.

    1981-09-01

    This report describes the Zion Station reactor coolant loop model developed by Sargent and Lundy Engineers for Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory as part of its Load Combination Program. This model was developed for use in performing seismic time history analyses of an actual pressurized water reactor (PWR) system. It includes all major items affecting the seismic response of a 4-loop Westinghouse nuclear steam supply system: the components, supports, and interconnecting piping. The model was further expanded to permit static analysis of dead weight, thermal, and internal pressure load conditions.

  8. Probability of pipe fracture in the primary coolant loop of a PWR Plant. Volume 2. Primary Coolant Loop Model. Load Combination Program, Project I final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eberhardt, A.C.

    1981-06-01

    This report describes the Zion Station reactor coolant loop model developed by Sargent and Lundy Engineers for Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory as part of its Load Combination Program. This model was developed for use in performing seismic time history analyses of an actual pressurized water reactor (PWR) system. It includes all major items affecting the seismic response of a 4-loop Westinghouse nuclear steam supply system: the components, supports, and interconnecting piping. The model was further expanded to permit static analysis of dead weight, thermal, and internal pressure load conditions. 7 refs., 42 figs., 9 tabs.

  9. Speaker for Nov. 1 Lecture to Discuss Deadliest Viral Diseases | Jefferson

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lab Speaker for Nov. 1 Lecture to Discuss Deadliest Viral Diseases Speaker for Nov. 1 Lecture to Discuss Deadliest Viral Diseases NEWPORT NEWS, Va., Oct. 27, 2011 - A noted scientist will discuss some of the world's deadliest viruses as guest speaker at Jefferson Lab's Fall Science Series lecture to be held at the lab on Tuesday, Nov. 1. Susan Fisher-Hoch, a virologist and epidemiologist from the University of Texas School of Public Health will present: Studying Deadly Diseases. She will

  10. Method of combustion for dual fuel engine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hsu, Bertrand D.; Confer, Gregory L.; Shen, Zujing; Hapeman, Martin J.; Flynn, Paul L.

    1993-12-21

    Apparatus and a method of introducing a primary fuel, which may be a coal water slutty, and a high combustion auxiliary fuel, which may be a conventional diesel oil, into an internal combustion diesel engine comprises detecting the load conditions of the engine, determining the amount of time prior to the top dead center position of the piston to inject the main fuel into the combustion chamber, and determining the relationship of the timing of the injection of the auxiliary fuel into the combustion chamber to achieve a predetermined specific fuel consumption, a predetermined combustion efficiency, and a predetermined peak cylinder firing pressure.

  11. Method for removal of explosives from aqueous solution using suspended plant cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jackson, Paul J.; Torres, deceased, Agapito P.; Delhaize, Emmanuel

    1994-01-01

    The use of plant suspension cultures to remove ionic metallic species and TNT-based explosives and their oxidation products from aqueous solution is described. Several plant strains were investigated including D. innoxia, Citrus citrus, and Black Mexican Sweet Corn. All showed significant ability to remove metal ions. Ions removed to sub-ppm levels include barium, iron, and plutonium. D. innoxia cells growing in media containing weapons effluent contaminated with Ba.sup.2+ also remove TNT, other explosives and oxidation products thereof from solution. The use of dead, dehydrated cells was also found to be of use in treating waste directly.

  12. Method for removal of metal atoms from aqueous solution using suspended plant cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jackson, Paul J.; Torres, deceased, Agapito P.; Delhaize, Emmanuel

    1992-01-01

    The use of plant suspension cultures to remove ionic metallic species and TNT-based explosives and their oxidation products from aqueous solution is described. Several plant strains were investigated including D. innoxia, Citrus citrus, and Black Mexican Sweet Corn. All showed significant ability to remove metal ions. Ions removed to sub-ppm levels include barium, iron, and plutonium. D. innoxia cells growing in media containing weapons effluent contaminated with Ba.sup.2+ also remove TNT, other explosives and oxidation products thereof from solution. The use of dead, dehydrated cells were also found to be of use in treating waste directly.

  13. Microfluidic interconnects

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benett, William J.; Krulevitch, Peter A.

