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1

MHK Projects/Contra Rotating Marine Turbine CoRMaT | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Contra Rotating Marine Turbine CoRMaT Contra Rotating Marine Turbine CoRMaT < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":55.6655,"lon":-4.93682,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

2

Consider Steam Turbine Drives for Rotating Equipment  

SciTech Connect

This revised ITP tip sheet on steam turbine drives for rotating equipment provides how-to advice for improving the system using low-cost, proven practices and technologies.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Marine Current Turbines Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Turbines Ltd Turbines Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Marine Current Turbines Ltd (MCT) Place Bristol, United Kingdom Zip BS34 8PD Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Product Developer of tidal stream turbine technology for exploiting flowing water in general and tidal streams in particular. Coordinates 51.454513°, -2.58791° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":51.454513,"lon":-2.58791,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

4

MHK Technologies/Blue Motion Energy marine turbine | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Motion Energy marine turbine Motion Energy marine turbine < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Blue Motion Energy marine turbine.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Blue Motion Energy Technology Resource Click here Current Technology Type Click here Cross Flow Turbine Technology Description The Blue Motion Energy marine turbine however uses a patented system of seawalls A placed radial around the vertically mounted rotor B this way it is possible to funnel the current and significantly increase the flow velocity independent of the direction of the current Technology Dimensions Device Testing Date Submitted 59:30.2 << Return to the MHK database homepage Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=MHK_Technologies/Blue_Motion_Energy_marine_turbine&oldid=681547

5

Aviation Enterprises Ltd see Marine Current Turbines Ltd | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Enterprises Ltd see Marine Current Turbines Ltd Enterprises Ltd see Marine Current Turbines Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Aviation Enterprises Ltd see Marine Current Turbines Ltd Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Website http://http://www.escoot.co.uk Region United Kingdom LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This company is listed in the Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database. This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Aviation_Enterprises_Ltd_see_Marine_Current_Turbines_Ltd&oldid=678251" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs MHK Companies What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties About us

6

High-Order Sliding Mode Control of a Marine Current Turbine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Doubly-Fed Induction Generator- (DFIG) based marine current turbines have been tested to evaluate

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

7

HomoFaber 2010 Turbine hydraulique contra-rotative  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HomoFaber 2010 Turbine hydraulique contra-rotative Personne de contact Dr. Pierre Maruzewski inexploitée à ce jour. Le projet « Micro Turbine » est un projet visant à récupérer une partie de cette énergie perdue. L'idée est de turbiner à même les conduites afin d'assurer la perte de pression désirée

8

Comparison of PMSG and DFIG for Marine Current Turbine Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Comparison of PMSG and DFIG for Marine Current Turbine Applications S. Benelghali, M.E.H. Benbouzid Generator (DFIG), Permanent Magnet Synchronous Generator (PMSG), modeling, Maximum Power Point Tracking

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

9

Marine gas turbine programs at AlliedSignal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Work has been continuing at AlliedSignal Turbines, located in Phoenix, Arizona, U.S.A., on the integration of their gas turbine programs with those of Textron Lycoming since the merger of the Lycoming gas turbine operations into the AlliedSignal Turbines Group about a year and a half ago. Although much of the gas turbine business and development programs are aimed at the aircraft markets, the industrial and marine gas turbine product area is also receiving significant attention in this combined organization. Of particular importance is the marine market, where the TF40 marine gas turbine is a key element. The TF40 is based on a tested turbine core engine with over ten million hours of operating experience. The compact TF40 gas turbine offers one of the highest power-to-weight ratios in its class. With a length of 1422 mm and a weight of 600 kg without a gearbox, the TF40 can produce 3432 kW boost rating for yachts and military craft and 2984 kW at maximum continuous rating for fast ferries. This paper describes the specifications and variations of the different versions being offered by the company.

NONE

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Single-ended counter-rotating radial turbine for space application  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A single-ended turbine with counter-rotating blades operating with sodium as the working fluid. The single-ended, counter-rotating feature of the turbine results in zero torque application to a space platform. Thus, maneuvering of the platform is not adversely affected by the turbine. 4 figs.

Coomes, E.P.; Wilson, D.G.; Webb, B.J.; McCabe, S.J.

1987-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

11

Spanwise aerodynamic loads on a rotating wind turbine blade  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Wind turbine performance and load predictions depend on accurate airfoil performance data. Wind tunnel test data are typically used which accurately describe two-dimensional airfoil performance characteristics. Usually these data are only available for a range of angles of attack from 0 to 15 deg, which excludes the stall characteristics. Airfoils on stall-controlled wind turbines operate in deep stall in medium to high winds. Therefore it is very important to know how the airfoil will perform in these high load conditions. Butterfield et al. have shown that three-dimensional effects and rotation of the blade modify the two-dimensional performance of the airfoil. These effects are modified to different degrees throughout the blade span. The Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) has conducted a series of tests to measure the spanwise variation of airfoil performance characteristics on a rotating wind turbine blade. Maximum lift coefficients were measured to be 200% greater than wind tunnel results at the 30% span. Stall characteristics were generally modified throughout the span. Lift characteristics were unmodified for low to medium angles of attack. This paper discusses these test results for four spanwise locations. 8 refs., 12 figs.

Butterfield, C.P.; Simms, D.; Musial, W.; Scott, G.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Model for simulating rotational data for wind turbine applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document describes a wind simulation model to be used in relation to wind turbine operations. The model is a computer code written in FORTRAN 77. The model simulates turbulence and mean wind effects as they are experienced at a rotating point on the blade of either a horizontal-axis wind turbine (HAWT) or a vertical-axis wind turbine (VAWT). The model is fast, requiring 15 to 120 seconds of VAX execution time to produce a simulation and related statistics. The model allows the user to set a number of wind parameters so that he may evaluate the uncertainty of model results as well as their typical values. When this capability is combined with short execution time, the user can quickly produce a number of simulations based on reasonable variation of input parameters and can use these simulations to obtain a range of wind turbine responses to the turbulence. This ability is important because some of the wind parameters that cannot be precisely evaluated should be prescribed over a range of values. This document is essentially a user's guide. Its features include theoretical derivations, samples of output, comparisons of measured and modeled results, a listing of the FORTRAN code, a glossary for the code, and the input and output of a sample run.

Powell, D.C.; Connell, J.R.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Energetics of Marine Turbine Arrays - Extraction, Dissipation and Diminution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A two-scale modelling approach is discussed to predict the performance and energetics of a large number (more than a few hundred) of marine turbines installed as a power farm in a general coastal environment. The kernel of this approach is that the outer (coastal-scale) model/simulation is to assess the reduction of flow passing through a given farm area as a function of the increase of head loss across the farm, whereas the inner (device-scale) model/simulation uses this function to account for the (otherwise unknown) effect of coastal dynamics for that farm site. Large-eddy simulations (LES) of periodic open channel flow (with a porous plate model representing turbines) are then presented as the device-scale part of such a two-scale model of large marine turbine arrays. Results demonstrate how the energetics of turbine arrays (i.e. extraction, dissipation and diminution of energy in the entire farm area) may change depending on the characteristics of the farm site, array configuration and operating conditio...

Nishino, Takafumi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Numerical simulation and prediction of loads in marine current turbine full-scale rotor blades.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Marine current turbines are submerged structures and subjected to loading conditions from both the currents and wave effects. The associated phenomena posed significant challenge to (more)

Senat, Junior.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Aerodynamic testing of a rotating wind turbine blade  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Aerodynamic, load, flow-visualization, and inflow measurements were taken on a downwind horizontal-axis wind turbine (HAWT). A video camera mounted on the rotor recorded video images of tufts attached to the low-pressure side of the blade. Strain gages, mounted every 10% of the blade's span, provided load and pressure measurements. Pressure taps at 32 chordwise positions recorded pressure distributions. Wind inflow was measured via a vertical-plane array of anemometers located 10 m upwind. The objectives of the test were to address whether airfoil pressure distributions measured on a rotating blade differed from those measured in the wind tunnel, if radial flow near or in the boundary layer of the airfoil affected pressure distributions, if dynamic stall could result in increased dynamic loads, and if the location of the separation boundary measured on the rotating blade agreed with that measured in two-dimensional flow in the wind tunnel. 6 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

Butterfield, C.P.; Nelsen, E.N.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Modeling and Control of a Marine Current Turbine Driven Doubly-Fed Induction Generator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with the modeling and the control of a variable speed DFIG-based marine current turbine with and without tidal synchronous speed); r = Rotor current frequency (r = s ­ ); = DFIG speed ( = /p); f = Viscosity coefficient; J = Rotor Inertia; p = Pole pair number. GLOSSARY MCT = Marine Current Turbine; DFIG = Doubly

Brest, Université de

17

Film cooling effectiveness measurements on rotating and non-rotating turbine components  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Detailed film cooling effectiveness distributions were measured on the stationary blade tip and on the leading edge region of a rotating blade using a Pressure Sensitive Paint technique. Air and nitrogen gas were used as the film cooling gases and the oxygen concentration distribution for each case was measured. The film cooling effectiveness information was obtained from the difference of the oxygen concentration between air and nitrogen gas cases by applying the mass transfer analogy. In the case of the stationary blade tip, plane tip and squealer tip blades were used while the film cooling holes were located (a) along the camber line on the tip or (b) along the span of the pressure side. The average blowing ratio of the cooling gas was controlled to be 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0. Tests were conducted in a five-bladed linear cascade with a blow down facility. The free stream Reynolds number, based on the axial chord length and the exit velocity, was 1,100,000 and the inlet and the exit Mach number were 0.25 and 0.59, respectively. Turbulence intensity level at the cascade inlet was 9.7%. All measurements were made at three different tip gap clearances of 1%, 1.5%, and 2.5% of blade span. Results show that the locations of the film cooling holes and the presence of squealer have significant effects on surface static pressure and film-cooling effectiveness. Same technique was applied to the rotating turbine blade leading edge region. Tests were conducted on the first stage rotor of a 3-stage axial turbine. The Reynolds number based on the axial chord length and the exit velocity was 200,000 and the total to exit pressure ratio was 1.12 for the first rotor. The effects of the rotational speed and the blowing ratio were studied. The rotational speed was controlled to be 2400, 2550, and 3000 rpm and the blowing ratio was 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0. Two different film cooling hole geometries were used; 2-row and 3-row film cooling holes. Results show that the rotational speed changes the directions of the coolant flows. Blowing ratio also changes the distributions of the coolant flows. The results of this study will be helpful in understanding the physical phenomena regarding the film injection and designing more efficient turbine blades.

Ahn, Jaeyong

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Rotationally sampled wind characteristics and correlations with MOD-OA wind turbine response  

SciTech Connect

This report presents results of a comprehensive wind and wind turbine measurement program: the Clayton, New Mexico, vertical plane array/MOD-OA project. In this experiment, the turbulent wind was measured for a large array of fixed anemometers located two blade diameters upwind of a 200-kW horizontal-axis wind turbine (HAWT). Simultaneously, key wind turbine response parameters were also measured. The first of two major objectives of this experiment was to determine the turbulent wind, rotationally sampled to emulate the motion of the wind turbine blade, for the range of different wind speeds and stability classes actually experienced by the wind turbine. The second major objective was to correlate this rotationally sampled wind with the wind turbine blade stress and power, in order to assess the usefulness of the wind measurements for wind turbine loads testing a prediction. Time series of rotationally sampled winds and wind turbine blade bending moments and power were converted to frequency spectra using Fourier transform techniques. These spectra were used as the basis for both qualitative and quantitative comparisons among the various cases. A quantitative comparison between the rotationally sampled wind input and blade bending response was made, using the Fourier spectra to estimate the blade transfer function. These transfer functions were then used to calculate an approximate damping coefficient for the MOD-OA fiberglass blade.

George, R.L.; Connell, J.R.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Study on flow parameters optimisation for marine gas turbine intercooler system based on simulation experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The thermodynamic calculation software of Intercooled-Cycle gas turbine was developed to observe the impacts that the environmental parameters and cold degrees of intercooler produce quantitatively on this marine engine performance. And then, the mathematical ...

Yu-long Ying; Yun-peng Cao; Shu-ying Li; Zhi-tao Wang

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

High-Order Sliding Mode Control of DFIG-Based Marine Current Turbine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High-Order Sliding Mode Control of DFIG-Based Marine Current Turbine S.E. Ben Elghali1 , M, 29240 Brest Armées, France Abstract--This paper deals with the speed control of a variable speed DFIG current turbine, a nonlinear controller has been proposed. DFIG has been already considered for similar

Brest, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rotating marine turbine" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Rotating diffuser for pressure recovery in a steam cooling circuit of a gas turbine  

SciTech Connect

The buckets of a gas turbine are steam-cooled via a bore tube assembly having concentric supply and spent cooling steam return passages rotating with the rotor. A diffuser is provided in the return passage to reduce the pressure drop. In a combined cycle system, the spent return cooling steam with reduced pressure drop is combined with reheat steam from a heat recovery steam generator for flow to the intermediate pressure turbine. The exhaust steam from the high pressure turbine of the combined cycle unit supplies cooling steam to the supply conduit of the gas turbine.

Eldrid, Sacheverel Q. (Saratoga Springs, NY); Salamah, Samir A. (Niskayuna, NY); DeStefano, Thomas Daniel (Ballston Lake, NY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Consider Steam Turbine Drives for Rotating Equipment: Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) Steam Tip Fact Sheet No.21  

SciTech Connect

Steam turbines are well suited as prime movers for driving boiler feedwater pumps, forced or induced-draft fans, blowers, air compressors, and other rotating equipment. This service generally calls for a backpressure non-condensing steam turbine. The low-pressure steam turbine exhaust is available for feedwater heating, preheating of deaerator makeup water, and/or process requirements.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Alternative Liquid Fuel Effects on Cooled Silicon Nitride Marine Gas Turbine Airfoils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With prior support from the Office of Naval Research, DARPA, and U.S. Department of Energy, United Technologies is developing and engine environment testing what we believe to be the first internally cooled silicon nitride ceramic turbine vane in the United States. The vanes are being developed for the FT8, an aeroderivative stationary/marine gas turbine. The current effort resulted in further manufacturing and development and prototyping by two U.S. based gas turbine grade silicon nitride component manufacturers, preliminary development of both alumina, and YTRIA based environmental barrier coatings (EBC's) and testing or ceramic vanes with an EBC coating.

Holowczak, J.

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Power Smoothing Control in a Grid-Connected Marine Current Turbine System for Compensating  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of generator power. In the second step, Super-capacitor (SC) Energy Storage System (ESS) is added to compensate, supercapacitor. NOMENCLATURE ESS Energy storage system MCT Marine current turbine MPPT Maximum power point tracking PMSG Permanent-magnet synchronous generator SoC State of charge SC Supercapacitor , , Magnitude

Brest, Université de

25

Experimental investigation of turbine blade platform film cooling and rotational effect on trailing edge internal cooling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The present work has been an experimental investigation to evaluate the applicability of gas turbine cooling technology. With the temperature of the mainstream gas entering the turbine elevated above the melting temperature of the metal components, these components must be cooled, so they can withstand prolonged exposure to the mainstream gas. Both external and internal cooling techniques have been studied as a means to increase the life of turbine components. Detailed film cooling effectiveness distributions have been obtained on the turbine blade platform with a variety of cooling configurations. Because the newly developed pressure sensitive paint (PSP) technique has proven to be the most suitable technique for measuring the film effectiveness, it was applied to a variety of platform seal configurations and discrete film flows. From the measurements it was shown advanced seals provide more uniform protection through the passage with less potential for ingestion of the hot mainstream gases into the engine cavity. In addition to protecting the outer surface of the turbine components, via film cooling, heat can also be removed from the components internally. Because the turbine blades are rotating within the engine, it is important to consider the effect of rotation on the heat transfer enhancement within the airfoil cooling channels. Through this experimental investigation, the heat transfer enhancement has been measured in narrow, rectangular channels with various turbulators. The present experimental investigation has shown the turbulators, coupled with the rotation induced Coriolis and buoyancy forces, result in non-uniform levels of heat transfer enhancement in the cooling channels. Advanced turbulator configurations can be used to provide increased heat transfer enhancement. Although these designs result in increased frictional losses, the benefit of the heat transfer enhancement outweighs the frictional losses.

Wright, Lesley Mae

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Simulation of winds as seen by a rotating vertical axis wind turbine blade  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this report is to provide turbulent wind analyses relevant to the design and testing of Vertical Axis Wind Turbines (VAWT). A technique was developed for utilizing high-speed turbulence wind data from a line of seven anemometers at a single level to simulate the wind seen by a rotating VAWT blade. Twelve data cases, representing a range of wind speeds and stability classes, were selected from the large volume of data available from the Clayton, New Mexico, Vertical Plane Array (VPA) project. Simulations were run of the rotationally sampled wind speed relative to the earth, as well as the tangential and radial wind speeds, which are relative to the rotating wind turbine blade. Spectral analysis is used to compare and assess wind simulations from the different wind regimes, as well as from alternate wind measurement techniques. The variance in the wind speed at frequencies at or above the blade rotation rate is computed for all cases, and is used to quantitatively compare the VAWT simulations with Horizontal Axis Wind Turbine (HAWT) simulations. Qualitative comparisons are also made with direct wind measurements from a VAWT blade.

George, R.L.

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Lidar measurement of wind velocity turbulence spectra encountered by a rotating turbine blade  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A homodyne CO/sub 2/ lidar system beam was conically scanned around a horizontal axis to measure the wind speed and turbulence characteristics encountered by a rotating turbine blade. Turbulence spectra obtained from the scanning lidar differed considerably from those calculated from fixed-point anemometer measurements, showing a redistribution of energy from lower to higher frequencies. The differences appeared more pronounced during periods when the atmosphere was stable.

Hardesty, R.M.; Korrell, J.A.; Hall, F.F. Jr.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Wind Speed Technology Phase II: Semisubmersible Platform and Anchor Foundation Systems for Wind Turbine Support; Concept Marine Associates, Inc.  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet describes a subcontract with Concept Marine Associates, Inc. to evaluate and optimize a semisubmersible platform and anchor foundation system that can support a 5-MW wind turbine.

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Ocean Aerosols: The Marine Fast-Rotating Shadow-Band Radiometer Network  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ocean Aerosols: The Marine Fast-Rotating Ocean Aerosols: The Marine Fast-Rotating Shadow-Band Radiometer Network M. A. Miller, R. M. Reynolds, and J. J. Bartholomew Brookhaven National Laboratory Upton, New York Introduction A network of ship-mounted marine fast-rotating shadow-band radiometers (FRSRs) and broadband radiometers have been deployed over the fast four years on several backbone ships, funded jointly by Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) and National Aeronautic and Space Administration's (NASA's) Sensor Intercomparison and Merger for Biological and Interdisciplinary Studies (SIMBIOS). These radiometers operate continuously and automatically during daylight hours. There fundamental measurements made by the FRSRs in the network are the direct-normal irradiance

30

Determining the orientation of marine CSEM receivers using orthogonal Procrustes rotation analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Determining the orientation of marine CSEM receivers using orthogonal Procrustes rotation analysis surveys can have unknown orientations because of the unavailability of compass and tilt recordings. In such situ- ations, only the orientation-independent parameters derived from the measured CSEM field vector

Key, Kerry

31

Heat transfer in leading and trailing edge cooling channels of the gas turbine blade under high rotation numbers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The gas turbine blade/vane internal cooling is achieved by circulating the compressed air through the cooling passages inside the turbine blade. Leading edge and trailing edge of the turbine blade are two critical regions which need to be properly cooled. Leading edge region receives extremely hot mainstream flow and high heat transfer enhancement is required. Trailing edge region usually has narrow shaped geometry and applicable cooling techniques are restricted. Heat transfer will be investigated in the leading edge and trailing edge cooling channels at high rotation numbers close to the engine condition. Heat transfer and pressure drop has been investigated in an equilateral triangular channel (Dh=1.83cm) to simulate the cooling channel near the leading edge of the gas turbine blade. Three different rib configurations (45, inverted 45, and 90) were tested at four different Reynolds numbers (10000-40000), each with five different rotational speeds (0-400 rpm). By varying the Reynolds numbers (10000-40000) and the rotational speeds (0-400 rpm), the rotation number and buoyancy parameter reached in this study were 0-0.58 and 0-2.3, respectively. 45 angled ribs show the highest thermal performance at stationary condition. 90 ribs have the highest thermal performance at the highest rotation number of 0.58. Heat transfer coefficients are also experimentally measured in a wedge-shaped cooling channel (Dh =2.22cm, Ac=7.62cm2) to model an internal cooling passage near the trailing edge of a gas turbine blade where the coolant discharges through the slot to the mainstream flow. Tapered ribs are put on the leading and trailing surfaces with an angle of attack of 45. The ribs are parallel with staggered arrangement on opposite walls. The inlet Reynolds number of the coolant varies from 10,000 to 40,000 and the rotational speeds varies from 0 to 500 rpm. The inlet rotation number is from 0 - 1.0. The local rotation number and buoyancy parameter are determined by the rotational speeds and the local Reynolds number at each region. Results show that heat transfer is high near the regions where strong slot ejection exists. Both the rotation number and buoyancy parameter have been correlated to predict the rotational heat transfer enhancement.

Liu, Yao-Hsien

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Wind turbines convert the kinetic energy in moving air into rotational energy, which in turn is converted  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wind turbines convert the kinetic energy in moving air into rotational energy, which in turn the wind doesn't blow? Wind Power on the Community Scale Renewable Energy Research Laboratory, University Energy Research Laboratory brings you this series of fact sheets about Wind Power on the community scale

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

33

Order-of-magnitude enhancement of wind farm power density via counter-rotating vertical-axis wind turbine arrays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modern wind farms require significant land resources to separate each wind turbine from the adjacent turbine wakes. These aerodynamic constraints limit the amount of power that can be extracted from a given wind farm footprint. We conducted full-scale field tests of vertical-axis wind turbines in counter-rotating configurations under natural wind conditions. Whereas wind farms consisting of propeller-style turbines produce 2 to 3 watts of power per square meter of land area, these field tests indicate that power densities approaching 100 W m^-2 can be achieved by arranging vertical-axis wind turbines in layouts that enable them to extract energy from adjacent wakes. In addition, we calculated that the global wind resource available to 10-m tall turbines based on the present approach is approximately 225 trillion watts (TW), which significantly exceeds the global wind resource available to 80-m tall, propeller-style wind turbines, approximately 75 TW. This improvement is due to the closer spacing that can be a...

Dabiri, John O

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Investigating the Influence of the Added Mass Effect to Marine Hydrokinetic Horizontal-Axis Turbines Using a General Dynamic Wake Wind Turbine Code  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes a recent study to investigate the applicability of a horizontal-axis wind turbine (HAWT) structural dynamics and unsteady aerodynamics analysis program (FAST and AeroDyn respectively) to modeling the forces on marine hydrokinetic (MHK) turbines. This paper summarizes the added mass model that has been added to AeroDyn. The added mass model only includes flow acceleration perpendicular to the rotor disc, and ignores added mass forces caused by blade deflection. A model of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) Unsteady Aerodynamics Experiment (UAE) Phase VI wind turbine was analyzed using FAST and AeroDyn with sea water conditions and the new added mass model. The results of this analysis exhibited a 3.6% change in thrust for a rapid pitch case and a slight change in amplitude and phase of thrust for a case with 30{sup o} of yaw.

Maniaci, D. C.; Li, Y.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Investigating the Influence of the Added Mass Effect to Marine Hydrokinetic Horizontal-Axis Turbines Using a General Dynamic Wake Wind Turbine Code: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes a recent study to investigate the applicability of a horizontal-axis wind turbine (HAWT) structural dynamics and unsteady aerodynamics analysis program (FAST and AeroDyn respectively) to modeling the forces on marine hydrokinetic (MHK) turbines. It summarizes the added mass model that has been added to AeroDyn. The added mass model only includes flow acceleration perpendicular to the rotor disc, and ignores added mass forces caused by blade deflection. A model of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) Unsteady Aerodynamics Experiment (UAE) Phase VI wind turbine was analyzed using FAST and AeroDyn with sea water conditions and the new added mass model. The results of this analysis exhibited a 3.6% change in thrust for a rapid pitch case and a slight change in amplitude and phase of thrust for a case with 30 degrees of yaw.

Maniaci, D. C.; Li, Y.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Effects of Tidal Turbine Noise on Fish Hearing and Tissues - Draft Final Report - Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Snohomish Public Utility District No.1 plans to deploy two 6 meter OpenHydro tidal turbines in Admiralty Inlet in Puget Sound, under a FERC pilot permitting process. Regulators and stakeholders have raised questions about the potential effect of noise from the turbines on marine life. Noise in the aquatic environment is known to be a stressor to many types of aquatic life, including marine mammals, fish and birds. Marine mammals and birds are exceptionally difficult to work with for technical and regulatory reasons. Fish have been used as surrogates for other aquatic organisms as they have similar auditory structures. This project was funded under the FY09 Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) to Snohomish PUD, in partnership with the University of Washington - Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center, the Sea Mammal Research Unit, and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The results of this study will inform the larger research project outcomes. Proposed tidal turbine deployments in coastal waters are likely to propagate noise into nearby waters, potentially causing stress to native organisms. For this set of experiments, juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) were used as the experimental model. Plans exist for prototype tidal turbines to be deployed into their habitat. Noise is known to affect fish in many ways, such as causing a threshold shift in auditory sensitivity or tissue damage. The characteristics of noise, its spectra and level, are important factors that influence the potential for the noise to injure fish. For example, the frequency range of the tidal turbine noise includes the audiogram (frequency range of hearing) of most fish. This study was performed during FY 2011 to determine if noise generated by a 6-m diameter OpenHydro turbine might affect juvenile Chinook salmon hearing or cause barotrauma. Naturally spawning stocks of Chinook salmon that utilize Puget Sound are listed as threatened (http://www.nwr.noaa.gov/ESA-Salmon-Listings/Salmon-Populations/Chinook/CKPUG.cfm); the fish used in this experiment were hatchery raised and their populations are not in danger of depletion. After they were exposed to simulated tidal turbine noise, the hearing of juvenile Chinook salmon was measured and necropsies performed to check for tissue damage. Experimental groups were (1) noise exposed, (2) control (the same handling as treatment fish but without exposure to tidal turbine noise), and (3) baseline (never handled). Experimental results indicate that non-lethal, low levels of tissue damage may have occurred but that there were no effects of noise exposure on the auditory systems of the test fish.

Halvorsen, Michele B.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Copping, Andrea E.

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

37

Investigating the Influence of the Added Mass Effect to Marine Hydrokinetic Horizontal-Axis Turbines Using a General Dynamic Wake Wind Turbine Code  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Investigating the Influence of Investigating the Influence of the Added Mass Effect to Marine Hydrokinetic Horizontal-Axis Turbines Using a General Dynamic Wake Wind Turbine Code D.C. Maniaci Pennsylvania State University Y. Li National Renewable Energy Laboratory Presented at the Oceans 11 Conference Kona, Hawaii September 19-21, 2011 Conference Paper NREL/CP-5000-52306 October 2011 NOTICE The submitted manuscript has been offered by an employee of the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC (Alliance), a contractor of the US Government under Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308. Accordingly, the US Government and Alliance retain a nonexclusive royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or allow others to do so, for US Government purposes.

38

Rotationally Augmented Flow Structures and Time Varying Loads on Turbine Blades: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To better understand wind turbine flow physics, time dependent blade surface pressure data were acquired from the NREL Unsteady Aerodynamics Experiment.

Schreck, S. J.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Marine Hydrokinetic Turbine Power-Take-Off Design for Optimal Performance and Low Impact on Cost-of-Energy: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Marine hydrokinetic devices are becoming a popular method for generating marine renewable energy worldwide. These devices generate electricity by converting the kinetic energy of moving water, wave motion or currents, into electrical energy through the use of a power-take-off (PTO) system. Most PTO systems incorporate a mechanical or hydraulic drivetrain, power generator, and electric control/conditioning system to deliver the generated electric power to the grid at the required state. Like wind turbine applications, the PTO system must be designed for high reliability, good efficiency, and long service life with reasonable maintenance requirements, low cost, and an appropriate mechanical design for anticipated applied steady and unsteady loads. The ultimate goal of a PTO design is high efficiency and low maintenance and cost, with a low impact on the device cost-of-energy (CoE).

Beam, M.; Kline, B.; Elbing, B.; Straka, W.; Fontaine, A.; Lawson, M.; Li, Y.; Thresher, R.; Previsic, M.

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Marine Hydrokinetic Turbine Power-Take-Off Design for Optimal Performance and Low Impact on Cost-of-Energy: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Marine hydrokinetic devices are becoming a popular method for generating marine renewable energy worldwide. These devices generate electricity by converting the kinetic energy of moving water, wave motion or currents, into electrical energy through the use of a Power-Take-Off (PTO) system. Most PTO systems incorporate a mechanical or hydraulic drive train, power generator and electric control/conditioning system to deliver the generated electric power to the grid at the required state. Like wind turbine applications, the PTO system must be designed for high reliability, good efficiency, and long service life with reasonable maintenance requirements, low cost and an appropriate mechanical design for anticipated applied steady and unsteady loads. The ultimate goal of a PTO design is high efficiency, low maintenance and cost with a low impact on the device Cost-of-Energy (CoE).

Beam, M.; Kline, B.; Elbing, B.; Straka, W.; Fontaine, A.; Lawson, M.; Li, Y.; Thresher, R.; Previsic, M.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rotating marine turbine" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Heat Transfer in Rectangular Channels (AR=2:1) of the Gas Turbine Blade at High Rotation Numbers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas turbine blade/vane cooling is obtained by circulating the high pressure air from compressor to the internal cooling passage of the blade/vane. Heat transfer and cooling effect in the rotating blade is highly affected by rotation. The typical rotation number for the aircraft engine is in the range of 0~0.25 and for the land based power generation turbine in the range of 0~05. Currently, the heat transfer data at high rotation numbers are limited. Besides, the investigation of heat transfer phenomena in the turn region, especially near hub portion is rare. This dissertation is to study the heat transfer in rectangular channels with turns in the tip or the hub portion respectively at high rotation numbers close to the engine condition. The dissertation experimentally investigates the heat transfer phenomena in a two-pass rectangular channel (AR=W/H=2:1) with a 180 degree sharp turn in the tip portion. The flow in the first passage is radial outward and after the turn in the second passage, the flow direction is radial inward. The hydraulic diameter (Dh) of the channel is 16.9 mm. Parallel square ribs with an attack angle (alpha) of 45 degrees are used on leading and trailing surfaces to enhance the heat transfer. The rib height-to-hydraulic diameter ratio (e/Dh) is 0.094. For the baseline smooth case and the case with rib pitch-to-height ratio (P/e) 10, channel orientation angles (beta) of 90 degrees and 135 degrees were tried to model the cooling passage in the mid and rear portion of the blade respectively. Two other P/e ratios of 5 and 7.5 were studied at beta=135 degrees to investigate their effect on heat transfer. The data are presented under high rotation numbers and buoyancy parameters by varying the Reynolds number (Re=10,000~40,000) and rotation speed (rpm=0~400). Corresponding rotation number and buoyancy parameter are ranged as 0~0.45 and 0~0.8 respectively. The dissertation also studies the heat transfer in a two-pass channel (AR=2:1) connected by a 180 degree U bend in the hub portion. The flow in the first passage is radial inward and after the U bend, the flow in the second passage is radial outward. The cross-section dimension of this channel is the same as the previous one. To increase heat transfer, staggered square ribs (e/Dh=0.094) are pasted on leading and trailing walls with an attack angle (alpha) of 45 degrees and pitch-to-height ratio (P/e) of 8. A turning vane in the shape of half circle (R=18.5 mm, t=1.6 mm) is used in the turn region to guide the flow for both smooth and ribbed cases. Channel orientation angles (beta) of 90 degrees and 135 degrees were taken for both smooth and ribbed cases. The heat transfer data were taken at high rotation numbers close to previous test section.

Lei, Jiang 1980-

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

An experimental study of film cooling in a rotating transonic turbine  

SciTech Connect

Time-resolved measurements of heat transfer on a fully cooled transonic turbine stage have been taken in a short duration turbine test facility, which simulates full engine nondimensional conditions. The time average of this data is compared to uncooled rotor data and cooled linear cascade measurements made on the same profile. The film cooling reduces the time-averaged heat transfer compared to the uncooled rotor on the blade suction surface by as much as 60 percent, but has relatively little effect on the pressure surface. The suction surface rotor heat transfer is lower than that measured in the cascade. The results are similar over the central 3/4 of the span, implying that the flow here is mainly two dimensional. The film cooling is shown to be much less effective at high blowing ratios than at low ones. Time-resolved measurements reveal that the cooling, when effective, both reduced the dc level of heat transfer and changed the shape of the unsteady waveform. Unsteady blowing is shown to be a principal driver of film cooling fluctuations, and a linear model is shown to do a good job in predicting the unsteady heat transfer. The unsteadiness results in a 12 percent decrease in heat transfer on the suction surface and a 5 percent increase on the pressure surface.

Abhari, R.S. (Textron Lycoming, Stratford, CT (United States)); Epstein, A.H. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States))

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

CFD analysis of rotating two-bladed flatback wind turbine rotor.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The effects of modifying the inboard portion of the NREL Phase VI rotor using a thickened, flatback version of the S809 design airfoil are studied using a three-dimensional Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes method. A motivation for using such a thicker airfoil design coupled with a blunt trailing edge is to alleviate structural constraints while reducing blade weight and maintaining the power performance of the rotor. The calculated results for the baseline Phase VI rotor are benchmarked against wind tunnel results obtained at 10, 7, and 5 meters per second. The calculated results for the modified rotor are compared against those of the baseline rotor. The results of this study demonstrate that a thick, flatback blade profile is viable as a bridge to connect structural requirements with aerodynamic performance in designing future wind turbine rotors.

van Dam, C.P. (University of California, David, CA); Chao, David D.; Berg, Dale E. (University of California, David, CA)

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

High-Order Sliding Mode Control of DFIG-Based Marine Current Turbine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

wind turbines 1 #12;2 · Providing analysis of data submitted by DyoCore to the Energy CommissionBEFORE THE ENERGY RESOURCES CONSERVATION AND DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA IN THE MATTER OF THE COMPLAINT AGAINST DOCKET NO.: 11-CAI-03 DYOCORE, INC. BROUGHT BY ENERGY COMMISSION STAFF

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

45

Simulating Collisions for Hydrokinetic Turbines  

SciTech Connect

Evaluations of blade-strike on an axial-flow Marine Hydrokinetic turbine were conducted using a conventional methodology as well as an alternative modeling approach proposed in the present document. The proposed methodology integrates the following components into a Computa- tional Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model: (i) advanced eddy-resolving flow simulations, (ii) ambient turbulence based on field data, (iii) moving turbine blades in highly transient flows, and (iv) Lagrangian particles to mimic the potential fish pathways. The sensitivity of blade-strike prob- ability to the following conditions was also evaluated: (i) to the turbulent environment, (ii) to fish size and (iii) to mean stream flow velocity. The proposed methodology provided fraction of collisions and offered the capability of analyzing the causal relationships between the flow envi- ronment and resulting strikes on rotating blades. Overall, the conventional methodology largely overestimates the probability of strike, and lacks the ability to produce potential fish and aquatic biota trajectories as they interact with the rotating turbine. By using a set of experimental corre- lations of exposure-response of living fish colliding on moving blades, the occurrence, frequency and intensity of the particle collisions was next used to calculate the survival rate of fish crossing the MHK turbine. This step indicated survival rates always greater than 98%. Although the proposed CFD framework is computationally more expensive, it provides the advantage of evaluating multiple mechanisms of stress and injury of hydrokinetic turbine devices on fish.

Richmond, Marshall C.; Romero Gomez, Pedro DJ; Rakowski, Cynthia L.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

MHK Technologies/The Davis Hydro Turbine | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydro Turbine Hydro Turbine < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage The Davis Hydro Turbine.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Blue Energy Technology Resource Click here Current Technology Type Click here Cross Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1 3 Discovery Concept Def Early Stage Dev Design Engineering Technology Description The Blue Energy Ocean Turbine acts as a highly efficient underwater vertical axis windmill Four fixed hydrofoil blades of the turbine are connected to a rotor that drives an integrated gearbox and electrical generator assembly The turbine is mounted in a durable concrete marine caisson that anchors the unit to the ocean floor and the structure directs flow through the turbine further concentrating the resource supporting the coupler gearbox and generator above the rotor These sit above the surface of the water and are readily accessible for maintenance and repair The hydrofoil blades employ a hydrodynamic lift principal that causes the turbine foils to move proportionately faster than the speed of the surrounding water Computer optimized cross flow design ensures that the rotation of the turbine is unidirectional on both the ebb and flow of the tide

47

Turbine Overspeed Trip Modernization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides guidance for power plant engineers contemplating modernization of their main turbine overspeed trip systems. When a large power plant turbine suddenly loses its output shaft loading due to a generator or power grid problem, the steam flow driving the turbine must be cut off very quickly to prevent an overspeed event. The overspeed trip system protects personnel and plant systems by preventing missiles that can result when turbines disintegrate at higher than normal rotational speeds....

2006-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

48

118 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON INDUSTRIAL ELECTRONICS, VOL. 58, NO. 1, JANUARY 2011 Experimental Validation of a Marine Current Turbine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Calpine Gilroy Cogen, L.P. filed a petition with the California Energy Commission (Energy Commission on the Project's S-100 General Electric Frame 7 Gas Turbine Generator (S-100 gas turbine). These changes will update the Conditions of Certification in the 1995 California Energy Commission (Energy Commission

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

49

NETL: Turbines  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Turbines Coal and Power Systems Turbines Turbine Animation Turbines have been the world's energy workhorses for generations... - Read More The NETL Turbine Program manages a...

50

Advanced Gas Turbine Guidelines: Rotating Blade Temperature Measurement System (BTMS): Durability Surveillance at Potomac Electric P ower Company's Station H  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The blade scans performed by EPRI's Blade Temperature Measurement System (BTMS) represent an important source of blade metal temperature data. These advanced gas turbine guidelines describe the design, installation, and operation of the BTMS in a utility power plant. The guidelines include an analysis of blade temperature scans as well as a summary of lessons learned.

1999-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

51

Automotive turbine engine  

SciTech Connect

Gas flow through a turbine is divided, with part of the flow directed to the compressor for the combusion chamber and part directed to the primary power turbine. Division of the gas flow is accomplished by a mixing wheel of novel design. Before passing to the primary power turbine the gas flow passes through a secondary power turbine that drives the compressor for the combustion chamber. Both the secondary power turbine and the compressor rotate independently of the main turbine rotor shaft. The power input to the secondary power turbine is varied in accordance with the pressure differential between the gas pressure at the outlet of the compressor for the combustion chamber and the outlet from the mixing wheel. If the speed of the main turbine shaft slows down more power is put into the secondary power turbine and the combustion chamber compressor is speeded up so as to produce a higher gas pressure than would otherwise be the case.

Wirth, R.E.; Wirth, M.N.

1978-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

52

554 IEEE JOURNAL OF OCEANIC ENGINEERING, VOL. 37, NO. 3, JULY 2012 Generator Systems for Marine Current Turbine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

turbine. DFIG Doubly-fed induction generator. PMSG Permanent magnet synchronous generator. MPPT Maximum from a DFIG- and PMSG-based MCT. To high- light differences between the considered technologies, a vari

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

53

Microhydropower Turbines, Pumps, and Waterwheels  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A microhydropower system needs a turbine, pump, or waterwheel to transform the energy of flowing water into rotational energy, which is then converted into electricity.

54

Gas Turbine World performance specs 1984  

SciTech Connect

The following topics are discussed: working insights into the performance specifications; performance and design characteristics of electric power plants, mechanical drive gas turbines, and marine propulsion gas turbines; and performance calculations.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Water Wall Turbine | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wall Turbine Jump to: navigation, search Name Water Wall Turbine Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Website http:www.wwturbine.com Region Canada LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase...

56

Sustainable Energy Solutions Task 2.0: Wind Turbine Reliability and Maintainability Enhancement through System-wide Structure Health Monitoring and Modifications to Rotating Components  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

EXECUTIVE SUMARRY An evaluation of nondestructive structural health monitoring methods was completed with over 132 documents, 37 specifically about wind turbines, summarized into a technology matrix. This matrix lists the technology, what can be monitored with this technology, and gives a short summary of the key aspects of the technology and its application. Passive and active acoustic emission equipment from Physical Acoustics Corp. and Acellent Technologies have been evaluated and selected for use in experimental state loading and fatigue tests of composite wind turbine blade materials. Acoustic Emission (AE) and Active Ultrasonic Testing (AUT), were applied to composite coupons with both simulated and actual damage. The results found that, while composites are more complicated in nature, compared to metallic structures, an artificial neural network analysis could still be used to determine damage. For the AE system, the failure mode could be determined (i.e. fiber breakage, delamination, etc.). The Acellent system has been evaluated to work well with composite materials. A test-rig for reliability testing of the rotating components was constructed. The research on the types of bearings used in the wind turbines indicated that in most of the designs, the main bearings utilized to support the shaft are cylindrical roller bearings. The accelerated degradation testing of a population of bearings was performed. Vibration and acoustic emission data was collected and analyzed in order to identify a representative degradation signal for each bearing to identify the initiation of the degradation process in the bearings. Afterwards, the RMS of the vibration signal from degradation initiation up to the end of the useful life of the bearing was selected to predict the remaining useful life of the bearing. This step included fitting Autoregressive Moving Average (ARMA) models to the degradation signals and approximating the probability distribution function (PDF) of remaining useful life based on the results of Monte-Carlo simulation of the ARMA models. This step was performed for different percentages of the degradation signal of each bearing. The accuracy of the proposed approach then was assessed by comparing the actual life of the bearing and the estimated life of the bearing from the developed models. The results were impressive and indicated that the accuracy of the models improved as more data was utilized in developing the ARMA models (we get closer to the end of the life of the bearing).

