Sample records for rotor start-up wind

  1. Wind turbine rotor aileron

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coleman, Clint (Warren, VT); Kurth, William T. (Warren, VT)

    1994-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A wind turbine has a rotor with at least one blade which has an aileron which is adjusted by an actuator. A hinge has two portions, one for mounting a stationary hinge arm to the blade, the other for coupling to the aileron actuator. Several types of hinges can be used, along with different actuators. The aileron is designed so that it has a constant chord with a number of identical sub-assemblies. The leading edge of the aileron has at least one curved portion so that the aileron does not vent over a certain range of angles, but vents if the position is outside the range. A cyclic actuator can be mounted to the aileron to adjust the position periodically. Generally, the aileron will be adjusted over a range related to the rotational position of the blade. A method for operating the cyclic assembly is also described.

  2. SMART Wind Turbine Rotor: Design and Field Test | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Design and Field Test SMART Wind Turbine Rotor: Design and Field Test This report documents the design, fabrication, and testing of the SMART Wind Turbine Rotor. This work...

  3. Start-Up Engineer

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A successful candidate in this position is part of the Manager, Waste Treatment Project Start-Up and Commissioning Integration Group. The Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Project (WTP) is a...

  4. Sandia National Laboratories: wind-turbine rotor design

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    wind-turbine rotor design National Rotor Testbed Functional Scaling Presented at American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics 2014 Scitech On April 15, 2014, in Energy,...

  5. Variable diameter wind turbine rotor blades

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jamieson, Peter McKeich; Hornzee-Jones, Chris; Moroz, Emilian M.; Blakemore, Ralph W.

    2005-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A system and method for changing wind turbine rotor diameters to meet changing wind speeds and control system loads is disclosed. The rotor blades on the wind turbine are able to adjust length by extensions nested within or containing the base blade. The blades can have more than one extension in a variety of configurations. A cable winching system, a hydraulic system, a pneumatic system, inflatable or elastic extensions, and a spring-loaded jack knife deployment are some of the methods of adjustment. The extension is also protected from lightning by a grounding system.

  6. Horizontal wind rotor. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guard, E.J.

    1983-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A vertical axis wind machine called, ''Horizontal Wind Rotor'' conceived in 1979 by the Grantee E.J. Guard was an effort to marry a new high tech carousel type wind rotor to a basic building design for the purpose of generating practical amounts of electricty. This was directed especially towards high performance power generation, relative to low average wind velocity fields, typically found in Florida. From January 1980 to April 1983 two 1/30 scale wind tunnel type test models of buildings, one round and one square were built. An eight Hartzell shrouded wind tunnel fan machine was designed and built to supply uniform wind velocities for testing. All components of the Horizontal Wind Rotor (HWR) were fabricated, instrumented, mounted on the building models, and tested and modified repeatedly for performance optimization. Aerodynamic consultants, model makers, mechanical and computer engineers and technicians under the direction of E. Guard all teamed up to evolve the size, shape, and placement of the system components. It was recognized early that the machine had to be large in order to extract energy from low wind velocities. It was also noted that there were so many variables in the system, so as to elude analytical computation, that only testing could provide the answers. Consequently, this grant program has provided major contributions to the sparse available data in this little studied field, and set up valuable bench marks in design and power output parameters. This data will be the foundation for incorporating the newly discovered design improvements into the full scale prototype to follow. (Phase II) It is believed that this Rotor design is the only one in the world today that will produce as much power in the lower wind velocity ranges and it is also believed that every objective of the original grant proposal has been met or exceeded.

  7. Dynamics and Fatigue Damage of Wind Turbine Rotors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    6 3 RiS0-Rr512 Dynamics and Fatigue Damage of Wind Turbine Rotors during Steady Operation Peter OF WIND TURBINE ROTORS DURING STEADY OPERATION Peter Hauge Madsen, Sten Frandsen, William E. Holley-carrying capacity of a wind turbine rotor with respect to short-term strength and material fatigue are presented

  8. Sandia Energy - Offshore Wind RD&D: Large Offshore Rotor Development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Offshore Rotor Development Home Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Wind Energy Offshore Wind Offshore Wind RD&D: Large Offshore Rotor Development Offshore Wind RD&D:...

  9. Sandia Energy - Offshore Wind RD&D: Large Offshore Rotor Development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Offshore Wind RD&D: Large Offshore Rotor Development Home Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Wind Energy Offshore Wind Offshore Wind RD&D: Large Offshore Rotor...

  10. Wind turbine rotor hub and teeter joint

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coleman, Clint (Warren, VT); Kurth, William T. (Warren, VT); Jankowski, Joseph (Stowe, VT)

    1994-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A rotor hub is provided for coupling a wind turbine rotor blade and a shaft. The hub has a yoke with a body which is connected to the shaft, and extension portions which are connected to teeter bearing blocks, each of which has an aperture. The blocks are connected to a saddle which envelops the rotor blade by one or two shafts which pass through the apertures in the bearing blocks. The saddle and blade are separated by a rubber interface which provides for distribution of stress over a larger portion of the blade. Two teeter control mechanisms, which may include hydraulic pistons and springs, are connected to the rotor blade and to the yoke at extension portions. These control mechanisms provide end-of-stroke damping, braking, and stiffness based on the teeter angle and speed of the blade.

  11. Variable speed operation of generators with rotor-speed feedback in wind power applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C.P.; Migliore, P.

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of induction generators in wind power applications has been common since the early development of the wind industry. Most of these generators operate at fixed frequency and are connected directly to the utility grid. Unfortunately, this mode of operation limits the rotor speed to a specific rpm. Variable-speed operation is preferred in order to facilitate maximum energy capture over a wide range of wind speeds. This paper explores variable-speed operating strategies for wind turbine applications. The objectives are to maximize energy production, provide controlled start-up and reduce torque loading. This paper focuses on optimizing the energy captured by operating at maximum aerodynamic efficiency at any wind speed. The control strategy we analyze uses rotor speed and generator power as the feedback signals. In the normal operating region, rotor speed is used to compute a target power that corresponds to optimum operation. With power as the control objective, the power converter and generator are controlled to track the target power at any rpm. Thus, the torque-speed characteristic of the generator is shaped to optimize the energy capture. The target power is continuously updated at any rpm. in extreme areas of the operating envelope, during start-up, shutdown, generator overload, or overspeed, different strategies driven by other system considerations must be used.

  12. Variable speed operation of generators with rotor-speed feedback in wind power applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C.P.; Migliore, P. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States). Wind Technology Div.

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of induction generators in wind power applications has been common since the early development of the wind industry. Most of these generators operate at fixed frequency and are connected directly to the utility grid. Unfortunately, this mode of operation limits the rotor speed to a specific rpm. Variable-speed operation is preferred in order to facilitate maximum energy capture over a wide range of wind speeds. This paper explores variable-speed operating strategies for wind turbine applications. The objectives are to maximize energy production, provide controlled start-up and reduce torque loading. This paper focuses on optimizing the energy captured by operating at maximum aerodynamic efficiency at any wind speed. The control strategy analyzed uses rotor speed and generator power as the feedback signals. In the normal operating region, rotor speed is used to compute a target power that corresponds to optimum operation. With power as the control objective, the power converter and generator are controlled to track the target power at any rpm. Thus, the torque-speed characteristic of the generator is shaped to optimize the energy capture. The target power is continuously updated at any rpm. In extreme areas of the operating envelope, during start-up, shutdown, generator overload, or overspeed, different strategies driven by other system considerations must be used.

  13. Variable speed operation of generators with rotor-speed feedback in wind power applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C.P.; Migliore, P. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of induction generators in wind power applications has been common since the early development of the wind industry. Most of these generators operate at fixed frequency and are connected directly to the utility grid. Unfortunately, this mode of operation limits the rotor speed to a specific rpm. Variable speed operation is preferred in order to facilitate maximum energy capture over a wide range of wind speeds. This paper explores variable speed operating strategies for wind turbine applications. The objectives are to maximize energy production, provide controlled start-up, and reduce torque loading. This paper focuses on optimizing the energy captured by operating at maximum aerodynamic efficiency at any wind speed. The control strategy the authors analyze uses rotor speed and generator power as the feedback signals. In the normal operating region, rotor speed is used to compute a target power that corresponds to optimum operation. With power as the control objective, the power converter and generator are controlled to track the target power at any rpm. Thus, the torque-speed characteristic of the generator is shaped to optimize the energy capture. The target power is continuously updated at any rpm. In extreme areas of the operating envelope, during start-up, shutdown, generator overload, or overspeed, different strategies driven by other system considerations must be used.

  14. EXPRESSLICENSE Got Start-ups?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsien, Roger Y.

    EXPRESSLICENSE Got Start-ups? · High level of transparency in the application process for negotiation · Defers payment for pre-existing patent costs · Start-up friendly, geared towards addressing needs of young companies · Encourages social responsibility Check out some of the start-ups founded

  15. Sandia National Laboratories: capture more wind with longer rotors

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    capture more wind with longer rotors New Material Tests Show Biaxial Laminate Creep Is Important for Large Wind-Turbine Blades On April 1, 2014, in Energy, News, News & Events,...

  16. Methods and apparatus for rotor load control in wind turbines

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moroz, Emilian Mieczyslaw

    2006-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A wind turbine having a rotor, at least one rotor blade, and a plurality of generators, of which a first generator is configured to provide power to an electric grid and a second generator is configured to provide power to the wind turbine during times of grid loss. The wind turbine is configured to utilize power provided by the second generator to reduce loads on the wind turbine during times of grid loss.

  17. Why Do Start-Ups Patent?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graham, Stuart; Sichelman, Ted

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    everything. ”). Why Do Start-Ups Patent? another employee2005, at 38. Why Do Start-Ups Patent? Second, many companiesNov. 2002, at 1. Why Do Start-Ups Patent? licensing cohort,

  18. Offshore Series Wind Turbine Variable Hub heights & rotor diameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    3.6MW Offshore Series Wind Turbine GE Energy #12;Feature Variable Hub heights & rotor diameters-savings feature, considering the rigors of offshore power generation. The 3.6 MW offshore wind turbine also, for both on and offshore use. Special features include... As the world's first commercially available wind

  19. Effects of increasing tip velocity on wind turbine rotor design.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Resor, Brian Ray; Maniaci, David Charles; Berg, Jonathan Charles; Richards, Phillip William

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A reduction in cost of energy from wind is anticipated when maximum allowable tip velocity is allowed to increase. Rotor torque decreases as tip velocity increases and rotor size and power rating are held constant. Reduction in rotor torque yields a lighter weight gearbox, a decrease in the turbine cost, and an increase in the capacity for the turbine to deliver cost competitive electricity. The high speed rotor incurs costs attributable to rotor aero-acoustics and system loads. The increased loads of high speed rotors drive the sizing and cost of other components in the system. Rotor, drivetrain, and tower designs at 80 m/s maximum tip velocity and 100 m/s maximum tip velocity are created to quantify these effects. Component costs, annualized energy production, and cost of energy are computed for each design to quantify the change in overall cost of energy resulting from the increase in turbine tip velocity. High fidelity physics based models rather than cost and scaling models are used to perform the work. Results provide a quantitative assessment of anticipated costs and benefits for high speed rotors. Finally, important lessons regarding full system optimization of wind turbines are documented.

  20. Structural testing of the North Wind 250 composite rotor joint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Musial, W; Link, H [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Coleman, C [Northern Power Systems, Moretown, VT (United States)

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The North Wind 250 wind turbine is under development at Northern Power Systems (NPS) in Moretown, VT. The turbine uses a unique, flow-through, teetered-rotor design. This design eliminates structural discontinuities at the blade/hub interface by fabricating the rotor as one continuous structural element. To accomplish this, the two blade spars are joined at the center of the rotor using a proprietary bonding technique. Fatigue tests were conducted on the full-scale rotor joint at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). Subsequent tests are now underway to test the full-scale rotor and hub assembly to verify the design assumptions. The test articles were mounted in dedicated test fixtures. For the joint test, a constant moment was generated across the joint and parent material. Hydraulic actuators applied sinusoidal loading to the test article at levels equivalent to 90% of the extreme wind load for over one million cycles. When the loading was increased to 112% of the extreme wind load, the joint failed by buckling. Strain levels were monitored at 14 locations inside and outside of the blade joint during the test. The tests were used to qualify this critical element of the rotor for field testing and to provide information needed to improve the structural design of the joint.

  1. Hi-Q Rotor - Low Wind Speed Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Todd E. Mills; Judy Tatum

    2010-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The project objective was to optimize the performance of the Hi-Q Rotor. Early research funded by the California Energy Commission indicated the design might be advantageous over state-of-the-art turbines for collecting wind energy in low wind conditions. The Hi-Q Rotor is a new kind of rotor targeted for harvesting wind in Class 2, 3, and 4 sites, and has application in areas that are closer to cities, or 'load centers.' An advantage of the Hi-Q Rotor is that the rotor has non-conventional blade tips, producing less turbulence, and is quieter than standard wind turbine blades which is critical to the low-wind populated urban sites. Unlike state-of-the-art propeller type blades, the Hi-Q Rotor has six blades connected by end caps. In this phase of the research funded by DOE's Inventions and Innovation Program, the goal was to improve the current design by building a series of theoretical and numeric models, and composite prototypes to determine a best of class device. Development of the rotor was performed by aeronautical engineering and design firm, DARcorporation. From this investigation, an optimized design was determined and an 8-foot diameter, full-scale rotor was built and mounted using a Bergey LX-1 generator and furling system which were adapted to support the rotor. The Hi-Q Rotor was then tested side-by-side against the state-of-the-art Bergey XL-1 at the Alternative Energy Institute's Wind Test Center at West Texas State University for six weeks, and real time measurements of power generated were collected and compared. Early wind tunnel testing showed that the cut-in-speed of the Hi-Q rotor is much lower than a conventional tested HAWT enabling the Hi-Q Wind Turbine to begin collecting energy before a conventional HAWT has started spinning. Also, torque at low wind speeds for the Hi-Q Wind Turbine is higher than the tested conventional HAWT and enabled the wind turbine to generate power at lower wind speeds. Based on the data collected, the results of our first full-scale prototype wind turbine proved that higher energy can be captured at lower wind speeds with the new Hi-Q Rotor. The Hi-Q Rotor is almost 15% more productive than the Bergey from 6 m/s to 8 m/s, making it ideal in Class 3, 4, and 5 wind sites and has application in the critical and heretofore untapped areas that are closer to cities, 'load centers,' and may even be used directly in urban areas. The additional advantage of the Hi-Q Rotor's non-conventional blade tips, which eliminates most air turbulence, is noise reduction which makes it doubly ideal for populated urban areas. Hi-Q Products recommends one final stage of development to take the Hi-Q Rotor through Technology Readiness Levels 8-9. During this stage of development, the rotor will be redesigned to further increase efficiency, match the rotor to a more suitable generator, and lower the cost of manufacturing by redesigning the structure to allow for production in larger quantities at lower cost. Before taking the rotor to market and commercialization, it is necessary to further optimize the performance by finding a better generator and autofurling system, ones more suitable for lower wind speeds and rpms should be used in all future testing. The potential impact of this fully developed technology will be the expansion and proliferation of energy renewal into the heretofore untapped Class 2, 3, 4, and 5 Wind Sites, or the large underutilized sites where the wind speed is broken by physical features such as mountains, buildings, and trees. Market estimates by 2011, if low wind speed technology can be developed are well above: 13 million homes, 675,000 commercial buildings, 250,000 public facilities. Estimated commercial exploitation of the Hi-Q Rotor show potential increase in U.S. energy gained through the clean, renewable wind energy found in low and very low wind speed sites. This new energy source would greatly impact greenhouse emissions as well as the public sector's growing energy demands.

  2. LOSS OF ROTOR ISOTROPY AS A BLADE DAMAGE INDICATOR FOR WIND TURBINE STRUCTURE HEALTH MONITORING SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    LOSS OF ROTOR ISOTROPY AS A BLADE DAMAGE INDICATOR FOR WIND TURBINE STRUCTURE HEALTH MONITORING to simulated vibrations of a rotating rotor. KEYWORDS : wind turbine blade, rotor anisotropy, Floquet analysis, OMA INTRODUCTION Blades of modern wind turbines are complex high-tech structures, and their cost

  3. DETECTION OF IMPULSE-LIKE AIRBORNE SOUND FOR DAMAGE IDENTIFICATION IN ROTOR BLADES OF WIND TURBINES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    DETECTION OF IMPULSE-LIKE AIRBORNE SOUND FOR DAMAGE IDENTIFICATION IN ROTOR BLADES OF WIND TURBINES burdens of wind turbines. To detect damage of rotor blades, several research projects focus on an acoustic, rotor blade, wind turbine INTRODUCTION There are several publications of non destructive damage

  4. Research Start-up Request Form Please use this form for all start-up requests.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Andrew

    Research Start-up Request Form Please use this form for all start-up requests. All requests must: Department: College: Date of Offer: Start Date: Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Fiscal Year: Equipment: Amount of Start-up of Start-up Provided by Dept. or College Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Amount: Planned Use: EVP/Provost Signature

  5. Assessment of research needs for wind turbine rotor materials technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind-driven power systems is a renewable energy technology that is still in the early stages of development. Wind power plants installed in early 1980s suffered structural failures chiefly because of incomplete understanding of wind forces (turbulent), in some cases because of poor product quality. Failures of rotor blades are now somewhat better understood. This committee has examined the experience base accumulated by wind turbines and the R and D programs sponsored by DOE. It is concluded that a wind energy system such as is described is within the capability of engineering practice; however because of certain gaps in knowledge, and the presence of only one major integrated manufacturer of wind power machines in the USA, a DOE R and D investment is still required.

  6. Operating Modes of a Teeter-Rotor Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bir, G. S. (National Renewable Energy Laboratory); Stol, K. (University of Colorado at Boulder)

    1999-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We examine the operating modes of a two-bladed teetered wind turbine. Because of the gyroscopic asymmetry of its rotor, this turbine's dynamics can be quite distinct from those of a turbine with three or more blades. This asymmetry leads to system equations with periodic coefficients that are solved using the Floquet approach to extract the correct modal parameters. The system equations are derived using a simple analytical model with four degrees of freedom: cacelle yaw, rotor teeter, and flapping associated with each blade. Results confirm that the turbine modes become more dominated by the centrifugal and gyroscopic effects as the rotor speed increases. They gyroscopic effect may also cause dynamic instability. Under certain design conditions, yaw and teeter modal frequencies may coalesce.

  7. Methods of making wind turbine rotor blades

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Livingston, Jamie T. (Pensacola, FL); Burke, Arthur H. E. (Gulf Breeze, FL); Bakhuis, Jan Willem (Nijverdal, NL); Van Breugel, Sjef (Enschede, NL); Billen, Andrew (Daarlerveen, NL)

    2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of manufacturing a root portion of a wind turbine blade includes, in an exemplary embodiment, providing an outer layer of reinforcing fibers including at least two woven mats of reinforcing fibers, providing an inner layer of reinforcing fibers including at least two woven mats of reinforcing fibers, and positioning at least two bands of reinforcing fibers between the inner and outer layers, with each band of reinforcing fibers including at least two woven mats of reinforcing fibers. The method further includes positioning a mat of randomly arranged reinforcing fibers between each pair of adjacent bands of reinforcing fibers, introducing a polymeric resin into the root potion of the wind turbine blade, infusing the resin through the outer layer, the inner layer, each band of reinforcing fibers, and each mat of random reinforcing fibers, and curing the resin to form the root portion of the wind turbine blade.

  8. Preform spar cap for a wind turbine rotor blade

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Livingston, Jamie T. (Simpsonville, SC); Driver, Howard D. (Greer, SC); van Breugel, Sjef (Enschede, NL); Jenkins, Thomas B. (Cantonment, FL); Bakhuis, Jan Willem (Nijverdal, NL); Billen, Andrew J. (Daarlerveen, NL); Riahi, Amir (Pensacola, FL)

    2011-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A spar cap for a wind turbine rotor blade. The spar cap may include multiple preform components. The multiple preform components may be planar sheets having a swept shape with a first end and a second end. The multiple preform components may be joined by mating the first end of a first preform component to the second end of a next preform component, forming the spar cap.

  9. The Physics of Tokamak Start-Up

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Related Links: U.S. Department of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information Fusion Links 1 The physics of tokamak start-up D. Mueller Princeton Plasma Physics...

  10. The physics of tokamak start-up

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mueller, D. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, P.O. Box 451 Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)] [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, P.O. Box 451 Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

    2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Tokamak start-up on present-day devices usually relies on inductively induced voltage from a central solenoid. In some cases, inductive startup is assisted with auxiliary power from electron cyclotron radio frequency heating. International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor, the National Spherical Torus Experiment Upgrade and JT60, now under construction, will make use of the understanding gained from present-day devices to ensure successful start-up. Design of a spherical tokamak (ST) with DT capability for nuclear component testing would require an alternative to a central solenoid because the small central column in an ST has insufficient space to provide shielding for the insulators in the solenoid. Alternative start-up techniques such as induction using outer poloidal field coils, electron Bernstein wave start-up, coaxial helicity injection, and point source helicity injection have been used with success, but require demonstration of scaling to higher plasma current.

  11. Sparkr Blade Test Centre Wind turbines with a rotor diameter exceed-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparkær Blade Test Centre Wind turbines with a rotor diameter exceed- ing 2 metres must have a type of a wind turbine. Failure of a rotor blade in service often involves damage of the entire turbine operating type cer- tification systems for wind turbines. Reg. no. 427 The Sparkær Blade Test Centre became

  12. Numerical Investigation of a Wind Turbine Rotor with an aerodynamically redesigned hub-region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Numerical Investigation of a Wind Turbine Rotor with an aerodynamically redesigned hub-region J methods on a redesigned modern Mega-Watt sized wind turbine, where the new design includes an increase of the blade in the vicinity of the wind turbine nacelle, to obtain an aerodynamically more efficient rotor

  13. RIS0-M-2432 SIMPLIFIED LAWS OF SIMIALRITY FOR WIND TURBINE ROTORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RIS0-M-2432 SIMPLIFIED LAWS OF SIMIALRITY FOR WIND TURBINE ROTORS Helge Petersen The Test Station for Small Windmills Abstract, Laws of similarity or scaling laws for the character- istics of a wind turbine rotor are of importance to the designer even during the initial design phase of a new wind turbine con

  14. ,,START-UP BRACHFLCHE" Arbeitshilfe zur Erarbeitung von Projektplnen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cirpka, Olaf Arie

    ,,START-UP BRACHFLÄCHE" Arbeitshilfe zur Erarbeitung von Projektplänen #12;#12;,,START-UP Preuß Volker Schrenk Kai Steffens Karolin Weber Stuttgart, April 2005 #12;START-UP-BRACHFLÄCHE Impressum;START-UP-BRACHFLÄCHE 3 Inhalt Abbildungsverzeichnis

  15. Methods and apparatus for reduction of asymmetric rotor loads in wind turbines

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moroz, Emilian Mieczyslaw; Pierce, Kirk Gee

    2006-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for reducing load and providing yaw alignment in a wind turbine includes measuring displacements or moments resulting from asymmetric loads on the wind turbine. These measured displacements or moments are used to determine a pitch for each rotor blade to reduce or counter asymmetric rotor loading and a favorable yaw orientation to reduce pitch activity. Yaw alignment of the wind turbine is adjusted in accordance with the favorable yaw orientation and the pitch of each rotor blade is adjusted in accordance with the determined pitch to reduce or counter asymmetric rotor loading.

  16. WindPACT Turbine Rotor Design Study: June 2000--June 2002 (Revised)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malcolm, D. J.; Hansen, A. C.

    2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of the turbine rotor study completed by Global Energy Concepts (GEC) as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's WindPACT (Wind Partnership for Advanced Component Technologies) project. The purpose of the WindPACT project is to identify technology improvements that will enable the cost of energy from wind turbines to fall to a target of 3.0 cents/kilowatt-hour in low wind speed sites. The study focused on different rotor configurations and the effect of scale on those rotors.

  17. CFD analysis of rotating two-bladed flatback wind turbine rotor.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    van Dam, C.P. (University of California, David, CA); Chao, David D.; Berg, Dale E. (University of California, David, CA)

    2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of modifying the inboard portion of the NREL Phase VI rotor using a thickened, flatback version of the S809 design airfoil are studied using a three-dimensional Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes method. A motivation for using such a thicker airfoil design coupled with a blunt trailing edge is to alleviate structural constraints while reducing blade weight and maintaining the power performance of the rotor. The calculated results for the baseline Phase VI rotor are benchmarked against wind tunnel results obtained at 10, 7, and 5 meters per second. The calculated results for the modified rotor are compared against those of the baseline rotor. The results of this study demonstrate that a thick, flatback blade profile is viable as a bridge to connect structural requirements with aerodynamic performance in designing future wind turbine rotors.

  18. Start-Ups for Smarties Personal Advice for Academic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    Start-Ups for Smarties 8 Personal Advice for Academic Entrepreneurs This section addresses start-up formation and launch. Your Role(s) in the Start-Up Company Most first-time academic entrepreneurs leave academia to become company employees. A faculty member's role in the start-up is likely

  19. 3-D Time-Accurate CFD Simulations of Wind Turbine Rotor Flow Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    problems such as helicopter rotors and propellers. In particular, wind turbine blades can experience large from the tower support on downwind, horizontal axis wind turbines. These blade/inflow/tower wake in large scale wind turbines, because the blade passage frequency is well below the audible range

  20. Kyrgyzstan starts up its first refinery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLeod, G. [Petrofac LLC, Tyler, TX (United States)

    1997-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The Central Asian republic of Kyrgyzstan started up its first oil refinery in October 1996. The 10,000 b/d plant is designed to produce gasoline, diesel, and mazut (heavy fuel oil) from local Kyrgyz crude. Before construction of the Jalalabad refinery, all finished petroleum products were imported from neighboring countries. Kyrgyzstan`s demand for finished products is about 40,000 b/d. The new refinery was designed and constructed by Petrofac of Tyler, Texas, on behalf of Kyrgoil Corp., Calgary. Kyrgoil is a partner with the Kyrgyz state oil company, Kyrgyzsneft, in a venture called Kyrzgyz Petroleum Co. (KPC). KPC has undertaken restoration and continued development of the oil fields in Kyrgyzstan`s Fergana basin, in addition to the refinery project. The company also has marketing rights for finished products within Kyrgyzstan. The refinery comprises: a hydroskimming (atmospheric distillation) section, diesel steam stripping, gasoline blending, and utilities and off-sites, including steam generation, power generation, tank farm, truck and rail tank-car loading and unloading facilities, crude inlet pipeline, high-voltage power line, substation, air compression, laboratory, and maintenance facilities.

  1. Sandia Energy - SMART Rotor Video

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SMART Rotor Video Home Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Wind Energy Resources Wind Energy Publications Online Abstracts and Reports SMART Rotor Video SMART Rotor...

  2. Start-up manufacturing firms: operations for survival 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Kuangyi

    2009-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Start-up firms play an important role in the economy. Statistics show that a large percent of start-up firms fail after few years of establishment. Raising capital, which is crucial to success, is one of the difficulties ...

  3. Start-Up of FEL Oscillator from Shot Noise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, V.; Krishnagopal, S.; Fawley, W.M.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of start-up of the CUTE-FEL oscillator from shot noiseof passes required for the FEL to saturate is equivalent toSTART-UP OF FEL OSCILLATOR FROM SHOT NOISE V. Kumar ? , S.

  4. Start-Ups for Smarties Introduction and Basics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    Start-Ups for Smarties 4 Introduction and Basics Introduction Academic researchers frequently suspect that a discovery of theirs may have what it takes to spawn a start-up company. Usually be missing the boat by not being in- volved in a start-up. This is a dramatic change from the situation

  5. Start-Ups for Smarties Leading Sources of Frustration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    Start-Ups for Smarties 24 Leading Sources of Frustration for the Academic Entrepreneur Starting the start-up a preferential licensing deal. Some academic entrepreneurs believe that their employers should give faculty start-ups better licensing terms than they would to an unaffiliated company. Actually

  6. A Start-up company to start your career

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Start-up company to start your career Professional Development Seminar March 6, 2013 #12;What is a start-up company? · Small, just started · Typically 1-5 years old · Often no products, no sales · Developing something totally new · May, or may not be a market #12;What is a start-up company? · Funding

  7. MPC for Wind Power Gradients --Utilizing Forecasts, Rotor Inertia, and Central Energy Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MPC for Wind Power Gradients -- Utilizing Forecasts, Rotor Inertia, and Central Energy Storage define an extremely low power output gradient and demonstrate how decentralized energy storage conservative bids on the power market. Energy storage strikes the major problems of wind power and joining

  8. Start-up control system and vessel for LMFBR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Durrant, Oliver W. (Akron, OH); Kakarala, Chandrasekhara R. (Clinton, OH); Mandel, Sheldon W. (Galesburg, IL)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A reflux condensing start-up system includes a steam generator, a start-up vessel connected parallel to the steam generator, a main steam line connecting steam outlets of the steam generator and start-up vessel to a steam turbine, a condenser connected to an outlet of the turbine and a feedwater return line connected between the condenser and inlets of the steam generator and start-up vessel. The start-up vessel has one or more heaters at the bottom thereof for heating feedwater which is supplied over a start-up line to the start-up vessel. Steam is thus generated to pressurize the steam generator before the steam generator is supplied with a heat transfer medium, for example liquid sodium, in the case of a liquid metal fast breeder reactor. The start-up vessel includes upper and lower bulbs with a smaller diameter mid-section to act as water and steam reservoirs. The start-up vessel can thus be used not only in a start-up operation but as a mixing tank, a water storage tank and a level control at low loads for controlling feedwater flow.

  9. Start-up control system and vessel for LMFBR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Durrant, Oliver W. (Akron, OH); Kakarala, Chandrasekhara R. (Clinton, OH); Mandel, Sheldon W. (Galesburg, IL)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A reflux condensing start-up system comprises a steam generator, a start-up vessel connected parallel to the steam generator, a main steam line connecting steam outlets of the steam generator and start-up vessel to a steam turbine, a condenser connected to an outlet of the turbine and a feedwater return line connected between the condenser and inlets of the steam generator and start-up vessel. The start-up vessel has one or more heaters at the bottom thereof for heating feedwater which is supplied over a start-up line to the start-up vessel. Steam is thus generated to pressurize the steam generator before the steam generator is supplied with a heat transfer medium, for example liquid sodium, in the case of a liquid metal fast breeder reactor. The start-up vessel includes upper and lower bulbs with a smaller diameter mid-section to act as water and steam reservoirs. The start-up vessel can thus be used not only in a start-up operation but as a mixing tank, a water storage tank and a level control at low loads for controlling feedwater flow.

  10. Construction, Qualification, and Low Rate Production Start-up...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Manufacturing Facility with Capacity to Support 100,000 Electric Drive Vehicles Construction, Qualification, and Low Rate Production Start-up of a DC Bus Capacitor High Volume...

  11. NNSA Authorizes Start-Up of Highly Enriched Uranium Materials...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Authorizes Start-Up of Highly Enriched Uranium Materials Facility at Y-12 | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the...

  12. Sandia National Laboratories: reducing start-up risks for solar...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    reducing start-up risks for solar thermal generation Sandia Solar Energy Test System Cited in National Engineering Competition On May 16, 2013, in Concentrating Solar Power,...

  13. Characterizing Inflow Conditions Across the Rotor Disk of a Utility-Scale Wind Turbine (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clifton, A.; Lundquist, J. K.; Kelley, N.; Scott, G.; Jager, D.; Schreck, S.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Multi-megawatt utility-scale wind turbines operate in a turbulent, thermally-driven atmosphere where wind speed and air temperature vary with height. Turbines convert the wind's momentum into electrical power, and so changes in the atmosphere across the rotor disk influence the power produced by the turbine. To characterize the inflow into utility scale turbines at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) near Boulder, Colorado, NREL recently built two 135-meter inflow monitoring towers. This poster introduces the towers and the measurements that are made, showing some of the data obtained in the first few months of operation in 2011.

  14. Construction, Qualification, and Low Rate Production Start-up...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of a DC Bus Capacitor High Volume Manufacturing Facility with Capacity to Support 100,000 Electric Drive Vehicles Construction, Qualification, and Low Rate Production Start-up of a...

  15. Two start-ups formed from Ames Laboratory's computational tools...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Two start-ups formed from Ames Laboratory's computational tools Scientists with ties to the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory have created two spin-off companies based on...

