Sample records for rooms finished basements

  1. Basement Insulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is one of a series of technology fact sheets created to help housing designers and builders adopt a whole-house design approach and energy efficient design practices. The fact sheet advises how to create a comfortable basement environment that is free of moisture problems and easy to condition.

  2. LANL Finishing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davenport, Karen [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Karen Davenport of Los Alamos National Laboratory discusses a high-throughput next generation genome finishing pipeline on June 3, 2010 at the "Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future" meeting in Santa Fe, NM

  3. Directions to Petroleum Abstracts Petroleum Abstracts' main office is located in the basement of John Rogers Hall (JRH)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reynolds, Albert C.

    Directions to Petroleum Abstracts Petroleum Abstracts' main office is located in the basement approximately 2 blocks West of South Harvard Avenue. Petroleum Abstracts' office (Room 1520) is on the basement wish to visit Petroleum Abstracts and they will contact us to direct you to our office in the basement

  4. Measure Guideline: Basement Insulation Basics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aldrich, R.; Mantha, P.; Puttagunta, S.

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This guideline is intended to describe good practices for insulating basements in new and existing homes, and is intended to be a practical resources for building contractors, designers, and also to homeowners.

  5. Wearability of Portland Cement Concrete Pavement Finishes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKeen, William Rew

    1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Major Subject: Civil Engineering NEARABILITY OF PORTLAND CENENT CONCRETE PAPFNENT FIVISNFS A Thesis by Nilliam Rem NcKeen Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committ e) (Nember) August 1971 ABSTRACT Hearabil'tv of Portland Cement... portland cement, and an air entrainment admixture. Standard laboratory tests were performed on all aggregates to determine their properties. iv The test specimens were molded in a controlled environmental room and the anpropriate surface finish (burlap...

  6. Finishing Using Next Generation Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Tonder, Andries [Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute

    2010-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Andries van Tonder of Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute discusses a pipeline for finishing genomes to the gold standard on June 3, 2010 at the "Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future" meeting in Santa Fe, NM

  7. 1 BASEMENT STORAGE 3 MICROSCOPE LAB

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boonstra, Rudy

    MECHANICAL ROOM 13 SHOWER ROOMSAIR COMPRESSOR 14 NITROGEN STORAGE 15 DIESEL FUEL STORAGE 16 ACID NEUT. TANK NMR RELAXOMETER ROOM 13 LARGE MEETING ROOM (INCL. KITCHEN) 14 STIPEND / VISITOR OFFICE 15 GRAD OFFICE ROOM / TECH OFFICE 5 ELECTRICAL CLOSET 6 NMR RELAXOMETER ROOM 7 DRY SOLVENT ROOM 8 MEETING ROOM

  8. Semi-finished modular cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bachelder, Laura Govoni, 1971-

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis subject is a pre-fabricated element (cell): a system that employs natural, light, and economic materials to produce a near-finished portion of a building. The intent is to introduce sustainable design into ...

  9. The Best Finish First: Sequence Finishing with Whole Genome Mapping ( 7th Annual SFAF Meeting, 2012)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Sweeney, Deacon [OpGen, Inc.

    2013-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Deacon Sweeney on "the Best Finish First: Sequence Finishing with Whole Genome Mapping" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

  10. Conductive Plays - Basement | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformationNew| Open EnergyInformationConductive Plays - Basement

  11. Engine Friction Reduction Through Surface Finish and Coatings...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Friction Reduction Through Surface Finish and Coatings Engine Friction Reduction Through Surface Finish and Coatings Opportunities exist for friction reduction in piston rings and...

  12. Y-12 Finishes Initial HEUMF Loading Ahead of Schedule | National...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Home Field Offices Welcome to the NNSA Production Office NPO News Releases Y-12 Finishes Initial HEUMF Loading Ahead of Schedule Y-12 Finishes Initial HEUMF Loading...

  13. Basement rift control on oil production in eastern Kansas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gustavson, J.B.

    1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Improved understanding of the central North American rift system (CNARS) offers a new interpretation of the basement structure in certain parts of the Mid-Continent. In eastern Kansas, basement structure can be shown to control oil production from some producing fields. Structural control includes rotated blocks along faults created by horst and graben tectonics typically associated with rift zones. A distinctive gravity signature, the Mid-Continent geophysical anomaly (MGA) is related directly to the CNARS and provides good data for interpretation of the basement structure. Some oil fields can be correlated directly with gravity-interpreted basement structure. Aeromagnetic and Landsat information, combined with the gravity data, further define exploration targets along the general trend of basement features. Migration of thermally matured hydrocarbons into pre-Pennsylvanian, rift generated traps in the ancestral north Kansas basin is postulated. The Nemaha ridge subsequently divided that basin into two smaller basins, the present Salina and Forest City basins. Several exploration targets could exist in this area, with the Arbuckle, Simpson, and Viola units being primary targets. The source of hydrocarbons also may lie in the deep but distant Anadorko basin. An additional totally untested hydrocarbons potential exists in the deep Precambrian/Cambrian sedimentary subbasins created along the flanks of the CNARS. Recent data points to sedimentary columns with depths of approximately 15,000 ft (4500 m) which might be hosts to gas reserves similar to the Rome trough potential of the Appalachian region.

  14. NCMS PWB Surface Finishes Team project summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kokas, J.; DeSantis, C. [United Technologies Corp., Farmington, CT (United States). Hamilton Standard Div.; Wenger, G. [AT and T, New York, NY (United States)] [and others

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The NCMS PWB Surface Finishes Consortium is just about at the end of the five year program. Dozens of projects related to surface finishes and PWB solder-ability were performed by the team throughout the program, and many of them are listed in this paper. They are listed with a cross reference to where and when a technical paper was presented describing the results of the research. However, due to time and space constraints, this paper can summarize the details of only three of the major research projects accomplished by the team. The first project described is an ``Evaluation of PWB Surface Finishes.`` It describes the solderability, reliability, and wire bondability of numerous surface finishes. The second project outlined is an ``Evaluation of PWB Solderability Test Methods.`` The third project outlined is the ``Development and Evaluation of Organic Solderability Preservatives.``

  15. News Room

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > The EnergyCenterDioxideDocumentationThreeNews Releases NewsRoom

  16. Improved Microbe Assembly and Finishing Using 454 8kb Libraries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buhay, Christian [Baylor College of Medicine's Human Genome Sequencing Center

    2010-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Christian Buhay from Baylor College of Medicine's Human Genome Sequencing Center discusses microbial genome finishing strategies on June 3, 2010 at the "Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future" meeting in Santa Fe, NM

  17. Nearly Finished Genomes Produced Using Gel Microdroplet Culturing (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Fitzsimmons, Michael [LANL

    2013-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Michael Fitzsimmons from Los Alamos National Laboratory gives a talk titled "Nearly Finished Genomes Produced Using Gel Microdroplet Culturing" at the 7th Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting held in June, 2012 in Santa Fe, NM.

  18. Perspective on plating for precision finishing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dini, J.W.

    1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is intended as an overview on platings for precision finishing operations. After a brief review of the two processes (polishing and precision machining) by which a coating on a part can be converted to a precision surface, the coatings which work successfully in these applications will be discussed. Then adhesion and stress aspects of deposits will be covered. Electroless nickel, which is a particularly attractive coating for precision finishing applications, will be discussed in some detail, from its early years as the Kanigen'' process to the present. Since microstructural changes in deposits are important for precision parts, this aspect will be covered for electroless nickel, copper and silver deposits. Lastly, some words will be directed at potential future electrodeposited coatings including nickel-phosphorus alloys, and various silver alloys. 41 refs., 16 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Room to grow | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Room to grow Room to grow Released: June 26, 2012 New lithium ion battery strategy offers more energy, longer life cycle In situ transmission electron microscopy at EMSL was used...

  20. PLUTONIUM FINISHING PLANT (PFP) STABILIZATION & PACKAGING PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GERBER, M.S.

    2004-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Fluor Hanford is pleased to submit the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Stabilization and Packaging Project (SPP) for consideration by the Project Management Institute as Project of the Year for 2004. The SPP thermally stabilized and/or packaged nearly 18 metric tons (MT) of plutonium and plutonium-bearing materials left in PFP facilities from 40 years of nuclear weapons production and experimentation. The stabilization of the plutonium-bearing materials substantially reduced the radiological risk to the environment and security concerns regarding the potential for terrorists to acquire the non-stabilized plutonium products for nefarious purposes. The work was done In older facilities which were never designed for the long-term storage of plutonium, and required working with materials that were extremely radioactive, hazardous, pyrophoric, and In some cases completely unique. I n some Instances, one-of-a-kind processes and equipment were designed, installed, and started up. The SPP was completed ahead of schedule, substantially beating all Interim progress milestone dates set by the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) and in the Hanford Site's Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement or TPA), and finished $1-million under budget.

  1. Plutonium finishing plant safeguards and security systems replacement study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klear, P.F.; Humphrys, K.L.

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides the preferred alternatives for the replacement of the Safeguards and Security systems located at the Hanford Plutonium Finishing Plant.

  2. Sequence finishing and mapping of Drosophila melanogaster heterochromatin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Figure 1. Comparison of WGS sequence scaffolds to thecorresponding Release 5 sequence scaffold. The WGSSequence finishing and mapping of Drosophila melanogaster

  3. Workers Create Demolition Zone at Hanford Site's Plutonium Finishing...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    getting ready to demolish all of the facilities at the Plutonium Finishing Plant," said Bryan Foley, deputy federal project director for EM's Richland Operations Office. "Taking...

  4. Figure and finish of grazing incidence mirrors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takacs, P.Z. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA)); Church, E.L. (Picatinny Arsenal, Dover, NJ (USA). Army Armament Research, Development and Engineering Center)

    1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Great improvement has been made in the past several years in the quality of optical components used in synchrotron radiation (SR) beamlines. Most of this progress has been the result of vastly improved metrology techniques and instrumentation permitting rapid and accurate measurement of the surface finish and figure on grazing incidence optics. A significant theoretical effort has linked the actual performance of components used as x-ray wavelengths to their topological properties as measured by surface profiling instruments. Next-generation advanced light sources will require optical components and systems to have sub-arc second surface figure tolerances. This paper will explore the consequences of these requirements in terms of manufacturing tolerances to see if the present manufacturing state-of-the-art is capable of producing the required surfaces. 15 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Coincident P and Sh reflections from basement rocks at Coso geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Coincident P and Sh reflections from basement rocks at Coso geothermal field Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Coincident P and Sh...

  6. Plutonium Finishing Plant safety evaluation report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) previously known as the Plutonium Process and Storage Facility, or Z-Plant, was built and put into operation in 1949. Since 1949 PFP has been used for various processing missions, including plutonium purification, oxide production, metal production, parts fabrication, plutonium recovery, and the recovery of americium (Am-241). The PFP has also been used for receipt and large scale storage of plutonium scrap and product materials. The PFP Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) was prepared by WHC to document the hazards associated with the facility, present safety analyses of potential accident scenarios, and demonstrate the adequacy of safety class structures, systems, and components (SSCs) and operational safety requirements (OSRs) necessary to eliminate, control, or mitigate the identified hazards. Documented in this Safety Evaluation Report (SER) is DOE`s independent review and evaluation of the PFP FSAR and the basis for approval of the PFP FSAR. The evaluation is presented in a format that parallels the format of the PFP FSAR. As an aid to the reactor, a list of acronyms has been included at the beginning of this report. The DOE review concluded that the risks associated with conducting plutonium handling, processing, and storage operations within PFP facilities, as described in the PFP FSAR, are acceptable, since the accident safety analyses associated with these activities meet the WHC risk acceptance guidelines and DOE safety goals in SEN-35-91.

  7. avaetapi finish oli: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Akvil? 2012-01-01 12 Wearability of Portland Cement Concrete Pavement Finishes Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary: fine aggregate types: a siliceous sand (SF), also...

  8. Use of Optical Mapping in Bacterial Genome Finishing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, Dibyendu [University of Florida

    2010-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Dibyendu Kumar from the University of Florida discusses whole-genome optical mapping to help validate bacterial genome assemblies on June 3, 2010 at the "Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future" meeting in Santa Fe, NM

  9. Worker Involvement Improves Safety at Hanford Site's Plutonium Finishing Plant

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Employees at the Hanford site are working together to find new and innovative ways to stay safe at the Plutonium Finishing Plant, one of the site’s most complex decommissioning projects.

  10. Solder flow over fine line PWB surface finishes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hosking, F.M.; Hernandez, C.L.

    1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The rapid advancement of interconnect technology has stimulated the development of alternative printed wiring board (PWB) surface finishes to enhance the solderability of standard copper and solder-coated surfaces. These new finishes are based on either metallic or organic chemistries. As part of an ongoing solderability study, Sandia National Laboratories has investigated the solder flow behavior of two azole-based organic solderability preservations, immersion Au, immersion Ag, electroless Pd, and electroless Pd/Ni on fine line copper features. The coated substrates were solder tested in the as-fabricated and environmentally-stressed conditions. Samples were processed through an inerted reflow machine. The azole-based coatings generally provided the most effective protection after aging. Thin Pd over Cu yielded the best wetting results of the metallic coatings, with complete dissolution of the Pd overcoat and wetting of the underlying Cu by the flowing solder. Limited wetting was measured on the thicker Pd and Pd over Ni finishes, which were not completely dissolved by the molten solder. The immersion Au and Ag finishes yielded the lowest wetted lengths, respectively. These general differences in solderability were directly attributed to the type of surface finish which the solder came in contact with. The effects of circuit geometry, surface finish, stressing, and solder processing conditions are discussed.

  11. Bioenergy 2015 Press Room

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This U.S. Department of Energy Bioenergy 2015 online press room provides contacts, information, and resources to members of the media who cover Bioenergy 2015 conference-related news.

  12. Finished Prokaryotic Genome Assemblies from a Low-cost Combination of Short and Long Reads (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Yin, Shuangye (Broad Institute)

    2013-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Shuangye Yin on "Finished prokaryotic genome assemblies from a low-cost combination of short and long reads" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

  13. Possible options for reducing occupational dose from the TMI-2 basement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munson, L. F. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Harty, R. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The major sources of exposure in the basement include the enclosed stairwell/elevator shaft structure, water and sludge in the elevator shaft, cast concrete walls, concrete floor slab, water and sludge on the floor, and activity in the paint and loose surface contamination. The sources were identified using data obtained by the utility from water processing, water and solid samples, remote video inspections and radiation monitoring with a robot, and strings of thermoluminescent dosimeters lowered from upper elevations. The area dose rates in the basement range from approximately 4 R/hr (in the NE quadrant) to over 1100 R/hr (near the enclosed stairwell/elevator shaft structure). It is estimated that the basement contains between 11,000 and 21,000 curies of /sup 137/Cs. Specific decontamination and cleanup techniques are discussed. These techniques include flushing with water, high-pressure water blasting, leaching, scabbling and chemical cleaning. The applicability of these techniques to the major sources of radiation are discussed, and possible approaches and work sequences for basement cleanup are given.

  14. Technical Article 38 Plating & Surface Finishing March 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bristol, University of

    are finding increas- ing industrial acceptance in automotive, aerospace and medi- cal applications due, as well as decorative finishes. For automotive and aerospace applications, DLC films may be utilized of the surface, leading to wider application of lighter materials such as titanium and aluminum alloys

  15. Lead-Free Surface Finishes for Electronic Components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lead-Free Surface Finishes for Electronic Components: Tin Whisker Growth METALS This project degraded by the switch to lead- free technology. In particular, the state of compressive stress and the localized creep response (whisker growth) of tin-based lead-free electrodeposits are being measured

  16. Room Policies Printing Options

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , please return them to the desk for new ones. Saving the stuff you write on the Whiteboard 1. Make the room as bright as you can for best contrast 2. Hit the "Save to Web" button on the gray wall box 3, they are incorrect. #12;2. Click on your image to enlarge it. Click on the image to get the `save' option. Save

  17. 32539,"AECTRA REFG & MKTG",1,133,"MOTOR GAS, FINISHED UNLEADED...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    539,"AECTRA REFG & MKTG",1,133,"MOTOR GAS, FINISHED UNLEADED",1801,"TAMPA, FL","FLORIDA",1,940,"VENEZUELA",77,0,0,,,,, 32539,"AECTRA REFG & MKTG",2,133,"MOTOR GAS, FINISHED...

  18. 33269,"AECTRA REFG & MKTG",1,133,"MOTOR GAS, FINISHED UNLEADED...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    269,"AECTRA REFG & MKTG",1,133,"MOTOR GAS, FINISHED UNLEADED",1803,"JACKSONVILLE, FL","FLORIDA",1,940,"VENEZUELA",92,0,0,,,,, 33269,"AECTRA REFG & MKTG",2,133,"MOTOR GAS, FINISHED...

  19. 32904,"AECTRA REFG & MKTG",1,133,"MOTOR GAS, FINISHED UNLEADED...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    904,"AECTRA REFG & MKTG",1,133,"MOTOR GAS, FINISHED UNLEADED",1801,"TAMPA, FL","FLORIDA",1,940,"VENEZUELA",175,0,0,,,,, 32904,"AECTRA REFG & MKTG",2,133,"MOTOR GAS, FINISHED...

  20. Cost-effectiveness analysis of effluent standards and limitations for the metal finishing industry. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report summarizes the results of a cost-effectiveness analysis of the metal finishing industry. The analysis considers the cost-effectiveness of the final metal finishing regulations for direct and indirect dischargers.

  1. Deformation of a basement corner, Crazy Woman Canyon, northeastern Bighorn Mountains, Wyoming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Gretchen Louise

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , structures, and fractures and sample collecting in the field area were done during the summers of 1987-1988. Laboratory analysis was accomplished using the facilities of the Center for Tectonophysics and the Department of Geology at Texas ADAM University... the Bighorn Mountain front. Analysis of fracture, foliation, and calcite strain data, and deformation mechanisms suggest that the structures in Crazy Woman Canyon are locally controlled by pre-existing structures in the Precambrian basement. Interpreting...

  2. Lower Cretaceous and Upper Jurassic oil reservoirs of the updip basement structure play: Southwest Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mink, R.M.; Mancini, E.A. [Geological Survey of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States)

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Exploration for Lower Cretaceous and Upper Jurassic reservoirs associated with updip basement structures currently is the most active exploratory oil play in Alabama. High initial flow rates, on the order of hundreds to thousands of barrels of oil per day, are commonly encountered at depths between 8,200 and 14,500 feet. Fifty-one fields have been established and 25 million barrels of oil have been produced from these fields developed in Lower Cretaceous Hosston and Upper Jurassic Haynesville, Smackover, and Norphlet reservoirs. Production from Smackover carbonates began at Toxey field in 1967 and from Haynesville sandstones at Frisco City field in 1986. As of September 1994, Smackover wells averaged 88 barrels of oil per day and Haynesville wells averaged 284 barrels of oil per day. In 1994, production was established in the Norphlet at North Excel field and in the Hosston at Pleasant Home field. Reservoirs in the updip basement structure play cluster in three distinct areas; (1) a western area on the Choctaw ridge complex, (2) a central area on the Conecuh ridge complex, and (3) an eastern area in the Conecuh embayment. Reservoir lithologies include Smackover limestones and dolostones and Hosston, Haynesville, Smackover, and Norphlet sandstones. Hydrocarbon traps are structural or combination traps where reservoirs occur on the flanks or over the crests of basement palohighs. An understanding of the complex reservoir properties and trap relationships is the key to successful discovery and development of Lower Cretaceous and Upper Jurassic oil reservoirs of the updip basement structure play of southwest Alabama.

  3. Basement/cover rock relations of the Dry Fork Ridge Anticline termination, northeastern Bighorn Mountains, Wyoming and Montana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hennings, Peter Hill

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , Northeastern Bighorn Mountains, Wyoming and Montana. (August 1986) Peter Hill Hennings, B. S. , Texas A&M University Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. John H. Spang Field mapping on scales of 1:6, 000 and 1: 12, 000 indicate that the basement involved... in the Field Area Methodology DATA. PAGE I 3 7 10 12 17 25 25 28 Field Map. Interpretive Data: Cross Sections Dry Fork Ridge Anticline. Faole Point Anticline and the Mountain Flank. . Basement Geometry. Fracture Analysis...

  4. News Room | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    News Room Argonne Associate Laboratory Director for Energy and Global Security Mark Peters, left, signs a memorandum of understanding with Nadya Bliss, director of the Global...

  5. Storage for the Fast Flux Test Facility unirradiated fuel in the Plutonium Finishing Plant Complex, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Environmental Assessment evaluates the proposed action to relocate and store unirradiated Fast Flux Test Facility fuel in the Plutonium Finishing Plant Complex on the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington. The US Department of Energy has decided to cease fuel fabrication activities in the 308 Building in the 300 Area. This decision was based on a safety concern over the ability of the fuel fabrication portion of the 308 Building to withstand a seismic event. The proposed action to relocate and store the fuel is based on the savings that could be realized by consolidating security costs associated with storage of the fuel. While the 308 Building belowgrade fuel storage areas are not at jeopardy by a seismic event, the US Department of Energy is proposing to cease storage operations along with the related fabrication operations. The US Department of Energy proposes to remove the unirradiated fuel pins and fuel assemblies from the 308 Building and store them in Room 192A, within the 234-5Z Building, a part of the Plutonium Finishing Plant Complex, located in the 200 West Area. Minor modifications to Room 192A would be required to accommodate placement of the fuel. The US Department of Energy estimates that removing all of the fuel from the 308 Building would save $6.5 million annually in security expenditures for the Fast Flux Test Facility. Environmental impacts of construction, relocation, and operation of the proposed action and alternatives were evaluated. This evaluation concluded that the proposed action would have no significant impacts on the human environment.

  6. Economics of specialized integrated swine finishing operation in the Texas Panhandle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cavin, Guyle Earl

    1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Department (Member) (Member) C (Member) December 1971 ABSTRACT Economics of Specialized Swine Finishing Operation in the Texas Panhandle. (December 1971) Guyle Earl Cavin, B. S. , Texas Afd1 University Directed by: Dr. Donald E. Ferris The purpose... and finishing stage of production. The objectives of the study were to determine: (1) if a supply of good quality relatively disease-free feeder pigs is available in a supply sufficient to furnish an expanded increase in the swine finishing industry, (2...

  7. Workers Create Demolition Zone at Hanford Site’s Plutonium Finishing Plant

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    RICHLAND, Wash. – In recent weeks, the look of Hanford site’s Plutonium Finishing Plant has changed as crews removed or demolished eight buildings surrounding it.

  8. DTRA Algorithm Prize (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitechurch, Christian [Defense Threat Reduction Agency] [Defense Threat Reduction Agency

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Christian Whitchurch on the "DTRA Algorithm Prize" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

  9. Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, Plutonium Finishing Plant Closure Project- May 2007

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Evaluation to determine whether Plutonium Finishing Plant Closure Project is continuing to perform at a level deserving DOE-VPP Star recognition.

  10. DTRA Algorithm Prize (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Whitechurch, Christian [Defense Threat Reduction Agency

    2013-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Christian Whitchurch on the "DTRA Algorithm Prize" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

  11. Columbia University Hazardous Waste Room Inspection Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jia, Songtao

    Storage Area Hazardous Waste Room Inspection Report Location: Bldg. Room: Date: Inspected ByColumbia University Hazardous Waste Room Inspection Report Flammable Storage Area Lack Pack always closed while holding hazardous wastes? Comment: 12. Are containers labeled? Date

  12. Nuclear reactor control room construction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lamuro, R.C.; Orr, R.

    1993-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A control room for a nuclear plant is disclosed. In the control room, objects labelled 12, 20, 22, 26, 30 in the drawing are no less than four inches from walls labelled 10.2. A ceiling contains cooling fins that extend downwards toward the floor from metal plates. A concrete slab is poured over the plates. Studs are welded to the plates and are encased in the concrete. 6 figures.

  13. Nuclear reactor control room construction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lamuro, Robert C. (Pittsburgh, PA); Orr, Richard (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A control room 10 for a nuclear plant is disclosed. In the control room, objects 12, 20, 22, 26, 30 are no less than four inches from walls 10.2. A ceiling 32 contains cooling fins 35 that extend downwards toward the floor from metal plates 34. A concrete slab 33 is poured over the plates. Studs 36 are welded to the plates and are encased in the concrete.

  14. Plutonium Finishing Plant. Interim plutonium stabilization engineering study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sevigny, G.J.; Gallucci, R.H.; Garrett, S.M.K.; Geeting, J.G.H.; Goheen, R.S.; Molton, P.M.; Templeton, K.J.; Villegas, A.J. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Nass, R. [Nuclear Fuel Services, Inc. (United States)

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides the results of an engineering study that evaluated the available technologies for stabilizing the plutonium stored at the Plutonium Finishing Plant located at the hanford Site in southeastern Washington. Further processing of the plutonium may be required to prepare the plutonium for interim (<50 years) storage. Specifically this document provides the current plutonium inventory and characterization, the initial screening process, and the process descriptions and flowsheets of the technologies that passed the initial screening. The conclusions and recommendations also are provided. The information contained in this report will be used to assist in the preparation of the environmental impact statement and to help decision makers determine which is the preferred technology to process the plutonium for interim storage.

  15. Utilization of horse beans by growing finishing pigs after tryptophan supplementation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Utilization of horse beans by growing finishing pigs after tryptophan supplementation Y. HENRY D., i83511 Jouy en Josas Utilization of whole horse-beans in growing-finishing pig diets was studied in presence of niacine or not, in the case of partial or almost total replacement of soya- bean meal bv horse-beans

  16. Assessment of Pollutant Spread from a Building Basement with three Ventilation Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koffi, Juslin

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ventilation aims at providing a sufficient air renewal for ensuring a good indoor air quality (IAQ), yet building energy policies are leading to adapting various ventilation strategies minimising energy losses through air renewal. A recent IAQ evaluation campaign in French dwellings shows important pollution of living spaces by VOCs such as formaldehyde, acetaldehyde or hexanal, particularly in buildings equipped with a garage. Besides, radon emission from soil is a subject of concern in many countries. Several studies are done to understand its release mode and deal with the spread of this carcinogen gas. This paper aims to experimentally assess a contaminant spread from a house basement using mechanical exhaust and balanced ventilation systems, and natural ventilation.

  17. Analysis of data from leaching concrete samples taken from the TMI-2 reactor building basement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collins, E.D.; Box, W.D.; Godbee, H.W.; Scott, T.C.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Samples of contaminated concrete from the basement of the reactor building at the Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Station, Unit 2 were tested and analyzed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to determine the potential for decontamination by diffusion-controlled leaching under conditions of full submergence and by forced flow-through leaching of porous concrete block walls. Pertinent physical characteristics of the concrete were measured, and leaching tests were performed. Data were analyzed by established mass transport principles, and predictions of leaching for several years were made. A numerical algorithm was used to model removal of /sup 137/Cs and /sup 90/Sr by forced flow-through leaching. Results indicated that forced flow-through leaching would require only a few days, whereas complete decontamination by submerged, diffusion-only methods would require several years. 9 refs., 8 figs., 8 tabs.

  18. Building Name Room Support By

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    Building Name Room Technology Classroom? Technology Support By: Phone Number: Contact Name: Agricultural Sciences Building G29 Standard iDC 304-293-2832 n/a Agricultural Sciences Building G31 Standard iDC 304-293-2832 n/a Agricultural Sciences Building G101 Standard iDC 304-293-2832 n/a Agricultural

  19. Master Clock in Laser Room

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Master Clock in Laser Room Master clock MITEQ MN XTO-02-81.6-G-T-20P SN 180585 1 2 3 4 To YAG SYSTEM CLOCK To YAG SYSTEM C 975 81.6 MHz To MEZZ SPARE J17 J15 Multiplier...

  20. Classification and storage of wastewater from floor finish removal operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunt, C.E.

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study evaluates the wastewater generated from hard surface floor finish removal operations at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory in order to determine if this wastewater is a hazardous waste, either by statistical evaluation, or other measurable regulatory guidelines established in California Regulations. This research also comparatively evaluates the 55 gallon drum and other portable tanks, all less than 1,000 gallons in size in order to determine which is most effective for the management of this waste stream at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. The statistical methods in SW-846 were found to be scientifically questionable in their application to hazardous waste determination. In this statistical evaluation, the different data transformations discussed in the regulatory guidance document were applied along with the log transformation to the population of 18 samples from 55 gallon drums. Although this statistical evaluation proved awkward in its application, once the data is collected and organized on a spreadsheet this statistical analysis can be an effective tool which can aid the environmental manager in the hazardous waste classification process.

  1. Fire hazard analysis for Plutonium Finishing Plant complex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MCKINNIS, D.L.

    1999-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A fire hazards analysis (FHA) was performed for the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Complex at the Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford site. The scope of the FHA focuses on the nuclear facilities/structures in the Complex. The analysis was conducted in accordance with RLID 5480.7, [DOE Directive RLID 5480.7, 1/17/94] and DOE Order 5480.7A, ''Fire Protection'' [DOE Order 5480.7A, 2/17/93] and addresses each of the sixteen principle elements outlined in paragraph 9.a(3) of the Order. The elements are addressed in terms of the fire protection objectives stated in paragraph 4 of DOE 5480.7A. In addition, the FHA also complies with WHC-CM-4-41, Fire Protection Program Manual, Section 3.4 [1994] and WHC-SD-GN-FHA-30001, Rev. 0 [WHC, 1994]. Objectives of the FHA are to determine: (1) the fire hazards that expose the PFP facilities, or that are inherent in the building operations, (2) the adequacy of the fire safety features currently located in the PFP Complex, and (3) the degree of compliance of the facility with specific fire safety provisions in DOE orders, related engineering codes, and standards.

  2. Maintenance implementation plan for the Plutonium Finishing Plant. Revision 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meldrom, C.A.

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document outlines the Maintenance Implementation Plan (MIP) for the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) located at the Hanford site at Richland, Washington. This MIP describes the PFP maintenance program relative to DOE order 4330.4B. The MIP defines the key actions needed to meet the guidelines of the Order to produce a cost-effective and efficient maintenance program. A previous report identified the presence of significant quantities of Pu-bearing materials within PFP that pose risks to workers. PFP`s current mission is to develop, install and operate processes which will mitigate these risks. The PFP Maintenance strategy is to equip the facility with systems and equipment able to sustain scheduled PFP operations. The current operating run is scheduled to last seven years. Activities following the stabilization operation will involve an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) to determine future plant activities. This strategy includes long-term maintenance of the facility for safe occupancy and material storage. The PFP maintenance staff used the graded approach to dictate the priorities of the improvement and upgrade actions identified in Chapter 2 of this document. The MIP documents PFP compliance to the DOE 4330.4B Order. Chapter 2 of the MIP follows the format of the Order in addressing the eighteen elements. As this revision is a total rewrite, no sidebars are included to highlight changes.

  3. Pollution prevention and water conservation in metals finishing operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O`Shaughnessy, J.; Clark, W. [Worcester Polytechnic Inst., MA (United States); Lizotte, R.P. Jr.; Mikutel, D. [Texas Instruments Inc., Attleboro, MA (United States)

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Attleboro, Massachusetts is the headquarters of the Materials and Controls Group of Texas Instruments Incorporated (Texas Instruments). In support of their activities, Texas Instruments operates a number of metal finishing and electroplating processes. The water supply and the wastewater treatment requirements are supplied throughout the facility from a central location. Water supply quality requirements varies with each manufacturing operation. As a result, manufacturing operations are classified as either high level or a lower water quality. The facility has two methods of wastewater treatment and disposal. The first method involves hydroxide and sulfide metals precipitation prior to discharge to a surface water. The second method involves metals precipitation, filtration, and discharge via sewer to the Attleboro WTF. The facility is limited to a maximum wastewater discharge of 460,000 gallons per day to surface water under the existing National Pollution Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit. There is also a hydraulic flow restriction on pretreated wastewater that is discharged to the Attleboro WTF. Both of these restrictions combined with increased production could cause the facility to reach the treatment capacity. The net effect is that wastewater discharge problems are becoming restrictive to the company`s growth. This paper reviews Texas Instruments efforts to overcome these restrictions through pollution prevention and reuse practices rather than expansion of end of pipe treatment methods.