Janet M Twomey, PhD

2010-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

57

Gas turbine sealing apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas turbine includes forward and aft rows of rotatable blades, a row of stationary vanes between the forward and aft rows of rotatable blades, an annular intermediate disc, and a seal housing apparatus. The forward and aft rows of rotatable blades are coupled to respective first and second portions of a disc/rotor assembly. The annular intermediate disc is coupled to the disc/rotor assembly so as to be rotatable with the disc/rotor assembly during operation of the gas turbine. The annular intermediate disc includes a forward side coupled to the first portion of the disc/rotor assembly and an aft side coupled to the second portion of the disc/rotor assembly. The seal housing apparatus is coupled to the annular intermediate disc so as to be rotatable with the annular intermediate disc and the disc/rotor assembly during operation of the gas turbine.

Wiebe, David J; Wessell, Brian J; Ebert, Todd; Beeck, Alexander; Liang, George; Marussich, Walter H

2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

58

Wind Turbines  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Although all wind turbines operate on similar principles, several varieties are in use today. These include horizontal axis turbines and vertical axis turbines.

59

Gas turbine engine braking and method  

SciTech Connect

A method is described of decelerating a ground vehicle driven by a gas turbine engine having a gas generator section and a free turbine output power section driven by a gas flow from the gas generator section, comprising the steps of: altering the incidence of gas flow from the gas generator section onto the free turbine section whereby said gas flow opposes rotation of the free turbine section; increasing gas generator section speed; and subsequent to said altering and increasing steps, selectively mechanically interconnecting said gas generator and free turbine sections whereby the rotational inertia of the gas generator section tends to decelerate the free turbine section.

Mattson, G.; Woodhouse, G.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Energy Basics: Microhydropower Turbines, Pumps, and Waterwheels  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

A microhydropower system needs a turbine, pump, or waterwheel to transform the energy of flowing water into rotational energy, which is then converted into electricity....

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rotating marine turbine" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Snubber assembly for turbine blades  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A snubber associated with a rotatable turbine blade in a turbine engine, the turbine blade including a pressure sidewall and a suction sidewall opposed from the pressure wall. The snubber assembly includes a first snubber structure associated with the pressure sidewall of the turbine blade, a second snubber structure associated with the suction sidewall of the turbine blade, and a support structure. The support structure extends through the blade and is rigidly coupled at a first end portion thereof to the first snubber structure and at a second end portion thereof to the second snubber structure. Centrifugal loads exerted by the first and second snubber structures caused by rotation thereof during operation of the engine are at least partially transferred to the support structure, such that centrifugal loads exerted on the pressure and suctions sidewalls of the turbine blade by the first and second snubber structures are reduced.

Marra, John J

2013-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

62

Lubricated Reciprocating Frictional Properties of Marine Cylinder ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Process Design of the Ductile Cast Iron Cylinder Head for Marine Diesel Engine ... Heavy Section Ductile Iron Castings for Use in Wind Turbine Generators.

63

Vertical axis wind turbine with continuous blade angle adjustment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The author presents a concept for a vertical axis wind turbine that utilizes each blade's entire rotational cycle for power generation. Each blade has its own vertical axis of rotation and is constrained to rotate at the ...

Weiss, Samuel Bruce

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Advanced Gas Turbine Guidelines: Rotating Blade Temperature Measurement System (BTMS)--Supplement No. 1: Durability Surveillance at Florida Power & Light Company's Martin Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The blade scans performed by EPRI's Blade Temperature Measurement System (BTMS) represent an important source of blade metal temperature data. These advanced gas turbine guidelines describe the design, installation, and operation of the BTMS in a utility power plant operating General Electric MS7221FA advanced gas turbines. The guidelines include an analysis of blade temperature scans as well as a summary of lessons learned under baseload operating conditions.

1999-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

65

MHK Technologies/Cross Flow Turbine | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flow Turbine < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Technology Profile Primary Organization Marine Renewable Technologies Technology...

66

Fluid turbine  

SciTech Connect

A fluid turbine designed for increased power output includes an annular housing provided with a semi-spherical dome for directing incoming fluid flow to impinge on a plurality of rotor blades within the housing fixed to a vertical output shaft. An angle on the order of between 5 to 85/sup 0/, in the direction of rotation of the shaft, exists between the upper (Leading) and lower (Trailing) edges of each blade. The blades are manufactured from a plurality of aerodynamically-shaped, radially spaced ribs covered with a skin. The leading edge of each rib is curved, while the trailing edge is straight. The straight edge of the ribs in each blade approach a vertical plane through the vertical axis of the housing output shaft as the ribs progress radially inwardly towards the output shaft. The housing has fluid exit passages in its base so that deenergized fluid can be quickly flushed from the housing by the downwardly directed flow in combination with the novel blade configuration, which acts as a screw or force multiplier, to expel deenergized fluid. The airfoil shaped ribs also provide the blades with a contour for increasing the fluid velocity on the underside of the blades adjacent the fluid exit passage to aid in expelling the deenergized air while providing the turbine with both impulse and axial-flow, fluid impingement on the blades, resulting in a force vector of increased magnitude. A downwardly directed, substantially semi-cylindrical deflector frame connected to the housing blocks the path of flow of ambient fluid to create a low pressure area beneath the base to aid in continuously drawing fluid into the housing at high velocity to impinge on the rotor blades. The increased flow velocity and force on the blades along with the enhanced removal of deenergized fluid results in increased power output of the turbine.

Lebost, B.A.

1980-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

67

Dynamic analysis of a 5 megawatt offshore floating wind turbine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of wind turbine. Rating Control Rotor Radius Rated Windturbines is a major design consideration due to cyclic loading induced by the rotating rotors [the turbine. The base was assumed to be fixed and the rotor

Harriger, Evan Michael

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Industrial Gas Turbines | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Industrial Gas Turbines Industrial Gas Turbines Industrial Gas Turbines November 1, 2013 - 11:40am Addthis A gas turbine is a heat engine that uses high-temperature, high-pressure gas as the working fluid. Part of the heat supplied by the gas is converted directly into mechanical work. High-temperature, high-pressure gas rushes out of the combustor and pushes against the turbine blades, causing them to rotate. In most cases, hot gas is produced by burning a fuel in air. This is why gas turbines are often referred to as "combustion" turbines. Because gas turbines are compact, lightweight, quick-starting, and simple to operate, they are used widely in industry, universities and colleges, hospitals, and commercial buildings. Simple-cycle gas turbines convert a portion of input energy from the fuel

69

Industrial Gas Turbines | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Industrial Gas Turbines Industrial Gas Turbines Industrial Gas Turbines November 1, 2013 - 11:40am Addthis A gas turbine is a heat engine that uses high-temperature, high-pressure gas as the working fluid. Part of the heat supplied by the gas is converted directly into mechanical work. High-temperature, high-pressure gas rushes out of the combustor and pushes against the turbine blades, causing them to rotate. In most cases, hot gas is produced by burning a fuel in air. This is why gas turbines are often referred to as "combustion" turbines. Because gas turbines are compact, lightweight, quick-starting, and simple to operate, they are used widely in industry, universities and colleges, hospitals, and commercial buildings. Simple-cycle gas turbines convert a portion of input energy from the fuel

70

NETL: Turbines - About the Turbine Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Turbines About the Turbine Program Siemens Turbine Turbines have been the world's energy workhorses for generations, harkening back to primitive devices such as waterwheels (2,000...

71

Geothermal turbine  

SciTech Connect

A turbine for the generation of energy from geothermal sources including a reaction water turbine of the radial outflow type and a similar turbine for supersonic expansion of steam or gases. The rotor structure may incorporate an integral separator for removing the liquid and/or solids from the steam and gas before the mixture reaches the turbines.

Sohre, J.S.

1982-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

72

Overspeed protection for a gas turbine/steam turbine combined cycle  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes an improved combined cycle power plant and overspeed protection system of the type having a reheat steam turbine. It comprises: a high pressure steam turbine section with at least one control valve, and a lower pressure steam turbine section; a gas turbine including a turbine section, a combustor, a fuel valve supplying the combustor, and an air compressor with a discharge end leading to the combustor; a load riven by the reheat steam turbine and the gas turbine; the reheat steam turbine, the gas turbine and the load all having rotating members; a heat recovery steam generator heated by the gas turbine, including a high pressure steam generating section supplying steam to the high pressure steam turbine section through the control valve, and a steam reheater section receiving steam exhausted from the high pressure steam turbine section. The improvement comprises: a valveless steam conduit connected between the outlet of the steam reheater section and the inlet of the lower pressure steam turbine section, and solid couplings serving to solidify couple the rotating members together as a single rotor, the rotor having a single thrust bearing.

Moore, J.H.

1991-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

73

Microhydropower Turbine, Pump, and Waterwheel Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Microhydropower Turbine, Pump, and Waterwheel Basics Microhydropower Turbine, Pump, and Waterwheel Basics Microhydropower Turbine, Pump, and Waterwheel Basics August 16, 2013 - 3:58pm Addthis A microhydropower system needs a turbine, pump, or waterwheel to transform the energy of flowing water into rotational energy, which is then converted into electricity. Turbines Turbines are commonly used to power microhydropower systems. The moving water strikes the turbine blades, much like a waterwheel, to spin a shaft. But turbines are more compact in relation to their energy output than waterwheels. They also have fewer gears and require less material for construction. There are two general types of turbines: impulse and reaction. Impulse Turbines Impulse turbines, which have the least complex design, are most commonly

74

Microhydropower Turbine, Pump, and Waterwheel Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Microhydropower Turbine, Pump, and Waterwheel Basics Microhydropower Turbine, Pump, and Waterwheel Basics Microhydropower Turbine, Pump, and Waterwheel Basics August 16, 2013 - 3:58pm Addthis A microhydropower system needs a turbine, pump, or waterwheel to transform the energy of flowing water into rotational energy, which is then converted into electricity. Turbines Turbines are commonly used to power microhydropower systems. The moving water strikes the turbine blades, much like a waterwheel, to spin a shaft. But turbines are more compact in relation to their energy output than waterwheels. They also have fewer gears and require less material for construction. There are two general types of turbines: impulse and reaction. Impulse Turbines Impulse turbines, which have the least complex design, are most commonly

75

Turbine arrangement  

SciTech Connect

A turbine arrangement is disclosed for a gas turbine engine having a sloped gas flowpath through the turbine. The radial axes of the rotor blades and stator vanes in the sloped flowpath are tilted such that the axes are substantially normal to the mean flow streamline of the gases. This arrangement reduces tip losses and thereby increases engine efficiency.

Johnston, R.P.

1984-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

76

Turbine seal assembly  

SciTech Connect

A seal assembly that limits gas leakage from a hot gas path to one or more disc cavities in a turbine engine. The seal assembly includes a seal apparatus that limits gas leakage from the hot gas path to a respective one of the disc cavities. The seal apparatus comprises a plurality of blade members rotatable with a blade structure. The blade members are associated with the blade structure and extend toward adjacent stationary components. Each blade member includes a leading edge and a trailing edge, the leading edge of each blade member being located circumferentially in front of the blade member's corresponding trailing edge in a direction of rotation of the turbine rotor. The blade members are arranged such that a space having a component in a circumferential direction is defined between adjacent circumferentially spaced blade members.

Little, David A.

2013-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

77

Gas turbine sealing apparatus  

SciTech Connect

A sealing apparatus in a gas turbine. The sealing apparatus includes a seal housing apparatus coupled to a disc/rotor assembly so as to be rotatable therewith during operation of the gas turbine. The seal housing apparatus comprises a base member, a first leg portion, a second leg portion, and spanning structure. The base member extends generally axially between forward and aft rows of rotatable blades and is positioned adjacent to a row of stationary vanes. The first leg portion extends radially inwardly from the base member and is coupled to the disc/rotor assembly. The second leg portion is axially spaced from the first leg portion, extends radially inwardly from the base member, and is coupled to the disc/rotor assembly. The spanning structure extends between and is rigidly coupled to each of the base member, the first leg portion, and the second leg portion.

Marra, John Joseph; Wessell, Brian J.; Liang, George

2013-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

78

Electronic fuel control system for gas turbine  

SciTech Connect

A method is described for monitoring gas turbine operating temperatures and rotational velocity for producing one of a group of fuel control signals for controlling the fuel input rate to the gas turbine. The method consists of: monitoring turbine inlet temperatures through respective sensors for the gas turbine, averaging the turbine inlet temperatures to produce an average turbine inlet temperature signal, monitoring a gas generator inlet temperature sensor of the gas turbine for producing a gas generator inlet temperature signal, generating a speed signal proportional to the rotational velocity of the gas turbine, combining the gas generator inlet temperature signal with the speed signal to produce a first function signal, applying the first function signal to a stored data set to produce a second function signal, the stored data set related to performance characteristics of the gas turbine, and comparing the turbine inlet temperature signal to the second function signal to produce a difference signal therefrom, the difference signal serving as a fuel control signal for the gas turbine.

Nick, C.F.

1986-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

79

Technological cost%3CU%2B2010%3Ereduction pathways for axial%3CU%2B2010%3Eflow turbines in the marine hydrokinetic environment.  

SciTech Connect

This report considers and prioritizes potential technical costreduction pathways for axialflow turbines designed for tidal, river, and ocean current resources. This report focuses on technical research and development costreduction pathways related to the device technology rather than environmental monitoring or permitting opportunities. Three sources of information were utilized to understand current cost drivers and develop a list of potential costreduction pathways: a literature review of technical work related to axialflow turbines, the U.S. Department of Energy Reference Model effort, and informal webinars and other targeted interactions with industry developers. Data from these various information sources were aggregated and prioritized with respect to potential impact on the lifetime levelized cost of energy. The four most promising costreduction pathways include structural design optimization; improved deployment, maintenance, and recovery; system simplicity and reliability; and array optimization.

Laird, Daniel L.; Johnson, Erick L.; Ochs, Margaret Ellen; Boren, Blake [Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Technological cost%3CU%2B2010%3Ereduction pathways for axial%3CU%2B2010%3Eflow turbines in the marine hydrokinetic environment.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report considers and prioritizes potential technical costreduction pathways for axialflow turbines designed for tidal, river, and ocean current resources. This report focuses on technical research and development costreduction pathways related to the device technology rather than environmental monitoring or permitting opportunities. Three sources of information were utilized to understand current cost drivers and develop a list of potential costreduction pathways: a literature review of technical work related to axialflow turbines, the U.S. Department of Energy Reference Model effort, and informal webinars and other targeted interactions with industry developers. Data from these various information sources were aggregated and prioritized with respect to potential impact on the lifetime levelized cost of energy. The four most promising costreduction pathways include structural design optimization; improved deployment, maintenance, and recovery; system simplicity and reliability; and array optimization.

Laird, Daniel L.; Johnson, Erick L.; Ochs, Margaret Ellen; Boren, Blake [Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rotating marine turbine" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Airfoil seal system for gas turbine engine  

SciTech Connect

A turbine airfoil seal system of a turbine engine having a seal base with a plurality of seal strips extending therefrom for sealing gaps between rotational airfoils and adjacent stationary components. The seal strips may overlap each other and may be generally aligned with each other. The seal strips may flex during operation to further reduce the gap between the rotational airfoils and adjacent stationary components.

Diakunchak, Ihor S.

2013-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

82

Chapter 14: Wind Turbine Control Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Wind turbines are complex, nonlinear, dynamic systems forced by gravity, stochastic wind disturbances, and gravitational, centrifugal, and gyroscopic loads. The aerodynamic behavior of wind turbines is nonlinear, unsteady, and complex. Turbine rotors are subjected to a complicated three-dimensional turbulent wind inflow field that drives fatigue loading. Wind turbine modeling is also complex and challenging. Accurate models must contain many degrees of freedom (DOF) to capture the most important dynamic effects. The rotation of the rotor adds complexity to the dynamics modeling. Designs of control algorithms for wind turbines must account for these complexities. Algorithms must capture the most important turbine dynamics without being too complex and unwieldy. Off-the-shelf commercial soft ware is seldom adequate for wind turbine dynamics modeling. Instead, specialized dynamic simulation codes are usually required to model all the important nonlinear effects. As illustrated in Figure 14-1, a wind turbine control system consists of sensors, actuators and a system that ties these elements together. A hardware or software system processes input signals from the sensors and generates output signals for actuators. The main goal of the controller is to modify the operating states of the turbine to maintain safe turbine operation, maximize power, mitigate damaging fatigue loads, and detect fault conditions. A supervisory control system starts and stops the machine, yaws the turbine when there is a significant yaw misalignment, detects fault conditions, and performs emergency shut-downs. Other parts of the controller are intended to maximize power and reduce loads during normal turbine operation.

Wright, A. D.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Turbine Option  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

study was sponsored by the Turbine Survival Program in cooperation with the Department of Energy (DOE), Hydro Optimization Team (HOT), and the Federal Columbia River Power System...

84

Overspeed protection method for a gas turbine/steam turbine combined cycle  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a method for achieving overspeed protection in a combined cycle gas and steam turbine power plant. It comprises solidly coupling together to rotate at all times as a single rotor unit, including during sudden loss of load occurrences, the rotating members of a gas turbine with its associated combustor and air compressor, a high pressure steam turbine at least one lower pressure stream turbine and an electrical generator; transferring heat from the gas turbine exhaust to steam exhausted from the high pressure steam turbine in a steam reheater before it is input to the at least one lower pressure steam turbine; connecting an output of the steam reheater with an input of the lower pressure steam turbine via a valveless steam conduit; and using a single overspeed control to detect a sudden loss of load occurrence and, in response, simultaneously reducing steam input to the high pressure steam turbine and reducing fuel input to the gas turbine combustor while permitting residual reheater output to continue to expand freely through the at least one lower pressure steam turbine.

Moore, J.H.

1991-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

85

MHK Technologies/Tidal Turbine | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Turbine Turbine < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Tidal Turbine.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Aquascientific Project(s) where this technology is utilized *MHK Projects/Race Rocks Demonstration Technology Resource Click here Current/Tidal Technology Type Click here Cross Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 5/6: System Integration and Technology Laboratory Demonstration Technology Description Turbine is positioned by anchoring and cabling Energy extraction from flow that is transverse to the rotation axis Turbines utilize both lift and drag Mooring Configuration Gravity base although other options are currently being explored Technology Dimensions Device Testing Date Submitted 10/8/2010

86

Operational behavior of a double-fed permanent magnet generator for wind turbines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Greater efficiency in wind turbine systems is achieved by allowing the rotor to change its rate of rotation as the wind speed changes. The wind turbine system is decoupled from the utility grid and a variable speed operation ...

Reddy, Sivananda Kumjula

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Turbine blade tip with offset squealer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An industrial turbine assembly comprises a plurality of rotating blade portions in a spaced relation with a stationary shroud. The rotating blade includes a root section, an airfoil having a pressure sidewall and a suction sidewall defining an outer periphery and a tip portion having a tip cap. An offset squealer is disposed on the tip cap. The offset squealer is positioned inward from the outer periphery of the rotating blade. The offset squealer increases the flow resistance and reduces the flow of hot gas flow leakage for a given pressure differential across the blade tip portion so as to improve overall turbine efficiency.

Bunker, Ronald Scott (Niskayuna, NY)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

On the Fatigue Analysis of Wind Turbines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Modern wind turbines are fatigue critical machines that are typically used to produce electrical power from the wind. Operational experiences with these large rotating machines indicated that their components (primarily blades and blade joints) were failing at unexpectedly high rates, which led the wind turbine community to develop fatigue analysis capabilities for wind turbines. Our ability to analyze the fatigue behavior of wind turbine components has matured to the point that the prediction of service lifetime is becoming an essential part of the design process. In this review paper, I summarize the technology and describe the ''best practices'' for the fatigue analysis of a wind turbine component. The paper focuses on U.S. technology, but cites European references that provide important insights into the fatigue analysis of wind turbines.

Sutherland, Herbert J.

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

MHK Technologies/Water Wall Turbine | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Turbine Turbine < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Water Wall Turbine.png Technology Profile Primary Organization Water Wall Turbine Technology Resource Click here Current Technology Type Click here Cross Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 5 6 System Integration and Technology Laboratory Demonstration Technology Description WWTurbine has developed and introduced a new commercially viable system for the extraction of Potential and Kinetic Energy from large fast moving water currents for conversion into Electric Energy Mooring Configuration Monopile Optimum Marine/Riverline Conditions min current velocity of 2 m s Technology Dimensions Technology Nameplate Capacity (MW) 0 5 3 0 MW Device Testing

90

Chemically recuperated gas turbine  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a powerplant. It comprises: a gas turbine engine having a compressor, a combustor downstream of the compressor, a turbine, and a power turbine downstream and adjacent the turbine there being no reheating means between the turbine and power turbine; a reformer positioned downstream of the power turbine such that the output of the power turbine provides a first means for heating the reformer; a second means for heating the reformer, the second means positioned downstream of the power turbine.

Horner, M.W.; Hines, W.R.

1992-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

91

Design and operation of a counter-rotating aspirated compressor blowdown test facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A unique counter-rotating aspirated compressor was tested in a blowdown facility at the Gas Turbine Laboratory at MIT. The facility expanded on experience from previous blowdown turbine and blowdown compressor experiments. ...

Parker, David V. (David Vickery)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Design and operation of a counter-rotating aspirated compressor blowdown test facility; Counter-rotating aspirated compressor blowdown test facility.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A unique counter-rotating aspirated compressor was tested in a blowdown facility at the Gas Turbine Laboratory at MIT. The facility expanded on experience from previous (more)

Parker, David V. (David Vickery)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Steam turbine for geothermal power generation  

SciTech Connect

A steam turbine comprises a casing; turbine vanes rotatably set in the casing; a plurality of partition walls which extend along radial directions from the rotation center of the turbine vanes to define a plurality of steam valve chambers in the casing; steam supply pipes respectively connected to the corresponding steam valve chambers; and regulating valves which are fitted to the respective steam supply pipes to regulate respectively the flow rate of steam streams supplied to the respective steam valve chambers. At least one partition wall for dividing the interior space of the steam turbine into adjacent steam valve chambers is provided with at least one penetrating hole for causing the steam valve chambers to communicate with each other.

Tsujimura, K.; Hadano, Y.

1984-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

94

Vertical axis wind turbine airfoil  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A vertical axis wind turbine airfoil is described. The wind turbine airfoil can include a leading edge, a trailing edge, an upper curved surface, a lower curved surface, and a centerline running between the upper surface and the lower surface and from the leading edge to the trailing edge. The airfoil can be configured so that the distance between the centerline and the upper surface is the same as the distance between the centerline and the lower surface at all points along the length of the airfoil. A plurality of such airfoils can be included in a vertical axis wind turbine. These airfoils can be vertically disposed and can rotate about a vertical axis.

Krivcov, Vladimir; Krivospitski, Vladimir; Maksimov, Vasili; Halstead, Richard; Grahov, Jurij Vasiljevich

2012-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

95

Wind turbine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A wind turbine of the type having an airfoil blade (15) mounted on a flexible beam (20) and a pitch governor (55) which selectively, torsionally twists the flexible beam in response to wind turbine speed thereby setting blade pitch, is provided with a limiter (85) which restricts unwanted pitch change at operating speeds due to torsional creep of the flexible beam. The limiter allows twisting of the beam by the governor under excessive wind velocity conditions to orient the blades in stall pitch positions, thereby preventing overspeed operation of the turbine. In the preferred embodiment, the pitch governor comprises a pendulum (65,70) which responds to changing rotor speed by pivotal movement, the limiter comprising a resilient member (90) which engages an end of the pendulum to restrict further movement thereof, and in turn restrict beam creep and unwanted blade pitch misadjustment.

Cheney, Jr., Marvin C. (Glastonbury, CT)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Energy 101: Wind Turbines | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wind Turbines Wind Turbines Energy 101: Wind Turbines July 30, 2010 - 10:47am Addthis John Schueler John Schueler Former New Media Specialist, Office of Public Affairs On Tuesday, the Department announced a $117 million loan guarantee through for the Kahuku Wind Power Project in Hawaii. That's a major step forward for clean energy in the region, as it's expected to supply clean electricity to roughly 7,700 households per year, and it also invites a deceptively simple question: how exactly do wind turbines generate electricity? One thing you might not realize is that wind is actually a form of solar energy. This is because wind is produced by the sun heating Earth's atmosphere, the rotation of the earth, and the earth's surface irregularities. Wind turbines are the rotary devices that convert the

97

Influence of refraction on wind turbine noise  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A semi-empirical method is applied to calculate the time-average sound level of wind turbine noise generation and propagation. Both are affected by wind shear refraction. Under upwind conditions the partially ensonified zone separates the fully ensonified zone (close to the turbine) and the shadow zone (far away from the turbine). Refraction is described in terms of the wind speed linear profile fitted to the power law profile. The rotating blades are treated as a two-dimensional circular source in the vertical plane. Inside the partially ensonified zone the effective A-weighted sound power decreases to zero when the receiver moves from the turbine toward the shadow zone. The presented results would be useful in practical applications to give a quick estimate of the effect of refraction on wind turbine noise.

Makarewicz, Rufin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

MHK Technologies/Open Centre Turbine | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Turbine Turbine < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Open Centre Turbine.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization OpenHydro Group Limited Project(s) where this technology is utilized *MHK Projects/OpenHydro Alderney Channel Islands UK *MHK Projects/OpenHydro Bay of Fundy Nova Scotia CA Technology Resource Click here Current/Tidal Technology Type Click here Axial Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1-3: Discovery / Concept Definition / Early Stage Development & Design & Engineering Technology Description The Open-Centre Turbine is designed to be deployed directly on the seabed. The Open-Centre Turbine is a horizontal axis turbine with a direct-drive, permanent magnetic generator that has a slow-moving rotor and lubricant-free operation, which decreases maintenance and minimizes risk to marine life.

99

Analysis of binary vapor turbines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The effect the binary mixture has on the turbine is examined in terms of design and cost. Several flow theories for turbines and turbine blading are reviewed. The similarity method, which uses dimensionless parameters, is used in determining rotative speeds and diameters for a variety of inlet temperatures and exit pressures. It is shown that the ratio of exit to inlet specific volume for each component in the mixture is the same for each specie. The specific volume ratio constraints are combined with the temperature equalities, the condenser pressure, and the total inlet entropy to form the constraints necessary to determine the exit state uniquely in an isentropic expansion. The non-isentropic exit state is found in a similar manner. The expansion process is examined for several cases and compared with the expansion of a single component vapor. Finally, in order to maintain high efficiency and to meet the criteria which makes the similarity method valid at high inlet temperatures, turbine multistaging is examined and a sample case is given for a two stage turbine.

Bliss, R.W.; Boehm, R.F.; Jacobs, H.R.

1976-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Design of high-efficiency turbomachinery and gas turbines  

SciTech Connect

The present treatment of pump, compressor, and turbine turbomachinery emphasizes thermodynamics, design methods, and the use that can be made of relatively simple rules for the choosing of cycle types, vector diagrams, blading types, heat exchanger configurations, etc. Gas dynamics are treated to the virtual exclusion of mechanical design considerations, although a brief historical account of the family of turbomachine systems notes gradual structural as well as thermodynamic and gas dynamic refinements. The complete systems described and analyzed include aircraft, marine, and electrical power generation gas turbines, steam turbines, and hydraulic pumps and turbines. Both axial and centrifugal flow turbomachine types are considered. 112 references.

Wilson, D.G.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rotating marine turbine" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

GAS TURBINES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the age of volatile and ever increasing natural gas fuel prices, strict new emission regulations and technological advancements, modern IGCC plants are the answer to growing market demands for efficient and environmentally friendly power generation. IGCC technology allows the use of low cost opportunity fuels, such as coal, of which there is a more than a 200-year supply in the U.S., and refinery residues, such as petroleum coke and residual oil. Future IGCC plants are expected to be more efficient and have a potential to be a lower cost solution to future CO2 and mercury regulations compared to the direct coal fired steam plants. Siemens has more than 300,000 hours of successful IGCC plant operational experience on a variety of heavy duty gas turbine models in Europe and the U.S. The gas turbines involved range from SGT5-2000E to SGT6-3000E (former designations are shown on Table 1). Future IGCC applications will extend this experience to the SGT5-4000F and SGT6-4000F/5000F/6000G gas turbines. In the currently operating Siemens 60 Hz fleet, the SGT6-5000F gas turbine has the most operating engines and the most cumulative operating hours. Over the years, advancements have increased its performance and decreased its emissions and life cycle costs without impacting reliability. Development has been initiated to verify its readiness for future IGCC application including syngas combustion system testing. Similar efforts are planned for the SGT6-6000G and SGT5-4000F/SGT6-4000F models. This paper discusses the extensive development programs that have been carried out to demonstrate that target emissions and engine operability can be achieved on syngas operation in advanced F-class 50 Hz and 60 Hz gas turbine based IGCC applications.

Power For L; Satish Gadde; Jianfan Wu; Anil Gulati; Gerry Mcquiggan; Berthold Koestlin; Bernd Prade

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Turbine blade tip flow discouragers  

SciTech Connect

A turbine assembly comprises a plurality of rotating blade portions in a spaced relation with a stationery shroud. The rotating blade portions comprise a root section, a tip portion and an airfoil. The tip portion has a pressure side wall and a suction side wall. A number of flow discouragers are disposed on the blade tip portion. In one embodiment, the flow discouragers extend circumferentially from the pressure side wall to the suction side wall so as to be aligned generally parallel to the direction of rotation. In an alternative embodiment, the flow discouragers extend circumferentially from the pressure side wall to the suction side wall so as to be aligned at an angle in the range between about 0.degree. to about 60.degree. with respect to a reference axis aligned generally parallel to the direction of rotation. The flow discouragers increase the flow resistance and thus reduce the flow of hot gas flow leakage for a given pressure differential across the blade tip portion so as to improve overall turbine efficiency.

Bunker, Ronald Scott (Niskayuna, NY)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

PowerJet Wind Turbine Project  

SciTech Connect

PROJECT OBJECTIVE The PowerJet wind turbine overcomes problems characteristic of the small wind turbines that are on the market today by providing reliable output at a wide range of wind speeds, durability, silent operation at all wind speeds, and bird-safe operation. Prime Energyâ??s objective for this project was to design and integrate a generator with an electrical controller and mechanical controls to maximize the generation of electricity by its wind turbine. The scope of this project was to design, construct and test a mechanical back plate to control rotational speed in high winds, and an electronic controller to maximize power output and to assist the base plate in controlling rotational speed in high winds. The test model will continue to operate beyond the time frame of the project, with the ultimate goal of manufacturing and marketing the PowerJet worldwide. Increased Understanding of Electronic & Mechanical Controls Integrated With Electricity Generator The PowerJet back plate begins to open as wind speed exceeds 13.5 mps. The pressure inside the turbine and the turbine rotational speed are held constant. Once the back plate has fully opened at approximately 29 mps, the controller begins pulsing back to the generator to limit the rotational speed of the turbine. At a wind speed in excess of 29 mps, the controller shorts the generator and brings the turbine to a complete stop. As the wind speed subsides, the controller releases the turbine and it resumes producing electricity. Data collection and instrumentation problems prevented identification of the exact speeds at which these events occur. However, the turbine, controller and generator survived winds in excess of 36 mps, confirming that the two over-speed controls accomplished their purpose. Technical Effectiveness & Economic Feasibility Maximum Electrical Output The output of electricity is maximized by the integration of an electronic controller and mechanical over-speed controls designed and tested during the course of this project. The output exceeds that of the PowerJetâ??s 3-bladed counterparts (see Appendix). Durability All components of the PowerJet turbine assemblyâ??including the electronic and mechanical controls designed, manufactured and field tested during the course of this projectâ??proved to be durable through severe weather conditions, with constant operation and no interruption in energy production. Low Cost Materials for the turbine, generator, tower, charge controllers and ancillary parts are available at reasonable prices. Fabrication of these parts is also readily available worldwide. The cost of assembling and installing the turbine is reduced because it has fewer parts and requires less labor to manufacture and assemble, making it competitively priced compared with turbines of similar output manufactured in the U.S. and Europe. The electronic controller is the unique part to be included in the turbine package. The controllers can be manufactured in reasonably-sized production runs to keep the cost below $250 each. The data logger and 24 sensors are for research only and will be unnecessary for the commercial product. Benefit To Public The PowerJet wind-electric system is designed for distributed wind generation in 3 and 4 class winds. This wind turbine meets DOEâ??s requirements for a quiet, durable, bird-safe turbine that eventually can be deployed as a grid-connected generator in urban and suburban settings. Results As described more fully below and illustrated in the Appendices, the goals and objectives outlined in 2060 SOPO were fully met. Electronic and mechanical controls were successfully designed, manufactured and integrated with the generator. The turbine, tower, controllers and generators operated without incident throughout the test period, surviving severe winter and summer weather conditions such as extreme temperatures, ice and sustained high winds. The electronic controls were contained in weather-proof electrical boxes and the elec

Bartlett, Raymond J

2008-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

104

Single Rotor Turbine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A rotor for use in turbine applications has a centrifugal compressor having axially disposed spaced apart fins forming passages and an axial turbine having hollow turbine blades interleaved with the fins and through which fluid from the centrifugal compressor flows.

Platts, David A. (Los Alamos, NM)

2004-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

105

Turbine power plant with back pressure turbine  

SciTech Connect

A combined gas/steam turbine power plant is disclosed including a gas turbine having a combustion chamber and a steam turbine driven by steam generated with heat from the combustion gases of the gas turbine. The steam is utilized in a technological process downstream of the steam turbine. Relatively small fluctuations in back pressure are compensated by varying a delivery of fuel to the combustion chamber. Relatively large fluctuations in back pressure are compensated by supplying live steam directly to the technological process downstream of the steam turbine. Various devices are provided for conditioning the steam prior to being supplied to the technological process.

Kalt, J.; Kehlhofer, R.

1981-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

106

Wind turbine rotor aileron  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A wind turbine has a rotor with at least one blade which has an aileron which is adjusted by an actuator. A hinge has two portions, one for mounting a stationary hinge arm to the blade, the other for coupling to the aileron actuator. Several types of hinges can be used, along with different actuators. The aileron is designed so that it has a constant chord with a number of identical sub-assemblies. The leading edge of the aileron has at least one curved portion so that the aileron does not vent over a certain range of angles, but vents if the position is outside the range. A cyclic actuator can be mounted to the aileron to adjust the position periodically. Generally, the aileron will be adjusted over a range related to the rotational position of the blade. A method for operating the cyclic assembly is also described.

Coleman, Clint (Warren, VT); Kurth, William T. (Warren, VT)

1994-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

107

MHK Technologies/SeaUrchin Vortex Reaction Turbine | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SeaUrchin Vortex Reaction Turbine SeaUrchin Vortex Reaction Turbine < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage SeaUrchin Vortex Reaction Turbine.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Elemental Energy Technologies Limited ABN 46 128 491 903 Technology Resource Click here Current Technology Type Click here Axial Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 4 Proof of Concept Technology Description A revolutionary vortex reaction turbine branded the SeaUrchin an advanced third generation marine turbine technology capable of delivering inexpensive small to large scale baseload or predictable electricity by harnessing the kinetic energy of free flowing ocean currents tides and rivers Technology Dimensions Device Testing Date Submitted 55:15.2

108

Marine & hydrokinetic technology development.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Wind and Water Power Program supports the development of marine and hydrokinetic devices, which capture energy from waves, tides, ocean currents, the natural flow of water in rivers, and marine thermal gradients, without building new dams or diversions. The program works closely with industry and the Department of Energy's national laboratories to advance the development and testing of marine and hydrokinetic devices. In 2008, the program funded projects to develop and test point absorber, oscillating wave column, and tidal turbine technologies. The program also funds component design, such as techniques for manufacturing and installing coldwater pipes critical for ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) systems. Rigorous device testing is necessary to validate and optimize prototypes before beginning full-scale demonstration and deployment. The program supports device testing by providing technology developers with information on testing facilities. Technology developers require access to facilities capable of simulating open-water conditions in order to refine and validate device operability. The program has identified more than 20 tank testing operators in the United States with capabilities suited to the marine and hydrokinetic technology industry. This information is available to the public in the program's Hydrodynamic Testing Facilities Database. The program also supports the development of open-water, grid-connected testing facilities, as well as resource assessments that will improve simulations done in dry-dock and closed-water testing facilities. The program has established two university-led National Marine Renewable Energy Centers to be used for device testing. These centers are located on coasts and will have open-water testing berths, allowing researchers to investigate marine and estuary conditions. Optimal array design, development, modeling and testing are needed to maximize efficiency and electricity generation at marine and hydrokinetic power plants while mitigating nearby and distant impacts. Activities may include laboratory and computational modeling of mooring design or research on device spacing. The geographies, resources, technologies, and even nomenclature of the U.S. marine and hydrokinetic technology industry have yet to be fully understood or defined. The program characterizes and assesses marine and hydrokinetic devices, and then organizes the collected information into a comprehensive and searchable Web-based database, the Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database. The database, which reflects intergovernmental and international collaboration, provides industry with one of the most comprehensive and up-to-date public resources on marine and hydrokinetic devices.

LiVecchi, Al (National Renewable Energy Laboratory); Jepsen, Richard Alan

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Energy Basics: Wind Turbines  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Solar Wind Wind Turbines Wind Resources Wind Turbines...

110

MHK Technologies/Wells Turbine for OWC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Turbine for OWC Turbine for OWC < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Wells Turbine for OWC.png Technology Profile Primary Organization Voith Hydro Wavegen Limited Project(s) where this technology is utilized *MHK Projects/Siadar Technology Resource Click here Current/Tidal Technology Type Click here Cross Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1-3: Discovery / Concept Definition / Early Stage Development & Design & Engineering Technology Description From Brochure Wells turbine is a fixed pitch machine with only one direction of rotation Therefore the rotor is symeteric with respect to the rotation plane Technology Dimensions Device Testing Date Submitted 10/8/2010 << Return to the MHK database homepage

111

Automatic Identification of Shaft Orbits for Steam Turbine Generator Sets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The shaft orbits and dynamic characteristics of the shaft centre orbit contain abundant information for the fault diagnosis of rotating machinery and reflect different faults of rotating machine. Therefore the shaft orbits recognition plays an important ... Keywords: shaft orbit, steam turbine generator sets, morphological filter, invariant moment, BP neural network

Changfeng Yan; Hao Zhang; Hui Li; Li Yang; Wen Huang

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Wind and solar powered turbine  

SciTech Connect

A power generating station having a generator driven by solar heat assisted ambient wind is disclosed. A first plurality of radially extending air passages direct ambient wind to a radial flow wind turbine disposed in a centrally located opening in a substantially disc-shaped structure. A solar radiation collecting surface having black bodies is disposed above the first plurality of air passages and in communication with a second plurality of radial air passages. A cover plate enclosing the second plurality of radial air passages is transparent so as to permit solar radiation to effectively reach the black bodies. The second plurality of air passages direct ambient wind and thermal updrafts generated by the black bodies to an axial flow turbine which also derives additional motive power from the air mass exhausted by the radial flow turbine. The rotating shaft of the turbines drive the generator. The solar and wind driven power generating system operates in electrical cogeneration mode with a fuel powered prime mover. The system is particularly adapted to satisfy the power requirements of a relatively small community located in a geographic area having favorable climatic conditions for wind and solar powered power generation.

Wells, I.D.; Holmes, M.; Kohn, J.L.

1984-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

113

Turbine inter-disk cavity cooling air compressor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A combustion turbine may have a cooling circuit for directing a cooling medium through the combustion turbine to cool various components of the combustion turbine. This cooling circuit may include a compressor, a combustor shell and a component of the combustion turbine to be cooled. This component may be a rotating blade of the combustion turbine. A pressure changing mechanism is disposed in the combustion turbine between the component to be cooled and the combustor shell. The cooling medium preferably flows from the compressor to the combustor shell, through a cooler, the component to the cooled and the pressure changing mechanism. After flowing through the pressure changing mechanism, the cooling medium is returned to the combustor shell. The pressure changing mechanism preferably changes the pressure of the cooling medium from a pressure at which it is exhausted from the component to be cooled to approximately that of the combustor shell.