    2001-01-01

    A miniature connector for introducing microliter quantities of solutions into microfabricated fluidic devices. The fluidic connector, for example, joins standard high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) tubing to 1 mm diameter holes in silicon or glass, enabling ml-sized volumes of sample solutions to be merged with .mu.l-sized devices. The connector has many features, including ease of connect and disconnect; a small footprint which enables numerous connectors to be located in a small area; low dead volume; helium leak-tight; and tubing does not twist during connection. Thus the connector enables easy and effective change of microfluidic devices and introduction of different solutions in the devices.

  14. Kinetic model for anaerobic digestion of biogas biological sludge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pavlostathis, S.G.; Gossett, J.M.

    1986-10-01

    The principal objective of this study was the development and evaluation of a comprehensive kinetic model capable of predicting digester performance when fed biological sludge. Preliminary conversion mechanisms such as cell deaths, lysis, and hydrolysis responsible for rendering viable biological sludge organisms to available substrate were studied in depth. The results of this study indicate that hydrolysis of the dead, particulate biomass - primarily consisting of protein - is the slowest step, and therefore kinetically controls the overall process of an anaerobic digestion of biological sludge. A kinetic model was developed which could accurately describe digester performance and predict effluent quality.

  15. Integral finned heater and cooler for stirling engines

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Corey, John A.

    1984-01-01

    A piston and cylinder for a Stirling engine and the like having top and bottom meshing or nesting finned conical surfaces to provide large surface areas in close proximity to the working gas for good thermal (addition and subtraction of heat) exchange to the working gas and elimination of the usual heater and cooler dead volume. The piston fins at the hot end of the cylinder are perforated to permit the gas to pass into the piston interior and through a regenerator contained therein.

  16. Employee Spotlight: Gene Ortega

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Gene Ortega May 4, 2016 The eyes have it Gene Ortega paints portraits rich in color and symbolism. "My style is chaotic with a bit of refinement," says Gene, a systems engineer in Facility System Engineering. "It can be almost photo-realistic, but you can see the brushstrokes and the texture in it, and the chaos and the anger." Gene's vivid paintings explore religious iconography and Day of the Dead motifs in portraits, often drawing on the imagery of saints, the Virgin Mary,

  17. 11-2015 | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    veterans_day_brochure.jpg On November 11, 1921, on a hillside overlooking the Potomac River, an unknown soldier who had died in battle in World War I was laid to rest. The memorial service took place at the dedication of the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier at Arlington National Cemetery in Washington, D.C. At England's Westminster Abbey, and at the Arc de Triomphe in France, similar ceremonies honoring those countries' unknown war dead had taken place in prior years, but always on November 11. That

  18. Infrastructure Security EXCEPTIONAL SERVICE IN THE NATIONAL INTEREST

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    372P The "Sandia Cooler" In a conventional CPU cooler, the heat transfer bottleneck is the boundary layer of "dead air" that clings to the cooling fins. This insulating layer is largely unaffected by the impinging airflow generated by the fan. In this new device architecture, heat is efficiently transferred from a stationary base plate to a rotating (ccw) structure that combines the functionality of cooling fins with a centrifugal impeller. This direct drive approach, in

  19. Probes for anionic cell surface detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Bradley D.

    2013-03-05

    Embodiments of the present invention are generally directed to compositions comprising a class of molecular probes for detecting the presence of anionic cell surfaces. Embodiments include compositions that are enriched for these compositions and preparations, particularly preparations suitable for use as laboratory/clinical reagents and diagnostic indicators, either alone or as part of a kit. An embodiment of the invention provides for a highly selective agent useful in the discernment and identification of dead or dying cells, such as apoptotic cells, in a relatively calcium-free environment. An embodiment of the invention provides a selective agent for the identification of bacteria in a mixed population of bacterial cells and nonbacterial cells.