  4. 35461,"AECTRA REFG & MKTG",1,152,"MOTOR GAS, OTHER FINISHED"...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    461,"AECTRA REFG & MKTG",1,152,"MOTOR GAS, OTHER FINISHED",1803,"JACKSONVILLE, FL","FLORIDA",1,340,"FINLAND",50,0,0,,,,, 35461,"AECTRA REFG & MKTG",2,152,"MOTOR GAS, OTHER...

  5. 33634,"AECTRA REFG & MKTG",1,133,"MOTOR GAS, FINISHED UNLEADED...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    634,"AECTRA REFG & MKTG",1,133,"MOTOR GAS, FINISHED UNLEADED",1803,"JACKSONVILLE, FL","FLORIDA",1,940,"VENEZUELA",239,0,0,,,,, 33634,"AECTRA REFG & MKTG",2,134,"MOTOR GAS BLENDING...

  6. 36556,"AECTRA REFG & MKTG",1,152,"MOTOR GAS, OTHER FINISHED"...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    556,"AECTRA REFG & MKTG",1,152,"MOTOR GAS, OTHER FINISHED",1803,"JACKSONVILLE, FL","FLORIDA",1,940,"VENEZUELA",230,0,0 36556,"AECTRA REFG & MKTG",2,461,"DISTILLATE, < 0.05% SUL...

  7. 36191,"AECTRA REFG & MKTG",1,152,"MOTOR GAS, OTHER FINISHED"...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    191,"AECTRA REFG & MKTG",1,152,"MOTOR GAS, OTHER FINISHED",1803,"JACKSONVILLE, FL","FLORIDA",1,940,"VENEZUELA",115,0,0 36191,"AECTRA REFG & MKTG",2,152,"MOTOR GAS, OTHER...

  8. Signature Peptide-Enabled Metagenomics (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    McMahon, Ben [LANL

    2013-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Ben McMahon of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) presents "Signature Peptide-Enabled Metagenomics" at the 7th Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting held in June, 2012 in Santa Fe, NM.

  9. Pilon: Automated Assembly Improvement Software (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Walker, Bruce (Broad Institute)

    2013-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Bruce Walker on "Pilon: Automated Assembly Improvement Software" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

  10. Feeding Value of Wet Sorghum Distillers Grains for Growing and Finishing Beef Cattle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feeding Value of Wet Sorghum Distillers Grains for Growing and Finishing Beef Cattle Ethanol, but sorghum grain is commonly either blended with corn before use or used as the sole grain for ethanol

  11. Use of Optical Mapping to Aid in Assembly and Finishing of Human Microbiome Genome Projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, Trevor [OpGen, Inc

    2010-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Trevor Wagner of OpGen, Inc. discusses the use of optical mapping to validate the assembly of HMP genomes on June 3, 2010 at the "Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future" meeting in Santa Fe, NM

  12. Tool Path Planning Generation For Finish Machining of Freeform Surfaces in the Cybercut Process Planning Pipeline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Paul K; Dornfeld, David; Sundararajan, V.; Misra, Debananda

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CYBERCUT PROCESS PLANNING PIPELINE Paul K. Wright, David A.describes part of a "Pipeline of De- sign and Manufacturingversus surface finish. 2.5D PIPELINE AND 3D SURFACES Figure

  13. Sources of biological variation in residual feed intake in growing and finishing steers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Erin Gwen

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Objectives of this research were to characterize residual feed intake (RFI) in growing and finishing steers and examine phenotypic correlations between performance, feed efficiency, carcass, digestib ility, and physiological ...

  14. Deactivation and decommissioning environmental strategy for the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Complex Hanford Nuclear Reservation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HOPKINS, A.M.

    2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall goal of this strategy is to comply with all applicable environmental laws and regulations and/or compliance agreements during Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) stabilization, deactivation, and eventual dismantlement.

  15. Metagenomics for Etiologic Agent Discovery (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Ross, Matthew [Baylor College of Medicine

    2013-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Matthew Ross on "Metagenomics for etiological agent discovery" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

  16. Evaluation of a mathematical model in predicting intake of growing and finishing cattle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bourg, Brandi Marie

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    EVALUATIONS OF A MATHEMATICAL MODEL IN PREDICTING INTAKE OF GROWING AND FINISHING CATTLE A Thesis by BRANDI MARIE BOURG Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 2007 Major Subject: Animal Science EVALUATIONS OF A MATHEMATICAL MODEL IN PREDICTING INTAKE OF GROWING AND FINISHING CATTLE A Thesis by BRANDI MARIE BOURG Submitted...

  17. Evaluation of a mathematical model in predicting intake of growing and finishing cattle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bourg, Brandi Marie

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    EVALUATIONS OF A MATHEMATICAL MODEL IN PREDICTING INTAKE OF GROWING AND FINISHING CATTLE A Thesis by BRANDI MARIE BOURG Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 2007 Major Subject: Animal Science EVALUATIONS OF A MATHEMATICAL MODEL IN PREDICTING INTAKE OF GROWING AND FINISHING CATTLE A Thesis by BRANDI MARIE BOURG Submitted...

  18. Technical Basis for Work Place Air Monitoring for the Plutonium Finishing Plan (PFP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JONES, R.A.

    1999-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This document establishes the basis for the Plutonium Finishing Plant's (PFP) work place air monitoring program in accordance with the following requirements: Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 835 ''Occupational Radiation Protection''; Hanford Site Radiological Control Manual (HSRCM-1); HNF-PRO-33 1, Work Place Air Monitoring; WHC-SD-CP-SAR-021, Plutonium Finishing Plant Final Safety Analysis Report; and Applicable recognized national standards invoked by DOE Orders and Policies.

  19. Energy Integration Visualization Room (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This two-page fact sheet describes the new Energy Integration Visualization Room in the ESIF and talks about some of the capabilities and unique visualization features of the the room.

  20. The Live Room : transducing resonant architectures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bain, Mark, 1966-

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Live Room is a temporary site specific installation presented in building N 51, room 117 on the MIT campus on May 7, 1998 and concluded on June 10, 1998. Using small acoustic intensifying equipment which mount directly ...

  1. Novel room temperature ferromagnetic semiconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gupta, Amita

    2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Today's information world, bits of data are processed by semiconductor chips, and stored in the magnetic disk drives. But tomorrow's information technology may see magnetism (spin) and semiconductivity (charge) combined in one 'spintronic' device that exploits both charge and 'spin' to carry data (the best of two worlds). Spintronic devices such as spin valve transistors, spin light emitting diodes, non-volatile memory, logic devices, optical isolators and ultra-fast optical switches are some of the areas of interest for introducing the ferromagnetic properties at room temperature in a semiconductor to make it multifunctional. The potential advantages of such spintronic devices will be higher speed, greater efficiency, and better stability at a reduced power consumption. This Thesis contains two main topics: In-depth understanding of magnetism in Mn doped ZnO, and our search and identification of at least six new above room temperature ferromagnetic semiconductors. Both complex doped ZnO based new materials, as well as a number of nonoxides like phosphides, and sulfides suitably doped with Mn or Cu are shown to give rise to ferromagnetism above room temperature. Some of the highlights of this work are discovery of room temperature ferromagnetism in: (1) ZnO:Mn (paper in Nature Materials, Oct issue, 2003); (2) ZnO doped with Cu (containing no magnetic elements in it); (3) GaP doped with Cu (again containing no magnetic elements in it); (4) Enhancement of Magnetization by Cu co-doping in ZnO:Mn; (5) CdS doped with Mn, and a few others not reported in this thesis. We discuss in detail the first observation of ferromagnetism above room temperature in the form of powder, bulk pellets, in 2-3 mu-m thick transparent pulsed laser deposited films of the Mn (<4 at. percent) doped ZnO. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) spectra recorded from 2 to 200nm areas showed homogeneous distribution of Mn substituting for Zn a 2+ state in the ZnO lattice. Ferromagnetic Resonance (FMR) technique is used to confirm the existence of ferromagnetic ordering at temperatures as high as 425K. The ab initio calculations were found to be consistent with the observation of ferromagnetism arising from fully polarized Mn 2+ state. The key to observed room temperature ferromagnetism in this system is the low temperature processing, which prevents formation of clusters, secondary phases and the host ZnO from becoming n-type. The electronic structure of the same Mn doped ZnO thin films studied using XAS, XES and RIXS, revealed a strong hybridization between Mn 3d and O 2p states, which is an important characteristic of a Dilute magnetic Semiconductor (DMS). It is shown that the various processing conditions like sintering temperature, dopant concentration and the properties of precursors used for making of DMS have a great influence on the final properties. Use of various experimental techniques to verify the physical properties, and to understand the mechanism involved to give rise to ferromagnetism is presented. Methods to improve the magnetic moment in Mn doped ZnO are also described. New promising DMS materials (such as Cu doped ZnO are explored). The demonstrated new capability to fabricate powder, pellets, and thin films of room temperature ferromagnetic semiconductors thus makes possible the realization of a wide range of complex elements for a variety of new multifunctional phenomena related to Spintronic devices as well as magneto-optic components.

  2. Library Reserved Room Policy All Meeting Spaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mather, Patrick T.

    Library Reserved Room Policy All Meeting Spaces Room reservation To make a reservation for any Library meeting space, complete the room reservation form at http://library.syr.edu/services/space/form-findroom.php. In order to provide equitable access to library spaces, the Library may impose limitations on frequency

  3. Multisurface Interaction in the WILD Room

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    - 1 - Multisurface Interaction in the WILD Room Michel Beaudouin-Lafon, Stéphane Huot, Mathieu University Abstract The WILD room (wall-sized interaction with large datasets) serves as a testbed. (2012), "Multisurface Interaction in the WILD Room", IEEE Computer, vol 45, nº 4, pp. 48-56. DOI

  4. Electronic Docket Room (e-Docket Room) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube|6721 Federal Register / Vol.6:Energy|Electrifying YourElectronic Docket Room

  5. Heating remote rooms in passive solar buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balcomb, J.D.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Remote rooms can be effectively heated by convection through a connecting doorway. A simple steady-state equation is developed for design purposes. Validation of a dynamic model is achieved using data obtained over a 13-day period. Dynamic effects are investigated using a simulation analysis for three different cases of driving temperature; the effect is to reduce the temperature difference between the driving room and the remote room compared to the steady-state model. For large temperature swings in the driving room a strategy which uses the intervening door in a diode mode is effective. The importance of heat-storing mass in the remote room is investigated.

  6. Last Updated 8/12/2013 Page 1 of 2 Meeting Room 2 Meeting Room 3 Meeting Room 4 Meeting Room 5 Meeting Room 6

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Meeting Room 6 8:00 a.m.-12:00 noon Intro to LID Rainwater Harvesting 1:00-5:00 p.m. Advances in Design Strategies for Achieving Water Quality Goals Publications and Approaches for Mainstreaming LID LID Modeling Cities Light Rail Monitoring Bioretention and Rainwater Harvesting Systems Urban Trees as a LID Source

  7. Third and fourth limiting amino acids in sorghum for growing and finishing swine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Purser, Kenneth Wayne

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -methionine (Met) and L-isoleucine (Ile) were added individually and in all combinations to a vitamin, mineral, lysine and threonine fortified sorghum basal diet (B) and fed to growing and finishing pigs (18. 1 and 50. 0 kg average initial weight, respectively...). The B diet was formulated with equimolar additions of glycine (Gly) and L-glutamic acid (Glu) to provide 12. 0 and 11. 5X crude protein (N x 6. 25) for growing and finish- ing diets, respectively. Trp, Met and Ile were added at the expense of Gly...

  8. Estimation and characterization of decontamination and decommissioning solid waste expected from the Plutonium Finishing Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Millar, J.S.; Pottmeyer, J.A.; Stratton, T.J. [and others

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose of the study was to estimate the amounts of equipment and other materials that are candidates for removal and subsequent processing in a solid waste facility when the Hanford Plutonium Finishing Plant is decontaminated and decommissioned. (Building structure and soil are not covered.) Results indicate that {approximately}5,500 m{sup 3} of solid waste is expected to result from the decontamination and decommissioning of the Pu Finishing Plant. The breakdown of the volumes and percentages of waste by category is 1% dangerous solid waste, 71% low-level waste, 21% transuranic waste, 7% transuranic mixed waste.

  9. Au microstructure and the functional properties of Ni/Au finishes on ceramic IC packages

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winters, E.D.; Baxter, W.K. [Coors Electronic Package Co., Chattanooga, TN (United States); Braski, D.N.; Watkins, T.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Ni/Au plated finishes used on thick-film metallized multilayer ceramic packages for integrated circuits must meet functional requirements such as bondability, sealability, and solderability. Their ability to do so is dependent, among other things, on the ability of the Au deposit to inhibit the grain boundary diffusion and subsequent surface oxidation of Ni. In this study, the relation between functional performance, Ni diffusionr ate, and Au microstructure was examined. Extent of Ni diffusion during heating was determined by Auger electron spectroscopy for several electrolytic and electroless Ni/Au finishing processes. Results were correlated with differences in Au microstructures determined by SEM, atomic force microscopy, and XRD.

  10. The Influence of a Subslab Gravel Layer and Open Area on Soil-Gas and Radon Entry into Two Experimental Basements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robinson, Allen L.; Sextro, R.G.

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements of steady-state soil-gas and {sup 222}Rn entry rates into two room-sized, experimental basement structures were made for a range of structure depressurizations (0-40 Pa) and open floor areas (0-165 x 10{sup -4} m{sup 2}). The structures are identical except that in one the floor slab lies directly on native soil whereas in the other the slab lies on a high-permeability gravel layer. The subslab gravel layer greatly enhances the soil-gas and radon entry rate into the structure. The radon entry rate into the structure with the subslab gravel layer is four times greater than the entry rate into the structure without the gravel layer with an open floor area of 165 x 10{sup -4}m{sup 2}; however the ratio increases to 30 for an open floor area of 5.0 x 10{sup -4} m{sup 2}. The relationship between open area and soil-gas entry rate is complex. It depends on both the amount and distribution of the open area as well as the permeability of the soil near the opening. The entry rate into the experimental structures is largely determined by the presence or absence of a subslab gravel layer. Therefore open area is a poor indicator of radon and soil-gas entry into the structures. The extension of the soil-gas pressure field created by structure depressurization is a good measure of the radon entry. The measured normalized radon entry rate into both structures has the same linear relationship with the average subslab pressure coupling regardless of open area or the presence or absence of a subslab gravel layer. The average subslab pressure coupling is an estimate of the extension of the soil-gas pressure field. A three-dimensional finite-difference model correctly predicts the effect of a subslab gravel layer and different open area configurations on radon and soil-gas entry rate; however, the model underpredicts the absolute entry rate into each structure by a factor of 1.5.

  11. Adsorption of Chromium (VI) by metal hydroxide sludge from the metal finishing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Adsorption of Chromium (VI) by metal hydroxide sludge from the metal finishing Loïc Perrin Ecole sludge (MHS) during the treatment of their liquid effluents charged with heavy metals. Generally, a small part of these sludge is valorized because of their important metal fickleness. Consequently

  12. Computer Aided Design of Automotive Finishes Gary Meyer and Clement Shimizu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    of the paint. A designer from the automotive industry was invited to use the program to create three new paints measurement system used in the automotive industry.1,2 The program gives the user several different waysComputer Aided Design of Automotive Finishes Gary Meyer and Clement Shimizu Department of Computer

  13. Assessment of circuit board surface finishes for electronic assembly with lead-free solders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ray, U.; Artaki, I.; Finley, D.W.; Wenger, G.M. [Bell Labs., Princeton, NJ (United States). Lucent Technologies; Pan, T.; Blair, H.D.; Nicholson, J.M. [Ford Motor Co., Dearborn, MI (United States); Vianco, P.T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The suitability of various metallic printed wiring board surface finishes was assessed for new technology applications that incorporate assembly with Lead-free solders. The manufacture of a lead-free product necessitates elimination of lead (Pb) from the solder, the circuit board as well as the component lead termination. It is critical however for the selected interconnect Pb-free solder and the corresponding printed wiring board (PWB) and component lead finishes to be mutually compatible. Baseline compatibility of select Pb-free solders with Pb containing PWB surface finish and components was assessed. This was followed by examining the compatibility of the commercially available CASTIN{trademark} (SnAgCuSb) Pb-free solder with a series of PWB metallic finishes: Ni/Au, Ni/Pd, and Pd/Cu. The compatibility was assessed with respect to assembly performance, solder joint integrity and long term attachment reliability. Solder joint integrity and mechanical behavior of representative 50 mil pitch 20I/O SOICs was determined before and after thermal stress. Mechanical pull test studies demonstrated that the strength of SnAgCuSb solder interconnections is notably greater than that of SnPb interconnections.

  14. Comparative Summer Thermal Performance of Finished and Unfinished Metal Roofing Products with Composition Shingles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, D. S.; Sherwin, J.; Sonne, J.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , both finished and unfinished, might compare with other more traditional roofing types. All of the test cells had R-19 insulation installed on the attic floor except in the double roof configuration which had R-19 of open cell foam blown onto...

  15. The use of acid-treated sorghum grain in the diet of finishing beef cattle 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kowalik, Alvin James

    1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and the grains were full fed to a 12 total of 100 finishing steers for a period of 83 days. Cattle fed acid-treated corn gained 6% more rapidly than cattle fed dry corn. Feed consumption was comparable so feed effiency favored the acid- preserved corn...

  16. Improved Yield and Diverse Finished Bacterial Genomes using Pacific Biosciences RS II SMRT Sequencing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weber, David J.

    Improved Yield and Diverse Finished Bacterial Genomes using Pacific Biosciences RS II SMRT-Cruz, Alvaro Godinez, Luke J. Tallon Institute for Genome Sciences, University of Maryland School of Medicine, effective, and highly accurate platform for generation of complete microbial genome sequences. As early

  17. Utrecht University's High Potential Programme Making Room

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    Utrecht University's High Potential Programme Making Room for Talent 2 #12;Making Room for Talent Utrecht University has a worldwide reputation for excellence in research across a broad range. This is why in 2003 Utrecht University created the High Potential Programme, an incentive scheme which gives

  18. Also Known As (Room or Building)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mottram, Nigel

    Room No. Also Known As (Room or Building) Hearing Assistance Type 702 InfraRed 704 InfraRed 706 Smith Building Adam Smith Building Adam Smith Building Adam Smith Building Adam Smith Building Adam Smith Building Adam Smith Building Adam Smith Building Adam Smith Building Adam Smith Building Adam

  19. Topological Insulators at Room Temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Haijun; /Beijing, Inst. Phys.; Liu, Chao-Xing; /Tsinghua U., Beijing; Qi, Xiao-Liang; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Dai, Xi; Fang, Zhong; /Beijing, Inst. Phys.; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2010-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Topological insulators are new states of quantum matter with surface states protected by the time-reversal symmetry. In this work, we perform first-principle electronic structure calculations for Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3}, Sb{sub 2}Se{sub 3}, Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} and Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} crystals. Our calculations predict that Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3}, Bi{sub 2}T e{sub 3} and Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} are topological insulators, while Sb{sub 2}Se{sub 3} is not. In particular, Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} has a topologically non-trivial energy gap of 0.3eV , suitable for room temperature applications. We present a simple and unified continuum model which captures the salient topological features of this class of materials. These topological insulators have robust surface states consisting of a single Dirac cone at the {Lambda} point.

  20. NATURAL CONVECTION IN ROOM GEOMETRIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gadgil, A.; Bauman, Fred; Kammerud, R.; Ruberg, K.

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Computer programs have been developed to numerically simulate natural convection in room geometries in two and three dimensions. The programs have been validated using published data from the literature, results from a full-scale experiment performed at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and results from a small-scale experiment reported here. One of the computer programs has been used to study the influence of natural convection on the thermal performance of a single thermal zone in a direct-gain passive solar building. The results indicate that the building heating loads calculated by standard building energy analysis methods may be in error by as much as 50% as a result of their use of common assumptions regarding the convection processes which occur in an enclosure. It is also found that the convective heat transfer coefficients between the air and the enclosure surfaces can be substantially different from the values assumed in the standard building energy analysis methods, and can exhibit significant variations across a given surface.

  1. Los Alamos test-room results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McFarland, R.D.; Balcomb, J.D.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fourteen Los Alamos test rooms have been operated for several years; this paper covers operation during the winters of 1980-81 and 1981-82. Extensive data have been taken and computer analyzed to determine performance parameters such as efficiency, solar savings fraction, and comfort index. The rooms are directly comparable because each has the same net coefficient and solar collection area and thus the same load collector ratio. Configurations include direct gain, unvented Trombe walls, water walls, phase change walls, and two sunspace geometries. Strategies for reducing heat loss include selective surfaces, two brands of superglazing windows, a heat pipe system, and convection-suppression baffles. Significant differences in both backup heat and comfort are observed among the various rooms. The results are useful, not only for direct room-to-room comparisons, but also to provide data for validation of computer simulation programs.

  2. Finishing and Special Motifs: Lessons Learned from CRISPR Analysis Using Next-Generation Draft Sequences ( 7th Annual SFAF Meeting, 2012)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Campbell, Catherine [Noblis

    2013-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Catherine Campbell on "Finishing and Special Motifs: Lessons learned from CRISPR analysis using next-generation draft sequences" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

  3. Cryo Utilities Room Cooling System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ball, G.S.; /Fermilab

    1989-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Many of the mechanical equipment failures at the Laboratory are due to the loss of cooling water. In order to insure the proper operating temperatures and to increase the reliability of the mechanical equipment in the D0 Cryo Utilities Room it is necessary to provide an independent liquid cooling system. To this end, an enclosed glycoVwater cooling system which transfers heat from two vane-type vacuum pumps and an air compressor to the outside air has been installed in the Cryo Utilities Room. From the appended list it can be seen that only the Thermal Precision PFC-121-D and Ingersoll-Rand WAC 16 deserve closer investigation based on price. The disadvantages of the WAC 16 are that: it runs a little warmer, it requires more valving to properly install a backup pump, inlet and outlet piping are not included, and temperature and pressure indicators are not included. Its only advantage is that it is $818 cheaper than the PFC-121-D. The advantages of the PFC-121-D are that: it has automatic pump switching during shutdown, it has a temperature regulator on one fan control, it has a switch which indicates proper operation, has a sight glass on the expansion tank, and comes with an ASME approved expansion tank and relief valve. For these reasons the Thermal Precision PFC-121-D was chosen. In the past, we have always found the pond water to be muddy and to sometimes contain rocks of greater than 1/2 inch diameter. Thus a system completely dependent on the pond water from the accelerator was deemed unacceptable. A closed system was selected based on its ability to greatly improve reliability, while remaining economical. It is charged with a 50/50 glycol/water mixture capable of withstanding outside temperatures down to -33 F. The fluid will be circulated by a totally enclosed air cooled Thermal Precision PFC-121-D pump. The system will be on emergency power and an automatically controlled backup pump, identical to the primary, is available should the main pump fail. The fan unit is used as a primary cooler and the trim cooler cools the fluid further on extremely hot days. The trim cooler has also been sized to cool the system in the event of a total shutdown provided that the pond water supply has adequate pressure. Due to a broken filter, we found it necessary to install a strainer in the pond water supply line. The expansion tank separates air bubbles, ensures a net positive suction head, protects against surges and over pressurization of the system, and allows for the filling of the system without shutting it off. All piping has been installed, flushed, charged with the glycol/water mix, and hydrostatically tested to 55 psi. The condition of all pumps and flow conditions will be recorded at the PLC. It has been decided not to include the regulator valve in the pond water return line. This valve was designated by the manufacturer to reduce the amount of water flowing through the trim cooler. This is not necessary in our application. There is some concern that the cooling fluid may cool the mechanical eqUipment too much when they are not operating or during very cold days. This issue will be addressed and the conclusion appended to this engineering note.

  4. Training Room Equipment Instructions Projector and TV Display

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford, T. Daniel

    Training Room Equipment Instructions Projector and TV Display The control panel on the wall are connected to a training room computer and room is equipped with a keyboard, mouse and clicker. Connect USB

  5. Environmental color for pediatric patient room design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Jin Gyu

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Color has a large impact on our psychological and physiological responses. This study examines the value of color as a component in a healing environment for pediatric patient rooms by measuring color preferences among healthy children, pediatric...

  6. The Chemical Hazards Assessment Prior to D&D of the Plutonium Finishing Plant, Hanford Nuclear Reservation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hopkins, A. M.; Prevette, S. S.; Sherwood, A. R.; Fitch, L. R.; Ranade, D. G.; Oldham, R. W.

    2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the evaluation methods and results of a chemical safety status assessment of the process equipment at the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Nuclear Reservation Plutonium Finishing Plant. This assessment, designated as the Plutonium Finishing Plant Residual Chemical Hazards Assessment, focused particular emphasis on the idle and inactive plant systems, though certain active areas also were examined to the extent that these were examined during a previous facility vulnerability assessment completed in 1999. The Plutonium Finishing Plant is located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Nuclear Reservation that is situated in south central Washington State.

  7. Protein levels and lysine supplementation of sorghum grain-soybean meal rations for growing-finishing swine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Escobosa, Adrian

    1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Efficiency of Gain and Feed Cost of Growing-Finishing Swine 25 26 Effect of Level of Dietary Protein on Carcass Meri. t of Growing-Finishing Swine Effect of Level of Dietary Protein on Rate and Efficiency of Gain and Feed Cost of Growing- Finishing... to the 16-13 and 13 + lysine regimes. Car'ooss Meri t The pooled carcass data for all experiments are given in table 6 while the same data for the three separate experiments are given in appendix tables 4, 5 and 6. There were no significant differences...

  8. The Advanced Photon Source main control room

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pasky, S.

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory is a third-generation light source built in the 1990s. Like the machine itself, the Main Control Room (MCR) employs design concepts based on today`s requirements. The discussion will center on ideas used in the design of the MCR, the comfort of personnel using the design, and safety concerns integrated into the control room layout.

  9. Project plan remove special nuclear material from PFP project plutonium finishing plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BARTLETT, W.D.

    1999-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This plan presents the overall objectives, description, justification and planning for the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Remove Special Nuclear Material (SNM) Materials. The intent of this plan is to describe how this project will be managed and integrated with other facility stabilization and deactivation activities. This plan supplements the overall integrated plan presented in the Plutonium Finishing Plant Integrated Project Management Plan (IPMP), HNF-3617, Rev. 0. This project plan is the top-level definitive project management document for PFP Remove SNM Materials project. It specifies the technical, schedule, requirements and the cost baselines to manage the execution of the Remove SNM Materials project. Any deviations to the document must be authorized through the appropriate change control process.

  10. Petrology of a basement core from the Champlin No. 1 International Paper Company well, Jackson County, Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrelson, D.W.; Jennings, S.P.

    1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In May 1981, 11 ft (3.3 m) of granite from 18,678 to 18,689 ft (5,693-5,696 m) was cored on the Wiggins Anticline in the Champlin No. 1 International Paper Company well. Interpreted in the 1920s as a simple anticline and referred to locally as the Lucedale Ridge, subsequent drilling has delineated the Wiggins as a broad complex feature with the anticlinal axis of Cretaceous-Jurassic sediments north of the axis of a series of basement highs forming the Wiggins Anticline. In the context of plate tectonics, the Wiggins is significant in the understanding of the Ouachita-Appalachian tectonic junction and the origin of the Gulf of Mexico. Megascopically, the core consists of fine- to coarse-grained granite with irregular foliations. The foliation is produced by bands of biotite that are occasionally interrupted with ptygmatic folds. Pink plagioclase, white orthoclase, and clear to milky quartz phenocrysts are visible and some appear to have been weathered in situ when subjected to intense regional metamorphic conditions producing selective anatexis. Preliminary interpretations by Smith suggested the Wiggins represents an allochthonous block separated by rifting from the South American plate during the opening of the Gulf of Mexico. However, subsequent interpretations utilizing petrographic data and age dates of 272 M.Y. (Amoco No. 1 Cumbest) and 282 M.Y. (Champlin I.P.C.) tend to indicate the Wiggins is a buried southwest continuation of the Appalachian Mountains. The potential for finding significant hydrocarbon reservoirs in Cretaceous reefs, dolomitized Smackover carbonate shelf sediments, and/or Norphlet eolian sandstones on the flanks of the basement features will make exploration for both structural and stratigraphic traps increasingly attractive in this sparsely drilled area.

  11. Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Standards/Requirements Identification Document (S/RID)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maddox, B.S.

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Standards/Requirements Identification Document (S/RID) sets forth the Environmental Safety and Health (ESH) standards/requirements for the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). This S/RID is applicable to the appropriate life cycle phases of design, construction, operation, and preparation for decommissioning. These standards/requirements are adequate to ensure the protection of the health and safety of workers, the public, and the environment.

  12. Grain sorghum, reconstituted in whole and in ground forms, in finishing rations for beef cattle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Penic, Peter

    1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the grain, is kept by the embryo, the . , only tissue capable of growth. All of the methods described in this work have brought about increases in feed efficiency. It appears that reconstituting brings into play mechanisms similar to those observed... GRAIN SORGHUM, RECONSTITUTED IN WHOLE AND IN GROUND BOHMS, IN FINISHING RATIONS FOR BEEF CATTLE A Thesis PETER PENIC Submitted to the Graduate College of' the Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree...

  13. Field Test of Room-to-Room Distribution of Outside Air with Two Residential Ventilation Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendron, R.; Anderson, R.; Barley, D.; Rudd, A.; Townsend, A.; Hancock, E.

    2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Uniform distribution of outside air is one way to ensure that residential dilution ventilation systems will provide a known amount of fresh air to all rooms.

  14. High Throughput Plasmid Sequencing with Illumina and CLC Bio (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Athavale, Ajay [Monsanto

    2013-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Ajay Athavale (Monsanto) presents "High Throughput Plasmid Sequencing with Illumina and CLC Bio" at the 7th Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting held in June, 2012 in Santa Fe, NM.

  15. Introducing National Center for Genome Resources (NCGR) Informatics (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Crow, John [National Center for Genome Resources

    2013-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    John Crow from the National Center for Genome Resources discusses his organization's informatics at the 7th Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting held in June, 2012 in Santa Fe, NM.

  16. Mercury: Next-gen Data Analysis and Annotation Pipeline (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Sexton, David [Baylor

    2013-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    David Sexton (Baylor) gives a talk titled "Mercury: Next-gen Data Analysis and Annotation Pipeline" at the 7th Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting held in June, 2012 in Santa Fe, NM.

  17. The PerkinElmer Omics Laboratory (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Smith, Todd [PerkinElmer Omics Laboratory

    2013-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Todd Smith of the PerkinElmer Omics Laboratory gives a talk about his lab and its work at the 7th Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting held in June, 2012 in Santa Fe, NM.

  18. Mercury: Next-gen Data Analysis and Annotation Pipeline (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sexton, David [Baylor

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    David Sexton (Baylor) gives a talk titled "Mercury: Next-gen Data Analysis and Annotation Pipeline" at the 7th Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting held in June, 2012 in Santa Fe, NM.

  19. RoomZoner: Occupancy-based Room-Level Zoning of a Centralized HVAC System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitehouse, Kamin

    RoomZoner: Occupancy-based Room-Level Zoning of a Centralized HVAC System Tamim Sookoor & Kamin. In this paper we present a CPS that enables a centralized Heating, Ventila- tion, and Air Conditioning (HVAC application due to residential HVAC systems ac- counting for over 15% of all U.S. energy usage, making it one

  20. A New Control Room for SLAC Accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erickson, Roger; Guerra, E.; Stanek, M.; Hoover, Z.Van; Warren, J.; /SLAC

    2012-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We are planning to construct a new control room at SLAC to unify and improve the operation of the LCLS, SPEAR3, and FACET accelerator facilities, and to provide the space and flexibility needed to support the LCLS-II and proposed new test beam facilities. The existing control rooms for the linac and SPEAR3 have been upgraded in various ways over the last decade, but their basic features have remained unchanged. We propose to build a larger modern Accelerator Control Room (ACR) in the new Research Support Building (RSB) which is currently under construction at SLAC. Shifting the center of control for the accelerator facilities entails both technical and administrative challenges. In this paper, we describe the history, concept, and status of this project.