  16. Abstract--This paper proposes a methodology to decide the optimal matching between the size of the rotor of a wind turbine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    of the rotor of a wind turbine and the rated power of a permanent magnet synchronous machine. This is made of the wind turbine, the gearbox's transformation ratio, the battery voltage and the wind speed probability's rated power and the wind turbine's rotor size. The system studied in this paper consists of 220 (V)/50

  17. Segmented Ultralight Pre-Aligned Rotor for Extreme-Scale Wind Turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loth, E.; Steele, A.; Ichter, B.; Selig, M.; Moriarty, P.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To alleviate the mass-scaling issues associated with conventional upwind rotors of extreme-scale turbines, a downwind rotor concept is proposed which employs fixed blade curvature based on force alignment at rated conditions. For a given peak stress constraint, the reduction in downwind cantilever loads allows reduced shell and spar thickness, and thus a reduced blade mass as compared with a conventional upwind rotor, especially as rotor sizes approach extreme-scales. To quantify this mass reduction, a Finite Element Analysis was conducted for a 10 MW rated rotor based on the NREL offshore 5 MW baseline wind turbine. The results show that this 'pre-alignment' yields a net downstream deflection of 32 deg, a downward hub-pitch angle of 6 deg, a 20% increase in blade length (to maintain the same radius as the conventional blade), and a net mass savings of about 50% through decreased shell and spar thicknesses. The pre-alignment may also allow a more straightforward and efficient segmentation of the blade since shear stresses near joints are substantially reduced. Segmenting, in turn, can dramatically reduce costs associated with fabrication, transport and assembly for extreme-scale off-shore systems. The pre-aligned geometric curvature can also help alleviate tower wake effects on the blades since blade tips (where shadow effects can be most problematic) are shifted downstream where the tower wake is weaker. In addition, the portion of the tower that is upstream of the blade tips can be faired with an externally-rotating aerodynamic shroud. Furthermore, the downwind rotor can allow a floating off-shore tri-pod platform to reduce tower weight and yaw-control requirements. A simple economic analysis of the segmented ultralight pre-aligned rotor (SUPAR) concept suggests that the overall system cost savings can be as much as 25%, indicating that more detailed (numerical and experimental) investigations are warranted.

  18. Measured and predicted rotor performance for the SERI advanced wind turbine blades

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tangler, J.; Smith, B.; Kelley, N.; Jager, D.

    1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Measured and predicted rotor performance for the SERI advanced wind turbine blades were compared to assess the accuracy of predictions and to identify the sources of error affecting both predictions and measurements. An awareness of these sources of error contributes to improved prediction and measurement methods that will ultimately benefit future rotor design efforts. Propeller/vane anemometers were found to underestimate the wind speed in turbulent environments such as the San Gorgonio Pass wind farm area. Using sonic or cup anemometers, good agreement was achieved between predicted and measured power output for wind speeds up to 8 m/sec. At higher wind speeds an optimistic predicted power output and the occurrence of peak power at wind speeds lower than measurements resulted from the omission of turbulence and yaw error. In addition, accurate two-dimensional (2-D) airfoil data prior to stall and a post stall airfoil data synthesization method that reflects three-dimensional (3-D) effects were found to be essential for accurate performance prediction. 11 refs.

  19. Rotor Speed Dependent Yaw Control of Wind Turbines Based on Empirical Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kragh, K. A.; Fleming, P. A.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    When extracting energy from the wind using horizontal-axis upwind wind turbines, a primary condition for maximum power yield is the ability to align the rotor axis with the dominating wind direction. Attempts have been made to improve yaw alignment by applying advanced measurement techniques such as LIDARs. This study is focused at assessing the current performance of an operating turbine and exploring how the yaw alignment can be improved using existing measurements. By analyzing available turbine and met mast data a correction scheme for the original yaw alignment system is synthesized. The correction scheme is applied and it is seen that with the correction scheme in place, the power yield below rated is raised 1-5 percent. Furthermore, results indicate that blade load variations are decreased when the correction scheme is applied. The results are associated with uncertainties due to the amount of available data and the wind site climate. Further work should be focused at gathering more experimental data.

  20. Dynamic optimization of a plate reactor start-up

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of a plate reactor #12;Safety conditions for ignition and conversion Avoid regions in the state-space, where reactor #12;Details of the NMPC implementation Cost function = tp t0 (x(t), u(t), ¯u(t), r(t))dt =1 + 1 2Dynamic optimization of a plate reactor start-up Staffan Haugwitz, Per Hagander and John Bagterp

  1. CHRISTOPHNIEMANN A new wave of start-ups

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    CHRISTOPHNIEMANN 20 INNOVATION A new wave of start-ups wants to install rooftop solar panels. Installing a rooftop ar- ray of solar panels large enough to produce all of the energy required by a building a pool of cash to pay for the solar panels. Directly or indirectly, homeowners buy the electricity

  2. Characterization of winds through the rotor plane using a phased array SODAR and recommendations for future work.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deola, Regina Anne

    2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Portable remote sensing devices are increasingly needed to cost effectively characterize the meteorology at a potential wind energy site as the size of modern wind turbines increase. A short term project co-locating a Sound Detection and Ranging System (SODAR) with a 200 meter instrumented meteorological tower at the Texas Tech Wind Technology Field Site was performed to collect and summarize wind information through an atmospheric layer typical of utility scale rotor plane depths. Data collected identified large speed shears and directional shears that may lead to unbalanced loads on the rotors. This report identifies suggestions for incorporation of additional data in wind resource assessments and a few thoughts on the potential for using a SODAR or SODAR data to quantify or investigate other parameters that may be significant to the wind industry.

  3. Enertech 2-kW high-reliability wind system. Phase II. Fabrication and testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cordes, J A; Johnson, B A

    1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-reliability wind machine rated for 2 kW in a 9 m/s wind has been developed. Activities are summarized that are centered on the fabrication and testing of prototypes of the wind machine. The test results verified that the wind machine met the power output specification and that the variable-pitch rotor effectively controlled the rotor speed for wind speeds up to 50 mph. Three prototypes of the wind machine were shipped to the Rocky Flats test center in September through November of 1979. Work was also performed to reduce the start-up wind speed. The start-up wind speed to the Enertech facility has been reduced to 4.5 m/s.

  4. Nigeria`s Escravos gas project starts up

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nwokoma, M. [Chevron Nigeria Ltd., Lekki (Nigeria)

    1998-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Nigeria`s Escravos gas project, Delta state, officially began late last year. The project -- 6,650 b/d of LPG and 1,740 b/d of condensate from 165 MMscfd of gas -- is the first attempt to rid Nigeria of incessant flares that have lit the Delta skies. Operator Chevron Nigeria Ltd. believes that the Escravos project will enable the joint venture to utilize a significant portion of the gas reserves, thus reducing gas flaring. The paper describes the background of the project, the gas fields, transport pipeline, process design, construction, and start-up.

  5. Long Pulse EBW Start-up Experiments in MAST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shevchenko, V F; Caughman, J B; Diem, S; Mailloux, J; Brien, M R O; Peng, M; Saveliev, A N; Takase, Y; Tanaka, H; Taylor, G

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The non-solenoid start-up technique reported here relies on a double mode conversion for electron Bernstein wave (EBW) excitation. It consists of the mode conversion of the ordinary mode, entering the plasma from the low field side of the tokamak, into the extraordinary (X) mode at a mirror-polarizer located at the high field side. The X mode propagates back to the plasma, passes through electron cyclotron resonance and experiences a subsequent X to EBW mode conversion near the upper hybrid resonance. Finally the excited EBW mode is totally absorbed at the Doppler shifted electron cyclotron resonance. The absorption of EBW remains high even in cold rarefied plasmas. Furthermore, EBW can generate significant plasma current giving the prospect of a fully solenoid-free plasma start-up. First experiments using this scheme were carried out on MAST [V. Shevchenko et al, Nuclear Fusion 50, 022004 (2010)]. Plasma currents up to 33 kA have been achieved using 28 GHz 100kW 90ms RF pulses. Recently experimental results ...

  6. Start-up control system and vessel for lmfbr

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durrant, O.W.; Kakarala, C.R.; Mandel, S.W.

    1987-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This patent describes a start-up vessel for a start-up system suitable for liquid metal fast breeder reactors comprising: a lower bulb defining a lower space; an upper bulb defining an upper space; a mid-section of a cross-sectional diameter less than that of the lower and upper bulbs, defining a mid-space and connected between the upper and lower bulbs; heating means associated with the lower bulb for heating water in the lower space; at least one inlet conduit connection connected to the vessel for admitting feed water to the lower space to be heated by the heating means to produce steam; at least one outlet conduit connection connected to the vessel for discharging steam; an auxiliary feed water line connected through the upper bulb having at least one nozzle at the end thereof for spraying feed water into the upper space; and a main steam inlet connection connected to the upper bulb for heating the auxiliary feed water to produce steam.

  7. Wind turbine rotor blade with in-plane sweep and devices using same, and methods for making same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wetzel, Kyle Kristopher (Lawrence, KS)

    2008-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A wind turbine includes a rotor having a hub and at least one blade having a torsionally rigid root, an inboard section, and an outboard section. The inboard section has a forward sweep relative to an elastic axis of the blade and the outboard section has an aft sweep.

  8. Wind turbine rotor blade with in-plane sweep and devices using the same, and methods for making the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wetzel, Kyle Kristopher

    2014-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A wind turbine includes a rotor having a hub and at least one blade having a torsionally rigid root, an inboard section, and an outboard section. The inboard section has a forward sweep relative to an elastic axis of the blade and the outboard section has an aft sweep.

  9. Fuel cell apparatus with rapid start-up

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farooque, M.; Novacco, L.J.

    1987-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This patent describes an apparatus comprising: a fuel cell stack including passage means having entry and exit ends, the passage means carrying a gas through the stack from the entry to the exit end; loop means for recirculating a portion of the gas leaving the exit end back to the entry end; blower means within the loop for driving the recirculation; burner means within the loop downstream of the blower means, the burner means being adapted to receive a portion of the gas in the loop and being further adapted to receive fuel from a fuel supply during start-up of the fuel cell stack; and an entry port in the loop means disposed upstream of the blower, for replenishing gas to the loop.

  10. Dual-Fuel Truck Fleet: Start-Up Experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NREL

    1998-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Although dual-fuel engine technology has been in development and limited use for several years, it has only recently moved toward full-scale operational capability for heavy-duty truck applications. Unlike a bifuel engine, which has two separate fuel systems that are used one at a time, a dual-fuel engine uses two fuel systems simultaneously. One of California's South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) current programs is a demonstration of dual-fuel engine technology in heavy-duty trucks. These trucks are being studied as part of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) Alternative Fuel Truck Program. This report describes the start-up experience from the program.

  11. Supporting the High-Technology Entrepreneur: Support Network Geographies for Semiconductor, Telecommunications Equipment, and Biotechnology Start-Ups

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kenney, Martin; Patton, Donald

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Biotechnology Start-ups April 29, 2004 BRIE Workingto encourage biotechnology start-ups, but the synergies fromcapital and Internet start-ups. This paper extends previous

  12. Multi-piece wind turbine rotor blades and wind turbines incorporating same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moroz; Emilian Mieczyslaw (San Diego, CA) [San Diego, CA

    2008-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A multisection blade for a wind turbine includes a hub extender having a pitch bearing at one end, a skirt or fairing having a hole therethrough and configured to mount over the hub extender, and an outboard section configured to couple to the pitch bearing.

  13. The single-item lot-sizing polytope with continuous start-up costs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    lot-sizing problem with continuous start-up costs. A continuous start-up cost is generated in a period whenever there is a nonzero production in the period and.

  14. 1 | P a g e Faculty Guide to Start-Ups

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapman, Michael S.

    1 | P a g e Faculty Guide to Start-Ups Sited at OHSU So you're going to be a Founder and offers this Guide as an aid to those who are forming their own "start-up" companies that are located during this period of your professional growth. A common cause of confusion during a start-up's early

  15. The College of Liberal Arts February 4, 2013 Guideline for Requesting and Accessing Start-Up

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bermúdez, José Luis

    The College of Liberal Arts February 4, 2013 Guideline for Requesting and Accessing Start-Up Funds OFFICE OF THE DEAN Guideline for Requesting and Accessing Start-Up Funds __________________________________________________________ Departments and Interdisciplinary Programs may request funding for start-up packages to offer prospective

  16. Department of Economic Development EMERGENCY RULE MAKING START-UP NY Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    Department of Economic Development EMERGENCY RULE MAKING START-UP NY Program I.D. No. EDV-31 into law the SUNY Tax-free Areas to Revitalize and Transform UPstate New York (START-UP NY) program, which affiliated with New York universities and colleges. The START-UP NY program will leverage these tax benefits

  17. Zhengzhou High Tech Start up Investment | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlinPapersWindey Wind Generating Engineering Jump

  18. Sandia National Laboratories: National Rotor Testbed Functional...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of the National Rotor Testbed: An Aeroelastically Relevant Research-Scale Wind Turbine Rotor." Approximately 60 researchers from various institutions and countries attended...

  19. Colorado Start-Up Awarded First 'America's Next Top Energy Innovator...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Energy Innovator" challenge. The challenge, which started on May 2, allows start-up companies to apply for the Department of Energy's many thousand unlicensed patents for reduced...

  20. Bruno Works gives start-ups a space in Downtown Pittsburgh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruno Works gives start-ups a space in Downtown Pittsburgh July 2, 2013 3:45 pm Kaitlynn Riely / The Pittsburgh Press John Norton was wrapping up his lunchtime talk, a how-to on maneuvering a sailboat around,500 square feet, Bruno Works is "work space for tiny little start-ups." The bright space, open for use 24

  1. Computer Automated Start-Up and Shutdown of an Air Separation Plant 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russek, S. L.; Beckowski, T. M.; Vinson, D. R.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    operator. The combined efforts of start-up, plant effic1ency, and computer process control engineers were ut1l1zed to adapt the seemingly qualHatrve art of process start-up and shutdown into well defined algorithms. In addH10n to the start...

  2. Start-up Optimization of a Combined Cycle Power Plant A. Linda, E. Sllberga,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Keywords: Combined Cycle Power Plants, Start-up, Dynamic optimization, Optimica, Control, Modelica are obtained by simulating Modelica power plant models. The study has been carried out to de- velop simplified

  3. Growth strategies : how software start-ups can leverage alliances, acquisitions, IPOs and venture capital

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ybanez, Sergio D

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The identification of the different factors impacting a software start-up company's decision to pursue an alliance, acquisition, IPO or venture capital to sustain growth is the main objective of this research study. First ...

  4. The role of venture capitalists in financing and developing high-technology start-ups

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hsu, David H

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation addresses the interaction between venture capitalists (VCs) and start-up development through three essays. A common theme is that VCs serve important extra-financial and information brokering roles. In ...

  5. University of Minnesota Start-up Guide Office for Technology Commercialization (OTC) -Venture Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amin, S. Massoud

    ....................................................................................... 18 APPENDIX D: UNIVERSITY FUNDING OPPORTUNITIESUniversity of Minnesota Start-up Guide Office for Technology Commercialization (OTC) - Venture on University of Minnesota research Revised September 2010 1000 Westgate Drive: Suite 160 St. Paul, MN 55114 612

  6. Business plan of starting up a health checkup business in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Weibo, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A health checkup business provides services to examine the customer's health status. This thesis has been developed to understand the heath preventive market and prepare a business plan of starting up high-tier checkup ...

  7. Commissioning and Start Up of a 110 MegaWatt Cogeneration Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Good, R.

    manufacturing facility constraints 4. Mechanical problems 5. Electrical problems 6. Control system/instrumentation problems The commissioning and start up had to be coordinated with existing Plant operations. As a result of the Project Team's efforts...

  8. Fuel Cell Housing for Rapid Start-Up Auxiliary Power and Gas...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fuel Cell Housing for Rapid Start-Up Auxiliary Power and Gas Separation Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Contact LBL About This Technology In tests of the new fuel cell stack...

  9. Computer Automated Start-Up and Shutdown of an Air Separation Plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russek, S. L.; Beckowski, T. M.; Vinson, D. R.

    ~ .. COMPUTER AUTOMATED START-UP AND SHUTDOWN OF AN AIR SEPARATION PLANT S. L. Russek, T. M. Beckowksl, D. R. Vlnson Alr Products and Chemlcals, Inc., Allentown, PA ABSTRACT Process control computers have gal ned wlde acceptance wlthln...-of-day" electrlc power rates are causlng many companles to conslder lntermlttent operatlon; thls has also provlded the 1mpetus for computer automated start-up and shutdown. Alr Products and Chemlcals, Inc. has 1mplemented a computer automated start...

  10. Sandia Energy - Innovative Offshore Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine Rotors Home Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Wind Energy Offshore Wind Innovative Offshore Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine Rotors Innovative...

  11. Double Side Control of Wound Rotor Induction Machine for Wind Energy Application Employing Half Controlled

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lipo, Thomas

    the cost of a wind generator system, a new configuration using half controlled converters for both the required KVA rating of both machine side and line side converters, improves the efficiency of the wind generator, helps operating over a wide speed range and supports near unity power factor interface

  12. Starting up a new U.S. Department of Energy Analytical Laboratory at the Hanford site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grabbe, R.R.

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new analytical chemistry laboratory was constructed on the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington by the U.S. Department of Energy to provide radiochemistry, inorganic, and organic analytical services. The laboratory is staffed and operated by Westinghouse Hanford Company, the U.S. Department of Energy contractor of the government-owned contractor-operated site. The start-up process, after laboratory construction and analytical equipment installation, requires a safety analysis report, approved analytical procedures, training, a plant {open_quotes}readiness review{close_quotes} by Westinghouse Hanford Company, and final approval for start-up by the U.S. Department of Energy.

  13. Experimental and Theoretical Studies on the Start-Up Operation of a Multivessel Batch Distillation Column

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    Experimental and Theoretical Studies on the Start-Up Operation of a Multivessel Batch DistillationVersity of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway Multivessel batch distillation is a promising alternative to conventional batch distillation. Earlier studies proved the feasibility of temperature control in a closed

  14. First LNG from North field overcomes feed, start-up problems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Redha, A.; Rahman, A.; Al-Thani, N.H. [Qatar Liquefied Gas Co., Doha (Qatar); Ishikura, Masayuki; Kikkawa, Yoshitsugi [Chiyoda Corp., Yokohama (Japan)

    1998-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Qatar Gas LNG is the first LNG project in the gas-development program of the world`s largest gas reservoir, North field. The LNG plant was completed within the budget and schedule. The paper discusses the LNG plant design, LNG storage and loading, alternative mercaptan removal, layout modification, information and control systems, training, data management systems, start-up, and performance testing.

  15. Les facteurs stratgiques influenant l'valuation des start-ups par les capitaux-risqueurs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    , valuation method. hal-00951565,version1-25Feb2014 Manuscrit auteur, publié dans "Management & Avenir 9, 49'évaluation. Strategic factors influencing start-ups' valuation by venture capitalists Abstract A new venture valuation and develops an integrated theoretical framework to investigate new valuation. Statistical analyses

  16. Economic Lot-Sizing with Start-up Costs: The Convex Hull

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Hoesel, C. P. M.

    A partial description of the convex hull of solutions to the economic lot-sizing problem with start-up costs (ELSS) has been derived recently. Here a larger class of valid inequalities is given and it is shown that these ...

  17. Examination of microbial fuel cell start-up times with domestic wastewater and additional amendments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    biological process used for wastewater treatment is desirable to avoid discharge of untreated wastewaterExamination of microbial fuel cell start-up times with domestic wastewater and additional Available online 30 April 2011 Keywords: Microbial fuel cell Domestic wastewater Startup time Substrate a b

  18. Supplementary Information Pre-enrichment procedure for enhanced start-up of anaerobic facultatively

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Supplementary Information Pre-enrichment procedure for enhanced start-up of anaerobic-814-963-7908, Fax 1-814-863-7304, E-mail blogan@psu.edu #12;2 Fig. S1 Steps for (a) general pre-enrichment procedure for development of anaerobic biocathodes and (b) pre-enrichment for development of facultatively autotrophic

  19. Sandia National Laboratories: National Rotor Testbed

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy, SWIFT, Systems Analysis, Wind Energy The National Rotor Testbed (NRT) team is examining the effect of airfoil choice on the final design of the new rotor for the Scaled...

  20. Design, construction and start-up of a modern coke plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, A.E.

    1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The planning and design of a 60-oven, 6m replacement coke battery and associated by-products plant for Republic Steel Corp, Chicago, are described together with the constructional methods used and problems experienced through start-up of the facility. Pushing emission control is achieved with a Mitsubishi-type land-based system and changing emission control with a Nippon Steel combination car and land-based system. A Takahax-Hirohax coke-oven gas desulphurization unit is included in the by-product plant. Construction began in March 1979 with the first push in December 1981.

  1. Sandia National Laboratories: functional rotor scaling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) SciTechAmerican Society of Mechanical Engineers Wind Energy Symposium titled, "Definition of the National Rotor Testbed: An Aeroelastically...

  2. Sandia National Laboratories: Wind Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wind Energy National Rotor Testbed Rotor Design Integrated Airfoil Performance Results On February 24, 2015, in Computational Modeling & Simulation, Energy, Facilities, News, News...

  3. START-UP AND RAMP-UP OF THE PLT TOKAMAK BY LOWER HYBRID WAVES F . C . Jobes et al.--

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karney, Charles

    START-UP AND RAMP-UP OF THE PLT TOKAMAK BY LOWER HYBRID WAVES F . C . Jobes et al.- - AUGUST 1985 LAB PRINCETON UNI PRINCETON, NEW JERSEY Link: http://charles.karney.info/biblio/jobes86.html #12;START-UP AND RAMP-UP OF THE PLT MKAMAK BY LOWER HYBRID WAVES F.C. Jobes, S. Bernabei, T.K. Chu, N.J. Fisch, W

  4. Sandia National Laboratories: rotor structural verification

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Renewable Energy, SWIFT, Wind Energy Rotor fixation stands, one for each Scaled Wind Farm Technology (SWiFT) facility turbine, have been built. The stands will be used to...

  5. Sandia National Laboratories: Wind Power

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wind Energy Staff On March 24, 2011, in Wind Energy On November 10, 2010, in Wind Plant Opt. Rotor Innovation Materials, Reliability & Standards Siting & Barrier Mitigation...

  6. WIND ENERGY Wind Energ. (2014)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peinke, Joachim

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    loads from the wind inflow through rotor aerodynamics, drive train and power electronics is stillWIND ENERGY Wind Energ. (2014) Published online in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary wind inflow conditions M. R. Luhur, J. Peinke, J. Schneemann and M. Wächter ForWind-Center for Wind

  7. Start-up and ramp-up of the PLT tokamak by lower hybrid waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jobes, F.C.; Bernabei, S.; Chu, T.K.; Fisch, N.J.; Hooke, W.M.; Karney, C.F.F.; Merservey, E.B.; Motley, R.W.; Stevens, J.E.; von Goeler, S.

    1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lower hybrid waves have been used on the PLT tokamak both to start the plasma current and to ramp it up from pre-existing levels. The waves, at 800 MHz, were launched from a 6-waveguide grill. The phasing between adjacent guides could be selected electronically, and thus the launched spectrum could be set and changed at will. For start-up, the waveguide phase difference was initially set at 0/sup 0/ in order to create a plasma, then switched to 90/sup 0/ to drive the current. Over 100 kA of plasma current, at a density of 0.5 to 1 x 10/sup 12/ cm/sup -3/, was generated in this manner. Ramp-up experiments were performed under a wide variety of conditions. The most efficient ramp-up was found at the lowest plasma densities and with the fastest launched spectrum (n/sub e/ approx. 2 x 10/sup 12/ cm/sup -3/, N/sub parallel/ approx. 1.6 peak); approx.20% of the launched RF power was converted to (increased) poloidal field energy. All of the ramp-up results are in excellent agreement with a theory which determines the efficiency of ramp-up from the consideration of the relative energy losses of the superthermal current-carrying electrons to collisions and to the opposing inductive E-field.

  8. Evaluation of Neutron Radiography Reactor LEU-Core Start-Up Measurements

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    None

    2014-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Benchmark models were developed to evaluate the cold-critical start-up measurements performed during the fresh core reload of the Neutron Radiography (NRAD) reactor with Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel. Experiments include criticality, control-rod worth measurements, shutdown margin, and excess reactivity for four core loadings with 56, 60, 62, and 64 fuel elements. The worth of four graphite reflector block assemblies and an empty dry tube used for experiment irradiations were also measured and evaluated for the 60-fuel-element core configuration. Dominant uncertainties in the experimental keff come from uncertainties in the manganese content and impurities in the stainless steel fuel cladding asmore »well as the 236U and erbium poison content in the fuel matrix. Calculations with MCNP5 and ENDF/B-VII.0 neutron nuclear data are approximately 1.4% (9?) greater than the benchmark model eigenvalues, which is commonly seen in Monte Carlo simulations of other TRIGA reactors. Simulations of the worth measurements are within the 2? uncertainty for most of the benchmark experiment worth values. The complete benchmark evaluation details are available in the 2014 edition of the International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments.« less

  9. The start-up of the DIOS pilot plant (DIOS Project)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sawada, Terutoshi

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The DIOS process has been successfully developed as an 8-year project commenced in April 1988. Based on the results of the element studies reported at the previous conference and at other meetings, the pilot plant, with a designed capacity of 500 t/d, was constructed and started up in october 1993. After the starting operation with the single smelting reduction furnace in the beginning of the first campaign, the pilot plant has been principally operated in integration, that is, with the smelting reduction furnace connected with the preheating and prereduction furnaces. So far five campaigns have been successfully conducted on schedule. The operation has been improved gradually and the designed performance has been achieved. New processes are targeted at the direct use of coal and iron ore fines to eliminate not only the problematic coke ovens but also pellet and sinter plants. The direct smelting reduction processes currently at the most advanced stage of development are the DIOS in Japan, the AISI in the USA and the HIsmelt in Australia.

  10. Evaluation of Neutron Radiography Reactor LEU-Core Start-Up Measurements

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    None

    2014-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Benchmark models were developed to evaluate the cold-critical start-up measurements performed during the fresh core reload of the Neutron Radiography (NRAD) reactor with Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel. Experiments include criticality, control-rod worth measurements, shutdown margin, and excess reactivity for four core loadings with 56, 60, 62, and 64 fuel elements. The worth of four graphite reflector block assemblies and an empty dry tube used for experiment irradiations were also measured and evaluated for the 60-fuel-element core configuration. Dominant uncertainties in the experimental keff come from uncertainties in the manganese content and impurities in the stainless steel fuel cladding as well as the 236U and erbium poison content in the fuel matrix. Calculations with MCNP5 and ENDF/B-VII.0 neutron nuclear data are approximately 1.4% (9?) greater than the benchmark model eigenvalues, which is commonly seen in Monte Carlo simulations of other TRIGA reactors. Simulations of the worth measurements are within the 2? uncertainty for most of the benchmark experiment worth values. The complete benchmark evaluation details are available in the 2014 edition of the International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments.

  11. Evaluation of Neutron Radiography Reactor LEU-Core Start-Up Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2014-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Benchmark models were developed to evaluate the cold-critical start-up measurements performed during the fresh core reload of the Neutron Radiography (NRAD) reactor with Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel. Experiments include criticality, control-rod worth measurements, shutdown margin, and excess reactivity for four core loadings with 56, 60, 62, and 64 fuel elements. The worth of four graphite reflector block assemblies and an empty dry tube used for experiment irradiations were also measured and evaluated for the 60-fuel-element core configuration. Dominant uncertainties in the experimental keff come from uncertainties in the manganese content and impurities in the stainless steel fuel cladding as well as the 236U and erbium poison content in the fuel matrix. Calculations with MCNP5 and ENDF/B-VII.0 neutron nuclear data are approximately 1.4% (9?) greater than the benchmark model eigenvalues, which is commonly seen in Monte Carlo simulations of other TRIGA reactors. Simulations of the worth measurements are within the 2? uncertainty for most of the benchmark experiment worth values. The complete benchmark evaluation details are available in the 2014 edition of the International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments.

  12. No. 2 battery design and start-up at Bethlehem`s Burns Harbor Div.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mayton, L.R. [Bethlehem Steel Corp., Chesteron, IN (United States); Buss, W.E. [Thyssen Still Otto Technical Services, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On November 1, 1993, the No. 2 battery at the Burns Harbor Div. was shutdown in preparation for a pad up rebuild. Work for this project had been ongoing for several years. Awarding of the turnkey contract for the rebuild had occurred in Sept. 1992, to a Davy International/Davy Songer joint venture and Thyssen Still Otto for the design and construction of the facility. The project was to include the replacement of the existing 82 oven facility, utilizing the latest in battery design and technology. The overall design philosophy was to construct a battery having a 30-year operational life capability, incorporating emission control systems to comply with existing and future Clean Air Act regulation. Construction work for the project was completed two months ahead of schedule, with the first charges made on Dec. 17, 1994. Beginning with the first pushes on the following day, the battery began stable operations at the 24-hr coking rate Jan. 3, 1995. At that time, production began increasing in planned states, with the designed coking rate achieved on March 13. The paper will detail the overall design philosophy for No. 2 battery along with related facilities, highlight key features of the design providing for 30-year life and environmental compliance, review the start-up and detail current operational performance.

  13. Start-up and control method and apparatus for resonant free piston Stirling engine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Walsh, Michael M. (Schenectady, NY)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A resonant free-piston Stirling engine having a new and improved start-up and control method and system. A displacer linear electrodynamic machine is provided having an armature secured to and movable with the displacer and having a stator supported by the Stirling engine housing in juxtaposition to the armature. A control excitation circuit is provided for electrically exciting the displacer linear electrodynamic machine with electrical excitation signals having substantially the same frequency as the desired frequency of operation of the Stirling engine. The excitation control circuit is designed so that it selectively and controllably causes the displacer electrodynamic machine to function either as a generator load to extract power from the displacer or the control circuit selectively can be operated to cause the displacer electrodynamic machine to operate as an electric drive motor to apply additional input power to the displacer in addition to the thermodynamic power feedback to the displacer whereby the displacer linear electrodynamic machine also is used in the electric drive motor mode as a means for initially starting the resonant free-piston Stirling engine.

  14. A pulse width modulated picket fence pulser to reduce accelerator start-up transients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reass, William A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Balmes, Anthony A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bradley, Joseph T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Netz, Dana [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sandoval, Jacob B [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes a solid state modulator used to control the input beam to the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center 'LANSCE' 800 MeV accelerator. This electrostatic Ground Level Deflector (GLD) chops the beam after the 750 keV injection energy. Two GLD's are utilized, one for the 'H+' beam and another for the 'H-' beam. These modulators are mounted on the vacuum beam pipe and directly operate sets of deflection plates. To minimize the accelerator beam start up transients, the beam is let into the accelerator cavity structures by a pulse width modulated picket fence operating between 0 and 12 kV. As the deflection plate structure appears as a capacitive load, a totem-pole switching network is utilized to facilitate rise and fall times of {approx}50 ns that is able to sink and source current to minimize beam induced sidewall activation. This paper will describe the system design and provides operational results as now presently utilized on the LANSCE accelerator system.

  15. Control of Induction Motor with Cbrientation on Rotor Flux or on Stator Flux in a very wide Field Weakening Regiori -

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paderborn, Universität

    inductance of stator and rotor winding (Ls = L, = L,,, +Lo is assumed here). Rotor speed. Number of pole pairs. Resistances of stator and rotor winding. Rotor time constant. Electromagnetic torque. Load torqueControl of Induction Motor with Cbrientation on Rotor Flux or on Stator Flux in a very wide Field

  16. Estimation of Wind Speed in Connection to a Wind Turbine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Estimation of Wind Speed in Connection to a Wind Turbine X. Ma #3; , N. K. Poulsen #3; , H. Bindner y December 20, 1995 Abstract The wind speed varies over the rotor plane of wind turbine making the wind speed on the rotor plane will be estimated by using a wind turbine as a wind measuring device

  17. PRELIMINARY DATA CALL REPORT ADVANCED BURNER REACTOR START UP FUEL FABRICATION FACILITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. T. Khericha

    2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide data for preparation of a NEPA Environmental Impact Statement in support the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP). One of the GNEP objectives is to reduce the inventory of long lived actinide from the light water reactor (LWR) spent fuel. The LWR spent fuel contains Plutonium (Pu) -239 and other transuranics (TRU) such as Americium-241. One of the options is to transmute or burn these actinides in fast neutron spectra as well as generate the electricity. A sodium-cooled Advanced Recycling Reactor (ARR) concept has been proposed to achieve this goal. However, fuel with relatively high TRU content has not been used in the fast reactor. To demonstrate the utilization of TRU fuel in a fast reactor, an Advanced Burner Reactor (ABR) prototype of ARR is proposed, which would necessarily be started up using weapons grade (WG) Pu fuel. The WG Pu is distinguished by relatively highest proportions of Pu-239 and lesser amount of other actinides. The WG Pu will be used as the startup fuel along with TRU fuel in lead test assemblies. Because such fuel is not currently being produced in the US, a new facility (or new capability in an existing facility) is being considered for fabrication of WG Pu fuel for the ABR. This report is provided in response to ‘Data Call’ for the construction of startup fuel fabrication facility. It is anticipated that the facility will provide the startup fuel for 10-15 years and will take to 3 to 5 years to construct.