Little, David Allen (Oviedo, FL)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Applications: Operational wind turbines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Capability Applications: Operational wind turbines Benefits: Optimize wind turbine performance Summary: Researchers at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Intelligent Wind Turbine Program are developing a multi-physics modeling approach for the analysis of wind turbines in the presence of realistic

115

Effects of Tidal Turbine Noise on Fish Task 2.1.3.2: Effects on Aquatic Organisms: Acoustics/Noise - Fiscal Year 2011 - Progress Report - Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Naturally spawning stocks of Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) that utilize Puget Sound are listed as threatened (http://www.nwr.noaa.gov/ESA-Salmon-Listings/Salmon-Populations/ Chinook/CKPUG.cfm). Plans exist for prototype tidal turbines to be deployed into their habitat. Noise is known to affect fish in many ways, such as causing a threshold shift in auditory sensitivity or tissue damage. The characteristics of noise, its spectra and level, are important factors that influence the potential for the noise to injure fish. For example, the frequency range of the tidal turbine noise includes the audiogram (frequency range of hearing) of most fish. This study (Effects on Aquatic Organisms, Subtask 2.1.3.2: Acoustics) was performed during FY 2011 to determine if noise generated by a 6-m-diameter open-hydro turbine might affect juvenile Chinook salmon hearing or cause barotrauma. After they were exposed to simulated tidal turbine noise, the hearing of juvenile Chinook salmon was measured and necropsies performed to check for tissue damage. Experimental groups were (1) noise exposed, (2) control (the same handling as treatment fish but without exposure to tidal turbine noise), and (3) baseline (never handled). Preliminary results indicate that low levels of tissue damage may have occurred but that there were no effects of noise exposure on the auditory systems of the test fish.

Halvorsen, Michele B.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Copping, Andrea E.

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

116

Aero-engine derivative gas turbines for power generation: Thermodynamic and economic perspectives  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aero-engine technology has played a major part in the development of both the industrial gas turbine and, more recently, the combined cycle gas turbine (CCGT) plant. A distinction may be drawn between the direct use of developed aero-engine hardware in power generation (and in marine applications), and the more indirect influence of aero-engine technology, particularly in design of heavy-duty gas turbines. Both the direct use of aero-engine hardware, in gas turbines for power generation, and the indirect influence of aero-engine technology, in the design of more conventional heavy-duty plants (including combined cycle gas turbines, CCGTs), are reviewed.

Horlock, J.H. [Whittle Lab., Cambridge (United Kingdom)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

turbine | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

turbine Home Future of Condition Monitoring for Wind Turbines Description: Research into third party software to aid in the development of better CMS in order to raise turbine...

118

Overspeed protection for a gas turbine/steam turbine combined cycle  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes an improved combined cycle power plant and overspeed protection system of the type having a reheat steam turbine including a high pressure steam turbine section with at least one control valve, and a lower pressure steam turbine section. The improvement comprises: a valveless steam conduit connected between the outlet of the steam reheater section and the inlet of the lower pressure steam turbine section, a plurality of solid couplings serving to solidly couple the rotating members together as a single rotor, the rotor having a single thrust bearing, and control means for sensing a potential overspeed condition operatively connected to the control valves to prevent overspeed, whereby the steam in the steam reheater and in the valveless steam conduit may freely expand through the lower pressure steam turbine and potential overspeed of the rotor is resisted by the combined inertia of the coupled rotating members and by the braking torque of the air compressor, wherein the heat recovery steam generator includes a low pressure steam generating section connected to supply low pressure steam to the steam reheater section along with the steam exhausted from the high pressure steam turbine section.

Moore, J.H.

1992-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

119

UNSTEADY SIMULATION OF FLOW IN MICRO VERTICAL AXIS WIND TURBINE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Though wind turbines and windmills have been used for centuries, the application of aerodynamics technology to improve reliability and reduce costs of wind-generated energy has only been pursued in earnest for the past 40 years. Today, wind energy is mainly used to generate electricity. Wind is a renewable energy source. Power production from wind turbines is affected by certain conditions: wind speed, turbine speed, turbulence and the changes of wind direction. These conditions are not always optimal and have negative effects on most turbines. The present turbine is supposed to be less affected by these conditions because the blades combine a rotating movement around each own axis and around the nacelles one. Due to this combination of movements, flow around this turbine can be more highly unsteady, because of great blade stagger angles. The turbine has a rotor with three straight blades of symmetrical airfoil. Paper presents unsteady simulations that have been performed for one wind velocity, and different initial blades stagger angles. The influence of interaction of blades is studied for one specific constant rotational speed among the four rotational speeds that have been studied.

A. C. Bayeul-lain; G. Bois

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Advanced turbine design for coal-fueled engines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this task is to perform a technical assessment of turbine blading for advanced second generation PFBC conditions, identify specific problems/issues, and recommend an approach for solving any problems identified. A literature search was conducted, problems associated with hot corrosion defined and limited experiments performed. Sulfidation corrosion occurs in industrial, marine and aircraft gas turbine engines and is due to the presence of condensed alkali (sodium) sulfates. The principle source of the alkali in industrial, marine and aircraft gas turbine engines is sea salt crystals. The principle source of the sulfur is not the liquid fuels, but the same ocean born crystals. Moreover deposition of the corrosive salt occurs primarily by a non-equilibrium process. Sodium will be present in the cleaned combusted gases that enter the PFBC turbine. Although equilibrium condensation is not favored, deposition via impaction is probable. Marine gas turbines operate in sodium chloride rich environments without experiencing the accelerated attack noted in coal fired boilers where condensed chlorides contact metallic surfaces. The sulfates of calcium and magnesium are the products of the reactions used to control sulfur. Based upon industrial gas turbine experience and laboratory tests, calcium and magnesium sulfates are, at temperatures up to 1500[degrees]F (815[degrees]C), relatively innocuous salts. In this study it is found that at 1650[degrees]F (900[degrees]C) and above, calcium sulfate becomes an aggressive corrodent.

Bornstein, N.S.

1992-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rotating marine turbine" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

EA-1965: Florida Atlantic University Southeast National Marine Renewable  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5: Florida Atlantic University Southeast National Marine 5: Florida Atlantic University Southeast National Marine Renewable Energy Center's Offshore Marine Hydrokinetic Technology Testing Project, Florida EA-1965: Florida Atlantic University Southeast National Marine Renewable Energy Center's Offshore Marine Hydrokinetic Technology Testing Project, Florida SUMMARY The Department of Energy (DOE), through its Wind and Water Power Technologies Office (WWPTO), is proposing to provide federal funding to Florida Atlantic University's South-East National Marine Renewable Energy Center (FAU SNMREC) to support the at sea testing of FAU SNMREC's experimental current generation turbine and the deployment and operation of their Small-Scale Ocean Current Turbine Test Berth, sited on the outer continental shelf (OCS) in waters off the coast of Ft Lauderdale, Florida.

122

Submersible Generator for Marine Hydrokinetics  

SciTech Connect

A submersible generator was designed as a distinct and critical subassembly of marine hydrokinetics systems, specifically tidal and stream energy conversion. The generator is designed to work with both vertical and horizontal axis turbines. The final product is a high-pole-count, radial-flux, permanent magnet, rim mounted generator, initially rated at twenty kilowatts in a two-meter-per-second flow, and designed to leverage established and simple manufacturing processes. The generator was designed to work with a 3 meter by 7 meter Gorlov Helical Turbine or a marine hydrokinetic version of the FloDesign wind turbine. The team consisted of experienced motor/generator design engineers with cooperation from major US component suppliers (magnetics, coil winding and electrical steel laminations). Support for this effort was provided by Lucid Energy Technologies and FloDesign, Inc. The following tasks were completed: â?¢ Identified the conditions and requirements for MHK generators. â?¢ Defined a methodology for sizing and rating MHK systems. â?¢ Selected an MHK generator topology and form factor. â?¢ Completed electromechanical design of submersible generator capable of coupling to multiple turbine styles. â?¢ Investigated MHK generator manufacturing requirements. â?¢ Reviewed cost implications and financial viability. â?¢ Completed final reporting and deliverables

Robert S. Cinq-Mars; Timothy Burke; Dr. James Irish; Brian Gustafson; Dr. James Kirtley; Dr. Aiman Alawa

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Turbine power plant system  

SciTech Connect

A turbine power plant system consisting of three sub-systems; a gas turbine sub-system, an exhaust turbine sub-system, and a steam turbine sub-system. The three turbine sub-systems use one external fuel source which is used to drive the turbine of the gas turbine sub-system. Hot exhaust fluid from the gas turbine sub-system is used to drive the turbines of the exhaust turbine sub-system and heat energy from the combustion chamber of the gas turbine sub-system is used to drive the turbine of the steam turbine sub-system. Each sub-system has a generator. In the gas turbine sub-system, air flows through several compressors and a combustion chamber and drives the gas turbine. In the exhaust turbine sub-system, hot exhaust fluid from the gas turbine sub-system flows into the second passageway arrangement of first and fourth heat exchangers and thus transfering the heat energy to the first passageway arrangement of the first and fourth heat exchangers which are connected to the inlets of first and second turbines, thus driving them. Each turbine has its own closed loop fluid cycle which consists of the turbine and three heat exchangers and which uses a fluid which boils at low temperatures. A cooler is connected to a corresponding compressor which forms another closed loop system and is used to cool the exhaust fluid from each of the two above mentioned turbines. In the steam turbine sub-system, hot fluid is used to drive the steam turbine and then it flows through a fluid duct, to a first compressor, the first fluid passageway arrangement of first and second heat exchangers, the second passageway of the first heat exchanger, the combustion chamber of the gas turbine where it receives heat energy, and then finally to the inlet of the steam turbine, all in one closed loop fluid cycle. A cooler is connected to the second passageway of the second heat exchanger in a closed loop fluid cycle, which is used to cool the turbine exhaust.

Papastavros, D.

1985-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

124

MHK Technologies/Uppsala Cross flow Turbine | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

flow Turbine flow Turbine < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Uppsala Cross flow Turbine.gif Technology Profile Primary Organization Uppsala University Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Cross Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 4 Proof of Concept Technology Description A cross flow turbine with fixed blade pitch is directly connected i e no gearbox to a low speed generator The generator is designed to give good efficiency over a wide range of speeds and loads The output voltage and current from the generator will be rectified and then inverted to grid specifications Mooring Configuration Gravity base Optimum Marine/Riverline Conditions Not yet determined Research concerns velocities below and above 1 m s

125

MHK Technologies/Horizontal Axis Logarithmic Spiral Turbine | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Horizontal Axis Logarithmic Spiral Turbine Horizontal Axis Logarithmic Spiral Turbine < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Technology Profile Primary Organization Golden Turbines LLC Technology Resource Click here Current Technology Type Click here Axial Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1 3 Discovery Concept Def Early Stage Dev Design Engineering Technology Description A Horizontal axis Water turbine following the logarithmic spiral to generate clean electric energy from slow moving currents like rivers or ocean currents and with least impact on marine life and the environment because it doesn t require a damn or building huge structures Technology Dimensions Device Testing Date Submitted 36:09.5 << Return to the MHK database homepage

126

MHK Technologies/Deep water capable hydrokinetic turbine | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

water capable hydrokinetic turbine water capable hydrokinetic turbine < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage 275px Technology Profile Primary Organization Hills Inc Technology Resource Click here Current Technology Type Click here Axial Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 4 Proof of Concept Technology Description It is an axial flow shrouded turbine direct connected to a water pump that delivers water to an on shore genetator Being completely water proof and submersible the device can operate at any water depth Mooring Configuration An array of turbines are teathered to a cable that is anchored via a dead weight Optimum Marine/Riverline Conditions This system is designed for use in Florida s Gulf Stream however any constant ocean current is suitable

127

Hydro-flow supra-turbine engine  

SciTech Connect

A turbine engine operates at high pressure and at relatively low temperatures and revolutions per minute through the use of special carburetion, compressor, combustion unit, and turbine arrangements. The system is characterized by the use of water which is vaporized and concurrently reduces the temperature of the vaporized fuel and air mixture as compression occurs, and is not physically intermixed with the combustion gases until after initial combustion takes place. The compressor includes a pair of back-to-back, four stage composite compressors to which synchronized dual carburetion or meter-flow arrangements separately supply water and gasoline or other fuel, along with air. The water absorbs heat from the compression of both of the two compressors, and the resultant vaporous product gases are routed to the jacket of a combustion chamber in which the compressed fuel and air mixture is burned. Following initial ignition and some burning of the fuel, the superheated steam and combustion products are combined, and the combination is supplied to a multistage transverse flow turbine having in the order of 17 pressure stages. The turbine includes arrangements for directing the high pressure gases back and forth through the rotor blades at different radial distances from the axis of the turbine. Exhaust gases from the turbine are applied to a ''floating'' muffler, including a rotatable inner chamber to facilitate mixing exhaust gases with the ambient air, and to disperse the high moisture content of the exhaust gases.

Neale, A.B.

1981-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

128

Annual Report: Turbines (30 September 2012)  

SciTech Connect

The FY12 NETL-RUA Turbine Thermal Management effort supported the Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen Turbine Program through conduct of novel, fundamental, basic, and applied research in the areas of aerothermal heat transfer, coatings development, and secondary flow control. This research project utilized the extensive expertise and facilities readily available at NETL and the participating universities. The research approach includes explorative studies based on scaled models and prototype coupon tests conducted under realistic high-temperature, pressurized, turbine operating conditions. This research is expected to render measurable outcomes that will meet DOE advanced turbine development goals of a 3- to 5-point increase in power island efficiency and a 30 percent power increase above the hydrogen-fired combined cycle baseline. In addition, knowledge gained from this project will further advance the aerothermal cooling and TBC technologies in the general turbine community. This project has been structured to address ? Development and design of aerothermal and materials concepts in FY12-13. ? Design and manufacturing of these advanced concepts in FY13. ? Bench-scale/proof-of-concept testing of these concepts in FY13-14 and beyond. The Turbine Thermal Management project consists of four tasks that focus on a critical technology development in the areas of aerothermal and heat transfer, coatings and materials development, design integration and testing, and a secondary flow rotating rig.

Alvin, Mary Anne [NETL] [NETL; Richards, George [NETL] [NETL

2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

129

Wind Turbines | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Turbines Wind Turbines July 30, 2013 - 2:58pm Addthis Energy 101: Wind Turbines Basics This video explains the basics of how wind turbines operate to produce clean power from an...

130

Low pressure turbine installation  

SciTech Connect

Low-pressure turbine installation is described comprising a casing, at least two groups of turbine stages mounted in said casing, each turbine stage having blades so arranged that a flow of steam passes through the respective turbine stages in contraflow manner, partition means in said casing for separating the opposed final stages of said turbine stages from each other, and steam exhausting means opened in the side walls of said casing in a direction substantially perpendicular to the axis of said turbine, said steam exhausting means being connected to condensers.

Iizuka, N.; Hisano, K.; Ninomiya, S.; Otawara, Y.

1976-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

131

Nuclear rotations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An analysis of the gamma-ray spectra produced using the quantum mechanical rotational energy formula is presented for nuclei with large angular momentum. This analysis is suitable for quantum mechanics modern physics

G. F. Bertsch; R. V. F. Janssens

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Apparatus and method for partial-load operation of a combined gas and steam turbine plant  

SciTech Connect

Apparatus and method are disclosed for the partial load operation of a combined gas turbine and steam turbine plant, including a shaft being connected to the gas turbine and drivable at a given nominal speed of rotation, a first generator being connected to the shaft and electrically connectible to an electric network, a compressor being connected to the shaft and connected upstream of the gas turbine in gas flow direction, a heat exchanger having an output and a variable heat supply and being connected upstream of the gas turbine in gas flow direction, a steam generator for the steam turbine being connected downstream of the gas turbine in gas flow direction for receiving exhaust gases therefrom, a second generator being connected to the steam turbine and electrically connectible to the electric network for supplying given nominal power thereto along with the first generator, means for giving to the electric network and taking away from the network at least part of the nominal power if the shaft rotates at less than the nominal speed of rotation, and means for reducing the speed of rotation of the gas turbine for preventing a substantial drop in temperature at the output of the heat exchanger if the heat supply of the heat exchanger is reduced.

Becker, B.; Finckh, H.; Meyer-pittroff, R.

1982-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

133

Energy Basics: Wind Turbines  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Photo of a crane lifting the blades onto a wind turbine that reads 'U.S. Department of Energy, NREL.' You can learn more about horizontal axis turbines from the EERE Wind Program's...

134

Wind Turbine Maintenance Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This guideline provides component-level information regarding the maintenance of major components associated with a wind turbine. It combines recommendations offered by major equipment manufacturers with lessons learned from owner/operators of wind turbine facilities.

2012-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

135

Radar-cross-section reduction of wind turbines. part 1.  

SciTech Connect

In recent years, increasing deployment of large wind-turbine farms has become an issue of growing concern for the radar community. The large radar cross section (RCS) presented by wind turbines interferes with radar operation, and the Doppler shift caused by blade rotation causes problems identifying and tracking moving targets. Each new wind-turbine farm installation must be carefully evaluated for potential disruption of radar operation for air defense, air traffic control, weather sensing, and other applications. Several approaches currently exist to minimize conflict between wind-turbine farms and radar installations, including procedural adjustments, radar upgrades, and proper choice of low-impact wind-farm sites, but each has problems with limited effectiveness or prohibitive cost. An alternative approach, heretofore not technically feasible, is to reduce the RCS of wind turbines to the extent that they can be installed near existing radar installations. This report summarizes efforts to reduce wind-turbine RCS, with a particular emphasis on the blades. The report begins with a survey of the wind-turbine RCS-reduction literature to establish a baseline for comparison. The following topics are then addressed: electromagnetic model development and validation, novel material development, integration into wind-turbine fabrication processes, integrated-absorber design, and wind-turbine RCS modeling. Related topics of interest, including alternative mitigation techniques (procedural, at-the-radar, etc.), an introduction to RCS and electromagnetic scattering, and RCS-reduction modeling techniques, can be found in a previous report.

Brock, Billy C.; Loui, Hung; McDonald, Jacob J.; Paquette, Joshua A.; Calkins, David A.; Miller, William K.; Allen, Steven E.; Clem, Paul Gilbert; Patitz, Ward E.

2012-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

136

Load attenuating passively adaptive wind turbine blade  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for improving wind turbine performance by alleviating loads and controlling the rotor. The invention employs the use of a passively adaptive blade that senses the wind velocity or rotational speed, and accordingly modifies its aerodynamic configuration. The invention exploits the load mitigation prospects of a blade that twists toward feather as it bends. The invention includes passively adaptive wind turbine rotors or blades with currently preferred power control features. The apparatus is a composite fiber horizontal axis wind-turbine blade, in which a substantial majority of fibers in the blade skin are inclined at angles of between 15 and 30 degrees to the axis of the blade, to produces passive adaptive aeroelastic tailoring (bend-twist coupling) to alleviate loading without unduly jeopardizing performance.

Veers, Paul S. (Albuquerque, NM); Lobitz, Donald W. (Albuquerque, NM)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Gas Turbine Engines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...times higher than atmospheric pressure.Ref 25The gas turbine was developed generally for main propulsion and power

138

A simplified sizing and mass model for axial flow turbines  

SciTech Connect

An axial flow turbine mass model has been developed and used to study axial flow turbines for space power systems. Hydrogen, helium-xenon, hydrogen-water vapor, air, and potassium vapor working fluids have been investigated to date. The impact of construction material, inlet temperature, rotational speed, pressure ratio, and power level on turbine mass and volume has been analyzed. This paper presents the turbine model description and results of parametric studies showing general design trends characteristic of any axial flow machine. Also, a comparison of axial flow turbine designs using helium-xenon mixtures and potassium vapor working fluids, which are used in Brayton and Rankine space power systems, respectively, is presented. 9 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

Hudson, S.L.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

The wind turbine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we present the modeling of a wing turbine, using the Euler Lagrange method and circuits theory. We get the mathematical equation (modeling) that describes the wind turbine and we simulate it using the mathlab program. Keywords: modeling, simulation, wind turbine

Jos De Jess Rubio Avila; Andrs Ferreira Ramrez; Genaro Deloera Flores; Martn Salazar Pereyra; Fernando Baruch Santillanes Posada

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Improving steam turbine-gas turbine plants  

SciTech Connect

Leningrad Polytechnic Institute investigated the main characteristics of combined plants according to their structure, determined by very important parameters. The following parameters were selected: utilization factor (ratio of heat added to the steam-water working medium from the heat of the exhaust gases to the entire amount of heat added to the steam-water working medium) and fuel consumption factor (ratio of heat from fuel added to the steam-water working medium to the entire consumption of heat in the combined plant). It is concluded that steam turbine-gas turbine plants working at comparatively low gas temperatures (about 800/sup 0/C) must be constructed as plants of maximum capacity, i.e., with large steam flows. Gas turbine-steam turbine plants with high-temperature gas turbines operating at a high utilization factor (approaching binary plants) ensure a qualitative rise in efficiency and have high flexibility characteristics. They are the most promising power plants. A long-term plan for development of combined plants on the basis of standard steam turbine and gas turbine equipment, the production of which is planned in the USSR and in Comecon countries, is required. This plan must be closely connected with solution of the problem of using coals for gas turbine plants.

Kirillov, I.I.; Arsen' ev, L.V.; Khodak, E.A.; Romakhova, G.A.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rotating marine turbine" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Design and cavitation performance of contra-rotating propellers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Improvement of the propulsive efficiency of ships has always been one of the main objectives for naval architects and marine engineers. Contra-Rotating propellers (CRP) are propulsor configurations offering higher efficiency ...

Laskos, Dimitrios

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

NETL: Turbines - Oxy-Fuel Turbines  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oxy-Fuel Turbines Oxy-Fuel Turbines Oxy-fuel combustion potentially can be used in plants based on both conventional and advanced technology. Studies have shown that plants equipped with oxy-fuel systems could reach nominal efficiencies in the 30 percent range with today's steam turbines when fueled with natural gas and when capturing the CO2. With anticipated advances in gasification, oxygen separation, and steam turbine technology, plants using oxy-fuel systems are expected to achieve efficiencies in the mid-40 percent range, with near-100 percent CO2 capture and near-zero NOx emissions. By 2012: In the near-term, efforts are focused on the development of oxy- fuel turbine and combustor technologies for highly efficient (50-60 percent), near-zero emissions, coal-based power systems

143

Rotational Augmentation Disparities in the MEXICO and UAE Phase VI Experiments: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Wind turbine structures and components suffer excessive loads and premature failures when key aerodynamic phenomena are not well characterized, fail to be understood, or are inaccurately predicted. Turbine blade rotational augmentation remains incompletely characterized and understood, thus limiting robust prediction for design. Pertinent rotational augmentation research including experimental, theoretical, and computational work has been pursued for some time, but large scale wind tunnel testing is a relatively recent development for investigating wind turbine blade aerodynamics. Because of their large scale and complementary nature, the MEXICO and UAE Phase VI wind tunnel experiments offer unprecedented synergies to better characterize and understand rotational augmentation of blade aerodynamics.

Schreck, S.; Sant, T.; Micallef, D.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

F-Class Combustion Turbine Life Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the results of a durability analysis of the critical hot section rotating blades in the Siemens 501FD2 (SGT6-5000F) gas turbine. The report presents an overview of the approach, technology, and specific issues addressed in the durability analysis of each hot section blade. Subsequent chapters provide technical results from the aerothermal analysis with details on the magnitude and distribution of temperatures and stresses that occur within the parts under base load and transient ope...

2008-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

145

Turbine Imaging Technology Assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this project was to identify and evaluate imaging alternatives for observing the behavior of juvenile fish within an operating Kaplan turbine unit with a focus on methods to quantify fish injury mechanisms inside an operating turbine unit. Imaging methods are particularly needed to observe the approach and interaction of fish with turbine structural elements. This evaluation documents both the opportunities and constraints for observing juvenile fish at specific locations during turbine passage. The information may be used to acquire the scientific knowledge to make structural improvements and create opportunities for industry to modify turbines and improve fish passage conditions.

Moursund, Russell A.; Carlson, Thomas J.

2004-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

146

Wind shear for large wind turbine generators at selected tall tower sites  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of the study described in this report is to examine the nature of wind shear profiles and their variability over the height of large horizontal-axis wind turbines and to provide information on wind shear relevant to the design and opertion of large wind turbines. Wind turbine fatigue life and power quality are related through the forcing functions on the blade to the shapes of the wind shear profiles and their fluctuations over the disk of rotation.

Elliott, D.L.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Stabilized space---time computation of wind-turbine rotor aerodynamics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We show how we use the Deforming-Spatial-Domain/Stabilized Space---Time (DSD/SST) formulation for accurate 3D computation of the aerodynamics of a wind-turbine rotor. As the test case, we use the NREL 5MW offshore baseline wind-turbine rotor. This class ... Keywords: DSD/SST formulation, Rotating turbulent flow, Space---time variational multiscale method, Torque values, Wind-turbine aerodynamics

Kenji Takizawa; Bradley Henicke; Tayfun E. Tezduyar; Ming-Chen Hsu; Yuri Bazilevs

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Geothermal turbine installation  

SciTech Connect

A geothermal turbine intallation in which high-pressure steam is separated from geothermal steam, which is a mixture of steam and water, with the high pressure steam connected to a high pressure turbine. Low pressure steam produced by flashing the hot water component of the geothermal steam is introduced to a low pressure turbine which is constructed and operates independently of the high pressure turbine. The discharge steam from the high pressure turbine is introduced to a steam condenser operating at a low vacuum while discharge steam from the low pressure turbine is introduced into a steam condenser operating at a high vacuum. The cooling water system of the high and low pressure condensers are connected in series with one another. A maximum power increase is obtained if the flow rates of the high and low pressure steams at the extraction ports of the high and low pressure turbines are made substantially equal to one another.

Nishioka, R.

1983-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

149

Steam turbine plant  

SciTech Connect

A system for regulating the rate of closing of the turbine intake valve of a steam turbine plant is disclosed. A steam turbine is supplied from a steam generator through a turbine intake valve. A branch line conducts the steam to a bypass valve which is normally closed. In the event of conditions making it necessary to close the turbine intake valve rapidly, a regulator is provided to control the rate of closing of the turbine intake valve and the opening of the bypass valve so that the pressure conditions in the steam generator do not exceed the limits established by the manufacturer. Pressure measuring instruments are placed in the system to sense the pressure immediately upstream from the turbine intake valve and the bypass valve as well as the initial steam supply pressure. These pressure signals are transmitted to a computer which produces a control signal in accordance with predetermined conditions.

Skala, K.

1981-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

150

A High-Order Sliding Mode Observer for Sensorless Control ofDFIG-Based Wind Turbines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A High-Order Sliding Mode Observer for Sensorless Control ofDFIG-Based Wind Turbines Mohamed control of a doubly-fed induction generator (DFIG) based wind turbine. The sensorless control scheme is based on a high-order sliding mode (HOSM) observer to estimate the DFIG rotational speed. Indeed, high

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

151

Advanced turbine systems: Studies and conceptual design  

SciTech Connect

The ABB selection for the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) includes advanced developments especially in the hot gas path of the combustion turbine and new state-of-the-art units such as the steam turbine and the HRSG. The increase in efficiency by more than 10% multiplicative compared to current designs will be based on: (1) Turbine Inlet Temperature Increase; (2) New Cooling Techniques for Stationary and Rotating Parts; and New Materials. Present, projected component improvements that will be introduced with the above mentioned issues will yield improved CCSC turbine performance, which will drive the ATS selected gas-fired reference CC power plant to 6 % LHV or better. The decrease in emission levels requires a careful optimization of the cycle design, where cooling air consumption has to be minimized. All interfaces of the individual systems in the complete CC Plant need careful checks, especially to avoid unnecessary margins in the individual designs. This study is an important step pointing out the feasibility of the ATS program with realistic goals set by DOE, which, however, will present challenges for Phase II time schedule of 18 months. With the approach outlined in this study and close cooperation with DOE, ATS program success can be achieved to deliver low emissions and low cost of electricity by the year 2002. The ABB conceptual design and step approach will lead to early component demonstration which will help accelerate the overall program objectives.

van der Linden, S.; Gnaedig, G.; Kreitmeier, F.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Stream-injected free-turbine-type gas turbine  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes an improvement in a free turbine type gas turbine. The turbine comprises: compressor means; a core turbine mechanically coupled with the compressor means to power it; a power turbine which is independent from the core turbine; and a combustion chamber for providing a heated working fluid; means for adding steam to the working fluid; means for providing a single flow path for the working fluid, first through the core turbine and then through the power turbine. The improvement comprises: means for preventing mismatch between the core turbine and the compressor due to the addition of steam comprising coupling a variable output load to the compressor.

Cheng, D.Y.

1990-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

153

Steam Turbine Cogeneration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Steam turbines are widely used in most industrial facilities because steam is readily available and steam turbine is easy to operate and maintain. If designed properly, a steam turbine co-generation (producing heat and power simultaneously) system can increase energy efficiency, reduce air emissions and qualify the equipment for a Capital Cost tax Allowance. As a result, such a system benefits the stakeholders, the society and the environment. This paper describes briefly the types of steam turbine classified by their conditions of exhaust and review quickly the fundamentals related to steam and steam turbine. Then the authors will analyze a typical steam turbine co-generation system and give examples to illustrate the benefits of the System.

Quach, K.; Robb, A. G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Wind turbine | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

turbine turbine Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Wind turbine: A machine that converts wind energy to mechanical energy; typically connected to a generator to produce electricity. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Contents 1 Types of Wind Turbines 1.1 Vertical Axis Wind Turbines 1.2 Horizontal Axis Wind Turbines 2 Wind Turbine Sizes 3 Components of a Wind Turbine 4 References Types of Wind Turbines There are two basic wind turbine designs: those with a vertical axis (sometimes referred to as VAWTs) and those with a horizontal axis (sometimes referred to as HAWTs). There are several manufacturers of vertical axis turbines, but they have not penetrated the "utility scale" (100 kW capacity and larger) market to the same degree as horizontal axis turbines.[1]

155

Ten years with turbine metering  

SciTech Connect

The operation and performance experience in using 110 turbine meters to monitor the gas flow in turbines used on natural gas pipelines are discussed. Information is included on turbine meter selection, installation, calibration, performance testing, failures, and maintenance. (LCL)

Judd, H.C.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Steam Turbine Developments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...O. Jonas, Corrosion of Steam Turbines, Corrosion: Environments and Industries, Vol 13C, ASM Handbook, ASM International, 2006, p 469??476...

157

Gas Turbine Optimum Operation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Many offshore installations are dependent on power generated by gas turbines and a critical issue is that these experience performance deterioration over time. Performance deterioration (more)

Flesland, Synnve Mangerud

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Economical Condensing Turbines?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Steam turbines have long been used at utilities and in industry to generate power. There are three basic types of steam turbines: condensing, letdown and extraction/condensing. Letdown turbines reduce the pressure of the incoming steam to one or more pressures and generate power very efficiently, assuming that all the letdown steam has a use. Two caveats: Letdown turbines produce power based upon steam requirements and not based upon power requirements, and if all the steam letdown does not have a use, letdown turbines can become a very expensive way of producing electric power. Condensing turbines have the ability to handle rapid swings in electrical load. Unfortunately, they can only condense a small percentage of the steam, usually less than 14%. Therefore only a small percent of the heat of condensation is available for their use. Also equipment must be used to condense the remaining steam below atmospheric pressure. Extraction/condensing turbines both extract steam at a useful temperature and pressure and then condense the remainder of the steam. These units have the ability to load follow also. They are often used in concert with gas turbines to produce the balance of electrical power and to keep a electric self generator from drawing electrical power from the grid. The method for analyzing the cost of the condensing steam produced power is exactly the same in all cases. This paper will attempt to provide a frame work for preliminary economic analysis on electric power generation for condensing steam turbines.

Dean, J. E.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Rampressor Turbine Design  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The design of a unique gas turbine engine is presented. The first Rampressor Turbine engine rig will be a configuration where the Rampressor rotor is integrated into an existing industrial gas turbine engine. The Rampressor rotor compresses air which is burned in a traditional stationary combustion system in order to increase the enthalpy of the compressed air. The combustion products are then expanded through a conventional gas turbine which provides both compressor and electrical power. This in turn produces shaft torque, which drives a generator to provide electricity. The design and the associated design process of such an engine are discussed in this report.

Ramgen Power Systems

2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

160

NETL: Turbines - UTSR Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 Syngas Particulate Deposition and Erosion at the Leading Edge of a Turbine Blade with Film Cooling Virginia Tech Danesh Tafti Project Dates: 812007 - 9302010 Area of...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rotating marine turbine" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Hermetic turbine generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A Rankine cycle turbine drives an electric generator and a feed pump, all on a single shaft, and all enclosed within a hermetically sealed case. The shaft is vertically oriented with the turbine exhaust directed downward and the shaft is supported on hydrodynamic fluid film bearings using the process fluid as lubricant and coolant. The selection of process fluid, type of turbine, operating speed, system power rating, and cycle state points are uniquely coordinated to achieve high turbine efficiency at the temperature levels imposed by the recovery of waste heat from the more prevalent industrial processes.

Meacher, John S. (Ballston Lake, NY); Ruscitto, David E. (Ballston Spa, NY)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Real time wind turbine simulator.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A novel dynamic real-time wind turbine simulator (WTS) is developed in this thesis, which is capable of reproducing dynamic behavior of real wind turbine. The (more)

Gong, Bing

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

NETL: Turbine Projects - Efficiency Improvement  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Efficiency Improvemenet Turbine Projects Efficiency Improvemenet Advanced Hot Section Materials and Coatings Test Rig DataFact Sheets System Study for Improved Gas Turbine...

164

Apparatus and methods for installing, removing and adjusting an inner turbine shell section relative to an outer turbine shell section  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A turbine includes upper and lower inner shell sections mounting the nozzles and shrouds and which inner shell is supported by pins secured to a surrounding outer shell. To disassemble the turbine for access to the inner shell sections and rotor, an alignment fixture is secured to the lower outer shell section and has pins engaging the inner shell section. To disassemble the turbine, the inner shell weight is transferred to the lower outer shell section via the alignment fixture and cradle pins. Roller assemblies are inserted through access openings vacated by support pins to permit rotation of the lower inner shell section out of and into the lower outer shell section during disassembly and assembly. The alignment fixture includes adjusting rods for adjusting the inner shell axially, vertically, laterally and about a lateral axis. A roller over-cage is provided to rotate the inner shell and a dummy shell to facilitate assembly and disassembly in the field.

Leach, David (Niskayuna, NY); Bergendahl, Peter Allen (Scotia, NY); Waldo, Stuart Forrest (Salem, NC); Smith, Robert Leroy (Milford, OH); Phelps, Robert Kim (Milford, OH)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Single rotor turbine engine  

SciTech Connect

There has been invented a turbine engine with a single rotor which cools the engine, functions as a radial compressor, pushes air through the engine to the ignition point, and acts as an axial turbine for powering the compressor. The invention engine is designed to use a simple scheme of conventional passage shapes to provide both a radial and axial flow pattern through the single rotor, thereby allowing the radial intake air flow to cool the turbine blades and turbine exhaust gases in an axial flow to be used for energy transfer. In an alternative embodiment, an electric generator is incorporated in the engine to specifically adapt the invention for power generation. Magnets are embedded in the exhaust face of the single rotor proximate to a ring of stationary magnetic cores with windings to provide for the generation of electricity. In this alternative embodiment, the turbine is a radial inflow turbine rather than an axial turbine as used in the first embodiment. Radial inflow passages of conventional design are interleaved with radial compressor passages to allow the intake air to cool the turbine blades.

Platts, David A. (Los Alamos, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Gas turbine diagnostic system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the given article the methods of parametric diagnostics of gas turbine based on fuzzy logic is proposed. The diagnostic map of interconnection between some parts of turbine and changes of corresponding parameters has been developed. Also we have created model to define the efficiency of the compressor using fuzzy logic algorithms.

Talgat, Shuvatov

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Turbine disc sealing assembly  

SciTech Connect

A disc seal assembly for use in a turbine engine. The disc seal assembly includes a plurality of outwardly extending sealing flange members that define a plurality of fluid pockets. The sealing flange members define a labyrinth flow path therebetween to limit leakage between a hot gas path and a disc cavity in the turbine engine.

Diakunchak, Ihor S.

2013-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

168

Gas turbine engines  

SciTech Connect

A core engine or gas generator is described for use in a range of gas turbine engines. A multi-stage compressor and a single stage supersonic turbine are mounted on a single shaft. The compressor includes a number of stages of variable angle and the gas generator has an annular combustion chamber.

MacDonald, A.G.

1976-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

169

Estimation of the Risks of Collision or Strike to Freshwater Aquatic Organisms Resulting from Operation of Instream Hydrokinetic Turbines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrokinetic energy technologies have been proposed as renewable, environmentally preferable alternatives to fossil fuels for generation of electricity. Hydrokinetic technologies harness the energy of water in motion, either from waves, tides or from river currents. For energy capture from free-flowing rivers, arrays of rotating devices are most commonly proposed. The placement of hydrokinetic devices in large rivers is expected to increase the underwater structural complexity of river landscapes. Moore and Gregory (1988) found that structural complexity increased local fish populations because fish and other aquatic biota are attracted to structural complexity that provides microhabitats with steep flow velocity gradients (Liao 2007). However, hydrokinetic devices have mechanical parts, blades, wings or bars that move through the water column, posing a potential strike or collision risk to fish and other aquatic biota. Furthermore, in a setting with arrays of hydrokinetic turbines the cumulative effects of multiple encounters may increase the risk of strike. Submerged structures associated with a hydrokinetic (HK) project present a collision risk to aquatic organisms and diving birds (Cada et al. 2007). Collision is physical contact between a device or its pressure field and an organism that may result in an injury to that organism (Wilson et al. 2007). Collisions can occur between animals and fixed submerged structures, mooring equipment, horizontal or vertical axis turbine rotors, and structures that, by their individual design or in combination, may form traps. This report defines strike as a special case of collision where a moving part, such as a rotor blade of a HK turbine intercepts the path of an organism of interest, resulting in physical contact with the organism. The severity of a strike incidence may range from minor physical contact with no adverse effects to the organism to severe strike resulting in injury or death of the organism. Harmful effects to animal populations could occur directly (e.g., from strike mortality of individuals) or indirectly (e.g., if the loss of prey species to strike reduces food for predators). Although actively swimming or passively drifting animals may collide with any of the physical structures associated with hydrokinetic devices, turbine rotors are the most likely sources for risk of strike or significant collision (DOE 2009). It is also possible that during a close encounter with a HK device no physical contact will be made between the device and the organism, either because the animal avoids the device by successfully changing its direction of movement, or by successfully evading any moving parts of the device. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been funded by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Waterpower Program to evaluate strike potential and consequences for Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) technologies in rivers and estuaries of the United States. We will use both predictive models and laboratory/field experiments to evaluate the likelihood and consequences of strike at HK projects in rivers. Efforts undertaken at ORNL address three objectives: (1) Assess strike risk for marine and freshwater organisms; (2) Develop experimental procedures to assess the risk and consequences of strike; and (3) Conduct strike studies in experimental flumes and field installations of hydrokinetic devices. During the first year of the study ORNL collected information from the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) MHK database about geographical distribution of proposed hydrokinetic projects (what rivers or other types of systems), HK turbine design (horizontal axis, vertical axis, other), description of proposed axial turbine (number of blades, size of blades, rotation rate, mitigation measures), and number of units per project. Where site specific information was available, we compared the location of proposed projects rotors within the channel (e.g., along cutting edge bank, middle of thalweg, near bottom or in midwater) to the general locations of fish in the river (shoreline,

Schweizer, Peter E [ORNL; Cada, Glenn F [ORNL; Bevelhimer, Mark S [ORNL

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Estimation of the Risks of Collision or Strike to Freshwater Aquatic Organisms Resulting from Operation of Instream Hydrokinetic Turbines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydrokinetic energy technologies have been proposed as renewable, environmentally preferable alternatives to fossil fuels for generation of electricity. Hydrokinetic technologies harness the energy of water in motion, either from waves, tides or from river currents. For energy capture from free-flowing rivers, arrays of rotating devices are most commonly proposed. The placement of hydrokinetic devices in large rivers is expected to increase the underwater structural complexity of river landscapes. Moore and Gregory (1988) found that structural complexity increased local fish populations because fish and other aquatic biota are attracted to structural complexity that provides microhabitats with steep flow velocity gradients (Liao 2007). However, hydrokinetic devices have mechanical parts, blades, wings or bars that move through the water column, posing a potential strike or collision risk to fish and other aquatic biota. Furthermore, in a setting with arrays of hydrokinetic turbines the cumulative effects of multiple encounters may increase the risk of strike. Submerged structures associated with a hydrokinetic (HK) project present a collision risk to aquatic organisms and diving birds (Cada et al. 2007). Collision is physical contact between a device or its pressure field and an organism that may result in an injury to that organism (Wilson et al. 2007). Collisions can occur between animals and fixed submerged structures, mooring equipment, horizontal or vertical axis turbine rotors, and structures that, by their individual design or in combination, may form traps. This report defines strike as a special case of collision where a moving part, such as a rotor blade of a HK turbine intercepts the path of an organism of interest, resulting in physical contact with the organism. The severity of a strike incidence may range from minor physical contact with no adverse effects to the organism to severe strike resulting in injury or death of the organism. Harmful effects to animal populations could occur directly (e.g., from strike mortality of individuals) or indirectly (e.g., if the loss of prey species to strike reduces food for predators). Although actively swimming or passively drifting animals may collide with any of the physical structures associated with hydrokinetic devices, turbine rotors are the most likely sources for risk of strike or significant collision (DOE 2009). It is also possible that during a close encounter with a HK device no physical contact will be made between the device and the organism, either because the animal avoids the device by successfully changing its direction of movement, or by successfully evading any moving parts of the device. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been funded by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Waterpower Program to evaluate strike potential and consequences for Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) technologies in rivers and estuaries of the United States. We will use both predictive models and laboratory/field experiments to evaluate the likelihood and consequences of strike at HK projects in rivers. Efforts undertaken at ORNL address three objectives: (1) Assess strike risk for marine and freshwater organisms; (2) Develop experimental procedures to assess the risk and consequences of strike; and (3) Conduct strike studies in experimental flumes and field installations of hydrokinetic devices. During the first year of the study ORNL collected information from the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) MHK database about geographical distribution of proposed hydrokinetic projects (what rivers or other types of systems), HK turbine design (horizontal axis, vertical axis, other), description of proposed axial turbine (number of blades, size of blades, rotation rate, mitigation measures), and number of units per project. Where site specific information was available, we compared the location of proposed projects rotors within the channel (e.g., along cutting edge bank, middle of thalweg, near bottom or in midwater) to the general locations of fish in the river (shoreline,

Schweizer, Peter E [ORNL; Cada, Glenn F [ORNL; Bevelhimer, Mark S [ORNL

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Category:Marine and Hydrokinetic Technologies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Marine and Hydrokinetic Technologies Marine and Hydrokinetic Technologies Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Looking for the Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database? Click here for a user-friendly list of Marine and Hydrokinetic Technologies. This category has the default of form Form:Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology. Pages in category "Marine and Hydrokinetic Technologies" The following 200 pages are in this category, out of 282 total. (previous 200) (next 200) 1 MHK Technologies/14 MW OTECPOWER A MHK Technologies/Aegir Dynamo MHK Technologies/AirWEC MHK Technologies/Anaconda bulge tube drives turbine MHK Technologies/AquaBuoy MHK Technologies/Aquanator MHK Technologies/Aquantis MHK Technologies/Archimedes Wave Swing MHK Technologies/Atlantis AN 150 MHK Technologies/Atlantis AR 1000

172

Steam turbine control  

SciTech Connect

In a power plant which includes a steam turbine with main control valves for admitting steam into the steam turbine and a steam bypass with bypass control valves for diverting steam around the steam turbine directly into a condenser, it is necessary to coordinate the operation of the respective valves so that the steam turbine can be started, brought up to speed, synchronized with a generator and then loaded as smoothly and efficiently as possible. The present invention provides for such operation and, in addition, allows for the transfer of power plant operation from the so-called turbine following mode to the boiler following mode through the use of the sliding pressure concept. The invention described is particularly applicable to combined cycle power plants.