  1. Energy conservation standards for room air conditioners

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenquist, G.J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Appliance Energy Conservation Act (NAECA) of 1987 established minimum energy-efficiency standards for room air conditioners, which became effective on January 1, 1990. The 1990 minimum energy-efficiency ratios (EER) range from 8.0 to 9.0 (Btu/h)/W (2.34 to 2.64 W/W). As required by NAECA, the Department of Energy (DOE) must also consider amending the room air conditioner standards that went into effect in 1990. As a result, the DOE issued a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NOPR) in March 1994 proposing new energy-efficiency standards for several products including room air conditioners. DOE received an extensive number of comments in response to the updated standards that were proposed. A reanalysis was conducted incorporating these comments, resulting in revised estimates of the cost and efficiency increases for more efficient room air conditioner designs. This paper describes the cost-efficiency analysis of design options carried out in support of DOE`s effort to revise the energy-efficiency standards that were proposed for room air conditioners in March 1994. The analysis shows that for the most popular classes of room air conditioners (classes without reverse cycle, with louvered sides, and with capacities ranging from less than 5000 to 20,000 Btu/h [1758 to 5860 W]) EERs of approximately 10.0 (Btu/h)/W (2.93 W/W) can be achieved by incorporating commonly used technologies, such as high-efficiency rotary compressors, grooved refrigerant tubing, slit-type fins, subcoolers, and permanent split capacitor fan motors. Even greater increases in efficiency can be realized with brushless permanent magnet fan motors, enlarged heat exchanger coils, and variable-speed compressors.

  2. News Room | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > The EnergyCenterDioxideDocumentationThreeNews Releases NewsRoomRoom

  3. Alfalfa leaf meal in finishing steer diets. Quarterly report, July 1, 1997--September 30, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zehnder, C.M.; DiCostanzo, A.; Smith, L.B.; Brown, D.B.; Hall, J.M.

    1997-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Ninety-six medium frame, Angus and Angus cross steer calves (average initial weight 540 lb.) were allotted to a heavy or light weight block and then randomly assigned to one of four dietary treatments for a 167 or 189-day finishing phase, respectively. Treatments were control (supplemental soybean meal), alfalfa leaf meal (ALM) providing 33%, 66%, 100% of supplemental protein. Finishing diets were formulated to contain .61 Mcal NE{sub g}/lb dry matter, 12.5% crude protein, .6 % Ca and .3 % P. There were no significant (P >.05) effects of dietary treatments on daily gain or dry matter required /lb of gain. Steers fed 100 % ALM consumed more (P <.05) dry matter than steers fed either of the other three treatments. Dry matter consumption increased linearly (P >.05) with increasing ALM. There was no significant (P >.05) dietary treatment effect on marbling, KPH %, yield grade, quality grade, or liver abscesses. There was an apparent trend in reduced liver abscess incidence in steers fed 100 % ALM. Steers fed 66 % ALM had significantly (P <.05) greater backfat measurements, backfat also had a cubic effect (P <.05). Hot carcass weight had a quadratic relation (P <.05) with level of ALM. Substituting alfalfa leaf meal for soybean meal in diets of finishing steers increased DM intake, but this increase was accompanied by an increase in gain which resulted in similar feed efficiency. There may be an advantage in blending ALM and soybean meal as feed efficiency was improved when cattle were fed the blend. Also, feeding ALM may result in lower incidence of liver abscess.

  4. Progressive Powder Coating: New Infrared Curing Oven at Metal Finishing Plant Increases Production by 50%

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Progressive Powder Coating in Mentor, Ohio, is a metal finishing plant that uses a convection oven in its manufacturing process. In an effort to save energy and improve production, the company installed an infrared oven in between the powder coating booth and the convection oven on its production line. This installation allowed the plant to increase its conveyor line speed and increase production by 50 percent. In addition, the plant reduced its natural gas consumption, yielding annual energy savings of approximately$54,000. With a total project cost of$136,000, the simple payback is 2.5 years.

  5. Macquarie University Design Standards ROOM DATA SHEETS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yan

    ALARM Thermal Smoke POWER GPO's Dedicated GPO 3 phase Oven UPS AUDIOVISUAL OUTLETS Outlets Video projector Induction loop #12;Macquarie University Design Standards Section S ANNEXURE 9 ROOM DATA SHEETS) Conference chair Coffee table Blinds Modular table Microwave Oven Curtains Conference table Refrigerator

  6. Registrar's Office Room 130, 6299 South Street

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brownstone, Rob

    Registrar's Office Room 130, 6299 South Street Henry Hicks Academic Administration Bldg PO Box, Visa, MasterCard, American Express or debit in person. Please do not send cash in the mail or enclose Integrated Science Program Skills Transcript (for courses completed between September 1998 and April 2005

  7. Einstein Room Reservations Rules and Regulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yates, Andrew

    Einstein Room Reservations Rules and Regulations Before Reservation: Requests are not confirmed Activities, Joan Junger, (718) 430-2105 or student.activities@einstein.yu.edu. A meeting or conversation in accordance to Albert Einstein College of Medicine's Alcohol Policy. Before your request is confirmed you must

  8. Covered Product Category: Room Air Conditioners

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    FEMP provides acquisition guidance across a variety of product categories, including room air conditioners, which are an ENERGY STAR®-qualified product category. Federal laws and requirements mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law.

  9. Texas Union Pizza Order Form ROOM RESERVED ______________________________________________________

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jefferys, William

    : ________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ Pick-up All orders are to be picked up at the Texas Union Hospitality Center desk in the south end West#12;#12;Texas Union Pizza Order Form ROOM RESERVED with the Texas Union Policies and Procedures. I understand that I will be held responsible for any debts incurred

  10. Advanced nuclear plant control room complex

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scarola, Kenneth (Windsor, CT); Jamison, David S. (Windsor, CT); Manazir, Richard M. (North Canton, CT); Rescorl, Robert L. (Vernon, CT); Harmon, Daryl L. (Enfield, CT)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An advanced control room complex for a nuclear power plant, including a discrete indicator and alarm system (72) which is nuclear qualified for rapid response to changes in plant parameters and a component control system (64) which together provide a discrete monitoring and control capability at a panel (14-22, 26, 28) in the control room (10). A separate data processing system (70), which need not be nuclear qualified, provides integrated and overview information to the control room and to each panel, through CRTs (84) and a large, overhead integrated process status overview board (24). The discrete indicator and alarm system (72) and the data processing system (70) receive inputs from common plant sensors and validate the sensor outputs to arrive at a representative value of the parameter for use by the operator during both normal and accident conditions, thereby avoiding the need for him to assimilate data from each sensor individually. The integrated process status board (24) is at the apex of an information hierarchy that extends through four levels and provides access at each panel to the full display hierarchy. The control room panels are preferably of a modular construction, permitting the definition of inputs and outputs, the man machine interface, and the plant specific algorithms, to proceed in parallel with the fabrication of the panels, the installation of the equipment and the generic testing thereof.

  11. ULTRASONIC CAVITATION IN FREON AT ROOM TEMPERATURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caupin, Frédéric

    ULTRASONIC CAVITATION IN FREON AT ROOM TEMPERATURE FR´ED´ERIC CAUPIN AND VINCENT FOURMOND on ultrasonic cavitation in freon (1,1,2-trichloro 1,2,2-trifluoro ethane). We use a high intensity 1 MHz observe the nucleation of bubbles. We describe the three different methods we use to detect cavitation

  12. ROOM AIR CONDITIONER WALL MOUNTED type

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kleinfeld, David

    SPLIT TYPE ROOM AIR CONDITIONER WALL MOUNTED type Reciprocating Compressor Models Indoor unit.6 - 11.4 ----- MOISTURE REMOVAL ( / hr) 2.0 1.8 2.7 2.7 4.3 3 AIR CIRCULATION - Hi (m / hr) 800 800 1

  13. Airflow Simulation and Energy Analysis in Ventilated Room with a New Type of Air Conditioning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, D.; Tang, G.; Zhao, F.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Airflow simulation in one ventilated room with radiant heating and natural ventilation has been carried out. Three cases are compared: the closed room, the room with full openings, and the room with small openings. The radiator heating room...

  14. Mesozoic sedimentary rock features resulting from volume movements required in drape folds at corners of basement blocks--Casper Mountain Area, Wyoming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vaughn, Patty Holyfield

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    environment resulted in 700 feet of varicolored shale and sandstone of Jurassic age which lie unconformably upon the Triassic rocks. During Cretaceous time 5, 000 feet of marine sandstone and shale were deposited unconformably on tne Jurassic sediments...MESOZOIC SEDIMENTARY ROCK FEATURES RESULTING FROM VOLUME MOVEMENTS REQUIRED IN DRAPE FOLDS AT CORNERS OF BASEMENT BIOCKS ? CASPER MOUNTAIN AREA, MYOMING A Thesis by PATTY HOLYFIELD VAUGHN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A...

  15. Development of secondary faults between en echelon, oblique-slip faults: examples from basement controlled, small-fault systems in the Llano Uplift of central Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hedgcoxe, Howard Reiffert

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    correspond to the NE trending set of faults and the secondary antithetic faults corre- spond to the N to NNE set (Figure 12). Fractures, represented by the dashed lines in Figure 12, occur in direct association with the primary and secondary faults...DEVELOPMENT OF SECONDARY FAULTS BETWEEN EN ECHELON, OBLIQUE-SLIP FAULTS: EXAMPLES FROM BASEMENT CONTROLLED, SMALL-FAULT SYSTEMS IN THE LLANO UPLIFT OF CENTRAL TEXAS A Thesis by HOWARD REIFFERT HEDGCOXE Submitted to the Graduate College...

  16. Local public document room directory. Revision 7

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This directory (NUREG/BR-0088, Revision 7) lists local public document rooms (LPDRs) for commercial nuclear power plants with operating or possession-only licenses or under construction, plus the LPDRs for potential high-level radioactive waste repository sites, gaseous diffusion plants, certain fuel cycle facilities, certain low-level waste disposal facilities, and any temporary LPDRs established for the duration of licensing proceedings. In some instances, the LPDR libraries maintain document collections for more than one licensed facility. The library staff members listed are the persons most familiar with the LPDR collections. Reference librarians in the NRC Headquarters Public Document Room (PDR) are also available to assist the public in locating NRC documents.

  17. Priority coding for control room alarms

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scarola, Kenneth (Windsor, CT); Jamison, David S. (Windsor, CT); Manazir, Richard M. (North Canton, CT); Rescorl, Robert L. (Vernon, CT); Harmon, Daryl L. (Enfield, CT)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Indicating the priority of a spatially fixed, activated alarm tile on an alarm tile array by a shape coding at the tile, and preferably using the same shape coding wherever the same alarm condition is indicated elsewhere in the control room. The status of an alarm tile can change automatically or by operator acknowledgement, but tones and/or flashing cues continue to provide status information to the operator.

  18. Release of DRAFT RFP Headquarters Reading Room Instructions/Guidelines

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Release of DRAFT RFP Headquarters Reading Room InstructionsGuidelines 1. Reading Room Points of Contact: 721 - 88, Mike Baehre, (202) 586-6575 89 - Close of Draft RFP, John...

  19. A CONVECTIVE HEAT TRANSFER MODEL FOR SIMULATION OF ROOMS WITH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A CONVECTIVE HEAT TRANSFER MODEL FOR SIMULATION OF ROOMS WITH ATTACHED WALL JETS By WEIXIU KONGQuest Information and Learning Company. #12;II A CONVECTIVE HEAT TRANSFER MODEL FOR SIMULATION OF ROOMS

  20. Dissertation Room Application Form Cecil H. Green Library

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quake, Stephen R.

    Dissertation Room Application Form Cecil H. Green Library Name address: E-mail: sul-privileges@stanford.edu Campus Mail: Access Services, Attn. ­Dissertation Rooms, Green Library, 6063 Fax number: (650) 723-3992 U.S. Mail: Access Services, Attn. Dissertation Rooms

  1. 2012-2013 Housing Lottery & Room Selection Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rusu, Adrian

    2012-2013 Housing Lottery & Room Selection Information Residential Learning & University Housing Room Selection Profile Deadline to Apply for 2012-2013 Housing Lottery Room Selection Begins March 9th housing for 2012-2013 must apply online: www.rowan.edu/rluh/roomselection Due to high demand

  2. The Influence of Operating Modes, Room Temperature Set Point and Curtain Styles on Energy Consumption of Room Air Conditioner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, J.; Yang, C.; Guo, R.; Wu, D.; Chen, H.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A field investigation was carried out in an office building of Changsha city in winter and summer, the influence of different running modes, curtain styles and room temperature set point on energy consumption of room air conditioner (RAC...

  3. WUFI Basement Module

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your DensityEnergy U.S.-China Electric Vehicle and03/02Report |toVEHICLE TECHNOLOGIES5 WRITTENManfred Kehrer,

  4. Characterization of past and present solid waste streams from the plutonium finishing plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duncan, D R; Mayancsik, B A [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)] [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Pottmeyer, J A; Vejvoda, E J; Reddick, J A; Sheldon, K M; Weyns, M I [Los Alamos Technical Associates, Kennewick, WA (United States)] [Los Alamos Technical Associates, Kennewick, WA (United States)

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the next two decades the transuranic (TRU) wastes now stored in the burial trenches and storage facilities at the Hanford Site are to be retrieved, processed at the Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) Facility, and shipped to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, New Mexico for final disposal. Over 50% of the TRU waste to be retrieved for shipment to the WIPP has been generated at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP), also known as the Plutonium Processing and Storage Facility and Z Plant. The purpose of this report is to characterize the radioactive solid wastes generated by the PFP since its construction in 1947 using process knowledge, existing records, and history-obtained from interviews. The PFP is currently operated by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) for the US Department of Energy (DOE).

  5. Evaluating sealed storage of high moisture sorghum grain for a beef finishing program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cross, Julian Frederick

    1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bedaced coNan and rice, . cro. ge has resulted in a search for crops of hip& ecoiiomic return. har;w corsages h. =ve bean pi". uted to grain sor, -hum and, h ve proluced nigh yields. T%s, problem of, attkising this sorghum grain has sparked 4 grominp...~:fora ~ainee rn aver -j. ?s. of 2. l6 pounIls ~sr Dog, rhile thnie fel, ~nle ~in ~ in& 2. . 'I6 . ". our8O-~er 8:g. . i hi~her i -i . , Qsgres'o'f finish pgihishnr aellin, , price ve"s ohtcinel an 'ths steers fe4 tho' prounIi gs, g, ', Ponos statee. that enr...

  6. Role of surface finishing on pitting corrosion of a duplex stainless steel in seawater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salah-Rousset, N.B.; Chaouachi, M.A. [ENIT, Tunis (Tunisia). Lab. of Metallurgy and Materials; Chellouf, A. [STEG, Tunis (Tunisia)

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Localized corrosion of duplex UNS S32550 stainless steel in seawater was investigated in the laboratory and in field trials for several surface finish conditions: polished, ground, and sandblasted. Electrochemical data obtained by polarization curves showed that the smoother, polished surface had better characteristics (higher pitting and protection potentials) than the ground or sandblasted surfaces. However, despite its high degree of roughness, the sandblasted surface was the most resistant in field conditions, exhibiting the lowest number of sites attacked. Internal compressive stresses created by sandblasting seem also to have an unsensitizing effect on sensitized zones that exist in cast steel (due to repairs of mold defects), reducing its susceptibility to microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC). Such stresses are not generated in polished or ground surfaces, and localized MIC attack can occur.

  7. Evaluating an Exterior Insulation and Finish System for Deep Energy Retrofits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dentz, J.; Podorson, D.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Exterior insulation and finish systems (EIFS) are proprietary synthetic formulations that are applied to the exterior walls of buildings to serve as insulation and exterior cladding. The insulation thickness can vary from less than one inch to a foot or more. In this project the applicability of EIFS for residential deep energy retrofits was investigated through modeling and a case study home. The home was retrofitted using a site-applied four-inch-thick EIFS. Site-specific details were developed as required for the residential retrofit application. Site work and the costs of the EIFS system were documented. The demonstration home was modeled using Building Energy Optimization energy and cost analysis software to explore cost effectiveness of various EIFS insulation thicknesses in two climate locations.

  8. Project plan international atomic energy agency (IAEA) safeguards project plutonium finishing plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BARTLETT, W.D.

    1999-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This plan presents the overall objectives, description, justification and planning for the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) project. The intent of this plan is to describe how this project will be managed and integrated with other facility stabilization and deactivation activities. This plan supplements the overall integrated plan presented in the PFP Integrated Project Management Plan (PMP), HNF-3617, Rev. 0. This project plan is the top-level definitive project management document for the PFP IAEA project. It specifies the technical, schedule, requirements and the cost baselines to manage the execution of the IAEA project. Any deviations to the document must be authorized through the appropriate change control process.

  9. Evaluating sealed storage of high moisture sorghum grain for a beef finishing program 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cross, Julian Frederick

    1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bedaced coNan and rice, . cro. ge has resulted in a search for crops of hip& ecoiiomic return. har;w corsages h. =ve bean pi". uted to grain sor, -hum and, h ve proluced nigh yields. T%s, problem of, attkising this sorghum grain has sparked 4 grominp...~:fora ~ainee rn aver -j. ?s. of 2. l6 pounIls ~sr Dog, rhile thnie fel, ~nle ~in ~ in& 2. . 'I6 . ". our8O-~er 8:g. . i hi~her i -i . , Qsgres'o'f finish pgihishnr aellin, , price ve"s ohtcinel an 'ths steers fe4 tho' prounIi gs, g, ', Ponos statee. that enr...

  10. The Building Adaptive Re-Use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flynn, E. Victor

    quality internal finishes without historic significance · Existing substation at basement level requiring in addressing these issues of cost an

  11. The chemistry of tributyl phosphate at elevated temperatures in the Plutonium Finishing Plant Process Vessels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barney, G.S.; Cooper, T.D.

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Potentially violent chemical reactions of the tributyl phosphate solvent used by the Plutonium Finishing Plant at the Hanford Site were investigated. There is a small probability that a significant quantity of this solvent could be accidental transferred to heated process vessels and react there with nitric acid or plutonium nitrate also present in the solvent extraction process. The results of laboratory studies of the reactions show that exothermic oxidation of tributyl phosphate by either nitric acid or actinide nitrates is slow at temperatures expected in the heated vessels. Less than four percent of the tributyl phosphate will be oxidized in these vented vessels at temperatures between 125{degrees}C and 250{degrees}C because the oxidant will be lost from the vessels by vaporization or decomposition before the tributyl phosphate can be extensively oxidized. The net amounts of heat generated by oxidation with concentrated nitric acid and with thorium nitrate (a stand-in for plutonium nitrate) were determined to be about -150 and -220 joules per gram of tributyl phosphate initially present, respectively. This is not enough heat to cause violent reactions in the vessels. Pyrolysis of the tributyl phosphate occurred in these mixtures at temperatures of 110{degrees}C to 270{degrees}C and produced mainly 1-butene gas, water, and pyrophosphoric acid. Butene gas generation is slow at expected process vessel temperatures, but the rate is faster at higher temperatures. At 252{degrees}C the rate of butene gas generated was 0.33 g butene/min/g of tributyl phosphate present. The measured heat absorbed by the pyrolysis reaction was 228 J/g of tributyl phosphate initially present (or 14.5 kcal/mole of tributyl phosphate). Release of flammable butene gas into process areas where it could ignite appears to be the most serious safety consideration for the Plutonium Finishing Plant.

  12. ASSESSING CHEMICAL HAZARDS AT THE PLUTONIUM FINISHING PLANT (PFP) FOR PLANNING FUTURE D&D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HOPKINS, A.M.; KLOS, D.B.; MINETT, M.J.

    2007-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper documents the fiscal year (FY) 2006 assessment to evaluate potential chemical and radiological hazards associated with vessels and piping in the former plutonium process areas at Hanford's Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). Evaluations by PFP engineers as design authorities for specific systems and other subject-matter experts were conducted to identify the chemical hazards associated with transitioning the process areas for the long-term layup of PFP before its eventual final decontamination and decommissioning (D and D). D and D activities in the main process facilities were suspended in September 2005 for a period of between 5 and 10 years. A previous assessment conducted in FY 2003 found that certain activities to mitigate chemical hazards could be deferred safely until the D and D of PFP, which had been scheduled to result in a slab-on-grade condition by 2009. As a result of necessary planning changes, however, D and D activities at PFP will be delayed until after the 2009 time frame. Given the extended project and plant life, it was determined that a review of the plant chemical hazards should be conducted. This review to determine the extended life impact of chemicals is called the ''Plutonium Finishing Plant Chemical Hazards Assessment, FY 2006''. This FY 2006 assessment addresses potential chemical and radiological hazard areas identified by facility personnel and subject-matter experts who reevaluated all the chemical systems (items) from the FY 2003 assessment. This paper provides the results of the FY 2006 chemical hazards assessment and describes the methodology used to assign a hazard ranking to the items reviewed.

  13. THE INTEGRATION OF A PROPOSED ZONE CLOSURE APPROACH FOR THE PLUTONIUM FINISHING PLANT (PFP) DECOMMISSIONING & THE PFP ZONE HANFORD SITE WASHINGTON

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HOPKINS, A.M.

    2005-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) and associated processing facilities are located in the 200 area of the Hanford Site in Eastern Washington. This area is part of what is now called the Central Plateau. In order to achieve closure of the contaminated facilities and waste sites at Hanford on the Central Plateau (CP), a geographic re-districting of the area into zones has been proposed in the recently published Plan for Central Plateau Closure. One of the 22 zones proposed in the Central Plateau encompasses the PFP and ancillary facilities. Approximately eighty six buildings are included in the PFP Zone. This paper addresses the approach for the closure of the PFP Zone within the Central Plateau. The PFP complex of buildings forms the bulk of the structures in the PFP Zone. For closure of the above-grade portion of structures within the PFP complex, the approach is to remove them to a state called ''slab-on-grade'' per the criteria contained in PFP End Point Criteria document and as documented in action memoranda. For below-grade portions of the structures (such as below-grade rooms, pipe trenches and underground ducts), the approach is to remove as much residual contamination as practicable and to fill the void spaces with clean fill material such as sand, grout, or controlled density fill. This approach will be modified as planning for the waste sites progresses to ensure that the actions of the PFP decommissioning projects do not negatively impact future planned actions under the CERCLA. Cribs, settling tanks, septic tanks and other miscellaneous below-grade void spaces will either be cleaned to the extent practicable and filled or will be covered with an environmental barrier as determined by further studies and CERCLA decision documents. Currently, between two and five environmental barriers are proposed to be placed over waste sites and remaining building slabs in the PFP Zone.

  14. Exterior Insulation Finish System (EIFS) Walls ORNL provides the tools to enable industry to engineer durable, moisture-tolerant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Exterior Insulation Finish System (EIFS) Walls ORNL provides the tools to enable industry the insulating value of walls and the energy efficiency of buildings. The EIFS concept came to America from in both moisture control and insulating value. EIFS's are inherently superior on thermal performance

  15. Comparison of different types of barley with variable crude fibre contents in growing-finishing pig diets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Comparison of different types of barley with variable crude fibre contents in growing-finishing pig pens to compare several types of barley with variable contents of crude fibre components under the same : a naked barley, a spring barley, a two-row winter barley and two six-row winter barleys with a crude fibre

  16. Energy-Saving Landscaping for Your Passive Solar Home Landscaping is often regarded as a finishing touch to enhance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy-Saving Landscaping for Your Passive Solar Home Landscaping is often regarded as a finishing at 30o north of east. When the sun reaches its maximum height, again at solar noon when it is directly Energy Office North Carolina Department of Administration Industrial Extension Service College

  17. An Overview of Surface Finishes and Their Role in Printed Circuit Board Solderability and Solder Joint Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vianco, P.T.

    1998-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A overview has been presented on the topic of alternative surface finishes for package I/Os and circuit board features. Aspects of processability and solder joint reliability were described for the following coatings: baseline hot-dipped, plated, and plated-and-fused 100Sn and Sn-Pb coatings; Ni/Au; Pd, Ni/Pd, and Ni/Pd/Au finishes; and the recently marketed immersion Ag coatings. The Ni/Au coatings appear to provide the all-around best option in terms of solderability protection and wire bondability. Nickel/Pal ftishes offer a slightly reduced level of performance in these areas that is most likely due to variable Pd surface conditions. It is necessmy to minimize dissolved Au or Pd contents in the solder material to prevent solder joint embrittlement. Ancillary aspects that included thickness measurement techniques; the importance of finish compatibility with conformal coatings and conductive adhesives; and the need for alternative finishes for the processing of non-Pb bearing solders were discussed.

  18. Media Room | National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > The EnergyCenter (LMI-EFRC)MaRIETechnologies | BlandineMediaMedia Room

  19. Room Air Conditioners | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin ofEnergy at Waste-to-Energy usingofRetrofittingFundA l i c eRooftop UnitRooftopRoom

  20. Carbon War Room | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovation inOpen EnergyCallawayCapara Energia S ACarbonWar Room Jump to:

  1. Room Temperature Dispenser Photocathode Using Elemental Cesium

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection TechnicalResonantNovember 15 toAdvancesRockSodiumWIPPDepartmentRoom

  2. NEPA Reading Room | National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |IsLove Your1 SECTIONES2008-54174MoreMuseum|NEESReading Room |

  3. A holistic investigation of complexity sources in nuclear power plant control rooms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sasangohar, Farzan

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The nuclear power community in the United States is moving to modernize aging power plant control rooms as well as develop control rooms for new reactors. New generation control rooms, along with modernized control rooms, ...

  4. Absorber Materials at Room and Cryogenic Temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    F. Marhauser, T.S. Elliott, A.T. Wu, E.P. Chojnacki, E. Savrun

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We recently reported on investigations of RF absorber materials at cryogenic temperatures conducted at Jefferson Laboratory (JLab). The work was initiated to find a replacement material for the 2 Kelvin low power waveguide Higher Order Mode (HOM) absorbers employed within the original cavity cryomodules of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF). This effort eventually led to suitable candidates as reported in this paper. Furthermore, though constrained by small funds for labor and resources, we have analyzed a variety of lossy ceramic materials, several of which could be usable as HOM absorbers for both normal conducting and superconducting RF structures, e.g. as loads in cavity waveguides and beam tubes either at room or cryogenic temperatures and, depending on cooling measures, low to high operational power levels.

  5. Room air monitor for radioactive aerosols

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Balmer, David K. (Broomfield, CO); Tyree, William H. (Boulder, CO)

    1989-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A housing assembly for use with a room air monitor for simultaneous collection and counting of suspended particles includes a casing containing a combination detector-preamplifier system at one end, a filter system at the other end, and an air flow system consisting of an air inlet formed in the casing between the detector-preamplifier system and the filter system and an air passageway extending from the air inlet through the casing and out the end opposite the detector-preamplifier combination. The filter system collects suspended particles transported directly through the housing by means of the air flow system, and these particles are detected and examined for radioactivity by the detector-pre The U.S. Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract No. DE-AC04-76DP03533 between the Department of Energy and Rockwell International Corporation.

  6. Room air monitor for radioactive aerosols

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Balmer, D.K.; Tyree, W.H.

    1987-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A housing assembly for use with a room air monitor for simultaneous collection and counting of suspended particles includes a casing containing a combination detector-preamplifier system at one end, a filter system at the other end, and an air flow system consisting of an air inlet formed in the casing between the detector-preamplifier system and the filter system and an air passageway extending from the air inlet through the casing and out the end opposite the detector-preamplifier combination. The filter system collects suspended particles transported directly through the housing by means of the air flow system, and these particles are detected and examined for radioactivity by the detector-preamplifier combination. 2 figs.

  7. A comparison of several surface finish measurement methods as applied to ground ceramic and metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blau, P.J.; Martin, R.L.; Riester, L.

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Surface finish is one of the most common measures of surface quality of ground ceramics and metal parts and a wide variety of methods and parameters have been developed to measure it. The purpose of this investigation was to compare the surface roughness parameters obtained on the same two specimens from three different types of measuring instruments: a traditional mechanical stylus system, a non-contact laser scanning system, and the atomic force microscope (two different AFM systems were compared). The same surface-ground silicon nitride and Inconel 625 alloy specimens were used for all measurements in this investigation. Significant differences in arithmetic average roughness, root-mean-square roughness, and peak-to-valley roughness were obtained when comparing data from the various topography measuring instruments. Non-contact methods agreed better with the others on the metal specimen than on the ceramic specimen. Reasons for these differences include the effective dimensions and geometry of the probe with respect to the surface topography; the reflectivity of the surface, and the type of filtering scheme Results of this investigation emphasize the importance of rigorously specifying the manner of surface roughness measurement when either reporting roughness data or when requesting that roughness data be provided.

  8. Thermal Performance of Exterior Insulation and Finish Systems Containing Vacuum Insulation Panels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Childs, Kenneth W [ORNL; Stovall, Therese K [ORNL; Biswas, Kaushik [ORNL; Carbary, Lawrence D [Dow Corning Corporation, Midland, MI

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-performance wall system is under development to improve wall thermal performance to a level of U-factor of 0.19 W/(m2 K) (R-30 [h ft2 F]/Btu) in a standard wall thickness by incorporating vacuum insulation panels (VIPs) into an exterior insulation finish system (EIFS). Such a system would be applicable to new construction and will offer a solution to more challenging retrofit situations as well. Multiple design options were considered to balance the need to protect theVIPs during construction and building operation, while minimizing heat transfer through the wall system. The results reported here encompass an indepth assessment of potential system performances including thermal modeling, detailed laboratory measurements under controlled conditions on the component, and system levels according to ASTM C518 (ASTM 2010). The results demonstrate the importance of maximizing the VIP coverage over the wall face. The results also reveal the impact of both the design and execution of system details, such as the joints between adjacent VIPs. The test results include an explicit modeled evaluation of the system performance in a clear wall.

  9. A Plutonium Finishing Plant Model for the Cercla Removal Action and Decommissioning Construction Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hopkins, A. [Fluor Hanford, Inc, Richland, WA (United States)

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The joint policy between the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for decommissioning buildings at DOE facilities documents an agreement between the agencies to perform decommissioning activities including demolition under the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA). The use of removal actions for decommissioning integrates EPA oversight authority, DOE lead agency responsibility, and state authority for decommissioning activities. Once removal actions have been performed under CERCLA, a construction completion report is required to document the completion of the required action. Additionally, a decommissioning report is required under DOE guidance. No direct guidance was found for documenting completion of decommissioning activities and preparing a final report that satisfies the CERCLA requirements and the DOE requirements for decommissioning. Additional guidance was needed for the documentation of construction completion under CERCLA for D and D projects undertaken under the joint policy that addresses the requirements of both agencies. A model for the construction completion report was developed to document construction completion for CERCLA D and D activities performed under the joint EPA/DOE policy at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). The model documentation report developed at PFP integrates the DOE requirements for establishing decommissioning end-points, documenting end-point completion and preparing a final decommissioning report with the CERCLA requirements to document completion of the action identified in the Action Memorandum (AM). The model includes the required information on health and safety, data management, cost and schedule and end-points completion. (authors)

  10. TOTAL MEASUREMENT UNCERTAINTY IN HOLDUP MEASUREMENTS AT THE PLUTONIUM FINISHING PLANT (PFP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KEELE, B.D.