  18. Start-up fuel and power flattening of sodium-cooled candle core

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takaki, Naoyuki; Sagawa, Yu; Umino, Akitake [Department of Nuclear Safety Engineering, Tokyo City University 1-28-1 Tamazutsumi, Setagaya, Tokyo 158-8557 (Japan); Sekimoto, Hiroshi [University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The hard neutron spectrum and unique power shape of CANDLE enable its distinctive performances such as achieving high burnup more than 30% and exempting necessity of both enrichment and reprocessing. On the other hand, they also cause several challenging problems. One is how the initial fuel can be prepared to start up the first CANDLE reactor because the equilibrium fuel composition that enables stable CANDLE burning is complex both in axial and radial directions. Another prominent problem is high radial power peaking factor that worsens averaged burnup, namely resource utilization factor in once-through mode and shorten the life time of structure materials. The purposes of this study are to solve these two problems. Several ideas for core configurations and startup fuel using single enrichment uranium and iron as a substitute of fission products are studied. As a result, it is found that low enriched uranium is applicable to ignite the core but all concepts examined here exceeded heat limits. Adjustment in enrichment and height of active and burnt zone is opened for future work. Sodium duct assemblies and thorium fuel assemblies loaded in the center region are studied as measures to reduce radial power peaking factor. Replacing 37 fuels by thorium fuel assemblies in the zeroth to third row provides well-balanced performance with flattened radial power distribution. The CANDLE core loaded with natural uranium in the outer and thorium in the center region achieved 35.6% of averaged burnup and 7.0 years of cladding life time owing to mitigated local fast neutron irradiation at the center. Using thorium with natural or depleted uranium in CANDLE reactor is also beneficial to diversifying fission resource and extending available term of fission energy without expansion of needs for enrichment and reprocessing.

  19. Evaluation of the use of condensate filters up-stream of condensate polishers during start-up

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Revere, A. [Pacific Gas and Electric Co., San Francisco, CA (United States); Ryan, J. [Pacific Gas and Electric Co., Pittsburg, CA (United States). Pittsburg Power Plant

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Condensate clean-up is a necessity before light-off of a supercritical boiler. It is a rate-limiting step. Pacific Gas and Electric Company`s Pittsburg Power Plant installed a start-up condensate polishing filter before the condensate polishers containing eighty-five, forty-inch long, five micron absolute rated filter cartridges to remove corrosion products. The filter has consistently decreased the amount of suspended solids during circulation for clean-up and reduced start-up times by several hours.

  20. Tokamak start-up with electron-cyclotron heating This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sprott, Julien Clinton

    Tokamak start-up with electron-cyclotron heating This article has been downloaded from IOPscience September 1979 Final manuscript received 6 August 1981) TOKAMAK START-UP WITH ELECTRON- CYCLOTRON HEATING D States of America) ABSTRACT. Experiments are described in which the start-up voltage in a tokamak

  1. "Best practices" for student start-ups Innovation and the translation of inventions into products that serve the public are deeply ingrained in Stanford's culture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Puglisi, Joseph

    "Best practices" for student start-ups 8-2-12 Innovation and the translation of inventions to avoiding either perceived or actual conflict of interest issues with respect to start-ups. Both Stanford of interest (COI) when licensing Stanford intellectual property to a start-up is considered. OTL makes

  2. Wind Turbine Blade Test Definition of the DeWind DW90 Rotor Blade: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-09-326

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughes, S.

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This CRADA was developed as a funds-in CRADA with DeWind to assess the suitability of facilities and equipment at the NWTC for performing certification blade testing on wind turbine blades made from advanced materials. DeWind produces a wind turbine blade which includes the use of high-strength and stiffness materials. NREL and DeWind had a mutual interest in defining the necessary facilities, equipment, and test methods for testing large wind turbine blades which incorporate advanced materials and adaptive structures, as the demands on test equipment and infrastructure are greater than current capabilities. Work under this CRADA would enable DeWind to verify domestic capability for certification-class static and fatigue testing, while NREL would be able to identify and develop specialized test capabilities based on the test requirements.

  3. Structural health and prognostics management for offshore wind turbines : case studies of rotor fault and blade damage with initial O&M cost modeling.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myrent, Noah J. [Purdue Center for Systems Integrity, Lafayette, IN; Kusnick, Joshua F. [Purdue Center for Systems Integrity, Lafayette, IN; Barrett, Natalie C. [Purdue Center for Systems Integrity, Lafayette, IN; Adams, Douglas E. [Purdue Center for Systems Integrity, Lafayette, IN; Griffith, Daniel Todd

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Operations and maintenance costs for offshore wind plants are significantly higher than the current costs for land-based (onshore) wind plants. One way to reduce these costs would be to implement a structural health and prognostic management (SHPM) system as part of a condition based maintenance paradigm with smart load management and utilize a state-based cost model to assess the economics associated with use of the SHPM system. To facilitate the development of such a system a multi-scale modeling approach developed in prior work is used to identify how the underlying physics of the system are affected by the presence of damage and faults, and how these changes manifest themselves in the operational response of a full turbine. This methodology was used to investigate two case studies: (1) the effects of rotor imbalance due to pitch error (aerodynamic imbalance) and mass imbalance and (2) disbond of the shear web; both on a 5-MW offshore wind turbine in the present report. Based on simulations of damage in the turbine model, the operational measurements that demonstrated the highest sensitivity to the damage/faults were the blade tip accelerations and local pitching moments for both imbalance and shear web disbond. The initial cost model provided a great deal of insight into the estimated savings in operations and maintenance costs due to the implementation of an effective SHPM system. The integration of the health monitoring information and O&M cost versus damage/fault severity information provides the initial steps to identify processes to reduce operations and maintenance costs for an offshore wind farm while increasing turbine availability, revenue, and overall profit.

  4. A multi-scale approach to statistical and model-based structural health monitoring with application to embedded sensing for wind energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Stuart Glynn

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    comparison in a composite wind turbine rotor blade." Thecrack detection in composite wind turbine blades." Thecomparison in a composite wind turbine rotor blade,"

  5. About Armstrong Coal Company In just a few short years, Armstrong Coal has grown from a start-up

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Kathleen

    About Armstrong Coal Company In just a few short years, Armstrong Coal has grown from a start-up to one of the leading producers of steam coal in the Illinois Basin. The company specializes in providing custom-blended coal to meet the needs of electric power plants throughout the region. Controlling

  6. DART's (Dallas Area Rapid Transit) LNG Bus Fleet Start-Up Experience (Alternative Fuel Transit Buses Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Battelle

    2000-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This report, based on interviews and site visits conducted in October 1999, describes the start-up activities of the DART liquefied natural gas program, identifying problem areas, highlighting successes, and capturing the lessons learned in DART's ongoing efforts to remain at the forefront of the transit industry.

  7. Sandia Energy - Innovative Offshore Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Innovative Offshore Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine Rotors Home Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Wind Energy Offshore Wind Innovative Offshore Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine...

  8. Wind turbine/generator set and method of making same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bevington, Christopher M.; Bywaters, Garrett L.; Coleman, Clint C.; Costin, Daniel P.; Danforth, William L.; Lynch, Jonathan A.; Rolland, Robert H.

    2013-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A wind turbine comprising an electrical generator that includes a rotor assembly. A wind rotor that includes a wind rotor hub is directly coupled to the rotor assembly via a simplified connection. The wind rotor and generator rotor assembly are rotatably mounted on a central spindle via a bearing assembly. The wind rotor hub includes an opening having a diameter larger than the outside diameter of the central spindle adjacent the bearing assembly so as to allow access to the bearing assembly from a cavity inside the wind rotor hub. The spindle is attached to a turret supported by a tower. Each of the spindle, turret and tower has an interior cavity that permits personnel to traverse therethrough to the cavity of the wind rotor hub. The wind turbine further includes a frictional braking system for slowing, stopping or keeping stopped the rotation of the wind rotor and rotor assembly.

  9. Wind turbine having a direct-drive drivetrain

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bevington, Christopher M.; Bywaters, Garrett L.; Coleman, Clint C.; Costin, Daniel P.; Danforth, William L.; Lynch, Jonathan A.; Rolland, Robert H.

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A wind turbine comprising an electrical generator that includes a rotor assembly. A wind rotor that includes a wind rotor hub is directly coupled to the rotor assembly via a simplified connection. The wind rotor and generator rotor assembly are rotatably mounted on a central spindle via a bearing assembly. The wind rotor hub includes an opening having a diameter larger than the outside diameter of the central spindle adjacent the bearing assembly so as to allow access to the bearing assembly from a cavity inside the wind rotor hub. The spindle is attached to a turret supported by a tower. Each of the spindle, turret and tower has an interior cavity that permits personnel to traverse therethrough to the cavity of the wind rotor hub. The wind turbine further includes a frictional braking system for slowing, stopping or keeping stopped the rotation of the wind rotor and rotor assembly.

  10. Robi, Robichaud, Wind Technologies and Evolving Opportunities

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    RPS * Wind Technology Overview * Larger Rotors * Taller Towers * Improved Controls * Wind Resource * Improved Assessment 2 Innova+on for Our Energy Future National Wind Technology...

  11. Assessment study of RELAP5/MOD2, CYCLE 36. 04 based on spray start-up test for DOEL-4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moeyaert, P.; Stubbe, E.

    1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents an assessment study for the code RELAP-5 MOD-2 based on a pressurizer spray start-up test of the Doel-4 power plant. Doel-4 is a three loop WESTINGHOUSE PWR plant ordered by the EBES utility with a nominal power rating of 1000 MWe and equipped with preheater type E steam generators. A large series of commissioning tests are normally performed on new plants, of which the so called pressurizer spray and heater test (SU-PR-01) was performed on February 2nd 1985. TRACTEBEL, being the Architect-Engineer for this plant was closely involved with all start-up tests and was responsible for the final approval of the tests.

  12. Optimization of a Savonius rotor vertical-axis wind turbine for use in water pumping systems in rural Honduras

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zingman, Aron (Aron Olesen)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The D-lab Honduras team designed and constructed a wind-powered water pump in rural Honduras during IAP 2007. Currently, the system does not work under its own power and water must be pumped by hand. This thesis seeks to ...

  13. Study of plasma start-up initiated by second harmonic electron cyclotron resonance heating on WEGA experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Preynas, M.; Laqua, H. P.; Otte, M.; Stange, T.; Aßmus, D. [Max Planck Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, D-17491 Greifswald (Germany); Wauters, T. [Association Euratom-Belgian State, LPP-ERM/KMS, 1000 Brussels (Belgium)

    2014-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Although both 1st harmonic ordinary mode (O1) and 2nd harmonic extra-ordinary mode (X2) have been successfully used to initiate pre-ionization and breakdown in many devices, a complete theoretical model is still missing to explain the success of this method. Moreover, some experimental observations are not completely understood, such as what occurs during the delay time between the turn-on of ECRH power and first signals of density or light measurements. Since during this free period the ECRH power has to be absorbed by in-vessel components, it is of prime importance to know what governs this delay time. Recently, dedicated start-up experiments have been performed on WEGA, using a 28 GHz ECRH system in X2-mode. This machine has the interesting capability to be run also as a tokamak allowing comparative experiments between stellarator (?/2? > 0) and tokamak (?/2? = 0) configurations. Different scans in heating power, neutral gas pressure, and rotational transform (?) show clearly that the start-up is a two step process. A first step following the turn-on of the ECRH power during which no measurable electron density (or just above the noise level in some cases), ECE and radiated power is detected. Its duration depends strongly on the level of injected power. The second step corresponds to the gas ionization and plasma expansion phase, with a velocity of density build-up and filling-up of the vessel volume depending mainly on pressure, gas and rotational transform. Moreover, an interesting scenario of ECRH pre-ionization without loop voltage in tokamak configuration by applying a small optimal vertical field is relevant for start-up assistance on future experiments like ITER. The results from this experimental parametric study are useful for the modeling of the start-up assisted by the second harmonic electron cyclotron resonance heating. The aim of this work is to establish predictive scenarios for both ITER and W7-X operation.

  14. WIND ENERGY Wind Energ. (2014)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the near wake. In conclusion, WiTTS performs satisfactorily in the rotor region of wind turbine wakes under neutral stability. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. KEYWORDS wind turbine wake; wake model; self in wind farms along several rows and columns. Because wind turbines generate wakes that propagate downwind

  15. Separators for flywheel rotors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bender, D.A.; Kuklo, T.C.

    1998-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A separator forms a connection between the rotors of a concentric rotor assembly. This separator allows for the relatively free expansion of outer rotors away from inner rotors while providing a connection between the rotors that is strong enough to prevent disassembly. The rotor assembly includes at least two rotors referred to as inner and outer flywheel rings or rotors. This combination of inner flywheel ring, separator, and outer flywheel ring may be nested to include an arbitrary number of concentric rings. The separator may be a segmented or continuous ring that abuts the ends of the inner rotor and the inner bore of the outer rotor. It is supported against centrifugal loads by the outer rotor and is affixed to the outer rotor. The separator is allowed to slide with respect to the inner rotor. It is made of a material that has a modulus of elasticity that is lower than that of the rotors. 10 figs.

  16. Separators for flywheel rotors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bender, Donald A. (Dublin, CA); Kuklo, Thomas C. (Oakdale, CA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A separator forms a connection between the rotors of a concentric rotor assembly. This separator allows for the relatively free expansion of outer rotors away from inner rotors while providing a connection between the rotors that is strong enough to prevent disassembly. The rotor assembly includes at least two rotors referred to as inner and outer flywheel rings or rotors. This combination of inner flywheel ring, separator, and outer flywheel ring may be nested to include an arbitrary number of concentric rings. The separator may be a segmented or continuous ring that abuts the ends of the inner rotor and the inner bore of the outer rotor. It is supported against centrifugal loads by the outer rotor and is affixed to the outer rotor. The separator is allowed to slide with respect to the inner rotor. It is made of a material that has a modulus of elasticity that is lower than that of the rotors.

  17. DOE and Sandia National Laboratories Develop National Rotor Testbed...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) are designing a modern, research-quality wind turbine rotor for use at the new Scaled Wind Farm Technology (SWiFT) site at Texas Tech...

  18. Texas Fluid Dynamics Meeting, 2013 STABILITY OF ROTOR WAKES.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tinney, Charles E.

    to the presence of multiple helical fila- ments. Wakes of helicopter rotors, wind turbines and ma- rine propellers% confidence interval at wake ages, : 10 - 80. Dashed lines are separated by r /r = 3 in the wake of windTexas Fluid Dynamics Meeting, 2013 STABILITY OF ROTOR WAKES. Swathi M. Mula & Charles. E. Tinney

  19. How Does a Wind Turbine Work?

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Wind turbines operate on a simple principle. The energy in the wind turns two or three propeller-like blades around a rotor. The rotor is connected to the main shaft, which spins a generator to...

  20. Single rotor turbine engine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Platts, David A. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There has been invented a turbine engine with a single rotor which cools the engine, functions as a radial compressor, pushes air through the engine to the ignition point, and acts as an axial turbine for powering the compressor. The invention engine is designed to use a simple scheme of conventional passage shapes to provide both a radial and axial flow pattern through the single rotor, thereby allowing the radial intake air flow to cool the turbine blades and turbine exhaust gases in an axial flow to be used for energy transfer. In an alternative embodiment, an electric generator is incorporated in the engine to specifically adapt the invention for power generation. Magnets are embedded in the exhaust face of the single rotor proximate to a ring of stationary magnetic cores with windings to provide for the generation of electricity. In this alternative embodiment, the turbine is a radial inflow turbine rather than an axial turbine as used in the first embodiment. Radial inflow passages of conventional design are interleaved with radial compressor passages to allow the intake air to cool the turbine blades.

  1. Lessons learned from an installation perspective for chemical demilitarization plant start-up at four operating incineration sites.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Motz, L.; Decision and Information Sciences

    2011-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This study presents the lessons learned by chemical storage installations as they prepared for the start of chemical demilitarization plant operations at the four current chemical incinerator sites in Alabama, Arkansas, Oregon, and Utah. The study included interviews with persons associated with the process and collection of available documents prepared at each site. The goal was to provide useful information for the chemical weapons storage sites in Colorado and Kentucky that will be going through plant start-up in the next few years. The study is not a compendium of what to do and what not to do. The information has been categorized into ten lessons learned; each is discussed individually. Documents that may be useful to the Colorado and Kentucky sites are included in the appendices. This study should be used as a basis for planning and training.

  2. Women & early-stage entrepreneurship : examining the impact of the venture funding crisis on male and female-led technology start-ups

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swaminathan, Shuba

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Women in technology have always been a minority and the number of women who are founders of venture backed start-ups is even lower. This research empirically investigates venture capital funding received by entrepreneurs ...

  3. Wind turbine/generator set having a stator cooling system located between stator frame and active coils

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bevington, Christopher M.; Bywaters, Garrett L.; Coleman, Clint C.; Costin, Daniel P.; Danforth, William L.; Lynch, Jonathan A.; Rolland, Robert H.

    2012-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A wind turbine comprising an electrical generator that includes a rotor assembly. A wind rotor that includes a wind rotor hub is directly coupled to the rotor assembly via a simplified connection. The wind rotor and generator rotor assembly are rotatably mounted on a central spindle via a bearing assembly. The wind rotor hub includes an opening having a diameter larger than the outside diameter of the central spindle adjacent the bearing assembly so as to allow access to the bearing assembly from a cavity inside the wind rotor hub. The spindle is attached to a turret supported by a tower. Each of the spindle, turret and tower has an interior cavity that permits personnel to traverse therethrough to the cavity of the wind rotor hub. The wind turbine further includes a frictional braking system for slowing, stopping or keeping stopped the rotation of the wind rotor and rotor assembly.

  4. ABWR start-up test analysis using BWR core simulator with three-dimensional direct response matrix method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitsuyasu, T.; Ishii, K.; Hino, T.; Aoyama, M. [Hitachi, Ltd., Hitachi Research Laboratory, 2-1 Omika-cho 7-chome, Hitachi-shi Ibaraki-ken, 319-1221 (Japan)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ABWR start-up test analysis has been done with the BWR core simulator using the three--dimensional direct response matrix (3D-DRM) method. The Monte Carlo code VMONT made the sub-response matrices for the 3D-DRM method. Each boundary surface was subdivided by 4 x 4 for transverse segments, by 4 for angular segments and by 4 for axial zones in a node. For the calculation speedup, the 3D-DRM code used the divided sub-response matrices data set. The code used the MPI and OpenMP for the parallelized method. The median value is set as the average critical eigenvalues. The changes from the maximum value to the minimum value are 0.34 %{Delta}k with the spectral history method and 0.40 %{Delta}k without it, and the respective standard deviations were 0.12 % and 0.14 %. Using the spectral history method decreased the variation by 0.06 %{Delta}k. The root mean square differences of the axial power distribution were about 6 % between the analysis results and the plant data. Using the currents which converged in the previous exposure step reduced the number of iterations when the CR pattern changed only slightly. The averaged calculation time for each exposure step was about 5 hours on 12 PC Linux cluster servers with Core 2 Quad 3 GHz. (authors)

  5. Induction Motors Thermal Monitoring by Means of Rotor Resistance Identification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    , FRANCE Mohamed-El-Hackemi.Benbouzid@sc.u-picardie.fr Abstract: Rotor and stator temperature machines. Especially, when operating with overload cycles, it is necessary to monitor rotor bars and stator winding temperatures to make sure that the temperature remains below prescribed limits. The purpose

  6. What Stator Current Processing Based Technique to Use for Induction Motor Rotor Faults Diagnosis?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    What Stator Current Processing Based Technique to Use for Induction Motor Rotor Faults Diagnosis, marked improvement has been achieved in the design and manufacture of stator winding. However, motors and treatment processes. But cage rotor design has undergone little change. As a result, rotor failures now

  7. Method and apparatus for wind turbine braking

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barbu, Corneliu (Laguna Hills, CA); Teichmann, Ralph (Nishkayuna, NY); Avagliano, Aaron (Houston, TX); Kammer, Leonardo Cesar (Niskayuna, NY); Pierce, Kirk Gee (Simpsonville, SC); Pesetsky, David Samuel (Greenville, SC); Gauchel, Peter (Muenster, DE)

    2009-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for braking a wind turbine including at least one rotor blade coupled to a rotor. The method includes selectively controlling an angle of pitch of the at least one rotor blade with respect to a wind direction based on a design parameter of a component of the wind turbine to facilitate reducing a force induced into the wind turbine component as a result of braking.

  8. Stator for a rotating electrical machine having multiple control windings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shah, Manoj R. (Latham, NY); Lewandowski, Chad R. (Amsterdam, NY)

    2001-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A rotating electric machine is provided which includes multiple independent control windings for compensating for rotor imbalances and for levitating/centering the rotor. The multiple independent control windings are placed at different axial locations along the rotor to oppose forces created by imbalances at different axial locations along the rotor. The multiple control windings can also be used to levitate/center the rotor with a relatively small magnetic field per unit area since the rotor and/or the main power winding provides the bias field.

  9. A RIGOROUS, ENGINEER-FRIENDLY APPROACH FOR MODELING REALISTIC, COMPOSITE ROTOR BLADES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Wenbin

    structures of the type encountered in wind turbine blades, helicopter rotor blades, and the like such as wind turbine blades lead to a splitting of the problem into a (usually) linear, two-dimensional cross

  10. Rotor parameter determination for the Brushless Doubly Fed (Induction) Machine (BDFM)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMahon, R. A.; Roberts, P. C.; Tatlow, M. R.; Abdi, E.; Broekhof, A.; Abdi, S.

    2015-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Zeff Impedance of individual rotor loop (?) nr rotor turns ratio I. INTRODUCTION Contemporary interest in the BDFM principally arises as it is a potential alternative to the slip-ring induction generator widely used in wind turbines although it can also... , the equivalent circuit forms a valuable design tool, enabling candidate machine designs to be rapidly evaluated. In particular rotor parameters are important in determining the pull out torque of the machine as well as low-voltage ride through performance in wind...

  11. Methods and apparatus for cooling wind turbine generators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salamah, Samir A. (Niskayuna, NY); Gadre, Aniruddha Dattatraya (Rexford, NY); Garg, Jivtesh (Schenectady, NY); Bagepalli, Bharat Sampathkumaran (Niskayuna, NY); Jansen, Patrick Lee (Alplaus, NY); Carl, Jr., Ralph James (Clifton Park, NY)

    2008-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A wind turbine generator includes a stator having a core and a plurality of stator windings circumferentially spaced about a generator longitudinal axis. A rotor is rotatable about the generator longitudinal axis, and the rotor includes a plurality of magnetic elements coupled to the rotor and cooperating with the stator windings. The magnetic elements are configured to generate a magnetic field and the stator windings are configured to interact with the magnetic field to generate a voltage in the stator windings. A heat pipe assembly thermally engaging one of the stator and the rotor to dissipate heat generated in the stator or rotor.

  12. Sandia National Laboratories: Wind Turbine Blade Design

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wind Turbine Blade Design National Rotor Testbed Functional Scaling Presented at American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics 2014 Scitech On April 15, 2014, in Energy,...

  13. Methods and apparatus for rotor blade ice detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    LeMieux, David Lawrence

    2006-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for detecting ice on a wind turbine having a rotor and one or more rotor blades each having blade roots includes monitoring meteorological conditions relating to icing conditions and monitoring one or more physical characteristics of the wind turbine in operation that vary in accordance with at least one of the mass of the one or more rotor blades or a mass imbalance between the rotor blades. The method also includes using the one or more monitored physical characteristics to determine whether a blade mass anomaly exists, determining whether the monitored meteorological conditions are consistent with blade icing; and signaling an icing-related blade mass anomaly when a blade mass anomaly is determined to exist and the monitored meteorological conditions are determined to be consistent with icing.

  14. Wind turbine having a direct-drive drivetrain

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bevington, Christopher M.; Bywaters, Garrett L.; Coleman, Clint C.; Costin, Daniel P.; Danforth, William L.; Lynch, Jonathan A.; Rolland, Robert H.

    2008-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A wind turbine (100) comprising an electrical generator (108) that includes a rotor assembly (112). A wind rotor (104) that includes a wind rotor hub (124) is directly coupled to the rotor assembly via a simplified connection. The wind rotor and generator rotor assembly are rotatably mounted on a central spindle (160) via a bearing assembly (180). The wind rotor hub includes an opening (244) having a diameter larger than the outside diameter of the central spindle adjacent the bearing assembly so as to allow access to the bearing assembly from a cavity (380) inside the wind rotor hub. The spindle is attached to a turret (140) supported by a tower (136). Each of the spindle, turret and tower has an interior cavity (172, 176, 368) that permits personnel to traverse therethrough to the cavity of the wind rotor hub. The wind turbine further includes a frictional braking system (276) for slowing, stopping or keeping stopped the rotation of the wind rotor and rotor assembly.

  15. Method and apparatus for reducing rotor blade deflections, loads, and/or peak rotational speed

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moroz, Emilian Mieczyslaw; Pierce, Kirk Gee

    2006-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for reducing at least one of loads, deflections of rotor blades, or peak rotational speed of a wind turbine includes storing recent historical pitch related data, wind related data, or both. The stored recent historical data is analyzed to determine at least one of whether rapid pitching is occurring or whether wind speed decreases are occurring. A minimum pitch, a pitch rate limit, or both are imposed on pitch angle controls of the rotor blades conditioned upon results of the analysis.

  16. PRODUCTION START-UP OF 2 MW a-Si PV MANUFACTURING LINE AT SOVLUX M. Im, X. Den& II. C. Ovshinsky,R. Crucetand S.R Ovshimky

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deng, Xunming

    PRODUCTION START-UP OF 2 MW a-Si PV MANUFACTURING LINE AT SOVLUX PLANT M. Im, X. Den& II. C start-up efforts at the 2MW Sovlux photovoltaic production line. Triple-junction solar cells with higher than 10% initial effXency were producedin this production line with subcell yield up to 96

  17. Sandia National Laboratories: Scaled Wind Farm Technology Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy, SWIFT, Systems Analysis, Wind Energy The National Rotor Testbed (NRT) team is examining the effect of airfoil choice on the final design of the new rotor for the Scaled...

  18. This introduction to wind power technology is meant to help communities begin considering or

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    call both liquids and gases "fluids" ­ i.e. things that flow). A wind turbine's blades use aerodynamic of a typical wind turbine are: - Rotor: a wind turbine's blades and the hub to which they attach form the rotor or planning wind power. It focuses on commercial and medium-scale wind turbine technology available

  19. Single Rotor Turbine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Platts, David A. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2004-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A rotor for use in turbine applications has a centrifugal compressor having axially disposed spaced apart fins forming passages and an axial turbine having hollow turbine blades interleaved with the fins and through which fluid from the centrifugal compressor flows.

  20. Methods and apparatus for twist bend coupled (TCB) wind turbine blades

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moroz, Emilian Mieczyslaw; LeMieux, David Lawrence; Pierce, Kirk Gee

    2006-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for controlling a wind turbine having twist bend coupled rotor blades on a rotor mechanically coupled to a generator includes determining a speed of a rotor blade tip of the wind turbine, measuring a current twist distribution and current blade loading, and adjusting a torque of a generator to change the speed of the rotor blade tip to thereby increase an energy capture power coefficient of the wind turbine.

  1. Fuzzy Estimation of DC Motor Winding Currents Innovatia Software

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simon, Dan

    stator windings. an attractive alternative to current estimation using In order to implement an e. The fuzzy estimator is applied to actual motor wind- When the stator and rotor °uxes are not aligned the rotor stator winding current estimation. #12;2 Fuzzy Estimation The output of the correction mapping

  2. UPWIND, Aerodynamics and aero-elasticity Rotor aerodynamics in atmospheric shear flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    wind turbines with rotor diameters in the order of 100 meters, the influence of upstream turbine wakes codes for wind turbines utilize aerodynamics based on BEM methods, see [1, 2]. For modern large scale. Sørensen Wind Energy Department, Risø National Laboratory & Department of Civil Engineering, Aalborg

  3. Sandia National Laboratories: increasing average wind-turbine...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    wind-turbine rotor diameter Latest Version of the Composite Materials Database Available for Download On December 3, 2014, in Energy, Materials Science, News, News & Events,...

  4. Sandia National Laboratories: DOE/Sandia Scaled Wind Farm Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sandia Scaled Wind Farm Technology New Facility Tool at SWiFT Makes Rotor Work More Efficient On January 22, 2014, in Energy, Facilities, News, News & Events, Partnership,...

  5. Sandia National Laboratories: functional wind-turbine blade scaling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    wind-turbine blade scaling National Rotor Testbed Functional Scaling Presented at American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics 2014 Scitech On April 15, 2014, in Energy,...

  6. The 5-megawatt power plant with 126 metre rotor diameter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    The 5-megawatt power plant with 126 metre rotor diameter #12;Design data Rated power 5,000kW Cut and most powerful wind turbines in the world. The 5M sets new standards for the economic viability similar to conventional power plants. This in turn puts high demands on the control and regulation system

  7. Ris-R-1353(EN) Numerical Investigation of Three Wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    downstream ISBN 87-550-3087-4; ISBN 87-550-3088-2 (Internet) ISSN 0106-2840 Print: Pitney Bowes Management that the geometry of a rotor tip influences the aerodynamic damping [1] and aeroacoustics [2] of a wind turbine rotor. But for the overall aerodynamics of the rotor the influence of the tip is not well investigated

  8. Preliminary structural design conceptualization for composite rotor for verdant power water current turbine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paquette, J. A.

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and Verdant Power Inc. (VPI) have partnered under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) to develop a new kinetic hydropower rotor. The rotor features an improved hydrodynamic and structural design which features state-of-the-art technology developed for the wind industry. The new rotor will have higher energy capture, increased system reliability, and reduction of overall cost of energy. This project was divided into six tasks: (1) Composite Rotor Project Planning and Design Specification; (2) Baseline Fatigue Testing and Failure analysis; (3) Develop Blade/Rotor Performance Model; (4) Hydrofoil Survey and Selection; (5) FEM Structural Design; and (6) Develop Candidate Rotor Designs and Prepare Final Report.

  9. NON-STATIONARY TEMPERATURE STRESSES IN THE INDUSTRIAL STEAM TURBINE ROTOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zvonimir Guzovi?; Krešimir Kova?i?; Tihomir Mihali?

    The usage of industrial steam turbines in different industrial branches (chemistry, petrochemistry, refineries, sugar and ethanol plants, etc.) for a generator drive for electricity generation or a mechanical drive for compressors, blowers and pumps, is characterized by the need for high flexibility of operation. High flexibility includes numerous start-ups, shut-downs and power changes during the useful life. Changes in power and steam mass flow lead to changes of the working fluid state in the single turbine stages, and thus their aerodynamic and thermodynamic characteristics. During these transient working regimes in steam turbine rotors, large space and time-dependent temperature gradients appear, which can result in high non-stationary temperature stresses, i.e. increased local stress concentrations, what has a negative impact on the useful life of the rotor. In the worst case they can cause fracture of the turbine rotor. Today, for the determination of thermal stressed state of the steam turbine parts the user softwares based on numerical methods are used. In this paper the results of numerical modelling and calculations of non-stationary temperature fields and related stresses in the rotor of industrial steam turbine of 35 MW power during transient operating regime (a cold startup) will be presented. The results of the calculations serve for estimation of the transient regime impact on the stresses of the rotor, as well as on its entire useful life. Key words: industrial steam turbine, transient regimes, temperature stresses, numerical modelling 1.

  10. Operational behavior of a double-fed permanent magnet generator for wind turbines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reddy, Sivananda Kumjula

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Greater efficiency in wind turbine systems is achieved by allowing the rotor to change its rate of rotation as the wind speed changes. The wind turbine system is decoupled from the utility grid and a variable speed operation ...

  11. Analysis of a teetered, variable-speed rotor: final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weber, T.L.; Wilson, R.E.; Walker, S.N. (Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (USA). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering) [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (USA). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A computer model of a horizontal axis wind turbine (HOOT) with four structural degrees of freedom has been derived and verified. The four degrees of freedom include flapwise motion of the blades, teeter motion, and variable rotor speed. Options for the variable rotor speed include synchronous, induction, and constant-tip speed generator models with either start, stop, or normal operations. Verification is made by comparison with analytical solutions and mean and cyclic ESI-80 data. The Veers full-field turbulence model is used as a wind input for a synchronous and induction generator test case during normal operation. As a result of the comparison, it is concluded that the computer model can be used to predict accurately mean and cyclic loads with a turbulent wind input. 47 refs., 19 figs.

  12. Polygonal shaft hole rotor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hussey, John H. (St. Louis, MO); Rose, John Scott (Alton, IL); Meystrik, Jeffrey J. (Webster Groves, MO); White, Kent Lee (Maryland Heights, MO)

    2001-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A laminated rotor for an induction motor has a plurality of ferro-magnetic laminations mounted axially on a rotor shaft. Each of the plurality of laminations has a central aperture in the shape of a polygon with sides of equal length. The laminations are alternatingly rotated 180.degree. from one another so that the straight sides of the polygon shaped apertures are misaligned. As a circular rotor shaft is press fit into a stack of laminations, the point of maximum interference occurs at the midpoints of the sides of the polygon (i.e., at the smallest radius of the central apertures of the laminations). Because the laminates are alternatingly rotated, the laminate material at the points of maximum interference yields relatively easily into the vertices (i.e., the greatest radius of the central aperture) of the polygonal central aperture of the next lamination as the shaft is inserted into the stack of laminations. Because of this yielding process, the amount of force required to insert the shaft is reduced, and a tighter fit is achieved.

  13. Value Capture in the Global Wind Energy Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dedrick, Jason; Kraemer, Kenneth L.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    a large scale wind turbine are the tower, blades, and gearof large wind turbine (REpower MM92) Tower Rotor blades Gearwind turbine. Towers run from 40-100 meters, while blades

  14. Performance of twist-coupled blades on variable speed rotors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lobitz, D.W.; Veers, P.S.; Laino, D.J.