Priluck, D.M.; Wagner, J.B.

1982-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

173

Ceramic turbine nozzle  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A turbine nozzle and shroud assembly having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is positioned in a gas turbine engine and being attached to conventional metallic components. The metallic components having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being greater than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the turbine nozzle vane assembly. The turbine nozzle vane assembly includes a plurality of segmented vane defining a first vane segment and a second vane segment. Each of the first and second vane segments having a vertical portion. Each of the first vane segments and the second vane segments being positioned in functional relationship one to another within a recess formed within an outer shroud and an inner shroud. The turbine nozzle and shroud assembly provides an economical, reliable and effective ceramic component having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being less than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the other component.

Shaffer, James E. (Maitland, FL); Norton, Paul F. (San Diego, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Ceramic Cerami Turbine Nozzle  

SciTech Connect

A turbine nozzle vane assembly having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is positioned in a gas turbine engine and being attached to conventional metallic components. The metallic components having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being greater than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the turbine nozzle vane assembly. The turbine nozzle vane assembly includes an outer shroud and an inner shroud having a plurality of horizontally segmented vanes therebetween being positioned by a connecting member positioning segmented vanes in functional relationship one to another. The turbine nozzle vane assembly provides an economical, reliable and effective ceramic component having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being greater than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the other component.

Boyd, Gary L. (Alpine, CA)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Ceramic turbine nozzle  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A turbine nozzle and shroud assembly having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is positioned in a gas turbine engine and being attached to conventional metallic components. The metallic components have a preestablished rate of thermal expansion greater than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the turbine nozzle vane assembly. The turbine nozzle vane assembly includes a plurality of segmented vane defining a first vane segment and a second vane segment, each of the first and second vane segments having a vertical portion, and each of the first vane segments and the second vane segments being positioned in functional relationship one to another within a recess formed within an outer shroud and an inner shroud. The turbine nozzle and shroud assembly provides an economical, reliable and effective ceramic component having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being less than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the other component. 4 figs.

Shaffer, J.E.; Norton, P.F.

1996-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

176

Combined gas turbine and steam turbine power plant  

SciTech Connect

A description is given of a power plant arrangement having a gas turbine, a heat recovery steam generator, a steam turbine and means for controlling steam flow from the heat recovery steam generator to the steam turbine. Steam conditions are maintained generally constant and variations in power plant loading are carried by the steam turbine while operating the gas turbine at a generally constant fuel flow.

Baker, J.M.; Clark, G.W.; Harper, D.M.; Tomlinson, L.O.

1978-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

177

Measurement of turbulent wind velocities using a rotating boom apparatus  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The present report covers both the development of a rotating-boom facility and the evaluation of the spectral energy of the turbulence measured relative to the rotating boom. The rotating boom is composed of a helicopter blade driven through a pulley speed reducer by a variable speed motor. The boom is mounted on a semiportable tower that can be raised to provide various ratios of hub height to rotor diameter. The boom can be mounted to rotate in either the vertical or horizontal plane. Probes that measure the three components of turbulence can be mounted at any location along the radius of the boom. Special hot-film sensors measured two components of the turbulence at a point directly in front of the rotating blade. By using the probe rotated 90/sup 0/ about its axis, the third turbulent velocity component was measured. Evaluation of the spectral energy distributions for the three components of velocity indicates a large concentration of energy at the rotational frequency. At frequencies slightly below the rotational frequency, the spectral energy is greatly reduced over that measured for the nonrotating case measurements. Peaks in the energy at frequencies that are multiples of the rotation frequency were also observed. We conclude that the rotating boom apparatus is suitable and ready to be used in experiments for developing and testing sensors for rotational measurement of wind velocity from wind turbine rotors. It also can be used to accurately measure turbulent wind for testing theories of rotationally sampled wind velocity.

Sandborn, V.A.; Connell, J.R.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Foam Cleaning of Steam Turbines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The efficiency and power output of a steam turbine can be dramatically reduced when deposits form on the turbine blades. Disassembly and mechanical cleaning of the turbine is very time consuming and costly. Deposits can be removed from the turbine internals in situ by foaming an appropriate cleaning solution and injecting it through the turbine, dissolving the deposits and removing them from the system. Because disassembly of the turbine is not required, foam cleaning is a much faster and more cost-effective method of removing deposits. In recent years, HydroChem has removed copper deposits from over 130 Westinghouse and General Electric turbines nationwide using patented equipment.

Foster, C.; Curtis, G.; Horvath, J. W.

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Gas turbine combustor transition  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for converting a steam cooled transition to an air cooled transition in a gas turbine having a compressor in fluid communication with a combustor, a turbine section in fluid communication with the combustor, the transition disposed in a combustor shell and having a cooling circuit connecting a steam outlet and a steam inlet and wherein hot gas flows from the combustor through the transition and to the turbine section, includes forming an air outlet in the transition in fluid communication with the cooling circuit and providing for an air inlet in the transition in fluid communication with the cooling circuit. 7 figs.

Coslow, B.J.; Whidden, G.L.

1999-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

180

Gas turbine combustor transition  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of converting a steam cooled transition to an air cooled transition in a gas turbine having a compressor in fluid communication with a combustor, a turbine section in fluid communication with the combustor, the transition disposed in a combustor shell and having a cooling circuit connecting a steam outlet and a steam inlet and wherein hot gas flows from the combustor through the transition and to the turbine section, includes forming an air outlet in the transition in fluid communication with the cooling circuit and providing for an air inlet in the transition in fluid communication with the cooling circuit.

Coslow, Billy Joe (Winter Park, FL); Whidden, Graydon Lane (Great Blue, CT)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rotating marine turbine" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Turbine blade vibration dampening  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present turbine wheel assembly increases component life and turbine engine longevity. The combination of the strap and the opening combined with the preestablished area of the outer surface of the opening and the preestablished area of the outer circumferential surface of the strap and the friction between the strap and the opening increases the life and longevity of the turbine wheel assembly. Furthermore, the mass ``M`` or combined mass ``CM`` of the strap or straps and the centrifugal force assist in controlling vibrations and damping characteristics. 5 figs.

Cornelius, C.C.; Pytanowski, G.P.; Vendituoli, J.S.

1997-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

182

Gas turbine plant emissions  

SciTech Connect

Many cogeneration facilities use gas turbines combined with heat recovery boilers, and the number is increasing. At the start of 1986, over 75% of filings for new cogeneration plants included plans to burn natural gas. Depending on the geographic region, gas turbines are still one of the most popular prime movers. Emissions of pollutants from these turbines pose potential risks to the environment, particularly in geographical areas that already have high concentrations of cogeneration facilities. Although environmental regulations have concentrated on nitrogen oxides (NO/sub x/) in the past, it is now necessary to evaluate emission controls for other pollutants as well.

Davidson, L.N.; Gullett, D.E.

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Turbine blade vibration dampening  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present turbine wheel assembly increases component life and turbine engine longevity. The combination of the strap and the opening combined with the preestablished area of the outer surface of the opening and the preestablished area of the outer circumferential surface of the strap and the friction between the strap and the opening increases the life and longevity of the turbine wheel assembly. Furthermore, the mass "M" or combined mass "CM" of the strap or straps and the centrifugal force assist in controlling vibrations and damping characteristics.

Cornelius, Charles C. (San Diego, CA); Pytanowski, Gregory P. (San Diego, CA); Vendituoli, Jonathan S. (San Diego, CA)

1997-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

184

Aviation turbine fuels, 1982  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Properties of some aviation turbine fuels marketed in the United States during 1982 are presented in this report. The samples represented are typical 1982 production and were analyzed in the laboratories of 14 manufacturers of aviation turbine (jet) fuels. The data were submitted for study, calculation, and compilation under a cooperative agreement between the Department of Energy (DOE), Bartlesville Energy Technology Center (BETC), Bartlesville, Oklahoma, and the American Petroleum Institute (API). Results for the properties of 90 samples of aviation turbine fuels are included in the report for military grades JP-4 and HP-5, and commercial type Jet A.

Shelton, E.M.; Dickson, C.L.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Wind Turbine Acoustic Noise A white paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wind Turbine Acoustic Noise A white paper Prepared by the Renewable Energy Research Laboratory...................................................................... 8 Sound from Wind Turbines .............................................................................................. 10 Sources of Wind Turbine Sound

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

186

Heat Transfer from Rotating Blade Platforms with and without Film Cooling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transfer from Rotating Blade Transfer from Rotating Blade Platforms with and without Film Cooling J.C. Han and M.T. Schobeiri SCIES Project 03-01-SR113 DOE COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT DE-FC26-02NT41431 Texas A&M University Tom J. George, Program Manager, DOE/NETL Richard Wenglarz, Manager of Research, SCIES Project Awarded 07/01/2003 (36 Month Duration) $461,024 Total Contract Value ($361,024 DOE) Turbine Heat Transfer Laboratory Texas A&M University SR 113 - 10-2005 - JCHan Gas Turbine Needs Need Detailed Heat Transfer Data on Rotating Blade Platforms Improve Current Rotor Blade Cooling Schemes Provide Options for New Rotor Blade Cooling Designs Need Accurate and Efficient CFD Codes to Improve Flow and Heat Transfer Predictions and Guide Rotor Blade Cooling Designs Improved Turbine Power Efficiency by Increasing Turbine

187

Marine Insects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Zeylanica 16, 353354. Herring, J.L. (1949) A new species ofEntomol. 32, 160165. Herring, J.L. (1955) A new AmericanFlorida Entomol. 38, 2125. Herring, J.L. (1958a) The marine

Cheng, Lanna

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Operational-Condition-Independent Criteria Dedicated to Monitoring Wind Turbine Generators: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To date the existing wind turbine condition monitoring technologies and commercially available systems have not been fully accepted for improving wind turbine availability and reducing their operation and maintenance costs. One of the main reasons is that wind turbines are subject to constantly varying loads and operate at variable rotational speeds. As a consequence, the influences of turbine faults and the effects of varying load and speed are coupled together in wind turbine condition monitoring signals. So, there is an urgent need to either introduce some operational condition de-coupling procedures into the current wind turbine condition monitoring techniques or develop a new operational condition independent wind turbine condition monitoring technique to maintain high turbine availability and achieve the expected economic benefits from wind. The purpose of this paper is to develop such a technique. In the paper, three operational condition independent criteria are developed dedicated for monitoring the operation and health condition of wind turbine generators. All proposed criteria have been tested through both simulated and practical experiments. The experiments have shown that these criteria provide a solution for detecting both mechanical and electrical faults occurring in wind turbine generators.

Yang, W.; Sheng, S.; Court, R.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

NETL: Turbines Archive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Archive Archive KEY: News News & Features Events Events Publications Publications Archive 09.26.2013 Publications The 2013 Hydrogen Turbine Program Portfolio has been posted to the Reference Shelf. 08.15.2013 News DOE Selects Ten Projects to Conduct Advanced Turbine Technology Research Ten university projects to conduct advanced turbine technology research under the Office of Fossil Energy's University Turbine Systems Research (UTSR) Program have been selected by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for additional development. 07.15.2013 News NETL Innovations Recognized with R&D 100 Awards Two technologies advanced by the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) in collaboration with strategic partners have been recognized by R&D Magazine as among the 100 most technologically significant products introduced into the commercial marketplace within the past year.

190

NETL: Turbines - UTSR Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 Simulating Particle Deposition and Mitigating Deposition Degradation Effects in Film Cooled Turbine Sections University of Texas 7 Simulating Particle Deposition and Mitigating Deposition Degradation Effects in Film Cooled Turbine Sections University of Texas David Bogard Project Dates: 8/1/2007 - 9/30/2010 Area of Research: Aero/Heat Transfer Federal Project Manager: Mark Freeman Project Objective: A major goal of this project is to determine a reliable methodology for simulating contaminant deposition in a low-speed wind tunnel facility where testing is considerably less costly. The project is aimed at developing new cooling designs for turbine components that will minimize the effect of the depositions of contaminant particles on turbine components and maintain good film cooling performance even when surface conditions deteriorate. Moreover, a methodology will be established that

191

NETL: Turbines - UTSR Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 Aerodynamics and Heat Transfer Studies of Parameters Specific to the IGCC Requirements: High Mass Flow Endwall Contouring, Leading Edge Filleting and Blade Tip Ejection under Roating Turbine Condition Texas A&M University Meinhard Schobeiri 3 Aerodynamics and Heat Transfer Studies of Parameters Specific to the IGCC Requirements: High Mass Flow Endwall Contouring, Leading Edge Filleting and Blade Tip Ejection under Roating Turbine Condition Texas A&M University Meinhard Schobeiri Project Dates: 10/1/2009 - 9/30/2012 Area of Research: Aero/Heat Transfer Federal Project Manager: Robin Ames Project Objective: This project is advanced research designed to provide the gas turbine industry with a set of quantitative aerodynamic and film cooling effectiveness data essential to understanding the basic physics of complex secondary flows. This includes their influence on the efficiency and performance of gas turbines, and the impact that differing film cooling ejection arrangements have on suppressing the detrimental effect of these

192

Micro Turbine Generator Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A number of micro turbines generators have recently been announced as currently commercially available for sale to customers, such as end users, utilities, and energy service providers. Manufacturers and others are reporting certain performance capabilities ...

Stephanie L. Hamilton

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

NETL: Turbines - Reference Shelf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- Catalytic Combustion PDF-855KB 41892 - Praxair Final Report - Low NOx Fuel Flexible Gas Turbine PDF-214KB 42176 - GT 2006 Annual Report PDF-504KB 42495 - UTEP H2 Kinetics...

194

Turbines in the sky  

SciTech Connect

Gas turbines are being investigated as power sources for the proposed Star Wars weapons flatforms. The gas turbine engine offers the best opportunity for exploiting the high-temperature potential of both nuclear and chemical combustion. The use of mature gas turbine technology and existing materials would result in highly reliable PCUs capable of meeting SDI's requirements. However, operation under the temperature limits imposed by existing materials would result in a prohibitively heavy system. Cooled blades would somewhat increase temperature capability; however the turbine's mass, though reduced, would still be unacceptably large. The greatest improvements would result from the ability to operate at temperatures of up to 2000 K, pressures up to 14 MPa, and stress up to 690 MPa.

Boyle, R.V.; Riple, J.C.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Wind Turbines and Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wind power has been gaining prominence as a viable sustainable alternative to other forms of energy production. Studies have found that there is increasing population demand for green energy 1,2. In Australia, this has been encouraged by the introduction of the Renewable Energy (Electricity) Act in 2000 and the Renewable Energy Target Scheme in 2009. As with any new technology, wind turbines are not without controversy. Those who oppose the development of wind farms contend that wind turbines can adversely impact the health of individuals living in close proximity. Do wind turbines impact on health? Concerns regarding the adverse health impacts of wind turbines focus on infrasound noise, electromagnetic interference, shadow flicker and blade glint produced

unknown authors

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Wind Turbines and Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wind power has been gaining prominence as a viable sustainable alternative to other forms of energy production. Studies have found that there is increasing population demand for green energy1,2. In Australia, this has been encouraged by the introduction of the Renewable Energy (Electricity) Act in 2000 and the Renewable Energy Target Scheme in 2009. As with any new technology, wind turbines are not without controversy. Those who oppose the development of wind farms contend that wind turbines can adversely impact the health of individuals living in close proximity. Do wind turbines impact on health? Concerns regarding the adverse health impacts of wind turbines focus on infrasound noise, electromagnetic interference, shadow flicker and blade glint produced

unknown authors

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Turbine nozzle positioning system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nozzle guide vane assembly having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is positioned in a gas turbine engine and being attached to conventional metallic components. The nozzle guide vane assembly includes an outer shroud having a mounting leg with an opening defined therein, a tip shoe ring having a mounting member with an opening defined therein, a nozzle support ring having a plurality of holes therein and a pin positioned in the corresponding opening in the outer shroud, opening in the tip shoe ring and the hole in the nozzle support ring. A rolling joint is provided between metallic components of the gas turbine engine and the nozzle guide vane assembly. The nozzle guide vane assembly is positioned radially about a central axis of the gas turbine engine and axially aligned with a combustor of the gas turbine engine.

Norton, Paul F. (San Diego, CA); Shaffer, James E. (Maitland, FL)

1996-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

198

Turbine nozzle positioning system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nozzle guide vane assembly having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is positioned in a gas turbine engine and being attached to conventional metallic components. The nozzle guide vane assembly includes an outer shroud having a mounting leg with an opening defined therein, a tip shoe ring having a mounting member with an opening defined therein, a nozzle support ring having a plurality of holes therein and a pin positioned in the corresponding opening in the outer shroud, opening in the tip shoe ring and the hole in the nozzle support ring. A rolling joint is provided between metallic components of the gas turbine engine and the nozzle guide vane assembly. The nozzle guide vane assembly is positioned radially about a central axis of the gas turbine engine and axially aligned with a combustor of the gas turbine engine. 9 figs.

Norton, P.F.; Shaffer, J.E.

1996-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

199

SPACE HANDBOOK TURBINES  

SciTech Connect

Turbine specific weight vs. power plant output was investigated for rubidium, potassium, and sodium at several inlet temperatures to obtain order of magnitude performance and weight of possible nuclear power plant systems. (W.L.H.)

Grimaldi, J.

1960-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

200

Gas turbine noise control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of gas turbine powered generators and pumping stations are likely to increase over the next two decades. Alternative fuel systems utilizing fluidized coal beds are likely in the near future

Louis A. Challis and Associates Pty. Ltd.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rotating marine turbine" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Torque ripple in a Darrieus, vertical axis wind turbine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Interaction between a steady wind and a rotating, Darrieus, vertical axis wind turbine produces time periodic aerodynamic loads which cause time dependent torque variations, referred to as torque ripple, to occur in the mechanical link between the turbine and the electrical generator. There is concern for the effect of torque ripple upon fatigue life of drive train components and upon power quality. An analytical solution characterizing the phenomenon of torque ripple has been obtained which is based upon a Fourier expansion of the time dependent features of the problem. Numerical results for torque ripple, some experimental data, determination of acceptable levels and methods of controlling it, are presented and discussed.

Reuter, R.C. Jr.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Design Method for Contra-Rotating Propellers for High-Speed Crafts: Revising the Original Lerbs Theory in a Modern Perspective  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The main theoretical and numerical aspects of a design method for optimum contrar-rotating (CR) propellers for fast marine crafts are presented. We propose a reformulated version of a well-known design theory for contra-rotating ...

Brizzolara, Stefano

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Hydrogen Turbines | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hydrogen Turbines Hydrogen Turbines Hydrogen Turbines Hydrogen Turbines The Turbines of Tomorrow Combustion (gas) turbines are key components of advanced systems designed for new electric power plants in the United States. With gas turbines, power plants will supply clean, increasingly fuel-efficient, and relatively low-cost energy. Typically, a natural gas-fired combustion turbine-generator operating in a "simple cycle" converts between 25 and 35 percent of the natural gas heating value to useable electricity. Today, most new smaller power plants also install a recuperator to capture waste heat from the turbine's exhaust to preheat combustion air and boost efficiencies. In most of the new larger plants, a "heat recovery steam generator" is installed to recover waste

204

High temperature nuclear gas turbine  

SciTech Connect

Significance of gas turbine cycle, process of the development of gas turbines, cycle and efficiency of high-temperature gas turbines, history of gas turbine plants and application of nuclear gas turbines are described. The gas turbines are directly operated by the heat from nuclear plants. The gas turbines are classified into two types, namely open cycle and closed cycle types from the point of thermal cycle, and into two types of internal combustion and external combustion from the point of heating method. The hightemperature gas turbines are tbe type of internal combustion closed cycle. Principle of the gas turbines of closed cycle and open cycle types is based on Brayton, Sirling, and Ericsson cycles. Etficiency of the turbines is decided only by pressure ratio, and is independent of gas temperature. An example of the turbine cycle for the nuclear plant Gestacht II is explained. The thermal efficiency of that plant attains 37%. Over the gas temperature of about 750 deg C, the thermal efficiency of the gas turbine cycle is better than that of steam turbine cycle. As the nuclear fuel, coated particle fuel is used, and this can attain higher temperature of core outlet gas. Direct coupling of the nuclear power plants and the high temperature gas turbines has possibility of the higher thermal efficiency. (JA)

Kurosawa, A.

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Debris trap in a turbine cooling system  

SciTech Connect

In a turbine having a rotor and a plurality of stages, each stage comprising a row of buckets mounted on the rotor for rotation therewith; and wherein the buckets of at least one of the stages are cooled by steam, the improvement comprising at least one axially extending cooling steam supply conduit communicating with an at least partially annular steam supply manifold; one or more axially extending cooling steam feed tubes connected to the manifold at a location radially outwardly of the cooling steam supply conduit, the feed tubes arranged to supply cooling steam to the buckets of at least one of the plurality of stages; the manifold extending radially beyond the feed tubes to thereby create a debris trap region for collecting debris under centrifugal loading caused by rotation of the rotor.

Wilson, Ian David (Clifton Park, NY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Environmental Effects of Hydrokinetic Turbines on Fish: Desktop and Laboratory Flume Studies  

SciTech Connect

This collection of three reports describes desktop and laboratory flume studies that provide information to support assessment of the potential for injury and mortality of fish that encounter hydrokinetic turbines of various designs installed in tidal and river environments. Behavioral responses to turbine exposure also are investigated to support assessment of the potential for disruptions to upstream and downstream movements of fish. The studies: (1) conducted an assessment of potential injury mechanisms using available data from studies with conventional hydro turbines; (2) developed theoretical models for predicting blade strike probabilities and mortality rates; and (3) performed flume testing with three turbine designs and several fish species and size groups in two laboratory flumes to estimate survival rates and document fish behavior. The project yielded three reports which this document comprises. The three constituent documents are addressed individually below Fish Passage Through Turbines: Application of Conventional Hydropower Data to Hydrokinetic Technologies Fish passing through the blade sweep of a hydrokinetic turbine experience a much less harsh physical environment than do fish entrained through conventional hydro turbines. The design and operation of conventional turbines results in high flow velocities, abrupt changes in flow direction, relatively high runner rotational and blade speeds, rapid and significant changes in pressure, and the need for various structures throughout the turbine passageway that can be impacted by fish. These conditions generally do not occur or are not significant factors for hydrokinetic turbines. Furthermore, compared to conventional hydro turbines, hydrokinetic turbines typically produce relatively minor changes in shear, turbulence, and pressure levels from ambient conditions in the surrounding environment. Injuries and mortality from mechanical injuries will be less as well, mainly due to low rotational speeds and strike velocities, and an absence of structures that can lead to grinding or abrasion injuries. Additional information is needed to rigorously assess the nature and magnitude of effects on individuals and populations, and to refine criteria for design of more fish-friendly hydrokinetic turbines. Evaluation of Fish Injury and Mortality Associated with Hydrokinetic Turbines Flume studies exposed fish to two hydrokinetic turbine designs to determine injury and survival rates and to assess behavioral responses. Also, a theoretical model developed for predicting strike probability and mortality of fish passing through conventional hydro turbines was adapted for use with hydrokinetic turbines and applied to the two designs evaluated during flume studies. The flume tests were conducted with the Lucid spherical turbine (LST), a Darrieus-type (cross flow) turbine, and the Welka UPG, an axial flow propeller turbine. Survival rates for rainbow trout tested with the LST were greater than 98% for both size groups and approach velocities evaluated. Turbine passage survival rates for rainbow trout and largemouth bass tested with the Welka UPG were greater than 99% for both size groups and velocities evaluated. Injury rates of turbine-exposed fish were low with both turbines and generally comparable to control fish. Video observations of the LST demonstrated active avoidance of turbine passage by a large proportion fish despite being released about 25 cm upstream of the turbine blade sweep. Video observations from behavior trials indicated few if any fish pass through the turbines when released farther upstream. The theoretical predictions for the LST indicated that strike mortality would begin to occur at an ambient current velocity of about 1.7 m/s for fish with lengths greater than the thickness of the leading edge of the blades. As current velocities increase above 1.7 m/s, survival was predicted to decrease for fish passing through the LST, but generally remained high (greater than 90%) for fish less than 200 mm in length. Strike mortality was not predicted to occur duri

Jacobson, Paul T. [Electric Power Research Institute; Amaral, Stephen V. [Alden Research Laboratory; Castro-Santos, Theodore [U.S. Geological Survey; Giza, Dan [Alden Research Laboratory; Haro, Alexander J. [U.S. Geological Survey; Hecker, George [Alden Research Laboratory; McMahon, Brian [Alden Research Laboratory; Perkins, Norman [Alden Research Laboratory; Pioppi, Nick [Alden Research Laboratory

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

207

Radial-Radial Single Rotor Turbine  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radial-Radial Single Rotor Turbine Radial-Radial Single Rotor Turbine A rotor for use in turbine applications. June 26, 2013 Radial-Radial Single Rotor Turbine A rotor for use in...

208

Turbine inner shroud and turbine assembly containing such inner shroud  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A turbine inner shroud and a turbine assembly. The turbine assembly includes a turbine stator having a longitudinal axis and having an outer shroud block with opposing and longitudinally outward facing first and second sides having open slots. A ceramic inner shroud has longitudinally inward facing hook portions which can longitudinally and radially surround a portion of the sides of the outer shroud block. In one attachment, the hook portions are engageable with, and are positioned within, the open slots.

Bagepalli, Bharat Sampathkumaran (Niskayuna, NY); Corman, Gregory Scot (Ballston Lake, NY); Dean, Anthony John (Scotia, NY); DiMascio, Paul Stephen (Clifton Park, NY); Mirdamadi, Massoud (Niskayuna, NY)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Large-Eddy Simulation Study of Wake Propagation and Power Production in an Array of Tidal-Current Turbines: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents our initial work in performing large-eddy simulations of tidal turbine array flows. First, a horizontally-periodic precursor simulation is performed to create turbulent flow data. Then that data is used as inflow into a tidal turbine array two rows deep and infinitely wide. The turbines are modeled using rotating actuator lines, and the finite-volume method is used to solve the governing equations. In studying the wakes created by the turbines, we observed that the vertical shear of the inflow combined with wake rotation causes lateral wake asymmetry. Also, various turbine configurations are simulated, and the total power production relative to isolated turbines is examined. Staggering consecutive rows of turbines in the simulated configurations allows the greatest efficiency using the least downstream row spacing. Counter-rotating consecutive downstream turbines in a non-staggered array shows a small benefit. This work has identified areas for improvement, such as the use of a larger precursor domain to better capture elongated turbulent structures, the inclusion of salinity and temperature equations to account for density stratification and its effect on turbulence, improved wall shear stress modelling, and the examination of more array configurations.

Churchfield, M. J.; Li, Y.; Moriarty, P. J.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Large-Eddy Simulation Study of Wake Propagation and Power Production in an Array of Tidal-Current Turbines: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents our initial work in performing large-eddy simulations of tidal turbine array flows. First, a horizontally-periodic precursor simulation is performed to create turbulent flow data. Then that data is used to determine the inflow into a tidal turbine array two rows deep and infinitely wide. The turbines are modeled using rotating actuator lines, and the finite-volume method is used to solve the governing equations. In studying the wakes created by the turbines, we observed that the vertical shear of the inflow combined with wake rotation causes lateral wake asymmetry. Also, various turbine configurations are simulated, and the total power production relative to isolated turbines is examined. Staggering consecutive rows of turbines in the simulated configurations allows the greatest efficiency using the least downstream row spacing. Counter-rotating consecutive downstream turbines in a non-staggered array shows a small benefit. This work has identified areas for improvement, such as the use of a larger precursor domain to better capture elongated turbulent structures, the inclusion of salinity and temperature equations to account for density stratification and its effect on turbulence, improved wall shear stress modeling, and the examination of more array configurations.

Churchfield, M. J.; Li, Y.; Moriarty, P. J.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Program on Technology Innovation: Wireless Vibration Measurement of Low-Pressure Steam Turbine Blades  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes Phase 2 of a research and development effort to define a turbine blade vibration sensor (TBVS) system for measuring the mechanical vibrational spectrum of large steam turbine blades as they rotate. In Phase 1, the design concept and a number of alternative system components were considered for a wireless electronic device called a mote. In the Phase 2 research covered in this report, the final design of a custom accelerometer capable of operating under very high sustained centrifuga...

2010-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

212

Vertical-axis wind turbines -- The current status of an old technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Vertical-axis wind turbine technology is not well understood, even though the earliest wind machines rotated about a vertical axis. The operating environment of a vertical-axis wind turbine is quite complex, but detailed analysis capabilities have been developed and verified over the last 30 years. Although vertical-axis technology has not been widely commercialized, it exhibits both advantages and disadvantages compared to horizontal-axis technology, and in some applications, it appears to offer significant advantages.

Berg, D.E.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

213

Advanced Control Design and Field Testing for Wind Turbines at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Utility-scale wind turbines require active control systems to operate at variable rotational speeds. As turbines become larger and more flexible, advanced control algorithms become necessary to meet multiple objectives such as speed regulation, blade load mitigation, and mode stabilization. At the same time, they must maximize energy capture. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory has developed control design and testing capabilities to meet these growing challenges.

Hand, M. M.; Johnson, K. E.; Fingersh, L. J.; Wright, A. D.

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Gas Turbine Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Historically, preliminary design information regarding gas turbine emissions has been unreliable, particularly for facilities using steam injection and other forms of Best Available Control Technology (BACT). This was probably attributed to the lack of regulatory interest in the 'real world' test results coupled with the difficulties of gathering analogous bench test data for systems employing gas turbines with Heat Recovery Steam Generators (HRSG) and steam injection. It appears that the agencies are getting a better grasp of emissions, but there are still problem areas, particularly CO and unburned hydrocarbon emissions. The lag in data has resulted in the imposition of a CO reactor as BACT for the gas turbine. With the renewed concern about the environment, air permits will have a high profile with offsets being the next fix beyond BACT. 'The manner in which technology developers and electric utilities will share emissions reductions in the coming era of pollution allowance trading is becoming prominent on the agendas of strategic planners at technology vendors and the electric power industry....' (1) Therefore, it becomes increasingly important that the proponents of gas turbine-based facilities establish more reliable data on their proposed emissions. This paper addresses the gas turbine emissions experiences of eight cogeneration plants utilizing: 1) steam injection for both NOx control and power augmentation, 2) CO reactors, 3) selective catalytic reduction units. It also looks at possible regulatory actions.

Frederick, J. D.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Ceramic stationary gas turbine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The performance of current industrial gas turbines is limited by the temperature and strength capabilities of the metallic structural materials in the engine hot section. Because of their superior high-temperature strength and durability, ceramics can be used as structural materials for hot section components (blades, nozzles, combustor liners) in innovative designs at increased turbine firing temperatures. The benefits include the ability to increase the turbine inlet temperature (TIT) to about 1200{degrees}C ({approx}2200{degrees}F) or more with uncooled ceramics. It has been projected that fully optimized stationary gas turbines would have a {approx}20 percent gain in thermal efficiency and {approx}40 percent gain in output power in simple cycle compared to all metal-engines with air-cooled components. Annual fuel savings in cogeneration in the U.S. would be on the order of 0.2 Quad by 2010. Emissions reductions to under 10 ppmv NO{sub x} are also forecast. This paper describes the progress on a three-phase, 6-year program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Industrial Technologies, to achieve significant performance improvements and emissions reductions in stationary gas turbines by replacing metallic hot section components with ceramic parts. Progress is being reported for the period September 1, 1994, through September 30, 1995.

Roode, M. van

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

216

Using a new characterization of turbulent wind for accurate correlation of wind turbine response with wind speed  

SciTech Connect

The turbulence encountered by a point on a rotating wind turbine blade has characteristics that in some important respects are different from those measured by a stationary anemometer. The conventional one-peaked continuous spectrum becomes, broadly, a two-peaked spectrum that in addition contains a set of narrow-band spikes of turbulence energy, one centered on the frequency of rotor rotation and the others centered on multiples of that frequency. The rotational sampling effect on wind spectra is quantified using measurements of wind velocity by anemometers on stationary crosswind circular arrays. Characteristics of fluctuating wind are compared to measured fluctuations of bending moments of the rotor blades and power output fluctuations of a horizontal-axis wind turbine at the same site. The wind characteristics and the correlations between wind fluctuations and wind turbine fluctuations provide a basis for improving turbine design, siting, and control. 6 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

Connell, J.R.; George, R.L.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Gas generator and turbine unit  

SciTech Connect

A gas turbine power unit is disclosed in which the arrangement and configuration of parts is such as to save space and weight in order to provide a compact and self-contained assembly. An air-intake casing supports the upstream end of a gas generator, the down-stream end of which is integral with a power turbine. The stator casing of the turbine is connected to a cone thermally insulated and completely inserted into any exhaust casing having a vertical outlet, wherein the turbine exhaust is conveyed into the exhaust casing by an annular diffusing cone. The turbine casing is supported on four legs. In addition, the turbine rotor and thus the turbine shaft are overhangingly supported by an independent structure, the weight of which bears on the machine base outside the exhaust casing and away of the power turbine space.

Vinciguerra, C.

1984-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

218

Ceramics for ATS industrial turbines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

US DOE and most US manufacturers of stationary gas turbines are participating in a major national effort to develop advanced turbine systems (ATS). The ATS program will achieve ultrahigh efficiencies, environmental superiority, and cost competitiveness compared with current combustion turbine systems. A major factor in the improved efficiencies of simple cycle ATS gas turbines will be higher operating efficiencies than curren engines. These temperatures strain the limits of metallic alloy and flow-path cooling technologies. Ceramics materials offer a potential alterative to cooled turbine alloys for ATS turbines due to higher melting points than metallics. This paper evaluates ceramics technology and plant economic issues for ATS industrial turbine systems. A program with the objective of demonstrating first-stage ceramic vanes in a commerical industrial turbine is also described.

Wenglarz, R.; Ali, S. [Allison Engine Co., Indianapolis, IN (United States); Layne, A. [USDOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center, WV (United States)

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

NETL: Turbine Projects - Emissions Reduction  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emissions Reduction Turbine Projects Emissions Reduction Pre-Mixer Design for High Hydrogen Fuels DataFact Sheets Low-NOX Emissions in a Fuel Flexible Gas Turbine Combustor Design...

220

Basic Integrative Models for Offshore Wind Turbine Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This research study developed basic dynamic models that can be used to accurately predict the response behavior of a near-shore wind turbine structure with monopile, suction caisson, or gravity-based foundation systems. The marine soil conditions were modeled using apparent fixity level, Randolph elastic continuum, and modified cone models. The offshore wind turbine structures were developed using a finite element formulation. A two-bladed 3.0 megawatt (MW) and a three-bladed 1.5 MW capacity wind turbine were studied using a variety of design load, and soil conditions scenarios. Aerodynamic thrust loads were estimated using the FAST Software developed by the U.S Department of Energys National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). Hydrodynamic loads were estimated using Morisons equation and the more recent Faltinsen Newman Vinje (FNV) theory. This research study addressed two of the important design constraints, specifically, the angle of the support structure at seafloor and the horizontal displacement at the hub elevation during dynamic loading. The simulation results show that the modified cone model is stiffer than the apparent fixity level and Randolph elastic continuum models. The effect of the blade pitch failure on the offshore wind turbine structure decreases with increasing water depth, but increases with increasing hub height of the offshore wind turbine structure.

Aljeeran, Fares

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rotating marine turbine" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Retooling Michigan: Tanks to Turbines | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tanks to Turbines Tanks to Turbines Retooling Michigan: Tanks to Turbines June 8, 2010 - 6:13pm Addthis Joshua DeLung Editor's Note: This story was updated Oct. 13, 2010, to reflect the additional equipment purchases, manufacturing goals and customer additions for Loc Performance Products. Tanks strike fear in enemies during battle, and for good reason - the 120-mm main gun of an M1 Abrams tank is both deafening and destructive. Now a company that has manufactured geared systems for those mobile weapons for more than 20 years is part of the forces working toward energy security and independence. Weapons of mass production In southern Michigan, Loc Performance Products is retooling space in its existing factory in Plymouth, where it builds gears and gearboxes -which provide rotating force from gears to move vehicles - for the U.S.

222

Air cooled turbine component having an internal filtration system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A centrifugal particle separator is provided for removing particles such as microscopic dirt or dust particles from the compressed cooling air prior to reaching and cooling the turbine blades or turbine vanes of a turbine engine. The centrifugal particle separator structure has a substantially cylindrical body with an inlet arranged on a periphery of the substantially cylindrical body. Cooling air enters centrifugal particle separator through the separator inlet port having a linear velocity. When the cooling air impinges the substantially cylindrical body, the linear velocity is transformed into a rotational velocity, separating microscopic particles from the cooling air. Microscopic dust particles exit the centrifugal particle separator through a conical outlet and returned to a working medium.

Beeck, Alexander R. (Orlando, FL)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

223

Fuzzy control of steam turbines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Keywords: PID control, comparison of PID and fuzzy control, fuzzy logic control, robustness, speed control, steam turbine control

N. Kiupel; P. M. Frank; O. Bux

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Steam Turbine Performance Engineer's Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Steam Turbine Performance Engineer's Guide is meant to present the steam turbine performance engineer with the expected and important functions and responsibilities necessary to succeed in this position that are not necessarily taught in college. The instructions and recommendations in this guide, when properly executed, will improve the effectiveness of steam turbine performance engineers, positively affecting both the performance and reliability of the steam turbines under their care.

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

225

Cavitation Erosion of Francis Turbines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2013. Symposium, Advances in Hydroelectric Turbine Manufacturing and Repair. Presentation...

226

Gas Turbine Manufacturers Perspective  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Viability and Experience of IGCC From a Viability and Experience of IGCC From a Gas Turbine Manufacturers Perspective ASME - IGCC ASME - IGCC Turbo Turbo Expo Expo June 2001 June 2001 GE Power Systems g Klaus Brun, Ph.D. - Manager Process Power Plant Product & Market Development Robert M. Jones - Project Development Manager Process Power Plants Power Systems Power Systems General Electric Company General Electric Company ABSTRACT GE Power Systems g Economic Viability and Experience of IGCC From a Gas Turbine Manufacturers Perspective High natural gas fuel gas prices combined with new technology developments have made IGCC a competitive option when compared to conventional combined cycle or coal steam turbine cycles. Although the initial investment costs for an IGCC plant are still comparatively high, the low

227

NETL: Turbines - UTSR Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

65 Hafnia-based Nanostructured Thermal Barrier Coatings for Advanced Hydrogen Turbine Technology University of Texas -- El Paso 65 Hafnia-based Nanostructured Thermal Barrier Coatings for Advanced Hydrogen Turbine Technology University of Texas -- El Paso Chintalapalle Ramana Project Dates: 9/30/2009 - 9/30/2011 Area of Research: Materials Federal Project Manager: Briggs White Project Objective: This project is focused on developing novel coatings for high-H2 fired gas turbine components such that high efficiencies and long lifetimes may be acheived in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) powerplants. Nanostructured Hafnia-based coatings will be develped for thermal barrier coatings (TBCs). A fundamental understanding of TBCs will be aquired and a knowledge database of next generation TBC materials with high-temperature tolerance, durability, and reliability will be generated.