    2007-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    An approach to determine the total measurement uncertainty (TMU) associated with Generalized Geometry Holdup (GGH) [1,2,3] measurements was developed and implemented in 2004 and 2005 [4]. This paper describes a condensed version of the TMU calculational model, including recent developments. Recent modifications to the TMU calculation model include a change in the attenuation uncertainty, clarifying the definition of the forward background uncertainty, reducing conservatism in the random uncertainty by selecting either a propagation of counting statistics or the standard deviation of the mean, and considering uncertainty in the width and height as a part of the self attenuation uncertainty. In addition, a detection limit is calculated for point sources using equations derived from summary equations contained in Chapter 20 of MARLAP [5]. The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) Recommendation 2007-1 to the Secretary of Energy identified a lack of requirements and a lack of standardization for performing measurements across the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex. The DNFSB also recommended that guidance be developed for a consistent application of uncertainty values. As such, the recent modifications to the TMU calculational model described in this paper have not yet been implemented. The Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) is continuing to perform uncertainty calculations as per Reference 4. Publication at this time is so that these concepts can be considered in developing a consensus methodology across the complex.

  11. History and stabilization of the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) complex, Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerber, M.S., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The 231-Z Isolation Building or Plutonium Metallurgy Building is located in the Hanford Site`s 200 West Area, approximately 300 yards north of the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) (234-5 Building). When the Hanford Engineer Works (HEW) built it in 1944 to contain the final step for processing plutonium, it was called the Isolation Building. At that time, HEW used a bismuth phosphate radiochemical separations process to make `AT solution,` which was then dried and shipped to Los Alamos, New Mexico. (AT solution is a code name used during World War II for the final HEW product.) The process was carried out first in T Plant and the 224-T Bulk Reduction Building and B Plant and the 224-B Bulk Reduction Building. The 224-T and -B processes produced a concentrated plutonium nitrate stream, which then was sent in 8-gallon batches to the 231-Z Building for final purification. In the 231-Z Building, the plutonium nitrate solution underwent peroxide `strikes` (additions of hydrogen peroxide to further separate the plutonium from its carrier solutions), to form the AT solution. The AT solution was dried and shipped to the Los Alamos Site, where it was made into metallic plutonium and then into weapons hemispheres.` The 231-Z Building began `hot` operations (operations using radioactive materials) with regular runs of plutonium nitrate on January 16, 1945.

  12. INTERNATIONAL ATOMIC ENERGY AGENCY (IAEA) SAFEGUARDS DURING STABILIZATION AT HANFORD PLUTONIUM FINISHING PLANT (PFP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MCRAE, L.P.

    2004-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Vault at the Plutonium Finishing Plan (PFP) became subject to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards beginning in 1994 as part of the US excess fissile material program. The inventory needed to be stabilized and repackaged for long-term storage to comply with Defense Nuclear Facility Safety Board Recommendation 94-1. In 1998, the United States began negotiations with IAEA to develop methods to maintain safeguards during stabilization and repackaging of this material. The Design Information Questionnaire was revised and submitted to the IAEA in 2002 describing modification to the facility to accommodate the stabilization process line. The operation plan for 2003 was submitted describing the proposed schedules for removing materials for stabilization. Stabilization and repackaging activities for the safeguarded plutonium began in January 2003 and were completed in December 2003. The stabilization was completed in five phases. IAEA containment and surveillance measures were maintained until the material was removed by phase for stabilization and repackaging. Following placement of the repackaged material into the storage vault, the IAEA conducted inventory change verification measurements, and re-established containment and surveillance. Plant activities and the impacts on operations are described.

  13. Fact Sheet: Improving Energy Efficiency for Server Rooms and Closets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheung, Hoi Ying Iris

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning Power Distributionlike a packaged air conditioning unit) for your server room(Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers’ (ASHRAE)

  14. Room-Temperature Multiferroic Hexagonal LuFeO3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, Xuemei [Bryn Mawr College; Balke, Nina [ORNL; Chi, Miaofang [ORNL; Gai, Zheng [ORNL; Keavney, David [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Lee, Ho Nyung [ORNL; Shen, Jian [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Snijders, Paul C [ORNL; Wang, Wenbin [ORNL; Ward, Thomas Z [ORNL; Xu, Xiaoshan [ORNL; Yi, Jieyu [ORNL; Zhu, Leyi [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Christen, Hans M [ORNL; Zhao, Jun [University of California, Berkeley

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We observed the coexistence of ferroelectricity and weak ferromagnetism at room temperature in the hexagonal phase of LuFeO3 stabilized by epitaxial thin film growth. While the ferroelectricity in hexagonal LuFeO3 can be understood as arising from its polar structure, the observation of weak ferromagnetism at room temperature is remarkable considering the frustrated triangular spin structure. An explanation of the room temperature weak ferromagnetism is proposed in terms of a subtle lattice distortion revealed by the structural characterization. The combination of ferroelectricity and weak ferromagnetism in epitaxial films at room temperature offers great potential for the application of this novel multiferroic material in next generation devices.

  15. INVENTORY FOR ELGAR COURT FLAT NO. BLOCK NO. ROOM NO.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birmingham, University of

    INVENTORY FOR ELGAR COURT FLAT NO. BLOCK NO. ROOM NO. Staff on the Vale Village try to ensure and cleaned to a high standard. Please make sure that you complete this inventory and note down anything which seat x 1 Toilet roll holder x 1 INVENTORY FOR SHACKLETON FLAT NO: BLOCK NO: ROOM NO: NAME: TELEPHONE

  16. INVENTORY FOR ELGAR COURT FLAT NO. BLOCK NO. ROOM NO.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birmingham, University of

    INVENTORY FOR ELGAR COURT FLAT NO. BLOCK NO. ROOM NO. Staff on the Vale Village try to ensure and cleaned to a high standard. Please make sure that you complete this inventory and note down anything which Toilet seat x 1 Toilet roll holder x 1 INVENTORY FOR MASON FLAT NO: BLOCK NO: ROOM NO: NAME: TELEPHONE

  17. INVENTORY FOR ELGAR COURT FLAT NO. BLOCK NO. ROOM NO.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birmingham, University of

    INVENTORY FOR ELGAR COURT FLAT NO. BLOCK NO. ROOM NO. Staff on the Vale Village try to ensure and cleaned to a high standard. Please make sure that you complete this inventory and note down anything which holder x 1 INVENTORY FOR TENNIS COURT BLOCK NO: FLAT NO: ROOM NO: NAME: TELEPHONE EXT. NO: #12;How

  18. INVENTORY FOR ELGAR COURT FLAT NO. BLOCK NO. ROOM NO.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birmingham, University of

    INVENTORY FOR ELGAR COURT FLAT NO. BLOCK NO. ROOM NO. Staff on the Vale Village try to ensure and cleaned to a high standard. Please make sure that you complete this inventory and note down anything which Toilet seat x 1 Toilet roll holder x 1 INVENTORY FOR ELGAR COURT FLAT NO: BLOCK NO: ROOM NO: NAME

  19. INVENTORY FOR ELGAR COURT FLAT NO. BLOCK NO. ROOM NO.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birmingham, University of

    INVENTORY FOR ELGAR COURT FLAT NO. BLOCK NO. ROOM NO. Staff on the Vale Village try to ensure and cleaned to a high standard. Please make sure that you complete this inventory and note down anything which rail x 1 INVENTORY FOR MAPLE BANK FLAT NO: BLOCK NO: ROOM NO: NAME: TELEPHONE EXT. NO: #12;How

  20. Determination of the Acceptable Room Temperature Range for Local Cooling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Y.; Zhao, R.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Determination of the acceptable room temperature range is a key problem in satisfactory design of local cooling for energy savings. At the room temperatures ranging from neutral to warm, three sensitive body parts-the face, chest and back-were each...

  1. Housing & Residential Services Room and Board Rates 20112012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Barbara

    Housing & Residential Services Room and Board Rates 2011­2012 Campus housing offers a variety, please view the Housing & Residential Services website at: housing.iit.edu. McCormick Student Village to participate in the Residential 5 meal plan. Winter Break is included in MSV, Gunsaulus Hall and SSV. DAS room

  2. Numerical modelling and analysis of a room temperature magnetic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Numerical modelling and analysis of a room temperature magnetic refrigeration system Thomas Frank and analysis of a room temperature magnetic refrigeration system Department: Fuel Cells and Solid State-dimensional mathematical model of an Active Magnetic Regenerator (AMR) system which is used for magnetic refrigeration

  3. Notice of Construction for the Magnesium Hydroxide Precipitation Process at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JANSKY, M.T.

    1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The following description and any attachments and references are provided to the Washington State Department of Health (WDOH), Division of Radiation Protection, Air Emissions & Defense Waste (WAC) 246-247, Radiation Protection-Air Emissions. The WAC 246-247-060, ''Applications, registration, and licensing'', states ''This section describes the information requirements for approval to construct, modify, and operate an emission unit. Any NOC requires the submittal of information listed in Appendix A.'' Appendix A (WAC 246-247-1 10) lists the requirements that must be addressed. Additionally, the following description, attachments and references are provided to the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as an NOC, in accordance with Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 61, ''National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants.'' The information required for submittal to the EPA is specified in 40 CFR 61.07. The potential emissions from this activity are estimated to provide greater than 0.1 millirem per year total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) to the hypothetical offsite maximally exposed individual (MEI), and commencement is needed within a short time. Therefore, this application also is intended to provide notification of the anticipated date of initial startup in accordance with the requirement listed in 40 CFR 61.09(a)(1), and it is requested that approval of this application also will constitute EPA acceptance of this initial startup notification. Written notification of the actual date of initial startup, in accordance with the requirement listed in 40 CFR 61.09(a)(2) will be provided at a later date. This NOC covers the activities associated with the Construction and operation activities involving the magnesium hydroxide precipitation process of plutonium solutions within the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP).

  4. Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) [SEC 1 THRU 11

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ULLAH, M K

    2001-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) is located on the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site in south central Washington State. The DOE Richland Operations (DOE-RL) Project Hanford Management Contract (PHMC) is with Fluor Hanford Inc. (FH). Westinghouse Safety Management Systems (WSMS) provides management support to the PFP facility. Since 1991, the mission of the PFP has changed from plutonium material processing to preparation for decontamination and decommissioning (D and D). The PFP is in transition between its previous mission and the proposed D and D mission. The objective of the transition is to place the facility into a stable state for long-term storage of plutonium materials before final disposition of the facility. Accordingly, this update of the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) reflects the current status of the buildings, equipment, and operations during this transition. The primary product of the PFP was plutonium metal in the form of 2.2-kg, cylindrical ingots called buttoms. Plutonium nitrate was one of several chemical compounds containing plutonium that were produced as an intermediate processing product. Plutonium recovery was performed at the Plutonium Reclamation Facility (PRF) and plutonium conversion (from a nitrate form to a metal form) was performed at the Remote Mechanical C (RMC) Line as the primary processes. Plutonium oxide was also produced at the Remote Mechanical A (RMA) Line. Plutonium processed at the PFP contained both weapons-grade and fuels-grade plutonium materials. The capability existed to process both weapons-grade and fuels-grade material through the PRF and only weapons-grade material through the RMC Line although fuels-grade material was processed through the line before 1984. Amounts of these materials exist in storage throughout the facility in various residual forms left from previous years of operations.

  5. DEACTIVATION AND DECOMMISSIONING ENVIRONMENTAL STRATEGY FOR THE PLUTONIUM FINISHING PLANT COMPLEX, HANFORD NUCLEAR RESERVATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hopkins, A.M.; Heineman, R.; Norton, S.; Miller, M.; Oates, L.

    2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Maintaining compliance with environmental regulatory requirements is a significant priority in successful completion of the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Nuclear Material Stabilization (NMS) Project. To ensure regulatory compliance throughout the deactivation and decommissioning of the PFP complex, an environmental regulatory strategy was developed. The overall goal of this strategy is to comply with all applicable environmental laws and regulations and/or compliance agreements during PFP stabilization, deactivation, and eventual dismantlement. Significant environmental drivers for the PFP Nuclear Material Stabilization Project include the Tri-Party Agreement; the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA); the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA); the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA); the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA); the Clean Air Act (CAA), and the Clean Water Act (CWA). Recent TPA negotiation s with Ecology and EPA have resulted in milestones that support the use of CERCLA as the primary statutory framework for decommissioning PFP. Milestones have been negotiated to support the preparation of Engineering Evaluations/Cost Analyses for decommissioning major PFP buildings. Specifically, CERCLA EE/CA(s) are anticipated for the following scopes of work: Settling Tank 241-Z-361, the 232-Z Incinerator, , the process facilities (eg, 234-5Z, 242, 236) and the process facility support buildings. These CERCLA EE/CA(s) are for the purpose of analyzing the appropriateness of the slab-on-grade endpoint Additionally, agreement was reached on performing an evaluation of actions necessary to address below-grade structures or other structures remaining after completion of the decommissioning of PFP. Remaining CERCLA actions will be integrated with other Central Plateau activities at the Hanford site.

  6. IAEA SAFEGUARDS DURING PLUTONIUM STABILIZATION AT HANFORDS PLUTONIUM FINISHING PLANT (PFP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MCRAE, L.P.

    2004-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The Vault at the Plutonium Finishing Plan (PFP) became subject to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards beginning in 1994 as part of the US excess fissile material program. The inventory needed to be stabilized and repackaged for long-term storage to comply with Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 94-1. In 1998, the United States began negotiations with IAEA to develop methods to maintain safeguards as this material was stabilized and repackaged. The Design Information Questionnaire was revised and submitted to the IAEA in 2002 describing how PFP would be modified to accommodate the stabilization process line. The operation plan for 2003 was submitted describing the proposed schedules for removing materials for stabilization. Stabilization and repackaging activities for the safeguarded plutonium began in January 2003 and were completed in December 2003. The safeguards approach implemented at the Hanford Site was a combination of the original baseline approach augmented by a series of five vault additions of stabilized materials followed by five removals of unstabilized materials. IAEA containment and surveillance measures were maintained until the unstabilized material was removed. Following placement of repackaged material (most from the original safeguarded stock) into the storage vault, the IAEA conducted inventory change verification measurements and then established containment and surveillance. As part of the stabilization campaign, the IAEA developed new measurement methods and calibration standards representative of the materials and packaging. The annual physical inventory verification was conducted on the normal IAEA schedule following the fourth additional/removal phase. Plant activities and the impacts on operations are described.

  7. Preliminary safety analysis report for project 89-GEB-610 Plutonium Finishing Plant instrumentation upgrade. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huber, T.E.

    1995-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This document consists of an analysis of the MICON system upgrade. This project shall install a Micon Co. distributed process monitor and control system with Sparc Sun workstation operator interfaces. The Sparc workstations are housed in consoles custom designed to human factors specifications. The distributed control system (DCS) shall have the installed capacity to monitor and control all related instruments and equipment presently connected to the panels in the PFP Power Control Room 321A as listed in the input/output list. This also includes all devices monitored and controlled by the 2736-ZB Allen Bradley programmable logic controller. The system has since assumed the control and monitoring responsibilities for Projects B- 680H ``Low Level Waste Treatment Facility`` and C-031H ``PFP Liquid Effluent Facilities``. Part of the new en`s change area in Building 234-5ZA, Room 712, has been remodeled to house two consoles and one supervisor console. Local control units containing the microprocontrollers and the input/output interface circuit boards shall be wired to the instrumentation and controlled equipment. These units communicate with the Sparc workstations via a redundant data communications highway and shall be strategic, throughout the PFP facility. The DCS has already been purchased from Micon Co., located in Houston Texas, presently on site.

  8. Comparisons of Lower Cambrian ( ) Chilhowee Group siliciclastics of the frontal Blue Ridge with possible equivalents in the central Blue Ridge and basement massifs in the southern Appalachians

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aylor, J.G. Jr.; Tull, J.F. (Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States). Dept. of Geology)

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Lower Cambrian Chilhowee Group (CG) along the Blue Ridge (BR) foreland boundary may also be represented in more internal parts of the orogen. The relative palinspastic positions of these more internal CG( ) sequences are poorly constrained, but they are believed to represent more outboard facies than those along the frontal BR. Although correlation with CG rocks of the frontal BR is indefinite due to metamorphism and polydeformation, correlative sequences may include the cover of the Corbin and Salem Church gneisses (Pinelog Fm.), Grandfather Mountain window, Murphy belt (MB) (Hiwassee River Group), Tallulah and Toxaway domes (TTD) (quartzite-schist member of the Tallulah Falls Fm.), Pine Mountain window (Hollis Quartzite), and Sauratown Mountains window (Hogan Creek and Sauratown Fms.). The CG is generally bounded on the west by the Great Smoky fault. Siliciclastics of the CG represent stacked, coarsening upward sequences, separated by transgressive facies, and capped by a highstand of the Shady Dolomite or its equivalents. CG correlations in the Kahatchee Mountain Group of the Talladega belt and the siliciclastics in the Hiwassee River Group of the MB are supported by fossil constraints. Other units are correlated with CG based upon intimate associations with marble believed to be equivalent to the overlying Lower Cambrian Shady Dolomite, or upon presumed uncomformable relationships above Grenville basement. The CG averages about 1,260 meters thickness at the frontal BR, whereas lower siliciclastics in the MB average 1,830 meters. The Pinelog Fm. is up to 600 meters thick. The Hollis Quartzite is approximately 325 meters thick, and the estimated thickness of the quartz-schist member at Tallulah Falls is up to 900 meters. More distal siliciclastics of the central BR in the MB and distal siliciclastics overlying basement were deposited farther out on the shelf as stratigraphic, litho-facies equivalents of shallower marine and continental deposits of the CG.

  9. Pyne Library Praised "Princeton had no separate library building until 1873, when the books

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , besides eleven basement rooms used for storage, ventilating machinery, storage battery, etc. Shelving

  10. The Integrated Safety Management System Verification Enhancement Review of the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BRIGGS, C.R.

    2000-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary purpose of the verification enhancement review was for the DOE Richland Operations Office (RL) to verify contractor readiness for the independent DOE Integrated Safety Management System Verification (ISMSV) on the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). Secondary objectives included: (1) to reinforce the engagement of management and to gauge management commitment and accountability; (2) to evaluate the ''value added'' benefit of direct public involvement; (3) to evaluate the ''value added'' benefit of direct worker involvement; (4) to evaluate the ''value added'' benefit of the panel-to-panel review approach; and, (5) to evaluate the utility of the review's methodology/adaptability to periodic assessments of ISM status. The review was conducted on December 6-8, 1999, and involved the conduct of two-hour interviews with five separate panels of individuals with various management and operations responsibilities related to PFP. A semi-structured interview process was employed by a team of five ''reviewers'' who directed open-ended questions to the panels which focused on: (1) evidence of management commitment, accountability, and involvement; and, (2) consideration and demonstration of stakeholder (including worker) information and involvement opportunities. The purpose of a panel-to-panel dialogue approach was to better spotlight: (1) areas of mutual reinforcement and alignment that could serve as good examples of the management commitment and accountability aspects of ISMS implementation, and, (2) areas of potential discrepancy that could provide opportunities for improvement. In summary, the Review Team found major strengths to include: (1) the use of multi-disciplinary project work teams to plan and do work; (2) the availability and broad usage of multiple tools to help with planning and integrating work; (3) senior management presence and accessibility; (4) the institutionalization of worker involvement; (5) encouragement of self-reporting and self-assessment by management; (6) the availability of multiple internal communication mechanisms; and, (7) the existence of overall facility-wide safety management goals as well as individualized project work team goals. Major opportunities for improvement identified include: (1) the enhancement of external communications relative to ISM; (2) the institutionalization of ISM-related performance agreements/incentives; (3) the strengthening of feedback loops; (4) fine-tuning the use of tools; and, (5) the formalization of good practices.

  11. Plutonium Finishing Plan (PFP) Treatment and Storage Unit Interim Status Closure Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PRIGNANO, A.L.

    2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the planned activities and performance standards for closing the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Treatment and Storage Unit. The PFP Treatment and Storage Unit is located within the 234-52 Building in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Facility. Although this document is prepared based upon Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 265, Subpart G requirements, closure of the unit will comply with Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-610 regulations pursuant to Section 5.3 of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) Action Plan (Ecology et al. 1996). Because the PFP Treatment and Storage Unit manages transuranic mixed (TRUM) waste, there are many controls placed on management of the waste. Based on the many controls placed on management of TRUM waste, releases of TRUM waste are not anticipated to occur in the PFP Treatment and Storage Unit. Because the intention is to clean close the PFP Treatment and Storage Unit, postclosure activities are not applicable to this closure plan. To clean close the unit, it will be demonstrated that dangerous waste has not been left onsite at levels above the closure performance standard for removal and decontamination. If it is determined that clean closure is not possible or is environmentally impractical, the closure plan will be modified to address required postclosure activities. The PFP Treatment and Storage Unit will be operated to immobilize and/or repackage plutonium-bearing waste in a glovebox process. The waste to be processed is in a solid physical state (chunks and coarse powder) and will be sealed into and out of the glovebox in closed containers. The containers of immobilized waste will be stored in the glovebox and in additional permitted storage locations at PFP. The waste will be managed to minimize the potential for spills outside the glovebox, and to preclude spills from reaching soil. Containment surfaces will be maintained to ensure integrity. In the unlikely event that a waste spill does occur outside the glovebox, operating methods and administrative controls will require that waste spills be cleaned up promptly and completely, and a notation will be made in the operating record. Because dangerous waste does not include source, special nuclear, and by-product material components of mixed waste, radionuclides are not within the scope of this documentation. The information on radionuclides is provided only for general knowledge.

  12. Comparison of predicted and derived measures of volatile organic compounds inside four relocatable classrooms due to identified interior finish sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hodgson, Alfred T.; Shendell, Derek G.; Fisk, William J.; Apte, Michael G.

    2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Indoor exposures to toxic and odorous volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are of general concern. Recently, VOCs in portable or relocatable classrooms (RCs) have received particular attention. However, very little was known about indoor environmental quality (IEQ) and the sources, composition, and indoor concentrations of VOCs in RCs. This project task focused on developing and demonstrating a process for selecting interior finish materials for RCs that have relatively low impacts with respect to their emissions of toxic and odorous VOCs. This task was part of a larger project to demonstrate the potential for simultaneous improvements in IEQ and energy efficiency in four new RCs equipped both with a continuously ventilating advanced heating, ventilating, and air conditioning system (HVAC) and a standard HVAC system. These HVACs were operated on alternate weeks. One RC per pair was constructed with standard interior finish materials, and the other included alternate interior materials identified in our prior laboratory study to have low VOC emissions. The RCs were sited in side-by-side pairs at two elementary schools in distinct northern California climate zones. Classroom VOC emission rates (mg hr{sup -1}) and concentrations were predicted based on VOC emission factors ({micro}g m{sup -2} hr{sup -1}) measured for individual materials in the laboratory, the quantities of installed materials and design ventilation rates. Predicted emission rates were compared to values derived from classroom measurements of VOC concentrations and ventilation rates made at pre-occupancy, eight weeks, and 27 weeks. Predicted concentrations were compared to measured integrated VOC indoor minus outdoor concentrations during school hours in the fall cooling season with the advanced HVAC operated. These measured concentrations also were compared between standard and material-modified RCs. Our combined laboratory and field process proved effective by correctly predicting that IEQ impacts of material VOC emissions would be minor when RCs were ventilated at or above code-minimum requirements. Assuming code-minimum ventilation rates are maintained, the benefits attributable to the use of alternate interior finish materials in RC's constructed by the manufacturer associated with this study are small, implying that it is not imperative to use such alternative finishing materials. However, it is essential to avoid materials that can degrade IEQ, and the results of this study demonstrate that laboratory-based material testing combined with modeling and field validation can help to achieve that aim.

  13. A few rooms on campus are available for students to use,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Escher, Christine

    . Frosted glass walls let light into the room while keeping the space private. Foot baths are located in public bathrooms near the multifath room. A curtain in the middle of the room creates a separate space

  14. Control and Room Temperature Optimization of Energy Efficient Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Djouadi, Seddik M [ORNL] [ORNL; Kuruganti, Phani Teja [ORNL] [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The building sector consumes a large part of the energy used in the United States and is responsible for nearly 40% of greenhouse gas emissions. It is therefore economically and environmentally important to reduce the building energy consumption to realize massive energy savings. In this paper, a method to control room temperature in buildings is proposed. The approach is based on a distributed parameter model represented by a three dimensional (3D) heat equation in a room with heater/cooler located at ceiling. The latter is resolved using finite element methods, and results in a model for room temperature with thousands of states. The latter is not amenable to control design. A reduced order model of only few states is then derived using Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD). A Linear Quadratic Regulator (LQR) is computed based on the reduced model, and applied to the full order model to control room temperature.

  15. Study on Influencing Factors of Night Ventilation in Office Rooms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Z.; Sun, X.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A mathematical and physical model on night ventilation is set up. The fields of indoor air temperature, air velocity and thermal comfort are simulated using Airpak software. Some main influencing factors of night ventilation in office rooms...

  16. Terahertz Room-Temperature Photonic Crystal Nanocavity Laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dirk Englund; Hatice Altug; Ilya Fushman; Jelena Vuckovic

    2007-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe an efficient surface-passivated photonic crystal nanocavity laser, demonstrating room-temperature operation with 3-ps total pulse duration (detector response limited) and low-temperature operation with ultra-low-threshold near 9uW.

  17. Prediction of Room Air Diffusion for Reduced Diffuser Flow Rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gangisetti, Kavita

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    With the ever-increasing availability of high performance computing facilities, numerical simulation through Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is increasingly used to predict the room air distribution. CFD is becoming an important design...

  18. Modeling control room crews for accident sequence analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Y. (Yuhao)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes a systems-based operating crew model designed to simulate the behavior of an nuclear power plant control room crew during an accident scenario. This model can lead to an improved treatment of potential ...

  19. Student Employment Office 883 Broadway Street, Room 102

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Lowell, University of

    1 STUDENT EMPLOYMENT HANDBOOK 2011-2012 Student Employment Office 883 Broadway Street, Room 102://www.uml.edu/financialaid #12;2 Table of Contents Introduction to the Student Employment Programs .....................................................4 The Basics of On-Campus Employment

  20. Near room temperature lithographically processed metal-oxide transistors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tang, Hui, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fully lithographic process at near-room-temperature was developed for the purpose of fabricating transistors based on metal-oxide channel materials. The combination of indium tin oxide (ITO) as the source/drain electrodes, ...

  1. Financial Aid and Student Records Student Wing, Room 119

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    Financial Aid and Student Records Student Wing, Room 119 PO Box 6000 Binghamton, New York 13902 or spring semester. · Any student wishing to drop all summer or winter classes is not required to complete

  2. Avoiding 100 New Power Plants by Increasing Efficiency of Room Air Conditioners in India: Opportunities and Challenges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phadke, Amol

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Efficiency of Room Air Conditioners in India: OpportunitiesStar Labeled room Air Conditioners. ” Ministry of Power (of Superefficient Room Air Conditioners,” Lawrence Berkeley

  3. Using a Research Simulator for Validating Control Room Modernization Concepts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronald L. Boring; Vivek Agarwal; Julius J. Persensky; Jeffrey C. Joe

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program is a research, development, and deployment program sponsored by the United States Department of Energy. The program is operated in close collaboration with industry research and development programs to provide the technical foundations for licensing and managing the long-term, safe, and economical operation of nuclear power plants that are currently in operation. Advanced instrumentation and control (I&C) technologies are needed to support the continued safe and reliable production of power from nuclear energy systems during sustained periods of operation up to and beyond their expected licensed lifetime. This requires that new capabilities to achieve process control be developed and eventually implemented in existing nuclear control rooms. It also requires that approaches be developed and proven to achieve sustainability of I&C systems throughout the period of extended operation. Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is working closely with nuclear utilities to develop technologies and solutions to help ensure the safe life extension of current reactors. One of the main areas of focus is control room modernization. Current analog control rooms are growing obsolete, and it is difficult for utilities to maintain them. Using its reconfigurable control room simulator adapted from a training simulator, INL serves as a neutral test bed for implementing new control room system technologies and assisting in control room modernization efforts across.

  4. Single-Molecule Triplet-State Photon Antibunching at Room Temperature...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Antibunching at Room Temperature. Abstract: We have demonstrated probing single-molecule metal-to-ligand charge transfer (MLCT) dynamics at room temperature. Using photon...

  5. Energy Consumption Estimation for Room Air-conditioners Using Room Temperature Simulation with One-Minute Intervals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, F.; Yoshida, H.; Matsumoto, K.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For the purpose of developing optimized control algorithm for room air-conditioners to ensure their energy efficiency, a short time interval (i.e., one minute) simulation of building thermal performance is necessary because the sampling time...

  6. PLUTONIUM FINISHING PLANT (PFP) 241-Z LIQUID WASTE TREATMENT FACILITY DEACTIVATION AND DEMOLITION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JOHNSTON GA

    2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Fluor Hanford, Inc. (FH) is proud to submit the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) 241-Z liquid Waste Treatment Facility Deactivation and Demolition (D&D) Project for consideration by the Project Management Institute as Project of the Year for 2008. The decommissioning of the 241-Z Facility presented numerous challenges, many of which were unique with in the Department of Energy (DOE) Complex. The majority of the project budget and schedule was allocated for cleaning out five below-grade tank vaults. These highly contaminated, confined spaces also presented significant industrial safety hazards that presented some of the most hazardous work environments on the Hanford Site. The 241-Z D&D Project encompassed diverse tasks: cleaning out and stabilizing five below-grade tank vaults (also called cells), manually size-reducing and removing over three tons of process piping from the vaults, permanently isolating service utilities, removing a large contaminated chemical supply tank, stabilizing and removing plutonium-contaminated ventilation ducts, demolishing three structures to grade, and installing an environmental barrier on the demolition site . All of this work was performed safely, on schedule, and under budget. During the deactivation phase of the project between November 2005 and February 2007, workers entered the highly contaminated confined-space tank vaults 428 times. Each entry (or 'dive') involved an average of three workers, thus equaling approximately 1,300 individual confined -space entries. Over the course of the entire deactivation and demolition period, there were no recordable injuries and only one minor reportable skin contamination. The 241-Z D&D Project was decommissioned under the provisions of the 'Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order' (the Tri-Party Agreement or TPA), the 'Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976' (RCRA), and the 'Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980' (CERCLA). The project completed TPA Milestone M-083-032 to 'Complete those activities required by the 241-Z Treatment and Storage Unit's RCRA Closure Plan' four years and seven months ahead of this legally enforceable milestone. In addition, the project completed TPA Milestone M-083-042 to 'Complete transition and dismantlement of the 241-2 Waste Treatment Facility' four years and four months ahead of schedule. The project used an innovative approach in developing the project-specific RCRA closure plan to assure clear integration between the 241-Z RCRA closure activities and ongoing and future CERCLA actions at PFP. This approach provided a regulatory mechanism within the RCRA closure plan to place segments of the closure that were not practical to address at this time into future actions under CERCLA. Lessons learned from th is approach can be applied to other closure projects within the DOE Complex to control scope creep and mitigate risk. A paper on this topic, entitled 'Integration of the 241-Z Building D and D Under CERCLA with RCRA Closure at the PFP', was presented at the 2007 Waste Management Conference in Tucson, Arizona. In addition, techniques developed by the 241-Z D&D Project to control airborne contamination, clean the interior of the waste tanks, don and doff protective equipment, size-reduce plutonium-contaminated process piping, and mitigate thermal stress for the workers can be applied to other cleanup activities. The project-management team developed a strategy utilizing early characterization, targeted cleanup, and close coordination with PFP Criticality Engineering to significantly streamline the waste- handling costs associated with the project . The project schedule was structured to support an early transition to a criticality 'incredible' status for the 241-Z Facility. The cleanup work was sequenced and coordinated with project-specific criticality analysis to allow the fissile material waste being generated to be managed in a bulk fashion, instead of individual waste packages. This approach negated the need for real-time assay of individ

  7. Compatibility of lead-free solders with lead containing surface finishes as a reliability issue in electronic assemblies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vianco, P.; Rejent, J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Artaki, I.; Ray, U.; Finley, D.; Jackson, A. [AT and T Bell Labs., Princeton, NJ (United States)

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Enhanced performance goals and environmental restrictions have heightened the consideration for use of alternative solders as replacements for the traditional tin-lead (Sn-Pb) eutectic and near-eutectic alloys. However, the implementation of non-Pb bearing surface finishes may lag behind solder alloy development. A study was performed which examined the effect(s) of Pb contamination on the performance of Sn-Ag-Bi and Sn-Ag-Cu-Sb lead-free solders by the controlled addition of 63Sn-37Pb solder at levels of 0.5 {minus} 8.0 wt.%. Thermal analysis and ring-in-plug shear strength studies were conducted on bulk solder properties. Circuit board prototype studies centered on the performance of 20I/O SOIC gull wing joints. Both alloys exhibited declines in their melting temperatures with greater Sn-Pb additions. The ring-in-plug shear strength of the Sn-Ag-Cu-Sb solder increased slightly with Sn-Pb levels while the Sn-Ag-Bi alloy experienced a strength loss. The mechanical behavior of the SOIC (Small Outline Integrated Circuit) Sn-Ag-Bi solder joints reproduced the strength levels were insensitive to 10,106 thermal cycles. The Sn-Ag-Cu-Sb solder showed a slight decrease in the gull wing joint strengths that was sensitive to the Pb content of the surface finish.