    1999-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The load mitigation and energy capture characteristics of twist-coupled HAWT blades that are mounted on a variable speed rotor are investigated in this paper. These blades are designed to twist toward feather as they bend with pretwist set to achieve a desirable twist distribution at rated power. For this investigation, the ADAMS-WT software has been modified to include blade models with bending-twist coupling. Using twist-coupled and uncoupled models, the ADAMS software is exercised for steady wind environments to generate C{sub p} curves at a number of operating speeds to compare the efficiencies of the two models. The ADAMS software is also used to generate the response of a twist-coupled variable speed rotor to a spectrum of stochastic wind time series. This spectrum contains time series with two mean wind speeds at two turbulence levels. Power control is achieved by imposing a reactive torque on the low speed shaft proportional to the RPM squared with the coefficient specified so that the rotor operates at peak efficiency in the linear aerodynamic range, and by limiting the maximum RPM to take advantage of the stall controlled nature of the rotor. Fatigue calculations are done for the generated load histories using a range of material exponents that represent materials from welded steel to aluminum to composites, and results are compared with the damage computed for the rotor without twist-coupling. Results indicate that significant reductions in damage are achieved across the spectrum of applied wind loading without any degradation in power production.

  15. Homopolar motor with dual rotors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hsu, J.S.

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A homopolar motor has a field rotor mounted on a frame for rotation in a first rotational direction and for producing an electromagnetic field, and an armature rotor mounted for rotation on said frame within said electromagnetic field and in a second rotational direction counter to said first rotational direction of said field rotor. The two rotors are coupled through a 1:1 gearing mechanism, so as to travel at the same speed but in opposite directions. This doubles the output voltage and output power, as compared to a motor in which only the armature is rotated. Several embodiments are disclosed. 7 figs.

  16. System-Wide Emissions Implications of Increased Wind Power Penetration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemner, Ken

    of incorporating wind energy into the electric power system. We present a detailed emissions analysis based on comprehensive modeling of power system operations with unit commitment and economic dispatch for different wind of both cycling and start-ups of thermal power plants in analyzing emissions from an electric power system

  17. Wind turbine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cheney, Jr., Marvin C. (Glastonbury, CT)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A wind turbine of the type having an airfoil blade (15) mounted on a flexible beam (20) and a pitch governor (55) which selectively, torsionally twists the flexible beam in response to wind turbine speed thereby setting blade pitch, is provided with a limiter (85) which restricts unwanted pitch change at operating speeds due to torsional creep of the flexible beam. The limiter allows twisting of the beam by the governor under excessive wind velocity conditions to orient the blades in stall pitch positions, thereby preventing overspeed operation of the turbine. In the preferred embodiment, the pitch governor comprises a pendulum (65,70) which responds to changing rotor speed by pivotal movement, the limiter comprising a resilient member (90) which engages an end of the pendulum to restrict further movement thereof, and in turn restrict beam creep and unwanted blade pitch misadjustment.

  18. Solenoid-free Plasma Start-up in NSTX using Transient CHI R. Raman 1), T.R. Jarboe 1), B.A. Nelson 1), D. Mueller 2), M.G. Bell 2), R. Bell 1),

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    1 Solenoid-free Plasma Start-up in NSTX using Transient CHI R. Raman 1), T.R. Jarboe 1), B sustainment and ramp-up of the toroidal plasma current. In these discharges, the central Ohmic transformer by CHI. The coupled discharges have ramped up to >700 kA and transitioned into an H-mode demonstrating

  19. A Reconfigurable Motor for Experimental Emulation of Stator Winding Inter-Turn and Broken Bar Faults

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Povinelli, Richard J.

    A Reconfigurable Motor for Experimental Emulation of Stator Winding Inter-Turn and Broken Bar emulation of stator winding inter-turn and broken rotor bar faults, are presented in this paper such as stator windings or rotor bars when acquiring data from a knWi dinL lar Bearit faulty machine for fault

  20. Single-phase and two-phase anaerobic digestion of fruit and vegetable waste: Comparison of start-up, reactor stability and process performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ganesh, Rangaraj [INRA, UR50, Laboratoire de Biotechnologie de l’Environnement, Avenue des Etangs, Narbonne F-11100 (France); Torrijos, Michel, E-mail: michel.torrijos@supagro.inra.fr [INRA, UR50, Laboratoire de Biotechnologie de l’Environnement, Avenue des Etangs, Narbonne F-11100 (France); Sousbie, Philippe [INRA, UR50, Laboratoire de Biotechnologie de l’Environnement, Avenue des Etangs, Narbonne F-11100 (France); Lugardon, Aurelien [Naskeo Environnment, 52 rue Paul Vaillant Couturier, F-92240 Malakoff (France); Steyer, Jean Philippe; Delgenes, Jean Philippe [INRA, UR50, Laboratoire de Biotechnologie de l’Environnement, Avenue des Etangs, Narbonne F-11100 (France)

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: • Single-phase and two-phase systems were compared for fruit and vegetable waste digestion. • Single-phase digestion produced a methane yield of 0.45 m{sup 3} CH{sub 4}/kg VS and 83% VS removal. • Substrate solubilization was high in acidification conditions at 7.0 kg VS/m{sup 3} d and pH 5.5–6.2. • Energy yield was lower by 33% for two-phase system compared to the single-phase system. • Simple and straight-forward operation favored single phase process over two-phase process. - Abstract: Single-phase and two-phase digestion of fruit and vegetable waste were studied to compare reactor start-up, reactor stability and performance (methane yield, volatile solids reduction and energy yield). The single-phase reactor (SPR) was a conventional reactor operated at a low loading rate (maximum of 3.5 kg VS/m{sup 3} d), while the two-phase system consisted of an acidification reactor (TPAR) and a methanogenic reactor (TPMR). The TPAR was inoculated with methanogenic sludge similar to the SPR, but was operated with step-wise increase in the loading rate and with total recirculation of reactor solids to convert it into acidification sludge. Before each feeding, part of the sludge from TPAR was centrifuged, the centrifuge liquid (solubilized products) was fed to the TPMR and centrifuged solids were recycled back to the reactor. Single-phase digestion produced a methane yield of 0.45 m{sup 3} CH{sub 4}/kg VS fed and VS removal of 83%. The TPAR shifted to acidification mode at an OLR of 10.0 kg VS/m{sup 3} d and then achieved stable performance at 7.0 kg VS/m{sup 3} d and pH 5.5–6.2, with very high substrate solubilization rate and a methane yield of 0.30 m{sup 3} CH{sub 4}/kg COD fed. The two-phase process was capable of high VS reduction, but material and energy balance showed that the single-phase process was superior in terms of volumetric methane production and energy yield by 33%. The lower energy yield of the two-phase system was due to the loss of energy during hydrolysis in the TPAR and the deficit in methane production in the TPMR attributed to COD loss due to biomass synthesis and adsorption of hard COD onto the flocs. These results including the complicated operational procedure of the two-phase process and the economic factors suggested that the single-phase process could be the preferred system for FVW.

  1. Sandia Energy - Rotor Innovation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol Home Distribution GridDocuments Home Stationary PowerResearchRiskRotor

  2. Wind turbine spoiler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sullivan, William N. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An aerodynamic spoiler system for a vertical axis wind turbine includes spoilers on the blades initially stored near the rotor axis to minimize drag. A solenoid latch adjacent the central support tower releases the spoilers and centrifugal force causes the spoilers to move up the turbine blades away from the rotor axis, thereby producing a braking effect and actual slowing of the associated wind turbine, if desired. The spoiler system can also be used as an infinitely variable power control by regulated movement of the spoilers on the blades over the range between the undeployed and fully deployed positions. This is done by the use of a suitable powered reel and cable located at the rotor tower to move the spoilers.

  3. Final project report: High energy rotor development, test and evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under the auspices of the {open_quotes}Government/Industry Wind Technology Applications Project{close_quotes} [{open_quotes}Letter of Interest{close_quotes} (LOI) Number RC-1-11101], Flo Wind Corp. has successfully developed, tested, and delivered a high-energy rotor upgrade candidate for their 19-meter Vertical Axis Wind Turbine. The project included the demonstration of the innovative extended height-to-diameter ratio concept, the development of a continuous span single-piece composite blade, the demonstration of a continuous blade manufacturing technique, the utilization of the Sandia National Laboratories developed SNLA 2150 natural laminar flow airfoil and the reuse of existing wind turbine and wind power plant infrastructure.

  4. Gas turbine rotor straightening -- Case history

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mazur, Z.; Kubiak, J. [Inst. de Investigaciones Electricas, Temixco (Mexico); Villela, A.; Orozco, J. [Comision Federal de Electricidad, Mexicali (Mexico)

    1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Due to catastrophic damage, the turbine-compressor rotor of a gas turbine has been bent 0.62 mm. The in-situ repair process of rotor straightening is fully described. The repair process included the design of special fixtures for placing the rotor vertically and then hydraulically tensioning the rotor bolts for discs disassembling and run-out check by a special rotary equipment. After the repair process the rotor run-out fell within the design limits. Finally the rotor was put back into service. The approach to the in-house repair of the rotor bend has been successful and can be widely recommended for users of turbomachinery.

  5. Rotor component displacement measurement system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mercer, Gary D.; Li, Ming C.; Baum, Charles R.

    2003-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A measuring system for measuring axial displacement of a tube relative to an axially stationary component in a rotating rotor assembly includes at least one displacement sensor adapted to be located normal to a longitudinal axis of the tube; an insulated cable system adapted for passage through the rotor assembly; a rotatable proximitor module located axially beyond the rotor assembly to which the cables are connected; and a telemetry system operatively connected to the proximitor module for sampling signals from the proximitor module and forwarding data to a ground station.

  6. Permanent magnet machine with windings having strand transposition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Qu, Ronghai (Clifton Park, NY); Jansen, Patrick Lee (Scotia, NY)

    2009-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This document discusses, among other things, a stator with transposition between the windings or coils. The coils are free from transposition to increase the fill factor of the stator slots. The transposition at the end connections between an inner coil and an outer coil provide transposition to reduce circulating current loss. The increased fill factor reduces further current losses. Such a stator is used in a dual rotor, permanent magnet machine, for example, in a compressor pump, wind turbine gearbox, wind turbine rotor.

  7. Method and apparatus for wind turbine air gap control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grant, James Jonathan; Bagepalli, Bharat Sampathkumaran; Jansen, Patrick Lee; DiMascio, Paul Stephen; Gadre, Aniruddha Dattatraya; Qu, Ronghai

    2007-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and apparatus for assembling a wind turbine generator are provided. The wind turbine generator includes a core and a plurality of stator windings circumferentially spaced about a generator longitudinal axis, a rotor rotatable about the generator longitudinal axis wherein the rotor includes a plurality of magnetic elements coupled to a radially outer periphery of the rotor such that an airgap is defined between the stator windings and the magnetic elements and the plurality of magnetic elements including a radially inner periphery having a first diameter. The wind turbine generator also includes a bearing including a first member in rotatable engagement with a radially inner second member, the first member including a radially outer periphery, a diameter of the radially outer periphery of the first member being substantially equal to the first diameter, the rotor coupled to the stator through the bearing such that a substantially uniform airgap is maintained.

  8. Abstract--This paper addresses the problem of controlling wind energy conversion systems (WECS) which involve

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Abstract-- This paper addresses the problem of controlling wind energy conversion systems (WECS-inverter. The goal of control is to maximize wind energy extraction and this needs letting the wind turbine rotor wind energy extraction) only for one wind speed value depending on the considered value of turbine

  9. Rotor assembly and assay method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burtis, Carl A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Johnson, Wayne F. (Loudon, TN); Walker, William A. (Knoxville, TN)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A rotor assembly for carrying out an assay includes a rotor body which is rotatable about an axis of rotation, and has a central chamber and first, second, third, fourth, fifth, and sixth chambers which are in communication with and radiate from the central chamber. The rotor assembly further includes a shuttle which is movable through the central chamber and insertable into any of the chambers, the shuttle including a reaction cup carrying an immobilized antigen or an antibody for transport among the chambers. A method for carrying out an assay using the rotor assembly includes moving the reaction cup among the six chambers by passing the cup through the central chamber between centrifugation steps in order to perform the steps of: separating plasma from blood cells, binding plasma antibody or antigen, washing, drying, binding enzyme conjugate, reacting with enzyme substrate and optically comparing the resulting reaction product with unreacted enzyme substrate solution. The movement of the reaction cup can be provided by attaching a magnet to the reaction cup and supplying a moving magnetic field to the rotor.

  10. Rotor assembly and assay method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burtis, C.A.; Johnson, W.F.; Walker, W.A.

    1993-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A rotor assembly for carrying out an assay includes a rotor body which is rotatable about an axis of rotation, and has a central chamber and first, second, third, fourth, fifth, and sixth chambers which are in communication with and radiate from the central chamber. The rotor assembly further includes a shuttle which is movable through the central chamber and insertable into any of the chambers, the shuttle including a reaction cup carrying an immobilized antigen or an antibody for transport among the chambers. A method for carrying out an assay using the rotor assembly includes moving the reaction cup among the six chambers by passing the cup through the central chamber between centrifugation steps in order to perform the steps of: separating plasma from blood cells, binding plasma antibody or antigen, washing, drying, binding enzyme conjugate, reacting with enzyme substrate and optically comparing the resulting reaction product with unreacted enzyme substrate solution. The movement of the reaction cup can be provided by attaching a magnet to the reaction cup and supplying a moving magnetic field to the rotor. 34 figures.

  11. Wind turbulence characterization for wind energy development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wendell, L.L.; Gower, G.L.; Morris, V.R.; Tomich, S.D.

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of its support of the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Federal Wind Energy Program, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has initiated an effort to work jointly with the wind energy community to characterize wind turbulence in a variety of complex terrains at existing or potential sites of wind turbine installation. Five turbulence characterization systems were assembled and installed at four sites in the Tehachapi Pass in California, and one in the Green Mountains near Manchester, Vermont. Data processing and analyses techniques were developed to allow observational analyses of the turbulent structure; this analysis complements the more traditional statistical and spectral analyses. Preliminary results of the observational analyses, in the rotating framework or a wind turbine blade, show that the turbulence at a site can have two major components: (1) engulfing eddies larger than the rotor, and (2) fluctuating shear due to eddies smaller than the rotor disk. Comparison of the time series depicting these quantities at two sites showed that the turbulence intensity (the commonly used descriptor of turbulence) did not adequately characterize the turbulence at these sites. 9 refs., 10 figs.,

  12. A reduced Blade-Vortex Interaction rotor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mani, Somnath

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research work aims at mapping the BVI azimuthal locations using a model rotor. A model rotor was first developed. An experimental investigation was then carried out to determine the possible BVI locations. The results of the mapping...

  13. Turbomachine rotor with improved cooling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hultgren, K.G.; McLaurin, L.D.; Bertsch, O.L.; Lowe, P.E.

    1998-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A gas turbine rotor has an essentially closed loop cooling air scheme in which cooling air drawn from the compressor discharge air that is supplied to the combustion chamber is further compressed, cooled, and then directed to the aft end of the turbine rotor. Downstream seal rings attached to the downstream face of each rotor disc direct the cooling air over the downstream disc face, thereby cooling it, and then to cooling air passages formed in the rotating blades. Upstream seal rings attached to the upstream face of each disc direct the heated cooling air away from the blade root while keeping the disc thermally isolated from the heated cooling air. From each upstream seal ring, the heated cooling air flows through passages in the upstream discs and is then combined and returned to the combustion chamber from which it was drawn. 5 figs.

  14. Turbomachine rotor with improved cooling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hultgren, Kent Goran (Winter Park, FL); McLaurin, Leroy Dixon (Winter Springs, FL); Bertsch, Oran Leroy (Titusville, FL); Lowe, Perry Eugene (Oviedo, FL)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A gas turbine rotor has an essentially closed loop cooling air scheme in which cooling air drawn from the compressor discharge air that is supplied to the combustion chamber is further compressed, cooled, and then directed to the aft end of the turbine rotor. Downstream seal rings attached to the downstream face of each rotor disc direct the cooling air over the downstream disc face, thereby cooling it, and then to cooling air passages formed in the rotating blades. Upstream seal rings attached to the upstream face of each disc direct the heated cooling air away from the blade root while keeping the disc thermally isolated from the heated cooling air. From each upstream seal ring, the heated cooling air flows through passages in the upstream discs and is then combined and returned to the combustion chamber from which it was drawn.

  15. Mixer-Ejector Wind Turbine: Breakthrough High Efficiency Shrouded Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: FloDesign Wind Turbine’s innovative wind turbine, inspired by the design of jet engines, could deliver 300% more power than existing wind turbines of the same rotor diameter by extracting more energy over a larger area. FloDesign Wind Turbine’s unique shrouded design expands the wind capture area, and the mixing vortex downstream allows more energy to flow through the rotor without stalling the turbine. The unique rotor and shrouded design also provide significant opportunity for mass production and simplified assembly, enabling mid-scale turbines (approximately 100 kW) to produce power at a cost that is comparable to larger-scale conventional turbines.

  16. Control strategy for variable-speed, stall-regulated wind turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muljadi, E.; Pierce, K.; Migliore, P.

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A variable-speed, constant-pitch wind turbine was investigated to evaluate the feasibility of constraining its rotor speed and power output without the benefit of active aerodynamic control devices. A strategy was postulated to control rotational speed by specifying the demanded generator torque. By controlling rotor speed in relation to wind speed, the aerodynamic power extracted by the blades from the wind was manipulated. Specifically, the blades were caused to stall in high winds. In low and moderate winds, the demanded generator torque and the resulting rotor speed were controlled to cause the wind turbine to operate near maximum efficiency. A computational model was developed, and simulations were conducted of operation in high turbulent winds. Results indicated that rotor speed and power output were well regulated. 7 refs., 7 figs.

  17. Performance of Rotors in a Brushless Doubly-Fed Induction Machine (BDFM)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    a novel design of BDFM rotor, will perform in a BDFM configured as a variable speed generator. The results The BDFM is attractive as a variable speed generator for wind turbines. In this application, one stator. The BDFM operates in synchronous mode with a fixed relationship between the shaft speed, grid frequency

  18. Maximum power tracking control scheme for wind generator systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mena Lopez, Hugo Eduardo

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this work is to develop a maximum power tracking control strategy for variable speed wind turbine systems. Modern wind turbine control systems are slow, and they depend on the design parameters of the turbine and use wind and/or rotor...

  19. Maximum power tracking control scheme for wind generator systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mena, Hugo Eduardo

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this work is to develop a maximum power tracking control strategy for variable speed wind turbine systems. Modern wind turbine control systems are slow, and they depend on the design parameters of the turbine and use wind and/or rotor...

  20. Designing Micro Wind Turbines for Portable Power Generation Francois Hogan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barthelat, Francois

    to the design of a wind turbine rotor. Number of blades The number of blades does not have a significant impact on the efficiency of a wind turbine. We have chosen a two blade design because of ease of fabrication in order) (2) · This two blade micro wind turbine meets the optimal specifications to ensure good efficiency

  1. ATMOSPHERIC TURBULENCE MODELING AND IMPLICATIONS FOR WIND ENERGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chow, Fotini Katopodes

    turbines off too early in high winds, or may risk severe damage to the rotors and blades by operating under Introduction Wind turbines sit at the very bottom of the at- mospheric boundary layer, where winds are highly turbulent, shear events are intermittent, and land- atmosphere interactions may be strong. Turbine hub

  2. Maximum power tracking control scheme for wind generator systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mena, Hugo Eduardo

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this work is to develop a maximum power tracking control strategy for variable speed wind turbine systems. Modern wind turbine control systems are slow, and they depend on the design parameters of the turbine and use wind and/or rotor...

  3. Maximum power tracking control scheme for wind generator systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mena Lopez, Hugo Eduardo

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this work is to develop a maximum power tracking control strategy for variable speed wind turbine systems. Modern wind turbine control systems are slow, and they depend on the design parameters of the turbine and use wind and/or rotor...

  4. IMPLEMENTATION OF WIND TURBINE CONTROLLERS W.E.Leithead

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, Ken

    IMPLEMENTATION OF WIND TURBINE CONTROLLERS D.J.Leith W.E.Leithead Department of Electronic-speed wind turbines are considered, namely, (1) accommodation of the strongly nonlinear rotor aerodynamics derived and extended to cater for all wind turbine configurations. A rigorous stability analysis

  5. Sparkr Blade Test Centre Static tests of wind turbine blades

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparkær Blade Test Centre Static tests of wind turbine blades Static blade tests are performed down- and up-wind direction, and in the rotor thrust direction and opposite to that, respectively-4000 Roskilde Denmark www.risoe.dk Wind Energy Department Sparkær Blade test Centre vea@risoe.dk Tel

  6. Electrically heated DPF start-up strategy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gonze, Eugene V [Pinckney, MI; Ament, Frank [Troy, MI

    2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    An exhaust system that processes exhaust generated by an engine has a diesel particulate filter (DPF) that is disposed downstream of the engine and that filters particulates in the exhaust. An electrical heater is disposed upstream of the DPF and selectively heats the exhaust to initiate combustion of the particulates. Heat generated by combustion of particulates in the heater induces combustion of particulates within the DPF. A control module selectively enables current flow to the electrical heater for an initial period of a DPF regeneration cycle, and limits exhaust flow while the electrical heater is heating to a predetermined soot combustion temperature.

  7. Acquisition of medical device start-ups

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nair, Ganesh R

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Introduction: In the medical device space, a large proportion of the breakthrough inventions are developed by small firms that use private equity to bring their technologies from concept to varying stages of development. ...

  8. The Physics of Tokamak Start-Up

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem Not FoundInformation DOEInformation Summary Big*The Effective FieldImDact6

  9. Coupled Dynamic Analysis of Multiple Unit Floating Offshore Wind Turbine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bae, Yoon Hyeok

    2013-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    In the present study, a numerical simulation tool has been developed for the rotor-floater-tether coupled dynamic analysis of Multiple Unit Floating Offshore Wind Turbine (MUFOWT) in the time domain including aero-blade-tower dynamics and control...

  10. Passive aeroelastic tailoring of wind turbine blades : a numerical analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deilmann, Christian

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research aims to have an impact towards a sustainable energy supply. In wind power generation losses occur at tip speed ratios which the rotor was not designed for. Since the ideal blade shape changes nonlinearly with ...

  11. Coupled Dynamic Analysis of Multiple Unit Floating Offshore Wind Turbine 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bae, Yoon Hyeok

    2013-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    In the present study, a numerical simulation tool has been developed for the rotor-floater-tether coupled dynamic analysis of Multiple Unit Floating Offshore Wind Turbine (MUFOWT) in the time domain including aero-blade-tower dynamics and control...

  12. Development and Validation of an Aeroelastic Model of a Small Furling Wind Turbine: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jonkman, J. M.; Hansen, A. C.

    2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small wind turbines often use some form of furling (yawing and/or tilting out of the wind) to protect against excessive power generation and rotor speeds in high winds.The verification study demonstrated the correct implementation of FAST's furling dynamics. During validation, the model tends to predict mean rotor speeds higher than measured in spite of the fact that the mean furl motion and rotor thrust are predicted quite accurately. This work has culminated with an enhanced version of FAST that should prove to be a valuable asset to designers of small wind turbines.

  13. Utilization of Wind Energy at High Altitude

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Bolonkin

    2007-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Ground based, wind energy extraction systems have reached their maximum capability. The limitations of current designs are: wind instability, high cost of installations, and small power output of a single unit. The wind energy industry needs of revolutionary ideas to increase the capabilities of wind installations. This article suggests a revolutionary innovation which produces a dramatic increase in power per unit and is independent of prevailing weather and at a lower cost per unit of energy extracted. The main innovation consists of large free-flying air rotors positioned at high altitude for power and air stream stability, and an energy cable transmission system between the air rotor and a ground based electric generator. The air rotor system flies at high altitude up to 14 km. A stability and control is provided and systems enable the changing of altitude. This article includes six examples having a high unit power output (up to 100 MW). The proposed examples provide the following main advantages: 1. Large power production capacity per unit - up to 5,000-10,000 times more than conventional ground-based rotor designs; 2. The rotor operates at high altitude of 1-14 km, where the wind flow is strong and steady; 3. Installation cost per unit energy is low. 4. The installation is environmentally friendly (no propeller noise). -- * Presented in International Energy Conversion Engineering Conference at Providence., RI, Aug. 16-19. 2004. AIAA-2004-5705. USA. Keyword: wind energy, cable energy transmission, utilization of wind energy at high altitude, air rotor, windmills, Bolonkin.

  14. A New Method to Find the Fractional Slot Windings Structures from a Distributed Slot Windings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    a distributed slot permanent magnet synchronous machine (PMSM). It's a machine characterized by a distributed windings stator and a surface mounted PM rotor. First, a basic PMSM called "classical" has been studied performances assembled during the functional cycle of vehicle. Index Terms-- PMSM, distributed windings

  15. Sensorless Adaptive Output Feedback Control of Wind Energy Systems with PMS Generators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 Sensorless Adaptive Output Feedback Control of Wind Energy Systems with PMS Generators A. El the problem of controlling wind energy conversion (WEC) systems involving permanent magnet synchronous is to maximize wind energy extraction which cannot be achieved without letting the wind turbine rotor operate

  16. Robust control for wind power systems A. Pintea 1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    design applied to a horizontal wind turbine, functioning in the above rated wind speeds area. The turbines chosen for study in this paper are variable speed wind turbines and the main focus will fall. The controller presented here, is a robust digital controller which aims to regulate the wind turbine rotor speed

  17. Rotor blades for turbine engines

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Piersall, Matthew R; Potter, Brian D

    2013-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A tip shroud that includes a plurality of damping fins, each damping fin including a substantially non-radially-aligned surface that is configured to make contact with a tip shroud of a neighboring rotor blade. At least one damping fin may include a leading edge damping fin and at least one damping fin may include a trailing edge damping fin. The leading edge damping fin may be configured to correspond to the trailing edge damping fin.

  18. Method for manufacturing a rotor having superconducting coils

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Driscoll, David I. (South Euclid, OH); Shoykhet, Boris A. (Beachwood, OH)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for manufacturing a rotor for use with a rotating machine is provided that employs a superconducting coil on the rotor. An adhesive is applied to an outer surface of the rotor body, which may include a groove disposed within an outer surface of the rotor body. A superconducting coil is then mounted onto the rotor body such that the adhesive bonds the superconducting coil to the rotor body.

  19. LIDAR Wind Speed Measurements of Evolving Wind Fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simley, E.; Pao, L. Y.

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) systems are able to measure the speed of incoming wind before it interacts with a wind turbine rotor. These preview wind measurements can be used in feedforward control systems designed to reduce turbine loads. However, the degree to which such preview-based control techniques can reduce loads by reacting to turbulence depends on how accurately the incoming wind field can be measured. Past studies have assumed Taylor's frozen turbulence hypothesis, which implies that turbulence remains unchanged as it advects downwind at the mean wind speed. With Taylor's hypothesis applied, the only source of wind speed measurement error is distortion caused by the LIDAR. This study introduces wind evolution, characterized by the longitudinal coherence of the wind, to LIDAR measurement simulations to create a more realistic measurement model. A simple model of wind evolution is applied to a frozen wind field used in previous studies to investigate the effects of varying the intensity of wind evolution. LIDAR measurements are also evaluated with a large eddy simulation of a stable boundary layer provided by the National Center for Atmospheric Research. Simulation results show the combined effects of LIDAR errors and wind evolution for realistic turbine-mounted LIDAR measurement scenarios.

  20. Optimum balancing for flexible rotor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fu, Her James

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for the donation of vibration pick-ups and the loan of precious equipment. A special appreciation is extended to my friend, Miss Mei Ou-Yang, for her assistance, encouragement and unselfish support during the preparation and completion of this project. Last... Balancing Fig. 9 Typical Phase Lag Between Force and Vibration Amplitude Chart 14 20 Fig. 10 Typical Principal Modes for a Symmetric and Uniform Shaft 21 Fig. ll Test Rig Setup Fig. 12 Typical Rotor, Probe and Probe Stand Fig. 13 Critical Speed VS...

  1. Multiple piece turbine rotor blade

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jones, Russell B; Fedock, John A

    2013-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A multiple piece turbine rotor blade with a shell having an airfoil shape and secured between a spar and a platform with the spar including a tip end piece. a snap ring fits around the spar and abuts against the spar tip end piece on a top side and abuts against a shell on the bottom side so that the centrifugal loads from the shell is passed through the snap ring and into the spar and not through a tip cap dovetail slot and projection structure.

  2. Operation of a test bed axial-gap brushless DC rotor with a superconducting stator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKeever, J.W.; Sohns, C.W.; Schwenterly, S.W.; Young, R.W. Sr.; Campbell, V.W.; Hickey, M.H.; Ott, G.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Bailey, J.M. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A variable-speed axial-gap motor with a stator consisting of four liquid helium cooled superconducting electromagnets (two pole pairs) was built and proof tested up to 608 rpm in November 1990 as a tool for joint industry-laboratory evaluation of coils fabricated from high-temperature oxide superconductors. A second rotor was fabricated with improved material, winding configuration, and wire type, and the drive system was modified to eliminate current spiking. The modified motor was characterized to design speed, 188 rad/s (1800 rpm), to acquire a performance baseline for future comparison with that of high-temperature superconducting (HTS) wire. As it becomes commercially available, HTS wire will replace the low-temperature electromagnet wire in a stator modified to control wire temperatures between 4 K and 77 K. Measurements of the superconducting electromagnetic field and locked rotor torque as functions of cryocurrent and dc current through two phases of the rotor, respectively, provided data to estimate power that could be developed by the rotor. Back emf and parasitic mechanical and electromagnetic drag torques were measured as functions of angular velocity to calculate actual rotor power developed and to quantify losses, which reduce the motor`s efficiency. A detailed measurement of motor power at design speed confirmed the developed power equation. When subsequently operated at the 33-A maximum available rotor current, the motor delivered 15.3 kW (20.5 hp) to the load. In a final test, the cryostat was operated at 2500 A, 200 A below its critical current. At rotor design current of 60 A and 2500 A stator current, the extrapolated developed power would be 44.2 kW (59.2 hp) with 94% efficiency.

  3. Radial-radial single rotor turbine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Platts, David A. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2006-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A rotor for use in turbine applications has a radial compressor/pump having radially disposed spaced apart fins forming passages and a radial turbine having hollow turbine blades interleaved with the fins and through which fluid from the radial compressor/pump flows. The rotor can, in some applications, be used to produce electrical power.

  4. Wind turbine generators having wind assisted cooling systems and cooling methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bagepalli, Bharat (Niskayuna, NY); Barnes, Gary R. (Delanson, NY); Gadre, Aniruddha D. (Rexford, NY); Jansen, Patrick L. (Scotia, NY); Bouchard, Jr., Charles G. (Schenectady, NY); Jarczynski, Emil D. (Scotia, NY); Garg, Jivtesh (Cambridge, MA)

    2008-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A wind generator includes: a nacelle; a hub carried by the nacelle and including at least a pair of wind turbine blades; and an electricity producing generator including a stator and a rotor carried by the nacelle. The rotor is connected to the hub and rotatable in response to wind acting on the blades to rotate the rotor relative to the stator to generate electricity. A cooling system is carried by the nacelle and includes at least one ambient air inlet port opening through a surface of the nacelle downstream of the hub and blades, and a duct for flowing air from the inlet port in a generally upstream direction toward the hub and in cooling relation to the stator.

  5. Substantially parallel flux uncluttered rotor machines

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hsu, John S.

    2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A permanent magnet-less and brushless synchronous system includes a stator that generates a magnetic rotating field when sourced by polyphase alternating currents. An uncluttered rotor is positioned within the magnetic rotating field and is spaced apart from the stator. An excitation core is spaced apart from the stator and the uncluttered rotor and magnetically couples the uncluttered rotor. The brushless excitation source generates a magnet torque by inducing magnetic poles near an outer peripheral surface of the uncluttered rotor, and the stator currents also generate a reluctance torque by a reaction of the difference between the direct and quadrature magnetic paths of the uncluttered rotor. The system can be used either as a motor or a generator

  6. Brushless exciters using a high temperature superconducting field winding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garces, Luis Jose (Schenectady, NY); Delmerico, Robert William (Clifton Park, NY); Jansen, Patrick Lee (Scotia, NY); Parslow, John Harold (Scotia, NY); Sanderson, Harold Copeland (Tribes Hill, NY); Sinha, Gautam (Chesterfield, MO)

    2008-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A brushless exciter for a synchronous generator or motor generally includes a stator and a rotor rotatably disposed within the stator. The rotor has a field winding and a voltage rectifying bridge circuit connected in parallel to the field winding. A plurality of firing circuits are connected the voltage rectifying bridge circuit. The firing circuit is configured to fire a signal at an angle of less than 90.degree. or at an angle greater than 90.degree.. The voltage rectifying bridge circuit rectifies the AC voltage to excite or de-excite the field winding.