228

Wind turbine spoiler  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An aerodynamic spoiler system for a vertical axis wind turbine includes spoilers on the blades initially stored near the rotor axis to minimize drag. A solenoid latch adjacent the central support tower releases the spoilers and centrifugal force causes the spoilers to move up the turbine blades away from the rotor axis, thereby producing a braking effect and actual slowing of the associated wind turbine, if desired. The spoiler system can also be used as an infinitely variable power control by regulated movement of the spoilers on the blades over the range between the undeployed and fully deployed positions. This is done by the use of a suitable powered reel and cable located at the rotor tower to move the spoilers.

Sullivan, William N. (Albuquerque, NM)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Turbine nozzle attachment system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nozzle guide vane assembly having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is positioned in a gas turbine engine and being attached to conventional metallic components. The nozzle guide vane assembly includes a pair of legs extending radially outwardly from an outer shroud and a pair of mounting legs extending radially inwardly from an inner shroud. Each of the pair of legs and mounting legs have a pair of holes therein. A plurality of members attached to the gas turbine engine have a plurality of bores therein which axially align with corresponding ones of the pair of holes in the legs. A plurality of pins are positioned within the corresponding holes and bores radially positioning the nozzle guide vane assembly about a central axis of the gas turbine engine.

Norton, Paul F. (San Diego, CA); Shaffer, James E. (Maitland, FL)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Turbine nozzle attachment system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nozzle guide vane assembly having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is positioned in a gas turbine engine and is attached to conventional metallic components. The nozzle guide vane assembly includes a pair of legs extending radially outwardly from an outer shroud and a pair of mounting legs extending radially inwardly from an inner shroud. Each of the pair of legs and mounting legs have a pair of holes therein. A plurality of members attached to the gas turbine engine have a plurality of bores therein which axially align with corresponding ones of the pair of holes in the legs. A plurality of pins are positioned within the corresponding holes and bores radially positioning the nozzle guide vane assembly about a central axis of the gas turbine engine. 3 figs.

Norton, P.F.; Shaffer, J.E.

1995-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

231

A Silicon-Based Micro Gas Turbine Engine for Power Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper reports on our research in developing a micro power generation system based on gas turbine engine and piezoelectric converter. The micro gas turbine engine consists of a micro combustor, a turbine and a centrifugal compressor. Comprehensive simulation has been implemented to optimal the component design. We have successfully demonstrated a silicon-based micro combustor, which consists of seven layers of silicon structures. A hairpin-shaped design is applied to the fuel/air recirculation channel. The micro combustor can sustain a stable combustion with an exit temperature as high as 1600 K. We have also successfully developed a micro turbine device, which is equipped with enhanced micro air-bearings and driven by compressed air. A rotation speed of 15,000 rpm has been demonstrated during lab test. In this paper, we will introduce our research results major in the development of micro combustor and micro turbine test device.

Shan, X -C; Maeda, R; Sun, Y F; Wu, M; Hua, J S

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Applications: Wind turbine structural health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of turbine system management. The data obtained from this multi-scale sensing capability will be fullyCapability Applications: Wind turbine structural health monitoring Individual turbine maintenance for active control in the field Limit damage propagation and maintenance costs Maximize return

233

Steam generators, turbines, and condensers. Volume six  

SciTech Connect

Volume six covers steam generators (How steam is generated, steam generation in a PWR, vertical U-tube steam generators, once-through steam generators, how much steam do steam generators make.), turbines (basic turbine principles, impulse turbines, reaction turbines, turbine stages, turbine arrangements, turbine steam flow, steam admission to turbines, turbine seals and supports, turbine oil system, generators), and condensers (need for condensers, basic condenser principles, condenser arrangements, heat transfer in condensers, air removal from condensers, circulating water system, heat loss to the circulating water system, factors affecting condenser performance, condenser auxiliaries).

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Velocity pump reaction turbine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An expanding hydraulic/two-phase velocity pump reaction turbine including a dual concentric rotor configuration with an inter-rotor annular flow channel in which the inner rotor is mechanically driven by the outer rotor. In another embodiment, the inner rotor is immobilized and provided with gas recovery ports on its outer surface by means of which gas in solution may be recovered. This velocity pump reaction turbine configuration is capable of potential energy conversion efficiencies of up to 70%, and is particularly suited for geothermal applications.

House, Palmer A. (Walnut Creek, CA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Velocity pump reaction turbine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An expanding hydraulic/two-phase velocity pump reaction turbine including a dual concentric rotor configuration with an inter-rotor annular flow channel in which the inner rotor is mechanically driven by the outer rotor. In another embodiment, the inner rotor is immobilized and provided with gas recovery ports on its outer surface by means of which gas in solution may be recovered. This velocity pump reaction turbine configuration is capable of potential energy conversion efficiencies of up to 70%, and is particularly suited for geothermal applications.

House, Palmer A. (Walnut Creek, CA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Vertical axis wind turbines  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A vertical axis wind turbine is described. The wind turbine can include a top ring, a middle ring and a lower ring, wherein a plurality of vertical airfoils are disposed between the rings. For example, three vertical airfoils can be attached between the upper ring and the middle ring. In addition, three more vertical airfoils can be attached between the lower ring and the middle ring. When wind contacts the vertically arranged airfoils the rings begin to spin. By connecting the rings to a center pole which spins an alternator, electricity can be generated from wind.

Krivcov, Vladimir (Miass, RU); Krivospitski, Vladimir (Miass, RU); Maksimov, Vasili (Miass, RU); Halstead, Richard (Rohnert Park, CA); Grahov, Jurij (Miass, RU)

2011-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

237

Multiple piece turbine airfoil  

SciTech Connect

A turbine airfoil, such as a rotor blade or a stator vane, for a gas turbine engine, the airfoil formed as a shell and spar construction with a plurality of dog bone struts each mounted within openings formed within the shell and spar to allow for relative motion between the spar and shell in the airfoil chordwise direction while also forming a seal between adjacent cooling channels. The struts provide the seal as well as prevent bulging of the shell from the spar due to the cooling air pressure.

Kimmel, Keith D (Jupiter, FL); Wilson, Jr., Jack W. (Palm Beach Gardens, FL)

2010-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

238

ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEMS PROGRAM  

SciTech Connect

Natural gas combustion turbines are rapidly becoming the primary technology of choice for generating electricity. At least half of the new generating capacity added in the US over the next twenty years will be combustion turbine systems. The Department of Energy has cosponsored with Siemens Westinghouse, a program to maintain the technology lead in gas turbine systems. The very ambitious eight year program was designed to demonstrate a highly efficient and commercially acceptable power plant, with the ability to fire a wide range of fuels. The main goal of the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Program was to develop ultra-high efficiency, environmentally superior and cost effective competitive gas turbine systems for base load application in utility, independent power producer and industrial markets. Performance targets were focused on natural gas as a fuel and included: System efficiency that exceeds 60% (lower heating value basis); Less than 10 ppmv NO{sub x} emissions without the use of post combustion controls; Busbar electricity that are less than 10% of state of the art systems; Reliability-Availability-Maintainability (RAM) equivalent to current systems; Water consumption minimized to levels consistent with cost and efficiency goals; and Commercial systems by the year 2000. In a parallel effort, the program was to focus on adapting the ATS engine to coal-derived or biomass fuels. In Phase 1 of the ATS Program, preliminary investigators on different gas turbine cycles demonstrated that net plant LHV based efficiency greater than 60% was achievable. In Phase 2 the more promising cycles were evaluated in greater detail and the closed-loop steam-cooled combined cycle was selected for development because it offered the best solution with least risk for achieving the ATS Program goals for plant efficiency, emissions, cost of electricity and RAM. Phase 2 also involved conceptual ATS engine and plant design and technology developments in aerodynamics, sealing, combustion, cooling, materials, coatings and casting development. The market potential for the ATS gas turbine in the 2000-2014 timeframe was assessed for combined cycle, simple cycle and integrated gasification combined cycle, for three engine sizes. The total ATS market potential was forecasted to exceed 93 GW. Phase 3 and Phase 3 Extension involved further technology development, component testing and W501ATS engine detail design. The technology development efforts consisted of ultra low NO{sub x} combustion, catalytic combustion, sealing, heat transfer, advanced coating systems, advanced alloys, single crystal casting development and determining the effect of steam on turbine alloys. Included in this phase was full-load testing of the W501G engine at the McIntosh No. 5 site in Lakeland, Florida.

Gregory Gaul

2004-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

239

Aviation turbine fuels, 1985  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Samples of this report are typical 1985 production and were analyzed in the laboratories of 17 manufactures of aviation turbine (jet) fuels. The data were submitted for study, calculation, and compilation under a cooperative agreement between the National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research (NIPER), Bartlesville, Oklahoma, the American Petroleum Institute (API), and the United States Department of Energy (DOE), Bartlesville Project Office. results for certain properties of 88 samples of aviation turbine fuels are included in the report for military grades JP-4 and JP-5, and commercial type Jet A. Previous aviation fuel survey reports are listed.

Dickson, C.L.; Woodward, P.W.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Combined gas turbine and steam turbine power station  

SciTech Connect

In order to operate a gas turbine and steam turbine plant with a high temperature at the inlet to the gas turbine plant, the parts located in the hot-gas stream of the gas turbine being steam-cooled, and the cooling steam, thereby raised to a higher temperature, being fed to the steam turbine for further expansion, it is proposed that the waste heat from the gas turbine be led through a two-pressure waste heat boiler, and that the steam, generated in this boiler, be slightly superheated in a cooling-steam superheater, and fed to the hollow inlet vanes and to the rotor blades, which are likewise hollow, the steam, strongly superheated during this cooling process, then being admixed to the steam coming from the intermediate superheater, and being fed to the low-pressure section of the steam turbine.

Mukherjee, D.

1984-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rotating marine turbine" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Gas Turbine Compressor Field Repair Guideline: GE 7FA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This guideline is designed to assist gas turbine owners confronted with limited damage to compressor rotating blade airfoils. The guideline addresses typical damage to the airfoil tip and leading edge where a limited amount of material trimming and blending is allowable. The guideline provides an engineering basis for implementing safe repairs and avoiding possible risk of airfoil failure due to high-cycle fatigue. In-situ field repair criteria are given for each compressor row R-0 through R-17 for ...

2012-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

242

Advanced turbine cooling, heat transfer, and aerodynamic studies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The contractual work is in three parts: Part I - Effect of rotation on enhanced cooling passage heat transfer, Part II - Effect of Thermal Barrier Coating (TBC) spallation on surface heat transfer, and Part III - Effect of surface roughness and trailing edge ejection on turbine efficiency under unsteady flow conditions. Each section of this paper has been divided into three parts to individually accommodate each part. Part III is further divided into Parts IIIa and IIIb.

Han, Je-Chin; Schobeiri, M.T. [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

243

Turbine inter-disk cavity cooling air compressor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The inter-disk cavity between turbine rotor disks is used to pressurize cooling air. A plurality of ridges extend radially outwardly over the face of the rotor disks. When the rotor disks are rotated, the ridges cause the inter-disk cavity to compress air coolant flowing through the inter-disk cavity en route to the rotor blades. The ridges eliminate the need for an external compressor to pressurize the air coolant.

Chupp, Raymond E. (Oviedo, FL); Little, David A. (Oviedo, FL)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Turbine inter-disk cavity cooling air compressor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The inter-disk cavity between turbine rotor disks is used to pressurize cooling air. A plurality of ridges extend radially outwardly over the face of the rotor disks. When the rotor disks are rotated, the ridges cause the inter-disk cavity to compress air coolant flowing through the inter-disk cavity en route to the rotor blades. The ridges eliminate the need for an external compressor to pressurize the air coolant. 5 figs.

Chupp, R.E.; Little, D.A.

1998-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

245

Turbine-Generator Topics for Plant Engineers: Residual Magnetism  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The undesirable magnetization of components of rotating equipment used in the generation of electric power is a problem that has been recognized for many years; but wide understanding of the origins, detection techniques, remediation, and avoidance principles of residual magnetization has been lacking. As part of the series Turbine-Generator Topics for Plant Engineers, EPRI commissioned this report with the purpose of providing engineers active in the operation and maintenance of power ...

2013-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

246

Understanding Trends in Wind Turbine Prices Over the Past Decade  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that the average turbines rotor swept area has increasedthe average turbine hub height and rotor diameter also6. Average Turbine Capacity, Hub Height, and Rotor Diameter

Bolinger, Mark

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Wind Turbine Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wind Turbine Basics Wind Turbine Basics Wind Turbine Basics July 30, 2013 - 2:58pm Addthis Energy 101: Wind Turbines Basics This video explains the basics of how wind turbines operate to produce clean power from an abundant, renewable resource-the wind. Text Version Wind turbine assembly Although all wind turbines operate on similar principles, several varieties are in use today. These include horizontal axis turbines and vertical axis turbines. Horizontal Axis Turbines Horizontal axis turbines are the most common turbine configuration used today. They consist of a tall tower, atop which sits a fan-like rotor that faces into or away from the wind, a generator, a controller, and other components. Most horizontal axis turbines built today are two- or three-bladed. Horizontal axis turbines sit high atop towers to take advantage of the

248

Wind Turbine Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Turbine Basics Turbine Basics Wind Turbine Basics July 30, 2013 - 2:58pm Addthis Energy 101: Wind Turbines Basics This video explains the basics of how wind turbines operate to produce clean power from an abundant, renewable resource-the wind. Text Version Wind turbine assembly Although all wind turbines operate on similar principles, several varieties are in use today. These include horizontal axis turbines and vertical axis turbines. Horizontal Axis Turbines Horizontal axis turbines are the most common turbine configuration used today. They consist of a tall tower, atop which sits a fan-like rotor that faces into or away from the wind, a generator, a controller, and other components. Most horizontal axis turbines built today are two- or three-bladed. Horizontal axis turbines sit high atop towers to take advantage of the

249

NETL: Turbine Projects - Cost Reduction  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cost Reduction Cost Reduction Turbine Projects Cost Reduction Single Crystal Turbine Blades Enhancing Gas Turbine Efficiency Data/Fact Sheets Enabling and Information Technologies to Increase RAM of Advanced Powerplants Data/Fact Sheets Development of NDE Technology for Environmental Barrier Coating and Residual Life Estimation Data/Fact Sheets Welding and Weld Repair of Single Crystal Gas Turbine Alloy Data/Fact Sheets Combustion Turbine Hot Section Coating Life Management Data/Fact Sheets On-Line Thermal Barrier Coating Monitor for Real-Time Failure Protection and Life Maximization Data/Fact Sheets On-Line Thermal Barrier Coating [PDF] Advanced Monitoring to Improve Combustion Turbine/Combined Cycle RAM Data/Fact Sheets Advanced Monitoring to Improve Combustion Turbine [PDF]

250

Turbine vane structure  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A liquid cooled stator blade assembly for a gas turbine engine includes an outer shroud having a pair of liquid inlets and a pair of liquid outlets supplied through a header and wherein means including tubes support the header radially outwardly of the shroud and also couple the header with the pair of liquid inlets and outlets. A pair of turbine vanes extend radially between the shroud and a vane platform to define a gas turbine motive fluid passage therebetween; and each of the vanes is cooled by an internal body casting of super alloy material with a grooved layer of highly heat conductive material that includes spaced apart flat surface trailing edges in alignment with a flat trailing edge of the casting joined to wall segments of the liner which are juxtaposed with respect to the internal casting to form an array of parallel liquid inlet passages on one side of the vane and a second plurality of parallel liquid return passages on the opposite side of the vane; and a superalloy heat and wear resistant imperforate skin covers the outer surface of the composite blade including the internal casting and the heat conductive layer; a separate trailing edge section includes an internal casting and an outer skin butt connected to the end surfaces of the internal casting and the heat conductive layer to form an easily assembled liquid cooled trailing edge section in the turbine vane.

Irwin, John A. (Greenwood, IN)

1980-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

251

Advanced turbine systems program  

SciTech Connect

In accordance with the goals of the DOE program, improvements in the gas turbine are the primary focus of Allison activity during Phase I. To this end Allison conducted a survey of potentially applicable gas turbine cycles and selected the advanced combined cycle as reference system. Extensive analysis of two versions of the advanced combined cycle was performed against the requirement for a 60% thermal efficiency (LHV) utility-sized, natural gas fired system. This analysis resulted in technology requirements for this system. Additional analysis determined emissions potential for the system, established a coal-fueled derivative system and a commercialization plan. This report deals with the technical requirements for a system that meets the thermal efficiency goal. Allison initially investigated four basic thermodynamic cycles: Humid air turbine, intercalate-recuperated systems, advanced combined cycle, chemically recuperated cycle. Our survey and cycle analysis indicated that au had the potential of reaching 60% thermal efficiency. We also concluded that engine hot section technology would be a critical technology regardless of which cycle was chosen. Based on this result Allison chose to concentrate on the advanced combined cycle. This cycle is well known and understood by the utility turbine user community and is therefore likely to be acceptable to users.

Wilkes, C.; Mukavetz, D.W.; Knickerbocker, T.K.; Ali, S.A.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

252

Advanced turbine systems program  

SciTech Connect

In accordance with the goals of the DOE program, improvements in the gas turbine are the primary focus of Allison activity during Phase I. To this end Allison conducted a survey of potentially applicable gas turbine cycles and selected the advanced combined cycle as reference system. Extensive analysis of two versions of the advanced combined cycle was performed against the requirement for a 60% thermal efficiency (LHV) utility-sized, natural gas fired system. This analysis resulted in technology requirements for this system. Additional analysis determined emissions potential for the system, established a coal-fueled derivative system and a commercialization plan. This report deals with the technical requirements for a system that meets the thermal efficiency goal. Allison initially investigated four basic thermodynamic cycles: Humid air turbine, intercalate-recuperated systems, advanced combined cycle, chemically recuperated cycle. Our survey and cycle analysis indicated that au had the potential of reaching 60% thermal efficiency. We also concluded that engine hot section technology would be a critical technology regardless of which cycle was chosen. Based on this result Allison chose to concentrate on the advanced combined cycle. This cycle is well known and understood by the utility turbine user community and is therefore likely to be acceptable to users.

Wilkes, C.; Mukavetz, D.W.; Knickerbocker, T.K.; Ali, S.A.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Temperature stratified turbine compressors  

SciTech Connect

A method and apparatus for improving the efficiency of a compressor of a gas turbine engine is disclosed. The inlet gas entering the compressor is stratified into two portions of different temperatures. The higher temperature gas is introduced adjacent the outer tipe of the compressor blades to reduce the relative Mach number of the flow at the area.

Earnest, E.R.; Passinos, B.

1979-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

254

MHK Technologies/Scotrenewables Tidal Turbine SRTT | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Scotrenewables Tidal Turbine SRTT Scotrenewables Tidal Turbine SRTT < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Scotrenewables Tidal Turbine SRTT.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Scotrenewables Project(s) where this technology is utilized *MHK Projects/Scotrenewables EMEC Technology Resource Click here Current/Tidal Technology Type Click here Axial Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 4: Proof of Concept Technology Description The Scotrenewables Tidal Turbine (SRTT) system is a free-floating rotor-based tidal current energy converter. The concept in its present configuration involves dual counter-rotating horizontal axis rotors driving generators within sub-surface nacelles, each suspended from separate keel and rotor arm sections attached to a single surface-piercing cylindrical buoyancy tube. The device is anchored to the seabed via a yoke arrangement. A separate flexible power and control umbilical line connects the device to a subsea junction box. The rotor arm sections are hinged to allow each two-bladed rotor to be retracted so as to be parallel with the longitudinal axis of the buoyancy tube, giving the system a transport draught of less than 4.5m at full-scale to facilitate towing the device into harbors for maintenance.

255

Blade-Vortex Interactions in High Pressure Steam Turbines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A detailed experimental and numerical investigation of the transport of streamwise (passage) vortices in high-pressure axial turbines and their interaction with the downstream blade rows was performed. The results indicate large variations in the downstream flow field, notably the development of the secondary flows. The mechanism of passage vortex transport was studied in two differently configured high-pressure turbine stages. In the first configuration, the blades are radially stacked while the second configuration features three-dimensionally stacked high-pressure steam turbine blading. The stator hub passage vortex is chopped by the downstream blade row in a similar way to the wake. The bowed vortex tube near the inlet to the rotor appeared to develop two counter-rotating legs extending back to the leading edges of the adjacent blades. These were termed the suction side leg and the pressure side leg. The two legs of the incoming passage vortex then convect with the respective velocities on the blade surfaces. The results are discussed for the radially stacked turbine and the 3-D turbine separately.

Venkata Siva Prasad Chaluvadi

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Energy harvesting to power sensing hardware onboard wind turbine blade  

SciTech Connect

Wind turbines are becoming a larger source of renewable energy in the United States. However, most of the designs are geared toward the weather conditions seen in Europe. Also, in the United States, manufacturers have been increasing the length of the turbine blades, often made of composite materials, to maximize power output. As a result of the more severe loading conditions in the United States and the material level flaws in composite structures, blade failure has been a more common occurrence in the U.S. than in Europe. Therefore, it is imperative that a structural health monitoring system be incorporated into the design of the wind turbines in order to monitor flaws before they lead to a catastrophic failure. Due to the rotation of the turbine and issues related to lightning strikes, the best way to implement a structural health monitoring system would be to use a network of wireless sensor nodes. In order to provide power to these sensor nodes, piezoelectric, thermoelectric and photovoltaic energy harvesting techniques are examined on a cross section of a CX-100 wind turbine blade in order to determine the feasibility of powering individual nodes that would compose the sensor network.

Carlson, Clinton P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schichting, Alexander D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Quellette, Scott [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Faringolt, Kevin M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Park, Gyuhae [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Biphase turbine bottoming cycle for a diesel engine  

SciTech Connect

Application of a two-phase turbine system to waste heat recovery was examined. Bottoming cycle efficiencies ranging from 15 to 30% were calculated for a 720/sup 0/F diesel exhaust temperature. A single stage demonstration unit, designed for non-toxic fluids (water and DowTherm A) and for atmospheric seals and bearings, had a cycle efficiency of 23%. The net output power was 276 hp at 8,100 rpm, increasing the total shaft power from 1,800 hp for the diesel alone, to 2,076 hp for the combined system. A four stage organic turbine, for the same application, had a rotational speed of 14,700 rpm while a four stage steam turbine had 26,000 rpm. Fabrication drawings were prepared for the turbine and nozzle. The major improvement leading to higher cycle efficiency and lower turbine rpm was found to be the use of a liquid component with lower sensible heat. A reduction in capital cost was found to result from the use of a contact heat exchanger instead of tube-fin construction. The cost for a contact heat exchanger was only $35-52/kWe compared to $98/kWe for a tube-fin heat exchanger. Design drawings and materials list were prepared. A program resulting in the demonstration of a two-phase bottoming system was planned and the required cost estimated. The program would result in a feasibility test of the nozzle and turbine at the end of the first year, a laboratory performance test of the bottoming system by the end of the second year and a field demonstration test and laboratory endurance test of the bottoming system during the third year. The blowdown test rig for the first year's program and test turbine were designed.

Ahmad, S.; Hays, L.

1977-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

258

Wind shear climatology for large wind turbine generators  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Climatological wind shear analyses relevant to the design and operation of multimegawatt wind turbines are provided. Insight is provided for relating the wind experienced by a rotating blade in a shear flow to the analysis results. A simple analysis of the wind experienced by a rotating blade for three types of wind shear profiles under steady-state conditions is presented in graphical form. Comparisons of the magnitude and frequency of the variations in 1) the wind sensed by a single blade element, 2) the sum, and 3) the difference of the winds sensed by opposite blade elements show strong sensitivity to profile shape. These three items represent forcing functions that can be related to 1) flatwise bending moment, 2) torque on the shaft, and 3) teeter angle. A computer model was constructed to simulate rotational sampling of 10-s sampled winds from a tall tower for three different types of large wind turbines. Time series produced by the model indicated that the forcing functions on a rotating blade vary according to the shear profile encountered during each revolution as opposed to a profile derived from average wind conditions, e.g., hourly average winds. An analysis scheme was developed to establish a climatology of wind shear profiles derived from 10-s sampled winds and hourly average winds measured over a one-year period at several levels on a tall tower. Because of the sensitivity of the forcing function variability to profile shape, the analyses performed and presented are in the form of joint frequency distributions of velocity differences of the the top-to-hub versus the hub-to-bottom portion of disks of rotation for the three turbine configurations.

Elliott, D.L.; Wendell, L.L.; Heflick, S.K.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Advanced turbine design for coal-fueled engines. Topical report, Task 1.6, Task 1.7  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this task is to perform a technical assessment of turbine blading for advanced second generation PFBC conditions, identify specific problems/issues, and recommend an approach for solving any problems identified. A literature search was conducted, problems associated with hot corrosion defined and limited experiments performed. Sulfidation corrosion occurs in industrial, marine and aircraft gas turbine engines and is due to the presence of condensed alkali (sodium) sulfates. The principle source of the alkali in industrial, marine and aircraft gas turbine engines is sea salt crystals. The principle source of the sulfur is not the liquid fuels, but the same ocean born crystals. Moreover deposition of the corrosive salt occurs primarily by a non-equilibrium process. Sodium will be present in the cleaned combusted gases that enter the PFBC turbine. Although equilibrium condensation is not favored, deposition via impaction is probable. Marine gas turbines operate in sodium chloride rich environments without experiencing the accelerated attack noted in coal fired boilers where condensed chlorides contact metallic surfaces. The sulfates of calcium and magnesium are the products of the reactions used to control sulfur. Based upon industrial gas turbine experience and laboratory tests, calcium and magnesium sulfates are, at temperatures up to 1500{degrees}F (815{degrees}C), relatively innocuous salts. In this study it is found that at 1650{degrees}F (900{degrees}C) and above, calcium sulfate becomes an aggressive corrodent.

Bornstein, N.S.

1992-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

260

Turbine blade tip gap reduction system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A turbine blade sealing system for reducing a gap between a tip of a turbine blade and a stationary shroud of a turbine engine. The sealing system includes a plurality of flexible seal strips extending from a pressure side of a turbine blade generally orthogonal to the turbine blade. During operation of the turbine engine, the flexible seal strips flex radially outward extending towards the stationary shroud of the turbine engine, thereby reducing the leakage of air past the turbine blades and increasing the efficiency of the turbine engine.

Diakunchak, Ihor S.

2012-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rotating marine turbine" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Advanced wind turbine with lift-destroying aileron for shutdown  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An advanced aileron configuration for wind turbine rotors featuring an aileron with a bottom surface that slopes upwardly at an angle toward the nose region of the aileron. The aileron rotates about a center of rotation which is located within the envelope of the aileron, but does not protrude substantially into the air flowing past the aileron while the aileron is deflected to angles within a control range of angles. This allows for strong positive control of the rotation of the rotor. When the aileron is rotated to angles within a shutdown range of deflection angles, lift-destroying, turbulence-producing cross-flow of air through a flow gap, and turbulence created by the aileron, create sufficient drag to stop rotation of the rotor assembly. The profile of the aileron further allows the center of rotation to be located within the envelope of the aileron, at or near the centers of pressure and mass of the aileron. The location of the center of rotation optimizes aerodynamically and gyroscopically induced hinge moments and provides a fail safe configuration.

Coleman, Clint (Warren, VT); Juengst, Theresa M. (Warren, VT); Zuteck, Michael D. (Kemah, TX)

1996-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

262

SMART POWER TURBINE  

SciTech Connect

Gas turbines are the choice technology for high-performance power generation and are employed in both simple and combined cycle configurations around the world. The Smart Power Turbine (SPT) program has developed new technologies that are needed to further extend the performance and economic attractiveness of gas turbines for power generation. Today's power generation gas turbines control firing temperatures indirectly, by measuring the exhaust gas temperature and then mathematically calculating the peak combustor temperatures. But temperatures in the turbine hot gas path vary a great deal, making it difficult to control firing temperatures precisely enough to achieve optimal performance. Similarly, there is no current way to assess deterioration of turbine hot-gas-path components without shutting down the turbine. Consequently, maintenance and component replacements are often scheduled according to conservative design practices based on historical fleet-averaged data. Since fuel heating values vary with the prevalent natural gas fuel, the inability to measure heating value directly, with sufficient accuracy and timeliness, can lead to maintenance and operational decisions that are less than optimal. GE Global Research Center, under this Smart Power Turbine program, has developed a suite of novel sensors that would measure combustor flame temperature, online fuel lower heating value (LHV), and hot-gas-path component life directly. The feasibility of using the ratio of the integrated intensities of portions of the OH emission band to determine the specific average temperature of a premixed methane or natural-gas-fueled combustion flame was demonstrated. The temperature determined is the temperature of the plasma included in the field of view of the sensor. Two sensor types were investigated: the first used a low-resolution fiber optic spectrometer; the second was a SiC dual photodiode chip. Both methods worked. Sensitivity to flame temperature changes was remarkably high, that is a 1-2.5% change in ratio for an 11.1 C (20 F) change in temperature at flame temperatures between 1482.2 C (2700 F) and 1760 C (3200 F). Sensor ratio calibration was performed using flame temperatures determined by calculations using the amount of unburned oxygen in the exhaust and by the fuel/air ratio of the combustible gas mixture. The agreement between the results of these two methods was excellent. The sensor methods characterized are simple and viable. Experiments are underway to validate the GE Flame Temperature Sensor as a practical tool for use with multiburner gas turbine combustors. The lower heating value (LHV) Fuel Quality Sensor consists of a catalytic film deposited on the surface of a microhotplate. This micromachined design has low heat capacity and thermal conductivity, making it ideal for heating catalysts placed on its surface. Several methods of catalyst deposition were investigated, including micropen deposition and other proprietary methods, which permit precise and repeatable placement of the materials. The use of catalysts on the LHV sensor expands the limits of flammability (LoF) of combustion fuels as compared with conventional flames; an unoptimized LoF of 1-32% for natural gas (NG) in air was demonstrated with the microcombustor, whereas conventionally 4 to 16% is observed. The primary goal of this work was to measure the LHV of NG fuels. The secondary goal was to determine the relative quantities of the various components of NG mixes. This determination was made successfully by using an array of different catalysts operating at different temperatures. The combustion parameters for methane were shown to be dependent on whether Pt or Pd catalysts were used. In this project, significant effort was expended on making the LHV platform more robust by the addition of high-temperature stable materials, such as tantalum, and the use of passivation overcoats to protect the resistive heater/sensor materials from degradation in the combustion environment. Modeling and simulation were used to predict improved sensor designs.

Nirm V. Nirmalan

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

SEAL FOR ROTATING SHAFT  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A seal is described for a rotatable shaft that must highly effective when the shaft is not rotating but may be less effective while the shaft is rotating. Weights distributed about a sealing disk secured to the shaft press the sealing disk against a tubular section into which the shiilt extends, and whem the shaft rotates, the centrifugal forces on the weights relieve the pressurc of the sealing disk against the tubular section. This action has the very desirible result of minimizing the wear of the rotating disk due to contact with the tubular section, while affording maximum sealing action when it is needed.

Coffman, R.T.

1957-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

264

Marin Solar | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Marin Solar Jump to: navigation, search Name Marin Solar Place San Rafael, California Zip 94901 Sector Solar Product Marin Solar is a residential installer of photovoltaic systems....

265

MHK Technologies/Sub Surface Counter Rotation Current Generator | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sub Surface Counter Rotation Current Generator Sub Surface Counter Rotation Current Generator < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Sub Surface Counter Rotation Current Generator.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Cyclocean LLC Technology Type Click here Axial Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 7 8 Open Water System Testing Demonstration and Operation Technology Description Self regulated sub surface current generators that operate independently that tether freely anchored offshore in deep waters in the Gulf Stream Current producing continuos clean energy for the eastern seaboard Technology Dimensions Device Testing Date Submitted 20:10.1 << Return to the MHK database homepage Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=MHK_Technologies/Sub_Surface_Counter_Rotation_Current_Generator&oldid=681657

266

Airborne Wind Turbine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Makani Power is developing an Airborne Wind Turbine (AWT) that eliminates 90% of the mass of a conventional wind turbine and accesses a stronger, more consistent wind at altitudes of near 1,000 feet. At these altitudes, 85% of the country can offer viable wind resources compared to only 15% accessible with current technology. Additionally, the Makani Power wing can be economically deployed in deep offshore waters, opening up a resource which is 4 times greater than the entire U.S. electrical generation capacity. Makani Power has demonstrated the core technology, including autonomous launch, land, and power generation with an 8 meter wingspan, 20 kW prototype. At commercial scale, Makani Power aims to develop a 600 kW, 28 meter wingspan product capable of delivering energy at an unsubsidized cost competitive with coal, the current benchmark for low-cost power.

None

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Gas turbine cooling system  

SciTech Connect

A gas turbine engine (10) having a closed-loop cooling circuit (39) for transferring heat from the hot turbine section (16) to the compressed air (24) produced by the compressor section (12). The closed-loop cooling system (39) includes a heat exchanger (40) disposed in the flow path of the compressed air (24) between the outlet of the compressor section (12) and the inlet of the combustor (14). A cooling fluid (50) may be driven by a pump (52) located outside of the engine casing (53) or a pump (54) mounted on the rotor shaft (17). The cooling circuit (39) may include an orifice (60) for causing the cooling fluid (50) to change from a liquid state to a gaseous state, thereby increasing the heat transfer capacity of the cooling circuit (39).

Bancalari, Eduardo E. (Orlando, FL)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Multiple piece turbine airfoil  

SciTech Connect

A turbine airfoil, such as a rotor blade or a stator vane, for a gas turbine engine, the airfoil formed as a shell and spar construction with a plurality of hook shaped struts each mounted within channels extending in a spanwise direction of the spar and the shell to allow for relative motion between the spar and shell in the airfoil chordwise direction while also fanning a seal between adjacent cooling channels. The struts provide the seal as well as prevent bulging of the shell from the spar due to the cooling air pressure. The hook struts have a hooked shaped end and a rounded shaped end in order to insert the struts into the spar.

Kimmel, Keith D (Jupiter, FL)

2010-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

269

Advanced Hydrogen Turbine Development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Siemens has developed a roadmap to achieve the DOE goals for efficiency, cost reduction, and emissions through innovative approaches and novel technologies which build upon worldwide IGCC operational experience, platform technology, and extensive experience in G-class operating conditions. In Phase 1, the technologies and concepts necessary to achieve the program goals were identified for the gas turbine components and supporting technology areas and testing plans were developed to mitigate identified risks. Multiple studies were conducted to evaluate the impact in plant performance of different gas turbine and plant technologies. 2015 gas turbine technologies showed a significant improvement in IGCC plant efficiency, however, a severe performance penalty was calculated for high carbon capture cases. Thermodynamic calculations showed that the DOE 2010 and 2015 efficiency targets can be met with a two step approach. A risk management process was instituted in Phase 1 to identify risk and develop mitigation plans. For the risks identified, testing and development programs are in place and the risks will be revisited periodically to determine if changes to the plan are necessary. A compressor performance prediction has shown that the design of the compressor for the engine can be achieved with additional stages added to the rear of the compressor. Tip clearance effects were studied as well as a range of flow and pressure ratios to evaluate the impacts to both performance and stability. Considerable data was obtained on the four candidate combustion systems: diffusion, catalytic, premix, and distributed combustion. Based on the results of Phase 1, the premixed combustion system and the distributed combustion system were chosen as having the most potential and will be the focus of Phase 2 of the program. Significant progress was also made in obtaining combustion kinetics data for high hydrogen fuels. The Phase 1 turbine studies indicate initial feasibility of the advanced hydrogen turbine that meets the aggressive targets set forth for the advanced hydrogen turbine, including increased rotor inlet temperature (RIT), lower total cooling and leakage air (TCLA) flow, higher pressure ratio, and higher mass flow through the turbine compared to the baseline. Maintaining efficiency with high mass flow Syngas combustion is achieved using a large high AN2 blade 4, which has been identified as a significant advancement beyond the current state-of-the-art. Preliminary results showed feasibility of a rotor system capable of increased power output and operating conditions above the baseline. In addition, several concepts were developed for casing components to address higher operating conditions. Rare earth modified bond coat for the purpose of reducing oxidation and TBC spallation demonstrated an increase in TBC spallation life of almost 40%. The results from Phase 1 identified two TBC compositions which satisfy the thermal conductivity requirements and have demonstrated phase stability up to temperatures of 1850 C. The potential to join alloys using a bonding process has been demonstrated and initial HVOF spray deposition trials were promising. The qualitative ranking of alloys and coatings in environmental conditions was also performed using isothermal tests where significant variations in alloy degradation were observed as a function of gas composition. Initial basic system configuration schematics and working system descriptions have been produced to define key boundary data and support estimation of costs. Review of existing materials in use for hydrogen transportation show benefits or tradeoffs for materials that could be used in this type of applications. Hydrogen safety will become a larger risk than when using natural gas fuel as the work done to date in other areas has shown direct implications for this type of use. Studies were conducted which showed reduced CO{sub 2} and NOx emissions with increased plant efficiency. An approach to maximize plant output is needed in order to address the DOE turbine goal for 20-30% reduction o

Joesph Fadok

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Gas turbines for the future  

SciTech Connect

Utility gas turbine technology has been advancing fairly rapidly, one reason being that it shares in the benefits of the research and development for aviation gas turbines. In general, turbine progress is characterized by large, incremental advances in performance. At intervals of approx. 15 yr, new-generation turbines are introduced, refined, and eventually installed in relatively large numbers. A new generation of turbines is being readied for the market that will have power ratings into the 130- to 150-MW range (simple cycle), significantly higher than the 70 to 100 MW now in service. When the new turbines are installed in combined-cycle plants, the efficiency levels are expected to rise from the present value of approx. 42% higher heating value to approx. 46%.

Cohn, A.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Gas turbine premixing systems  

SciTech Connect

Methods and systems are provided for premixing combustion fuel and air within gas turbines. In one embodiment, a combustor includes an upstream mixing panel configured to direct compressed air and combustion fuel through premixing zone to form a fuel-air mixture. The combustor includes a downstream mixing panel configured to mix additional combustion fuel with the fule-air mixture to form a combustion mixture.

Kraemer, Gilbert Otto; Varatharajan, Balachandar; Evulet, Andrei Tristan; Yilmaz, Ertan; Lacy, Benjamin Paul

2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

272

Airfoils for wind turbine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Airfoils for the blade of a wind turbine wherein each airfoil is characterized by a thickness in a range from 16%-24% and a maximum lift coefficient designed to be largely insensitive to roughness effects. The airfoils include a family of airfoils for a blade 15 to 25 meters in length, a family of airfoils for a blade 1 to 5 meters in length, and a family of airfoils for a blade 5 to 10 meters in length.

Tangler, James L. (Boulder, CO); Somers, Dan M. (State College, PA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Airfoils for wind turbine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Airfoils are disclosed for the blade of a wind turbine wherein each airfoil is characterized by a thickness in a range from 16%-24% and a maximum lift coefficient designed to be largely insensitive to roughness effects. The airfoils include a family of airfoils for a blade 15 to 25 meters in length, a family of airfoils for a blade 1 to 5 meters in length, and a family of airfoils for a blade 5 to 10 meters in length. 10 figs.

Tangler, J.L.; Somers, D.M.

1996-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

274

Advanced Turbine Design Program  

SciTech Connect

The prime objective of this project task is to select a natural gas fired as Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) capable of reaching 60% cycle efficiency. Several cycles were compared and evaluated under all different kind of aspects, to determine the one with the highest potential and, at the same time, the best overall fit within and experience base to guarantee project goals. The combined cycle with multistep development potential was identified as the system to reach the 60% or greater thermal efficiency.

van der Linden, S.; Gnaedig, G.; Kreitmeier, F.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Advanced Turbine Design Program  

SciTech Connect

The prime objective of this project task is to select a natural gas fired as Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) capable of reaching 60% cycle efficiency. Several cycles were compared and evaluated under all different kind of aspects, to determine the one with the highest potential and, at the same time, the best overall fit within and experience base to guarantee project goals. The combined cycle with multistep development potential was identified as the system to reach the 60% or greater thermal efficiency.

van der Linden, S.; Gnaedig, G.; Kreitmeier, F.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

276

Verification of theoretically computed spectra for a point rotating in a vertical plane  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A theoretical model is modified and tested that produces the power spectrum of the alongwind component of turbulence as experienced by a point rotating in a vertical plane perpendicular to the mean wind direction. The ability to generate such a power spectrum, independent of measurement, is important in wind turbine design and testing. The radius of the circle of rotation, its height above the ground, and the rate of rotation are typical for those for a MOD-OA wind turbine. Verification of this model is attempted by comparing two sets of variances that correspond to individual harmonic bands of spectra of turbulence in the rotational frame. One set of variances is calculated by integrating the theoretically generated rotational spectra; the other is calculated by integrating rotational spectra from real data analysis. The theoretical spectrum is generated by Fourier transformation of an autocorrelation function taken from von Karman and modified for the rotational frame. The autocorrelation is based on dimensionless parameters, each of which incorporates both atmospheric and wind turbine parameters. The real data time series are formed by sampling around the circle of anemometers of the Vertical Plane Array at the former MOD-OA site at Clayton, New Mexico.