  8. Energy Efficiency in Small Server Rooms: Field Surveys and Findings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheung, Iris [Hoi; Greenberg, Steve; Mahdavi, Roozbeh; Brown, Richard; Tschudi, William

    2014-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Fifty-seven percent of US servers are housed in server closets, server rooms, and localized data centers, in what are commonly referred to as small server rooms, which comprise 99percent of all server spaces in the US. While many mid-tier and enterprise-class data centers are owned by large corporations that consider energy efficiency a goal to minimize business operating costs, small server rooms typically are not similarly motivated. They are characterized by decentralized ownership and management and come in many configurations, which creates a unique set of efficiency challenges. To develop energy efficiency strategies for these spaces, we surveyed 30 small server rooms across eight institutions, and selected four of them for detailed assessments. The four rooms had Power Usage Effectiveness (PUE) values ranging from 1.5 to 2.1. Energy saving opportunities ranged from no- to low-cost measures such as raising cooling set points and better airflow management, to more involved but cost-effective measures including server consolidation and virtualization, and dedicated cooling with economizers. We found that inefficiencies mainly resulted from organizational rather than technical issues. Because of the inherent space and resource limitations, the most effective measure is to operate servers through energy-efficient cloud-based services or well-managed larger data centers, rather than server rooms. Backup power requirement, and IT and cooling efficiency should be evaluated to minimize energy waste in the server space. Utility programs are instrumental in raising awareness and spreading technical knowledge on server operation, and the implementation of energy efficiency measures in small server rooms.

  9. Research on Thermal Properties in a Phase Change Wallboard Room Based on Air Conditioning Cold Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, G.; Li, W.; Chen, X.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    After comparing the thermal performance parameters of an ordinary wall room to a phase change wall (PCW) room, we learn that phase change wallboard affects the fluctuation of temperature in air-conditioning room in the summer. We built a PCW room...

  10. Replacement of the Advanced Test Reactor control room

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durney, J.L.; Klingler, W.B. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (USA))

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The control room for the Advanced Test Reactor has been replaced to provide modern equipment utilizing current standards and meeting the current human factors requirements. The control room was designed in the early 1960 era and had not been significantly upgraded since the initial installation. The replacement did not change any of the safety circuits or equipment but did result in replacement of some of the recorders that display information from the safety systems. The replacement was completed in concert with the replacement of the control room simulator which provided important feedback on the design. The design successfully incorporates computer-based systems into the display of the plant variables. This improved design provides the operator with more information in a more usable form than was provided by the original design. The replacement was successfully completed within the scheduled time thereby minimizing the down time for the reactor. 1 fig., 1 tab.

  11. Integrated intelligent systems in advanced reactor control rooms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beckmeyer, R.R.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An intelligent, reactor control room, information system is designed to be an integral part of an advanced control room and will assist the reactor operator's decision making process by continuously monitoring the current plant state and providing recommended operator actions to improve that state. This intelligent system is an integral part of, as well as an extension to, the plant protection and control systems. This paper describes the interaction of several functional components (intelligent information data display, technical specifications monitoring, and dynamic procedures) of the overall system and the artificial intelligence laboratory environment assembled for testing the prototype. 10 refs., 5 figs.

  12. Is thermo-ionic emission at room temperature exploitable?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Germano D'Abramo

    2009-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    In this brief note we describe two devices, a sort of flat and spherical capacitor, with which one should be able to test the possibility of creating a macroscopic voltage, and thus exploitable current, out of a single thermal source at room temperature. The basic idea is trivial and it makes use of a thermo-emitting cathode with work function as low as 0.7eV. The idea is not completely new, but our approach is simpler and neat. When implemented, it should allow to assess if approaches based on thermo-ionic materials at room temperature really violate the Second Law of Thermodynamics macroscopically.

  13. AN APPROACH TO CHARACTERIZING & EVALUATING ALTERNATIVES FOR THE DECOMMISSIONING OF SUB-GRADE STRUCTURES AT THE PLUTONIUM FINISHING PLANT (PFP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HOPKINS, A.M.; KLOS, D.B.

    2007-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2002, the Richland Operations Office (RL) of the US Department of Energy (DOE), the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) developed milestones for transitioning the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) facility to a clean slab-on-grade configuration. These milestones required developing an engineering evaluation/cost analysis (EF/CA) for the facility's sub-grade structures and installations as part of a series of evaluations intended to provide for the transition of the facility to a clean slab-on-grade configuration. In addition to supporting decisions for interim actions, the analyses of sub-grade structures and installations performed through this EE/CA will contribute to the remedial investigation feasibility study(ies) and subsequently to the final records of decision for the relevant operable units responsible for site closure in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site.

  14. Drying and curing of stains and lacquers used in furniture finishing 1 DRYING AND CURING OF STAINS AND LACQUERS USED IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stokes, Yvonne

    Nexus engaged a consultant to design a semi-automated finishing line, so as to remove inefficiencies. In cold or humid weather white milky patches may appear in the surface fin- ish. This is known as blooming-spray booth which consists of an open area of the factory backed by a wall of filters; fans behind thi

  15. PanFunPro: Bacterial Pan-Genome Analysis Based on the Functional Profiles (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Lukjancenko, Oksana [Technical University of Denmark

    2013-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Julien Tremblay from DOE JGI presents "Evaluation of Multiplexed 16S rRNA Microbial Population Surveys Using Illumina MiSeq Platorm" at the 7th Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting held in June, 2012 in Santa Fe, NM.

  16. Preparation of Nucleic Acid Libraries for Personalized Sequencing Systems Using an Integrated Microfluidic Hub Technology (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Patel, Kamlesh D [Ken]; SNL,

    2013-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Kamlesh (Ken) Patel from Sandia National Laboratories (Livermore, California) presents "Preparation of Nucleic Acid Libraries for Personalized Sequencing Systems Using an Integrated Microfluidic Hub Technology " at the 7th Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting held in June, 2012 in Santa Fe, NM.

  17. The following values were studied : pH, water retention ability, coloring, transformation yield, amount of residual nitrite, and distributior of sodium chloride in the finished product.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    The following values were studied : pH, water retention ability, coloring, transformation yield, amount of residual nitrite, and distributior of sodium chloride in the finished product. As a general sampling sites, lard weight, coloration index, and water retention ability in fresh ham. Values obtained

  18. Faculty of Law Number of students who has finished (with a degree) and early leavers (excluding transferred students) by AY (As of May 1, 2012)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banbara, Mutsunori

    Holdover H OthersI) Total + early admission Total GraduatesC) over-term within designated term Rate outside school Reasons to leaveF) Leaving RateG) Holdover H within designated term over-term GraduatesCFaculty of Law Number of students who has finished (with a degree) and early leavers (excluding

  19. Computer codes for evaluation of control room habitability (HABIT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stage, S.A. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the Computer Codes for Evaluation of Control Room Habitability (HABIT). HABIT is a package of computer codes designed to be used for the evaluation of control room habitability in the event of an accidental release of toxic chemicals or radioactive materials. Given information about the design of a nuclear power plant, a scenario for the release of toxic chemicals or radionuclides, and information about the air flows and protection systems of the control room, HABIT can be used to estimate the chemical exposure or radiological dose to control room personnel. HABIT is an integrated package of several programs that previously needed to be run separately and required considerable user intervention. This report discusses the theoretical basis and physical assumptions made by each of the modules in HABIT and gives detailed information about the data entry windows. Sample runs are given for each of the modules. A brief section of programming notes is included. A set of computer disks will accompany this report if the report is ordered from the Energy Science and Technology Software Center. The disks contain the files needed to run HABIT on a personal computer running DOS. Source codes for the various HABIT routines are on the disks. Also included are input and output files for three demonstration runs.

  20. audiometric test rooms: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    audiometric test rooms First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Energy performance of air...

  1. Room Temperature Metastability of Multilayer Graphene Oxide Films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Room Temperature Metastability of Multilayer Graphene Oxide Films Suenne Kim1 , Si Zhou2 , Yike Hu1 Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique ­ Institut N´eel, Grenoble, B.P. 166, 38042 France Graphene oxide has multiple potential applications. The chemistry of graphene oxide and its response to external

  2. University of Texas Arlington 701 S. West Street, Room 409

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Arlington, University of

    University of Texas Arlington UTA 701 S. West Street, Room 409 Arlington, Texas United States 76019.e. Fall/Year) You may be entitled to know what information The University of Texas at Arlington (UT to procedures set forth in UTS 139. The law is found in sections 552.021, 552.023 and 559.004 of the Texas

  3. Mr Justin Dixon Room 10GA07/08,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mr Justin Dixon Room 10GA07/08, Sand Hutton, York, Y41 1LZ Telephone: +44 (0)1904 465631 Website, pesticide and biological controls, alternative hosts (potatoes, beans, aubergine), controls in Spain and impact and control within the organic sector. · There was some concern about the current policy

  4. Electrochemical Generation of Superoxide in Room-Temperature Ionic Liquids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weidner, John W.

    with an inorganic salt.7 They are directly related to more familiar high-temperature molten salts that are used by the reduction of dioxygen in imidizalium chloride-aluminum chloride molten salt. However, the resulting su and chlorides.2,3,6 Room-temperature ionic liquids RTILs are stable mixtures of an organic cation/anion salt

  5. Laboratory Chemical Hygiene Plan Building and Room Numbers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Paul G.

    1 Laboratory Chemical Hygiene Plan Building and Room Numbers: Engineering Research Building 1125 or other Person in Charge: Paul G. Evans Phone: (608) 265-6773 Email: evans@engr.wisc.edu Chemical Hygiene. It is also available online at http://xray.engr.wisc.edu/resources/chemical_hygiene_plan_8-08.pdf

  6. Science Career & Cooperative Education Burke Science Building Room 127

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hitchcock, Adam P.

    Science Career & Cooperative Education Burke Science Building Room 127 www.science event. Visit the SCCE website to find event dates and details: www.science.mcmaster.ca/scce Attend a Co visit: www.science.mcmaster.ca/scce Enroll in SCIENCE 2C00 to learn the skills for career success

  7. Prediction of Room Air Diffusion for Reduced Diffuser Flow Rates 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gangisetti, Kavita

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    and analytical tool for investigating ventilation inside the system and thus to increase thermal comfort and improve indoor air quality. The room air supply diffuser flow rates can be reduced for less loading with the help of a variable air volume unit...

  8. Syllabus for Ec 122: Econometrics Room: 125 Baxter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Low, Steven H.

    Syllabus for Ec 122: Econometrics Fall, 2013 Room: 125 Baxter Days and Times: Tuesdays and Thursdays, 1 - 2:30pm Required Text: Principles of Econometrics, 4th Edition, Hill, Griffiths, and Lim, Wiley, 2011. Recommended Text: Applied Econometrics in R, Kleiber and Zeileis, Springer, 2008

  9. Model-Based Commissioning for Filters in Room Air Conditioners 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, F.; Yoshida, H.; Kitagawa, H.; Matsumoto, K.; Goto, K.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper proposes a model that can estimate filter resistance. Two sorts of value are used as inputs to estimate filter resistance. One is the power consumed by the fan in the indoor unit and the other is the thermal performance. For the room air...

  10. Perfect Secret Sharing Schemes from Room GhulamRasool Chaudhry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seberry, Jennifer

    Perfect Secret Sharing Schemes from Room Squares Ghulam­Rasool Chaudhry Hossein Ghodosi Jennifer retirement Abstract Secret sharing schemes are one of the most important primitives in distributed systems. In perfect secret sharing schemes, collabo­ ration between unauthorised participants cannot reduce

  11. Perfect Secret Sharing Schemes from Room Ghulam-Rasool Chaudhry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seberry, Jennifer

    Perfect Secret Sharing Schemes from Room Squares Ghulam-Rasool Chaudhry Hossein Ghodosi Jennifer retirement Abstract Secret sharing schemes are one of the most important primitives in distributed systems. In perfect secret sharing schemes, collabo- ration between unauthorised participants cannot reduce

  12. Model-Based Commissioning for Filters in Room Air Conditioners

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, F.; Yoshida, H.; Kitagawa, H.; Matsumoto, K.; Goto, K.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper proposes a model that can estimate filter resistance. Two sorts of value are used as inputs to estimate filter resistance. One is the power consumed by the fan in the indoor unit and the other is the thermal performance. For the room air...

  13. China Energy Efficiency Round Robin Testing Results for Room

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL-3502E China Energy Efficiency Round Robin Testing Results for Room Air Conditioners Nan Zhou Berkeley National Laboratory is an equal opportunity employer. #12;i Table of Contents I. Air Conditioner.......................................................................................................................... 6 I.2.1 Necessity for Air Conditioner Round Robin Testing

  14. Nuclear power plant control room operator control and monitoring tasks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bovell, C.R.; Beck, M.G. [Concord Associates, Inc., Knoxville, TN (United States); Carter, R.J. [Oak Ridge National Labs., TN (United States)

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory is conducting a research project the purpose of which is to develop the technical bases for regulatory review criteria for use in evaluating the safety implications of human factors associated with the use of artificial intelligence and expert systems, and with advanced instrumentation and control (I and C) systems in nuclear power plants (NPP). This report documents the results from Task 8 of that project. The primary objectives of the task was to identify the scope and type of control and monitoring tasks now performed by control-room operators. Another purpose was to address the types of controls and safety systems needed to operate the nuclear plant. The final objective of Task 8 was to identify and categorize the type of information and displays/indicators required to monitor the performance of the control and safety systems. This report also discusses state-of-the-art controls and advanced display devices which will be available for use in control-room retrofits and in control room of future plants. The fundamental types of control and monitoring tasks currently conducted by operators can be divided into four classifications: function monitoring tasks, control manipulation tasks, fault diagnostic tasks, and administrative tasks. There are three general types of controls used in today`s NPPs, switches, pushbuttons, and analog controllers. Plant I and C systems include components to achieve a number of safety-related functions: measuring critical plant parameters, controlling critical plant parameters within safety limits, and automatically actuating protective devices if safe limits are exceeded. The types of information monitored by the control-room operators consist of the following parameters: pressure, fluid flow and level, neutron flux, temperature, component status, water chemistry, electrical, and process and area radiation. The basic types of monitoring devices common to nearly all NPP control rooms include: analog meters, graphic recorders, digital displays and counters, light indicators, visual and audio alarms, and cathode-ray tubes.

  15. Energy Consumption Estimation for Room Air-conditioners Using Room Temperature Simulation with One-Minute Intervals 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, F.; Yoshida, H.; Matsumoto, K.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of simulated energy consumption can match the measured data. The simulation accuracy of room air temperature and energy consumption during the air-conditioner start-up period is not good and needs to be improved in future research. But in general...

  16. FRAMEWORK AND APPLICATION FOR MODELING CONTROL ROOM CREW PERFORMANCE AT NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronald L Boring; David I Gertman; Tuan Q Tran; Brian F Gore

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper summarizes an emerging project regarding the utilization of high-fidelity MIDAS simulations for visualizing and modeling control room crew performance at nuclear power plants. The key envisioned uses for MIDAS-based control room simulations are: (i) the estimation of human error associated with advanced control room equipment and configurations, (ii) the investigative determination of contributory cognitive factors for risk significant scenarios involving control room operating crews, and (iii) the certification of reduced staffing levels in advanced control rooms. It is proposed that MIDAS serves as a key component for the effective modeling of cognition, elements of situation awareness, and risk associated with human performance in next generation control rooms.

  17. Room-temperature magnetoelectric multiferroic thin films and applications thereof

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katiyar, Ram S; Kuman, Ashok; Scott, James F.

    2014-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention provides a novel class of room-temperature, single-phase, magnetoelectric multiferroic (PbFe.sub.0.67W.sub.0.33O.sub.3).sub.x (PbZr.sub.0.53Ti.sub.0.47O.sub.3).sub.1-x (0.2.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.0.8) (PFW.sub.x-PZT.sub.1-x) thin films that exhibit high dielectric constants, high polarization, weak saturation magnetization, broad dielectric temperature peak, high-frequency dispersion, low dielectric loss and low leakage current. These properties render them to be suitable candidates for room-temperature multiferroic devices. Methods of preparation are also provided.

  18. A comparison of nuclear reactor control room display panels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowers, Frances Renae

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    energized (and operating normally) and green indicates safe or deenergized (operation stopped) . This second coding system is the primary code in the control room of the TAMU Nuclear Engineering 10 Department's Research Reactor. It originated from... the red for danger standard mentioned at the beginning of this paragraph. In electrical systems, a closed circuit means that it is energized and therefore dangerous to touch. An open circuit means that current is not flowing and it is therefore safe...

  19. Room-temperature Formation of Hollow Cu2O Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hung, Ling-I; Tsung, Chia-Kuang; Huang, Wenyu; Yang, Peidong

    2010-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Monodisperse Cu and Cu2O nanoparticles (NPs) are synthesized using tetradecylphosphonic acid as a capping agent. Dispersing the NPs in chloroform and hexane at room temperature results in the formation of hollow Cu2O NPs and Cu@Cu2O core/shell NPs, respectively. The monodisperse Cu2O NPs are used to fabricate hybrid solar cells with efficiency of 0.14percent under AM 1.5 and 1 Sun illumination.

  20. Control of Computer Room Air Conditioning using IT Equipment Sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bell, Geoffrey C.; Storey, Bill; Patterson, Michael K.

    2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this demonstration was to show how sensors in IT equipment could be accessed and used to directly control computer room air conditioning. The data provided from the sensors is available on the IT network and the challenge for this project was to connect this information to the computer room air handler's control system. A control strategy was developed to enable separate control of the chilled water flow and the fans in the computer room air handlers. By using these existing sensors in the IT equipment, an additional control system is eliminated (or could be redundant) and optimal cooling can be provided saving significant energy. Using onboard server temperature sensors will yield significant energy reductions in data centers. Intel hosted the demonstration in its Santa Clara, CA data center. Intel collaborated with IBM, HP, Emerson, Wunderlich-Malec Engineers, FieldServer Technologies, and LBNL to install the necessary components and develop the new control scheme. LBNL also validated the results of the demonstration.

  1. The role of hydrogen in room-temperature ferromagnetism at graphite surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohldag, H.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    B, 70:235106, 2004. The role of hydrogen in room-temperatureThe role of hydrogen in room-temperature ferromagnetism atto carbon ? states, also hydrogen-mediated electronic states

  2. Research on Cool Storage Time of a Phase Change Wallboard Room in the Summer 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, G.; Liang, R.; Li, G.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Through testing and analysis of the parameters of the indoor thermal property in a phase change wallboard room and an ordinary room, the effects of using phase change wallboards on indoor temperature in summer and with air ...

  3. Study on Energy Saving of the Interlayer Ventilation Walla Used in Clean Operation Rooms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, J.; Lian, Z.; Hou, Z.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recovery energy of the exhaust in air conditioning is very important to clean operating rooms. In disinfected operating rooms, we often use completely fresh air conditioning system in order to maintain cleanliness. All the return air of the air...

  4. Room-Temperature Ferromagnetism in Ion-Implanted Co-Doped TiO...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Room-Temperature Ferromagnetism in Ion-Implanted Co-Doped TiO(110) Rutile. Room-Temperature Ferromagnetism in Ion-Implanted Co-Doped TiO(110) Rutile. Abstract: Interest in diluted...

  5. Synthesis of Room-Temperature Ferromagnetic Cr-doped TiO(110...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Room-Temperature Ferromagnetic Cr-doped TiO(110) Rutile Single Crystals using Ion Implantation. Synthesis of Room-Temperature Ferromagnetic Cr-doped TiO(110) Rutile Single Crystals...

  6. Room Temperature Ferromagnetism in Ion-implanted Co-doped TiO...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Room Temperature Ferromagnetism in Ion-implanted Co-doped TiO(110) Rutile. Room Temperature Ferromagnetism in Ion-implanted Co-doped TiO(110) Rutile. Abstract: Ferromagnetic...

  7. On the room-temperature ferromagnetism of Zn1-xCrxO thin films...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    On the room-temperature ferromagnetism of Zn1-xCrxO thin films deposited by reactive co-sputtering. On the room-temperature ferromagnetism of Zn1-xCrxO thin films deposited by...

  8. Design Principles and Performance Metrics for Magnetic Refrigerators Operating Near Room Temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victoria, University of

    Design Principles and Performance Metrics for Magnetic Refrigerators Operating Near Room Principles and Performance Metrics for Magnetic Refrigerators Operating Near Room Temperature by Daniel Sean decade, active magnetic regenerative (AMR) refrigeration technology has progressed towards commercial

  9. Development of an alternating magnetic-field-assisted finishing process for microelectromechanical systems micropore x-ray optics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riveros, Raul E.; Yamaguchi, Hitomi; Mitsuishi, Ikuyuki; Takagi, Utako; Ezoe, Yuichiro; Kato, Fumiki; Sugiyama, Susumu; Yamasaki, Noriko; Mitsuda, Kazuhisa

    2010-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray astronomy research is often limited by the size, weight, complexity, and cost of functioning x-ray optics. Micropore optics promises an economical alternative to traditional (e.g., glass or foil) x-ray optics; however, many manufacturing difficulties prevent micropore optics from being a viable solution. Ezoe et al. introduced microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) micropore optics having curvilinear micropores in 2008. Made by either deep reactive ion etching or x-ray lithography, electroforming, and molding (LIGA), MEMS micropore optics suffer from high micropore sidewall roughness (10-30nmrms) which, by current standards, cannot be improved. In this research, a new alternating magnetic-field-assisted finishing process was developed using a mixture of ferrofluid and microscale abrasive slurry. A machine was built, and a set of working process parameters including alternating frequency, abrasive size, and polishing time was selected. A polishing experiment on a LIGA-fabricated MEMS micropore optic was performed, and a change in micropore sidewall roughness of 9.3{+-}2.5nmrms to 5.7{+-}0.7nmrms was measured. An improvement in x-ray reflectance was also seen. This research shows the feasibility and confirms the effects of this new polishing process on MEMS micropore optics.

  10. MODELING OF HEAT TRANSFER IN ROOMS IN THE MODELICA "BUILDINGS" LIBRARY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    describes the implementation of the room heat transfer model in the free open-source Modelica "Buildings

  11. Welcome new and returning residents! Help us make USC greener by recycling! Your Room Recycling Bin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Almor, Amit

    Welcome new and returning residents! Help us make USC greener by recycling! Your Room Recycling Bin Every room is provided with a recycling bin to make it easy for you to recycle while living in University Housing. Use this bin to collect mixed recyclables in your room and take them to your nearest

  12. Trapped Capacity: Scheduling under a Power Cap to Maximize Machine-Room Throughput

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pakin, Scott

    in the machine room and thereby increase system throughput. Our goal is not to reduce energy or power consumption power and energy in machine rooms. In practice the power for machine rooms is well over-provisioned, specified by high energy LINPACK runs or nameplate power estimates. This results in a considerable amount

  13. Room-temperature 1.3 pm electroluminescence from strained Si, -,Ge,/Si quantum wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Room-temperature 1.3 pm electroluminescence from strained Si, -,Ge,/Si quantum wells Q. Mi, X. Xiao report the first room-temperature 1.3 ,um electroluminescence from strained Sir-,Ge,/Si quantum wells to that from the Sit-,GeX wells. A minimum band offset is required to have effective room

  14. CCSM Polar Climate Working Group The Village at Breckenridge, Aspen/Bighorn Rooms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CCSM Polar Climate Working Group AGENDA The Village at Breckenridge, Aspen/Bighorn Rooms Wednesday (Aspen/Bighorn Rooms) Focus: Abrupt Climate Change 1:30 PM-1:40 PM Opening Statement (M. Holland and Z Polar Climate Working Group Meeting (Aspen/Bighorn Rooms) Focus: Model Intercomparison Studies 3:30 PM-3

  15. Faculty of Law Number of students who has finished (with a degree) and early leavers (excluding transferred students) by AY (As of May 1, 2011)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banbara, Mutsunori

    Faculty of Law Number of students who has finished (with a degree) and early leavers (excluding or less more than 1 year Law 180 227 227 155 65 220 68% 29% 97% 5 2% 0 2 Total 180 227 227 155 65 220 68% 29% 97% 5 2% 0 2 Law 180 184 184 139 37 176 76% 20% 96% 6 3% 2 0 Total 180 184 184 139 37 176 76% 20

  16. Evaluation of high- and low-protein sorghum grains supplemented with lysine and lysine plus threonine as a feed for finishing swine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kinslow, William Freddie

    1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    /or methionine content are below the finishing pigs' requirements for these amino acids. Sorghum grain supplemented with these amino acids, either singularly or in combination, plus needed vitamins and minerals should theoretically provide optimum growth..., there was no significant difference in retained nitrogen. The nutritive value of two sorghum grains containing 7. 9 and 11. 8% protein was compared on the basis of rat growth and amino acid analyses by Waggle eX nf. (1966). The high protein sorghum grain had higher...

  17. Epoxy coating, acidproof brick a success in battery charging room

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dellicker, D.; Germain, A.

    1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    East Penn Manufacturing Company produces automotive and large industrial lead-acid batteries, including a line of accessories on private and national labels. The Lyon Stations, Pennsylvania plant has good reason to pay close attention to surface degradation since sulfuric acid is an essential chemical in the manufacturing process. The forming room, where a charge is generated on battery plates in tanks which are periodically refilled, is exposed to occasional spills of 15 to 20% sulfuric acid solutions. In addition, the walls and ceiling are regularly exposed to fumes. After three years, the coating that was originally applied to the concrete block walls exhibited blistering and the concrete surface softened considerably. Noting, however, that the brick and membrane floor in the forming room and similar areas at the plant were unscathed by the acid spills, East Penn engineers decided to consult the supplier of those systems for a way to economically restore and protect the walls. East Penn's maintenance crew began what would become a six-month-long restoration of the curbs, walls and ceilings of the forming room. Preparatory steps included cleaning, sandblasting of all concrete surfaces and neutralization of residual acid with a soda ash solution. Having selected an aromatic amine-cured epoxy coating, workers applied a compatible concrete primer and then spray-applied the coating to a thickness of 1/8'' on walls, ceilings, and floors. The sprayable and trowel-applied aromatic epoxy coatings have been free of deterioration after two years of exposure to sulfuric acid fumes. Moreover, the acid-resistant brick set with 1/8'' bed and head joints of carbon-filled phenolic mortar remains unaffected after six years of chemical and physical abuse.

  18. The Chemical Hazards Assessments Prior to D&D of the Plutonium Finishing Plant Hanford Nuclear Reservation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FITCH, L.R.; HOPKINS, A.M.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    All Hanford facilities, including the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) were evaluated for chemical hazards in 1997, 1998 and 2000. The hazard evaluation, known as the PFP Facility Vulnerability Assessment (FVA), was prompted when chemicals in Tank A-109 in the Plutonium Reclamation Facility (PRF) exploded in May 1997. Actions were undertaken to eliminate or reduce what were thought to be the worst hazards following that evaluation. In 2001, a new PFP team was organized to review the progress to date in reducing hazards and to reassess hazards that might still remain within the facility. This reassessment continued into 2002 and is referred to as the 2002 PFP Residual Chemical Hazards Reassessment (RCHR). This report explains the results of the 2001/2002 reassessment of the chemical hazards at PFP. This reassessment effort forms the basis of the RCHR. The RCHR relied on previous assessments as the starting point for the 2001/2002 evaluation and used ranking criteria very similar to previous efforts. The RCHR team was composed of professionals representing Industrial Hygiene, Chemical Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Hazardous Materials Handling Specialists, Solid Waste Management Specialists and Environmental Specialists. All areas of concern that could be accessed were physically examined and photographed where possible. Information from processing records, facility drawings and documents, design engineers, process engineers and work packages were compiled. The PFP vessel inventory was examined and expanded where required. New items listed in the vessel inventory were investigated. All items investigated were ranked using the hazard ranking criteria developed. This information was put on data sheets and compiled in a database.

  19. Nuclear power plant control room operators' performance research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, L.H.; Haas, P.M.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A research program is being conducted to provide information on the performance of nuclear power plant control room operators when responding to abnormal/emergency events in the plants and in full-scope training simulators. The initial impetus for this program was the need for data to assess proposed design criteria for the choice of manual versus automatic action for accomplishing safety-related functions during design basis accidents. The program also included studies of training simulator capabilities, of procedures and data for specifying and verifying simulator performance, and of methods and applications of task analysis.

  20. Development of a room air conditioner design model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Penson, Steven Brad

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    model was developed for this thesis by making major modifications to a heat pump model previously developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory: (1) Addition of a subcooler, (2) Revision of the capillary tube model, (3) Addition of multi-grooved tubes... circuiting . 11 3. 1 Ideal refrigeration cycle on a pressure-enthalpy diagram 3. 2 3. 3 Tube-in-condensate subcooler. Tube-in-tubs subcooler, . 15 . 17 3. 4 Simplified diagram of a room air conditioner . 19 3. 5 Capillary flow factors. . 30 3. 6...

  1. Human factors evaluation of the engineering test reactor control room

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Banks, W.W.; Boone, M.P.

    1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Reactor and Process Control Rooms at the Engineering Test Reactor were evaluated by a team of human factors engineers using available human factors design criteria. During the evaluation, ETR, equipment and facilities were compared with MIL-STD-1472-B, Human Engineering design Criteria for Military Systems. The focus of recommendations centered on: (a) displays and controls; placing displays and controls in functional groups; (b) establishing a consistent color coding (in compliance with a standard if possible); (c) systematizing annunciator alarms and reducing their number; (d) organizing equipment in functional groups; and (e) modifying labeling and lines of demarcation.

  2. Simulation of a plant minicomputer in reactor control room simulator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forrester, A.; Anderson, J.L.

    1984-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A control room simulator for the N-Reactor at Hanford is being developed. An important aspect of reactor operation is provided by the plant minicomputer. This paper discusses the simulation of the plant minicomputer. The original commitments in developing the model are set out, as well as the actual requirements at the start of implementation of the model. Original estimates of costs and times for the simulation are presented; actual costs and times were lower by large factors, and the reasons for better performance are examined.

  3. PHC Dining Room Closes at 2 p.m.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simons, Jack

    PHC Dining Room August 2- Closes at 2 p.m. August 4 ­ August 20 Breakfast 7 a.m.- 8:30 a.m. Lunch 11 a.m.- 1:30 p.m. Dinner 5 p.m. - 6:30 p.m. Saturday & Sunday Brunch 11 a.m. - 1 p.m. Dinner 5:30 p.m. - 6:30 p.m. Crimson Corner August 2- Closes at 2 p.m. August 4 ­ August 20 8 a.m.- 3 p.m. Saturday

  4. Semiconductor ridge microcavity source of quantum light at room temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    X. Caillet; A. Orieux; A. Lemaitre; P. Filloux; I. Favero; G. Leo; S. Ducci

    2009-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We experimentally demonstrate an integrated semiconductor ridge microcavity source of counterpropagating twin photons at room temperature in the telecom range. Based on parametric down conversion with a counterpropagating phase-matching, pump photons generate photon pairs with an efficiency of about 10^(-11) and a spectral linewidth of 0.3 nm for a 1mm long sample. The indistiguishability of the photons of the pair are measured via a two-photon interference experiment showing a visibility of 85%. This work opens a route towards new guided-wave semiconductor quantum devices.