  7. Toward Controlled Wind Farm Output: Adjustable Power Filtering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lehn, Peter W.

    wind energy is extracted by the turbine blades. CP depends on the tip-speed ratio, , defined as = Rh structure for a fully-rated converter interfaced wind turbine. A singular perturbations decomposition the static curve that describes the aerodynamic conversion of energy by the bladed turbine rotor

  8. Journal of Wind Engineering and Industrial Aerodynamics 96 (2008) 503523

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manuel, Lance

    with such spectral models can be in turn highly variable for different realizations. Turbine load and performance a wind velocity field over spatial dimensions on the scale of the turbine rotor diameter in accordance of uncertainty in inflow turbulence to wind turbine loads Korn Saranyasoontorn, Lance ManuelÃ? Department of Civil

  9. Understanding Inertial and Frequency Response of Wind Power Plants: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muljadi, E.; Gevorgian, V.; Singh, M.; Santoso, S.

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this paper is to analyze and quantify the inertia and frequency responses of wind power plants with different wind turbine technologies (particularly those of fixed speed, variable slip with rotor-resistance controls, and variable speed with vector controls).

  10. FINAL REPORT START-UP AND COMMISSIONING TESTS ON THE DURAMELTER 1200 HLW PILOT MELTER SYSTEM USING AZ-101 HLW SIMULANTS VSL-01R0100-2 REV 0 1/20/03

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS; KOT WK; BRANDYS M; WILSON CN; SCHATZ TR; GONG W; PEGG IL

    2011-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides the final report on data and results obtained from commissioning tests performed on the one-third scale DuraMelter{trademark} 1200 (DM 1200) HLW Pilot Melter system that has been installed at VSL with an integrated prototypical off-gas treatment system. That system has replaced the DM1000 system that was used for HLW throughput testing during Part BI [1]. Both melters have similar melt surface areas (1.2 m{sup 2}) but the DM1200 is prototypical of the present RPP-WTP HLW melter design whereas the DM1000 was not. These tests were performed under a corresponding RPP-WTP Test Specification and associated Test Plan. This report is a followup to the previously issued Preliminary Data Summary Report. The DM1200 system will be used for testing and confirmation of basic design, operability, flow sheet, and process control assumptions as well as for support of waste form qualification and permitting. This will include data on processing rates, off-gas treatment system performance, recycle stream compositions, as well as process operability and reliability. Consequently, this system is a key component of the overall HLW vitrification development strategy. The results presented in this report are from the initial series of short-duration tests that were conducted to support the start-up and commissioning of this system prior to conducting the main body of development tests that have been planned for this system. These tests were directed primarily at system 'debugging,' operator training, and procedure refinement. The AZ-101 waste simulant and glass composition that was used for previous testing was selected for these tests.

  11. Wind turbine generator with improved operating subassemblies

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cheney, Jr., Marvin C. (24 Stonepost Rd., Glastonbury, CT 06033)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A wind turbine includes a yaw spring return assembly to return the nacelle from a position to which it has been rotated by yawing forces, thus preventing excessive twisting of the power cables and control cables. It also includes negative coning restrainers to limit the bending of the flexible arms of the rotor towards the tower, and stop means on the rotor shaft to orient the blades in a vertical position during periods when the unit is upwind when the wind commences. A pendulum pitch control mechanism is improved by orienting the pivot axis for the pendulum arm at an angle to the longitudinal axis of its support arm, and excessive creep is of the synthetic resin flexible beam support for the blades is prevented by a restraining cable which limits the extent of pivoting of the pendulum during normal operation but which will permit further pivoting under abnormal conditions to cause the rotor to stall.

  12. Load attenuating passively adaptive wind turbine blade

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Veers, Paul S. (Albuquerque, NM); Lobitz, Donald W. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for improving wind turbine performance by alleviating loads and controlling the rotor. The invention employs the use of a passively adaptive blade that senses the wind velocity or rotational speed, and accordingly modifies its aerodynamic configuration. The invention exploits the load mitigation prospects of a blade that twists toward feather as it bends. The invention includes passively adaptive wind turbine rotors or blades with currently preferred power control features. The apparatus is a composite fiber horizontal axis wind-turbine blade, in which a substantial majority of fibers in the blade skin are inclined at angles of between 15 and 30 degrees to the axis of the blade, to produces passive adaptive aeroelastic tailoring (bend-twist coupling) to alleviate loading without unduly jeopardizing performance.

  13. Load attenuating passively adaptive wind turbine blade

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Veers, Paul S.; Lobitz, Donald W.

    2003-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for improving wind turbine performance by alleviating loads and controlling the rotor. The invention employs the use of a passively adaptive blade that senses the wind velocity or rotational speed, and accordingly modifies its aerodynamic configuration. The invention exploits the load mitigation prospects of a blade that twists toward feather as it bends. The invention includes passively adaptive wind turbine rotors or blades with currently preferred power control features. The apparatus is a composite fiber horizontal axis wind-turbine blade, in which a substantial majority of fibers in the blade skin are inclined at angles of between 15 and 30 degrees to the axis of the blade, to produces passive adaptive aeroelastic tailoring (bend-twist coupling) to alleviate loading without unduly jeopardizing performance.

  14. Amplitude modulation of wind turbine noise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Makarewicz, Rufin

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Due to swish and thump amplitude modulation, the noise of wind turbines cause more annoyance than other environmental noise of the same average level. The wind shear accounts for the thump modulation (van den Berg effect). Making use of the wind speed measurements at the hub height, as well as at the top and the bottom of the rotor disc (Fig.1), the non-standard wind profile is applied. It causes variations in the A-weighted sound pressure level, LpA. The difference between the maximum and minimum of LpA characterizes thump modulation (Fig.2).

  15. Vacuum coupling of rotating superconducting rotor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shoykhet, Boris A.; Zhang, Burt Xudong; Driscoll, David Infante

    2003-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A rotating coupling allows a vacuum chamber in the rotor of a superconducting electric motor to be continually pumped out. The coupling consists of at least two concentric portions, one of which is allowed to rotate and the other of which is stationary. The coupling is located on the non-drive end of the rotor and is connected to a coolant supply and a vacuum pump. The coupling is smaller in diameter than the shaft of the rotor so that the shaft can be increased in diameter without having to increase the size of the vacuum seal.

  16. A feasibility study of wind turbine blade surface crack detection using an optical inspection method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCalley, James D.

    A feasibility study of wind turbine blade surface crack detection using an optical inspection technique was investigated to assess its ability to detect surface flaws on an on-tower wind turbine blade and investors. Rotor blades are one of the largest mechanical components of a wind turbine and cannot

  17. Numerical Analysis of Winglets on Wind Turbine Blades using CFD Jeppe Johansen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Numerical Analysis of Winglets on Wind Turbine Blades using CFD Jeppe Johansen and Niels N of adding a winglet to a wind turbine rotor is to decrease the total drag from the blades and thereby increase. The resulting pressure difference on an operating wind turbine blade causes inward spanwise flow

  18. Session: Poster Session + Poster Award + Scientific Award + Excellent young wind doctor award (PO.106) Track: Technical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . The wind turbines are controlled by the pitch of the rotor blades, the electromagnetic torque.106) Track: Technical MODEL PREDICTIVE CONTROL OF A WIND TURBINE WITH CONSTRAINTS (abstract-ID: 224 the possibility to handle constraints on inputs, states and outputs of a controlled plant such as a wind turbine

  19. Advanced Signal Processing Techniques for Fault Detection and Diagnosis in a Wind Turbine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    rotor bars and bearing damages. Index Terms--Wind turbines, motor current signature analy- sis, time factors, such as wind speed and acoustic noise, wind parks are being mainly constructed offshore. Studies. Different methods of fault detection exist. These include monitoring of the acoustic vibration, internal

  20. Floating Offshore Wind Turbine Dynamics: Large-Angle Motions in Euler-Space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sweetman, Bert

    wind turbines in deep water, where environmental forcing could subject the rotor to meaningful angular relative to (X,Y,Z) CT Thrust coefficient, used to calculate wind force on the blade swept area 1Floating Offshore Wind Turbine Dynamics: Large-Angle Motions in Euler-Space Bert Sweetman Texas A

  1. Challenges in Simulation of Aerodynamics, Hydrodynamics, and Mooring-Line Dynamics of Floating Offshore Wind Turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matha, D.; Schlipf, M.; Cordle, A.; Pereira, R.; Jonkman, J.

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the current major modeling challenges for floating offshore wind turbine design tools and describes aerodynamic and hydrodynamic effects due to rotor and platform motions and usage of non-slender support structures.

  2. Lightning protection system for a wind turbine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Costin, Daniel P. (Chelsea, VT); Petter, Jeffrey K. (Williston, VT)

    2008-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    In a wind turbine (104, 500, 704) having a plurality of blades (132, 404, 516, 744) and a blade rotor hub (120, 712), a lightning protection system (100, 504, 700) for conducting lightning strikes to any one of the blades and the region surrounding the blade hub along a path around the blade hub and critical components of the wind turbine, such as the generator (112, 716), gearbox (708) and main turbine bearings (176, 724).

  3. Method for changing removable bearing for a wind turbine generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bagepalli, Bharat Sampathkumaran (Niskayuna, NY); Jansen, Patrick Lee (Scotia, NY); Gadre, Aniruddha Dattatraya (Rexford, NY)

    2008-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A wind generator having removable change-out bearings includes a rotor and a stator, locking bolts configured to lock the rotor and stator, a removable bearing sub-assembly having at least one shrunk-on bearing installed, and removable mounting bolts configured to engage the bearing sub-assembly and to allow the removable bearing sub-assembly to be removed when the removable mounting bolts are removed.

  4. Removable bearing arrangement for a wind turbine generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bagepalli, Bharat Sampathkumaran; Jansen, Patrick Lee; Gadre, Aniruddha Dattatraya

    2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A wind generator having removable change-out bearings includes a rotor and a stator, locking bolts configured to lock the rotor and stator, a removable bearing sub-assembly having at least one shrunk-on bearing installed, and removable mounting bolts configured to engage the bearing sub-assembly and to allow the removable bearing sub-assembly to be removed when the removable mounting bolts are removed.

  5. Interlayer toughening of fiber composite flywheel rotors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Groves, S.E.; Deteresa, S.J.

    1998-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    An interlayer toughening mechanism is described to mitigate the growth of damage in fiber composite flywheel rotors for long application. The interlayer toughening mechanism may comprise one or more tough layers composed of high-elongation fibers, high-strength fibers arranged in a woven pattern at a range from 0{degree} to 90{degree} to the rotor axis and bound by a ductile matrix material which adheres to and is compatible with the materials used for the bulk of the rotor. The number and spacing of the tough interlayers is a function of the design requirements and expected lifetime of the rotor. The mechanism has particular application in uninterruptable power supplies, electrical power grid reservoirs, and compulsators for electric guns, as well as electromechanical batteries for vehicles. 2 figs.

  6. Interlayer toughening of fiber composite flywheel rotors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Groves, Scott E. (Brentwood, CA); Deteresa, Steven J. (Livermore, CA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An interlayer toughening mechanism to mitigate the growth of damage in fiber composite flywheel rotors for long application. The interlayer toughening mechanism may comprise one or more tough layers composed of high-elongation fibers, high-strength fibers arranged in a woven pattern at a range from 0.degree. to 90.degree. to the rotor axis and bound by a ductile matrix material which adheres to and is compatible with the materials used for the bulk of the rotor. The number and spacing of the tough interlayers is a function of the design requirements and expected lifetime of the rotor. The mechanism has particular application in uninterruptable power supplies, electrical power grid reservoirs, and compulsators for electric guns, as well as electromechanical batteries for vehicles.

  7. A carbon nanotube bearing and Stodola rotor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, Eugene Hightower

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A nano-scale rotor supported on a cantilevered multi-wall carbon nanotube (MWNT) shaft (Stodola configuration) is proposed. The nanotube is also expected to function as the bearing, since individual walls of a MWNT are not ...

  8. SMART Wind Turbine Rotor: Data Analysis and Conclusions

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report documents the data post-processing and analysis performed to date on the field test data.

  9. SMART Wind Turbine Rotor: Data Analysis and Conclusions | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin ofEnergy atLLC - FE DKT. 10-160-LNG - ORDER 2913| DepartmentSLIDESHOW:

  10. National Rotor Testbed Targets Future Wind Plant Research Needs |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2:Introduction toManagement ofConverDyn NOPRNancy SutleyNationalOverview

  11. Sandia Energy - Innovative Offshore Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine Rotors

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand RequirementsCoatingsUltra-High-VoltagePower Company'sInAs Quantum

  12. Spectrum of wind speed fluctuations encountered by a rotating blade of a wind energy conversion system: observations and theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Connell, J.R.

    1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report proves that the characteristics of turbulence that are experienced by a rotating wind turbine rotor blade are in principle and in practice very different than those experienced by a nonrotating rotor blade. Thus conventional wind characteristics, which are formulated for the nonrotating frame of reference, are more inaccurate than generally supposed. The measurements and mathematical model that are presented for turbulence observed in the rotating frame of reference represent the third phase of the Pacific Northwest Laboratory work aimed at providing an accurate turbulence description for use in the design and evaluation of the performance of wind turbines. The first phase of work was the measurement of wind with a vertical plane array of anemometers. The second phase was the physical interpretation of the measurements in terms of implications for wind turbine rotors and initiation of development of a model of wind/wind turbine interaction. The third phase involved measurement of turbulence by rotating sensors and mathematical development of a physical model of this representation of turbulence as independent checks and expansions of the vertical plane array results. A fourth phase, to correlate real wind turbine response with rotationally measured turbulence and thereby understand the wind/wind turbine interaction, is in progress and preliminary results are quite promising.

  13. Prediction of stochastic blade loads for three-bladed, rigid-hub rotors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, A.D.; Weber, T.L.; Thresher, R.W.; Butterfield, C.P.

    1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Accurately predicting wind turbine blade loads and response is important for the design of future wind turbines. The need to include turbulent wind inputs in structural dynamics models is widely recognized. In this paper, the Force and Loads Analysis Program (FLAP) code will be used to predict turbulence-induced bending moments for the SERI Combined Experiment rotor blade and the Howden 330-kW blade. FLAP code predictions will be compared to the power spectra of measured blade-bending moments. Two methods will be used to generate turbulent wind inputs to FLAP: a theoretical simulation: the Pacific Northwest Laboratories (PNL) simulation theory; and measured wind-speed data taken from an array of anemometers upwind of the turbine. Turbulent wind-speed time series are input to FLAP for both methods outlined above. Power spectra of predicted flap-bending moments are compared to measured results for different wind conditions. Conclusions are also drawn as to the ability of the turbulence simulation models to provide accurate wind input to FLAP and to FLAP's ability to accurately simulate blade response to turbulence. Finally, suggestions are made as to needed improvements in the theoretical model. 11 refs., 8 figs.

  14. System-wide emissions implications of increased wind power penetration.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valentino, L.; Valenzuela, V.; Botterud, A.; Zhou, Z.; Conzelmann, G. (Decision and Information Sciences); (Univ. of Illinois, Champaign/Urbana); (Georgia Institute of Technology)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses the environmental effects of incorporating wind energy into the electric power system. We present a detailed emissions analysis based on comprehensive modeling of power system operations with unit commitment and economic dispatch for different wind penetration levels. First, by minimizing cost, the unit commitment model decides which thermal power plants will be utilized based on a wind power forecast, and then, the economic dispatch model dictates the level of production for each unit as a function of the realized wind power generation. Finally, knowing the power production from each power plant, the emissions are calculated. The emissions model incorporates the effects of both cycling and start-ups of thermal power plants in analyzing emissions from an electric power system with increasing levels of wind power. Our results for the power system in the state of Illinois show significant emissions effects from increased cycling and particularly start-ups of thermal power plants. However, we conclude that as the wind power penetration increases, pollutant emissions decrease overall due to the replacement of fossil fuels.

  15. User's Guide for the NREL Teetering Rotor Analysis Program (STRAP). [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, A.D.

    1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The following report gives the reader an overview of instructions on the proper use of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (formerly the Solar Energy Research Institute, or SERI) teetering Rotor Analysis Program (STRAP version 2.20). STRAP is a derivative of the Force and Loads Analysis program (FLAP). It is intended as a tool for prediction of rotor and blade loads and response for only two-bladed teetering hub wind turbines. The effects of delta-3, undersling, hub mass, and wind turbulence are accounted for. The objectives of the report are to give an overview of the code and also show the methods of data input and correct code execution steps in order to model an example two-bladed teetering hub turbine. A large portion of the discussion (Sections 6.0, 7.0, and 8.0) is devoted to the subject of inputting and running the code for wind turbulence effects. The ability to include turbulent wind effects is perhaps the biggest change in the code since the release of FLAP version 2.01 in 1988. This report is intended to be a user's guide. It does not contain a theoretical discussion on equations of motion, assumptions, underlying theory, etc. It is intended to be used in conjunction with Wright, Buhl, and Thresher (1988).

  16. User`s Guide for the NREL Teetering Rotor Analysis Program (STRAP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, A.D.

    1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The following report gives the reader an overview of instructions on the proper use of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (formerly the Solar Energy Research Institute, or SERI) teetering Rotor Analysis Program (STRAP version 2.20). STRAP is a derivative of the Force and Loads Analysis program (FLAP). It is intended as a tool for prediction of rotor and blade loads and response for only two-bladed teetering hub wind turbines. The effects of delta-3, undersling, hub mass, and wind turbulence are accounted for. The objectives of the report are to give an overview of the code and also show the methods of data input and correct code execution steps in order to model an example two-bladed teetering hub turbine. A large portion of the discussion (Sections 6.0, 7.0, and 8.0) is devoted to the subject of inputting and running the code for wind turbulence effects. The ability to include turbulent wind effects is perhaps the biggest change in the code since the release of FLAP version 2.01 in 1988. This report is intended to be a user`s guide. It does not contain a theoretical discussion on equations of motion, assumptions, underlying theory, etc. It is intended to be used in conjunction with Wright, Buhl, and Thresher (1988).

  17. Survey of techniques for reduction of wind turbine blade trailing edge noise.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barone, Matthew Franklin

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aerodynamic noise from wind turbine rotors leads to constraints in both rotor design and turbine siting. The primary source of aerodynamic noise on wind turbine rotors is the interaction of turbulent boundary layers on the blades with the blade trailing edges. This report surveys concepts that have been proposed for trailing edge noise reduction, with emphasis on concepts that have been tested at either sub-scale or full-scale. These concepts include trailing edge serrations, low-noise airfoil designs, trailing edge brushes, and porous trailing edges. The demonstrated noise reductions of these concepts are cited, along with their impacts on aerodynamic performance. An assessment is made of future research opportunities in trailing edge noise reduction for wind turbine rotors.

  18. The cost of noise reduction in commercial tilt rotor aircraft

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faulkner, Henry B.

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The relationship between direct operating cost and departure noise annoyance was developed for commercial tilt rotor aircraft. This was accomplished by generating a series of tilt rotor aircraft designs to meet various ...

  19. active elevon rotor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (UGT) are expected to be a next of incorporating a wave rotor to an ultra-micro gas turbine and the advantages of wave rotors, topping gas turbines at about 70%. Keywords:...

  20. active twist rotor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (UGT) are expected to be a next of incorporating a wave rotor to an ultra-micro gas turbine and the advantages of wave rotors, topping gas turbines at about 70%. Keywords:...

  1. advanced turbocharger rotor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (UGT) are expected to be a next of incorporating a wave rotor to an ultra-micro gas turbine and the advantages of wave rotors, topping gas turbines at about 70%. Keywords:...

  2. active flap rotor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (UGT) are expected to be a next of incorporating a wave rotor to an ultra-micro gas turbine and the advantages of wave rotors, topping gas turbines at about 70%. Keywords:...

  3. advanced rotor systems: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (UGT) are expected to be a next of incorporating a wave rotor to an ultra-micro gas turbine and the advantages of wave rotors, topping gas turbines at about 70%. Keywords:...

  4. adiabatic rotor model: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (UGT) are expected to be a next of incorporating a wave rotor to an ultra-micro gas turbine and the advantages of wave rotors, topping gas turbines at about 70%. Keywords:...

  5. asymmetric rotor model: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (UGT) are expected to be a next of incorporating a wave rotor to an ultra-micro gas turbine and the advantages of wave rotors, topping gas turbines at about 70%. Keywords:...

  6. Performance of a stand-alone wind-electric ice maker for remote villages

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, H.C. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Brandemuehl, M.J. [University of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States). Joint Center for Energy Management; Bergey, M.L.S. [Bergey Windpower Co., Norman, OK (United States)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two ice makers in the 1.1 metric tons per 24 hours (1.2 tons per day) size range were tested to determine their performance when directly coupled to a variable-frequency wind turbine generator. Initial tests were conducted using a dynamometer to simulate to wind to evaluate whether previously determined potential problems were significant and to define basic performance parameters. Field testing in Norman, Oklahoma, was completed to determine the performance of one of the ice makers under real wind conditions. As expected, the ice makers produced more ice at a higher speed than rated, and less ice at a lower speed. Due to the large start-up torque requirement of reciprocating compressors, the ice making system experienced a large start-up current and corresponding voltage drop which required a larger wind turbine that expected to provide the necessary current and voltage. Performance curves for ice production and power consumption are presented. A spreadsheet model was constructed to predict ice production at a user-defined site given the wind conditions for that location. Future work should include long-term performance tests and research on reducing the large start-up currents the system experiences when first coming on line.

  7. Aeroelastic analysis of a helicopter rotor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McQuien, Larry Jay

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AEROELASTIC ANALYSIS OF A HELICOPTER ROTOR A Thesis by LARRY JAY NcQUIEN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&'N University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1977 Major Subject...: Aerospace Engineering AEROELASTIC ANALYSIS OF A HELICOPTER ROTOR A Thesis LARRY JAY McQUIEN Approved as to style and content by: (Co-Chairman of Committee) / l (Co-Chair an o f Commi t tee) (Head of Depa tment) (Nember) (Nember) December 1977...

  8. Ultra-Micro Wave Rotor Investigations Florin Iancu, Janusz Piechna*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Müller, Norbert

    Nowowiejska Str., 00-665 Warsaw, Poland Abstract Ultra Micro Gas Turbines (UµGT) are expected to be a next of incorporating a wave rotor to an ultra-micro gas turbine and the advantages of wave rotors, topping gas turbines at about 70%. Keywords: PowerMEMS, wave rotor, ultra micro gas turbine, pressure exchanger, efficiency 1

  9. On the Classification of Universal Rotor-Routers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Xiaoyu

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The combinatorial theory of rotor-routers has connections with problems of statistical mechanics, graph theory, chaos theory, and computer science. A rotor-router network defines a deterministic walk on a digraph G in which a particle walks from a source vertex until it reaches one of several target vertices. Motivated by recent results due to Giacaglia et al., we study rotor-router networks in which all non-target vertices have the same type. A rotor type r is universal if every hitting sequence can be achieved by a homogeneous rotor-router network consisting entirely of rotors of type r. We give a conjecture that completely classifies universal rotor types. Then, this problem is simplified by a theorem we call the Reduction Theorem that allows us to consider only two-state rotors. A rotor-router network called the compressor, because it tends to shorten rotor periods, is introduced along with an associated algorithm that determines the universality of almost all rotors. New rotor classes, including boppy ro...

  10. Voith High Efficiency HM Rotor Energy Data, A Repulper Rotor Design Case Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aue, J.; Fineran, B.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A recently completed demonstration project, funded partly by the Wisconsin Focus on Energy program and Wisconsin Public Service Corporation, shows the effectiveness of an energy efficient repulper rotor design compared with that of a conventional...

  11. Rotor bore and turbine rotor wheel/spacer heat exchange flow circuit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Caruso, Philip M. (Selkirk, NY); Eldrid, Sacheverel Quentin (Saratoga Springs, NY); Ladhani, Azad A. (Niskayuna, NY); DeMania, Alan Richard (Niskayuna, NY); Palmer, Gene David (Clifton Park, NY); Wilson, Ian David (Clifton Park, NY); Rathbun, Lisa Shirley (Scotia, NY); Akin, Robert Craig (Schenectady, NY)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a turbine having closed-circuit steam-cooling passages about the rim of the rotor during steady-state operation, compressor discharge air is supplied to the rotor bore for passage radially outwardly into the wheel space cavities between the wheels and spacers. Communicating slots and channels in the spacers and wheels at circumferentially spaced positions enable egress of the compressor discharge air into the hot gas flow path. At turbine startup, cooling air flows through the closed-circuit steam passages to cool the outer rim of the rotor while compressor discharge air pre-warms the wheels and spacers. At steady-state, cooling steam is supplied in the closed-circuit steam-cooling passages and compressor discharge air is supplied through the bore and into the wheel space cavities to cool the rotor.

  12. Utilization of rotor kinetic energy storage for hybrid vehicles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hsu, John S. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2011-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A power system for a motor vehicle having an internal combustion engine, the power system comprises an electric machine (12) further comprising a first excitation source (47), a permanent magnet rotor (28) and a magnetic coupling rotor (26) spaced from the permanent magnet rotor and at least one second excitation source (43), the magnetic coupling rotor (26) also including a flywheel having an inertial mass to store kinetic energy during an initial acceleration to an operating speed; and wherein the first excitation source is electrically connected to the second excitation source for power cycling such that the flywheel rotor (26) exerts torque on the permanent magnet rotor (28) to assist braking and acceleration of the permanent magnet rotor (28) and consequently, the vehicle. An axial gap machine and a radial gap machine are disclosed and methods of the invention are also disclosed.

  13. Cost of Wind Energy in the United States: Trends from 2007 to 2012 (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hand, M.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation provides an overview of recent technology trends observed in the United States including project size, turbine size, rotor diameter, hub height, annual average wind speed, and annual energy production. It also highlights area where system analysis is required to fully understand how these technology trends relate to the cost of wind energy.

  14. Active load control techniques for wind turbines.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    van Dam, C.P. (University of California, Davis, CA); Berg, Dale E.; Johnson, Scott J. (University of California, Davis, CA)

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides an overview on the current state of wind turbine control and introduces a number of active techniques that could be potentially used for control of wind turbine blades. The focus is on research regarding active flow control (AFC) as it applies to wind turbine performance and loads. The techniques and concepts described here are often described as 'smart structures' or 'smart rotor control'. This field is rapidly growing and there are numerous concepts currently being investigated around the world; some concepts already are focused on the wind energy industry and others are intended for use in other fields, but have the potential for wind turbine control. An AFC system can be broken into three categories: controls and sensors, actuators and devices, and the flow phenomena. This report focuses on the research involved with the actuators and devices and the generated flow phenomena caused by each device.

  15. Modelling Dynamic Constraints in Electricity Markets and the Costs of Uncertain Wind Output

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Musgens, Felix; Neuhoff, Karsten

    2006-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    generation to analyse the effects of uncertainty. We find that the costs of balancing wind power were relatively low in the Ger- man system in 2003. They could be reduced even further when a better forecast becomes available, either by implementing a later... . This was to be expected, as start-up and shut-down decisions are the key variables used to balance wind power’s volatility. On the other hand, we find that the increase in generation costs is marginal. This is also plausible as average wind generation is held constant...

  16. Quantum rotor description of the Mott-insulator transition in the Bose-Hubbard model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Polak, T. P.; Kopec, T. K. [Institute for Low Temperatures and Structure Research, Polish Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 1410, 50-950 Wroclaw 2 (Poland)

    2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an approach to the Bose-Hubbard model using the U(1) quantum rotor description. The effective action formalism allows us to formulate a problem in the phase only action and obtain analytical formulas for the critical lines. We show that the nontrivial U(1) phase field configurations have an impact on the phase diagrams. The topological character of the quantum field is governed by terms of the integer charges--winding numbers. The comparison of presented results to recently obtained quantum Monte Carlo numerical calculations suggests that the competition between quantum effects in strongly interacting boson systems is correctly captured by our model.

  17. STANDARDS FOR MEASUREMENTS AND TESTING OF WIND TURBINE POWER QUALITY Poul Srensen, Ris National Laboratory, P.O.Box 49, DK-4000 Roskilde, Denmark.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Detlev

    STANDARDS FOR MEASUREMENTS AND TESTING OF WIND TURBINE POWER QUALITY Poul Sørensen, Risø National and verification of wind turbine power quality. The work has been organised in three major activities. The first farm summation on the power quality of wind turbines with constant rotor speed. The third activity has

  18. Design and Test of DC Voltage Link Conversion System and Brushless Doubly-Fed Induction Generator for Variable-Speed Wind Energy Applications: August 1999--May 2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lipo, T.A.; Panda, D.; Zarko, D.

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes four low-cost alternative power converters for processing the power developed by a doubly fed wound-rotor induction generator for wind energy conversion systems.

  19. Fourth Annual Progress Report on the Electrofluid Dynamic Wind Generator: Final Report for the Period 1 April 1979 - 31 August 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minardi, J. E.; Lawson, M. O.; Wattendorf, F. L.

    1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Conventional wind energy systems are limited in wind turbine diameter by allowable rotor stresses at power levels of several megawatts. In contrast, the Electrofluid Dynamic (EFD) wind driven generator has no fundamental limits on cross sectional area. It is a direct energy conversion device which employs unipolar charged particles transported by the wind against a retarding voltage gradient to a high potential. As no moving parts are exposed to the wind, extremely large power units may be feasible.

  20. Electrofriction method of manufacturing squirrel cage rotors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hsu, John S.

    2005-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of making a squirrel cage rotor of copper material for use in AC or DC motors, includes forming a core with longitudinal slots, inserting bars of conductive material in the slots, with ends extending out of opposite ends of the core, and joining the end rings to the bars, wherein the conductive material of either the end rings or the bars is copper. Various methods of joining the end rings to the bars are disclosed including electrofriction welding, current pulse welding and brazing, transient liquid phase joining and casting. Pressure is also applied to the end rings to improve contact and reduce areas of small or uneven contact between the bar ends and the end rings. Rotors made with such methods are also disclosed.

  1. A conservative control strategy for variable-speed stall-regulated wind turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muljadi, E.; Pierce, K.; Migliore, P.

    2000-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Simulation models of a variable-speed, fixed-pitch wind turbine were investigated to evaluate the feasibility of constraining rotor speed and power output without the benefit of active aerodynamic control devices. A strategy was postulated to control rotational speed by specifying the demanded generator torque. By controlling rotor speed in relation to wind speed, the aerodynamic power extracted by the blades from the wind was manipulated. Specifically, the blades were caused to stall in high winds. In low and moderate winds, the demanded generator torque and the resulting rotor speed were controlled to cause the wind turbine to operate near maximum efficiency. Using the developed models, simulations were conducted of operation in turbulent winds. Results indicated that rotor speed and power output were well regulated. Preliminary investigations of system dynamics showed that, compared to fixed-speed operation, variable-speed operation caused cyclic loading amplitude to be reduced for the turbine blades and low-speed shaft and slightly increased for the tower loads. This result suggests a favorable impact on fatigue life from implementation of the proposed control strategy.

  2. Double-ended ceramic helical-rotor expander

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mohr, P.B.; Myers, W.B.

    1995-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A ceramic helical rotor expander is disclosed using a double-ended or tandem herringbone type rotor arrangement with bearing and seal assemblies remote from the hot gas inlets and especially capable of operating at an inlet temperature of above 1,100 C. The rotors are solid or hollow and bonded to hollow metal shafts, and mounted in a composite or simple prismatic casing. The rotors, casing and shafts are constructed from low expansivity materials. In the preferred embodiment the rotors are constructed of silicon nitride and the shafts constructed of an molybdenum alloy, with the metal shafts being supported in bearings and secured to synchronizing gears. The rotors and casing may be provided with coolant channels therein, and are constructed to eliminate the problem of end leakages at inlet temperature and pressure, and the need for high temperature bearings and seals. 3 figs.

  3. Rotor assembly and method for automatically processing liquids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burtis, C.A.; Johnson, W.F.; Walker, W.A.

    1992-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A rotor assembly is described for performing a relatively large number of processing steps upon a sample, such as a whole blood sample, and a diluent, such as water. It includes a rotor body for rotation about an axis and includes a network of chambers within which various processing steps are performed upon the sample and diluent and passageways through which the sample and diluent are transferred. A transfer mechanism is movable through the rotor body by the influence of a magnetic field generated adjacent the transfer mechanism and movable along the rotor body, and the assembly utilizes centrifugal force, a transfer of momentum and capillary action to perform any of a number of processing steps such as separation, aliquoting, transference, washing, reagent addition and mixing of the sample and diluent within the rotor body. The rotor body is particularly suitable for automatic immunoassay analyses. 34 figs.

  4. Rotor assembly and method for automatically processing liquids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burtis, Carl A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Johnson, Wayne F. (Loudon, TN); Walker, William A. (Knoxville, TN)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A rotor assembly for performing a relatively large number of processing steps upon a sample, such as a whole blood sample, and a diluent, such as water, includes a rotor body for rotation about an axis and including a network of chambers within which various processing steps are performed upon the sample and diluent and passageways through which the sample and diluent are transferred. A transfer mechanism is movable through the rotor body by the influence of a magnetic field generated adjacent the transfer mechanism and movable along the rotor body, and the assembly utilizes centrifugal force, a transfer of momentum and capillary action to perform any of a number of processing steps such as separation, aliquoting, transference, washing, reagent addition and mixing of the sample and diluent within the rotor body. The rotor body is particularly suitable for automatic immunoassay analyses.