Powell, D.C.; Connell, J.R.; George, R.L.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Review of wind simulation methods for horizontal-axis wind turbine analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report reviews three reports on simulation of winds for use in wind turbine fatigue analysis. The three reports are presumed to represent the state of the art. The Purdue and Sandia methods simulate correlated wind data at two points rotating as on the rotor of a horizontal-axis wind turbine. The PNL method at present simulates only one point, which rotates either as on a horizontal-axis wind turbine blade or as on a vertical-axis wind turbine blade. The spectra of simulated data are presented from the Sandia and PNL models under comparable input conditions, and the energy calculated in the rotational spikes in the spectra by the two models is compared. Although agreement between the two methods is not impressive at this time, improvement of the Sandia and PNL methods is recommended as the best way to advance the state of the art. Physical deficiencies of the models are cited in the report and technical recommendations are made for improvement. The report also reviews two general methods for simulating single-point data, called the harmonic method and the white noise method. The harmonic method, which is the basis of all three specific methods reviewed, is recommended over the white noise method in simulating winds for wind turbine analysis.

Powell, D.C.; Connell, J.R.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Tornado type wind turbines  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A tornado type wind turbine has a vertically disposed wind collecting tower with spaced apart inner and outer walls and a central bore. The upper end of the tower is open while the lower end of the structure is in communication with a wind intake chamber. An opening in the wind chamber is positioned over a turbine which is in driving communication with an electrical generator. An opening between the inner and outer walls at the lower end of the tower permits radially flowing air to enter the space between the inner and outer walls while a vertically disposed opening in the wind collecting tower permits tangentially flowing air to enter the central bore. A porous portion of the inner wall permits the radially flowing air to interact with the tangentially flowing air so as to create an intensified vortex flow which exits out of the top opening of the tower so as to create a low pressure core and thus draw air through the opening of the wind intake chamber so as to drive the turbine.

Hsu, Cheng-Ting (Ames, IA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Maintenance and operation of a small wind generator in the marine environment. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses the maintenance and operation of a wind-turbine generator that has been undergoing tests as a source of energy for remote Coast Guard lighthouses. The report documents both the effects of operating the wind machine in the marine environment and the maintenance that it required. Design parameters and performance records of the generator are also evaluated. The HR2 is a horizontal-axis, upwind-oriented, three-bladed wind machine. It is equipped with a direct-drive system that allows the kinetic force captured by the propeller to be converted directly into rotational force driving the main shaft. The HR2 alternator and blade/hub system are allowed to tilt out of a near-vertical plane about a shaft and bearing mechanism. The VARCS is a torsion spring- and hinge-mechanism that acts against the lifting dynamics of the spinning blades. As high winds or gusts tilt the alternator about the hinge, the VARCS's spring opposes this force and regulates the blades angle of attack into the wind; the propeller's RPM drop when tilted because of the feathering action. If the wind subsides, the force of the VARCS spring drives the alternator assembly down and presents the blades back into the wind.

Heerlein, W.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Theory and Performance of Tesla Turbines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

through a Tesla turbine microchannel . . . . . . . . . . .1.2 History of the Tesla Turbine 1.3 BackgroundCFD) Solution of Flow Through a Tesla Turbine 4.1 Summary of

Romanin, Vincent D.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rotating marine turbine" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

OVERLAY COATINGS FOR GAS TURBINE AIRFOILS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Supperalloys for Gas Turbine Engines, 11 J. Metals, Q,OVERLAY COATINGS FOR GAS TURBINE AIRFOILS Donald H. Boone1970, p. 545. R. Krutenat, Gas Turbine Materials Conference

Boone, Donald H.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Howden Wind Turbines Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Howden Wind Turbines Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Howden Wind Turbines Ltd Place United Kingdom Sector Wind energy Product Howden was a manufacturer of wind turbines in the...

283

NREL: Wind Research - Advanced Research Turbines  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Turbines Two 440 foot meteorological towers are upwind of two research wind turbines. Two 600-kW Westinghouse turbines at the NWTC are used to test new control...

284

Theory and Performance of Tesla Turbines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

camera. Bottom: tested turbine rotor housing diameter isfound in Figure 1.1. The turbine rotor consists of severalpower was reached. The turbine rotor and nozzle can be seen

Romanin, Vincent D.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Marine Products and Marine Oil Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lab Proficiency Testing service for Marine Products and Marine Oil samples to test Anisidine Value, Free Fatty Acid, Iodine Value, Insoluble Impurities, Moisture, Peroxide Value. Marine Products and Marine Oil Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program Labo

286

Compressor and Turbine Models of Brayton Units for Space Nuclear Power Systems  

SciTech Connect

Closed Brayton Cycles with centrifugal flow, single-shaft turbo-machines are being considered, with gas cooled nuclear reactors, to provide 10's to 100's of electrical power to support future space exploration missions and Lunar and Mars outposts. Such power system analysis is typically based on the cycle thermodynamics, for given operating pressures and temperatures and assumed polytropic efficiencies of the compressor and turbine of the Brayton energy conversion units. Thus the analysis results not suitable for modeling operation transients such as startup and changes in the electric load. To simulate these transients, accurate models of the turbine and compressor in the Brayton rotating unit, which calculate the changes in the compressor and turbine efficiencies with system operation are needed. This paper presents flow models that account for the design and dimensions of the compressor impeller and diffuser, and the turbine stator and rotor blades. These models calculate the various enthalpy losses and the polytropic efficiencies along with the pressure ratios of the turbine and compressor. The predictions of these models compare well with reported performance data of actual hardware. In addition, the results of a parametric analysis to map the operations of the compressor and turbine, as functions of the rotating shaft speed and inlet Mach number of the gas working fluid, are presented and discussed. The analysis used a binary mixture of He-Xe with a molecular weight of 40 g/mole as the working fluid.

Gallo, Bruno M.; El-Genk, Mohamed S.; Tournier, Jean-Michel [Institute for Space and Nuclear Power Studies, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM, 87131 (United States); Chemical and Nuclear Engineering Department, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM, 87131 (United States)

2007-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

287

NETL Publications: 2012 University Turbine  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Energy Technology Laboratory Presentation PDF-7.41MB South Coast AQMD's Gas Turbine Experience-Regulations and Operations Mohsen Nazemi, Deputy Executive Officer,...

288

Engines, turbines and compressors directory  

SciTech Connect

This book is a directory of engines, turbines and compressors. It adds and deletes compressor engines in use by the gas industry.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Simulating Collisions for Hydrokinetic Turbines. FY2010 Annual Progress Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of turbulent flow and particle motion are being conducted to evaluate the frequency and severity of collisions between marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) energy devices and debris or aquatic organisms. The work is part of a collaborative research project between Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Sandia National Laboratories , funded by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Wind and Water Power Program. During FY2010 a reference design for an axial flow MHK turbine was used to develop a computational geometry for inclusion into a CFD model. Unsteady simulations of turbulent flow and the moving MHK turbine blades are being performed and the results used for simulation of particle trajectories. Preliminary results and plans for future work are presented.

Richmond, Marshall C.; Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Perkins, William A.; Serkowski, John A.

2010-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

290

Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Glossary | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Glossary Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Glossary (Redirected from Hybrid) Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Contents 1 Wave Power 1.1 Point Absorber 1.1.1 Submerged Pressure Differential (Example of a Point Absorber) 1.2 Oscillating Water Column 1.3 Overtopping Device 1.4 Attentuator 1.5 Oscillating Wave Surge Converter 2 Current Power 2.1 Axial Flow Turbine 2.2 Cross Flow Turbine 2.3 Reciprocating Device 2.3.1 Oscillating Hydrofoil: (Example of a Reciprocating Device) 3 Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) 3.1 Closed-cycle 3.2 Open-cycle 3.3 Hybrid Wave Power Graphics adapted from Bedard and Thresher Point Absorber Pointabsorber.jpg Wave energy capture device, with principal dimension relatively small compared to the wavelength, and is able to capture energy from a wave front

291

Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Glossary | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Glossary Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Glossary (Redirected from Attenuator) Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Contents 1 Wave Power 1.1 Point Absorber 1.1.1 Submerged Pressure Differential (Example of a Point Absorber) 1.2 Oscillating Water Column 1.3 Overtopping Device 1.4 Attentuator 1.5 Oscillating Wave Surge Converter 2 Current Power 2.1 Axial Flow Turbine 2.2 Cross Flow Turbine 2.3 Reciprocating Device 2.3.1 Oscillating Hydrofoil: (Example of a Reciprocating Device) 3 Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) 3.1 Closed-cycle 3.2 Open-cycle 3.3 Hybrid Wave Power Graphics adapted from Bedard and Thresher Point Absorber Pointabsorber.jpg Wave energy capture device, with principal dimension relatively small compared to the wavelength, and is able to capture energy from a wave front

292

Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Glossary | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Glossary Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Glossary Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Contents 1 Wave Power 1.1 Point Absorber 1.1.1 Submerged Pressure Differential (Example of a Point Absorber) 1.2 Oscillating Water Column 1.3 Overtopping Device 1.4 Attentuator 1.5 Oscillating Wave Surge Converter 2 Current Power 2.1 Axial Flow Turbine 2.2 Cross Flow Turbine 2.3 Reciprocating Device 2.3.1 Oscillating Hydrofoil: (Example of a Reciprocating Device) 3 Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) 3.1 Closed-cycle 3.2 Open-cycle 3.3 Hybrid Wave Power Graphics adapted from Bedard and Thresher Point Absorber Pointabsorber.jpg Wave energy capture device, with principal dimension relatively small compared to the wavelength, and is able to capture energy from a wave front

293

Wind turbine generator with improved operating subassemblies  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A wind turbine includes a yaw spring return assembly to return the nacelle from a position to which it has been rotated by yawing forces, thus preventing excessive twisting of the power cables and control cables. It also includes negative coning restrainers to limit the bending of the flexible arms of the rotor towards the tower, and stop means on the rotor shaft to orient the blades in a vertical position during periods when the unit is upwind when the wind commences. A pendulum pitch control mechanism is improved by orienting the pivot axis for the pendulum arm at an angle to the longitudinal axis of its support arm, and excessive creep is of the synthetic resin flexible beam support for the blades is prevented by a restraining cable which limits the extent of pivoting of the pendulum during normal operation but which will permit further pivoting under abnormal conditions to cause the rotor to stall.

Cheney, Jr., Marvin C. (24 Stonepost Rd., Glastonbury, CT 06033)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Study of the Acoustic Effects of Hydrokinetic Tidal Turbines in Admiralty Inlet, Puget Sound  

SciTech Connect

Hydrokinetic turbines will be a source of noise in the marine environment - both during operation and during installation/removal. High intensity sound can cause injury or behavioral changes in marine mammals and may also affect fish and invertebrates. These noise effects are, however, highly dependent on the individual marine animals; the intensity, frequency, and duration of the sound; and context in which the sound is received. In other words, production of sound is a necessary, but not sufficient, condition for an environmental impact. At a workshop on the environmental effects of tidal energy development, experts identified sound produced by turbines as an area of potentially significant impact, but also high uncertainty. The overall objectives of this project are to improve our understanding of the potential acoustic effects of tidal turbines by: (1) Characterizing sources of existing underwater noise; (2) Assessing the effectiveness of monitoring technologies to characterize underwater noise and marine mammal responsiveness to noise; (3) Evaluating the sound profile of an operating tidal turbine; and (4) Studying the effect of turbine sound on surrogate species in a laboratory environment. This study focuses on a specific case study for tidal energy development in Admiralty Inlet, Puget Sound, Washington (USA), but the methodologies and results are applicable to other turbine technologies and geographic locations. The project succeeded in achieving the above objectives and, in doing so, substantially contributed to the body of knowledge around the acoustic effects of tidal energy development in several ways: (1) Through collection of data from Admiralty Inlet, established the sources of sound generated by strong currents (mobilizations of sediment and gravel) and determined that low-frequency sound recorded during periods of strong currents is non-propagating pseudo-sound. This helped to advance the debate within the marine and hydrokinetics acoustic community as to whether strong currents produce propagating sound. (2) Analyzed data collected from a tidal turbine operating at the European Marine Energy Center to develop a profile of turbine sound and developed a framework to evaluate the acoustic effects of deploying similar devices in other locations. This framework has been applied to Public Utility District No. 1 of Snohomish Country's demonstration project in Admiralty Inlet to inform postinstallation acoustic and marine mammal monitoring plans. (3) Demonstrated passive acoustic techniques to characterize the ambient noise environment at tidal energy sites (fixed, long-term observations recommended) and characterize the sound from anthropogenic sources (drifting, short-term observations recommended). (4) Demonstrated the utility and limitations of instrumentation, including bottom mounted instrumentation packages, infrared cameras, and vessel monitoring systems. In doing so, also demonstrated how this type of comprehensive information is needed to interpret observations from each instrument (e.g., hydrophone data can be combined with vessel tracking data to evaluate the contribution of vessel sound to ambient noise). (5) Conducted a study that suggests harbor porpoise in Admiralty Inlet may be habituated to high levels of ambient noise due to omnipresent vessel traffic. The inability to detect behavioral changes associated with a high intensity source of opportunity (passenger ferry) has informed the approach for post-installation marine mammal monitoring. (6) Conducted laboratory exposure experiments of juvenile Chinook salmon and showed that exposure to a worse than worst case acoustic dose of turbine sound does not result in changes to hearing thresholds or biologically significant tissue damage. Collectively, this means that Chinook salmon may be at a relatively low risk of injury from sound produced by tidal turbines located in or near their migration path. In achieving these accomplishments, the project has significantly advanced the District's goals of developing a demonstration-scale tidal energy proj

Brian Polagye; Jim Thomson; Chris Bassett; Jason Wood; Dom Tollit; Robert Cavagnaro; Andrea Copping

2012-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

295

MHK Technologies/Denniss Auld Turbine | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Denniss Auld Turbine Denniss Auld Turbine < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Denniss Auld Turbine.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Oceanlinx Project(s) where this technology is utilized *MHK Projects/GPP Namibia *MHK Projects/Greenwave Rhode Island Ocean Wave Energy Project *MHK Projects/Hawaii *MHK Projects/Oceanlinx Maui *MHK Projects/Port Kembla *MHK Projects/Portland Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Oscillating Water Column Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 4: Proof of Concept Technology Description The turbine used in an Oscillating Water Column (OWC) is a key element in the devices economic performance. The Oceanlinx turbine uses variable pitch blades, which, with the slower rotational speed and higher torque of the turbine, improves efficiency and reliability and reduces the need for maintenance. The turbine uses a sensor system with a pressure transducer that measures the pressure exerted on the ocean floor by each wave as it approaches or enters the capture chamber. The transducer sends a voltage signal proportional to the pressure that identifies the height, duration and shape of each wave. The signal from the transducer is sent to a Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) that adjusts various parameters, such as the blade angle and turbine speed, in real time. The generator, which is coupled to the Oceanlinx turbine, is designed so that the electrical control will vary the speed and torque characteristic of the generator load in real time to maximize the power transfer. An induction machine will be used for the generator, with coupling to the electricity grid provided by a fully regenerative electronic control system. The grid interconnection point and the control system are located in a weatherproof building external to the air duct. The voltage of the three phase connection at this point is 415 V L-L at 50 Hz. With the appropriate phase and pulse width modulation, power is transferred in either direction with harmonies and power factor variation contained within the electricity authoritys requirements. The system is normally configured to operate at a power factor of 0.95 or better.

296

IC-EpsMsO NUMERICAL SIMULATION IN VERTICAL WIND AXIS TURBINE WITH PITCH  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy, pitch controlled blades Abstract: Wind energy is more and more used as a renewable energy source character. The present wind turbine is a small one which allows to be used on roofs or in gardens to light small areas like publicity boards, parking, roads or for water pumping, heating... The present turbine has a vertical axis. Each turbine blade combines a rotating movement around its own axis and around the main rotor axis. Due to this combination of movements, flow around this turbine is highly unsteady and needs to be modeled by unsteady calculation. One of the main problems of such geometry is to simulate the two combined movements. The present work is an extended study of ones made in 2009. In the previous study, some results like contours of pressure and velocity fields were presented for elliptic blades for one specific constant rotational speed and benefits of combined rotating blades was shown. The present paper points up the influence of two different blades geometries for different rotational speeds, different blade stagger angles and different Reynolds numbers related to a wider range of wind speeds. 1

Controlled Blades; Bayeul-lain Annie-claude; Dockter Aurore; Bois Grard; Simonet Sophie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

GE Upgrades Top Selling Advanced Gas Turbine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 30, 2009 ... According to GE, a typical power plant operating two new 7FA gas turbines with a single steam turbine in combined cycle configuration would...

298

Westwind Wind Turbines | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Westwind Wind Turbines Jump to: navigation, search Name Westwind Wind Turbines Place Northern Ireland, United Kingdom Zip BT29 4TF Sector Wind energy Product Northern Ireland based...

299

Baldrige Award Recipients--Solar Turbines (1998)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Incorporated With customers in 86 countries, Solar Turbines Incorporated is the world's largest supplier of mid-range industrial gas turbine systems. ...

2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

300

Parametric Study of Turbine Blade Internal Cooling and Film Cooling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas turbine engines are extensively used in the aviation and power generation industries. They are used as topping cycles in combined cycle power plants, or as stand alone power generation units. Gains in thermodynamic efficiency can be realized by increasing the turbine inlet temperatures. Since modern turbine inlet temperatures exceed the melting point of the constituent superalloys, it is necessary to provide an aggressive cooling system. Relatively cool air, ducted from the compressor of the engine is used to remove heat from the hot turbine blade. This air flows through passages in the hollow blade (internal cooling), and is also ejected onto the surface of the blade to form an insulating film (film cooling). Modern land-based gas turbine engines use high Reynolds number internal flow to cool their internal passages. The first part of this study focuses on experiments pertaining to passages with Reynolds numbers of up to 400,000. Common turbulator designs (45degree parallel sharp-edged and round-edged) ribs are studied. Older correlations are found to require corrections in order to be valid in the high Reynolds number parameter space. The effect of rotation on heat transfer in a typical three-pass serpentine channel is studied using a computational model with near-wall refinement. Results from this computational study indicate that the hub experiences abnormally high heat transfer under rotation. An experimental study is conducted at Buoyancy numbers similar to an actual engine on a wedge shaped model trailing edge, roughened with pin-fins and equipped with slot ejection. Results show an asymmetery between the leading and trailing surfaces due to rotation - a difference which is subdued due to the provision of pin-fins. Film cooling effectiveness is measured by the PSP mass transfer analogy technique in two different configurations: a flat plate and a typical high pressure turbine blade. Parameters studied include a step immediately upstream of a row of holes; the Strouhal number (quantifying rotor-stator interaction) and coolant to mainstream density ratio. Results show a deterioration in film cooling effectiveness with on increasing the Strouhal number. Using a coolant with a higher density results in higher film cooling effectiveness.

Rallabandi, Akhilesh P.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rotating marine turbine" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Property:Optimum Marine/Riverline Conditions | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Marine/Riverline Conditions Marine/Riverline Conditions Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Optimum Marine/Riverline Conditions Property Type Text Pages using the property "Optimum Marine/Riverline Conditions" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) M MHK Technologies/Aegir Dynamo + Proprietary MHK Technologies/AirWEC + 15kW per meter of wave front or greater MHK Technologies/Aquantis + The Aquantis Current Plane C Plane technology is a marine current turbine designed to extract the kinetic energy from the flow and is capable of achieving reliable competitively priced base load power generation The technology is suitable for both steady marine currents and tidal currents although there are system differences and specific arraying and deployment requirements for each Aquantis is designed to harness the energy from the Gulf Stream and other steady marine currents around the world Aquantis deployment is projected to be cost competitive with thermal power generation when CO2 emissions and other environmental costs are accounted for

302

NREL: Wind Research - Small Wind Turbine Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Small Wind Turbine Development Small Wind Turbine Development A photo of Southwest Windpower's Skystream wind turbine in front of a home. PIX14936 Southwest Windpower's Skystream wind turbine. A photo of the Endurance wind turbine. PIX15006 The Endurance wind turbine. A photo of the Atlantic Orient Corporation 15/50 wind turbine at the National Wind Technology Center. PIX07301 The Atlantic Orient Corporation 15/50 wind turbine at the National Wind Technology Center. NREL supports continued market expansion of small wind turbines by funding manufacturers through competitive solicitations (i.e., subcontracts and/or grants) to refine prototype systems leading to commercialization. Learn more about the turbine development projects below. Skystream NREL installed and tested an early prototype of this turbine at the

303

NEXT GENERATION TURBINE PROGRAM  

SciTech Connect

The Next Generation Turbine (NGT) Program's technological development focused on a study of the feasibility of turbine systems greater than 30 MW that offer improvement over the 1999 state-of-the-art systems. This program targeted goals of 50 percent turndown ratios, 15 percent reduction in generation cost/kW hour, improved service life, reduced emissions, 400 starts/year with 10 minutes to full load, and multiple fuel usage. Improvement in reliability, availability, and maintainability (RAM), while reducing operations, maintenance, and capital costs by 15 percent, was pursued. This program builds on the extensive low emissions stationary gas turbine work being carried out by Pratt & Whitney (P&W) for P&W Power Systems (PWPS), which is a company under the auspices of the United Technologies Corporation (UTC). This study was part of the overall Department of Energy (DOE) NGT Program that extends out to the year 2008. A follow-on plan for further full-scale component hardware testing is conceptualized for years 2002 through 2008 to insure a smooth and efficient transition to the marketplace for advanced turbine design and cycle technology. This program teamed the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), P&W, United Technologies Research Center (UTRC), kraftWork Systems Inc., a subcontractor on-site at UTRC, and Multiphase Power and Processing Technologies (MPPT), an off-site subcontractor. Under the auspices of the NGT Program, a series of analyses were performed to identify the NGT engine system's ability to serve multiple uses. The majority were in conjunction with a coal-fired plant, or used coal as the system fuel. Identified also was the ability of the NGT system to serve as the basis of an advanced performance cycle: the humid air turbine (HAT) cycle. The HAT cycle is also used with coal gasification in an integrated cycle HAT (IGHAT). The NGT systems identified were: (1) Feedwater heating retrofit to an existing coal-fired steam plant, which could supply both heat and peaking power (Block 2 engine); (2) Repowering of an older coal-fired plant (Block 2 engine); (3) Gas-fired HAT cycle (Block 1 and 2 engines); (4) Integrated gasification HAT (Block 1 and 2 engines). Also under Phase I of the NGT Program, a conceptual design of the combustion system has been completed. An integrated approach to cycle optimization for improved combustor turndown capability has been employed. The configuration selected has the potential for achieving single digit NO{sub x}/CO emissions between 40 percent and 100 percent load conditions. A technology maturation plan for the combustion system has been proposed. Also, as a result of Phase I, ceramic vane technology will be incorporated into NGT designs and will require less cooling flow than conventional metallic vanes, thereby improving engine efficiency. A common 50 Hz and 60 Hz power turbine was selected due to the cost savings from eliminating a gearbox. A list of ceramic vane technologies has been identified for which the funding comes from DOE, NASA, the U.S. Air Force, and P&W.

William H. Day

2002-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

304

NEXT GENERATION TURBINE PROGRAM  

SciTech Connect

The Next Generation Turbine (NGT) Program's technological development focused on a study of the feasibility of turbine systems greater than 30 MW that offer improvement over the 1999 state-of-the-art systems. This program targeted goals of 50 percent turndown ratios, 15 percent reduction in generation cost/kW hour, improved service life, reduced emissions, 400 starts/year with 10 minutes to full load, and multiple fuel usage. Improvement in reliability, availability, and maintainability (RAM), while reducing operations, maintenance, and capital costs by 15 percent, was pursued. This program builds on the extensive low emissions stationary gas turbine work being carried out by Pratt & Whitney (P&W) for P&W Power Systems (PWPS), which is a company under the auspices of the United Technologies Corporation (UTC). This study was part of the overall Department of Energy (DOE) NGT Program that extends out to the year 2008. A follow-on plan for further full-scale component hardware testing is conceptualized for years 2002 through 2008 to insure a smooth and efficient transition to the marketplace for advanced turbine design and cycle technology. This program teamed the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), P&W, United Technologies Research Center (UTRC), kraftWork Systems Inc., a subcontractor on-site at UTRC, and Multiphase Power and Processing Technologies (MPPT), an off-site subcontractor. Under the auspices of the NGT Program, a series of analyses were performed to identify the NGT engine system's ability to serve multiple uses. The majority were in conjunction with a coal-fired plant, or used coal as the system fuel. Identified also was the ability of the NGT system to serve as the basis of an advanced performance cycle: the humid air turbine (HAT) cycle. The HAT cycle is also used with coal gasification in an integrated cycle HAT (IGHAT). The NGT systems identified were: (1) Feedwater heating retrofit to an existing coal-fired steam plant, which could supply both heat and peaking power (Block 2 engine); (2) Repowering of an older coal-fired plant (Block 2 engine); (3) Gas-fired HAT cycle (Block 1 and 2 engines); (4) Integrated gasification HAT (Block 1 and 2 engines). Also under Phase I of the NGT Program, a conceptual design of the combustion system has been completed. An integrated approach to cycle optimization for improved combustor turndown capability has been employed. The configuration selected has the potential for achieving single digit NO{sub x}/CO emissions between 40 percent and 100 percent load conditions. A technology maturation plan for the combustion system has been proposed. Also, as a result of Phase I, ceramic vane technology will be incorporated into NGT designs and will require less cooling flow than conventional metallic vanes, thereby improving engine efficiency. A common 50 Hz and 60 Hz power turbine was selected due to the cost savings from eliminating a gearbox. A list of ceramic vane technologies has been identified for which the funding comes from DOE, NASA, the U.S. Air Force, and P&W.

William H. Day

2002-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

305

Gas Turbine Procurement: 1988 Workshop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Specifying the levels of reliability and availability needed for new gas turbines or combined-cycle plants can help utilities meet plant operating requirements. Equipment specifiers can use information presented in this workshop to help them formulate more effective specifications for new gas turbine generating equipment.

1989-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

306

MHK Technologies/MRL Turbine | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Turbine Turbine < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage 275px Technology Profile Technology Resource Click here Current Technology Type Click here Axial Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 7 8 Open Water System Testing Demonstration and Operation Technology Description The MRL turbine equally converts both the lift and drag force in any given flow to rotational energy The benefits of using lift and increase the potential energy when compared to solely lift based machines such as propellers The base efficiency of the MRL device is 54 before various optimization features are installed 10 Other benefits to the MRL technology 1 Modular Design Lower risk financially and environmentally 2 Variable aspect ratio Unlike propellers estuaries require letterbox shaped extraction profile Particularly suitable for shallow water sites such as rivers estuaries Suitable also for deep water applications 3 Near surface operation Placed in highest velocity stream Easy to maintain 4 Movable If silting or flow profile shifts over the years devices can re sited and optimized for best extraction 5 Highly efficient Higher efficiency means smaller device size and weight Self starting and much lower cut in speed 6 Cheap to install No high cost ves

307

Effects of Large Energetic Vortices on Axial-Flow Hydrokinetic Turbines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Large scale coherent motions around marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) machines can significantly increase the structural loading and affect the overall performance of the machines. Characterization of the approach turbulence and their impact on the instantaneous response of MHK devices is essential for improving their design and performance. This preliminary study investigates the effect of turbulence and dominant energetic coherent structures induced by a vertical cylinder on the structural load and energy production in a model MHK turbine. Results show that the power generated by the turbine is significantly reduced by the presence of the cylinder. This reduction depends on the distance from the cylinder and the level of turbulence around the rotor area.

Gunawan, Budi [ORNL; Neary, Vincent S [ORNL; Hill, Craig [St. Anthony Falls Laboratory, 2 Third Avenue SE, Minneapolis, MN 55414; Chamorro, Leonardo [St. Anthony Falls Laboratory, 2 Third Avenue SE, Minneapolis, MN 55414

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Aero Turbine | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Aero Turbine Aero Turbine Jump to: navigation, search Name Aero Turbine Facility Aero Turbine Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner AeroTurbine Energy Company Location Riverside County CA Coordinates 33.7437°, -115.9925° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.7437,"lon":-115.9925,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

309

Gas turbines face new challenges  

SciTech Connect

Gas turbines continue to increase the electric power generation market in both the peaking and the intermediate load categories. With the increase in unit size and operating efficiencies. capital costs per kilowatt are reduced. Clean fuels---gas, light oil, or alcohol-type fuel--are needed for the gas turbines. The most efficient method of power generation is now attained from gas turbines, but the shortage of clean fuels looms. Manufacturers are anticipating the availability of clean fuels and continue working on the development of high- pressure, high-temperature turbines. In the near-term, increased efficiency is sought by making use of the turbine exhaust heat. involving combined or regenerative cycles. (MCW)

Papamarcos, J.

1973-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Yale ME Turbine Test cell instructions Background  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Yale ME Turbine Test cell instructions Background: The Turbine Technologies Turbojet engine combustion gas backflow into the lab space. Test Cell preparation: 1. Turn on Circuit breakers # 16 of the turbine and check a few items: o Open keyed access door on rear of Turbine enclosure o Check Jet A fuel

Haller, Gary L.

311

AIAA 20033698 Aircraft Gas Turbine Engine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AIAA 2003­3698 Aircraft Gas Turbine Engine Simulations W. C. Reynolds , J. J. Alonso, and M. Fatica, Reston, VA 20191­4344 #12;AIAA 2003­3698 Aircraft Gas Turbine Engine Simulations W. C. Reynolds , J. J of the flowpath through complete aircraft gas turbines including the compressor, combustor, turbine, and secondary

Stanford University

312

Combined Heat and Power Plant Steam Turbine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

waste heat) Gas Turbine University Substation High Pressure Natural Gas Campus Electric Load SouthernCombined Heat and Power Plant Steam Turbine Steam Turbine Chiller Campus Heat Load Steam (recovered Generator Heat Recovery Alternative Uses: 1. Campus heating load 2. Steam turbine chiller to campus cooling

Rose, Michael R.

313

Advanced Coating Development for Gas Turbine Components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sacrificial, oxidation-resistant coatings on turbine blades in high-firing temperature gas turbines are wearing out at an unacceptably rapid rate, resulting in excessive downtime and repair costs for turbine operators. This report summarizes the results of an exploratory development project that assessed the feasibility of decelerating the degradation rate of an MCrAlY coating on several turbine blade alloys.

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Coatings for gas turbines; Specialized coatings boost, maintain turbine efficiency  

SciTech Connect

Airlines have been coating their jet engines for the past 30 years, thereby avoiding corrosion, erosion and wear. More recently, operators of mechanical-drive gas turbines have come to realize the value of coatings as a way to keep down costs. This paper describes specialized coatings technology which has evolved for gas turbines. Coatings have been designed for specific areas and even specific components within the turbine. Because operators must often request these coatings when buying new equipment or at overhaul, a basic understanding of the technology is presented.

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

NREL: Wind Research - Small Wind Turbine Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Small Wind Turbine Research Small Wind Turbine Research The National Renewable Energy Laboratory and U.S. Department of Energy (NREL/DOE) Small Wind Project's objectives are to reduce barriers to wind energy expansion, stabilize the market, and expand the number of small wind turbine systems installed in the United States. "Small wind turbine" refers to a turbine smaller than or equal to 100 kilowatts (kW). "Distributed wind" includes small and midsize turbines (100 kW through 1 megawatt [MW]). Since 1996, NREL's small wind turbine research has provided turbine testing, turbine development, and prototype refinement leading to more commercially available small wind turbines. Work is conducted under the following areas. You can also learn more about state and federal policies

316

NREL: Wind Research - Midsize Wind Turbine Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Midsize Wind Turbine Research Midsize Wind Turbine Research To facilitate the development and commercialization of midsize wind turbines (turbines with a capacity rating of more than 100 kW up to 1 MW), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and NREL launched the Midsize Wind Turbine Development Project. In its latest study, NREL determined that there is a substantial market for midsize wind turbines. One of the most significant barriers to the midsize turbine market is the lack of turbines available for deployment; there are few midsize turbines on the market today. The objectives of the Midsize Wind Turbine Development Project are to reduce the barriers to wind energy expansion by filling an existing domestic technology gap; facilitate partnerships; accelerate maturation of existing U.S. wind energy businesses; and incorporate process improvement

317

H gas turbine combined cycle  

SciTech Connect

A major step has been taken in the development of the Next Power Generation System--``H`` Technology Combined Cycle. This new gas turbine combined-cycle system increases thermal performance to the 60% level by increasing gas turbine operating temperature to 1,430 C (2,600 F) at a pressure ratio of 23 to 1. Although this represents a significant increase in operating temperature for the gas turbine, the potential for single digit NOx levels (based upon 15% O{sub 2}, in the exhaust) has been retained. The combined effect of performance increase and environmental control is achieved by an innovative closed loop steam cooling system which tightly integrates the gas turbine and steam turbine cycles. The ``H`` Gas Turbine Combined Cycle System meets the goals and objectives of the DOE Advanced Turbine System Program. The development and demonstration of this new system is being carried out as part of the Industrial/Government cooperative agreement under the ATS Program. This program will achieve first commercial operation of this new system before the end of the century.

Corman, J.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

318

Steam turbine gland seal control system  

SciTech Connect

A high pressure steam turbine having a sealing gland where the turbine rotor penetrates the casing of the turbine. Under certain conditions the gland is sealed by an auxiliary steam supply, and under other conditions the gland is self sealed by turbine inlet steam. A control system is provided to modify the temperature of the auxiliary steam to be more compatible with the self sealing steam, so as to eliminate thermal shock to the turbine rotor.

Martin, H. F.

1985-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

319

Turbine Blade Shape Favorable for Fish Survival  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Various mechanisms associated with turbine design and operation injure fish passing through hydro turbines. Pilot-scale tests with various fish species and sizes showed that most turbine passage injury and mortality are caused by blade strike. Leading edge blade strike is particularly important for turbines with numerous blades. Very little information and data are available on the mechanics of fish struck by turbine blades and the resulting injury and mortality rates. Determining what leading edge blade...

2008-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

320

Steam assisted gas turbine engine  

SciTech Connect

A gas turbine engine is disclosed which has an integral steam power system consisting of heat absorbing boilers which convert an unpressurized liquid into an expanded and heated steam by utilizing heat normally lost through component cooling systems and the exhaust system. Upon completion of the steam power cycle, the steam is condensed back to a liquid state through a condensing system located within the compressor and other functional components of the gas turbine engine. A system of high pressure air and friction seals restrict steam or liquid condensate within designed flow bounds. The gas turbine engine disclosed is designed to give improved fuel efficiency and economy for aircraft and land use applications.

Coronel, P.D.

1982-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rotating marine turbine" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Advanced wind turbine with lift cancelling aileron for shutdown  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An advanced aileron configuration for wind turbine rotors featuring an independent, lift generating aileron connected to the rotor blade. The aileron has an airfoil profile which is inverted relative to the airfoil profile of the main section of the rotor blade. The inverted airfoil profile of the aileron allows the aileron to be used for strong positive control of the rotation of the rotor while deflected to angles within a control range of angles. The aileron functions as a separate, lift generating body when deflected to angles within a shutdown range of angles, generating lift with a component acting in the direction opposite the direction of rotation of the rotor. Thus, the aileron can be used to shut down rotation of the rotor. The profile of the aileron further allows the center of rotation to be located within the envelope of the aileron, at or near the centers of pressure and mass of the aileron. The location of the center of rotation optimizes aerodynamically and gyroscopically induced hinge moments and provides a fail safe configuration.

Coleman, Clint (Warren, VT); Juengst, Theresa M. (Warren, VT); Zuteck, Michael D. (Kemah, TX)

1996-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

322

Adaptive Control of a Utility-Scale Wind Turbine Operating in Region 3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many challenges exist for the efficient and safe operation of wind turbines due to the difficulty in creating accurate models of their dynamic characteristics and the turbulent conditions in which they operate. A promising new area of wind turbine research is the application of adaptive control techniques, which are well suited to problems where the plant model is not well known and the plant operating conditions are unpredictable. In this paper, we design an adaptive collective pitch controller for a high-fidelity simulation of a utility scale, variable-speed horizontal axis wind turbine operating in Region 3. The objective of the adaptive pitch controller is to regulate generator speed and reject step disturbances, which model the uniform wind disturbance across the wind turbine rotor. The control objective is accomplished by collectively pitching the turbine blades. To improve controller performance, we use an extension of the Direct Model Reference Adaptive Control (DMRAC) approach to regulate turbine rotational speed and to accommodate step disturbances. The turbine simulation models the Controls Advanced Research Turbine (CART) of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, Colorado. The CART is a utility-scale wind turbine that has a well-developed and extensively verified simulator. The adaptive collective pitch controller for Region 3 was compared in simulations with a baseline classical Proportional Integrator (PI) collective pitch controller. In the simulations, the adaptive pitch controller showed improved generator speed regulation in Region 3 when compared with the baseline PI pitch controller. The adaptive controller demonstrated robustness to modeling errors and changes in system parameters.

Frost, S. A.; Balas, M. J.; Wright, A. D.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Development of a low swirl injector concept for gas turbines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Injector Concept for Gas Turbines Robert K. Cheng * , Scottconcept for ultra- low NO x gas turbines. Low-swirl flamevirtually every industrial gas turbine manufacturer to meet

Cheng, R.K.; Fable, S.A.; Schmidt, D.; Arellano, L.; Smith, K.O.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

An experimental and numerical study of wind turbine seismic behavior  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

3.2.1 Description of Test Wind Turbine . . . . . .Figure 1.2: Components of a modern wind turbine . . . . . .Wind Turbine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Prowell, I.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Gamesa Wind Turbines Pvt Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Turbines Pvt Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Gamesa Wind Turbines Pvt. Ltd. Place Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India Sector Wind energy Product Chennai-based wind turbine...

326

Experimental Study of Stability Limits for Slender Wind Turbine Blades.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??There is a growing interest in extracting more power per turbine by increasing the rotor size in offshore wind turbines. As a result, the turbine (more)

Ladge, Shruti

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

The Virtual Gas Turbine System for Alloy Assesment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Key words: Virtual turbine, Alloy design program, Gas turbine design program, Nickel-base ... developed a virtual gas turbine (VT) system as a combination of.

328

An experimental and numerical study of wind turbine seismic behavior  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2.2.1 Turbine Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .112 4.2 Description of Turbine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3.2.1 Description of Test Wind Turbine . . . . . .

Prowell, I.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Inter-stage and Performance Tests of a Two-stage High-pressure Turbine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The existing 3-stage research turbine at Turbomachinery Performance and Flow Research Laboratory (TPFL) facility, Texas A & M University (TAMU) was replaced with a newly designed and manufactured 2-stage turbine in accordance with the design requirements as per DooSan, DHI. This new design of turbine consisted of bowed stator and rotor blades to study the effect on reduction of secondary ow losses and thus improvement in turbine efficiency if any. The new design also incorporated labyrinth seals on both inner and outer shrouds. Extensive Inter-stage and Performance experiments were carried out on this new turbine. Inter-stage measurements were accomplished by traversing three 5-hole probes radially and circumferentially, using the existing probe traverse system in TPFL. Performance tests were conducted for varying pressure ratio, at fixed rotational speed and for varying rotational speed with fixed pressure ratio and the efficiency was plotted against u/c_0. Each condition was tested and measured two to three times to check for reproducibility of the data. The results from inter-stage experiments show that the rotor row loss coefficient is about four times higher than the stator row loss coefficient. This high rotor loss coefficient reduces the total to static efficiency. From the performance tests, the maximum total-to-static efficiency observed was 85.2 percent located at around u/c_0 = 0.75. This relatively low efficiency is in consonance with the inter-stage results (high rotor loss coefficient).

Sharma, Kapil

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Turbine-Generator Auxiliary Systems, Volume 2: Turbine Steam Seal System Maintenance Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Turbine-Generator Auxiliary Systems, Volume 2: Turbine Steam Seal System Maintenance Guide provides nuclear and fossil plant personnel with operation and maintenance guidance on the turbine steam seal system components.

2006-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

331

Rotatable seal assembly. [Patent application; rotating targets  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An assembly is provided for rotatably supporting a rotor on a stator so that vacuum chambers in the rotor and stator remain in communication while the chambers are sealed from ambient air, which enables the use of a ball bearing or the like to support most of the weight of the rotor. The apparatus includes a seal device mounted on the rotor to rotate therewith, but shiftable in position on the rotor while being sealed to the rotor as by an O-ring. The seal device has a flat face that is biased towards a flat face on the stator, and pressurized air is pumped between the faces to prevent contact between them while spacing them a small distance apart to avoid the inflow of large amounts of air between the faces and into the vacuum chambers.

Logan, C.M.; Garibaldi, J.L.