  20. Test results on a supercharged compressor for commercial refrigeration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrews, J.W.; Butcher, T.A.; Wilhelm, W.G. )

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports on a project whose objective was to quantify the technical benefits of using refrigerant R-502 in a supercharged reciprocating compressor for commercial refrigeration applications. The supercharged compressor concept used a special heat exchanger that subcools the major portion of the liquid refrigerant leaving the condenser. This subcooling is achieved by flashing the remaining portion of the condensed liquid through an expansion valve, thereby cooling it, and using it to absorb heat from the rest of the refrigerant. This supercharged stream is then fed to the cylinders through ports in the cylinder walls that are uncovered when the piston reaches bottom dead center.

  1. Critical importance of the de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis pathway for Trypanosoma cruzi growth in the mammalian host cell cytoplasm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hashimoto, Muneaki; Morales, Jorge; Fukai, Yoshihisa; Suzuki, Shigeo; Takamiya, Shinzaburo; Tsubouchi, Akiko; Inoue, Syou; Inoue, Masayuki; Kita, Kiyoshi; Harada, Shigeharu; Tanaka, Akiko; Aoki, Takashi; Nara, Takeshi

    2012-01-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We established Trypanosoma cruzi lacking the gene for carbamoyl phosphate synthetase II. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Disruption of the cpsII gene significantly reduced the growth of epimastigotes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In particular, the CPSII-null mutant severely retarded intracellular growth. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The de novo pyrimidine pathway is critical for the parasite growth in the host cell. -- Abstract: The intracellular parasitic protist Trypanosoma cruzi is the causative agent of Chagas disease in Latin America. In general, pyrimidine nucleotides are supplied by both de novo biosynthesis and salvage pathways. While epimastigotes-an insect form-possess both activities, amastigotes-an intracellular replicating form of T. cruzi-are unable to mediate the uptake of pyrimidine. However, the requirement of de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis for parasite growth and survival has not yet been elucidated. Carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase II (CPSII) is the first and rate-limiting enzyme of the de novo biosynthetic pathway, and increased CPSII activity is associated with the rapid proliferation of tumor cells. In the present study, we showed that disruption of the T. cruzicpsII gene significantly reduced parasite growth. In particular, the growth of amastigotes lacking the cpsII gene was severely suppressed. Thus, the de novo pyrimidine pathway is important for proliferation of T. cruzi in the host cell cytoplasm and represents a promising target for chemotherapy against Chagas disease.

  2. Modern Radiation Therapy for Extranodal Lymphomas: Field and Dose Guidelines From the International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yahalom, Joachim; Illidge, Tim; Specht, Lena; Hoppe, Richard T.; Li, Ye-Xiong; Tsang, Richard; Wirth, Andrew

    2015-05-01

    Extranodal lymphomas (ENLs) comprise about a third of all non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL). Radiation therapy (RT) is frequently used as either primary therapy (particularly for indolent ENL), consolidation after systemic therapy, salvage treatment, or palliation. The wide range of presentations of ENL, involving any organ in the body and the spectrum of histological sub-types, poses a challenge both for routine clinical care and for the conduct of prospective and retrospective studies. This has led to uncertainty and lack of consistency in RT approaches between centers and clinicians. Thus far there is a lack of guidelines for the use of RT in the management of ENL. This report presents an effort by the International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group (ILROG) to harmonize and standardize the principles of treatment of ENL, and to address the technical challenges of simulation, volume definition and treatment planning for the most frequently involved organs. Specifically, detailed recommendations for RT volumes are provided. We have applied the same modern principles of involved site radiation therapy as previously developed and published as guidelines for Hodgkin lymphoma and nodal NHL. We have adopted RT volume definitions based on the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU), as has been widely adopted by the field of radiation oncology for solid tumors. Organ-specific recommendations take into account histological subtype, anatomy, the treatment intent, and other treatment modalities that may be have been used before RT.

  3. Geothermal Well Site Restoration and Plug and Abandonment of Wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rinehart, Ben N.