  5. An Analysis of Efficiency Improvements in Room Air Conditioner 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Neal, D. L.; Penson, S. B.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . There are two public domain models that we have considered using for this analysis: the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) heat pump model [1] and the Arthur D. Little (ADL) room air conditioner model [2]. The ORNL model was completed in 1981. Although... regions. 3.2 The Oak Ridge model allows construction of various types of coils using different tube diameters, wall thicknesses, tube spacing, and fin thicknesses. The ORNL model allows use of wavy, louvered, or other fins if data are available...

  6. proposed designs for surface and subsurface information rooms

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron4 Self-Scrubbing:,, ,Development of NovelHigh( ( (Buried Room and

  7. Covered Product Category: Room Air Conditioners | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof"Wave theJuly 30, 2013DepartmentEnterpriseDepartmentofRoom Air

  8. Synthesis of manganese spinel nanoparticles at room temperature by coprecipitation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giovannelli, F., E-mail: fabien.giovannelli@univ-tours.fr [GREMAN, UMR 7347 CNRS-CEA, Universite Francois Rabelais, 15 rue de la chocolaterie, 41000 BLOIS (France); Autret-Lambert, C.; Mathieu, C.; Chartier, T.; Delorme, F. [GREMAN, UMR 7347 CNRS-CEA, Universite Francois Rabelais, 15 rue de la chocolaterie, 41000 BLOIS (France); Seron, A [BRGM, 3 Avenue Claude Guillemin, BP 36009, 45060 ORLEANS Cedex 2 (France)

    2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is focused on a new route to synthesize Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles by alkalisation by sodium hydroxide on a manganeous solution at room temperature. The precipitates obtained at different pH values have been characterized by XRD and TEM. Since the first addition of sodium hydroxide, a white Mn(OH){sub 2} precipitate appears. At pH=7, {gamma}-MnOOH phase is predominant with needle like shaped particles. At pH=10, hausmanite nanoparticles, which exhibits well defined cubic shape in the range 50-120 nm are obtained. This new precipitation route is a fast and easy environmentally friendly process to obtain well crystallized hausmanite nanoparticles. - Graphical abstract: TEM image showing Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} particles after a precipitation at pH=10. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A new route to synthesize Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles has been demonstrated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Synthesis has been performed by precipitation at room temperature. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The size of the Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles is between 50 and 120 nm.

  9. Stability limit of room air temperature of a VAV system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matsuba, Tadahiko; Kamimura, Kazuyuki [Yamatake-Honeywell Co., Ltd., Tokyo (Japan). Building System Div.; Kasahara, Masato; Kimbara, Akiomi; Kurosu, Shigeru [Oyama National Coll. of Technology (Japan); Murasawa, Itaru; Hashimoto, Yukihiko [Tonets Corp., Tokyo (Japan). Engineering Project Dept.

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    To control heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems, it has been necessary to accept an analog system controlled mainly by proportional-plus-integral-plus-derivative (PID) action. However, when conventional PID controllers are replaced with new digital controllers by selecting the same PID parameters as before, the control loops have often got into hunting phenomena, which result in undamped oscillations. Unstable control characteristics (such as huntings) are thought to be one of the crucial problems faced by field operators. The PID parameters must be carefully selected to avoid instabilities. In this study, a room space is simulated as a thermal system that is air-conditioned by a variable-air-volume (VAV) control system. A dynamic room model without infiltration or exfiltration, which is directly connected to a simple air-handling unit without an economizer, is developed. To explore the possible existence of huntings, a numerical system model is formulated as a bilinear system with time-delayed feedback, and a parametric analysis of the stability limit is presented. Results are given showing the stability region affected by the selection of control and system parameters. This analysis was conducted to help us tune the PID controllers for optimal HVAC control.

  10. Description Early Finish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    .00 Level 2 Milestones 1070 Friction Stir-Weld Coil Leads TF Conductors 0 08DEC11 53 05JAN12 B 0 0.00 1150

  11. Removal of Lattice Imperfections that Impact the Optical Quality of Ti:Sapphire using Advanced Magnetorheological Finishing Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menapace, J A; Schaffers, K I; Bayramian, A J; Davis, P J; Ebbers, C A; Wolfe, J E; Caird, J A; Barty, C J; Joyce, D B; Schmid, K; Schmid, F

    2007-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Ti:sapphire has become the premier lasing medium material for use in solid-state femtosecond high-peak power laser systems because of its wide wavelength tuning range. With a tuneable range from 680 to 1100 nm, peaking at 800 nm, Ti:sapphire lasing crystals can easily be tuned to the required pump wavelength and provide very high pump brightness due to their good beam quality and high output power of typically several watts. Femtosecond lasers are used for precision cutting and machining of materials ranging from steel to tooth enamel to delicate heart tissue and high explosives. These ultra-short pulses are too brief to transfer heat or shock to the material being cut, which means that cutting, drilling, and machining occur with virtually no damage to surrounding material. Furthermore, these lasers can cut with high precision, making hairline cuts of less than 100 microns in thick materials along a computer-generated path. Extension of laser output to higher energies is limited by the size of the amplification medium. Yields of high quality large diameter crystals have been constrained by lattice distortions that may appear in the boule limiting the usable area from which high quality optics can be harvested. Lattice distortions affect the transmitted wavefront of these optics which ultimately limits the high-end power output and efficiency of the laser system, particularly when operated in multi-pass mode. To make matters even more complicated, Ti:sapphire is extremely hard (Mohs hardness of 9 with diamond being 10) which makes it extremely difficult to accurately polish using conventional methods without subsurface damage or significant wavefront error. In this presentation, we demonstrate for the first time that Magnetorheological finishing (MRF) can be used to compensate for the lattice distortions in Ti:sapphire by perturbing the transmitted wavefront. The advanced MRF techniques developed allow for precise polishing of the optical inverse of lattice distortions with magnitudes of about 70 nm in optical path difference onto one or both of the optical surfaces to produce high quality optics from otherwise unusable Ti:sapphire crystals. The techniques include interferometric, software, and machine modifications to precisely locate and polish sub-millimeter sites onto the optical surfaces that can not be polished into the optics conventionally. This work may allow extension of Ti:sapphire based systems to peak powers well beyond one petawatt.

  12. ISSUANCE 2015-06-09: Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Room Air Conditioners; Request for Information

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Room Air Conditioners; Request for Information

  13. A dynamic macroscopic quantum oscillator at room temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Wei; Lee, Yi-Shan; Lin, Sheng-Di; Lai, Chih-Wei

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate a dynamic macroscopic quantum oscillator of a light--matter hybrid state in high-density plasmas created in an optically induced confining potential in a semiconductor microcavity at room temperature. One major advancement is the visualization of quantum oscillator states in a micrometer-scale optical potential at quantized energies up to 4 meV, an order of magnitude higher than that previously observed in spatially confined polariton condensates at cryogenic temperatures. Another advancement is the ability to characterize the time evolution and optical spin polarization of the quantum oscillator states directly from the consequent pulse radiation. The ability to control the macroscopic coherent state of plasma polaritons enables ultrafast multiple pulse lasing in a semiconductor microcavity.

  14. Tailoring room temperature photoluminescence of antireflective silicon nanofacets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basu, Tanmoy; Kumar, M.; Ghatak, J.; Som, T., E-mail: tsom@iopb.res.in [Institute of Physics, Schivalaya Marg. Bhubaneswar 751 005 (India); Kanjilal, A. [Department of Physics, School of Natural Sciences, Shiv Nadar University, Gautam Budh Nagar, Uttar Pradesh 201 314 (India); Sahoo, P. K. [National Institute of Science Education and Research, Bhubaneswar 751 005 (India)

    2014-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, a fluence-dependent antireflection performance is presented from ion-beam fabricated nanofaceted-Si surfaces. It is also demonstrated that these nanofacets are capable of producing room temperature ultra-violet and blue photoluminescence which can be attributed to inter-band transitions of the localized excitonic states of different Si-O bonds at the Si/SiO{sub x} interface. Time-resolved photoluminescence measurements further confirm defect-induced radiative emission from the surface of silicon nanofacets. It is observed that the spectral characteristics remain unchanged, except an enhancement in the photoluminescence intensity with increasing ion-fluence. The increase in photoluminescence intensity by orders of magnitude stronger than that of a planar Si substrate is due to higher absorption of incident photons by nanofaceted structures.

  15. Room temperature ferromagnetism in a phthalocyanine based carbon material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Honda, Z., E-mail: honda@fms.saitama-u.ac.jp; Sato, K.; Sakai, M.; Fukuda, T.; Kamata, N. [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Saitama University, 255 Shimo-Okubo, Sakura-ku, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Hagiwara, M.; Kida, T. [KYOKUGEN (Center for Quantum Science and Technology under Extreme Conditions), Osaka University, 1-3 Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan)

    2014-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on a simple method to fabricate a magnetic carbon material that contains nitrogen-coordinated transition metals and has a large magnetic moment. Highly chlorinated iron phthalocyanine was used as building blocks and potassium as a coupling reagent to uniformly disperse nitrogen-coordinated iron atoms on the phthalocyanine based carbon material. The iron phthalocyanine based carbon material exhibits ferromagnetic properties at room temperature and the ferromagnetic phase transition occurs at T{sub c}?=?490?±?10?K. Transmission electron microscopy observation, X-ray diffraction analysis, and the temperature dependence of magnetization suggest that the phthalocyanine molecules form three-dimensional random networks in the iron phthalocyanine based carbon material.

  16. Room temperature triplet state spectroscopy of organic semiconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reineke, Sebastian

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Organic light emitting devices and solar cells are machines that create, manipulate and destroy excited states in organic semiconductors. It is crucial to characterize these excited states, or excitons, to optimize device performance in applications like displays and solar energy harvesting. This is complicated if the excited state is a triplet because the electronic transition is dark with a vanishing oscillator strength. As a consequence, triplet state spectroscopy must usually be performed at cryogenic temperatures to reduce competition from non-radiative rates. Here, we control non-radiative rates by engineering a solid-state host matrix containing the target molecule, allowing the observation of phosphorescence at room temperature and alleviating constraints of cryogenic experiments. We test these techniques on a wide range of materials with functionalities spanning multi-exciton generation (singlet exciton fission), organic light emitting device host materials, and thermally activated delayed fluorescen...

  17. Distribution and Room Air Mixing Risks to Retrofitted Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burdick, A.

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ?Energy efficiency upgrades reduce heating and cooling loads on a house. With enough load reduction and if the HVAC system warrants replacement, the HVAC system is often upgraded with a more efficient, lower capacity system that meets the loads of the upgraded house. For a single-story house with ceiling supply air diffusers, ducts are often removed and upgraded. For houses with ducts that are embedded in walls, the cost of demolition precludes the replacement of ducts. The challenge with the use of existing ducts is that the reduced airflow creates a decreased throw at the supply registers, and the supply air and room air do not mix well, leading to potential thermal comfort complaints. This project investigates this retrofit scenario. The issues and solutions discussed here are relevant to all climate zones, with emphasis on climates that require cooling.

  18. COMMERCIAL UTILITY PERSPECTIVES ON NUCLEAR POWER PLANT CONTROL ROOM MODERNIZATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeffrey C. Joe; Ronald L. Boring; Julius J. Persensky

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs) in the United States need to modernize their main control rooms (MCR). Many NPPs have done partial upgrades with some success and with some challenges. The Department of Energy’s (DOE) Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program, and in particular the Advanced Instrumentation and Controls (I&C) and Information Systems Technologies Research and Development (R&D) Pathway within LWRS, is designed to assist commercial nuclear power industry with their MCR modernization efforts. As part of this framework, a survey was issued to utility representatives of the LWRS Program Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control Systems/Technologies (II&C) Utility Working Group to obtain their views on a range of issues related to MCR modernization, including: drivers, barriers, and technology options, and the effects these aspects will have on concepts of operations, modernization strategies, and staffing. This paper summarizes the key survey results and discusses their implications.

  19. Building Automation and Controls Systems: Integrated Room Control for Personalized Comfort and Increased ROI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gill, D.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    14-17, 2014 Smart Room Control Solution Architecture Example HVAC Master Controller 1 Light Module Blind Module Power Multisensors Room Sensors Power Mobile App ESL-IC-14-09-05 Proceedings of the 14th International Conference for Enhanced Building... Operations, Beijing, China, September 14-17, 2014 An End-to-End Solution ? Simplified design, installation and integration of integrated room control solutions ? Increased reliability of integrated systems ? Simplified architecture = simpler design...

  20. Human factors engineering control-room-design review/audit report: Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station, Arizona Public Service Company

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Savage, J.W.; Lappa, D.A.

    1981-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A human factors engineering design review of the Palo Verde control room simulator was performed at the site on September 15 through September 17, 1981. Observed human factors design discrepancies were given priority ratings. This report summarizes the team's observations of the control room design and layout and of the control room operators' interface with the control room environment. A list of the human factors strengths observed in the Palo Verde control room simulator is given.

  1. Validation and Application of the Room Model of the Modelica Buildings Library

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nouidui, Thierry Stephane

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent developments of the Modelica buildings library forthe 8th International Modelica Conference. Dresden, Germany,Transfer in Rooms in the Modelica "Buildings" Library," in

  2. Modeling of Heat Transfer in Rooms in the Modelica Buildings Library

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wetter, Michael

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the room heat transfer model in the free open-sourcea layer-by-layer heat transfer model that computes infrared

  3. China Energy Efficiency Round Robin Testing Results for Room Air Conditioners

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Nan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Results for Room Air Conditioners Nan Zhou David FridleyTable of Contents I. Air Conditioner Round Robin TestingAir Conditioners..

  4. Technical and economic analysis of energy efficiency of Chinese room air conditioners

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fridley, David G.; Rosenquist, Gregory; Jiang, Lin; Li, Aixian; Xin, Dingguo; Cheng, Jianhong

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sector Study of Room Air Conditioners in China) , ChinaQi Shichang ( China’s Air Conditioner Market ), China Lightand Constant-Speed Air Conditioners." ASHRAE Transactions.

  5. Room Change Information Sheet All students wishing to request a change of their room assignment must complete the appropriate paperwork at the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Royer, Dana

    (including Bennet, Butterfields, and Hewitt). 2. Students seeking a room change as a disability accommodation@wesleyan.edu Brian Nangle Program Housing and Apartments bnangle@wesleyan.edu Krystal-Gayle O'Neill Bennet, West

  6. THE DEACTIVATION DECONTAMINATION & DECOMMISSIONING OF THE PLUTONIUM FINISHING PLANT (PFP) A FORMER PLUTONIUM PROCESSING FACILITY AT DOE HANFORD SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CHARBONEAU, S.L.

    2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) was constructed as part of the Manhattan Project during World War II. The Manhattan Project was developed to usher in the use of nuclear weapons to end the war. The primary mission of the PFP was to provide plutonium used as special nuclear material (SNM) for fabrication of nuclear devices for the war effort. Subsequent to the end of World War II, the PFP's mission expanded to support the Cold War effort through plutonium production during the nuclear arms race and later the processing of fuel grade mixed plutonium-uranium oxide to support DOE's breeder reactor program. In October 1990, at the close of the production mission for PFP, a shutdown order was prepared by the Department of Energy (DOE) in Washington, DC and issued to the Richland DOE field office. Subsequent to the shutdown order, a team from the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) analyzed the hazards at PFP associated with the continued storage of certain forms of plutonium solutions and solids. The assessment identified many discrete actions that were required to stabilize the different plutonium forms into stable form and repackage the material in high integrity containers. These actions were technically complicated and completed as part of the PFP nuclear material stabilization project between 1995 and early 2005. The completion of the stabilization project was a necessary first step in deactivating PFP. During stabilization, DOE entered into negotiations with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the State of Washington and established milestones for the Deactivation and Decommissioning (D&D) of the PFP. The DOE and its contractor, Fluor Hanford (Fluor), have made great progress in deactivating, decontaminating and decommissioning the PFP at the Hanford Site as detailed in this paper. Background information covering the PFP D&D effort includes descriptions of negotiations with the State of Washington concerning consent-order milestones, milestones completed to date, and the vision of bringing PFP to slab-on-grade. Innovative approaches in planning and regulatory strategies, as well new technologies from within the United States and from other countries and field decontamination techniques developed by workforce personnel, such as the ''turkey roaster'' and the ''lazy Susan'' are covered in detail in the paper. Critical information on issues and opportunities during the performance of the work such as concerns regarding the handling and storage of special nuclear material, concerns regarding criticality safety and the impact of SNM de-inventory at PFP are also provided. The continued success of the PFP D&D effort is due to the detailed, yet flexible, approach to planning that applied innovative techniques and tools, involved a team of experienced independent reviewers, and incorporated previous lessons learned at the Hanford site, Rocky Flats, and commercial nuclear D&D projects. Multi-disciplined worker involvement in the planning and the execution of the work has produced a committed workforce that has developed innovative techniques, resulting in safer and more efficient work evolutions.

  7. QLRT-2001-00458 "Developing Friendly Rest Rooms for the elderly and the disabled people"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Szmolyan, Peter

    QLRT-2001-00458 "Developing Friendly Rest Rooms for the elderly and the disabled people" FRR Final : Katrina Hands Standalone CBI and Virtual reality CBI : Kenny Morrison #12;QLRT-2001-00458 "Developing opinions about new design features #12;QLRT-2001-00458 "Developing Friendly Rest Rooms for the elderly

  8. Validation and Application of the Room Model of the Modelica Buildings Library

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL-5932E Validation and Application of the Room Model of the Modelica Buildings Library Authors and Technologies Division September 2012 Presented at the 9th International Modelica Conference 2012 #12;DISCLAIMER of California. #12;Validation and Application of the Room Model of the Modelica Buildings Library Thierry

  9. EngineRoom: A Comparative Development Environment For Volume Rendering Engines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mueller, Klaus

    - 1 - EngineRoom: A Comparative Development Environment For Volume Rendering Engines Michael A for comparative volume rendering, fast prototyping of system components, and teaching. Engine Room's manager-driven architecture is able to: (i) dynamically dock or link multiple third- party volume rendering engines

  10. Room-temperature mid-infrared laser sensor for trace gas detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and pipeline leak detection. Applications such as landfill emissions monitoring require measurements of gasRoom-temperature mid-infrared laser sensor for trace gas detection Thomas To¨ pfer, Konstantin P of a compact, portable, room-temperature mid-infrared gas sensor is reported. The sensor is based on continuous

  11. Combined Cryo and Room-Temperature Ball Milling to Produce Ultrafine Halide Crystallites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srivastava, Kumar Vaibhav

    Combined Cryo and Room-Temperature Ball Milling to Produce Ultrafine Halide Crystallites AKASH milling at cryogenic temperature as well as room temperature (RT) has been carried out to prepare out in a high-energy ball mill, and it involves repeated deformation, cold-welding, fractur- ing

  12. CFN Operations and Safety Awareness (COSA) Checklist Nanofabrication (Clean Room) Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    -ESH-USERS [ ] [ ] [ ] Cyber Security Training GE-CYBERSEC X X X Laboratory Standard HP-IND-220 X X X Hazardous Waste HP Safety for Benchtop Workers TQ-ELECT-BENCHTOP [ ] [ ] [ ] Oxygen Deficiency Hazard TQ-ODH X X X and understood clean room orientation/protocols Gowning procedure: demonstrate proper clean room dress Personal

  13. A Research Framework for Demonstrating Benefits of Advanced Control Room Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Le Blanc, Katya [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Boring, Ronald [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Joe, Jeffrey [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hallbert, Bruce [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Thomas, Kenneth [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Control Room modernization is an important part of life extension for the existing light water reactor fleet. None of the 99 currently operating commercial nuclear power plants in the U.S. has completed a full-scale control room modernization to date. A full-scale modernization might, for example, entail replacement of all analog panels with digital workstations. Such modernizations have been undertaken successfully in upgrades in Europe and Asia, but the U.S. has yet to undertake a control room upgrade of this magnitude. Instead, nuclear power plant main control rooms for the existing commercial reactor fleet remain significantly analog, with only limited digital modernizations. Previous research under the U.S. Department of Energy’s Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program has helped establish a systematic process for control room upgrades that support the transition to a hybrid control. While the guidance developed to date helps streamline the process of modernization and reduce costs and uncertainty associated with introducing digital control technologies into an existing control room, these upgrades do not achieve the full potential of newer technologies that might otherwise enhance plant and operator performance. The aim of the control room benefits research presented here is to identify previously overlooked benefits of modernization, identify candidate technologies that may facilitate such benefits, and demonstrate these technologies through human factors research. This report serves as an outline for planned research on the benefits of greater modernization in the main control rooms of nuclear power plants.

  14. IMU Activities Tower Application and Contract 1 Indiana Memorial Union, Room 270

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Indiana University

    IMU Activities Tower Application and Contract 1 Indiana Memorial Union, Room 270 Bloomington space in the Student Activities Tower of the Indiana Memorial Union to student organizations registered Board office--located on the second floor of the Student Activities Tower-- IMU Room 270. Even if you

  15. Undergraduate Admissions for the 21st Conference in the Trinity Long Room Hub

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Mahony, Donal E.

    Undergraduate Admissions for the 21st Century Conference in the Trinity Long Room Hub Friday 18 May Foghlú. Part I 9.25 a.m. Dr. Patrick Prendergast (Provost of Trinity College Dublin), on `Undergraduate.m. Lunch in the Trinity Long Room Hub. #12;Part II The afternoon panel sessions will be chaired by Dr. John

  16. Electrodrift purification of materials for room temperature radiation detectors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    James, R.B.; Van Scyoc, J.M. III; Schlesinger, T.E.

    1997-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of purifying nonmetallic, crystalline semiconducting materials useful for room temperature radiation detecting devices by applying an electric field across the material is disclosed. The present invention discloses a simple technology for producing purified ionic semiconducting materials, in particular PbI{sub 2} and preferably HgI{sub 2}, which produces high yields of purified product, requires minimal handling of the material thereby reducing the possibility of introducing or reintroducing impurities into the material, is easy to control, is highly selective for impurities, retains the stoichiometry of the material and employs neither high temperatures nor hazardous materials such as solvents or liquid metals. An electric field is applied to a bulk sample of the material causing impurities present in the sample to drift in a preferred direction. After all of the impurities have been transported to the ends of the sample the current flowing through the sample, a measure of the rate of transport of mobile impurities, falls to a low, steady state value, at which time the end sections of the sample where the impurities have concentrated are removed leaving a bulk sample of higher purity material. Because the method disclosed here only acts on the electrically active impurities, the stoichiometry of the host material remains substantially unaffected. 4 figs.

  17. Electrodrift purification of materials for room temperature radiation detectors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    James, Ralph B. (5420 Lenore Ave., Livermore, Alameda County, CA 94550); Van Scyoc, III, John M. (P.O. Box 93, 65 Main St., Apt. 1, Plainfield, Cumberland County, PA 17081); Schlesinger, Tuviah E. (8 Carleton Dr., Mt. Lebanon, Allegheny County, PA 15243)

    1997-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of purifying nonmetallic, crystalline semiconducting materials useful for room temperature radiation detecting devices by applying an electric field across the material. The present invention discloses a simple technology for producing purified ionic semiconducting materials, in particular PbI.sub.2 and preferably HgI.sub.2, which produces high yields of purified product, requires minimal handling of the material thereby reducing the possibility of introducing or reintroducing impurities into the material, is easy to control, is highly selective for impurities, retains the stoichiometry of the material and employs neither high temperatures nor hazardous materials such as solvents or liquid metals. An electric field is applied to a bulk sample of the material causing impurities present in the sample to drift in a preferred direction. After all of the impurities have been transported to the ends of the sample the current flowing through the sample, a measure of the rate of transport of mobile impurities, falls to a low, steady state value, at which time the end sections of the sample where the impurities have concentrated are removed leaving a bulk sample of higher purity material. Because the method disclosed here only acts on the electrically active impurities, the stoichiometry of the host material remains substantially unaffected.

  18. Cross-linking of polytetrafluoroethylene during room-temperature irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pugmire, David L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wetteland, Chris J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Duncan, Wanda S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lakis, Rollin E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schwartz, Daniel S [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Exposure of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) to {alpha}-radiation was investigated to detennine the physical and chemical effects, as well as to compare and contrast the damage mechanisms with other radiation types ({beta}, {gamma}, or thermal neutron). A number of techniques were used to investigate the chemical and physical changes in PTFE after exposure to {alpha}-radiation. These techniques include: Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and fluorescence spectroscopy. Similar to other radiation types at low doses, the primary damage mechanism for the exposure of PTFE to {alpha}-radiation appears to be chain scission. Increased doses result in a change-over of the damage mechanism to cross-linking. This result is not observed for any radiation type other than {alpha} when irradiation is performed at room temperature. Finally, at high doses, PTFE undergoes mass-loss (via smallfluorocarbon species evolution) and defluorination. The amount and type of damage versus sample depth was also investigated. Other types of radiation yield damage at depths on the order of mm to cm into PTFE due to low linear energy transfer (LET) and the correspondingly large penetration depths. By contrast, the {alpha}-radiation employed in this study was shown to only induce damage to a depth of approximately 26 {mu}m, except at very high doses.

  19. OVERVIEW OF A RECONFIGURABLE SIMULATOR FOR MAIN CONTROL ROOM UPGRADES IN NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronald L. Boring

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper provides background on a reconfigurable control room simulator for nuclear power plants. The main control rooms in current nuclear power plants feature analog technology that is growing obsolete. The need to upgrade control rooms serves the practical need of maintainability as well as the opportunity to implement newer digital technologies with added functionality. There currently exists no dedicated research simulator for use in human factors design and evaluation activities for nuclear power plant modernization in the U.S. The new research simulator discussed in this paper provides a test bed in which operator performance on new control room concepts can be benchmarked against existing control rooms and in which new technologies can be validated for safety and usability prior to deployment.

  20. CONTAMINATED PROCESS EQUIPMENT REMOVAL FOR THE D&D OF THE 232-Z CONTAMINATED WASTE RECOVERY PROCESS FACILITY AT THE PLUTONIUM FINISHING PLANT (PFP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HOPKINS, A.M.; MINETTE, M.J.; KLOS, D.B.

    2007-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the unique challenges encountered and subsequent resolutions to accomplish the deactivation and decontamination of a plutonium ash contaminated building. The 232-Z Contaminated Waste Recovery Process Facility at the Plutonium Finishing Plant was used to recover plutonium from process wastes such as rags, gloves, containers and other items by incinerating the items and dissolving the resulting ash. The incineration process resulted in a light-weight plutonium ash residue that was highly mobile in air. This light-weight ash coated the incinerator's process equipment, which included gloveboxes, blowers, filters, furnaces, ducts, and filter boxes. Significant airborne contamination (over 1 million derived air concentration hours [DAC]) was found in the scrubber cell of the facility. Over 1300 grams of plutonium held up in the process equipment and attached to the walls had to be removed, packaged and disposed. This ash had to be removed before demolition of the building could take place.

  1. Ordered iron aluminide alloys having an improved room-temperature ductility and method thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sikka, Vinod K. (Clinton, TN)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is disclosed for improving the room temperature ductility and strength of iron aluminide intermetallic alloys. The process involves thermomechanically working an iron aluminide alloy by means which produce an elongated grain structure. The worked alloy is then heated at a temperature in the range of about 650.degree. C. to about 800.degree. C. to produce a B2-type crystal structure. The alloy is rapidly cooled in a moisture free atmosphere to retain the B2-type crystal structure at room temperature, thus providing an alloy having improved room temperature ductility and strength.

  2. Local magnetoresistance in Fe/MgO/Si lateral spin valve at room temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sasaki, Tomoyuki, E-mail: tomosasa@jp.tdk.com; Koike, Hayato; Oikawa, Tohru [Advanced Technology Development Center, TDK Corporation, Chiba (Japan); Suzuki, Toshio [AIT, Akita Industrial Technology Center, Akita (Japan); Ando, Yuichiro; Suzuki, Yoshishige [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka (Japan); Shiraishi, Masashi [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka (Japan); Department of Electronic Science and Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto-Daigaku-Katsura, Nishikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8530 (Japan)

    2014-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Room temperature local magnetoresistance in two-terminal scheme is reported. By employing 1.6?nm-thick MgO tunnel barrier, spin injection efficiency is increased, resulting in large non-local magnetoresistance. The magnitude of the non-local magnetoresistance is estimated to be 0.0057 ? at room temperature. As a result, a clear rectangle signal is observed in local magnetoresistance measurement even at room temperature. We also investigate the origin of local magnetoresistance by measuring the spin accumulation voltage of each contact separately.

  3. Materials Science Clean Room Facility at Tulane University (Final Technical Report)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Altiero, Nicholas

    2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The project involves conversion of a 3,000 sq. ft. area into a clean room facility for materials science research. It will be accomplished in phases. Phase I will involve preparation of the existing space, acquisition and installation of clean room equipped with a pulsed laser deposition (PLD) processing system, and conversion of ancillary space to facilitate the interface with the clean room. From a capital perspective, Phases II and III will involve the acquisition of additional processing, fabrication, and characterization equipment and capabilities.

  4. Sum frequency generation study on the orientation of room-temperature ionic liquid at the grapheneionic liquid interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bao, Jiming

    such as dye-sensitized solar cells and super capacitors, room-temperature ionic liquids are considered

  5. Mechanisms of Molecular Manipulation with the Scanning Tunneling Microscope at Room Temperature: Chlorobenzene=Si111-7 7

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Persson, Mats

    of such methods to room temperature systems is far from trivial, signifi- cant progress has been reported from the reconstructed Si111-7 7 surface at room temperature. This model system is also relevant s followed by quick cooling to 960 C and further cooling (1 C sÿ1) to room tem- perature. The STM tips

  6. Feasibility of Retrofitting Centralized HVAC Systems for Room-Level Zoning Tamim Sookoor, Brian Holben, Kamin Whitehouse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitehouse, Kamin

    and enable rooms to be heated or cooled individually, in order to reduce waste caused by conditioning into each room. Such a system could reduce wasted energy that is used to heat and cool unoccupied rooms {sookoor,bnh4k,whitehouse}@cs.virginia.edu Abstract--Heating, ventilation, and cooling (HVAC) accounts

  7. Distributions of respiratory contaminants from a patient with different postures and exhaling modes in a single-bed inpatient room

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

    and contaminant transport in inpatient rooms and to improve the ventilation system design for the rooms. Many studies have been conducted on airborne disease transmission and ventilation systems in hospitals. Li et that ventilation systems play a very important role in the contaminant distribution in an inpatient room. Qian et

  8. Fosmid Cre-LoxP Inverse PCR Paired-End (Fosmid CLIP-PE), a Novel Method for Constructing Fosmid Pair-End Library (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Peng, Ze [DOE JGI

    2013-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Ze Peng from DOE JGI presents "Fosmid Cre-LoxP Inverse PCR Paired-End (Fosmid CLIP-PE), a Novel Method for Constructing Fosmid Pair-End Library" at the 7th Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting held in June, 2012 in Santa Fe, NM.

  9. Fosmid Cre-LoxP Inverse PCR Paired-End (Fosmid CLIP-PE), a Novel Method for Constructing Fosmid Pair-End Library (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peng, Ze [DOE JGI] [DOE JGI

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ze Peng from DOE JGI presents "Fosmid Cre-LoxP Inverse PCR Paired-End (Fosmid CLIP-PE), a Novel Method for Constructing Fosmid Pair-End Library" at the 7th Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting held in June, 2012 in Santa Fe, NM.