  5. Disc rotors with permanent magnets for brushless dc motor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hawsey, R.A.; Bailery, J.M.

    1992-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This patent describes a brushless dc permanent magnet motor for driving an autonomous underwater vehicle. It comprises first and second substantially flat, generally cylindrical stators disposed in side by side relation; a first substantially flat, generally cylindrical rotor; a first shaft connected to the first rotor and a second, concentric shaft connected to the second rotor; and means for providing rotation of the first and second shafts in opposite directions.

  6. Rotor for processing liquids using movable capillary tubes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, W.F.; Burtis, C.A.; Walker, W.A.

    1987-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A rotor assembly for processing liquids, especially whole blood samples, is disclosed. The assembly includes apparatus for separating non-liquid components of whole blood samples from liquid components, apparatus for diluting the separated liquid component with a diluent and apparatus for transferring the diluted sample to an external apparatus for analysis. The rotor assembly employs several movable capillary tubes to handle the sample and diluents. A method for using the rotor assembly to process liquids is also described. 5 figs.

  7. Rotor for processing liquids using movable capillary tubes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, Wayne F. (Loudon, TN); Burtis, Carl A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Walker, William A. (Knoxville, TN)

    1989-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A rotor assembly for processing liquids, especially whole blood samples, is disclosed. The assembly includes apparatus for separating non-liquid components of whole blood samples from liquid components, apparatus for diluting the separated liquid component with a diluent and apparatus for transferring the diluted sample to an external apparatus for analysis. The rotor assembly employs several movable capillary tubes to handle the sample and diluents. A method for using the rotor assembly to process liquids is also described.

  8. Rotor for processing liquids using movable capillary tubes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, Wayne F. (Loudon, TN); Burtis, Carl A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Walker, William A. (Knoxville, TN)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A rotor assembly for processing liquids, especially whole blood samples, is disclosed. The assembly includes apparatus for separating non-liquid components of whole blood samples from liquid components, apparatus for diluting the separated liquid component with a diluent and apparatus for transferring the diluted sample to an external apparatus for analysis. The rotor assembly employs several movable capillary tubes to handle the sample and diluents. A method for using the rotor assembly to process liquids is also described.

  9. Commonwealth Wind Commercial Wind Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Through the Commonwealth Wind Incentive Program – Commercial Wind Initiative the Massachusetts Clean Energy Center (MassCEC) offers site assessment grants of services, feasibility study grants, a...

  10. Wind-To-Hydrogen Energy Pilot Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ron Rebenitsch; Randall Bush; Allen Boushee; Brad G. Stevens; Kirk D. Williams; Jeremy Woeste; Ronda Peters; Keith Bennett

    2009-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    WIND-TO-HYDROGEN ENERGY PILOT PROJECT: BASIN ELECTRIC POWER COOPERATIVE In an effort to address the hurdles of wind-generated electricity (specifically wind's intermittency and transmission capacity limitations) and support development of electrolysis technology, Basin Electric Power Cooperative (BEPC) conducted a research project involving a wind-to-hydrogen system. Through this effort, BEPC, with the support of the Energy & Environmental Research Center at the University of North Dakota, evaluated the feasibility of dynamically scheduling wind energy to power an electrolysis-based hydrogen production system. The goal of this project was to research the application of hydrogen production from wind energy, allowing for continued wind energy development in remote wind-rich areas and mitigating the necessity for electrical transmission expansion. Prior to expending significant funding on equipment and site development, a feasibility study was performed. The primary objective of the feasibility study was to provide BEPC and The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) with sufficient information to make a determination whether or not to proceed with Phase II of the project, which was equipment procurement, installation, and operation. Four modes of operation were considered in the feasibility report to evaluate technical and economic merits. Mode 1 - scaled wind, Mode 2 - scaled wind with off-peak, Mode 3 - full wind, and Mode 4 - full wind with off-peak In summary, the feasibility report, completed on August 11, 2005, found that the proposed hydrogen production system would produce between 8000 and 20,000 kg of hydrogen annually depending on the mode of operation. This estimate was based on actual wind energy production from one of the North Dakota (ND) wind farms of which BEPC is the electrical off-taker. The cost of the hydrogen produced ranged from $20 to $10 per kg (depending on the mode of operation). The economic sensitivity analysis performed as part of the feasibility study showed that several factors can greatly affect, both positively and negatively, the "per kg" cost of hydrogen. After a September 15, 2005, meeting to evaluate the advisability of funding Phase II of the project DOE concurred with BEPC that Phase I results did warrant a "go" recommendation to proceed with Phase II activities. The hydrogen production system was built by Hydrogenics and consisted of several main components: hydrogen production system, gas control panel, hydrogen storage assembly and hydrogen-fueling dispenser The hydrogen production system utilizes a bipolar alkaline electrolyzer nominally capable of producing 30 Nm3/h (2.7 kg/h). The hydrogen is compressed to 6000 psi and delivered to an on-site three-bank cascading storage assembly with 80 kg of storage capacity. Vehicle fueling is made possible through a Hydrogenics-provided gas control panel and dispenser able to fuel vehicles to 5000 psi. A key component of this project was the development of a dynamic scheduling system to control the wind energy's variable output to the electrolyzer cell stacks. The dynamic scheduling system received an output signal from the wind farm, processed this signal based on the operational mode, and dispatched the appropriate signal to the electrolyzer cell stacks. For the study BEPC chose to utilize output from the Wilton wind farm located in central ND. Site design was performed from May 2006 through August 2006. Site construction activities were from August to November 2006 which involved earthwork, infrastructure installation, and concrete slab construction. From April - October 2007, the system components were installed and connected. Beginning in November 2007, the system was operated in a start-up/shakedown mode. Because of numerous issues, the start-up/shakedown period essentially lasted until the end of January 2008, at which time a site acceptance test was performed. Official system operation began on February 14, 2008, and continued through the end of December 2008. Several issues continued to prevent consistent operation, resulting in operation o

  11. Advanced wind turbine with lift cancelling aileron for shutdown

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coleman, Clint (Warren, VT); Juengst, Theresa M. (Warren, VT); Zuteck, Michael D. (Kemah, TX)

    1996-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    An advanced aileron configuration for wind turbine rotors featuring an independent, lift generating aileron connected to the rotor blade. The aileron has an airfoil profile which is inverted relative to the airfoil profile of the main section of the rotor blade. The inverted airfoil profile of the aileron allows the aileron to be used for strong positive control of the rotation of the rotor while deflected to angles within a control range of angles. The aileron functions as a separate, lift generating body when deflected to angles within a shutdown range of angles, generating lift with a component acting in the direction opposite the direction of rotation of the rotor. Thus, the aileron can be used to shut down rotation of the rotor. The profile of the aileron further allows the center of rotation to be located within the envelope of the aileron, at or near the centers of pressure and mass of the aileron. The location of the center of rotation optimizes aerodynamically and gyroscopically induced hinge moments and provides a fail safe configuration.

  12. COE projection for the modular WARP{trademark} wind power system for wind farms and electric utility power transmission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weisbrich, A.L. [ENECO, West Simsbury, CT (United States); Ostrow, S.L.; Padalino, J. [Raytheon Engineers and Constructors, New York, NY (United States)

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind power has emerged as an attractive alternative source of electricity for utilities. Turbine operating experience from wind farms has provided corroborating data of wind power potential for electric utility application. Now, a patented modular wind power technology, the Toroidal Accelerator Rotor Platform (TARP{trademark}) Windframe{trademark}, forms the basis for next generation megawatt scale wind farm and/or distributed wind power plants. When arranged in tall vertically clustered TARP{trademark} module stacks, such power plant units are designated Wind Amplified Rotor Platform (WARP{trademark}) Systems. While heavily building on proven technology, these systems are projected to surpass current technology windmills in terms of performance, user-friendly operation and ease of maintenance. In its unique generation and transmission configuration, the WARP{trademark}-GT System combines both electricity generation through wind energy conversion and electric power transmission. Furthermore, environmental benefits include dramatically less land requirement, architectural appearance, lower noise and EMI/TV interference, and virtual elimination of bird mortality potential. Cost-of-energy (COE) is projected to be from under $0.02/kWh to less than $0.05/kWh in good to moderate wind resource sites.

  13. Mechanical coupling for a rotor shaft assembly of dissimilar materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shi, Jun (Glastonbury, CT); Bombara, David (New Hartford, CT); Green, Kevin E. (Broad Brook, CT); Bird, Connic (Rocky Hill, CT); Holowczak, John (South Windsor, CT)

    2009-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A mechanical coupling for coupling a ceramic disc member to a metallic shaft includes a first wedge clamp and a second wedge clamp. A fastener engages a threaded end of a tie-bolt to sandwich the ceramic disc between the wedge clamps. An axial spring is positioned between the fastener and the second wedge clamp to apply an axial preload along the longitudinal axis. Another coupling utilizes a rotor shaft end of a metallic rotor shaft as one wedge clamp. Still another coupling includes a solid ceramic rotor disc with a multiple of tie-bolts radially displaced from the longitudinal axis to exert the preload on the solid ceramic rotor disc.

  14. Interface structure for hub and mass attachment in flywheel rotors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deteresa, S.J.; Groves, S.E.

    1998-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    An interface structure is described for hub and mass attachment in flywheel rotors. The interface structure efficiently transmits high radial compression forces and withstands both large circumferential elongation and local stresses generated by mass-loading and hub attachments. The interface structure is comprised of high-strength fiber, such as glass and carbon, woven into an angle pattern which is about 45{degree} with respect to the rotor axis. The woven fiber is bonded by a ductile matrix material which is compatible with and adheres to the rotor material. This woven fiber is able to elongate in the circumferential direction to match the rotor growth during spinning. 2 figs.

  15. Interface structure for hub and mass attachment in flywheel rotors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deteresa, Steven J. (Livermore, CA); Groves, Scott E. (Brentwood, CA)

    1998-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    An interface structure for hub and mass attachment in flywheel rotors. The interface structure efficiently transmits high radial compression forces and withstands both large circumferential elongation and local stresses generated by mass-loading and hub attachments. The interface structure is comprised of high-strength fiber, such as glass and carbon, woven into an angle pattern which is about 45.degree. with respect to the rotor axis. The woven fiber is bonded by a ductile matrix material which is compatible with and adheres to the rotor material. This woven fiber is able to elongate in the circumferential direction to match the rotor growth during spinning.

  16. Assessment and Optimization of Lidar Measurement Availability for Wind Turbine Control (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scholbrock, F. A.; Fleming, P.; Wright, A.; Davoust, S.; Jehu, A.; Bouillet, M.; Bardon M.; Vercherin, B.

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Integrating Lidar to improve wind turbine controls is a potential breakthrough for reducing the cost of wind energy. By providing undisturbed wind measurements up to 400m in front of the rotor, Lidar may provide an accurate update of the turbine inflow with a preview time of several seconds. Focusing on loads, several studies have evaluated potential reductions using integrated Lidar, either by simulation or full scale field testing.

  17. Sandia National Laboratories: Rotor Aerodynamic Design

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Generator Modeling Radar Friendly Blades Special Programs Techno-Economic Modeling, Analysis, and Support Analysis, Modeling, Cost of Energy, and Policy Impact: Wind Vision 2014...

  18. Turbine Inflow Characterization at the National Wind Technology Center: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clifton, A.; Schreck, S.; Scott, G.; Kelley, N.; Lundquist, J.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Utility-scale wind turbines operate in dynamic flows that can vary significantly over timescales from less than a second to several years. To better understand the inflow to utility-scale turbines, two inflow towers were installed and commissioned at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) National Wind Technology Center near Boulder, Colorado, in 2011. These towers are 135 m tall and instrumented with a combination of sonic anemometers, cup anemometers, wind vanes, and temperature measurements to characterize the inflow wind speed and direction, turbulence, stability and thermal stratification to two utility-scale turbines. Herein, we present variations in mean and turbulent wind parameters with height, atmospheric stability, and as a function of wind direction that could be important for turbine operation as well as persistence of turbine wakes. Wind speed, turbulence intensity, and dissipation are all factors that affect turbine performance. Our results shown that these all vary with height across the rotor disk, demonstrating the importance of measuring atmospheric conditions that influence wind turbine performance at multiple heights in the rotor disk, rather than relying on extrapolation from lower levels.

  19. Rotor heating effects from geomagnetic induced currents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gish, W.B.; Feero, W.E.; Rockefeller, G.D. (Electric Research and Management, Inc., State College, PA (United States))

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The heating effects at the end-ring connection areas of the rotor due to the harmonic current generation of a saturating unit transformer from geomagnetic induced currents (GIC) on the transmission system have been calculated from observed data and from EMTP studies sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute. These calculations show that damage may occur during strong GIC storm activity. This damage can occur from unit transformer saturation or other transformers in the system near the generator. The possibility of damage should be monitored during strong GIC storms through the use of appropriate negative sequence current monitoring and alarms.

  20. Turbulence ingestion noise of open rotors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robison, Rosalyn Aruna Venner

    2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    . Thus a blade whose leading edge curves back in the axial direction, as seen in Figure 1.4, has non-zero sweep. 1.2 Technological context: the open rotor design 9 Figure 1.3: Example of Rig 140 noise results. Image reproduced with permission from... , flight testing and calibration of methods. Hoff included a diagram which illustrated the many different propfan noise sources, see Figure 1.4. There was also a recognition that distortion is an important factor in predicting the acoustics of propeller...

  1. Chaos in a rotor system supported by ball bearings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, James Robert, 1979-

    2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    to observing chaos in rotor systems. Further, there has been little work carried out in the area of chaos control, of which only a small portion has been applied to rotor systems. Originally, the goal of the research described in this paper was to control...

  2. Main Rotor Swashplate Test Stand Design Model and System Overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Almor, Amit

    on the aircraft due to reaction forces generated by rotor blade lift which varies with rotor speed and blade angle of the modified stand: Rotating Components Drivetrain o Variable speed AC Motor o Double cardan input driveshaft, and more closely mimic the operational kinematics of a swashplate which is installed on an aircraft

  3. Single Molecular Rotor at the Nanoscale Christian Joachim1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gimzewski, James

    to transform such a molecular rotor into a motor with a given motive power are also discussed. Keywords components that transform energy (or information) and use this transformation. Their miniaturization is often: Molecular rotor, Motive power, Decoherence, Classical motion, Quantum control, Nano-thermodynamics 1

  4. DEVELOPMENT OF MODIFIED WIND TURBINE: A PAST REVIEW

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rob Res; N R Deshmukh; S J Deshmukh; N R Deshmukh; S J Deshmukh

    Wind energy represents a viable alternative, as it is a virtually endless resource. Through the next several decades, renewable energy technologies, thanks to their continually improving performance and cost, and growing recognition of their Environmental, economic and social values, will grow increasingly competitive with Traditional energy technologies, so that by the middle of the 21 st century, renewable Energy, in its various forms, should be supplying half of the world’s energy needs. In this paper various types of wind turbine are reviewed to understand and the development and modification of horizontal axis wind turbine and how more power can be generated compared to bare turbine of the same rotor blade diameter.

  5. LIVRE DES START-UP 11 OCTOBRE 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Picasso, Marco

    ETURNITY P 33 GUAVAE P 37 LENR CARS SARL P 46 PLUS MAT AG P 58 FINANCE CASHSENTINEL SA P 15 JC FIDUCIAIRE P

  6. Modeling SRAM Start-Up Behavior for Physical Unclonable Functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuzmanov, Georgi

    /data, which are highly prone to physical attacks [1­3]; hence, the methods are no longer secure. Ideally), and reports some industrial measurements to validate the model. Simulation of the impact of different

  7. Transient Start-up of Plane Poiseuille Flow M. Aboubacar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grant, P. W.

    that the restrictions on variations in the gravitational constant are strict [11]. Nevertheless, we 2 hal-00473533

  8. Verification of Readiness to Start Up or Restart Nuclear Facilities

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2010-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The order establishes requirements for verifying readiness for startup of new Hazard Category 1, 2, and 3 nuclear facilities, activities, and operations, and for restart of existing Hazard Category 1, 2, and 3 nuclear facilities, activities, and operations that have been shut down. Cancels DOE O 425.1C. Adm Chg 1, dated 4-2-13.

  9. Verification of Readiness to Start Up or Restart Nuclear Facilities

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2010-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The order establishes requirements for verifying readiness for startup of new Hazard Category 1, 2, and 3 nuclear facilities, activities, and operations, and for restart of existing Hazard Category 1, 2, and 3 nuclear facilities, activities, and operations that have been shut down. Cancels DOE O 425.1C. Adm Chg 1, dated 4-2-13, cancels DOE O 425.1D.

  10. Berkeley Lab Technology Spawns Successful Start-up Companies | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureCommentsEnergy Christopher| Department ofBeowawe BinaryTransfer atof

  11. Start-Up Meeting Mudrock Systems Research Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Ford (Cretaceous) sedimentology, stratigraphy, and geochemistry: Ruppel, Nance, Harbour 2:05 PM Sedimentology and geochemistry of the Jurassic Haynesville/Bossier system: Ursula Hammes. 2:30 PM Wilcox

  12. Wind Farm

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The wind farm in Greensburg, Kansas, was completed in spring 2010, and consists of ten 1.25 megawatt (MW) wind turbines that supply enough electricity to power every house, business, and municipal...

  13. Wind Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation covers wind energy at the Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting, held on November 18-19, 2009.

  14. Reference Model 2: %22Rev 0%22 Rotor Design.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barone, Matthew F.; Berg, Jonathan Charles; Griffith, Daniel

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The preliminary design for a three-bladed cross-flow rotor for a reference marine hydrokinetic turbine is presented. A rotor performance design code is described, along with modifications to the code to allow prediction of blade support strut drag as well as interference between two counter-rotating rotors. The rotor is designed to operate in a reference site corresponding to a riverine environment. Basic rotor performance and rigid-body loads calculations are performed to size the rotor elements and select the operating speed range. The preliminary design is verified with a simple finite element model that provides estimates of bending stresses during operation. A concept for joining the blades and support struts is developed and analyzed with a separate finite element analysis. Rotor mass, production costs, and annual energy capture are estimated in order to allow calculations of system cost-of-energy. Evaluation Only. Created with Aspose.Pdf.Kit. Copyright 2002-2011 Aspose Pty Ltd Evaluation Only. Created with Aspose.Pdf.Kit. Copyright 2002-2011 Aspose Pty Ltd

  15. Tip cap for a turbine rotor blade

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kimmel, Keith D

    2014-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A turbine rotor blade with a spar and shell construction, and a tip cap that includes a row of lugs extending from a bottom side that form dovetail grooves that engage with similar shaped lugs and grooves on a tip end of the spar to secure the tip cap to the spar against radial displacement. The lug on the trailing edge end of the tip cap is aligned perpendicular to a chordwise line of the blade in the trailing edge region in order to minimize stress due to the lugs wanting to bend under high centrifugal loads. A two piece tip cap with lugs at different angles will reduce the bending stress even more.

  16. Rotor and bearing system for a turbomachine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lubell, Daniel; Weissert, Dennis

    2006-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A rotor and bearing system for a turbomachine. The turbomachine includes a drive shaft, an impeller positioned on the drive shaft, and a turbine positioned on the drive shaft proximate to the impeller. The bearing system comprises one gas journal bearing supporting the drive shaft between the impeller and the turbine. The area between the impeller and the turbine is an area of increased heat along the drive shaft in comparison to other locations along the drive shaft. The section of the drive shaft positioned between impeller and the turbine is also a section of the drive shaft that experiences increased stressed and load in the turbomachine. The inventive bearing machine system positions only one radial bearing in this area of increased stress and load.

  17. Synchronization and Collective Dynamics in a Carpet of Microfluidic Rotors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nariya Uchida; Ramin Golestanian

    2010-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We study synchronization of an array of rotors on a substrate that are coupled by hydrodynamic interaction. The rotors that are modeled by an effective rigid body, are driven by an internal torque and exerts an active force on the surrounding fluid. The long-ranged nature of the hydrodynamic interaction between the rotors causes a rich pattern of dynamical behaviors including phase ordering and turbulent spiral waves. The model provides a novel example of coupled oscillators with long-range interaction. Our results suggest strategies for designing controllable microfluidic mixers using the emergent behavior of hydrodynamically coupled active components.

  18. Control coil arrangement for a rotating machine rotor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shah, Manoj R. (Latham, NY); Lewandowsk, Chad R. (Amsterdam, NY)

    2001-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A rotating machine (e.g., a turbine, motor or generator) is provided wherein a fixed solenoid or other coil configuration is disposed adjacent to one or both ends of the active portion of the machine rotor for producing an axially directed flux in the active portion so as to provide planar axial control at single or multiple locations for rotor balance, levitation, centering, torque and thrust action. Permanent magnets can be used to produce an axial bias magnetic field. The rotor can include magnetic disks disposed in opposed, facing relation to the coil configuration.

  19. Optimizing small wind turbine performance in battery charging applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drouilhet, S; Muljadi, E; Holz, R [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States). Wind Technology Div.; Gevorgian, V [State Engineering Univ. of Armenia, Yerevan (Armenia)

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many small wind turbine generators (10 kW or less) consist of a variable speed rotor driving a permanent magnet synchronous generator (alternator). One application of such wind turbines is battery charging, in which the generator is connected through a rectifier to a battery bank. The wind turbine electrical interface is essentially the same whether the turbine is part of a remote power supply for telecommunications, a standalone residential power system, or a hybrid village power system, in short, any system in which the wind generator output is rectified and fed into a DC bus. Field experience with such applications has shown that both the peak power output and the total energy capture of the wind turbine often fall short of expectations based on rotor size and generator rating. In this paper, the authors present a simple analytical model of the typical wind generator battery charging system that allows one to calculate actual power curves if the generator and rotor properties are known. The model clearly illustrates how the load characteristics affect the generator output. In the second part of this paper, the authors present four approaches to maximizing energy capture from wind turbines in battery charging applications. The first of these is to determine the optimal battery bank voltage for a given WTG. The second consists of adding capacitors in series with the generator. The third approach is to place an optimizing DC/DC voltage converter between the rectifier and the battery bank. The fourth is a combination of the series capacitors and the optimizing voltage controller. They also discuss both the limitations and the potential performance gain associated with each of the four configurations.

  20. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ENERGY CONVERSION, VOL. 23, NO. 2, JUNE 2008 551 Sliding Mode Power Control of Variable-Speed Wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    in variable-speed wind energy conversion sys- tems (VS-WECS). These systems have two operation regions de of Variable-Speed Wind Energy Conversion Systems Brice Beltran, Tarek Ahmed-Ali, and Mohamed El Hachemi (newton meter). Tg Generator torque in the rotor side (newton meter). Ths High-speed torque (newton meter

  1. Sandia National Laboratories: Wind

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wind Grid System Planning for Wind: Wind Generator Modeling On June 11, 2014, in Wind generation continues to dominate the interconnection queues and the need for generic,...

  2. Lean implementation across value stream in main rotor blade area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phoenix, Casey J. (Casey John)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary goal for this project was to help expand the existing capability of Sikorsky's main rotor blade business from raw material (titanium) through final assembly. The project helped to facilitate the ongoing lean ...

  3. Structural effects of unsteady aerodynamic forces on horizontal-axis wind turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, M.S.; Shipley, D.E. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States). BioServe Space Technologies

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Due to its renewable nature and abundant resources, wind energy has the potential to fulfill a large portion of this nation`s energy needs. The simplest means of utilizing wind energy is through the use of downwind, horizontal-axis wind turbines (HAWT) with fixed-pitch rotors. This configuration regulates the peak power by allowing the rotor blade to aerodynamically stall. The stall point, the point of maximum coefficient of lift, is currently predicted using data obtained from wind tunnel tests. Unfortunately, these tests do not accurately simulate conditions encountered in the field. Flow around the tower and nacelle coupled with inflow turbulence and rotation of the turbine blades create unpredicted aerodynamic forces. Dynamic stall is hypothesized to occur. Such aerodynamic loads are transmitted into the rotor and tower causing structural resonance that drastically reduces the design lifetime of the wind turbine. The current method of alleviating this problem is to structurally reinforce the tower and blades. However, this adds unneeded mass and, therefore, cost to the turbines. A better understanding of the aerodynamic forces and the manner in which they affect the structure would allow for the design of more cost effective and durable wind turbines. Data compiled by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) for a downwind HAWT with constant chord, untwisted, fixed-pitch rotors is analyzed. From these data, the actual aerodynamic characteristics of the rotor are being portrayed and the potential effects upon the structure can for the first time be fully analyzed. Based upon their understanding, solutions to the problem of structural resonance are emerging.

  4. System engineering and energy costs of small and medium wind turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tu, P.K.C.

    1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A preliminary system-level, computational model was developed to allow broad assessment and optimization of wind turbine design and costs analysis at The Wind Energy Research Center, Solar Energy Research Institute under contract to the US Department of Energy (DOE). This paper briefly describes the basic principles used in the model for energy capture and cost-of-energy (COE), and demonstrates the model's usefulness in determining the effects of rotor and system design modifications. The model's utilization for conducting parametric studies and defining the energy cost of small and medium-sized wind turbines is also shown. Topics of interest to wind turbine engineers and designers include the effects on rotor performance of airfoil geometry, blade pitch angle setting, and the system RPM schedule, etc.

  5. Wind turbine tower for storing hydrogen and energy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fingersh, Lee Jay (Westminster, CO)

    2008-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A wind turbine tower assembly for storing compressed gas such as hydrogen. The tower assembly includes a wind turbine having a rotor, a generator driven by the rotor, and a nacelle housing the generator. The tower assembly includes a foundation and a tubular tower with one end mounted to the foundation and another end attached to the nacelle. The tower includes an in-tower storage configured for storing a pressurized gas and defined at least in part by inner surfaces of the tower wall. In one embodiment, the tower wall is steel and has a circular cross section. The in-tower storage may be defined by first and second end caps welded to the inner surface of the tower wall or by an end cap near the top of the tower and by a sealing element attached to the tower wall adjacent the foundation, with the sealing element abutting the foundation.

  6. Coastal Ohio Wind Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorsevski, Peter; Afjeh, Abdollah; Jamali, Mohsin; Bingman, Verner

    2014-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The Coastal Ohio Wind Project intends to address problems that impede deployment of wind turbines in the coastal and offshore regions of Northern Ohio. The project evaluates different wind turbine designs and the potential impact of offshore turbines on migratory and resident birds by developing multidisciplinary research, which involves wildlife biology, electrical and mechanical engineering, and geospatial science. Firstly, the project conducts cost and performance studies of two- and three-blade wind turbines using a turbine design suited for the Great Lakes. The numerical studies comprised an analysis and evaluation of the annual energy production of two- and three-blade wind turbines to determine the levelized cost of energy. This task also involved wind tunnel studies of model wind turbines to quantify the wake flow field of upwind and downwind wind turbine-tower arrangements. The experimental work included a study of a scaled model of an offshore wind turbine platform in a water tunnel. The levelized cost of energy work consisted of the development and application of a cost model to predict the cost of energy produced by a wind turbine system placed offshore. The analysis found that a floating two-blade wind turbine presents the most cost effective alternative for the Great Lakes. The load effects studies showed that the two-blade wind turbine model experiences less torque under all IEC Standard design load cases considered. Other load effects did not show this trend and depending on the design load cases, the two-bladed wind turbine showed higher or lower load effects. The experimental studies of the wake were conducted using smoke flow visualization and hot wire anemometry. Flow visualization studies showed that in the downwind turbine configuration the wake flow was insensitive to the presence of the blade and was very similar to that of the tower alone. On the other hand, in the upwind turbine configuration, increasing the rotor blade angle of attack reduced the wake size and enhanced the vortices in the flow downstream of the turbine-tower compared with the tower alone case. Mean and rms velocity distributions from hot wire anemometer data confirmed that in a downwind configuration, the wake of the tower dominates the flow, thus the flow fields of a tower alone and tower-turbine combinations are nearly the same. For the upwind configuration, the mean velocity shows a narrowing of the wake compared with the tower alone case. The downwind configuration wake persisted longer than that of an upwind configuration; however, it was not possible to quantify this difference because of the size limitation of the wind tunnel downstream of the test section. The water tunnel studies demonstrated that the scale model studies could be used to adequately produce accurate motions to model the motions of a wind turbine platform subject to large waves. It was found that the important factors that affect the platform is whether the platform is submerged or surface piercing. In the former, the loads on the platform will be relatively reduced whereas in the latter case, the structure pierces the wave free surface and gains stiffness and stability. The other important element that affects the movement of the platform is depth of the sea in which the wind turbine will be installed. Furthermore, the wildlife biology component evaluated migratory patterns by different monitoring systems consisting of marine radar, thermal IR camera and acoustic recorders. The types of radar used in the project are weather surveillance radar and marine radar. The weather surveillance radar (1988 Doppler), also known as Next Generation Radar (NEXRAD), provides a network of weather stations in the US. Data generated from this network were used to understand general migratory patterns, migratory stopover habitats, and other patterns caused by the effects of weather conditions. At a local scale our marine radar was used to complement the datasets from NEXRAD and to collect additional monitoring parameters such as passage rates, flight paths, flight directi

  7. Impact of Distributed Wind on Bulk Power System Operations in ISO-NE: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brancucci Martinez-Anido, C.; Hodge, B. M.; Palchak, D.; Miettinen, J.

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The work presented in this paper aims to study the impact of a range of penetration levels of distributed wind on the operation of the electric power system at the transmission level. This paper presents a case study on the power system in Independent System Operator New England. It is analyzed using PLEXOS, a commercial power system simulation tool. The results show that increasing the integration of distributed wind reduces total variable electricity generation costs, coal- and gas-fired electricity generation, electricity imports, and CO2 emissions, and increases wind curtailment. The variability and uncertainty of wind power also increases the start-up and shutdown costs and ramping of most conventional power plants.

  8. Development and Analysis of a Swept Blade Aeroelastic Model for a Small Wind Turbine (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Preus, R.; Damiani, R.; Lee, S.; Larwood, S.

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the U.S. Department-of-Energy-funded Competitiveness Improvement Project, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) developed new capabilities for aeroelastic modeling of precurved and preswept blades for small wind turbines. This presentation covers the quest for optimized rotors, computer-aided engineering tools, a case study, and summary of the results.

  9. Wind Turbines Condition Monitoring and Fault Diagnosis Using Generator Current Amplitude

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    stator current data collection and attempts to highlight the use of Hilbert transformation for failure the processing of available measurements. For the failure diagnosis problem, in addition, to identify the element, generator bearing failure, stator and rotor winding; insulation failures, inter-turn short circuits

  10. Simulations of an offshore wind farm using large eddy simulation and a torque-controlled actuator disc model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Creech, Angus; Maguire, A Eoghan

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present here a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation of Lillgrund offshore wind farm, which is located in the {\\O}resund Strait between Sweden and Denmark. The simulation combines a dynamic representation of wind turbines embedded within a Large-Eddy Simulation CFD solver, and uses hr-adaptive meshing to increase or decrease mesh resolution where required. This allows the resolution of both large scale flow structures around the wind farm, and local flow conditions at individual turbines; consequently, the response of each turbine to local conditions can be modelled, as well as the resulting evolution of the turbine wakes. This paper provides a detailed description of the turbine model which simulates interactions between the wind, turbine rotors, and turbine generators by calculating the forces on the rotor, the body forces on the air, and instantaneous power output. This model was used to investigate a selection of key wind speeds and directions, investigating cases where a row of turbines would ...

  11. Inverse Load Calculation of Wind Turbine Support Structures - A Numerical Verification Using the Comprehensive Simulation Code FAST: Preprint (Revised)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pahn, T.; Jonkman, J.; Rolges, R.; Robertson, A.

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Physically measuring the dynamic responses of wind turbine support structures enables the calculation of the applied loads using an inverse procedure. In this process, inverse means deriving the inputs/forces from the outputs/responses. This paper presents results of a numerical verification of such an inverse load calculation. For this verification, the comprehensive simulation code FAST is used. FAST accounts for the coupled dynamics of wind inflow, aerodynamics, elasticity and turbine controls. Simulations are run using a 5-MW onshore wind turbine model with a tubular tower. Both the applied loads due to the instantaneous wind field and the resulting system responses are known from the simulations. Using the system responses as inputs to the inverse calculation, the applied loads are calculated, which in this case are the rotor thrust forces. These forces are compared to the rotor thrust forces known from the FAST simulations. The results of these comparisons are presented to assess the accuracy of the inverse calculation. To study the influences of turbine controls, load cases in normal operation between cut-in and rated wind speed, near rated wind speed and between rated and cut-out wind speed are chosen. The presented study shows that the inverse load calculation is capable of computing very good estimates of the rotor thrust. The accuracy of the inverse calculation does not depend on the control activity of the wind turbine.