    1994-08-01

    A report is presented on the final phase of an energy research program conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) involving two geothermal well sites in the State of Louisiana-the Gladys McCall site and the Willis Hulin site. The research program was intended to improve geothermal technology and to determine the efficacy of producing electricity commercially from geopressured resource sites. The final phase of the program consisted of plug and abandonment (P&A) of the wells and restoration of the well sites. Restoration involved (a) initial soil and water sampling and analysis; (b) removal and disposal of well pads, concrete, utility poles, and trash; (c) plugging of monitor and freshwater wells; and (d) site leveling and general cleanup. Restoration of the McCall site required removal of naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM), which was costly and time-consuming. Exhibits are included that provide copies of work permits and authorizations, P&A reports and procedures, daily workover and current conditions report, and cost and salvage reports. Site locations, grid maps, and photographs are provided.

  4. Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe Guidelines on Endovascular Treatment in Aortoiliac Arterial Disease

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rossi, Michele; Iezzi, Roberto

    2013-11-06

    PurposeThese guidelines are intended for use in assessing the standard for technical success and safety in aorto-iliac percutaneous endovascular interventions.MethodsAny recommendation contained in the text comes from the highest level and extension of literature review available to date.ResultsThe success of endovascular procedures is strictly related to an accurate planning based mainly on CT- or MR-angiography. TASC II A through C lesions have an endovascular-first option Pre-procedure ASA antiplatelet therapy is advisable in all cases. The application of stents improves the immediate hemodynamic and most likely long-term clinical results. Cumulative mean complication rate is 7.51% according to the most relevant literature. Most of the complications can be managed by means of percutaneous techniques.ConclusionThe design and quality of devices, as well as the easy and accuracy of performing these procedures, have improved over the last decades, leading to the preferential treatment of aorto-iliac steno-obstructive disease via endovascular means, often as first-line therapy, with high technical success rate and low morbidity. This is mirrored by the decreasing number of patients undergoing surgical grafts over the last years with patency, limb salvage, and survival rates equivalent to open reconstruction.

  5. Status of inventory, recycling, and storage of hazardous waste in Kazakstan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yermekbayeva, L.

    1996-12-31

    Conditions associated with toxic and radioactive waste in the Republic of Kazakstan are discussed. At present, more than 19 billion tons of various wastes, including toxic, radioactive, and other hazardous waste, have accumulated in the country, and about 1 billion tons of waste are generated each year. Ecological legislation for toxic waste storage is being examined. However, the definition and classification of waste inventories are not finalized. Furthermore, the country does not have sites for salvaging, rendering harmless, or disposing of these wastes. Kazakstan also has problems with radioactive waste that are complicated by the activity at the Semipalatinsk nuclear testing site. Here, nuclear explosions occurred because of economic and other reasons. In ecologically challenged regions, high levels of pollutants from chemical, toxic, industrial, and radioactive wastes and pesticides cause many diseases. These complex problems may be resolved by establishing a Governmental body to manage industrial and consumer waste, including toxic and radioactive waste, and also by developing legal and other regulations. 3 tabs.

  6. Characterization Report for the David Witherspoon Screen Art Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phyllis C. Weaver

    2011-01-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Office (ORO) of Environmental Management (EM) requested the technical assistance of Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) to characterize a tract of land associated with the David Witherspoon, Incorporated (DWI) Volunteer Equipment and Supply Company (VESC). This tract of land (hereinafter referred to as Screen Arts) is located in the Vestal Community in the 2000-block of Maryville Pike in south Knoxville, Tennessee, as shown in Figure A-1. This tract of land has been used primarily to store salvaged equipment and materials for resale, recycle, or for disposal in the former landfill once operated by DWI. The DWI Site industrial landfill and metal recycling business had been permitted by the Tennessee Division of Radiological Health to accept low-level radiologically contaminated metals. DWI received materials and equipment associated with operations from DOE sites, including those in Oak Ridge, Tennessee; Paducah, Kentucky; and Portsmouth, Ohio. It is likely that items stored at Screen Arts may have contained some residual radiological materials.

  7. Life-cycle cost comparisons of advanced storage batteries and fuel cells for utility, stand-alone, and electric vehicle applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Humphreys, K.K.; Brown, D.R.