1980-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

332

NETL: Turbines - UTSR Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 High Pressure Kinetics of Syngas and Nearly Pure Hydrogen Fuels Univ of Colorado 6 High Pressure Kinetics of Syngas and Nearly Pure Hydrogen Fuels Univ of Colorado John Daily Project Dates: 8/1/2007 - 9/30/2010 Area of Research: Combusion Federal Project Manager: Mark Freeman Project Objective: The goal of this project is to develop the necessary chemical kinetics information to understand the combustion of syngas and nearly pure hydrogen fuels at conditions of interest in gas turbine combustion. Objectves are to explore high-pressure kinetics by making detailed composition measurements of combustion intermediates and products in a flow reactor using molecular beam/mass spectrometry (MB/MS) and matrix isolation spectroscopy (MIS), to compare experimental data with calculations using existing mechanisms, and to use theoretical methods to

333

NETL: Turbines - UTSR Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 An Experimental and Chemical Kinetics Study of the Combustion of Synga and High Hydrogen Content Fuels Penn State University & Princeton University 2 An Experimental and Chemical Kinetics Study of the Combustion of Synga and High Hydrogen Content Fuels Penn State University & Princeton University Robert Santoro (PSU), Fred Dryer (Princeton), & Yiguang Ju (Princeton) Project Dates: 10/1/2009 - 9/30/2012 Area of Research: Combusion Federal Project Manager: Mark Freeman Project Objective: To resolve the recently noted difficulties observed in the ability of existing elementary kinetic models to predict experimental ignition delay, burning rate, and homogenous chemical kinetic oxidation characteristics of hydrogen and hydrogen/carbon monoxide fuels with air and with air diluted with nitrogen and/or carbon dioxide at pressures and dilutions in the range of those contemplated for gas turbine applicaitons

334

NETL: Turbines - UTSR Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 Numerical and Experimental Study of Mixing Processes Associated with Hydrogen and High Hydrogen Content Fuels University of California -- Irvine 1 Numerical and Experimental Study of Mixing Processes Associated with Hydrogen and High Hydrogen Content Fuels University of California -- Irvine Vincent McDonell Project Dates: 10/1/2008 - 9/30/2010 Area of Research: Combusion Federal Project Manager: Mark Freeman Project Objective: The goal of this comprehensive research is to evaluate methods for characterizing fuel profiles of coal syngas and high hydrogen content (HHC) fuels and the level of mixing, and apply these methods to provide detailed fuel concentration profile data for various premixer system configurations relevant for turbine applications. The specific project objectives include: (1) Establish and apply reliable, accurate measurement methods to establish instantaneous and time averaged fuel

335

Multiple piece turbine blade  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A turbine rotor blade with a spar and shell construction, the spar including an internal cooling supply channel extending from an inlet end on a root section and ending near the tip end, and a plurality of external cooling channels formed on both side of the spar, where a middle external cooling channel is connected to the internal cooling supply channels through a row of holes located at a middle section of the channels. The spar and the shell are held together by hooks that define serpentine flow passages for the cooling air and include an upper serpentine flow circuit and a lower serpentine flow circuit. the serpentine flow circuits all discharge into a leading edge passage or a trailing edge passage.

Kimmel, Keith D (Jupiter, FL)

2012-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

336

Turbine blade cooling  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A turbine rotor blade comprises a shank portion, a tip portion and an airfoil. The airfoil has a pressure side wall and a suction side wall that are interconnected by a plurality of partition sidewalls, defining an internal cooling passageway within the airfoil. The internal cooling passageway includes at least one radial outflow passageway to direct a cooling medium flow from the shank portion towards the tip portion and at least one radial inflow passageway to direct a cooling medium flow from the tip portion towards the shank portion. A number of mixing ribs are disposed on the partition sidewalls within the radial outflow passageways so as to enhance the thermal mixing of the cooling medium flow, thereby producing improved heat transfer over a broad range of the Buoyancy number.

Staub, Fred Wolf (Schenectady, NY); Willett, Fred Thomas (Niskayuna, NY)

1999-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

337

Turbine blade cooling  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A turbine rotor blade comprises a shank portion, a tip portion and an airfoil. The airfoil has a pressure side wall and a suction side wall that are interconnected by a plurality of partition sidewalls, defining an internal cooling passageway within the airfoil. The internal cooling passageway includes at least one radial outflow passageway to direct a cooling medium flow from the shank portion towards the tip portion and at least one radial inflow passageway to direct a cooling medium flow from the tip portion towards the shank portion. A number of mixing ribs are disposed on the partition sidewalls within the radial outflow passageways so as to enhance the thermal mixing of the cooling medium flow, thereby producing improved heat transfer over a broad range of the Buoyancy number.

Staub, Fred Wolf (Schenectady, NY); Willett, Fred Thomas (Niskayuna, NY)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Turbine blade cooling  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A turbine rotor blade comprises a shank portion, a tip portion and an airfoil. The airfoil has a pressure side wall and a suction side wall that are interconnected by a plurality of partition sidewalls, defining an internal cooling passageway within the airfoil. The internal cooling passageway includes at least one radial outflow passageway to direct a cooling medium flow from the shank portion towards the tip portion and at least one radial inflow passageway to direct a cooling medium flow from the tip portion towards the shank portion. A number of mixing ribs are disposed on the partition sidewalls within the radial outflow passageways so as to enhance the thermal mixing of the cooling medium flow, thereby producing improved heat transfer over a broad range of the Buoyancy number. 13 figs.

Staub, F.W.; Willett, F.T.

1999-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

339

Methods and apparatus for cooling wind turbine generators  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A wind turbine generator includes a stator having a core and a plurality of stator windings circumferentially spaced about a generator longitudinal axis. A rotor is rotatable about the generator longitudinal axis, and the rotor includes a plurality of magnetic elements coupled to the rotor and cooperating with the stator windings. The magnetic elements are configured to generate a magnetic field and the stator windings are configured to interact with the magnetic field to generate a voltage in the stator windings. A heat pipe assembly thermally engaging one of the stator and the rotor to dissipate heat generated in the stator or rotor.

Salamah, Samir A. (Niskayuna, NY); Gadre, Aniruddha Dattatraya (Rexford, NY); Garg, Jivtesh (Schenectady, NY); Bagepalli, Bharat Sampathkumaran (Niskayuna, NY); Jansen, Patrick Lee (Alplaus, NY); Carl, Jr., Ralph James (Clifton Park, NY)

2008-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

340

Recovery Act: Online Nonintrusive Condition Monitoring and Fault Detection for Wind Turbines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The penetration of wind power has increased greatly over the last decade in the United States and across the world. The U.S. wind power industry installed 1,118 MW of new capacity in the first quarter of 2011 alone and entered the second quarter with another 5,600 MW under construction. By 2030, wind energy is expected to provide 20% of the U.S. electricity needs. As the number of wind turbines continues to grow, the need for effective condition monitoring and fault detection (CMFD) systems becomes increasingly important [3]. Online CMFD is an effective means of not only improving the reliability, capacity factor, and lifetime, but it also reduces the downtime, energy loss, and operation and maintenance (O&M) of wind turbines. The goal of this project is to develop novel online nonintrusive CMFD technologies for wind turbines. The proposed technologies use only the current measurements that have been used by the control and protection system of a wind turbine generator (WTG); no additional sensors or data acquisition devices are needed. Current signals are reliable and easily accessible from the ground without intruding on the wind turbine generators (WTGs) that are situated on high towers and installed in remote areas. Therefore, current-based CMFD techniques have great economic benefits and the potential to be adopted by the wind energy industry. Specifically, the following objectives and results have been achieved in this project: (1) Analyzed the effects of faults in a WTG on the generator currents of the WTG operating at variable rotating speed conditions from the perspective of amplitude and frequency modulations of the current measurements; (2) Developed effective amplitude and frequency demodulation methods for appropriate signal conditioning of the current measurements to improve the accuracy and reliability of wind turbine CMFD; (3) Developed a 1P-invariant power spectrum density (PSD) method for effective signature extraction of wind turbine faults with characteristic frequencies in the current or current demodulated signals, where 1P stands for the shaft rotating frequency of a WTG; (4) Developed a wavelet filter for effective signature extraction of wind turbine faults without characteristic frequencies in the current or current demodulated signals; (5) Developed an effective adaptive noise cancellation method as an alternative to the wavelet filter method for signature extraction of wind turbine faults without characteristic frequencies in the current or current demodulated signals; (6) Developed a statistical analysis-based impulse detection method for effective fault signature extraction and evaluation of WTGs based on the 1P-invariant PSD of the current or current demodulated signals; (7) Validated the proposed current-based wind turbine CMFD technologies through extensive computer simulations and experiments for small direct-drive WTGs without gearboxes; and (8) Showed, through extensive experiments for small direct-drive WTGs, that the performance of the proposed current-based wind turbine CMFD technologies is comparable to traditional vibration-based methods. The proposed technologies have been successfully applied for detection of major failures in blades, shafts, bearings, and generators of small direct-drive WTGs. The proposed technologies can be easily integrated into existing wind turbine control, protection, and monitoring systems and can be implemented remotely from the wind turbines being monitored. The proposed technologies provide an alternative to vibration-sensor-based CMFD. This will reduce the cost and hardware complexity of wind turbine CMFD systems. The proposed technologies can also be combined with vibration-sensor-based methods to improve the accuracy and reliability of wind turbine CMFD systems. When there are problems with sensors, the proposed technologies will ensure proper CMFD for the wind turbines, including their sensing systems. In conclusion, the proposed technologies offer an effective means to achieve condition-based smart maintenance for wind turbines and have a gre

Wei Qiao

2012-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rotating marine turbine" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Final Technical Report Recovery Act: Online Nonintrusive Condition Monitoring and Fault Detection for Wind Turbines  

SciTech Connect

The penetration of wind power has increased greatly over the last decade in the United States and across the world. The U.S. wind power industry installed 1,118 MW of new capacity in the first quarter of 2011 alone and entered the second quarter with another 5,600 MW under construction. By 2030, wind energy is expected to provide 20% of the U.S. electricity needs. As the number of wind turbines continues to grow, the need for effective condition monitoring and fault detection (CMFD) systems becomes increasingly important [3]. Online CMFD is an effective means of not only improving the reliability, capacity factor, and lifetime, but it also reduces the downtime, energy loss, and operation and maintenance (O&M) of wind turbines. The goal of this project is to develop novel online nonintrusive CMFD technologies for wind turbines. The proposed technologies use only the current measurements that have been used by the control and protection system of a wind turbine generator (WTG); no additional sensors or data acquisition devices are needed. Current signals are reliable and easily accessible from the ground without intruding on the wind turbine generators (WTGs) that are situated on high towers and installed in remote areas. Therefore, current-based CMFD techniques have great economic benefits and the potential to be adopted by the wind energy industry. Specifically, the following objectives and results have been achieved in this project: (1) Analyzed the effects of faults in a WTG on the generator currents of the WTG operating at variable rotating speed conditions from the perspective of amplitude and frequency modulations of the current measurements; (2) Developed effective amplitude and frequency demodulation methods for appropriate signal conditioning of the current measurements to improve the accuracy and reliability of wind turbine CMFD; (3) Developed a 1P-invariant power spectrum density (PSD) method for effective signature extraction of wind turbine faults with characteristic frequencies in the current or current demodulated signals, where 1P stands for the shaft rotating frequency of a WTG; (4) Developed a wavelet filter for effective signature extraction of wind turbine faults without characteristic frequencies in the current or current demodulated signals; (5) Developed an effective adaptive noise cancellation method as an alternative to the wavelet filter method for signature extraction of wind turbine faults without characteristic frequencies in the current or current demodulated signals; (6) Developed a statistical analysis-based impulse detection method for effective fault signature extraction and evaluation of WTGs based on the 1P-invariant PSD of the current or current demodulated signals; (7) Validated the proposed current-based wind turbine CMFD technologies through extensive computer simulations and experiments for small direct-drive WTGs without gearboxes; and (8) Showed, through extensive experiments for small direct-drive WTGs, that the performance of the proposed current-based wind turbine CMFD technologies is comparable to traditional vibration-based methods. The proposed technologies have been successfully applied for detection of major failures in blades, shafts, bearings, and generators of small direct-drive WTGs. The proposed technologies can be easily integrated into existing wind turbine control, protection, and monitoring systems and can be implemented remotely from the wind turbines being monitored. The proposed technologies provide an alternative to vibration-sensor-based CMFD. This will reduce the cost and hardware complexity of wind turbine CMFD systems. The proposed technologies can also be combined with vibration-sensor-based methods to improve the accuracy and reliability of wind turbine CMFD systems. When there are problems with sensors, the proposed technologies will ensure proper CMFD for the wind turbines, including their sensing systems. In conclusion, the proposed technologies offer an effective means to achieve condition-based smart maintenance for wind turbines and have a gre

Wei Qiao

2012-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

342

Western Turbine | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Turbine Turbine Jump to: navigation, search Name Western Turbine Place Aurora, Colorado Zip 80011 Sector Wind energy Product Wind Turbine Installation and Maintainance. Coordinates 39.325162°, -79.54975° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.325162,"lon":-79.54975,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

343

Turbine Oil Lube Notes Compilation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a special compilation of the EPRI Nuclear Maintenance Applications Center's (NMAC's) "Lube Notes" articles (extracted from "Lube Notes Compilation, 1989-2001 (Report Number 1006848)) that relate specifically to the topic of turbine oils.

2002-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

344

SERI advanced wind turbine blades  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The primary goal of the Solar Energy Research Institute`s (SERI) advanced wind turbine blades is to convert the kinetic energy in the wind into mechanical energy in an inexpensive and efficient manner. To accomplish this goal, advanced wind turbine blades have been developed by SERI that utilize unique airfoil technology. Performance characteristics of the advanced blades were verified through atmospheric testing on fixed-pitch, stall-regulated horizontal-axis wind turbines (HAWTs). Of the various wind turbine configurations, the stall-regulated HAWT dominates the market because of its simplicity and low cost. Results of the atmospheric tests show that the SERI advanced blades produce 10% to 30% more energy than conventional blades. 6 refs.

Tangler, J.; Smith, B.; Jager, D.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

SERI advanced wind turbine blades  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The primary goal of the Solar Energy Research Institute's (SERI) advanced wind turbine blades is to convert the kinetic energy in the wind into mechanical energy in an inexpensive and efficient manner. To accomplish this goal, advanced wind turbine blades have been developed by SERI that utilize unique airfoil technology. Performance characteristics of the advanced blades were verified through atmospheric testing on fixed-pitch, stall-regulated horizontal-axis wind turbines (HAWTs). Of the various wind turbine configurations, the stall-regulated HAWT dominates the market because of its simplicity and low cost. Results of the atmospheric tests show that the SERI advanced blades produce 10% to 30% more energy than conventional blades. 6 refs.

Tangler, J.; Smith, B.; Jager, D.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Rim seal for turbine wheel  

SciTech Connect

A turbine wheel assembly includes a disk having a plurality of blades therearound. A ceramic ring is mounted to the housing of the turbine wheel assembly. A labyrinth rim seal mounted on the disk cooperates with the ceramic ring to seal the hot gases acting on the blades from the disk. The ceramic ring permits a tighter clearance between the labyrinth rim seal and the ceramic ring.

Glezer, Boris (Del Mar, CA); Boyd, Gary L. (Alpine, CA); Norton, Paul F. (San Diego, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Onshore Wind Turbines Life Extension  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wind turbines are currently type-certified for nominal 20-year design lives, but many wind industry stakeholders are considering the possibility of extending the operating lives of their projects by 5, 10, or 15 years. Life extensionthe operation of an asset beyond the nominal design lifeis just one option to maximize the financial return of these expensive assets. Other options include repowering, upgrading, or uprating a turbine.In order to make informed decisions ...

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

High temperature turbine engine structure  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high temperature ceramic/metallic turbine engine includes a metallic housing which journals a rotor member of the turbine engine. A ceramic disk-like shroud portion of the engine is supported on the metallic housing portion and maintains a close running clearance with the rotor member. A ceramic spacer assembly maintains the close running clearance of the shroud portion and rotor member despite differential thermal movements between the shroud portion and metallic housing portion.

Carruthers, William D. (Mesa, AZ); Boyd, Gary L. (Tempe, AZ)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

High temperature turbine engine structure  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high temperature ceramic/metallic turbine engine includes a metallic housing which journals a rotor member of the turbine engine. A ceramic disk-like shroud portion of the engine is supported on the metallic housing portion and maintains a close running clearance with the rotor member. A ceramic spacer assembly maintains the close running clearance of the shroud portion and rotor member despite differential thermal movements between the shroud portion and metallic housing portion.

Carruthers, William D. (Mesa, AZ); Boyd, Gary L. (Tempe, AZ)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

High temperature turbine engine structure  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high temperature ceramic/metallic turbine engine includes a metallic housing which journals a rotor member of the turbine engine. A ceramic disk-like shroud portion of the engine is supported on the metallic housing portion and maintains a close running clearance with the rotor member. A ceramic spacer assembly maintains the close running clearance of the shroud portion and rotor member despite differential thermal movements between the shroud portion and metallic housing portion.

Carruthers, William D. (Mesa, AZ); Boyd, Gary L. (Tempe, AZ)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

DOE's Advanced Turbine Systems Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Program, which is necessary to achieve METC's vision for future IGCC systems. This major new program is a cooperative effort in which DOE's Office of Fossil Energy (FE) and Office of Conservation and Renewable Energy (CE) are joining forces with the private sector to develop ultra-high efficiency gas turbine systems. A goal of this Program is to have a utility-size gas turbine with a 60 percent efficiency (lower heating value basis (LHV)) ready for commercialization by the year 2002. (While this paper focuses on utility-size turbines which are the primary interest of this audience, an ultra-high efficiency, industrial-size gas turbine will also be developed in the ATS Program with a comparable improvement in efficiency.) Natural gas is the target fuel of the Program, a recognition by DOE that natural gas will play a significant role in supplying future power generation needs in the US. However, to insure that the US has fuel supply options, ATS designs will be adaptable to coal and biomass fuels. Therefore, the ATS Program will directly benefit IGCC and other advanced coal based power generation systems. Cost and efficiency improvements in the turbine system as well as in the gasification and gas stream cleanup plant sections will enable IGCC to reach a cost target of $1,000--$1,280/kW and an efficiency goal of 52 percent (higher heating value basis (HHV)) in the post-2000 market.

Bechtel, T.F.; Bajura, R.A.; Salvador, L.A.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Rotationally sampled wind characteristics for several rotor sizes using laser anemometer measurements  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The concept of measuring the wind velocity rotationally around crosswind circles using a circle-scanning Doppler laser anemometer is investigated to determine the technique's suitability as an effective, simple, economical, and nonintrusive method for estimation turbulence at a wind turbine rotor. Estimates of wind features obtained using the lidar technique are compared to actual wind measurements obtained using a vertical plane array of anemometers, and to other estimates generated using a single-tower technique. Although the lack of a common data set precludes a firm conclusion regarding the lidar method's accuracy, it appears that the rotationally scanning lidar has the potential of becoming an excellent tool for measuring turbulent wind around the disk of rotation of a turbine blade. 11 refs., 21 figs., 2 tabs.

Connell, J.R.; Morris, V.R.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Design of State-Space-Based Control Algorithms for Wind Turbine Speed Regulation: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Control can improve the performance of wind turbines by enhancing energy capture and reducing dynamic loads.At the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, we are beginning to design control algorithms for regulation of turbine speed and power using state-space control designs. In this paper, we describe the design of such a control algorithm for regulation of rotor speed in full-load operation (region 3) for a two-bladed wind turbine. We base our control design on simple linear models of a turbine, which contain rotor and generator rotation, drivetrain torsion, and rotor flap degrees of freedom (first mode only). We account for wind-speed fluctuations using disturbance-accommodating control. We show the capability of these control schemes to stabilize the modeled turbine modes via pole placement while using state estimation to reduce the number of turbine measurements that are needed for these control algorithms. We incorporate these controllers into the FAST-AD code and show simulation results for various conditions. Finally, we report conclusions to this work and outline future studies.

Wright, A.; Balas, M.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Hollings Marine Laboratory Homepage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The Hollings Marine Laboratory (HML) is a ... the Nation's coastal environmental- and health-related problems ... s National Ocean Service, the National ...

2013-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

355

EPRI steam-turbine-related research projects  

SciTech Connect

The current perspective is provided of EPRI-project activities that relate to steam turbine reliability. Compiling status information is a part of the planning effort for continuing projects on turbine rotor reliability, turbine chemistry monitoring and materials behavior, and for the proposed project related to cracking of shrunk-on discs in low pressure nuclear steam turbines. This document includes related work beyond the steam turbine itself to cover those research projects whose scope and results impact the efforts specific to the turbine.

Gelhaus, F.; Jaffee, R.; Kolar, M.; Poole, D.

1978-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Collaborative Advanced Gas Turbine Program: Phase 1. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Collaborative Advanced Gas Turbine (CAGT) Program is an advanced gas turbine research and development program whose goal is to accelerate the commercial availability, to within the turn of the century, of high efficiency aeroderivative gas turbines for electric power generating applications. In the first project phase, research was conducted to prove or disprove the research hypothesis that advanced aeroderivative gas turbine systems can provide a promising technology alternative, offering high efficiency and good environmental performance characteristics in modular sizes, for utility applications. This $5 million, Phase 1 research effort reflects the collaborative efforts of a broad and international coalition of industries and organizations, both public and private, that have pooled their resources to assist in this research. Included in this coalition are: electric and gas utilities, the Electric Power Research Institute, the Gas Research Institute and the principal aircraft engine manufacturers. Additionally, the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the California Energy Commission have interacted with the CAGT on both technical and executive levels as observers and sources of funding. The three aircraft engine manufacturer-led research teams participating in this research include: Rolls-Royce, Inc., and Bechtel; the Turbo Power and Marine Division of United Technologies and Fluor Daniel; and General Electric Power Generation, Stewart and Stevenson, and Bechtel. Each team has investigated advanced electric power generating systems based on their high-thrust (60,000 to 100,000 pounds) aircraft engines. The ultimate goal of the CAGT program is that the community of stakeholders in the growing market for natural-gas-fueled, electric power generation can collectively provide the right combination of market-pull and technology-push to substantially accelerate the commercialization of advanced, high efficiency aeroderivative technologies.

Hollenbacher, R.; Kesser, K.; Beishon, D.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Molecular Approaches in Marine Pharmacology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

natural products in marine algae (particularly Rhodophyta,haloperoxidases in marine algae producing chiral halogenatedto several species of algae (Laurencia, Delisea, Corallina,

Butler, Alison

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Advanced Turbine Systems program  

SciTech Connect

Allison draws the following preliminary conclusions from this preliminary design effort: (1) All cycles investigated require a high temperature turbine capability to be developed under ATS. (2) The HAT and intercooled chemical recuperation cycles compete in only a narrow sector of the industrial engine market. This is the result of the complexity and water usage of the HAT cycle and the limitation of the chemical recuperation cycle to applications where natural gas is readily available. (3) From a cycle point of view, the ICR and chemical recuperation cycles are similar. Both optimize at fairly low compressor pressure ratios ({approximately}15) because both want high temperature in the exhaust to optimize the recuperation process. Excess steam production with the chemical recuperation process makes it somewhat doubtful that the two recuperation processes are interchangeable from a hardware point of view. Allison intends to perform a global optimization on this cycle during Phase 2 of ATS. (4). There appears to be no substitute for the simple cycle with steam generation in the cogen-steam market since steam is, by definition, a valuable product of the cycle.

Wilkes, C.; Mukavetz, D.W.; Knickerbocker, T.K.; Ali, S.A.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Airfoils for wind turbine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Airfoils for the tip and mid-span regions of a wind turbine blade have upper surface and lower surface shapes and contours between a leading edge and a trailing edge that minimize roughness effects of the airfoil and provide maximum lift coefficients that are largely insensitive to roughness effects. The airfoil in one embodiment is shaped and contoured to have a thickness in a range of about fourteen to seventeen percent, a Reynolds number in a range of about 1,500,000 to 2,000,000, and a maximum lift coefficient in a range of about 1.4 to 1.5. In another embodiment, the airfoil is shaped and contoured to have a thickness in a range of about fourteen percent to sixteen percent, a Reynolds number in a range of about 1,500,000 to 3,000,000, and a maximum lift coefficient in a range of about 0.7 to 1.5. Another embodiment of the airfoil is shaped and contoured to have a Reynolds in a range of about 1,500,000 to 4,000,000, and a maximum lift coefficient in a range of about 1.0 to 1.5.

Tangler, James L. (Boulder, CO); Somers, Dan M. (State College, PA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Rotational Augmentation on a 2.3 MW Rotor Blade with Thick Flatback Airfoil Cross-Sections: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Rotational augmentation was analyzed for a 2.3 MW wind turbine, which was equipped with thick flatback airfoils at inboard radial locations and extensively instrumented for acquisition of time varying surface pressures. Mean aerodynamic force and surface pressure data were extracted from an extensive field test database, subject to stringent criteria for wind inflow and turbine operating conditions. Analyses of these data showed pronounced amplification of aerodynamic forces and significant enhancements to surface pressures in response to rotational influences, relative to two-dimensional, stationary conditions. Rotational augmentation occurrence and intensity in the current effort was found to be consistent with that observed in previous research. Notably, elevated airfoil thickness and flatback design did not impede rotational augmentation.

Schreck, S.; Fingersh, L.; Siegel, K.; Singh, M.; Medina, P.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rotating marine turbine" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Aerothermodynamics of low pressure steam turbines and condensers  

SciTech Connect

This book presents papers on steam turbines and steam condensers. Topics considered include the design of modern low pressure steam turbines, throughflow design methods, three-dimensional flow calculations, the calculation of wet steam stages, aerodynamic development of turbine blades, turbine performance measurement, turbine exhaust system design, and condensers for large turbines.

Moore, M.J.; Sieverding, C.H.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Rotating Aperture System  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A rotating aperture system includes a low-pressure vacuum pumping stage with apertures for passage of a deuterium beam. A stator assembly includes holes for passage of the beam. The rotor assembly includes a shaft connected to a deuterium gas cell or a crossflow venturi that has a single aperture on each side that together align with holes every rotation. The rotating apertures are synchronized with the firing of the deuterium beam such that the beam fires through a clear aperture and passes into the Xe gas beam stop. Portions of the rotor are lapped into the stator to improve the sealing surfaces, to prevent rapid escape of the deuterium gas from the gas cell.

Rusnak, Brian; Hall, James M.; Shen, Stewart; Wood, Richard L.

2005-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

363

MEASURING IMPACTS TO BIRDS CAUSED BY WIND TURBINES MEASURING IMPACTS TO BIRDS CAUSED BY WIND TURBINES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

APPENDIX A MEASURING IMPACTS TO BIRDS CAUSED BY WIND TURBINES #12;A-1 APPENDIX A MEASURING IMPACTS TO BIRDS CAUSED BY WIND TURBINES 1.0 INTRODUCTION Differential composition of wind turbines at wind energy used is the number of fatalities per wind turbine per year (Anderson et al. 1999). This metric has

364

The Robust Gas Turbine Project M.I.T. Gas Turbine Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 The Robust Gas Turbine Project M.I.T. Gas Turbine Laboratory Prof. David Darmofal, Prof. Daniel and in-service conditions is a key factor in gas turbine product quality. While a given design may these improved engines. The M.I.T. Gas Turbine Laboratory (GTL) has a long history of developing advanced

Waitz, Ian A.

365

A Dynamic Wind Turbine Simulator of the Wind Turbine Generator System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To study dynamic performances of wind turbine generator system (WTGS), and to determine the control structures in laboratory. The dynamic torque generated by wind turbine (WT) must be simulated. In there paper, a dynamic wind turbine emulator (WTE) is ... Keywords: dynamic wind turbine emulation, wind shear, tower shadow, torque compensation

Lei Lu; Zhen Xie; Xing Zhang; Shuying Yang; Renxian Cao

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Turbine-Turbine Interaction and Performance Detailed (Fact Sheet), NREL Highlights, Science  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Next-generation modeling capability assesses wind turbine array fluid dynamics and aero-elastic simulations.

Not Available

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Estimation of turbulence level and scale for wind turbine applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A simplified method is presented for estimating onsite turbulence variance within the wind turbine layer for horizontal wind speed. The method is based principally on estimating the probability distribution of wind speed and assigning a variance to each mean wind speed based on surface roughness estimates. The model is not proposed as an alternative to onsite measurement and analysis, but rather as an adjunct to such a program. A revision of the Kaimal neutral u-component spectrum is suggested to apply to the mix of the stabilities occurring during operational winds. Values of integral length scale calculated from data analysis are shown to contradict the length scale model implicit in turbulence power spectra. Also, these calculated values are shown to be extremely sensitive to the length of the time series and the detrending method used. The analysis and modeling are extended to the rotational frame of reference for a horizontal-axis wind turbine by modeling the ratios of harmonic spike variances (1P, 2P, etc.) in the rotational spectrum to the Eulerian turbulence variance. 15 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

Powell, D.C.

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Magnus air turbine system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A Magnus effect windmill for generating electrical power is disclosed. A large nacelle-hub mounted pivotally (in Azimuth) atop a support tower carries, in the example disclosed, three elongated barrels arranged in a vertical plane and extending symmetrically radially outwardly from the nacelle. The system provides spin energy to the barrels by internal mechanical coupling in the proper sense to cause, in reaction to an incident wind, a rotational torque of a predetermined sense on the hub. The rotating hub carries a set of power take-off rollers which ride on a stationary circular track in the nacelle. Shafts carry the power, given to the rollers by the wind driven hub, to a central collector or accumulator gear assembly whose output is divided to drive the spin mechanism for the Magnus barrels and the main electric generator. A planetary gear assembly is interposed between the collector gears and the spin mechanism functioning as a differential which is also connected to an auxiliary electric motor whereby power to the spin mechanism may selectively be provided by the motor. Generally, the motor provides initial spin to the barrels for start-up after which the motor is braked and the spin mechanism is driven as though by a fixed ratio coupling from the rotor hub. During high wind or other unusual conditions, the auxiliary motor may be unbraked and excess spin power may be used to operate the motor as a generator of additional electrical output. Interposed between the collector gears of the rotating hub and the main electric generator is a novel variable speed drive-fly wheel system which is driven by the variable speed of the wind driven rotor and which, in turn, drives the main electric generator at constant angular speed. Reference is made to the complete specification for disclosure of other novel aspects of the system such as, for example, the aerodynamic and structural aspects of the novel Magnus barrels as well as novel gearing and other power coupling combination apparatus of the invention. A reading of the complete specification is recommended for a full understanding of the principles and features of the disclosed system.

Hanson, Thomas F. (24204 Heritage La., Newhall, CA 91321)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Unusual plant features gas turbines  

SciTech Connect

Gas turbines were chosen by Phillips Petroleum Co. to operate the first gas-injection plant in the world to use gas-type turbines to drive reciprocating compressors. The plant is located in Lake Maracaibo, Venezuela. Gas turbines were chosen because of their inherent reliability as prime movers and for their lack of vibration. Reciprocating compressors were decided upon because of their great flexibility. Now, for the first time, the advantages of both gas turbines and reciprocating compressors are coupled on a very large scale. In this installation, the turbines will operate at about 5,000 rpm, while the compressors will run at only 270 rpm. Speed will be reduced through the giant gear boxes. The compressor platform rests on seventy- eight 36-in. piles in 100 ft of water. Piles were driven 180 ft below water level. To dehydrate the gas, Phillips will install a triethylene glycol unit. Two nearby flow stations will gather associated gas produced at the field and will pipe the gas underwater to the gas injection platform. Lamar Field is in the S. central area of Lake Maracaibo. To date, it has produced a 150 million bbl in 10 yr. Studies have indicated that a combination of waterflooding and repressuring by gas injection could double final recovery. Waterflooding began in 1963.

Franco, A.

1967-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Reliability Assessment of North American Steam Turbines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This survey provides statistics related to the reliability and maintenance of fossil-fueled steam turbines in the continental United States. The analysis focuses primarily on active turbines larger than 200 MW.

2002-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

371

Maglev Wind Turbine Technologies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Maglev Wind Turbine Technologies Maglev Wind Turbine Technologies Jump to: navigation, search Name Maglev Wind Turbine Technologies Place Sierra Vista, Arizona Zip 85635 Sector Wind energy Product The new company employs magnetic levitation (Maglev) technology in its wind turbines, which it says will have a longer life span, be cheaper to build, and produce 1GW of energy each. References Maglev Wind Turbine Technologies[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Maglev Wind Turbine Technologies is a company located in Sierra Vista, Arizona . References ↑ "Maglev Wind Turbine Technologies" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Maglev_Wind_Turbine_Technologies&oldid=348578"

372

Radial-Radial Single Rotor Turbine  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radial-Radial Single Rotor Turbine Radial-Radial Single Rotor Turbine Radial-Radial Single Rotor Turbine A rotor for use in turbine applications. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Radial-Radial Single Rotor Turbine A rotor for use in turbine applications has a radial compressor/pump having radially disposed spaced apart fins forming passages and a radial turbine having hollow turbine blades interleaved with the fins and through which fluid from the radial compressor/pump flows. The rotor can, in some applications, be used to produce electrical power. U.S. Patent No.: 7,044,718 (DOE S-100,626) Patent Application Filing Date: July 8, 2003 Patent Issue Date: May 16, 2006 Licensing Status: Available for Express Licensing (?). View terms and a sample license agreement.

373

Parametric design of floating wind turbines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As the price of energy increases and wind turbine technology matures, it is evident that cost effective designs for floating wind turbines are needed. The next frontier for wind power is the ocean, yet development in near ...

Tracy, Christopher (Christopher Henry)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Rugged ATS turbines for alternate fuels  

SciTech Connect

A major national effort is directed to developing advanced turbine systems designed for major improvements in efficiency and emissions performance using natural gas fuels. These turbine designs are also to be adaptable for future operation with alternate coal and biomass derived fuels. For several potential alternate fuel applications, available hot gas cleanup technologies will not likely be adequate to protect the turbine flowpath from deposition and corrosion. Past tests have indicated that cooling turbine airfoil surfaces could ruggedized a high temperature turbine flowpath to alleviate deposition and corrosion. Using this specification. ATS turbine that was evaluated. The initial analyses also showed that two-phase cooling offers the most attractive method of those explored to protect a coal-fueled ATS turbine from deposition and corrosion. This paper describes ruggedization approaches, particularly to counter the extreme deposition and corrosion effects of the high inlet temperatures of ATS turbines using alternate fuels.

Wenglarz, R.A.; Nirmalan, N.V.; Daehler, T.G.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Investigation of flow characteristics of gas turbines  

SciTech Connect

Measurements carried out in the process of assimilation of gas turbine (GT) plants of 16 different types in starting and working conditions to estimate the operational conditions and characteristics of the main elements (in particular of the turbines) have created a basis for generaliztion of flow characteristics of different turbines and for extending them to a wider range of operational conditions. The studies showed that: flow characteristics of the investigated turbines, independently of the number of stages and the degree of reaction, are described by the elliptic flowrate equation; throughput of similar turbines, i.e., of turbines formed of stages with high reaction, which have low design degrees of expansion, can be determined with satisfactory accuracy by the unique function of the degree of expansion; and in operating the gas turbine plants considerable changes in throughput of the turbines are possible.

Ol' khovskii, G.G.; Ol' khovskaya, N.I.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Maximizing Energy Capture of Fixed-Pitch Variable-Speed Wind Turbines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Field tests of a variable-speed, stall-regulated wind turbine were conducted at a US Department of Energy Laboratory. A variable-speed generating system, comprising a doubly-fed generator and series-resonant power converter, was installed on a 275-kW, downwind, two-blade wind turbine. Gearbox, generator, and converter efficiency were measured in the laboratory so that rotor aerodynamic efficiency could be determined from field measurement of generator power. The turbine was operated at several discrete rotational speeds to develop power curves for use in formulating variable-speed control strategies. Test results for fixed-speed and variable-speed operation are presented along with discussion and comparison of the variable-speed control methodologies. Where possible, comparisons between fixed-speed and variable-speed operation are shown.

Pierce, K.; Migliore, P.

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

A new emergency lubricating-oil system for steam turbine generators: Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A positive-displacement pump, powered by a turbine-shaft driven permanent magnet generator (PMG) can be used to provide lubricating oil over nearly the entire turbine generator speed range. The concept offers high reliability through its simplicity; switchgear, batteries and other auxiliaries are eliminated by hard-wiring the PMG to the pump induction drive motor. In this study, an existing PMG supplying power to the electrohydraulic control (EHC) system was evaluated as the power supply for an induction motor-driven screw pump running in a ''wafting'' mode as a backup to a conventional dc emergency oil system. The screw pump rotates all the time that the turbine shaft turns; check valves allow it to deliver oil instantly if the system pressure falls. It was found that the pump drive motor would start and run reliably with no adverse effects on the PMG or the electrohydraulic control (EHC) system. 6 refs., 23 figs., 11 tabs.

Kalan, G.L.; Oney, W.R.; Steenburgh, J.H.; Elwell, R.C.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Flow and heat transfer in gas turbine disk cavities subject to nonuniform external pressure field  

SciTech Connect

Ingestion of hot gas from the main-stream gas path into turbine disk cavities, particularly the first-stage disk cavity, has become a serious concern for the next-generation industrial gas turbines features high rotor inlet temperature. Fluid temperature in the cavities increases further due to windage generated by fluid drag at the rotating and stationary surfaces. The resulting problem of rotor disk heat-up is exacerbated by the high disk rim temperature due to adverse (relatively flat) temperature profile of the mainstream gas in the annular flow passage of the turbine. This describes an investigation into local convective heat transfer coefficient and cooling effectiveness of the rotor disk, flow field in the disk cavity, computation of the flow field and heat transfer in the disk cavity, and mainstream gas injection and rotor disk cooling effectiveness by mass transfer analogy.

Roy, R.P.; Kim, Y.W.; Tong, T.W. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States). Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

379

Environmental Coatings For Gas Turbine Engine Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Environmental Coatings For Gas Turbine Engine Applications. Author(s), Ming Fu, Roger Wustman, Jeffrey Williams, Douglas Konitzer.

380

Aircraft Gas Turbine Blade and Vane Repair  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gas turbine blades experience dimensional .... platinum applied in separate gas phase or electroplating ..... surfaces are natural consequences of fluoride.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rotating marine turbine" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Charts estimate gas-turbine site performance  

SciTech Connect

Nomographs have been developed to simplify site performance estimates for various types of gas turbine engines used for industrial applications. The nomographs can provide valuable data for engineers to use for an initial appraisal of projects where gas turbines are to be considered. General guidelines for the selection of gas turbines are also discussed. In particular, site conditions that influence the performance of gas turbines are described.

Dharmadhikari, S.

1988-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

382

Industrial gas turbines with subatmospheric expansion  

SciTech Connect

A modification is proposed to the basic Brayton cycle, by coupling the gas turbine with a jet pump. This allows subatmospheric pressure to exist at the exit of the turbine, a bigger turbine ratio and, hence, a higher efficiency. The jet pump operates with steam, produced from pressurized water heated by the exhaust gasses of the gas turbine. A simple configuration of the coupling is studied in detail.

Georgiou, D.P. (Patras Univ. (Greece))

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Advances in Hydroelectric Turbine Manufacturing and Repair  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Symposium. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2013. Symposium, Advances in Hydroelectric Turbine Manufacturing and Repair. Sponsorship...

384

Remote Monitoring of the Structural Health of Hydrokinetic Composite Turbine Blades  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A health monitoring approach is investigated for hydrokinetic turbine blade applications. In-service monitoring is critical due to the difficult environment for blade inspection and the cost of inspection downtime. Composite blade designs have advantages that include long life in marine environments and great control over mechanical properties. Experimental strain characteristics are determined for static loads and free-vibration loads. These experiments are designed to simulate the dynamic characteristics of hydrokinetic turbine blades. Carbon/epoxy symmetric composite laminates are manufactured using an autoclave process. Four-layer composite beams, eight-layer composite beams, and two-dimensional eight-layer composite blades are instrumented for strain. Experimental results for strain measurements from electrical resistance gages are validated with theoretical characteristics obtained from in-house finite-element analysis for all sample cases. These preliminary tests on the composite samples show good correlation between experimental and finite-element strain results. A health monitoring system is proposed in which damage to a composite structure, e.g. delamination and fiber breakage, causes changes in the strain signature behavior. The system is based on embedded strain sensors and embedded motes in which strain information is demodulated for wireless transmission. In-service monitoring is critical due to the difficult environment for blade inspection and the cost of inspection downtime. Composite blade designs provide a medium for embedding sensors into the blades for in-situ health monitoring. The major challenge with in-situ health monitoring is transmission of sensor signals from the remote rotating reference frame of the blade to the system monitoring station. In the presented work, a novel system for relaying in-situ blade health measurements in hydrokinetic systems is described and demonstrated. An ultrasonic communication system is used to transmit sensor data underwater from the rotating frame of the blade to a fixed relay station. Data are then broadcast via radio waves to a remote monitoring station. Results indicate that the assembled system can transmit simulated sensor data with an accuracy of ±5% at a maximum sampling rate of 500 samples/sec. A power investigation of the transmitter within the blade shows that continuous max-sampling operation is only possible for short durations (~days), and is limited due to the capacity of the battery power source. However, intermittent sampling, with long periods between samples, allows for the system to last for very long durations (~years). Finally, because the data transmission system can operate at a high sampling rate for short durations or at a lower sampling rate/higher duty cycle for long durations, it is well-suited for short-term prototype and environmental testing, as well as long-term commercially-deployed hydrokinetic machines.