  12. Rigid-rotor, field-reversed configuration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conti, F., E-mail: conti@df.unipi.it; Giammanco, F. [Physics Department “E. Fermi,” University of Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy) [Physics Department “E. Fermi,” University of Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Plasma Diagnostics and Technologies Ltd., Via Giuntini 63, 56023 Navacchio (PI) (Italy); Wessel, F. J.; Binderbauer, M. W.; Bolte, N.; Morehouse, M.; Qerushi, A.; Rahman, H. U.; Roche, T.; Slepchenkov, M. [Tri Alpha Energy, Inc., P.O. Box 7010, Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States)] [Tri Alpha Energy, Inc., P.O. Box 7010, Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The radial profiles, n(r), B{sub z}(r), and E{sub r}(r), for a Flux-Coil (“inductively driven”), Field-Reversed Configuration (FC-FRC) are measured and compared to the predictions of the Rigid-Rotor Model (RRM), which is an analytic, one-dimensional, time-independent, equilibrium description for the FRC. Injectors mounted on both ends of the confinement vessel provide a pre-fill plasma. Coaxial coils mounted outside the vacuum boundaries of the annular-confinement vessel accelerate the plasma and produce the FRC. The density profile is measured by laser interferometry, the magnetic-field profile using an in-situ probe array, and the electric-field profile using an in-situ, floating-probe array. Free parameters for each profile are measured, which also allow other intrinsic-plasma parameters to be determined, using computer-fit algorithms: null radius, radial thickness, plasma temperature, rotation frequencies, the latter of which are independently verified by spectroscopy. All radial profiles agree with the RRM predictions, for the experimental configuration, parameter regime, and specified-time interval studied here.

  13. Campbell diagrams of weakly anisotropic flexible rotors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oleg N. Kirillov

    2009-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider an axi-symmetric rotor perturbed by dissipative, conservative, and non-conservative positional forces originated at the contact with the anisotropic stator. The Campbell diagram of the unperturbed system is a mesh-like structure in the frequency-speed plane with double eigenfrequencies at the nodes. The diagram is convenient for the analysis of the traveling waves in the rotating elastic continuum. Computing sensitivities of the doublets we find that at every particular node the untwisting of the mesh into the branches of complex eigenvalues in the first approximation is generically determined by only four 2x2 sub-blocks of the perturbing matrix. Selection of the unstable modes that cause self-excited vibrations in the subcritical speed range, is governed by the exceptional points at the corners of the singular eigenvalue surfaces--`double coffee filter' and `viaduct'--which are associated with the crossings of the unperturbed Campbell diagram with the definite Krein signature. The singularities connect the problems of wave propagation in the rotating continua with that of electromagnetic and acoustic wave propagation in non-rotating anisotropic chiral media. As mechanical examples a model of a rotating shaft with two degrees of freedom and a continuous model of a rotating circular string passing through the eyelet are studied in detail.

  14. Stochastic model for aerodynamic force dynamics on wind turbine blades in unsteady wind inflow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luhur, Muhammad Ramzan; Kühn, Martin; Wächter, Matthias

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper presents a stochastic approach to estimate the aerodynamic forces with local dynamics on wind turbine blades in unsteady wind inflow. This is done by integrating a stochastic model of lift and drag dynamics for an airfoil into the aerodynamic simulation software AeroDyn. The model is added as an alternative to the static table lookup approach in blade element momentum (BEM) wake model used by AeroDyn. The stochastic forces are obtained for a rotor blade element using full field turbulence simulated wind data input and compared with the classical BEM and dynamic stall models for identical conditions. The comparison shows that the stochastic model generates additional extended dynamic response in terms of local force fluctuations. Further, the comparison of statistics between the classical BEM, dynamic stall and stochastic models' results in terms of their increment probability density functions gives consistent results.

  15. Offshore Wind Power USA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Offshore Wind Power USA conference provides the latest offshore wind market updates and forecasts.

  16. 20% Wind Energy 20% Wind Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powell, Warren B.

    (government, industry, utilities, NGOs) Analyzes wind's potential contributions to energy security, economic · Transmission a challenge #12;Wind Power Class Resource Potential Wind Power Density at 50 m W/m 2 Wind Speed20% Wind Energy by 2030 20% Wind Energy by 2030 #12;Presentation and Objectives Overview Background

  17. Wind Energy Leasing Handbook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

    Wind Energy Leasing Handbook Wind Energy Leasing Handbook E-1033 Oklahoma Cooperative Extension?..................................................................................................................... 31 What do wind developers consider in locating wind energy projects?............................................................................................ 37 How do companies and individuals invest in wind energy projects?....................................................................

  18. Winding Trail 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    During the past decade, the demand for clean renewable energy continues to rise drastically in Europe, the US, and other countries. Wind energy in the ocean can possibly be one of those future renewable clean energy sources as long...

  19. Aerodynamic testing of a rotating wind turbine blade

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Butterfield, C.P.; Nelsen, E.N.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aerodynamic, load, flow-visualization, and inflow measurements were taken on a downwind horizontal-axis wind turbine (HAWT). A video camera mounted on the rotor recorded video images of tufts attached to the low-pressure side of the blade. Strain gages, mounted every 10% of the blade's span, provided load and pressure measurements. Pressure taps at 32 chordwise positions recorded pressure distributions. Wind inflow was measured via a vertical-plane array of anemometers located 10 m upwind. The objectives of the test were to address whether airfoil pressure distributions measured on a rotating blade differed from those measured in the wind tunnel, if radial flow near or in the boundary layer of the airfoil affected pressure distributions, if dynamic stall could result in increased dynamic loads, and if the location of the separation boundary measured on the rotating blade agreed with that measured in two-dimensional flow in the wind tunnel. 6 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  20. ISABE-2005-1214 Optimum Applications of Four-Port Wave Rotors for Gas Turbines Enhancement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Müller, Norbert

    compressor PT polytropic turbine th thermal WE wave rotor expansion WP wave rotor compression 3 combustor efficiency pressure ratio Subscripts b baseline (untopped) engine comb combustor loss PC polytropic

  1. aero-elasticity rotor aerodynamics: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (UGT) are expected to be a next of incorporating a wave rotor to an ultra-micro gas turbine and the advantages of wave rotors, topping gas turbines at about 70%. Keywords:...

  2. Turning Waste Heat into Power: Ener-G-Rotors and the Entrepreneurial...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Waste Heat into Power: Ener-G-Rotors and the Entrepreneurial Mentorship Program Turning Waste Heat into Power: Ener-G-Rotors and the Entrepreneurial Mentorship Program March 16,...

  3. Method and apparatus for assembling permanent magnet rotors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hsu, J.S.; Adams, D.J.

    1999-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A permanent magnet assembly for assembly in large permanent magnet motors and generators includes a two-piece carrier that can be slid into a slot in the rotor and then secured in place using a set screw. The invention also provides an auxiliary carrier device with guide rails that line up with the teeth of the rotor, so that a permanent magnet assembly can be pushed first into a slot, and then down the slot to its proper location. An auxiliary tool is provided to move the permanent magnet assembly into position in the slot before it is secured in place. Methods of assembling and disassembling the magnet assemblies in the rotor are also disclosed. 2 figs.

  4. Wind Energy Benefits, Wind Powering America (WPA) (Fact Sheet...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Energy Benefits, Wind Powering America (WPA) (Fact Sheet), Wind And Water Power Program (WWPP) Wind Energy Benefits, Wind Powering America (WPA) (Fact Sheet), Wind And Water Power...

  5. Preliminary Design Procedure for Gas TurbineTopping Reverse-Flow Wave Rotors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Müller, Norbert

    improvement of a 30 kW microturbine by implementing various wave-rotor topping cycles. Five different

  6. Yaw dynamics of horizontal axis wind turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, A.C. (Utah Univ., Salt Lake City, UT (United States))

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Designers of a horizontal axis wind turbine yaw mechanism are faced with a difficult decision. They know that if they elect to use a yaw- controlled rotor then the system will suffer increased initial cost and increased inherent maintenance and reliability problems. On the other hand, if they elect to allow the rotor to freely yaw they known they will have to account for unknown and random, though bounded, yaw rates. They will have a higher-risk design to trade-off against the potential for cost savings and reliability improvement. The risk of a yaw-free system could be minimized if methods were available for analyzing and understanding yaw behavior. The complexity of yaw behavior has, until recently, discouraged engineers from developing a complete yaw analysis method. The objectives of this work are to (1) provide a fundamental understanding of free-yaw mechanics and the design concepts most effective at eliminating yaw problems, and (2) provide tested design tools and guidelines for use by free-yaw wind systems manufacturers. The emphasis is on developing practical and sufficiently accurate design methods.

  7. Evaluation of Wind Shear Patterns at Midwest Wind Energy Facilities: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, K.; Randall, G.; Malcolm, D.; Kelley, N.; Smith, B.

    2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy-Electric Power Research Institute (DOE-EPRI) Wind Turbine Verification Program (TVP) has included several wind energy facilities in the Midwestern United States. At several of these projects, a strong diurnal shear pattern has been observed. During the day, low and sometimes negative shear has been measured. During night hours, very high positive shear is frequently observed. These high nighttime shear values are of concern due to the potential for high stresses across the rotor. The resulting loads on turbine components could result in failures. Conversely, the effects of high nighttime wind shear could benefit wind generated energy production in the Midwest by providing a source of greater hub-height wind speeds, particularly for multi-megawatt turbines that utilize tall towers. This paper presents an overview of the observed wind shear at each of the Midwest TVP projects, focusing on diurnal patterns and the frequency of very high nighttime shear at the sites. Turbine fault incidence is examined to determine the presence or absence of a correlation to periods of high shear. Implications of shear-related failures are discussed for other Midwest projects that use megawatt-scale turbines. In addition, this paper discusses the importance of accurate shear estimates for project development.

  8. Study of the non-linear dynamic response of a rotor system with faults and uncertainties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    of the non-linear re- sponse in rotor systems with multi-faults (such as unbalance, asymmetric shaft, bow and Ferraris in fixed frame [10]. · The bow is an initial deformation of the rotor which can be caused) or all parts of the rotor (extended bow). Darpe [12] proposes to investigate the influence of a bow

  9. Non-linear models for the design of solid rotor induction machines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zaiem, M.E. (GE 44--LARGE, Saint-Nazaire (France))

    1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two finite element methods are used to calculate the steady state performances of solid iron rotor induction machines. They are applied to both smooth and slitted rotor and are used to define the rotor form which provides the maximum torque for the rated value of the slip. The mean torque-slip characteristics calculated under constant voltages are compared to experimental results.

  10. Analysis of Cycling Costs in Western Wind and Solar Integration Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jordan, G.; Venkataraman, S.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Western Wind and Solar Integration Study (WWSIS) examined the impact of up to 30% penetration of variable renewable generation on the Western Electricity Coordinating Council system. Although start-up costs and higher operating costs because of part-load operation of thermal generators were included in the analysis, further investigation of additional costs associated with thermal unit cycling was deemed worthwhile. These additional cycling costs can be attributed to increases in capital as well as operations and maintenance costs because of wear and tear associated with increased unit cycling. This analysis examines the additional cycling costs of the thermal fleet by leveraging the results of WWSIS Phase 1 study.

  11. Energy 101: Wind Turbines

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    See how wind turbines generate clean electricity from the power of the wind. Highlighted are the various parts and mechanisms of a modern wind turbine.

  12. WIND DATA REPORT Mattapoisett

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Mattapoisett Mattapoisett, Massachusetts December 1, 2006 ­ February 28, 2007...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distributions

  13. Energy 101: Wind Turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    See how wind turbines generate clean electricity from the power of the wind. Highlighted are the various parts and mechanisms of a modern wind turbine.

  14. Wind power and Wind power and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wind power and the CDM #12; Wind power and the CDM Emerging practices in developing wind power 2005 Jyoti P. Painuly, Niels-Erik Clausen, Jørgen Fenhann, Sami Kamel and Romeo Pacudan #12; WIND POWER AND THE CDM Emerging practices in developing wind power projects for the Clean Development Mechanism Energy

  15. Large Eddy Simulation studies of the effects of alignment and wind farm length

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stevens, Richard J A M; Meneveau, Charles

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Large eddy simulations of wind farms are performed to study the effects of wind turbine row alignment with respect to the incoming flow direction. Various wind farms with fixed stream-wise spacing (7.85 rotor diameters) and varying lateral displacements and span-wise turbine spacings are considered, for a fixed inflow direction. Simulations show that, contrary to common belief, a perfectly staggered (checker-board) configuration does not necessarily give the highest average power output. Instead, the highest mean wind farm power output is found to depend on several factors, the most important one being the alignment that leads to minimization of wake effects from turbines in several upstream rows. This alignment typically occurs at significantly smaller angles than those corresponding to perfect staggering. The observed trends have implications for wind farm designs, especially in sites with a well-defined prevailing wind direction.

  16. A comparison of predicted wind turbine blade loads to test measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, A.D.; Thresher, R.W.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The accurate prediction of wind turbine blade loads and response is important in predicting the fatigue life of wind machines. At the SERI Wind Energy Research Center, a rotor code called FLAP (Force and Loads Analysis Program) is currently being validated by comparing predicted results to machine measurements. The FLAP code has been modified to allow the teetering degrees of freedom. This paper describes these modifications and comparisons of predicted blade bending moments to test measurements. Wind tunnel data for a 1/20th scale model will be used to compare FLAP predictions for the cyclic flap-bending moments at the 33% spanwise station for three different wind speeds. The comparisons will be made for both rigid and teetering hubs. Currently, the FLAP code accounts for deterministic excitations such as wind shear, tower shadow, gravity, and prescribed yawing motions. Conclusions will be made regarding the code's accuracy in predicting the cyclic bending moments.

  17. Stator current demodulation for induction machine rotor faults diagnosis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    with emphasis on stator current processing [1], [2]. It has been proven that mechanical and electrical faultsStator current demodulation for induction machine rotor faults diagnosis El Houssin El Bouchikhi of the stator currents. Hence, demodulation of the stator currents is of high interest for induction machines

  18. Phase modulated rotor angle encoder for switched reluctance motor drive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahajan, Shailendra

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    sensor. In an inexpensive systein, the rotor position sensor comprises of a magnetized ring along with Hall etfect sensors or opto-interrupters with slotted clisk. An optical sensor has a, light emitting diode which acts as a light transmitter, enid a...

  19. TLA-55 Rotor Used in Beckman Coulter OptimaTM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawlowski, Wojtek

    should be read and understood before operation or maintenance of this equipment is attempted. When you, and tested for safety and reliability as part of a Beckman Coulter ultracentrifuge/rotor system. Its safety or reliability cannot be assured if used in a centrifuge not of Beckman Coulter's manufacture or in a Beckman

  20. Plasma Aerodynamic Control Effectors for Improved Wind Turbine Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mehul P. Patel; Srikanth Vasudevan; Robert C. Nelson; Thomas C. Corke

    2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Orbital Research Inc is developing an innovative Plasma Aerodynamic Control Effectors (PACE) technology for improved performance of wind turbines. The PACE system is aimed towards the design of "smart" rotor blades to enhance energy capture and reduce aerodynamic loading and noise using flow-control. The PACE system will provide ability to change aerodynamic loads and pitch distribution across the wind turbine blade without any moving surfaces. Additional benefits of the PACE system include reduced blade structure weight and complexity that should translate into a substantially reduced initial cost. During the Phase I program, the ORI-UND Team demonstrated (proof-of-concept) performance improvements on select rotor blade designs using PACE concepts. Control of both 2-D and 3-D flows were demonstrated. An analytical study was conducted to estimate control requirements for the PACE system to maintain control during wind gusts. Finally, independent laboratory experiments were conducted to identify promising dielectric materials for the plasma actuator, and to examine environmental effects (water and dust) on the plasma actuator operation. The proposed PACE system will be capable of capturing additional energy, and reducing aerodynamic loading and noise on wind turbines. Supplementary benefits from the PACE system include reduced blade structure weight and complexity that translates into reduced initial capital costs.

  1. EIS-0470: U.S. Department of Energy Loan Guarantee for the Cape Wind Energy Project on the Outer Continental Shelf off Massachusetts, Nantucket Sound

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The DOE Loan Programs Office is proposing to offer a loan guarantee to Cape Wind Associates, LLC for the construction and start-up of the Cape Wind Energy Project in Nantucket Sound, offshore of Massachusetts. The proposed Cape Wind Energy Project would consist of up to 130, 3.6-MW turbine generators, in an area of roughly 25-square miles, and would include 12.5 miles of 115-kilovolt submarine transmission cable and an electric service platform. To inform DOE's decision regarding a loan guarantee, DOE adopted the Department of the Interior’s 2009 Final Cape Wind Energy Project EIS, in combination with two Cape Wind Environmental Assessments dated May 2010 and April 2011 (per 40 CFR 1506.4), as a DOE Final EIS (DOE/EIS-0470). The adequacy of the Department of the Interior final EIS adopted by DOE is the subject of a judicial action. This project is inactive.

  2. Wind Power

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsingWhat is abig world of tinyWind Industry SoarsWind

  3. Coupled Dynamic Modeling of Floating Wind Turbine Systems: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wayman, E. N.; Sclavounos, P. D.; Butterfield, S.; Jonkman, J.; Musial, W.

    2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article presents a collaborative research program that the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have undertaken to develop innovative and cost-effective floating and mooring systems for offshore wind turbines in water depths of 10-200 m. Methods for the coupled structural, hydrodynamic, and aerodynamic analysis of floating wind turbine systems are presented in the frequency domain. This analysis was conducted by coupling the aerodynamics and structural dynamics code FAST [4] developed at NREL with the wave load and response simulation code WAMIT (Wave Analysis at MIT) [15] developed at MIT. Analysis tools were developed to consider coupled interactions between the wind turbine and the floating system. These include the gyroscopic loads of the wind turbine rotor on the tower and floater, the aerodynamic damping introduced by the wind turbine rotor, the hydrodynamic damping introduced by wave-body interactions, and the hydrodynamic forces caused by wave excitation. Analyses were conducted for two floater concepts coupled with the NREL 5-MW Offshore Baseline wind turbine in water depths of 10-200 m: the MIT/NREL Shallow Drafted Barge (SDB) and the MIT/NREL Tension Leg Platform (TLP). These concepts were chosen to represent two different methods of achieving stability to identify differences in performance and cost of the different stability methods. The static and dynamic analyses of these structures evaluate the systems' responses to wave excitation at a range of frequencies, the systems' natural frequencies, and the standard deviations of the systems' motions in each degree of freedom in various wind and wave environments. This article in various wind and wave environments. This article explores the effects of coupling the wind turbine with the floating platform, the effects of water depth, and the effects of wind speed on the systems' performance. An economic feasibility analysis of the two concepts was also performed. Key cost components included the material and construction costs of the buoy; material and installation costs of the tethers, mooring lines, and anchor technologies; costs of transporting and installing the system at the chosen site; and the cost of mounting the wind turbine to the platform. The two systems were evaluated based on their static and dynamic performance and the total system installed cost. Both systems demonstrated acceptable motions, and have estimated costs of $1.4-$1.8 million, not including the cost of the wind turbine, the power electronics, or the electrical transmission.

  4. Mathematical and Computational Applications, Vol. 18, No. 3, pp. 408-420, 2013 MODELING AND CONTROL OF A VARIABLE SPEED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yanikoglu, Berrin

    , vertical axis wind turbines have rotor axis perpendicular to wind streamlines. Savonius rotor is the most

  5. Active Flow Control on Bidirectional Rotors for Tidal MHK Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shiu, Henry [Research Engineer; van Dam, Cornelis P. [Professor

    2013-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) tidal turbine extracts energy from tidal currents, providing clean, sustainable electricity generation. In general, all MHK conversion technologies are confronted with significant operational hurdles, resulting in both increased capital and operations and maintenance (O&M) costs. To counter these high costs while maintaining reliability, MHK turbine designs can be simplified. Prior study found that a tidal turbine could be cost-effectively simplified by removing blade pitch and rotor/nacelle yaw. Its rotor would run in one direction during ebb and then reverse direction when the current switched to flood. We dubbed such a turbine a bidirectional rotor tidal turbine (BRTT). The bidirectional hydrofoils of a BRTT are less efficient than conventional hydrofoils and capture less energy, but the elimination of the pitch and yaw systems were estimated to reduce levelized cost of energy by 7.8%-9.6%. In this study, we investigated two mechanisms for recapturing some of the performance shortfall of the BRTT. First, we developed a novel set of hydrofoils, designated the yy series, for BRTT application. Second, we investigated the use of active flow control via microtabs. Microtabs are small deployable/retractable tabs, typically located near the leading or trailing edge of an air/hydrofoil with height on the order of the boundary layer thickness (1% - 2% of chord). They deploy approximately perpendicularly to the foil surface and, like gurney flaps and plain flaps, globally affect the aerodynamics of the airfoil. By strategically placing microtabs and selectively deploying them based on the direction of the inflow, performance of a BRTT rotor can be improved while retaining bidirectional operation. The yy foils were computationally designed and analyzed. They exhibited better performance than the baseline bidirectional foil, the ellipse. For example, the yyb07cn-180 had 14.7% higher (l/d)max than an ellipse of equal thickness. The yyb07cn family also had higher c{sub p,min} than equivalently thick ellipses, indicating less susceptibility to cavitation. Microtabs applied on yy foils demonstrated improved energy capture. A series of variable speed and constant speed rotors were developed with the yyb07cn family of hydrofoils. The constant speed yyb07cn rotor (yy-B02-Rcs,opt) captured 0.45% more energy than the equivalent rotor with ellipses (e-B02-Rcs,opt). With microtabs deployed (yy?t-B02-Rcs,opt), the energy capture increase over the rotor with ellipses was 1.05%. Note, however, that microtabs must be applied judiciously to bidirectional foils. On the 18% thick ellipse, performance decreased with the addition of microtabs. Details of hydrofoil performance, microtab sizing and positioning, rotor configurations, and revenue impacts are presented herein.

  6. Sandia National Laboratories: Rotor Blade Sensors and Instrumentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    capture all of the force applied to the entire wind-turbine system. A turbine's exact wind loading is fundamental to overall system design. Due to the large potential for...

  7. A discussion of the results of the rainflow counting of a wide range of dynamics associated with the simultaneous operation of adjacent wind turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelley, N.; Desrochers, G.; Tangler, J.; Smith, B.

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this study was to provide a fatigue load comparison between two identical wind turbines employing different rotor designs. One turbine was fitted with a rotor consisting of a set of NREL (SERI) thin-airfoil blades while the other rotor included the original-equipment AeroStar blades. The data discussed are based on sample load populations derived from the rainflow cycle counting of 405, 10-minute records specifically collected over a wide range of inflow turbulence conditions. The results have shown that the statistical structure of the alternating load cycles on both turbines can be described as a mixture of three stochastic processes. We noted a high degree of load distribution similarity between the two turbines, with the differences attributable to either rotor weight or swept area.

  8. Wind Technologies & Evolving Opportunities (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robichaud, R.

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation covers opportunities for wind technology; wind energy market trends; an overview of the National Wind Technology Center near Boulder, Colorado; wind energy price and cost trends; wind turbine technology improvements; and wind resource characterization improvements.

  9. 2015 Iowa Wind Power Conference and Iowa Wind Energy Association...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    2015 Iowa Wind Power Conference and Iowa Wind Energy Association Midwest Regional Energy Job Fair 2015 Iowa Wind Power Conference and Iowa Wind Energy Association Midwest Regional...

  10. Community Wind Handbook/Understand Your Wind Resource and Conduct...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Conduct a Preliminary Estimate < Community Wind Handbook Jump to: navigation, search WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHCommunity Wind Handbook WindTurbine-icon.png...

  11. American Wind Energy Association Wind Energy Finance and Investment...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    American Wind Energy Association Wind Energy Finance and Investment Seminar American Wind Energy Association Wind Energy Finance and Investment Seminar October 20, 2014 8:00AM EDT...

  12. 2010 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    wind turbine components (specifically, generators, bladeschangers. ” Wind turbine components such as blades, towers,17%). Wind turbine component exports (towers, blades,

  13. Sweep-twist adaptive rotor blade : final project report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashwill, Thomas D.

    2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Knight & Carver was contracted by Sandia National Laboratories to develop a Sweep Twist Adaptive Rotor (STAR) blade that reduced operating loads, thereby allowing a larger, more productive rotor. The blade design used outer blade sweep to create twist coupling without angled fiber. Knight & Carver successfully designed, fabricated, tested and evaluated STAR prototype blades. Through laboratory and field tests, Knight & Carver showed the STAR blade met the engineering design criteria and economic goals for the program. A STAR prototype was successfully tested in Tehachapi during 2008 and a large data set was collected to support engineering and commercial development of the technology. This report documents the methodology used to develop the STAR blade design and reviews the approach used for laboratory and field testing. The effort demonstrated that STAR technology can provide significantly greater energy capture without higher operating loads on the turbine.

  14. Adaptor assembly for coupling turbine blades to rotor disks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garcia-Crespo, Andres Jose; Delvaux, John McConnell

    2014-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    An adaptor assembly for coupling a blade root of a turbine blade to a root slot of a rotor disk is described. The adaptor assembly includes a turbine blade having a blade root and an adaptor body having an adaptor root. The adaptor body defines a slot having an open end configured to receive the blade root of the turbine blade such that the adaptor root of the adaptor body and the blade root of the turbine blade are adjacent to one another when the blade root of the turbine blade is positioned within the slot. Both the adaptor root of the adaptor body and the blade root of the turbine blade are configured to be received within the root slot of the rotor disk.

  15. 2010 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Public Service Wind Integration Cost Impact Study. Preparedequipment-related wind turbine costs, the overall importinstalled wind power project costs, wind turbine transaction

  16. 2009 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Public Service Wind Integration Cost Impact Study. Preparedinstalled wind power project costs, wind turbine transactionand components and wind turbine costs. Excluded from all

  17. Sandia National Laboratories: wind energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wind Energy Manufacturing Lab Helps Engineers Improve Wind Power On November 15, 2011, in Energy, News, Partnership, Renewable Energy, Wind Energy Researchers at the Wind Energy...

  18. Module Handbook Specialisation Wind Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Habel, Annegret

    ;Specialisation Wind Energy, NTU Athens, 2nd Semester Module 1/Wind Energy: Wind potential, Aerodynamics & Loading of Wind Turbines Module name: Wind potential, Aerodynamics & Loading of Wind Turbines Section Classes Evaluation of Wind Energy Potential Wind turbine Aerodynamics Static and dynamic Loading of Wind turbines

  19. Development of Fully Coupled Aeroelastic and Hydrodynamic Models for Offshore Wind Turbines: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jonkman, J. M.; Sclavounos, P. D.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aeroelastic simulation tools are routinely used to design and analyze onshore wind turbines, in order to obtain cost effective machines that achieve favorable performance while maintaining structural integrity. These tools employ sophisticated models of wind-inflow; aerodynamic, gravitational, and inertial loading of the rotor, nacelle, and tower; elastic effects within and between components; and mechanical actuation and electrical responses of the generator and of control and protection systems. For offshore wind turbines, additional models of the hydrodynamic loading in regular and irregular seas, the dynamic coupling between the support platform motions and wind turbine motions, and the dynamic characterization of mooring systems for compliant floating platforms are also important. Hydrodynamic loading includes contributions from hydrostatics, wave radiation, and wave scattering, including free surface memory effects. The integration of all of these models into comprehensive simulation tools, capable of modeling the fully coupled aeroelastic and hydrodynamic responses of floating offshore wind turbines, is presented.

  20. Blade platform seal for ceramic/metal rotor assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wertz, John L. (Indianapolis, IN)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A combination ceramic and metal turbine rotor for use in high temperature gas turbine engines includes a metal rotor disc having a rim with a plurality of circumferentially spaced blade root retention slots therein to receive a plurality of ceramic blades, each including side platform segments thereon and a dovetail configured root slidably received in one of the slots. Adjacent ones of the platform segments including edge portions thereon closely spaced when the blades are assembled to form expansion gaps in an annular flow surface for gas passage through the blades and wherein the assembly further includes a plurality of unitary seal members on the rotor connected to its rim and each including a plurality of spaced, axially extending, flexible fingers that underlie and conform to the edge portions of the platform segments and which are operative at turbine operating temperatures and speeds to distribute loading on the platform segments as the fingers are seated against the underside of the blade platforms to seal the gaps without undesirably stressing thin web ceramic sections of the platform.

  1. Oxygen-Diffused Titanium as a Candidate Brake Rotor Material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qu, Jun [ORNL; Blau, Peter Julian [ORNL; Jolly, Brian C [ORNL

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Titanium alloys are one of several candidate materials for the next generation of truck disk brake rotors. Despite their advantages of lightweight relative to cast iron and good strength and corrosion resistance, titanium alloys are unlikely to be satisfactory brake rotor materials unless their friction and wear behavior can be significantly improved. In this study, a surface engineering process oxygen diffusion was applied to titanium rotors and has shown very encouraging results. The oxygen diffused Ti-6Al-4V (OD-Ti) was tested on a sub-scale brake tester against a flat block of commercial brake lining material and benchmarked against several other Ti-based materials, including untreated Ti-6Al-4V, ceramic particle-reinforced Ti composites (MMCs), and a thermal-spray-coated Ti alloy. With respect to friction, the OD-Ti outperformed all other candidate materials under the imposed test conditions with the friction coefficient remaining within a desirable range of 0.35-0.50, even under the harshest conditions when the disk surface temperature reached nearly 600 ?C. In addition, the OD-Ti showed significantly improved wear-resistance over the non-treated one and was even better than the Ti-based composite materials.

  2. Wind turbine trailing-edge aerodynamic brake design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quandt, G.

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the design of a centrifugally actuated aerodynamic-overspeed device for a horizontal-axis wind turbine. The device will meet the following criteria; (1) It will be effective for airfoil angles of attack 0{degrees} to 45{degrees}. (2) It will be stowed inside the blade profile prior to deployment. (3) It will be capable of offsetting the positive torque produced by the overall blade. (4) Hinge moments will be minimized to lower actuator loads and cost. (5) It will be evaluated as a potential power modulating active rotor-control system. A literature review of aerodynamic braking devices was conducted. Information from the literature review was used to conceptualize the most effective devices for subsequent testing and design. Wind-tunnel test data for several braking devices are presented in this report. Using the data for the most promising configuration, a preliminary design was developed for a MICON 65/13 wind turbine with Phoenix 7.9-m rotor blades.

  3. SMART Wind Turbine Rotor: Design and Field Test | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin ofEnergy atLLC - FE DKT. 10-160-LNG - ORDER 2913| DepartmentSLIDESHOW:Design and Field

  4. Sandia Energy - Offshore Wind RD&D: Large Offshore Rotor Development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol Home Distribution Grid Integration

  5. Investigating Aeroelastic Performance of Multi-Mega Watt Wind Turbine Rotors Using CFD

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn OtherEnergyBPA-Film-Collection Sign Investigating

  6. Analysis and test results for a two-bladed, passive cycle pitch, horizontal-axis wind turbine in free and controlled yaw

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holenemser, K.H. [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States)

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report surveys the analysis and tests performed at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri, on a horizontal-axis, two-laded wind turbine with teeter hub. The introduction is a brief account of results obtained during the 5-year period ending December 1985. The wind tunnel model and the test turbine (7.6 m [25 ft.] in diameter) at Washington University`s Tyson Research Center had a 67{degree} delta-three angle of the teeter axis. The introduction explains why this configuration was selected and named the passive cycle pitch (PCP) wind turbine. Through the analysis was not limited to the PCP rotor, all tests, including those done from 1986 to 1994, wee conducted with the same teetered wind rotor. The blades are rather stiff and have only a small elastic coning angle and no precone.

  7. Pump impeller-shroud leakage path forces: their effect on a Jeffcott rotor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, James Philip

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for finding the frequency of free vibration as well as system stability. All results lead to the conclusion that the forces have little influence on natural frequency but can have appreciable effects on system stability. Specifically, at higher values.... Figure 15. Frequency response: whirl amplitude. Frequency response: phase angle, Rotor orbit during free vibration. Time history of rotor whirl frequency ratio during free vibration, 32 32 36 36 Figure 16. Figure 17. Rotor orbit during...

  8. Wind Integration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengtheningWildfires may contribute more to global warmingGlobal »Wind

  9. Wind Power

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch >Internship Program TheSiteEurekaWeekly UserWhat's New Today aboutWind

  10. Tuning thermal mismatch between turbine rotor parts with a thermal medium

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Mark Christopher (Niskayuna, NY)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a turbine rotor, an aft shaft wheel and the final-stage wheel of the rotor are coupled together, including by a rabbeted joint. During shutdown and startup of the turbine, a thermal mismatch between the aft shaft wheel and final-stage wheel is avoided by respectively heating and cooling the aft shaft wheel to maintain the thermal mismatch within acceptable limits, thereby avoiding opening of the rabbeted joint and the potential for unbalancing the rotor and rotor vibration. The thermal medium may be supplied by piping in the aft bearing cavity into the cavity between the forward closure plate and the aft shaft wheel.

  11. Midwest Consortium for Wind Turbine Reliability and Optimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott R. Dana; Douglas E. Adams; Noah J. Myrent

    2012-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides an overview of the efforts aimed to establish a student focused laboratory apparatus that will enhance Purdue's ability to recruit and train students in topics related to the dynamics, operations and economics of wind turbines. The project also aims to facilitate outreach to students at Purdue and in grades K-12 in the State of Indiana by sharing wind turbine operational data. For this project, a portable wind turbine test apparatus was developed and fabricated utilizing an AirX 400W wind energy converter. This turbine and test apparatus was outfitted with an array of sensors used to monitor wind speed, turbine rotor speed, power output and the tower structural dynamics. A major portion of this project included the development of a data logging program used to display real-time sensor data and the recording and creation of output files for data post-processing. The apparatus was tested in an open field to subject the turbine to typical operating conditions and the data acquisition system was adjusted to obtain desired functionality to facilitate use for student projects in existing courses offered at Purdue University and Indiana University. Data collected using the data logging program is analyzed and presented to demonstrate the usefulness of the test apparatus related to wind turbine dynamics and operations.