  10. Any conference is definitively over only when editing the last volume of Proceedings is com-plete. And only now we can say that the Conference has finished. We hope that we did

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Popovych, Roman

    Conclusion Any conference is definitively over only when editing the last volume of Proceedings are the titles of the talks given at the Conference that were not submitted to the Proceedings O. Batsula is com- plete. And only now we can say that the Conference has finished. We hope that we did everything

  11. Using finished compost is a way of returning organic matter to the soil in a usable form. Soil organic matter benefits plant growth by improving the moisture and nutrient-holding capacity of sandy soils, by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    Using finished compost is a way of returning organic matter to the soil in a usable form. Soil and by helping prevent soil erosion. Think of compost primarily as a soil conditioner rather than a fertilizer will be necessary for adequate plant growth. A soil test will determine if compost-amended garden soil requires

  12. Simulation of Mixed Convection Flow in a Room with a Two-Layer Turbulence Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

    ; displacement ventilation; office rooms. Nomenclature Ary local Archimedes number, 2 /UTyg n C Contaminant used to predict the mixed convection by displacement ventilation in an office. The computed results

  13. Reactor Room Experimental SF6 Tests to Determine Probable Stack Activity Response to Radioactive Releases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooper, R.E.

    2002-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This study was performed to obtain information that could be useful for obtaining an early estimate of the probable total stack activity monitor response in the event of an accidental release of radioactive activity in the process room.

  14. Spatial Sound Rendering Using Measured Room Impulse Responses Yan Li, Peter F. Driessen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Driessen, Peter F.

    Spatial Sound Rendering Using Measured Room Impulse Responses Yan Li, Peter F. Driessen Dept, Banff Centre Banff, Alberta, Canada Abstract-- Spatial sound rendering has many applications different quality and complexity requirements. This paper presents a new spatial sound rendering framework

  15. Room-temperature direct bandgap electroluminesence from Ge-on-Si light-emitting diodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Xiaochen

    We report what we believe to be the first demonstration of direct bandgap electroluminescence (EL) from Ge/Si heterojunction light-emitting diodes (LEDs) at room temperature. In-plane biaxial tensile strain is used to ...

  16. Research on the Temperature Control Method of an Artificial Climate Room 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Y.; Tan, W.; Wei, B.; Guo, R.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An artificial climate room plays an important role in the research of an apparatus test and indoor/outdoor environment simulation. Generally, the refrigerator is used to decrease temperature to simulate outdoor environment, ...

  17. Optical gain and lasing from band-engineered Ge-on-Si at room temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Jifeng

    We present theoretical modeling and experimental results of optical gain and lasing from tensile-strained, n[superscript +] Ge-on-Si at room temperature. Compatible with silicon CMOS, these devices are ideal for large-scale ...

  18. Digital Signal Processing Methods for Pixelated 3-D Position Sensitive Room-Temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Zhong

    Digital Signal Processing Methods for Pixelated 3-D Position Sensitive Room for Charge Collecting Signals . . . . 22 2.2.2 Optimal Filter for Transient signals . . . . . . . . . 26 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 3.2.2 Maxwell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 3.3 The Signal Induction

  19. State-of-the-Art and Outlook: Thermal Properties of Phase Change Wallboard Rooms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, G.; Liang, R.; Li, G.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    technology and the thermal characteristic- analyzing method commonly applied in building envelopes, proposes future research methods for phase change material wall rooms, and lays a solid foundation for the research of the heat transfer mechanism and thermal...

  20. China Energy Efficiency Round Robin Testing Results for Room Air Conditioners

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Nan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Australia The energy efficiency labeling in Australia adoptson the energy efficiency control list in Australia areenergy efficiency standards and labeling programs for room air conditioners in the United States, European Union, Japan, Australia

  1. Review of Methods Related to Assessing Human Performance in Nuclear Power Plant Control Room Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katya L Le Blanc; Ronald L Boring; David I Gertman

    2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the increased use of digital systems in Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) control rooms comes a need to thoroughly understand the human performance issues associated with digital systems. A common way to evaluate human performance is to test operators and crews in NPP control room simulators. However, it is often challenging to characterize human performance in meaningful ways when measuring performance in NPP control room simulations. A review of the literature in NPP simulator studies reveals a variety of ways to measure human performance in NPP control room simulations including direct observation, automated computer logging, recordings from physiological equipment, self-report techniques, protocol analysis and structured debriefs, and application of model-based evaluation. These methods and the particular measures used are summarized and evaluated.

  2. Workers Prepare to Safely Enter One of Hanford Site’s Most Hazardous Rooms

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    RICHLAND, Wash. – When workers enter the hazardous, historic McCluskey Room at the Hanford site this summer, they will be safer due to their preparation and involvement in planning and training for the job.

  3. Room-Temperature Gas Sensing Based on Electron Transfer between Discrete Tin Oxide Nanocrystals and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Junhong

    Room-Temperature Gas Sensing Based on Electron Transfer between Discrete Tin Oxide Nanocrystals and the response time. Rutile-structured tin oxide (SnO2) is an n-type semiconducting material widely used in gas

  4. Room Temperature Aryl Trifluoromethylation via Copper- Mediated Oxidative Cross-Coupling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buchwald, Stephen Leffler

    A method for the room temperature copper-mediated trifluoromethylation of aryl and heteroaryl boronic acids has been developed. This protocol is amenable to normal benchtop setup and reactions typically require only 1?4 ...

  5. Ferromagnetism in Ti-Doped ZnO Nanoclusters above Room Temperature...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    increase of temperature. Citation: Antony J, S Pendyala, DE McCready, MH Engelhard, D Meyer, AM Sharma, and Y Qiang.2006."Ferromagnetism in Ti-Doped ZnO Nanoclusters above Room...

  6. Research on the Temperature Control Method of an Artificial Climate Room

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Y.; Tan, W.; Wei, B.; Guo, R.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An artificial climate room plays an important role in the research of an apparatus test and indoor/outdoor environment simulation. Generally, the refrigerator is used to decrease temperature to simulate outdoor environment, while a heater is used...

  7. Effects of environmental agents on social behavior of geriatric residents in an institution dining room

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davies, Kimberly D

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    it for appropriateness for a geriatric population. Behavior of geriatric residents in a retirement community is assessed in accordance with minor changes made in their dining room environment. Observed behavior included the amount of time residents spent in the dining...

  8. Techno-Economic Analysis of Indian Draft Standard Levels for Room Air Conditioners

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McNeil, Michael A.; Iyer, Maithili

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Standard Levels for Room Air Conditioners Michael A. McNeilFigure 1 – MEPS for 1.5 ton Window Air Conditioners – 1994-4 Figure 2 – Air Conditioner Test Data and Rating Plan -

  9. A Smart Logic for Conference Room Terminal Box of Single Duct VAV System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Y.; Xu, K.; Cho, Y.; Liu, M.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A SMART LOGIC FOR CONFERENCE ROOM TERMINAL BOX OF SINGLE DUCT VAV SYSTEM Yuebin Yu Ke Xu YoungHum Cho Mingsheng Liu Graduate Student Graduate Student Graduate Student Professor of Architectural... in the conference room. The detailed calculation example for the parameters and the energy saving performance analysis based on air modeling are given in the other paper (Yuebin Yu, et al. 2007). The main principles of the operation logic are stated as follows...

  10. Room-temperature spin-polarized organic light-emitting diodes with a single ferromagnetic electrode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ding, Baofu, E-mail: b.ding@ecu.edu.au; Alameh, Kamal, E-mail: k.alameh@ecu.edu.au [Electron Science Research Institute, Edith Cowan University, 270 Joondalup Drive, Joondalup WA 6027 Australia (Australia); Song, Qunliang [Institute for Clean Energy and Advanced Materials, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China)

    2014-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we demonstrate the concept of a room-temperature spin-polarized organic light-emitting diode (Spin-OLED) structure based on (i) the deposition of an ultra-thin p-type organic buffer layer on the surface of the ferromagnetic electrode of the Spin-OLED and (ii) the use of oxygen plasma treatment to modify the surface of that electrode. Experimental results demonstrate that the brightness of the developed Spin-OLED can be increased by 110% and that a magneto-electroluminescence of 12% can be attained for a 150?mT in-plane magnetic field, at room temperature. This is attributed to enhanced hole and room-temperature spin-polarized injection from the ferromagnetic electrode, respectively.

  11. Enhancing the NCSU PULSTAR reactor control room with human factors considerations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glover, B.L.; Pupons, D.E.; Perez, P.B. (North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh (United States))

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The North Carolina PULSTAR research reactor was constructed to support teaching, training, and research. The training provided is not limited to academic students but encompasses plant operators, managers, engineers, designers, and supporting organizations in the nuclear industry. Our facility is under-going design changes to maximize teaching effectiveness and continued safe operation by providing current technology in the control room. The opportunity for the enhancements is a result of the generosity of neighboring utilities and the US Department of Energy instrumentation upgrade funds. Our objective, to provide a control room environment that conforms to selected industry practices, required human factors input. A human factors course, offered jointly between the industrial engineering and the psychology departments, included the PULSTAR control room enhancement as a case study.

  12. Proposal for the Award of a Contract, without Competitive Tendering, for the Supply of Semi-Finished Aluminium Alloy Components for the Support Structures of the ATLAS Barrel Toroid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document concerns the supply of semi-finished aluminum alloy components for the support structures of the ATLAS Barrel Toroid. The Finance Committee is invited to agree to the negotiation of a contract, without competitive tendering, with RUSSIAN ALUMINIUM (RU) for the supply of semi-finished aluminum alloy components for the support structures of the ATLAS Barrel Toroid for a total amount of 1 900 000 US dollars, not subject to revision. At the present rate of exchange, this amount is equivalent to approximately 2 850 000 Swiss francs. CERN's total contribution to the contract will not exceed 600 000 Swiss francs. The firm has indicated the following distribution by country of the contract value covered by this proposal: RU - 100%.

  13. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program A Reference Plan for Control Room Modernization: Planning and Analysis Phase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacques Hugo; Ronald Boring; Lew Hanes; Kenneth Thomas

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) program is collaborating with a U.S. nuclear utility to bring about a systematic fleet-wide control room modernization. To facilitate this upgrade, a new distributed control system (DCS) is being introduced into the control rooms of these plants. The DCS will upgrade the legacy plant process computer and emergency response facility information system. In addition, the DCS will replace an existing analog turbine control system with a display-based system. With technology upgrades comes the opportunity to improve the overall human-system interaction between the operators and the control room. To optimize operator performance, the LWRS Control Room Modernization research team followed a human-centered approach published by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. NUREG-0711, Rev. 3, Human Factors Engineering Program Review Model (O’Hara et al., 2012), prescribes four phases for human factors engineering. This report provides examples of the first phase, Planning and Analysis. The three elements of Planning and Analysis in NUREG-0711 that are most crucial to initiating control room upgrades are: • Operating Experience Review: Identifies opportunities for improvement in the existing system and provides lessons learned from implemented systems. • Function Analysis and Allocation: Identifies which functions at the plant may be optimally handled by the DCS vs. the operators. • Task Analysis: Identifies how tasks might be optimized for the operators. Each of these elements is covered in a separate chapter. Examples are drawn from workshops with reactor operators that were conducted at the LWRS Human System Simulation Laboratory HSSL and at the respective plants. The findings in this report represent generalized accounts of more detailed proprietary reports produced for the utility for each plant. The goal of this LWRS report is to disseminate the technique and provide examples sufficient to serve as a template for other utilities’ projects for control room modernization.

  14. Shot-noise-limited magnetometer with sub-pT sensitivity at room temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vito Giovanni Lucivero; Pawel Anielski; Wojciech Gawlik; Morgan W. Mitchell

    2014-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a photon shot-noise-limited (SNL) optical magnetometer based on amplitude modulated optical rotation using a room-temperature $^{85}$Rb vapor in a cell with anti-relaxation coating. The instrument achieves a room-temperature sensitivity of $70$ fT/$\\sqrt{\\mathrm{Hz}}$ at $7.6$ $\\mu$T. Experimental scaling of noise with optical power, in agreement with theoretical predictions, confirms the SNL behaviour from $5$ $\\mu$T to $75$ $\\mu$T. The combination of best-in-class sensitivity and SNL operation makes the system a promising candidate for application of squeezed light to a state-of-the-art atomic sensor.

  15. Room-Temperature Multiferroic Hexagonal LuFeO3 Films

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wang, Wenbin; Zhao, Jun; Wang, Wenbo; Gai, Zheng; Balke, Nina; Chi, Miaofang; Lee, Ho Nyung; Tian, Wei; Zhu, Leyi; Cheng, Xuemei; Keavney, David J.; Yi, Jieyu; Ward, Thomas Z.; Snijders, Paul C.; Christen, Hans M.; Wu, Weida; Shen, Jian; Xu, Xiaoshan

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The crystal and magnetic structures of single-crystalline hexagonal LuFeO3 films have been studied using x-ray, electron, and neutron diffraction methods. The polar structure of these films are found to persist up to 1050 K; and the switchability of the polar behavior is observed at room temperature, indicating ferroelectricity. An antiferromagnetic order was shown to occur below 440 K, followed by a spin reorientation resulting in a weak ferromagnetic order below 130 K. This observation of coexisting multiple ferroic orders demonstrates that hexagonal LuFeO3 films are room-temperature multiferroics.

  16. Experimental evidence of Ga-vacancy induced room temperature ferromagnetic behavior in GaN films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roul, Basanta; Kumar, Mahesh [Materials Research Centre, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India); Central Research Laboratory, Bharat Electronics, Bangalore 560013 (India); Rajpalke, Mohana K.; Bhat, Thirumaleshwara N.; Krupanidhi, S. B. [Materials Research Centre, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India); Kalghatgi, A. T. [Central Research Laboratory, Bharat Electronics, Bangalore 560013 (India); Kumar, Nitesh; Sundaresan, A. [Chemistry and Physics of Materials Unit, Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Jakkur P. O., Bangalore 560064 (India)

    2011-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We have grown Ga deficient GaN epitaxial films on (0001) sapphire substrate by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy and report the experimental evidence of room temperature ferromagnetic behavior. The observed yellow emission peak in room temperature photoluminescence spectra and the peak positioning at 300 cm{sup -1} in Raman spectra confirms the existence of Ga vacancies. The x-ray photoelectron spectroscopic measurements further confirmed the formation of Ga vacancies; since the N/Ga is found to be >1. The ferromagnetism is believed to originate from the polarization of the unpaired 2p electrons of N surrounding the Ga vacancy.

  17. Basement Insulation Systems - Building America Top Innovation...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    about this Top Innovation. See an example of this Top Innovation in action. Find more case studies of Building America projects across the country that demonstrate advanced...

  18. WUFI Basement Module | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradley Nickell Director of TransmissionMedia02-03 AUDITRICHLANDWUFI

  19. Taking on Scary Basements | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed off Energy.gov. Are you sure you wantJoin us for|Idaho |Energy

  20. Mimicking the Moon's surface in the basement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |IsLove Your1 SECTION A. Revised:7, at 3:00MilitaryMimicking the

  1. Stabilization of residual plutonium in L-9 hood in product removal room of PUREX with polymeric barrier system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chiao, T., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This report examines the application of Polymeric Barrier System to stabilize the remaining plutonium inside 1-9 Hood in PR Room, Purex for criticality safety.

  2. Indoor Airflow And Pollutant Removal In A Room With Floor-Based Task Ventilation: Results of Additional Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faulkner, D.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    C , "Displacement Ventilation Systems in Office Rooms,"Controlled Office Ventilation System," ASHRAE Transactions,of a floor-based task ventilation system designed for use in

  3. Tools of the Trade: The Socio-Technology of Arbitrage in a Wall Street Trading Room

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schweik, Charles M.

    Tools of the Trade: The Socio-Technology of Arbitrage in a Wall Street Trading Room Daniel Beunza at the Santa Fe Institute. #12;2 Tools of the Trade: The Socio-Technology of Arbitrage in a Wall Street Trading of trading in the era of quantitative finance. To do so, we conduct an ethnography of arbitrage, the trading

  4. Room-temperature stationary sodium-ion batteries for large-scale electric energy storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Wei Hua

    Room-temperature stationary sodium-ion batteries for large-scale electric energy storage Huilin Pan attention particularly in large- scale electric energy storage applications for renewable energy and smart storage system in the near future. Broader context With the rapid development of renewable energy sources

  5. Interactive Arts and Technology Student Union Room 245, Simon Fraser University Surrey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Interactive Arts and Technology Student Union Room 245, Simon Fraser University Surrey 2400 Central, For some time now, members of the Executive of the Interactive Arts and Technology Student Union (IATSU on our campus who are not Interactive Arts and Technology students. We have considered several

  6. Fuel Cells Workshop Agenda Burton D. Morgan Center for Entrepreneurship (MRGN), room 121

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ginzel, Matthew

    Fuel Cells Workshop Agenda Burton D. Morgan Center for Entrepreneurship (MRGN), room 121 April 3 Engineering Technology 9:35 - 10:35 am Bryan Pivovar, Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Group Manger, National Renewable Energy Lab (NREL) Title: Past, Current, and Future Research in Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells 10:35 ­ 10

  7. Section Course Term Credits Room Day Time 132D ALS4932 Fall 1 WEB WEB WEB

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    Section Course Term Credits Room Day Time 132D ALS4932 Fall 1 WEB WEB WEB 1G73 FNR3131C Fall 3 DEGREE APPLICATIONS DUE September 13th CLASSES END December 4th WEB WEB WEB WEB Forest Operations Sager WEB Capinera WEB Turf and Ornamental Entomology Buss WEB Bennet Capinera Lutz STAFF Mac

  8. Room temperature 1.6 m electroluminescence from Ge light emitting diode on Si substrate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vuckovic, Jelena

    Room temperature 1.6 µm electroluminescence from Ge light emitting diode on Si substrate Szu n+/p light emitting diode on a Si substrate. Unlike normal electrically pumped devices, this device.4670) Optical materials; (230.3670) Light-emitting diodes. References and links 1. L. C. Kimerling, "Silicon

  9. Physica B 372 (2006) 286289 Thermal activation in Permalloy nanorectangles at room temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garcia-Cervera, Carlos J.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    orthogonal metallized tracks (word and bit lines), which induce a magnetic field in the free layer to reverse ¼ Lx=Ly) has been analyzed assuming uniform magnetization in the sample at room temperature-exponential factor in the Arrhenius formula for each aspect ratio. That allows us to estimate the relaxation time

  10. 1250 IEEE SENSORS JOURNAL VOL. 6, NO. 5, OCTOBER 2006 Room-Temperature Hydrogen Sensitivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moritz, Werner

    , the dissociation of hydrogen molecules at the Pd gate electrode, diffusion of the atoms, and formation of a dipole and the mechanism of hydrogen detection at the Pd/oxide interface are summarized in [2]. For this sensor type in the semiconductor. The Pd/SiO2/Si-based sensor was used for hydrogen detection at room temperature, but the behavior

  11. Molecular dynamics simulations of the nano-scale room-temperature oxidation of aluminum single crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southern California, University of

    films that form on aluminum and aluminum alloys in air protect the surface against further oxidationMolecular dynamics simulations of the nano-scale room-temperature oxidation of aluminum single Abstract The oxidation of aluminum single crystals is studied using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations

  12. Optical Detection and Manipulation of Single Molecules in Room-Temperature Solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zare, Richard N.

    CONCEPTS Optical Detection and Manipulation of Single Molecules in Room-Temperature Solutions. Keywords: single-moleculedetection - single-moleculema- nipulation - laser-induced fluorescence * optical, frcquency-modulated optical ab- sorption and fluorescence excitation have been used to investi- gate

  13. Optical gain from the direct gap transition of Ge-on-Si at room temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Jifeng

    We report direct band gap optical gain of tensile strained n+ epitaxial Ge-on-Si at room temperature, which confirms that band-engineered Ge-on-Si is a promising gain medium for monolithic optical amplifiers and lasers on Si.

  14. Technical and economic analysis of energy efficiency of Chinese room air conditioners

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fridley, David G.; Rosenquist, Gregory; Jiang, Lin; Li, Aixian; Xin, Dingguo; Cheng, Jianhong

    2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    China has experienced tremendous growth in the production and sales of room air conditioners over the last decade. Although minimum room air conditioner energy efficiency standards have been in effect since 1989, no efforts were made during most of the 1990's to update the standard to be more reflective of current market conditions. In 1999, China's State Bureau of Technical Supervision (SBTS) included in their annual plan the development and revision of the 1989 room air conditioner standard, and experts from SBTS worked together with LBNL to analyze the new standards. Based on the engineering and life cycle-cost analyses performed, the most predominant type of room air conditioner in the Chinese market (split-type with a cooling capacity between 2500 and 4500 W (8500 Btu/h and 15,300Btu/h)) can have its efficiency increased cost-effectively to an energy efficiency ratio (EER) of 2.92 W/W (9.9 Btu/hr/W). If an EER standard of 2.92 W/W became effective in 2001, Chinese consumers would be estimated to save over 3.5 billion Yuan (420 million U.S. dollars) over the period of 2001-2020. Carbon emissions over the same period would be reduced by approximately 12 million metric tonnes.

  15. Condensation Risk in a Room with High Latent Load and Chilled Ceiling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

    proposed a new ventilation system with radiant cooling panel and air supplied from a liquid desiccant dehumidification system, which provided very dry supply air and chilled water for radiant cooling. This study usedCondensation Risk in a Room with High Latent Load and Chilled Ceiling Panel and with Air Supplied

  16. Framework for Coupling Room Air Models to Heat Balance Model Load and Energy Calculations (RP-1222)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

    1 Framework for Coupling Room Air Models to Heat Balance Model Load and Energy Calculations (RP in a program for hourly load calculations of a single thermal zone. The heat balance model for load and energy to heat balance model load and energy calculations," HVAC&R Research, 10(2), 91-111. #12;2 · Mixed

  17. Structural and Room-Temperature Transport Properties of Zinc Blende and Wurtzite InAs Nanowires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Deli

    Structural and Room-Temperature Transport Properties of Zinc Blende and Wurtzite InAs Nanowires between pure zinc blende (ZB) NWs and wurtzite (WZ) NWs containing stacking faults and small ZB segments their growth-direction axis while wurtzite (WZ) InAs NWs grown on InAs (111)B substrates have numerous stacking

  18. Silicon single-electron quantum-dot transistor switch operating at room temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , which showed drain current oscillations at room temperature. These oscillations are attributed current­voltage characteristic indicates that the energy level separation is about 110 meV and the silicon current (Id) as a function of the gate voltage (Vg) (I­V) was measured at different temperatures

  19. Wed., January 30 | noon -1:00p.m. King Hall, Room 1002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    , Room 1002 gReening The gRid ThRoUgh CaLifoRnia'S eLeCTRiCiTy MaRkeTS nancy Saracino Vice President birthing lagoon and World Heritage Site at Laguna San Ignacio in Baja California, to reduce ocean noise

  20. Method of installing a control room console in a nuclear power plant

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scarola, Kenneth (Windsor, CT); Jamison, David S. (Windsor, CT); Manazir, Richard M. (North Canton, CT); Rescorl, Robert L. (Vernon, CT); Harmon, Daryl L. (Enfield, CT)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An advanced control room complex for a nuclear power plant, including a discrete indicator and alarm system (72) which is nuclear qualified for rapid response to changes in plant parameters and a component control system (64) which together provide a discrete monitoring and control capability at a panel (14-22, 26, 28) in the control room (10). A separate data processing system (70), which need not be nuclear qualified, provides integrated and overview information to the control room and to each panel, through CRTs (84) and a large, overhead integrated process status overview board (24). The discrete indicator and alarm system (72) and the data processing system (70) receive inputs from common plant sensors and validate the sensor outputs to arrive at a representative value of the parameter for use by the operator during both normal and accident conditions, thereby avoiding the need for him to assimilate data from each sensor individually. The integrated process status board (24) is at the apex of an information hierarchy that extends through four levels and provides access at each panel to the full display hierarchy. The control room panels are preferably of a modular construction, permitting the definition of inputs and outputs, the man machine interface, and the plant specific algorithms, to proceed in parallel with the fabrication of the panels, the installation of the equipment and the generic testing thereof.

  1. Selective and Rapid Room Temperature Detection of H2S Using Gold Nanoparticle Chain Arrays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Wilfred

    Selective and Rapid Room Temperature Detection of H2S Using Gold Nanoparticle Chain Arrays Joun Lee conductometric hydrogen sulfide (H2S) sensor was fabricated by AC dielectrophoretic assembly of amino acid-ppm level, the upper detection limit of 2 ppm, and a response time ofH2S was achieved

  2. Analysis of Energy Saving in a Clean Room Air-conditioning System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, S.; Liu, J.; Pei, J.; Wang, M.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    above, we had chosen a representative air-handling unit for the testing renovation of 2nd return air system. Cleaning area for this AHU was a capsule clean room with a hundred thousand cleanliness classes. Indoor controlled dry-bulb temperature...

  3. High resolution InSb quantum well ballistic nanosensors for room temperature applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilbertson, Adam; Cohen, L. F. [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, SW7 2BZ (United Kingdom); Lambert, C. J. [Department of Physics, Lancaster University, Lancaster, LA1 4YB (United Kingdom); Solin, S. A. [Department of Physics, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri 63130 (United States)

    2013-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the room temperature operation of a quasi-ballistic InSb quantum well Hall sensor that exhibits a high frequency sensitivity of 560nT/?Hz at 20uA bias current. The device utilizes a partitioned buffer layer design that suppresses leakage currents through the mesa floor and can sustain large current densities.

  4. LIFETIME OF THE EXCITED STATE IN VIVO I. CHLOROPHYLL a IN ALGAE, AT ROOM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Govindjee

    LIFETIME OF THE EXCITED STATE IN VIVO I. CHLOROPHYLL a IN ALGAE, AT ROOM AND AT LIQUID NITROGEN decay of chloro- phyll (Chl) a in the green alga Chlorella pyrenoidosa, the red alga Porphyridium cruentum, and the blue-green alga Anacystis nidulans was measured by the phase- shift method under

  5. ECE 103 Solid State Electronics Master Exam 2012 Assume silicon, room temperature, complete ionization.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Deli

    ECE 103 Solid State Electronics Master Exam 2012 Assume silicon, room temperature, complete ionization. (q=1.6×10-19 C, ox=3.9×8.85×10-14 F/cm, si=11.7×8.85×10-14 F/cm, kT/q=0.0259 V, Eg=1.12 e

  6. Advanced control rooms and crew performance issues: Implications for human reliability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Hara, J.M.; Hall, R.E.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent trends in advanced control room (ACR) design are considered with respect to their impact on human performance. It is concluded that potentially negative influences exist, however, a variety of factors make it difficult to model, analyze, and quantify these effects for human reliability analyses (HRAs).

  7. Advanced control rooms and crew performance issues: Implications for human reliability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O`Hara, J.M.; Hall, R.E.

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent trends in advanced control room (ACR) design are considered with respect to their impact on human performance. It is concluded that potentially negative influences exist, however, a variety of factors make it difficult to model, analyze, and quantify these effects for human reliability analyses (HRAs).

  8. UTS:LIBRARY 1208/UTS:CRICOS CODE 00099F Seminar and Training Rooms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    University of Technology, Sydney

    UTS:LIBRARY 1208/UTS:CRICOS CODE 00099F Seminar and Training Rooms CONTRACT WWW.LIB.UTS.EDU.AU UTS LIBRARY: FACILITIES 1. This Contract must be signed and returned to Corporate Services at the Blake Library (City Campus) or to the Kuring- gai Library Manager at the George Muir Library (Kuring-gai Campus

  9. State-of-the-Art and Outlook: Thermal Properties of Phase Change Wallboard Rooms 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, G.; Liang, R.; Li, G.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ICEBO2006, Shenzhen, China Envelope Technologies for Building Energy Efficiency Vol.II-2-4 State-of-the Art and Outlook: Thermal Properties of Phase Change Wallboard Rooms1 Guohui Feng Ruobing Liang Li Gang Ph.D. Professor...

  10. Investigation of bonding strength and sealing behavior of aluminum/stainless steel bonded at room temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howlader, Matiar R

    ], spark welding [3], explosive bonding [4], and diffusion bonding [5,6]. However, the processing such as diffusion bonding [5,6], friction welding [7e11], vacuum roll bonding [12] and hot roll bonding [13Investigation of bonding strength and sealing behavior of aluminum/stainless steel bonded at room

  11. ECON 466 -INTRODUCTION TO ECONOMETRICS Instructor: Kai Sun Class Room: Engineering Building N25

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    ECON 466 - INTRODUCTION TO ECONOMETRICS Fall 2010 Instructor: Kai Sun Class Room: Engineering web page: blackboard.binghamton.edu (log in and select Intro To Econometrics-FALL10) TA: TBA, Introductory Econometrics: A Modern Approach, 4th edition, South-Western, 2008. Prerequisites: Grades of C

  12. Sensitive room-temperature terahertz detection via the photothermoelectric effect in graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murphy, Thomas E.

    Sensitive room-temperature terahertz detection via the photothermoelectric effect in graphene . The hot-electron photothermoelectric effect in graphene is a prom- ising detection mechanism; photoexcited, we demonstrate a graphene thermoelectric terahertz photodetector with sensi- tivity exceeding 10 V W

  13. Combined giant inverse and normal magnetocaloric effect for room-temperature magnetic cooling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zexian, Cao

    In the last two decades, magnetic refrigeration has been demonstrated as a very promising alternativeCombined giant inverse and normal magnetocaloric effect for room-temperature magnetic cooling Report, we report on the observation of a giant positive inverse magnetic entropy change about 28.6 J K-1

  14. Determination of Binding Constants of Cyclodextrins in Room-Temperature Ionic Liquids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reid, Scott A.

    unique chemical and physical properties, including being air and moisture stable, a high solubility power with supercritical fluid CO2;9-11 (4) electrochemical reactions;12,13 and (5) as a medium for enzymatic reactions.14Determination of Binding Constants of Cyclodextrins in Room-Temperature Ionic Liquids by Near

  15. Electronic Parts and Services Engineering Student Work Lab: Engineering East (EE), Room 205A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    Potentiometers (Pots) Motors, Servos, Solenoids, Fans, Air Batteries And Battery Holders Relays Cabinet 3 (Empty Manager, 561.297.3416, vansant@fau.edu Room Layout Cabinet 1 Battery Holders Crystals Crystals Assorted Standoffs Plastic Washers/Screws Washers Miscellaneous Hardware, Metal Screws Nuts Brackets

  16. Thermal Inertia: Towards An Energy Conservation Room Management System (Technical report)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Dan

    increasing attention to energy conservation around the world. The heating and air-conditioning systems-dissipated cool or heated air and conserve energy. We develop a green room management system with three main expenses of the heating or air-conditioning devices. Second, we build an energy-temperature correlation

  17. Indoor Chemical Exposures: Humans' Non-respiratory Interactions with Room Air

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Charles Weschler

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    March 18, 2010 Berkeley Lab Environmental Energy Technology Division distinguished lecture: The marked difference in pollutant concentrations between an occupied and un-occupied room are only partially explained by human bio-effluents. Humans alter levels of ozone and related oxidants such as nitrate and hydroxyl radicals in the rooms they inhabit; in effect, they change the oxidative capacity of room air. Ozone-initiated reactions on exposed skin, hair and clothing generate products, including potentially irritating chemicals whose concentrations are much higher in the occupant's breathing zone than in the core of the room. Charles J. Weschler is a Professor at the School of Public Health, the Department of Environmental and Occupational Medicine and the Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute (EOHSI) at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (UMDNJ)/Robert Wood Johnson Medical School & Rutgers University (New Jersey). He is also a Visiting Professor at the International Centre for Indoor Environment and Energy, Technical University of Denmark (DTU, Lyngby, Denmark).