    1990-01-01

    This report presents a comparison of battery and fuel cell economics for ten different technologies. To develop an equitable economic comparison, the technologies were evaluated on a life-cycle cost (LCC) basis. The LCC comparison involved normalizing source estimates to a standard set of assumptions and preparing a lifetime cost scenario for each technology, including the initial capital cost, replacement costs, operating and maintenance (O M) costs, auxiliary energy costs, costs due to system inefficiencies, the cost of energy stored, and salvage costs or credits. By considering all the costs associated with each technology over its respective lifetime, the technology that is most economical to operate over any given period of time can be determined. An analysis of this type indicates whether paying a high initial capital cost for a technology with low O M costs is more or less economical on a lifetime basis than purchasing a technology with a low initial capital cost and high O M costs. It is important to realize that while minimizing cost is important, the customer will not always purchase the least expensive technology. The customer may identify benefits associated with a more expensive option that make it the more attractive over all (e.g., reduced construction lead times, modularity, environmental benefits, spinning reserve, etc.). The LCC estimates presented in this report represent three end-use applications: utility load-leveling, stand-alone power systems, and electric vehicles.

  8. Trans-Americas leads the way into municipal textile recycling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ridgley, H.

    1998-08-01

    Most textile waste in the US still goes to the landfill--an estimated 6.6 million tons each year. But thanks to the efforts of textile recycles--such as Trans-Americas Textile Recycling CO. (Brooklyn, NY)--another 1.25 million tons gets salvaged for reuse overseas or as a feedstock for the wiping and fiber industries, according to the Council for Textile Recycling. In an era where global population levels are increasing the demand for textile waste from the Western world and municipalities are struggling to reach their waste diversion goals, boosting textile recovery rates makes sense. And it`s a waste that can be easily incorporated into existing municipal curbside or drop-off recycling programs. Since 1942, when the company first opened its doors in Brooklyn, NY, it purchased textile discards from charities. While those discards still make up the majority of Trans-Americas` supply, in the last two years, the company also began purchasing post-consumer material from municipalities. Textiles are definitely going to be an increasingly important part of recycling, as states look to meet their mandates.

  9. Techno-Economic Analysis of PEV Battery Second Use: Repurposed-Battery Selling Price and Commercial and Industrial End-User Value

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neubauer, J.; Pesaran, A.; Williams, B.; Ferry, M.; Eyer, J.

    2012-06-01

    Accelerated market penetration of plug-in electric vehicles and deployment of grid-connected energy storage are restricted by the high cost of lithium-ion batteries. Research, development, and manufacturing are underway to lower material costs, enhance process efficiencies, and increase production volumes. A fraction of the battery cost may be recovered after vehicular service by reusing the battery where it may have sufficient performance for other energy-storage applications. By extracting post-vehicle additional services and revenue from the battery, the total lifetime value of the battery is increased. The overall cost of energy-storage solutions for both primary (automotive) and secondary (grid) customer could be decreased. This techno-economic analysis of battery second use considers effects of battery degradation in both automotive and grid service, repurposing costs, balance-of-system costs, the value of aggregated energy-storage to commercial and industrial end users, and competitive technology. Batteries from plug-in electric vehicles can economically be used to serve the power quality and reliability needs of commercial and industrial end users. However, the value to the automotive battery owner is small (e.g., $20-$100/kWh) as declining future battery costs and other factors strongly affect salvage value. Repurposed automotive battery prices may range from $38/kWh to $132/kWh.

  10. Big Bang Day : Afternoon Play - Torchwood: Lost Souls

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-04-25

    Martha Jones, ex-time traveller and now working as a doctor for a UN task force, has been called to CERN where they're about to activate the Large Hadron Collider. Once activated, the Collider will fire beams of protons together recreating conditions a billionth of a second after the Big Bang - and potentially allowing the human race a greater insight into what the Universe is made of. But so much could go wrong - it could open a gateway to a parallel dimension, or create a black hole - and now voices from the past are calling out to people and scientists have started to disappear... Where have the missing scientists gone? What is the secret of the glowing man? What is lurking in the underground tunnel? And do the dead ever really stay dead? Lost Souls is a spin-off from the award-winning BBC Wales TV production Torchwood. It stars John Barrowman, Freema Agyeman, Eve Myles, Gareth David-Lloyd, Lucy Montgomery (of Titty Bang Bang) and Stephen Critchlow.