  12. Virtual Models for Prediction of Wind Turbine Parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrew Kusiak

    Abstract—In this paper, a data-driven methodology for the development of virtual models of a wind turbine is presented. To demonstrate the proposed methodology, two parameters of the wind turbine have been selected for modeling, namely, power output and rotor speed. A virtual model for each of the two parameters is developed and tested with data collected at a wind farm. Both models consider controllable and noncontrollable parameters of the wind turbine, as well as the delay effect of wind speed and other parameters. To mitigate data bias of each virtual model and ensure its robustness, a training set is assembled from ten randomly selected turbines. The performance of a virtual model is largely determined by the input parameters selected and the data mining algorithms used to extract the model. Several data mining algorithms for parameter selection and model extraction are analyzed. The research presented in the paper is illustrated with computational results. Index Terms—Data mining, parameter selection, power prediction, virtual model, wind turbine. I.

  13. Wind Power Today

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind Power Today is an annual publication that provides an overview of the wind energy research conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy Wind and Hydropower Technologies Program.

  14. Wind Power Today

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind Power Today is an annual publication that provides an overview of the wind energy research conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy Wind and Hydropower Technologies Program.

  15. Sunflower Wind Farm EA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sunflower Wind Farm EA Sunflower Wind Farm Draft EA (25mb pdf) Note: If you have problems downloading this file, pelase contact Lou Hanebury at (406) 255-2812 Sunflower Wind Farm...

  16. Sandia National Laboratories: wind energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... SMART Rotor Video On September 17, 2012, in A Model for the Nation: Promoting Education and Innovation in Vermont's Electricity Sector On May 8, 2012, in Climate,...

  17. Wind/Hydro Study

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    WindHydro Integration Feasibility Study Announcements (Updated July 8, 2010) The Final WindHydro Integration Feasibility Study Report, dated June 2, 2009, has been submitted to...

  18. Wind energy bibliography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This bibliography is designed to help the reader search for information on wind energy. The bibliography is intended to help several audiences, including engineers and scientists who may be unfamiliar with a particular aspect of wind energy, university researchers who are interested in this field, manufacturers who want to learn more about specific wind topics, and librarians who provide information to their clients. Topics covered range from the history of wind energy use to advanced wind turbine design. References for wind energy economics, the wind energy resource, and environmental and institutional issues related to wind energy are also included.

  19. Wind Turbine Tribology Seminar

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Wind turbine reliability issues are often linked to failures of contacting components, such as bearings, gears, and actuators. Therefore, special consideration to tribological design in wind...

  20. Advanced wind turbine with lift-destroying aileron for shutdown

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coleman, Clint (Warren, VT); Juengst, Theresa M. (Warren, VT); Zuteck, Michael D. (Kemah, TX)

    1996-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    An advanced aileron configuration for wind turbine rotors featuring an aileron with a bottom surface that slopes upwardly at an angle toward the nose region of the aileron. The aileron rotates about a center of rotation which is located within the envelope of the aileron, but does not protrude substantially into the air flowing past the aileron while the aileron is deflected to angles within a control range of angles. This allows for strong positive control of the rotation of the rotor. When the aileron is rotated to angles within a shutdown range of deflection angles, lift-destroying, turbulence-producing cross-flow of air through a flow gap, and turbulence created by the aileron, create sufficient drag to stop rotation of the rotor assembly. The profile of the aileron further allows the center of rotation to be located within the envelope of the aileron, at or near the centers of pressure and mass of the aileron. The location of the center of rotation optimizes aerodynamically and gyroscopically induced hinge moments and provides a fail safe configuration.

  1. Commonwealth Wind Incentive Program – Micro Wind Initiative

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Through the Commonwealth Wind Incentive Program – Micro Wind Initiative the Massachusetts Clean Energy Center (MassCEC) offers rebates of up to $4/W with a maximum of $130,000 for design and...

  2. Sensitivity Analysis of Offshore Wind Cost of Energy (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dykes, K.; Ning, A.; Graf, P.; Scott, G.; Damiami, R.; Hand, M.; Meadows, R.; Musial, W.; Moriarty, P.; Veers, P.

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    No matter the source, offshore wind energy plant cost estimates are significantly higher than for land-based projects. For instance, a National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) review on the 2010 cost of wind energy found baseline cost estimates for onshore wind energy systems to be 71 dollars per megawatt-hour ($/MWh), versus 225 $/MWh for offshore systems. There are many ways that innovation can be used to reduce the high costs of offshore wind energy. However, the use of such innovation impacts the cost of energy because of the highly coupled nature of the system. For example, the deployment of multimegawatt turbines can reduce the number of turbines, thereby reducing the operation and maintenance (O&M) costs associated with vessel acquisition and use. On the other hand, larger turbines may require more specialized vessels and infrastructure to perform the same operations, which could result in higher costs. To better understand the full impact of a design decision on offshore wind energy system performance and cost, a system analysis approach is needed. In 2011-2012, NREL began development of a wind energy systems engineering software tool to support offshore wind energy system analysis. The tool combines engineering and cost models to represent an entire offshore wind energy plant and to perform system cost sensitivity analysis and optimization. Initial results were collected by applying the tool to conduct a sensitivity analysis on a baseline offshore wind energy system using 5-MW and 6-MW NREL reference turbines. Results included information on rotor diameter, hub height, power rating, and maximum allowable tip speeds.

  3. 2008 WIND TECHNOLOGIES MARKET REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    States. Specifically, Bluewater Wind and Delmarva PowerLLC Babcock & Brown Acquisition Bluewater Wind Good Energies

  4. 2008 WIND TECHNOLOGIES MARKET REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    policy support for other renewable energy sources, wind mayrenewable energy and climate policy initiatives. With wind

  5. The experimental and theoretical investigaton of a horizontal-axis wind turbine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Milburn, Robert Terrance

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Design details of the wind turbine are discussed by the sections shown in the figure . Main Su ort Assembl The 3/4 in. diameter rotor shaft is supported at each end by roller bearings. Each bearing is clamped between two aluminum blocks. A flange...THE EXPERIMENTAL AND THEORETICAL INVESTIGATION OF A HORIZONTAL-AXIS WIND TURBINE A Thesis by ROBERT TERRANCE MILBURN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER...

  6. Neural Network Based Modeling of a Large Steam Turbine-Generator Rotor Body Parameters from On-Line Disturbance Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neural Network Based Modeling of a Large Steam Turbine-Generator Rotor Body Parameters from On technique to estimate and model rotor- body parameters of a large steam turbine-generator from real time

  7. Wind Resource Assessment in Europe Using Emergy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paudel, Subodh; Santarelli, Massimo; Martin, Viktoria; Lacarriere, Bruno; Le Corre, Olivier

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    mance characteristics of wind generator. The wind speed atcharacteristics of the wind generator. When wind speed is

  8. Thermodynamic Cycle Analysis for Wave Rotor Combustor Based Combined Cycle Jessica Collins1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Yaoqi

    Thermodynamic Cycle Analysis for Wave Rotor Combustor Based Combined Cycle Jessica Collins1 , Brian of Engineering and Technology The conventional combustor that exists in today's market is a constant pressure device; whereas, the wave rotor combustor investigated in the present research is a constant volume

  9. Molecular rotors: synthesis and evaluation as viscosity sensors Jeyanthy Sutharsan a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Theodorakis, Emmanuel

    Molecular rotors: synthesis and evaluation as viscosity sensors Jeyanthy Sutharsan a , Darcy-mechanical viscosity sensors. These compounds, referred to as molecular rotors, belong to a class of fluorescent probes present the synthesis and spectroscopic characterization of these compounds as viscosity sensors

  10. The Ultra-micro Wave Rotor Research at Michigan State University Florin Iancu, Janusz Piechna*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Müller, Norbert

    University of Technology 24 Nowowiejska Str., 00-665 Warsaw, Poland ABSTRACT Ultra Micro Gas Turbines (Uµ concepts of incorporating a wave rotor to an ultra-micro gas turbine and the advantages of wave rotors be estimated at about 70%. 1. INTRODUCTION Starting in 1995, with the MIT "Micro Gas Turbine" project

  11. Numerical modeling of heat transfer and fluid flow in rotor-stator cavities with throughflow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Numerical modeling of heat transfer and fluid flow in rotor-stator cavities with throughflow S modeling of the turbulent flow in a rotor-stator cavity subjected to a superimposed throughflow with heat the dynamical effects from the heat transfer process. The fluid flow in an enclosed disk system with axial

  12. Numerical modeling of heat transfer and fluid flow in rotor-stator cavities with throughflow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Numerical modeling of heat transfer and fluid flow in rotor-stator cavities with throughflow S in a rotor-stator cavity subjected to a superimposed throughflow with heat transfer. Nu- merical predictions field from the heat transfer process. The turbulent flux is approximated by a gradient hypothesis

  13. A New Approach to Detect Broken Rotor Bars in Induction Machines by Current Spectrum Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    the Fourier Transform of one stator current to make detection. But where the other methods use the Fourier. It is well- known that an interruption of a manufacturing process due to a mechanical or electrical problem rotor bars or cracked rotor end ring), stator faults (opening of a stator phase or inter-turn short

  14. Effect of Cooling Flow on the Operation of a Hot Rotor-Gas Foil Bearing System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryu, Keun

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    comprehensive measurements of bearing temperatures and shaft dynamics conducted on a hollow rotor supported on two first generation GFBs. The hollow rotor (1.36 kg, 36.51 mm OD and 17.9 mm ID) is heated from inside to reach an outer surface temperature of 120...

  15. Self-excited induction generator for variable-speed wind turbine generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muljadi, E.; Gregory, B. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)] [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Broad, D. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States). Dept. of Electrical Engineering] [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States). Dept. of Electrical Engineering

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    When an induction generator is connected to a utility bus, the voltage and frequency at the terminal of the generator are the same as the voltage and frequency of the utility. The reactive power needed by the induction generator is supplied by the utility and the real power is returned to the utility. The rotor speed varies within a very limited range, and the reactive power requirement must be transported through a long line feeder, thus creating additional transmission losses. The energy captured by a wind turbine can be increased if the rotor speed can be adjusted to follow wind speed variations. For small applications such as battery charging or water pumping, a stand alone operation can be implemented without the need to maintain the output frequency output of the generator. A self- excited induction generator is a good candidate for a stand alone operation where the wind turbine is operated at variable speed. Thus the performance of the wind turbine can be unproved. In this paper, we examine a self-excited induction generator operated in a stand alone mode. A potential application for battery charging is given. The output power of the generator will be controlled to improve the performance of the wind turbine.

  16. Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phadke, Amol

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind Generation2006. “ Integrating Wind Generation into Utility Systems”.Stand-Alone Wind Generation . 60

  17. Howard County- Wind Ordinance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This ordinance sets up provisions for allowing small wind energy systems in various zoning districts.

  18. LIDAR Wind Speed Measurement Analysis and Feed-Forward Blade Pitch Control for Load Mitigation in Wind Turbines: January 2010--January 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunne, F.; Simley, E.; Pao, L.Y.

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report examines the accuracy of measurements that rely on Doppler LIDAR systems to determine their applicability to wind turbine feed-forward control systems and discusses feed-forward control system designs that use preview wind measurements. Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) systems are able to measure the speed of incoming wind before it interacts with a wind turbine rotor. These preview wind measurements can be used in feed-forward control systems designed to reduce turbine loads. However, the degree to which such preview-based control techniques can reduce loads by reacting to turbulence depends on how accurately the incoming wind field can be measured. The first half of this report examines the accuracy of different measurement scenarios that rely on coherent continuous-wave or pulsed Doppler LIDAR systems to determine their applicability to feed-forward control. In particular, the impacts of measurement range and angular offset from the wind direction are studied for various wind conditions. A realistic case involving a scanning LIDAR unit mounted in the spinner of a wind turbine is studied in depth with emphasis on choices for scan radius and preview distance. The effects of turbulence parameters on measurement accuracy are studied as well. Continuous-wave and pulsed LIDAR models based on typical commercially available units were used in the studies present in this report. The second half of this report discusses feed-forward control system designs that use preview wind measurements. Combined feedback/feed-forward blade pitch control is compared to industry standard feedback control when simulated in realistic turbulent above-rated winds. The feed-forward controllers are designed to reduce fatigue loads, increasing turbine lifetime and therefore reducing the cost of energy. Three feed-forward designs are studied: non-causal series expansion, Preview Control, and optimized FIR filter. The input to the feed-forward controller is a measurement of incoming wind speeds that could be provided by LIDAR. Non-causal series expansion and Preview Control methods reduce blade root loads but increase tower bending in simulation results. The optimized FIR filter reduces loads overall, keeps pitch rates low, and maintains rotor speed regulation and power capture, while using imperfect wind measurements provided by the spinning continuous-wave LIDAR model.

  19. Advanced Flywheel Composite Rotors: Low-Cost, High-Energy Density Flywheel Storage Grid Demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    GRIDS Project: Boeing is developing a new material for use in the rotor of a low-cost, high-energy flywheel storage technology. Flywheels store energy by increasing the speed of an internal rotor —slowing the rotor releases the energy back to the grid when needed. The faster the rotor spins, the more energy it can store. Boeing’s new material could drastically improve the energy stored in the rotor. The team will work to improve the storage capacity of their flywheels and increase the duration over which they store energy. The ultimate goal of this project is to create a flywheel system that can be scaled up for use by electric utility companies and produce power for a full hour at a cost of $100 per kilowatt hour.

  20. Enclosure Requirements to Protect Personnel from Spinning Rotor Frailures at the Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Research Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKeever, John W [ORNL

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Performance evaluation of electric motors is a major function of the Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Research Center (PEEMRC). Normally these motors have a fixed wire-wound stator and a rotating rotor, which may have conductors embedded in a ferromagnetic core (induction motors), magnets mounted on the surface of the ferromagnetic core with a thin metal or composite cylinder or ring to hold them in place, or magnets embedded in the ferromagnetic core. Most of the work currently involves the last two permanent magnet (PM) configurations. Although the stator of a radial-gap motor can absorb energy from many of the fragments ejected from the rotor during operation, the stator of an axial-gap motor is not positioned to provide significant protection. The housing of each motor can also absorb some of the energy. The most conservative approach, however, is to assume that all fragments from the rotor must be contained by a protective enclosure. An ideal enclosure is transparent. Manufacturers of such plastics as Lexan, Tuffak, and Cyrolon sell different variations of transparent enclosure material. Lexan is a polycarbonate sheet. Lexgard{reg_sign} is a penetration resistant material made by layering polycarbonate material between pieces of ordinary glass. A fragment striking a sheet of enclosure material will pierce the surface layer, but the layered polycarbonate-glass material is able to absorb the fragment's energy before it completes penetration. Tuffak{reg_sign} is Lexan polycarbonate. Cyrolon{reg_sign} bullet resistant material is acrylic sheet. The ability of the enclosure to stop a fragment depends on its thickness as well as the penetration capability of the fragment; for example, a lead fragment has much less penetrating capability than a steel fragment. Enclosure thicknesses are commercially available to provide several levels of protection. These levels depend on the momentum of the fragments and have been evaluated for some common types of ammunition. This summary quantifies four typical worst-case fragments which have maximum translational kinetic energy when ejected from a rotating annulus. (1) The first fragment is released from a rotating annular titanium ring. (2) The second fragment is a magnet released from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL's) 30-kW axial-gap PM motor. Analysis of the second fragment which is like a segment of half-angle, {alpha}, from a thin annular ring is similar to that of the titanium ring segment except that the angle is 10{sup o} instead of 133{sup o}. (3) The third fragment is a magnet from the radial-gap 6-kW fractional-slot surface-mounted PM (SPM) motor with concentrated windings. Analysis of the third fragment is similar to the analysis of the second fragment. (4) The fourth fragment is a 133{sup o} segment of an entire rotor which assumes that the laminates and magnets in the rotor fail as a single fragment, truly a worst case assumption.

  1. An approach to the development and analysis of wind turbine control algorithms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, K.C.

    1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to develop the capability of symbolically generating an analytical model of a wind turbine for studies of control systems. This report focuses on a theoretical formulation of the symbolic equations of motion (EOMs) modeler for horizontal axis wind turbines. In addition to the power train dynamics, a generic 7-axis rotor assembly is used as the base model from which the EOMs of various turbine configurations can be derived. A systematic approach to generate the EOMs is presented using d`Alembert`s principle and Lagrangian dynamics. A Matlab M file was implemented to generate the EOMs of a two-bladed, free yaw wind turbine. The EOMs will be compared in the future to those of a similar wind turbine modeled with the YawDyn code for verification. This project was sponsored by Sandia National Laboratories as part of the Adaptive Structures and Control Task. This is the final report of Sandia Contract AS-0985.

  2. Wind energy offers considerable promise; the wind itself is free,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langendoen, Koen

    Wind energy offers considerable promise; the wind itself is free, wind power is clean. One of these sources, wind energy, offers considerable promise; the wind itself is free, wind power is clean, and it is virtually inexhaustible. In recent years, research on wind energy has accelerated

  3. The T-REX valley wind intercomparison project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmidli, J; Billings, B J; Burton, R; Chow, F K; De Wekker, S; Doyle, J D; Grubisic, V; Holt, T R; Jiang, Q; Lundquist, K A; Ross, A N; Sheridan, P; Vosper, S; Whiteman, C D; Wyszogrodzki, A A; Zaengl, G; Zhong, S

    2008-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    An accurate simulation of the evolution of the atmospheric boundary layer is very important, as the evolution of the boundary layer sets the stage for many weather phenomena, such as deep convection. Over mountain areas the evolution of the boundary layer is particularly complex, due to the nonlinear interaction between boundary layer turbulence and thermally-induced mesoscale wind systems, such as the slope and valley winds. As the horizontal resolution of operational forecasts progresses to finer and finer resolution, more and more of the thermally-induced mesoscale wind systems can be explicitly resolved, and it is very timely to document the current state-of-the-art of mesoscale models at simulating the coupled evolution of the mountain boundary layer and the valley wind system. In this paper we present an intercomparison of valley wind simulations for an idealized valley-plain configuration using eight state-of-the-art mesoscale models with a grid spacing of 1 km. Different sets of three-dimensional simulations are used to explore the effects of varying model dynamical cores and physical parameterizations. This intercomparison project was conducted as part of the Terrain-induced Rotor Experiment (T-REX; Grubisic et al., 2008).

  4. Wind Power Outlook 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    anon.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The brochure, expected to be updated annually, provides the American Wind Energy Association's (AWAE's) up-to-date assessment of the wind industry. It provides a summary of the state of wind power in the U.S., including the challenges and opportunities facing the industry. It provides summary information on the growth of the industry, policy-related factors such as the federal wind energy production tax credit status, comparisons with natural gas, and public views on wind energy.

  5. Aeroelastic tailoring in wind-turbine blade applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veers, P.; Lobitz, D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bir, G. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States). National Wind Technology Center

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reviews issues related to the use of aeroelastic tailoring as a cost-effective, passive means to shape the power curve and reduce loads. Wind turbine blades bend and twist during operation, effectively altering the angle of attack, which in turn affects loads and energy production. There are blades now in use that have significant aeroelastic couplings, either on purpose or because of flexible and light-weight designs. Since aeroelastic effects are almost unavoidable in flexible blade designs, it may be desirable to tailor these effects to the authors advantage. Efforts have been directed at adding flexible devices to a blade, or blade tip, to passively regulate power (or speed) in high winds. It is also possible to build a small amount of desirable twisting into the load response of a blade with proper asymmetric fiber lay up in the blade skin. (Such coupling is akin to distributed {delta}{sub 3} without mechanical hinges.) The tailored twisting can create an aeroelastic effect that has payoff in either better power production or in vibration alleviation, or both. Several research efforts have addressed different parts of this issue. Research and development in the use of aeroelastic tailoring on helicopter rotors is reviewed. Potential energy gains as a function of twist coupling are reviewed. The effects of such coupling on rotor stability have been studied and are presented here. The ability to design in twist coupling with either stretching or bending loads is examined also.

  6. Collegiate Wind Competition Engages Tomorrow's Wind Energy Innovators...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Engages Tomorrow's Wind Energy Innovators Collegiate Wind Competition Engages Tomorrow's Wind Energy Innovators January 6, 2014 - 10:00am Addthis 2014 Collegiate Teams Boise State...

  7. 20% Wind Energy by 2030: Increasing Wind Energy's Contribution...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    : Increasing Wind Energy's Contribution to U.S. Electricity Supply (Executive Summary) 20% Wind Energy by 2030: Increasing Wind Energy's Contribution to U.S. Electricity Supply...

  8. National Wind Technology Center (Fact Sheet), National Wind Technology...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NATIONAL WIND TECHNOLOGY CENTER www.nrel.govwind Wind energy is one of the fastest growing electricity generation sources in the world. NREL's National Wind Technology Center...

  9. Sinomatech Wind Power Blade aka Sinoma Science Technology Wind...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sinomatech Wind Power Blade aka Sinoma Science Technology Wind Turbine Blade Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Sinomatech Wind Power Blade (aka Sinoma Science & Technology...

  10. 20% Wind Energy by 2030: Increasing Wind Energy's Contribution...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    a new vision for wind energy through 2050. Taking into account all facets of wind energy (land-based, offshore, distributed), the new Wind Vision Report defines the...

  11. Sandia Energy - Sandia Wind Turbine Loads Database

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sandia Wind Turbine Loads Database Home Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Wind Energy Resources Wind Software Downloads Sandia Wind Turbine Loads Database Sandia Wind...

  12. North Wind Power Company 2-kilowatt high-reliability wind system. Phase I. Design and analysis. Technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mayer, D J; Norton, Jr, J H

    1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Results are presented of Phase I of a program to design a 2kW high reliability wind turbine for use in remote locations and harsh environments. In phase I of the program, a predecessor of the proposed design was procured and tested in a wind tunnel and in the freestream to observe operational characteristics. An analytical procedure was developed for designing and modelling the proposed variable axis rotor control system (VARCS). This was then verified by extensive mobile testing of pre-prototype components. A low speed three phase alternator with a Lundel type rotor was designed. Prototypes were fabricated and tested to refine calculation procedures and develop an effective alternator with appropriate characteristics. A solid state field switching regulator was designed and tested successfully. All necessary support elements were designed and engineered. A complete analysis of system reliability was conducted including failure mode and effects analyses and reliability, maintenance and safety analyses. Cost estimates were performed for a mature product in production rates of 1000 per year. Analysis and testing conducted throughout the first phase is included.

  13. 2009 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the Impact of Significant Wind Generation Facilities on BulkOperations Impacts of Wind Generation Integration Study.Impacts of Integrating Wind Generation into Idaho Power's

  14. 2011 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Operations Impacts of Wind Generation Integration Study.Impacts of Integrating Wind Generation into Idaho Power's2008. Analysis of Wind Generation Impact on ERCOT Ancillary

  15. 2008 WIND TECHNOLOGIES MARKET REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the Impact of Significant Wind Generation Facilities on BulkOperations Impacts of Wind Generation Integration Study.Impacts of Integrating Wind Generation into Idaho Power's

  16. 2010 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Operations Impacts of Wind Generation Integration Study.Impacts of Integrating Wind Generation into Idaho Power'sthe Impact of Significant Wind Generation Facilities on Bulk

  17. WIND DATA REPORT Presque Isle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Presque Isle June 1, 2005 ­ August 31, 2005 Prepared for United States Department...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distributions

  18. WIND DATA REPORT Presque Isle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Presque Isle December 1, 2004 ­ February 28, 2005 Prepared for United States.................................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distributions

  19. WIND DATA REPORT Presque Isle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Presque Isle December 1, 2004 ­ December 1, 2005 Prepared for United States ......................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distributions

  20. WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island June 1, 2003 ­ August 31, 2003 Prepared for Massachusetts...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distribution

  1. 2009 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Prepared for the Utility Wind Integration Group. Arlington,Consult. 2010. International Wind Energy Development: WorldUBS Global I/O: Global Wind Sector. UBS Investment Research.

  2. WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island December 1, 2003 ­ February 29, 2004 Prepared for Massachusetts.................................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Distribution

  3. WIND DATA REPORT Presque Isle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Presque Isle March 1, 2005 ­ May 31, 2005 Prepared for United States Department.................................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distributions

  4. WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island March 1, 2003 ­ May 31, 2003 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distributions

  5. WIND DATA REPORT FALMOUTH, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT FALMOUTH, MA June1, 2004 to August 31, 2004. Prepared for Massachusetts Technology...................................................................................................................... 8 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 8 Wind Speed Distributions

  6. WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island September 1, 2003 ­ November 30, 2003 Prepared for Massachusetts...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distribution

  7. WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island March 1, 2004 ­ May 31, 2004 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distribution

  8. 2008 WIND TECHNOLOGIES MARKET REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2008. Washington, DC: American Wind Energy Association.American Wind Energy Association ( AWEA).2009b. AWEA Small Wind Turbine Global Market Study: Year

  9. WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island June 1, 2004 ­ August 31, 2004 Prepared for Massachusetts...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distribution

  10. 2008 WIND TECHNOLOGIES MARKET REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Table 8 Figure 30. Wind Integration Costs at Various LevelsOperations and Maintenance Costs Wind project operations andPublic Service Wind Integration Cost Impact Study. Prepared

  11. 2011 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    wind turbine components (specifically, generators, bladeschangers. ” Wind turbine components such as blades, towers,Canada (8%). Wind turbine component exports (towers, blades,

  12. 2012 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    with the section on offshore wind; Donna Heimiller and Billyof 2012, global cumulative offshore wind capacity stood ats (DOE’s) investments in offshore wind energy research and

  13. 2011 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    charging wind power projects for balancing services. 81 BPA,in balancing reserves with increased wind power penetrationin balancing reserves with increased wind power penetration

  14. 2010 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    charging wind power projects for balancing services. 88 BPA,in balancing reserves with increased wind power penetrationin balancing reserves with increased wind power penetration

  15. 2012 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Xcel Energy. 2011. Wind Induced Coal Plant Cyclingand the Implications of Wind Curtailment for Public Serviceof Colorado 2 GW and 3 GW Wind Integration Cost Study.

  16. Wind Farms in North America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoen, Ben

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Opinion About Large Offshore Wind Power: Underlying Factors.Delaware Opinion on Offshore Wind Power - Interim Report.Newark, DE. 16 pages. Global Wind Energy Council (GWEC) (

  17. 2010 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2011. In March 2011, NRG Bluewater Wind?s Delaware projectPurchaser Delmarva NRG Bluewater Wind (Delaware) Universitythe project, while NRG Bluewater would retain the remaining

  18. 2011 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    natural gas prices), pushed wind energy to the top of (andperformance, and price of wind energy, policy uncertainty –cost, performance, and price of wind energy, some of these

  19. WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island December 1, 2004 ­ February 28, 2005 Prepared for Massachusetts.................................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distribution

  20. WIND DATA REPORT DARTMOUTH, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT DARTMOUTH, MA March 26th 2005 to May 31st 2005. Prepared for Massachusetts...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distributions

  1. WIND DATA REPORT FALMOUTH, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT FALMOUTH, MA June 1st 2004- May 31st 2005 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology.................................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distributions......................................................................................................... 11 Monthly Average Wind Speeds

  2. WIND DATA REPORT Kingston, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Kingston, MA March 1, 2006 - May 31, 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology.................................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Distributions.......

  3. WIND DATA REPORT Nantucket, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Nantucket, MA September 1st 2005 to November 30th 2005. Prepared for Massachusetts.................................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distributions

  4. WIND DATA REPORT Wellfleet, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Wellfleet, MA December 1st , 2006 ­ February 28th , 2007 Prepared...................................................................................................................... 8 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distributions

  5. WIND DATA REPORT Nantucket, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Nantucket, MA June 1st 2006 to August 31th 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts.................................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed D

  6. WIND DATA REPORT Truro, Massachusetts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Truro, Massachusetts March 24th to May 31st , 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts.................................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Distributions

  7. WIND DATA REPORT Chester, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Chester, MA December 2006 ­ February 2007 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distributions

  8. WIND DATA REPORT Brewster, Massachusetts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Brewster, Massachusetts December 1, 2005 - February 28, 2006 Prepared.................................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 12 Wind Speed Di

  9. WIND DATA REPORT Truro, Massachusetts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Truro, Massachusetts December, 2006 1st to February 28th , 2007 Prepared...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distributions

  10. WIND DATA REPORT Brewster, Massachusetts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Brewster, Massachusetts June 1, 2006 - August 31, 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts.................................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Di

  11. WIND DATA REPORT Chester, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Chester, MA March 2007 ­ May 2007 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology...................................................................................................................... 8 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distributions

  12. WIND DATA REPORT Chester, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Chester, MA September ­ November 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology.................................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Distributions

  13. WIND DATA REPORT DARTMOUTH, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT DARTMOUTH, MA September 1st 2005 to November 30th 2005. Prepared for Massachusetts.................................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distributions

  14. WIND DATA REPORT Kingston, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Kingston, MA December 1, 2005 - February 28, 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts.................................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Distribution

  15. WIND DATA REPORT Brewster, Massachusetts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Brewster, Massachusetts September 1, 2006 - November 30, 2006 Prepared.................................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Distributions..................

  16. WIND DATA REPORT Nantucket, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Nantucket, MA December 1st 2005 to February 28th 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts.................................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Distributions

  17. WIND DATA REPORT Gardner NCCI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Gardner NCCI March 1, 2007 ­ May 31, 2007 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology...................................................................................................................... 8 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distributions

  18. WIND DATA REPORT FALMOUTH, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT FALMOUTH, MA Sep 1st 2004 to Nov 30th 2004. Prepared for Massachusetts Technology...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distributions

  19. WIND DATA REPORT Chester, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Chester, MA June ­ August 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative.................................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Distributions

  20. WIND DATA REPORT September 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Lynn, MA September 2005 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75.................................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Monthly Average Wind Speeds

  1. WIND DATA REPORT Nantucket, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Nantucket, MA June 1st 2005 to August 31st 2005. Prepared for Massachusetts.................................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distributions

  2. WIND DATA REPORT Truro, Massachusetts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Truro, Massachusetts September 1st to November 30th , 2006 Prepared.................................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Distributions

  3. WIND DATA REPORT Truro, Massachusetts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Truro, Massachusetts June 1st to August 31st , 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts.................................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Distributions

  4. WIND DATA REPORT DARTMOUTH, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT DARTMOUTH, MA June 1st 2005 to August 31st 2005. Prepared for Massachusetts.................................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distributions

  5. WIND DATA REPORT Brewster, Massachusetts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Brewster, Massachusetts March 1, 2006 - May 31, 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts.................................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Distributi

  6. WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island September 1, 2004 ­ November 30, 2004 Prepared for Massachusetts.................................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Distribution.............

  7. WIND DATA REPORT DARTMOUTH, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT DARTMOUTH, MA December 1st 2005 to February 28th 2006. Prepared for Massachusetts.................................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Distributions

  8. WIND DATA REPORT Dartmouth, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Dartmouth, MA March 1st 2006 to May 31th 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts.................................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Distributions

  9. WIND DATA REPORT Wellfleet, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Wellfleet, MA March 1st , 2007 ­ May 31st , 2007 Prepared for Massachusetts...................................................................................................................... 8 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distributions

  10. WIND DATA REPORT Gardner NCCI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Gardner NCCI September 1, 2007 ­ November 30, 2007 Prepared for Massachusetts...................................................................................................................... 8 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distributions

  11. WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island March 1, 2005 ­ May 31, 2005 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology.................................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distribution

  12. WIND DATA REPORT Chester, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Chester, MA April 14 ­ May 31, 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology.................................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Distributions

  13. WIND DATA REPORT FALMOUTH, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT FALMOUTH, MA Dec 1st 2004 to Feb 28th 2005. Prepared for Massachusetts Technology ...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distributions

  14. WIND DATA REPORT FALMOUTH, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT FALMOUTH, MA March 1st 2005 to May 31st 2005. Prepared for Massachusetts...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distributions

  15. WIND DATA REPORT Dartmouth, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Dartmouth, MA June 1st 2006 to July 31th 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts.................................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Distributions

  16. WIND DATA REPORT Gardner NCCI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Gardner NCCI June 1, 2007 ­ August 31, 2007 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology...................................................................................................................... 8 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distributions

  17. 2011 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    studies show that wind energy integration costs are below $do not represent wind energy generation costs. This sectioncomponent of the overall cost of wind energy, but can vary

  18. 2008 WIND TECHNOLOGIES MARKET REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    do not represent wind energy generation costs. Based on thisproduction-cost reduction value of wind energy, without anwith wind energy. Generally, these costs are associated with

  19. 2011 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    performance, and price of wind energy, policy uncertainty –The wind energy integration, transmission, and policyand absent supportive policies for wind energy. That said,

  20. 2010 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The wind energy integration, transmission, and policy2012, however, federal policy towards wind energy remainsin federal policy towards wind energy after 2012 places such