J.L. Rovey K. Chandrashekhara

2012-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

385

ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEMS PROGRAM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The market for power generation equipment is undergoing a tremendous transformation. The traditional electric utility industry is restructuring, promising new opportunities and challenges for all facilities to meet their demands for electric and thermal energy. Now more than ever, facilities have a host of options to choose from, including new distributed generation (DG) technologies that are entering the market as well as existing DG options that are improving in cost and performance. The market is beginning to recognize that some of these users have needs beyond traditional grid-based power. Together, these changes are motivating commercial and industrial facilities to re-evaluate their current mix of energy services. One of the emerging generating options is a new breed of advanced fuel cells. While there are a variety of fuel cell technologies being developed, the solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) and molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFC) are especially promising, with their electric efficiency expected around 50-60 percent and their ability to generate either hot water or high quality steam. In addition, they both have the attractive characteristics of all fuel cells--relatively small siting footprint, rapid response to changing loads, very low emissions, quiet operation, and an inherently modular design lending itself to capacity expansion at predictable unit cost with reasonably short lead times. The objectives of this project are to:(1) Estimate the market potential for high efficiency fuel cell hybrids in the U.S.;(2) Segment market size by commercial, industrial, and other key markets;(3) Identify and evaluate potential early adopters; and(4) Develop results that will help prioritize and target future R&D investments. The study focuses on high efficiency MCFC- and SOFC-based hybrids and competing systems such as gas turbines, reciprocating engines, fuel cells and traditional grid service. Specific regions in the country have been identified where these technologies and the corresponding early adopters are likely to be located.

Sy Ali

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

User's guide for a personal computer model of turbulence at a wind turbine rotor  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document is primarily (1) a user's guide for the personal computer (PC) version of the code for the PNL computational model of the rotationally sampled wind speed (RODASIM11) and (2) a brief guide to the growing literature on the subject of rotationally sampled turbulence, from which the model is derived. The model generates values of turbulence experienced by single points fixed in the rotating frame of reference of an arbitrary wind turbine blade. The character of the turbulence depends on the specification of mean wind speed, the variance of turbulence, the crosswind and along-wind integral scales of turbulence, mean wind shear, and the hub height, radius, and angular speed of rotation of any point at which wind fluctuation is to be calculated. 13 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

Connell, J.R.; Powell, D.C.; Gower, G.L.

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Combined Experiment Phase 1. [Horizontal axis wind turbines: wind tunnel testing versus field testing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

How does wind tunnel airfoil data differ from the airfoil performance on an operating horizontal axis wind turbine (HAWT) The National Renewable Energy laboratory has been conducting a comprehensive test program focused on answering this question and understanding the basic fluid mechanics of rotating HAWT stall aerodynamics. The basic approach was to instrument a wind rotor, using an airfoil that was well documented by wind tunnel tests, and measure operating pressure distributions on the rotating blade. Based an the integrated values of the pressure data, airfoil performance coefficients were obtained, and comparisons were made between the rotating data and the wind tunnel data. Care was taken to the aerodynamic and geometric differences between the rotating and the wind tunnel models. This is the first of two reports describing the Combined Experiment Program and its results. This Phase I report covers background information such as test setup and instrumentation. It also includes wind tunnel test results and roughness testing.

Butterfield, C.P.; Musial, W.P.; Simms, D.A.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

TGM Turbines | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

TGM Turbines TGM Turbines Jump to: navigation, search Name TGM Turbines Place Sertaozinho, Sao Paulo, Brazil Zip 14175-000 Sector Biomass Product Brazil based company who constructs and sells boilers for biomass plants. Coordinates -21.14043°, -48.005154° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":-21.14043,"lon":-48.005154,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

389

Control coil arrangement for a rotating machine rotor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A rotating machine (e.g., a turbine, motor or generator) is provided wherein a fixed solenoid or other coil configuration is disposed adjacent to one or both ends of the active portion of the machine rotor for producing an axially directed flux in the active portion so as to provide planar axial control at single or multiple locations for rotor balance, levitation, centering, torque and thrust action. Permanent magnets can be used to produce an axial bias magnetic field. The rotor can include magnetic disks disposed in opposed, facing relation to the coil configuration.

Shah, Manoj R. (Latham, NY); Lewandowsk, Chad R. (Amsterdam, NY)

2001-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

390

Control Coil Arrangement for a Rotating Machine Rotor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A rotating machine (e.g., a turbine, motor or generator) is provided wherein a fixed solenoid or other coil configuration is disposed adjacent to one or both ends of the active portion of the machine rotor for producing an axially directed flux in the active portion so as to provide planar axial control at single or multiple locations for rotor balance, levitation, centering, torque and thrust action. Permanent magnets can be used to produce an axial bias magnetic field. The rotor can include magnetic disks disposed in opposed, facing relation to the coil configuration.

Shah, Manoj R.; Lewandowski, Chad R.

1999-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

391

Wind Turbines Electrical and Mechanical Engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wind Turbines Electrical and Mechanical Engineering Objective · Introduce students to the concept of alternative energy. · Explain the math and scientific principles behind engineering wind turbines. Standards and how it applies to wind energy · About how surface area and shape effects wind turbine efficiency

Provancher, William

392

Applications: Wind turbine and blade design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Capability Applications: Wind turbine and blade design optimization Energy production enhancement Summary: As the wind energy industry works to provide the infra- structure necessary for wind turbine develops a means to aug- ment power production with wind-derived energy. Turbines have become massive

393

Offshore Wind Turbines: Some Technical Challenges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Offshore Wind Turbines: Some Technical Challenges Prof. Guy Houlsby FREng Oxford University House engineers concerned with installation of offshore wind turbines. The author is Professor of Civil solved, a DTI and EPSRC-sponsored research programme on foundations for wind turbines will be briefly

Houlsby, Guy T.

394

Satoshi Hada Department of Gas Turbine Engineering,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Satoshi Hada Department of Gas Turbine Engineering, Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Takasago must be prevented by developing envi- ronmentally friendly power plants. Industrial gas turbines play a major role in power generation with modern high temperature gas turbines being applied in the gas

Thole, Karen A.

395

AWEA Small Wind Turbine Global Market Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

wind turbines ­ those with rated capacities of 100 kilowatts (kW)1 and less ­ grew 15% in 2009 with 20 small wind turbines, 95 of which-- more than one-third--are based in the u.S. An estimated 100,000 unitsAWEA Small Wind Turbine Global Market Study YEAR ENDING 2009 #12;Summary 3 Survey Findings

Leu, Tzong-Shyng "Jeremy"

396

Performance optimization of gas turbine engine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Performance optimization of a gas turbine engine can be expressed in terms of minimizing fuel consumption while maintaining nominal thrust output, maximizing thrust for the same fuel consumption and minimizing turbine blade temperature. Additional control ... Keywords: Fuel control, Gas turbines, Genetic algorithms, Optimization, Temperature control

Valceres V. R. Silva; Wael Khatib; Peter J. Fleming

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Radial-radial single rotor turbine  

SciTech Connect

A rotor for use in turbine applications has a radial compressor/pump having radially disposed spaced apart fins forming passages and a radial turbine having hollow turbine blades interleaved with the fins and through which fluid from the radial compressor/pump flows. The rotor can, in some applications, be used to produce electrical power.

Platts, David A. (Los Alamos, NM)

2006-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

398

Scale Model Turbine Missile Casing Impact Tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes three 1/5-scale-model turbine missile impact experiments performed to provide benchmark data for assessing turbine missiles effects in nuclear plant design. The development of an explosive launcher to accelerate the turbine missile models to the desired impact velocities is described. A comparison of the test results with those from full-scale experiments demonstrates scalability.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Wind energy conversion. Volume IX. Aerodynamics of wind turbine with tower disturbances  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Lifting line theory which is the counterpart of Prandtl's lifting line theory for rotating wing is employed for the overall performance analysis of a horizontal axis wind turbine rotor operating in a uniform flow. The wake system is modeled by non-rigid wake which includes the radial expansion and the axial retardation of trailing vortices. For the non-uniform flow which are caused by the ground, the tower reflection, or the tower shadow, the unsteady airloads acting on the turbine blade are computed, using lifting line theory and a non-rigid wake model. An equation which gives the wind profile in the tower shadow region is developed. Also, the equations to determine pitch angle control are derived to minimize the flapping moment variations or the thrust variations due to the non-uniform flow over a rotation.

Chung, S.Y.

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Wind energy conversion. Volume X. Aeroelastic stability of wind turbine rotor blades  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The nonlinear equations of motion of a general wind turbine rotor blade are derived from first principles. The twisted, tapered blade may be preconed out of the plane of rotation, and its root may be offset from the axis of rotation by a small amount. The aerodynamic center, center of mass, shear center, and area centroid are distinct in this derivation. The equations are applicable to studies of forced response or of aeroelastic flutter, however, neither gravity forcing, nor wind shear and gust forcing are included. The equations derived are applied to study the aeroelastic stability of the NASA-ERDA 100 kW wind turbine, and solved using the Galerkin method. The numerical results are used in conjunction with a mathematical comparison to prove the validity of an equivalent hinge model developed by the Wind Energy Conversion Project at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Wendell, J.

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rotating marine turbine" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Congrs SHF : Energies Marines Renouvelables 2013, Brest, 09-10 octobre 2013 Zhibin Zhou LISSAGE SUPERCAPACITIF DE LA PUISSANCE PRODUITE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Control of a Grid-Connected Marine Current Turbine System Using Supercapacitors Zhibin Zhou1,2 , Franck, the power limitation control will be applied. In the second step, Supercapacitor (SC) Energy Storage System, supercapacitor. I. INTRODUCTION During short-time period, swell waves are the main cause for variations

Recanati, Catherine

402

Rotatable stem and lock  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A valve stem and lock is disclosed which includes a housing surrounding a valve stem, a solenoid affixed to an interior wall of the housing, an armature affixed to the valve stem and a locking device for coupling the armature to the housing body. When the solenoid is energized, the solenoid moves away from the housing body, permitting rotation of the valve stem.

Deveney, J.E.; Sanderson, S.N.

1981-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

403

Rotating Hairy Black Holes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We construct stationary black holes in SU(2) Einstein-Yang-Mills theory, which carry angular momentum and electric charge. Possessing non-trivial non-abelian magnetic fields outside their regular event horizon, they represent non-perturbative rotating hairy black holes.

B. Kleihaus; J. Kunz

2000-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

404

Steam turbine materials and corrosion  

SciTech Connect

Ultra-supercritical (USC) power plants offer the promise of higher efficiencies and lower emissions. Current goals of the U.S. Department of Energys Advanced Power Systems Initiatives include power generation from coal at 60% efficiency, which would require steam temperatures of up to 760C. This project examines the steamside oxidation of candidate alloys for use in USC systems, with emphasis placed on applications in high- and intermediate-pressure turbines. As part of this research a concern has arisen about the possibility of high chromia evaporation rates of protective scales in the turbine. A model to calculate chromia evaporation rates is presented.

Holcomb, G.R.; Alman, D.E.; Dogan, O.N.; Rawers, J.C.; Schrems, K.K.; Ziomek-Moroz, M.

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Large wind turbine siting handbook: television interference assessment. Final subcontract report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The rotating blades of a horizontal axis wind turbine can distort the video portion of a television signal and thereby interfere with TV reception in the vicinity of the machine. The nature of this interference is described and methods are presented for calculating the zone within which the interference may be severs. Specific results are given for the MOD-OA, MOD-1 and MOD-2 machines as functions of the TV frequency.

Senior, T B.A.; Sengupta, D L

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Program on Technology Innovation: Impact of Syngas on F-Class Turbine Component Durability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project simulated the potential impact of operating the most advanced F-class components with a syngas fuel mixture. The durability analysis of an F-Class 1st stage rotating gas turbine bucket, which features the most recent cooling and coating strategies used to protect the design from overheating during operation, indicated there is a potential to increase the firing temperature limits applied in these simulations, without significantly affecting the present durability limits of the 1st stage bucket.

2009-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

407

Gas Turbine Superalloy Materials Property Handbook for Stationary Parts and Discs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Published material property data on alloys used in the stationary components, such as combustors, transition pieces, and nozzles (vanes), as well as rotating discs used in land-based gas turbines, is meager and widely scattered in the literature. This handbook provides a comprehensive resource of all available material property data for iron-containing, as well as nickel- and cobalt-based superalloys. Such data are critical for use in remaining life assessment calculations, failure analysis, comparison o...

2002-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

408

Understanding Wind Turbine Price Trends in the U.S. Over the Past Decade  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that the average turbines rotor swept area has increasedthe average turbine hub height and rotor diameter also4. Average Turbine Capacity, Hub Height, and Rotor Diameter

Bolinger, Mark

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Wave-driven Rotation in Supersonically Rotating Mirrors  

SciTech Connect

Supersonic rotation in mirrors may be produced by radio frequency waves. The waves produce coupled diffusion in ion kinetic and potential energy. A population inversion along the diffusion path then produces rotation. Waves may be designed to exploit a natural kinetic energy source or may provide the rotation energy on their own. Centrifugal traps for fusion and isotope separation may benefit from this wave-driven rotation.

A. Fetterman and N.J. Fisch

2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

410

ORCENT2. Nuclear Steam Turbine Cycle Analysis  

SciTech Connect

ORCENT2 performs heat and mass balance calculations at valves-wide-open design conditions, maximum guaranteed rating conditions, and an approximation of part-load conditions for steam turbine cycles supplied with throttle steam, characteristic of contemporary light-water reactors. The program handles both condensing and back-pressure turbine exhaust arrangements. Turbine performance calculations are based on the General Electric Company method for 1800-rpm large steam turbine-generators operating with light-water-cooled nuclear reactors. Output includes all information normally shown on a turbine-cycle heat balance diagram.

Fuller, L.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab, TN (United States)

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Steam turbines for cogeneration power plants  

SciTech Connect

Steam turbines for cogeneration plants may carry a combination of industrial, space heating, cooling and domestic hot water loads. These loads are hourly, weekly, and seasonally irregular and require turbines of special design to meet the load duration curve, while generating electric power. Design features and performance characteristics of one of the largest cogeneration turbine units for combined electric generation and district heat supply are presented. Different modes of operation of the cogeneration turbine under variable load conditions are discussed in conjunction with a heat load duration curve for urban heat supply. Problems associated with the retrofitting of existing condensing type turbines for cogeneration applications are identified. 4 refs.

Oliker, I.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

The value of steam turbine upgrades  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technological advances in mechanical and aerodynamic design of the turbine steam path are resulting in higher reliability and efficiency. A recent study conducted on a 390 MW pulverized coal-fired unit revealed just how much these new technological advancements can improve efficiency and output. The empirical study showed that the turbine upgrade raised high pressure (HP) turbine efficiency by 5%, intermediate pressure (IP) turbine efficiency by 4%, and low pressure (LP) turbine efficiency by 2.5%. In addition, the unit's highest achievable gross generation increased from 360 MW to 371 MW. 3 figs.

Potter, K.; Olear, D.; [General Physics Corp. (United States)

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Small Wind Turbine Testing and Applications Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Small wind turbines offer a promising alternative for many remote electrical uses where there is a good wind resource. The National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory helps further the role that small turbines can play in supplying remote power needs. The NWTC tests and develops new applications for small turbines. The NWTC also develops components used in conjunction with wind turbines for various applications. This paper describes wind energy research at the NWTC for applications including battery charging stations, water desalination/purification, and health clinics. Development of data acquisition systems and tests on small turbines are also described.

Corbus, D.; Baring-Gould, I.; Drouilhet, S.; Gevorgian, V.; Jimenez, T.; Newcomb, C.; Flowers, L.

1999-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

414

Closed-cycle gas turbine chemical processor  

SciTech Connect

A closed-cycle gas turbine chemical processor separates the functions of combustion air and dilution fluid in a gas turbine combustor. The output of the turbine stage of the gas turbine is cooled and recirculated to its compressor from where a proportion is fed to a dilution portion of its combustor and the remainder is fed to a chemical recovery system wherein at least carbon dioxide is recovered therefrom. Fuel and combustion air are fed to a combustion portion of the gas turbine combustor. In a preferred embodiment of the invention, the gas turbine is employed to drive an electric generator. A heat recovery steam generator and a steam turbine may be provided to recover additional energy from the gas turbine exhaust. The steam turbine may be employed to also drive the electric generator. additional heat may be added to the heat recovery steam generator for enhancing the electricity generated using heat recovery combustors in which the functions of combustion and dilution are separated. The chemical recovery system may employ process steam tapped from an intermediate stage of the steam turbine for stripping carbon dioxide from an absorbent liquid medium which is used to separate it from the gas stream fed to it. As the amount of carbon dioxide in the fuel fed to the chemical processor increases, the amount of process steam required to separate it from the absorbent fluid medium increases and the contribution to generated electricity by the steam turbine correspondingly decreases.

Stahl, C. R.

1985-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

415

Energy 101: Wind Turbines | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wind Turbines Wind Turbines Energy 101: Wind Turbines Addthis Below is the text version for the Energy 101: Wind Turbines video. The video opens with "Energy 101: Wind Turbines." This is followed by wooden windmills on farms. We've all seen those creaky, old windmills on farms. And although they may seem about as low-tech as you can get, those old windmills are the predecessors for new, modern wind turbines that generat electricity. The video pans through shots of large windmills and wind farms of different sizes, situated on cultivated plains and hills. The same wind that used to pump water for cattle is now turning giant wind turbines to power cities and homes. OK, have a look at this wind farm in the California desert. A hot desert, next to tall mountains. An ideal place for a lot of wind.

416

Single condenser arrangement for side exhaust turbine  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a large-scale power generating apparatus for converting steam energy into electrical energy. It comprises: a large turbine capable of converting steam energy into mechanical energy; a large generator for converting mechanical energy into electrical energy; a shaft disposed in and axially connecting the turbine and the generator, the shaft capable of being turned by steam energy in the turbine; a single condenser connected to the turbine and capable of drawing steam out of the turbine and condensing steam to water, the single condenser disposed alongside the turbine; and a low foundation which supports the turbine and the generator and a slab which supports the low foundation and the single condenser.

Stock, A.L.

1989-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

417

Energy 101: Wind Turbines | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wind Turbines Wind Turbines Energy 101: Wind Turbines Addthis Description See how wind turbines generate clean electricity from the power of the wind. Highlighted are the various parts and mechanisms of a modern wind turbine. Duration 2:16 Topic Tax Credits, Rebates, Savings Wind Energy Economy Credit Energy Department Video MR. : We've all seen those creaky old windmills on farms, and although they may seem about as low-tech as you can get, those old windmills are the predecessors for new modern wind turbines that generate electricity. The same wind that used to pump water for cattle is now turning giant wind turbines to power cities and homes. OK, have a look at this wind farm in the California desert, a hot desert next to tall mountains - an ideal place for a lot of wind.

418

Aerodynamic interference between two Darrieus wind turbines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The effect of aerodynamic interference on the performance of two curved bladed Darrieus-type vertical axis wind turbines has been calculated using a vortex/lifting line aerodynamic model. The turbines have a tower-to-tower separation distance of 1.5 turbine diameters, with the line of turbine centers varying with respect to the ambient wind direction. The effects of freestream turbulence were neglected. For the cases examined, the calculations showed that the downwind turbine power decrement (1) was significant only when the line of turbine centers was coincident with the ambient wind direction, (2) increased with increasing tipspeed ratio, and (3) is due more to induced flow angularities downstream than to speed deficits near the downstream turbine.

Schatzle, P.R.; Klimas, P.C.; Spahr, H.R.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Gas Turbine Procurement: 1987 Workshop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

By properly specifying a gas turbine unit, a utility buyer can avoid engine system configurations that could contribute to forced outages, long downtimes, and less than satisfactory starting reliability. A 1987 EPRI workshop identified factors that can assist utilities in specifying these systems to obtain high reliability, availability, and maintainability.

1988-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

420

High temperature turbine engine structure  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high temperature turbine engine includes a rotor portion having axially stacked adjacent ceramic rotor parts. A ceramic/ceramic joint structure transmits torque between the rotor parts while maintaining coaxial alignment and axially spaced mutually parallel relation thereof despite thermal and centrifugal cycling.

Boyd, Gary L. (Tempe, AZ)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rotating marine turbine" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

ADVANCED GAS TURBINE SYSTEMS RESEARCH  

SciTech Connect

The activities of the Advanced Gas Turbine Systems Research (AGTSR) program for this reporting period are described in this quarterly report. The report is divided into discussions of Membership, Administration, Technology Transfer (Workshop/Education), Research and Miscellaneous Related Activity. Items worthy of note are presented in extended bullet format following the appropriate heading.

Unknown

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

ADVANCED GAS TURBINE SYSTEMS RESEARCH  

SciTech Connect

The activities of the Advanced Gas Turbine Systems Research (AGRSR) program are described in the quarterly report. The report is divided into discussions of Membership, Administration, Technology Transfer (Workshop/Education) and Research. Items worthy of note are presented in extended bullet format following the appropriate heading.

Unknown

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Gas turbine intake air quality  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of preliminary research intended to evaluate the causes and effects of compressor fouling on pipeline gas turbines. A literature search and field-experience survey of pipeline operators provides the basis for the conclusions and recommendations.

Lawson, C.C.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

ADVANCED GAS TURBINE SYSTEMS RESEARCH  

SciTech Connect

The activities of the Advanced Gas Turbine Systems Research (AGTSR) program for this reporting period are described in this quarterly report. The report is divided into discussions of Membership, Administration, Technology Transfer (Workshop/Education), Research and Miscellaneous Related Activity. Items worthy of note are presented in extended bullet format following the appropriate heading.

Unknown

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

High temperature turbine engine structure  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high temperature turbine engine includes a hybrid ceramic/metallic rotor member having ceramic/metal joint structure. The disclosed joint is able to endure higher temperatures than previously possible, and aids in controlling heat transfer in the rotor member.

Boyd, Gary L. (Tempe, AZ)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Marine biologist salaries?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

much does a marine biologist get paid in a year? Replies: Nobody goes into it for the money. It depends very much on exactly what kind of job you have. For example, with a Ph.D.,...

427

Mixer-Ejector Wind Turbine: Breakthrough High Efficiency Shrouded Wind Turbine  

SciTech Connect

Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: FloDesign Wind Turbines innovative wind turbine, inspired by the design of jet engines, could deliver 300% more power than existing wind turbines of the same rotor diameter by extracting more energy over a larger area. FloDesign Wind Turbines unique shrouded design expands the wind capture area, and the mixing vortex downstream allows more energy to flow through the rotor without stalling the turbine. The unique rotor and shrouded design also provide significant opportunity for mass production and simplified assembly, enabling mid-scale turbines (approximately 100 kW) to produce power at a cost that is comparable to larger-scale conventional turbines.

None

2010-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

428

Stochastic Faraday Rotation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Different ray paths through a turbulent plasma can produce stochastic Faraday rotation leading to depolarization of any linearly polarized component. Simple theory predicts that the average values of the Stokes parameters decay according to $$, $\\propto\\exp(-\\delta_l)$, with $\\delta_l\\propto\\lambda^4$. It is pointed out that a definitive test for such depolarization is provided by the fact that $$ remains constant while $^2+^2$ decreases $\\propto\\exp(-2\\delta_l)$. The averages to which this effect, called polarization covariance, should apply are discussed; it should apply to spatial averages over a polarization map or temporal averages over a data set, but not to beamwidth and bandwidth averages that are intrinsic to the observation process. Observations of depolarization would provide statistical information on fluctuations in the turbulent plasma along the line of sight, specifically, the variance of the rotation measure. Other effects that can also cause depolarization are discussed.

D. B. Melrose; J. -P. Macquart

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Rotatable seal assembly  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An assembly is provided for rotatably supporting a rotor on a stator so that vacuum chambers in the rotor and stator remain in communication while the chambers are sealed from ambient air, which enables the use of a ball bearing or the like to support most of the weight of the rotor. The apparatus includes a seal device mounted on the rotor to rotate therewith, but shiftable in position on the rotor while being sealed to the rotor as by an O-ring. The seal device has a flat face that is biased towards a flat face on the stator, and pressurized air is pumped between the faces to prevent contact between them while spacing them a small distance apart to avoid the inflow of large amounts of air between the faces and into the vacuum chambers.

Logan, Clinton M. (Pleasanton, CA); Garibaldi, Jack L. (Livermore, CA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Guidelines for reducing dynamic loads in two-bladed teetering-hub downwind wind turbines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A major goal of the federal Wind Energy Program is the rapid development and validation of structural models to determine loads and response for a wide variety of different wind turbine configurations operating under extreme conditions. Such codes are crucial to the successful design of future advanced wind turbines. In previous papers the authors described steps they took to develop a model of a two-bladed teetering-hub downwind wind turbine using ADAMS{reg_sign} (Automatic Dynamic Analysis of Mechanical Systems), as well as comparison of model predictions to test data. In this paper they show the use of this analytical model to study the influence of various turbine parameters on predicted system loads. They concentrate their study on turbine response in the frequency range of six to ten times the rotor rotational frequency (6P to 10P). Their goal is to identify the most important parameters which influence the response of this type of machine in this frequency range and give turbine designers some general design guidelines for designing two-bladed teetering-hub machines to be less susceptible to vibration. They study the effects of such parameters as blade edgewise and flapwise stiffness, tower top stiffness, blade tip-brake mass, low-speed shaft stiffness, nacelle mass momenta of inertia, and rotor speed. They show which parameters can be varied in order to make the turbine less responsive to such atmospheric inputs as wind shear and tower shadow. They then give designers a set of design guidelines in order to show how these machines can be designed to be less responsive to these inputs.

Wright, A.D.; Bir, G.S.; Butterfield, C.D.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Marine Hydroelectric Company | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Marine Hydroelectric Company Jump to: navigation, search Name Marine Hydroelectric Company Address 24040 Camino Del Avion A 107 Place Monarch Beach Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic...

432

Rotating plug bearing and seal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A bearing and seal structure for nuclear reactors utilizing rotating plugs above the nuclear reactor vessel. The structure permits lubrication of bearings and seals of the rotating plugs without risk of the lubricant draining into the reactor vessel below. The structure permits lubrication by utilizing a rotating outer race bearing.

Wade, Elman E. (Ruffs Dale, PA)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Combined plant having steam turbine and gas turbine connected by single shaft  

SciTech Connect

A combined plant including a gas turbine, a steam turbine and a waste heat recovery boiler using exhaust gases of the gas turbine as a heat source for producing steam serving as a drive source of the steam turbine further includes an ancillary steam source separate from and independent of the waste heat recovery boiler. At the time of startup of the plant, steam from the ancillary steam source is introduced into the steam turbine until the conditions for feeding air to the waste heat recovery boiler are set, to thereby avoid overheating of the steam turbine due to a windage loss.

Okabe, A.; Kashiwahara, K.; Urushidani, H.

1985-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

434

Investigations of flow and film cooling on turbine blade edge regions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The inlet temperature of modern gas turbine engines has been increased to achieve higher thermal efficiency and increased output. The blade edge regions, including the blade tip, the leading edge, and the platform, are exposed to the most extreme heat loads, and therefore, must be adequately cooled to maintain safety. For the blade tip, there is tip leakage flow due to the pressure gradient across the tip. This leakage flow not only reduces the blade aerodynamic performance, but also yields a high heat load due to the thin boundary layer and high speed. Various tip configurations, such as plane tip, double side squealer tip, and single suction side squealer tip, have been studied to find which one is the best configuration to reduce the tip leakage flow and the heat load. In addition to the flow and heat transfer on the blade tip, film cooling with various arrangements, including camber line, upstream, and two row configurations, have been studied. Besides these cases of low inlet/outlet pressure ratio, low temperature, non-rotating, the high inlet/outlet pressure ratio, high temperature, and rotating cases have been investigated, since they are closer to real turbine working conditions. The leading edge of the rotor blade experiences high heat transfer because of the stagnation flow. Film cooling on the rotor leading edge in a 1-1/2 turbine stage has been numerically studied for the design and off-design conditions. Simulations find that the increasing rotating speed shifts the stagnation line from the pressure side, to the leading edge and the suction side, while film cooling protection moves in the reverse direction with decreasing cooling effectiveness. Film cooling brings a high unsteady intensity of the heat transfer coefficient, especially on the suction side. The unsteady intensity of film cooling effectiveness is higher than that of the heat transfer coefficient. The film cooling on the rotor platform has gained significant attention due to the usage of low-aspect ratio and low-solidity turbine designs. Film cooling and its heat transfer are strongly influenced by the secondary flow of the end-wall and the stator-rotor interaction. Numerical predictions have been performed for the film cooling on the rotating platform of a whole turbine stage. The design conditions yield a high cooling effectiveness and decrease the cooling effectiveness unsteady intensity, while the high rpm condition dramatically reduces the film cooling effectiveness. High purge flow rates provide a better cooling protection. In addition, the impact of the turbine work process on film cooling effectiveness and heat transfer coefficient has been investigated. The overall cooling effectiveness shows a higher value than the adiabatic effectiveness does.

Yang, Huitao

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

COMMISSIONING SPIN ROTATORS IN RHIC.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the summer of 2002, eight superconducting helical spin rotators were installed into RHIC in order to control the polarization directions independently at the STAR and PHENIX experiments. Without the rotators, the orientation of polarization at the interaction points would only be vertical. With four rotators around each of the two experiments, we can rotate either or both beams from vertical into the horizontal plane through the interaction region and then back to vertical on the other side. This allows independent control for each beam with vertical, longitudinal, or radial polarization at the experiment. In this paper, we present results from the first run using the new spin rotators at PHENIX.

Mackay, W W; Bai, M; Courant, E D; Fischer, W; Huang, H; Luccio, A; Montag, C; Pilat, F; Ptitsyn, V; Roser, T; Satogata, T; Trbojevic, D

2003-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

436

Advances in steam turbine technology for power generation  

SciTech Connect

This book contains articles presented at the 1990 International Joint Power Generation Conference. It is organized under the following headings: Solid particle erosion in steam turbines, Steam turbine failure analysis, Steam turbine upgrades, steam turbine blading development, Boiler feed pumps and auxiliary steam turbine drives.

Bellanca, C.P. (Dayton Power and Light Company (US))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Airfoil for a turbine of a gas turbine engine  

SciTech Connect

An airfoil for a turbine of a gas turbine engine is provided. The airfoil comprises a main body comprising a wall structure defining an inner cavity adapted to receive a cooling air. The wall structure includes a first diffusion region and at least one first metering opening extending from the inner cavity to the first diffusion region. The wall structure further comprises at least one cooling circuit comprising a second diffusion region and at least one second metering opening extending from the first diffusion region to the second diffusion region. The at least one cooling circuit may further comprise at least one third metering opening, at least one third diffusion region and a fourth diffusion region.

Liang, George (Palm City, FL)

2010-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

438

Turbine protection system for bypass operation  

SciTech Connect

In a steam turbine installation having a high pressure turbine, a steam generator is described for providing steam to the turbine, at least a lower pressure turbine, a reheater in the steam path between the high and lower pressure turbines, and a steam bypass path for bypassing the turbines, the high pressure turbine having a one-way check valve in its output steam line to prevent bypass steam from entering its output. The improvement described here consists of: (A) a second bypass path for passing steam around the high pressure turbine; (B) the second bypass path including, (i) steam jet compressor means including two input sections and an output section, with one input section being connected to the high pressure turbine output, the other input section being connected to receive steam from the steam generator and the output section being connected to the input of the reheater, (ii) valving means for controlling the steam supply from the steam generator to the steam jet compressor means; and (C) control means responsive to an output condition at the high pressure turbine output for controlling the valving means.

Silvestri, G.J. Jr.

1986-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

439

EA-1965: Southeast National Marine Renewable Energy Center (SNMREC) Offshore Testing Facility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Department of Energy (DOE), through its Wind and Water Power Technologies Office (WWPTO), is proposing to provide federal funding to Florida Atlantic Universitys South-East National Marine Renewable Energy Center (FAU SNMREC) to support the at sea testing of FAU SNMRECs experimental current generation turbine and the deployment and operation of their Small-Scale Ocean Current Turbine Test Berth, sited on the outer continental shelf (OCS) in waters off the coast of Ft Lauderdale, Florida. SNMREC is proposing to demonstrate the test berth site readiness by testing their pilot-scale experimental ocean current turbine unit at that location. The Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) is conducting an Environmental Assessment to analyze the impacts associated with leasing OCS lands to FAU SNMREC, per their jurisdictional responsibilities under the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act. DOE is a cooperating agency in this process.

440

Field test of ultra-low head hydropower package based on marine thrusters. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The project includes the design, fabrication, assembly, installation, and field test of the first full-scale operating hydropower package (turbine, transmission, and generator) based on a design which incorporates a marine-thruster as the hydraulic prime mover. Included here are: the project overview; engineering design; ultra-low head hydropower package fabrication; component procurement, cost control, and scheduling; thruster hydraulic section installation; site modeling and resulting recommended modifications; testing; and baseline environmental conditions at Stone Drop. (MHR)

Not Available

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rotating marine turbine" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Manual of Bearing Failures and Repair in Power Plant Rotating Equipment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Turbine bearing failures in electric utilities can be responsible for outages resulting in significant lost generation time. In addition to bearing failures in the turbogenerators, failures may occur in other rotating equipment, such as pumps, fans, and auxiliary systems. Knowledge of bearing failure mechanisms and causes allows utilities to introduce safeguards into their occurrence and take faster remedial action. EPRI released the initial report, Manual of Bearing Failures and Repair in Power Plant Ro...

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

442

Turbine-Generator Auxiliary Systems, Volume 5: Main and Feedpump Turbine Trip Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the trip systems for the mechanical hydraulic control (MHC) and electrohydraulic control (EHC) main turbine and feedpump turbines for the General Electric (GE) and Siemens Westinghouse (SW) units in the United States.

2009-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

443

Flow Characteristics Analysis of Widows' Creek Type Control Valve for Steam Turbine Control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The steam turbine converts the kinetic energy of steam to mechanical energy of rotor blades in the power conversion system of fossil and nuclear power plants. The electric output from the generator of which the rotor is coupled with that of the steam turbine depends on the rotation velocity of the steam turbine bucket. The rotation velocity is proportional to the mass flow rate of steam entering the steam turbine through valves and nozzles. Thus, it is very important to control the steam mass flow rate for the load following operation of power plants. Among various valves that control the steam turbine, the control valve is most significant. The steam flow rate is determined by the area formed by the stem disk and the seat of the control valve. While the ideal control valve linearly controls the steam mass flow rate with its stem lift, the real control valve has various flow characteristic curves pursuant to the stem lift type. Thus, flow characteristic curves are needed to precisely design the control valves manufactured for the operating conditions of nuclear power plants. OMEGA (Optimized Multidimensional Experiment Geometric Apparatus) was built to experimentally study the flow characteristics of steam flowing inside the control valve. The Widows' Creek type control valve was selected for reference. Air was selected as the working fluid in the OMEGA loop to exclude the condensation effect in this simplified approach. Flow characteristic curves were plotted by calculating the ratio of the measured mass flow rate versus the theoretical mass flow rate of the air. The flow characteristic curves are expected to be utilized to accurately design and operate the control valve for fossil as well as nuclear plants. (authors)

Yoo, Yong H.; Sohn, Myoung S.; Suh, Kune Y. [PHILOSOPHIA, Inc., Seoul National University, San 56-1 Sillim-dong, Gwanak-gu, Seoul, 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Definition: Turbine | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Turbine A device or machine that converts the kinetic energy of a fluid (air, water, steam or other gases) to mechanical energy.[1][2] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Related Terms Electric generator, Electricity, Electricity generation, energy, bioenergy References ↑ http://205.254.135.24/tools/glossary/index.cfm?id=T ↑ http://www1.eere.energy.gov/site_administration/glossary.html Retriev LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. ed from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Turbine&oldid=493149" Category: Definitions What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load)

445

Wind Turbine Manufacturing Process Monitoring  

SciTech Connect

To develop a practical inline inspection that could be used in combination with automated composite material placement equipment to economically manufacture high performance and reliable carbon composite wind turbine blade spar caps. The approach technical feasibility and cost benefit will be assessed to provide a solid basis for further development and implementation in the wind turbine industry. The program is focused on the following technology development: (1) Develop in-line monitoring methods, using optical metrology and ultrasound inspection, and perform a demonstration in the lab. This includes development of the approach and performing appropriate demonstration in the lab; (2) Develop methods to predict composite strength reduction due to defects; and (3) Develop process models to predict defects from leading indicators found in the uncured composites.

Waseem Faidi; Chris Nafis; Shatil Sinha; Chandra Yerramalli; Anthony Waas; Suresh Advani; John Gangloff; Pavel Simacek

2012-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

446

Gas turbine vane platform element  

SciTech Connect

A gas turbine CMC shroud plate (48A) with a vane-receiving opening (79) that matches a cross-section profile of a turbine vane airfoil (22). The shroud plate (48A) has first and second curved circumferential sides (73A, 74A) that generally follow the curves of respective first and second curved sides (81, 82) of the vane-receiving opening. Walls (75A, 76A, 77A, 78A, 80, 88) extend perpendicularly from the shroud plate forming a cross-bracing structure for the shroud plate. A vane (22) may be attached to the shroud plate by pins (83) or by hoop-tension rings (106) that clamp tabs (103) of the shroud plate against bosses (105) of the vane. A circular array (20) of shroud plates (48A) may be assembled to form a vane shroud ring in which adjacent shroud plates are separated by compressible ceramic seals (93).

Campbell, Christian X. (Oviedo, FL); Schiavo, Anthony L. (Oviedo, FL); Morrison, Jay A. (Oviedo, FL

2012-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

447

Enhancing gas-turbine performance  

SciTech Connect

According to one report, around 80% of the large frame-size industrial and utility gas turbines (GTs) in service throughout the world were installed between 1965 and 1975. Because of substantial technology advancements since their commissioning, these older units make ideal candidates for capacity enhancements through such options as steam or water injection, inlet-air cooling, steam-cycle addition, hot-gas-path component uprates, and in the case of combined-cycles, supplementary firing of the heat-recovery steam generator (HRSG). This article reports that many gas-turbine owners are searching for upgrades that will enhance capacity or thermal efficiency--or both. Uprating hot-gas-path components is perhaps the most popular option, but economic evaluations must account for shortened hot-section life and higher O and M costs.

Swanekamp, R.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

21st century advanced hydropower turbine system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

While hydropower turbine manufacturers have incrementally improved turbine technology to increase efficiency, the basic design concepts haven`t changed for decades. These late 19th and early 20th century designs did not consider environmental effects, since little was known about environmental effects of hydropower at the time. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the hydropower industry recognize that hydropower plants have an effect on the environment and there is a great need to bring turbine designs into the 21st century. DOE has issued a request for proposals (RFP) that requested proposers to discard conventional thinking, search out innovative solutions, and to visualize innovative turbines designed from a new perspective. This perspective would look at the {open_quotes}turbine system{close_quotes} (intake to tailrace) which will balance environmental, technical, and economic considerations. This paper describes the DOE Advanced Hydropower Turbine System Program.

Brookshier, P.A.; Flynn, J.V.; Loose, R.R.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Cooling scheme for turbine hot parts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A closed-loop cooling scheme for cooling stationary combustion turbine components, such as vanes, ring segments and transitions, is provided. The cooling scheme comprises: (1) an annular coolant inlet chamber, situated between the cylinder and blade ring of a turbine, for housing coolant before being distributed to the turbine components; (2) an annular coolant exhaust chamber, situated between the cylinder and the blade ring and proximate the annular coolant inlet chamber, for collecting coolant exhaust from the turbine components; (3) a coolant inlet conduit for supplying the coolant to said coolant inlet chamber; (4) a coolant exhaust conduit for directing coolant from said coolant exhaust chamber; and (5) a piping arrangement for distributing the coolant to and directing coolant exhaust from the turbine components. In preferred embodiments of the invention, the cooling scheme further comprises static seals for sealing the blade ring to the cylinder and flexible joints for attaching the blade ring to the turbine components.

Hultgren, Kent Goran (Winter Park, FL); Owen, Brian Charles (Orlando, FL); Dowman, Steven Wayne (Orlando, FL); Nordlund, Raymond Scott (Orlando, FL); Smith, Ricky Lee (Oviedo, FL)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Transportable Combustion Turbine Demonstration Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New York State Electric and Gas Corporation (NYSEG) installed a 7.15-MW Solar Taurus 70 (nominal 7 MW) gas combustion turbine (CT) at its State Street substation in Auburn, New York. As a demonstration project supported through EPRI's Tailored Collaboration (TC) program, it is intended to aid in better understanding the "complete picture" for siting this particular technology as a distributed resource (DR).

2001-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

451

Condition Monitoring of Wind Turbines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on industry experience, after four years of operation, failures of wind turbine gearboxes, generators, and other major components become common, and each failure typically requires major repairs and/or component replacement. Wind project owners and operators who apply lube oil monitoring, vibration-signature analysis, and other condition monitoring technology can expect to detect subtle changes in machine condition that often lead to major failures if left unrepaired. The estimated cost savings of ...

2006-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

452

Steam Turbine Materials and Corrosion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ultra-supercritical (USC) power plants offer the promise of higher efficiencies and lower emissions. Current goals of the U.S. Department of Energys Advanc