  18. SCRC Journal Club 2014-2015 Fridays 12-1pm, Physiology Seminar Room (BMSB 431)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manitoba, University of

    SCRC Journal Club 2014-2015 Fridays 12-1pm, Physiology Seminar Room (BMSB 431) Date Session type 10 Journal article Scott Dyck (PhD student) Oct 17 Journal article Chris Hart (M.Sc student) Oct 24 Journal article Arsalan Alizadeh (PhD student) Oct 31 Journal article Nagakannan Pandian (M.Sc student

  19. Synthesis, characterization, and magnetic properties of room-temperature nanofluid ferromagnetic graphite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lima, Oscar Ferreira

    Synthesis, characterization, and magnetic properties of room-temperature nanofluid ferromagnetic characterization, and physical properties of nanofluid magnetic graphite NFMG obtained from the previously. © 2009 American Institute of Physics. doi:10.1063/1.3265945 Nanofluids can be defined as fluids

  20. Adam Meyers New York University: 719 Broadway, Room 702, NY, NY 10003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohri, Mehryar

    Adam Meyers New York University: 719 Broadway, Room 702, NY, NY 10003 Telephone: (212) 998-3482 Home: 123 W93 St. Apt 2G, NY, NY 10025 Telephone: (212) 222-2771 Email: meyers@cs.nyu.edu Homepage: http://nlp.cs.nyu.edu/people/meyers.html Fax: (212) 995-4123 Publications A. Meyers, R. Grishman, and C

  1. DUBLIN The College & The City The Long Room, Trinity College Library Dublin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Mahony, Donal E.

    DUBLIN The College & The City 1250­1950 The Long Room, Trinity College Library Dublin 5 November of the oldest cities in Europe, Dublin's settlement spans over 1000 years. The collections of Trinity College, churchmen, politicians, landowners, servants or students. Since its foundation in 1592, Trinity's identity

  2. SOUND CLASSIFICATION IN A SMART ROOM ENVIRONMENT: AN APPROACH USING GMM AND HMM METHODS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    be hospitalized at home and smart information systems would be needed in order to assist human operatorsSOUND CLASSIFICATION IN A SMART ROOM ENVIRONMENT: AN APPROACH USING GMM AND HMM METHODS Michel suited for sound classification. Until now, GMMs are frequently used for sound classification in smart

  3. Group Date Location Room No. Group Day Date Location Room No. Monday 26 September David Hume Tower 9.18 Friday 30 September David Hume Tower 9.18

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tittley, Eric

    Group Date Location Room No. Group Day Date Location Room No. Monday 26 September David Hume Tower 9.18 Friday 30 September David Hume Tower 9.18 10 October David Hume Tower 9.18 14 October David Hume Tower 9.18 24 October David Hume Tower 9.18 28 October David Hume Tower 9.18 07 November David

  4. From Awareness to TeamRooms, GroupWeb and TurboTurtle: Eight Snapshots of Recent Work in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenberg, Saul

    From Awareness to TeamRooms, GroupWeb and TurboTurtle: Eight Snapshots of Recent Work in the Group. and Cockburn, A. (1995) From Awareness to TeamRooms, GroupWeb and TurboTurtle: Eight Snapshots of Recent Work in the GroupLab Project. Research Report 95/580/32, Department of Computer Science, University of Calgary

  5. Beacon Training in a Water Maze Can Facilitate and Compete With Subsequent Room Cue Learning in Rats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Indiana University

    Beacon Training in a Water Maze Can Facilitate and Compete With Subsequent Room Cue Learning experiments in which rats completed a water-maze blocking procedure, experimental groups were trained to use location. A Room Test (landmarks and background cues only) showed that Stage 1 training with a fixed

  6. Oxygen-assisted room-temperature deposition of CoPt3 films with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hellman, Frances

    Oxygen-assisted room-temperature deposition of CoPt3 films with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy B Jolla, California 92093 Received 23 July 2002; accepted 30 September 2002 Trace amounts of oxygen CoPt3 grown by vapor deposition at or slightly above room temperature. Oxygen is known to act

  7. Finished Motor Gasoline Net Production

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688Electricity Use asFeet)Second QuarterThe

  8. Plutonium Finishing Plant - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeeding accessPeptoidLabPhysics

  9. Product Supplied for Finished Gasoline

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Energy I I' a evie _ =_ In7, 20116,650.0 167,905.6 173,210.44,1159,600

  10. BEYOND INTEGRATED SYSTEM VALIDATION: USE OF A CONTROL ROOM TRAINING SIMULATOR FOR PROOF-OF-CONCEPT INTERFACE DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronald Boring; Vivek Agarwal

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper provides background on a reconfigurable control room simulator for nuclear power plants. The main control rooms in current nuclear power plants feature analog technology that is growing obsolete. The need to upgrade control rooms serves the practical need of maintainability as well as the opportunity to implement newer digital technologies with added functionality. There currently exists no dedicated research simulator for use in human factors design and evaluation activities for nuclear power plants in the US. The new research simulator discussed in this paper provides a test bed in which operator performance on new control room concepts can be benchmarked against existing control rooms and in which new technologies can be validated for safety and usability prior to deployment.

  11. Press Room

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeedingTechnical News, information and graphic resources from Fermilab and

  12. THE CREATIVE APPLICATION OF SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY & WORK FORCE INNOVATIONS TO THE D&D OF PLUTONIUM FINISHING PLANT (PFP) AT THE HANFORD NUCLEAR RESERVATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CHARBONEAU, S.L.

    2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) consists of a number of process and support buildings for handling plutonium. Building construction began in the late 1940's to meet national priorities and became operational in 1950 producing refined plutonium salts and metal for the United States nuclear weapons program. The primary mission of the PFP was to provide plutonium used as special nuclear material for fabrication into a nuclear device for the war effort. Subsequent to the end of World War II, the PFP's mission expanded to support the Cold War effort through plutonium production during the nuclear arms race. PFP has now completed its mission and is fully engaged in deactivation, decontamination and decommissioning (D&D). At this time the PFP buildings are planned to be reduced to ground level (slab-on-grade) and the site remediated to satisfy national, Department of Energy (DOE) and Washington state requirements. The D&D of a highly contaminated plutonium processing facility presents a plethora of challenges. PFP personnel approached the D&D mission with a can-do attitude. They went into D&D knowing they were facing a lot of challenges and unknowns. There were concerns about the configuration control associated with drawings of these old process facilities. There were unknowns regarding the location of electrical lines and process piping containing chemical residues such as strong acids and caustics. The gloveboxes were highly contaminated with plutonium and chemical residues. Most of the glovebox windows were opaque with splashed process chemicals that coated the windows or etched them, reducing visibility to near zero. Visibility into the glovebox was a serious worker concern. Additionally, all the gloves in the gloveboxes were degraded and unusable. Replacing gloves in gloveboxes was necessary to even begin glovebox cleanout. The sheer volume of breathing air needed was also an issue. These and other challenges and PFP's approach to overcome these challengers are described. Many of the challenges to the D&D work at PFP were met with innovative approaches based on new science and/or technology and many were also based on the creativity and motivation of the work force personnel.

  13. Sequential evacuation strategy for multiple rooms toward the same means of egress

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parisi, Daniel R

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper examines different evacuation strategies for systems where several rooms evacuate trough the same means of egress, using microscopic pedestrian simulation.As a case study, a medium-rise office building is considered. It was found that the standard strategy, whereby the simultaneous evacuation of all levels is performed, can be improved by a sequential evacuation, beginning with the lowest floor and continuing successively with each one of the upper floors after a certain delay. The importance of the present research is that it provides the basis for the design and implementation of new evacuation strategies and alarm systems that could significantly improve the evacuation of multiple rooms trough a common means of escape.

  14. Coupling of PbS Quantum Dots to Photonic Crystal Cavities at Room Temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ilya Fushman; Dirk Englund; Jelena Vuckovic

    2005-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate the coupling of PbS quantum dot emission to photonic crystal cavities at room temperature. The cavities are defined in 33% Al, AlGaAs membranes on top of oxidized AlAs. Quantum dots were dissolved in Poly-methyl-methacrylate (PMMA) and spun on top of the cavities. Quantum dot emission is shown to map out the structure resonances, and may prove to be viable sources for room temperature cavity coupled single photon generation for quantum information processing applications. These results also indicate that such commercially available quantum dots can be used for passive structure characterization. The deposition technique is versatile and allows layers with different dot densities and emission wavelengths to be re-deposited on the same chip.

  15. Cu-Cu direct bonding achieved by surface method at room temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Utsumi, Jun [Advanced Technology Research Center, Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., 1-8-1 Sachiura, Kanazawa-ku, Yokohama 236-8515 (Japan); Ichiyanagi, Yuko, E-mail: yuko@ynu.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Engineering, Yokohama National University, Tokiwadai, Hodogaya, Yokohama 240-8501 (Japan)

    2014-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The metal bonding is a key technology in the processes for the microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) devices and the semiconductor devices to improve functionality and higher density integration. Strong adhesion between surfaces at the atomic level is crucial; however, it is difficult to achieve close bonding in such a system. Cu films were deposited on Si substrates by vacuum deposition, and then, two Cu films were bonded directly by means of surface activated bonding (SAB) at room temperature. The two Cu films, with the surface roughness Ra about 1.3nm, were bonded by using SAB at room temperature, however, the bonding strength was very weak in this method. In order to improve the bonding strength between the Cu films, samples were annealed at low temperatures, between 323 and 473 K, in air. As the result, the Cu-Cu bonding strength was 10 times higher than that of the original samples without annealing.

  16. Iron-aluminum alloys having high room-temperature and method for making same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sikka, Vinod K. (Oak Ridge, TN); McKamey, Claudette G. (Knoxville, TN)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Iron-aluminum alloys having selectable room-temperature ductilities of greater than 20%, high resistance to oxidation and sulfidation, resistant pitting and corrosion in aqueous solutions, and possessing relatively high yield and ultimate tensile strengths are described. These alloys comprise 8 to 9.5% aluminum, up to 7% chromium, up to 4% molybdenum, up to 0.05% carbon, up to 0.5% of a carbide former such as zirconium, up to 0.1 yttrium, and the balance iron. These alloys in wrought form are annealed at a selected temperature in the range of 700.degree. C. to about 1100.degree. C. for providing the alloys with selected room-temperature ductilities in the range of 20 to about 29%.

  17. Electroluminescence from isolated defects in zinc oxide, towards electrically triggered single photon sources at room temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Sumin; Gentle, Angus; Ton-That, Cuong; Phillips, Matthew R; Aharonovich, Igor

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Single photon sources are required for a wide range of applications in quantum information science, quantum cryptography and quantum communications. However, so far majority of room temperature emitters are only excited optically, which limits their proper integration into scalable devices. In this work, we overcome this limitation and present room temperature electrically triggered light emission from localized defects in zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles and thin films. The devices emit at the red spectral range and show excellent rectifying behavior. The emission is stable over an extensive period of time, providing an important prerequisite for practical devices. Our results open up possibilities to build new ZnO based quantum integrated devices that incorporate solid-state single photon sources for quantum information technologies.

  18. Observation of optical spin injection into Ge-based structures at room temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yasutake, Yuhsuke; Hayashi, Shuhei; Fukatsu, Susumu [Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Komaba, Meguro, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan)] [Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Komaba, Meguro, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan); Yaguchi, Hiroyuki [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Saitama University, Shimo-Okubo 255, Sakura, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan)] [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Saitama University, Shimo-Okubo 255, Sakura, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan)

    2013-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Non-zero spin polarization induced by optical orientation was clearly observed at room temperature in a Ge/Ge{sub 0.8}Si{sub 0.2} quantum well grown on Ge and a Ge layer grown on Si by molecular beam epitaxy, whereas it was absent in bulk Ge. This occurred because indirect-gap photoluminescence (PL), which can obscure the spin-polarization information carried by the direct-gap PL, was quenched by unintentional growth-related defects in the epitaxial layers. Such interpretation was confirmed by applying time gating that effectively removed the indirect-gap PL characterized by a slower rise time, which allowed us to demonstrate the existence of room-temperature spin polarization in bulk Ge.

  19. Thirty Years of Near Room Temperature Magnetic Cooling: Where we are Today and Future Prospects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K.A. Gschneidner, Jr; V.K. Pecharsky'

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The seminal study by Brown in 1976 showed that it was possible to use the magnetocaloric effect to produce a substantial cooling effect near room temperature. About 15 years later Green et al. built a device which actually cooled a load other than the magnetocaloric material itself and the heat exchange fluid. The major breakthrough, however, occurred in 1997 when the Ames Laboratory/Astronautics proof-of-principle refrigerator showed that magnetic refrigeration was competitive with conventional gas compression cooling. Since then, over 25 magnetic cooling units have been built and tested throughout the world. The current status of near room temperature magnetic cooling is reviewed, including a discussion of the major problems facing commercialization and potential solutions thereof. The future outlook for this revolutionary technology is discussed.

  20. Integrated Demand Controlled Ventilation for Single Duct VAV System with Conference Rooms 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Y.; Liu, M.; Cho, Y.; Xu, K.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    INTEGRATED DEMAND CONTROLLED VENTILATION FOR SINGLE DUCT VAV SYSTEM WITH CONFERENCE ROOMS Yuebin Yu Mingsheng Liu YoungHum Cho Ke Xu Graduate Student Professor of Architectural Engineering, PhD, PE Graduate.... The total OA intake of IDCV is obtained with the occupancy time ratio considered. The real time distribution of the occupancy and un-occupancy doesn’t much influence the overall calculation. With the amount of OA intake and the local BIN data...

  1. Continuing Studies CRN Course Instructor Delivery Room Dates Days/Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northern British Columbia, University of

    147 April 2 Monday 8:30 am - 4:30 pm * March 26 - April 4, 2012 - Mel Dunleavey - Room 103 April 10 to Friday 8:30 am - 4:30 pm XENG 011 Forest Road Construction Practices & Procedures Gary Zsombor video from PG MOF (Mar 20&22) UNBC Rm 112 (Mar 21) Mar 20 - 22 Tuesday to Thursday 8:30 am - 4:30 pm Project

  2. Design and Validation of Control Room Upgrades Using a Research Simulator Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronald L. Boring; Vivek Agarwal; Jeffrey C. Joe; Julius J. Persensky

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since 1981, the United States (U.S.) Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) [1] requires a plant- specific simulator facility for use in training at U.S. nuclear power plants (NPPs). These training simulators are in near constant use for training and qualification of licensed NPP operators. In the early 1980s, the Halden Man-Machine Laboratory (HAMMLab) at the Halden Reactor Project (HRP) in Norway first built perhaps the most well known set of research simulators. The HRP offered a high- fidelity simulator facility in which the simulator is functionally linked to a specific plant but in which the human-machine interface (HMI) may differ from that found in the plant. As such, HAMMLab incorporated more advanced digital instrumentation and controls (I&C) than the plant, thereby giving it considerable interface flexibility that researchers took full advantage of when designing and validating different ways to upgrade NPP control rooms. Several U.S. partners—the U.S. NRC, the Electrical Power Research Institute (EPRI), Sandia National Laboratories, and Idaho National Laboratory (INL) – as well as international members of the HRP, have been working with HRP to run control room simulator studies. These studies, which use crews from Scandinavian plants, are used to determine crew behavior in a variety of normal and off-normal plant operations. The findings have ultimately been used to guide safety considerations at plants and to inform advanced HMI design—both for the regulator and in industry. Given the desire to use U.S. crews of licensed operators on a simulator of a U.S. NPP, there is a clear need for a research simulator facility in the U.S. There is no general-purpose reconfigurable research oriented control room simulator facility in the U.S. that can be used for a variety of studies, including the design and validation of control room upgrades.

  3. Analysis of Energy Saving in a Clean Room Air-conditioning System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, S.; Liu, J.; Pei, J.; Wang, M.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    temperature field, small supply air temperature difference, large airflow, but no reheater. As the design airflow rate of air conditioning system for cleaning mainly considered to meet the need of the cleanliness class, its air exchange rate was much... above, we had chosen a representative air-handling unit for the testing renovation of 2nd return air system. Cleaning area for this AHU was a capsule clean room with a hundred thousand cleanliness classes. Indoor controlled dry-bulb temperature...

  4. Room temperature broadband terahertz gains in graphene heterostructures based on inter-layer radiative transitions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, Linlong [Key Laboratory of High Energy Density Physics and Technology, College of Physics and Technology, Sichuan University, Chengdu, 610064 (China); Chongqing institute of green and intelligent technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chongqing, 401122 (China); Du, Jinglei, E-mail: dujl@scu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of High Energy Density Physics and Technology, College of Physics and Technology, Sichuan University, Chengdu, 610064 (China); Shi, Haofei, E-mail: shi@cigit.ac.cn; Wei, Dongshan; Du, Chunlei, E-mail: cldu@cigit.ac.cn [Chongqing institute of green and intelligent technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chongqing, 401122 (China)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We exploit inter-layer radiative transitions to provide gains to amplify terahertz waves in graphene heterostructures. This is achieved by properly doping graphene sheets and aligning their energy bands so that the processes of stimulated emissions can overwhelm absorptions. We derive an expression for the gain estimation and show the gain is insensitive to temperature variation. Moreover, the gain is broadband and can be strong enough to compensate the free carrier loss, indicating graphene based room temperature terahertz lasers are feasible.

  5. Human Factors Guidance for Control Room and Digital Human-System Interface Design and Modification, Guidelines for Planning, Specification, Design, Licensing, Implementation, Training, Operation and Maintenance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Fink, D. Hill, J. O'Hara

    2004-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear plant operators face a significant challenge designing and modifying control rooms. This report provides guidance on planning, designing, implementing and operating modernized control rooms and digital human-system interfaces.

  6. 1 Member Raoul Adamchak University of California Davis Agriculture Lecture 2 Member Jeffrey Amthor US DOE, Climate and Environmental Sceiences Div Agriculture Room A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corr Archer Daniels Midland Co. Energy Lecture 3 Member Matthew Frome Solazyme Energy Room B 4 Member

  7. ISSUANCE 2015-07-17: Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Room Air Conditioners; Request for Information, Extension of the Public Comment Period

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Room Air Conditioners; Request for Information, Extension of the Public Comment Period

  8. Determination of the Porosity Surfaces of the Disposal Room Containing Various Waste Inventories for WIPP PA.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Byoung; Hansen, Francis D.

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report develops a series of porosity surfaces for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. The concept of a porosity surface was developed for performance assessment and comprises calculation of room closure as salt creep processes are mitigated by gas generation and back stress created by the waste packages within the rooms. The physical and mechanical characteristics of the waste packaging that has already been disposed--such as the pipe overpack--and new waste packaging--such as the advanced mixed waste compaction--are appreciably different than the waste form upon which the original compliance was based and approved. This report provides structural analyses of room closure with various waste inventories. All of the underlying assumptions pertaining to the original compliance certification including the same finite element code are implemented; only the material parameters describing the more robust waste packages are changed from the certified baseline. As modeled, the more rigid waste tends to hold open the rooms and create relatively more void space in the underground than identical calculations run on the standard waste packages, which underpin the compliance certification. The several porosity surfaces quantified within this report provide possible ranges of pressure and porosity for performance assessment analyses.3 Intentionally blank4 AcknowledgementsThis research is funded by WIPP programs administered by the U.S. Department of Energy. The authors would like to acknowledge the valuable contributions to this work provided by others. Dr. Joshua S. Stein helped explain the hand off between these finite element porosity surfaces and implementation in the performance calculations. Dr. Leo L. Van Sambeek of RESPEC Inc. helped us understand the concepts of room closure under the circumstances created by a rigid waste inventory. Dr. T. William Thompson and Tom W. Pfeifle provided technical review and Mario J. Chavez provided a Quality Assurance review. The paper has been improved by these individuals.Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC04-94Al850005 Intentionally Blank6

  9. 2494 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON MAGNETICS, VOL. 47, NO. 10, OCTOBER 2011 Near Room Temperature Magnetocaloric Response of an (FeNi)ZrB Alloy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McHenry, Michael E.

    a good candidate for magnetic refrigeration near room temperature with additional benefits that is non2494 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON MAGNETICS, VOL. 47, NO. 10, OCTOBER 2011 Near Room Temperature of this powder was slightly higher than room temperature. The refrigerant capacity calculated for this alloy, kg

  10. Evaluation of the effects of contaminant injection location and injection method on the determination of overall relative room ventilation efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierce, Stephen Dale

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this research is to evaluate an emerging concept called ventilation effectiveness at several points in a real room. Ventilation effectiveness was calculated using the pulse and step-up injection methods which were performed in four...

  11. Commissioning Tools for Heating/Cooling System in Residence - Verification of Floor Heating System and Room Air Conditioning System Performance 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miura, H.; Hokoi, S.; Iwamae, A.; Umeno, T.; Kondo, S.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tools of evaluating the performance of floor heating and room air conditioner are examined as a commissioning tool. Simple method is needed to check these performance while in use by residents, because evaluation currently requires significant time...

  12. Avoiding 100 new power plants by increasing efficiency of room air conditioners in India: opportunities and challenges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phadke, Amol; Abhyankar, Nikit; Shah, Nihar; [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Environmental Energy Technology Division

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Electricity demand for room ACs is growing very rapidly in emerging economies such as India. We estimate the electricity demand from room ACs in 2030 in India considering factors such as weather and income growth using market data on penetration of ACs in different income classes and climatic regions. We discuss the status of the current standards, labels, and incentive programs to improve the efficiency of room ACs in these markets and assess the potential for further large improvements in efficiency and find that efficiency can be improved by over 40% cost effectively. The total potential energy savings from Room AC efficiency improvement in India using the best available technology will reach over 118 TWh in 2030; potential peak demand saving is found to be 60 GW by 2030. This is equivalent to avoiding 120 new coal fired power plants of 500 MW each. We discuss policy options to complement, expand and improve the ongoing programs to capture this large potential.

  13. 11-GHz direct modulation bandwidth GaAlAs window laser on semi-insulating substrate operating at room temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lau, K.Y.; Bar-Chaim, N.; Ury, I.; Yariv, A.

    1984-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We have demonstrated a direct modulation bandwidth of up to 11 GHz in a window GaAlAs buried heterostructure laser fabricated on a semi-insulating substrate, operating at room temperature.

  14. How the Number and Placement of Sensors Controlling Room Air Distribution Systems Affect Energy Use and Comfort 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, D.; Arens, E.; Webster, T.; Shi, M.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study assesses the impact of sensor number and placement on the energy needed to condition a typical office using several likely variants of an underfloor air distribution system (UFAD). The study uses an empirical-based room stratification...

  15. Avoiding 100 New Power Plants by Increasing Efficiency of Room Air Conditioners in India: Opportunities and Challenges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phadke, Amol; Abhyankar, Nikit; Shah, Nihar

    2014-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Electricity demand for room ACs is growing very rapidly in emerging economies such as India. We estimate the electricity demand from room ACs in 2030 in India considering factors such as weather and income growth using market data on penetration of ACs in different income classes and climatic regions. We discuss the status of the current standards, labels, and incentive programs to improve the efficiency of room ACs in these markets and assess the potential for further large improvements in efficiency and find that efficiency can be improved by over 40percent cost effectively. The total potential energy savings from Room AC efficiency improvement in India using the best available technology will reach over 118 TWh in 2030; potential peak demand saving is found to be 60 GW by 2030. This is equivalent to avoiding 120 new coal fired power plants of 500 MW each. We discuss policy options to complement, expand and improve the ongoing programs to capture this large potential.

  16. Commissioning Tools for Heating/Cooling System in Residence - Verification of Floor Heating System and Room Air Conditioning System Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miura, H.; Hokoi, S.; Iwamae, A.; Umeno, T.; Kondo, S.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tools of evaluating the performance of floor heating and room air conditioner are examined as a commissioning tool. Simple method is needed to check these performance while in use by residents, because evaluation currently requires significant time...

  17. Structural evaluation of WIPP disposal room raised to Clay Seam G.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Byoung Yoon (Sandia National Laboratories, Carlsbad, NM); Holland, John F. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM)

    2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An error was discovered in the ALGEBBRA script used to calculate the disturbed rock zone around the disposal room and the shear failure zone in the anhydrite layers in the original version. To correct the error, a memorandum of correction was submitted according to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Quality Assurance program. The recommended course of action was to correct the error, to repeat the post-process, and to rewrite Section 7.4, 7.5, 8, and Appendix B in the original report. The sections and appendix revised by the post-process using the corrected ALGEBRA scripts are provided in this revision. The original report summarizes a series of structural calculations that examine effects of raising the WIPP repository horizon from the original design level upward 2.43 meters. Calculations were then repeated for grid changes appropriate for the new horizon raised to Clay Seam G. Results are presented in three main areas: (1) Disposal room porosity, (2) Disturbed rock zone characteristics, and (3) Anhydrite marker bed failure. No change to the porosity surface for the compliance re-certification application is necessary to account for raising the repository horizon, because the new porosity surface is essentially identical. The disturbed rock zone evolution and devolution are charted in terms of a stress invariant criterion over the regulatory period. This model shows that the propagation of the DRZ into the surrounding rock salt does not penetrate through MB 139 in the case of both the original horizon and the raised room. Damaged salt would be expected to heal in nominally 150 years. The shear failure does not occur in either the upper or lower anhydrite layers at the moment of excavation, but appears above and below the middle of the pillar one day after the excavation. The damaged anhydrite is not expected to heal as the salt in the DRZ is expected to.

  18. Minimizing lighting power density in office rooms equipped with Anidolic Daylighting Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Linhart, Friedrich; Scartezzini, Jean-Louis [Solar Energy and Building Physics Laboratory (LESO-PB), Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Electric lighting is responsible for up to one third of an office building's electricity needs. Making daylight more available in office buildings can not only contribute to significant energy savings but also enhance the occupants' performance and wellbeing. Anidolic Daylighting Systems (ADS) are one type of very effective facade-integrated daylighting systems. All south-facing office rooms within the LESO solar experimental building in Lausanne (Switzerland) are equipped with a given type of ADS. A recent study has shown that these offices' occupants are highly satisfied with their lighting environment. The most energy-efficient south-facing offices have a lighting power density of less than 5W/m{sup 2}. The lighting situation within these ''best practice''-offices has been assessed using the lighting simulation software RELUX Vision. Because this lighting situation is very much appreciated by the occupants, it was used as a starting point for developing even more energy-efficient office lighting designs. Two new lighting designs, leading to lighting power densities of 3.9W/m{sup 2} and 3W/m{sup 2}, respectively, have been suggested and simulated with RELUX Vision. Simulation results have shown that the expected performances of these new systems are comparable to that of the current lighting installation within the ''best practice''-offices or even better. These simulation results have been confirmed during experiments on 20 human subjects in a test office room recently set up within the LESO building. This article gives engineers, architects and light planers valuable information and ideas on how to design energy-efficient and comfortable electric lighting systems in office rooms with abundant access to daylight. (author)

  19. Staff Radiation Doses in a Real-Time Display Inside the Angiography Room

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanchez, Roberto, E-mail: rmsanchez.hcsc@salud.madrid.org; Vano, E.; Fernandez, J. M. [Hospital Clinico San Carlos, Medical Physics Department (Spain); Gallego, J. J. [Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Radiology Department (Spain)

    2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    MethodsThe evaluation of a new occupational Dose Aware System (DAS) showing staff radiation doses in real time has been carried out in several angiography rooms in our hospital. The system uses electronic solid-state detectors with high-capacity memory storage. Every second, it archives the dose and dose rate measured and is wirelessly linked to a base-station screen mounted close to the diagnostic monitors. An easy transfer of the values to a data sheet permits further analysis of the scatter dose profile measured during the procedure, compares it with patient doses, and seeks to find the most effective actions to reduce operator exposure to radiation.ResultsThe cumulative occupational doses measured per procedure (shoulder-over lead apron) ranged from 0.6 to 350 {mu}Sv when the ceiling-suspended screen was used, and DSA (Digital Subtraction Acquisition) runs were acquired while the personnel left the angiography room. When the suspended screen was not used and radiologists remained inside the angiography room during DSA acquisitions, the dose rates registered at the operator's position reached up to 1-5 mSv/h during fluoroscopy and 12-235 mSv/h during DSA acquisitions. In such case, the cumulative scatter dose could be more than 3 mSv per procedure.ConclusionReal-time display of doses to staff members warns interventionists whenever the scatter dose rates are too high or the radiation protection tools are not being properly used, providing an opportunity to improve personal protection accordingly.

  20. Detection of pico-Tesla magnetic fields using magneto-electric sensors at room temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhai Junyi; Xing Zengping; Dong Shuxiang; Li Jiefang; Viehland, D. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States)

    2006-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The measurement of low-frequency (10{sup -2}-10{sup 3} Hz) minute magnetic field variations (10{sup -12} Tesla) at room temperature in a passive mode of operation would be critically enabling for deployable neurological signal interfacing and magnetic anomaly detection applications. However, there is presently no magnetic field sensor capable of meeting all of these requirements. Here, we present new bimorph and push-pull magneto-electric laminate composites, which incorporate a charge compensation mechanism (or bridge) that dramatically enhances noise rejection, enabling achievement of such requirements.

  1. Light storage in a room temperature atomic vapor based on coherent population oscillations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. -A. Maynard; F. Bretenaker; F. Goldfarb

    2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the experimental observation of Coherent Population Oscillation (CPO) based light storage in an atomic vapor cell at room temperature. Using the ultranarrow CPO between the ground levels of a $\\Lambda$ system selected by polarization in metastable $^4$He, such a light storage is experimentally shown to be phase preserving. As it does not involve any atomic coherences it has the advantage of being robust to dephasing effects such as small magnetic field inhomogeneities. The storage time is limited by the population lifetime of the ground states of the $\\Lambda$ system.

  2. Room temperature all-silicon photonic crystal nanocavity light emitting diode at sub-bandgap wavelengths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shakoor, A; Cardile, P; Portalupi, S L; Gerace, D; Welna, K; Boninelli, S; Franzo, G; Priolo, F; Krauss, T F; Galli, M; Faolain, L O

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Silicon is now firmly established as a high performance photonic material. Its only weakness is the lack of a native electrically driven light emitter that operates CW at room temperature, exhibits a narrow linewidth in the technologically important 1300- 1600 nm wavelength window, is small and operates with low power consumption. Here, an electrically pumped all-silicon nano light source around 1300-1600 nm range is demonstrated at room temperature. Using hydrogen plasma treatment, nano-scale optically active defects are introduced into silicon, which then feed the photonic crystal nanocavity to enahnce the electrically driven emission in a device via Purcell effect. A narrow ({\\Delta}{\\lambda} = 0.5 nm) emission line at 1515 nm wavelength with a power density of 0.4 mW/cm2 is observed, which represents the highest spectral power density ever reported from any silicon emitter. A number of possible improvements are also discussed, that make this scheme a very promising light source for optical interconnects a...

  3. A waterjet mining machine for use in room and pillar mining operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Summers, D.A.

    1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new mining machine is constructed for use in room and pillar mining operations. This machine uses the action of computer controlled, centrally located high pressure cutting lances to cut deep slots in a coal face. These slots stress relieve the coal ahead of the machine and outline blocks of coal. The movement forward of the machine then wedges up the lower block of coal. This wedging action is assisted by the gathering arms of the loader section of the machine, and by underlying oscillating waterjets which create a slot ahead of the loading wedge as it advances. Finally the top section of coal is brought down by the sequential advance of wedge faced roof support members, again assisted by the waterjet action from the central cutting arms. The machine is designed to overcome major disadvantages of existing room and pillar mining machines in regard to a reduction in respirable dust, the creation of an immediate roof support, and an increase in product size, with concomitant reduction in cleaning costs.

  4. A waterjet mining machine for use in room and pillar mining operations. [Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Summers, D.A.

    1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new mining machine is constructed for use in room and pillar mining operations. This machine uses the action of computer controlled, centrally located high pressure cutting lances to cut deep slots in a coal face. These slots stress relieve the coal ahead of the machine and outline blocks of coal. The movement forward of the machine then wedges up the lower block of coal. This wedging action is assisted by the gathering arms of the loader section of the machine, and by underlying oscillating waterjets which create a slot ahead of the loading wedge as it advances. Finally the top section of coal is brought down by the sequential advance of wedge faced roof support members, again assisted by the waterjet action from the central cutting arms. The machine is designed to overcome major disadvantages of existing room and pillar mining machines in regard to a reduction in respirable dust, the creation of an immediate roof support, and an increase in product size, with concomitant reduction in cleaning costs.

  5. An indoor radon survey of the X-ray rooms of Mexico City hospitals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Juarez, Faustino [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Instituto Literario No. 100. Estado de Mexico, 50000, Mexico. Instituto de Geofisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Circuito (Mexico); Reyes, Pedro G. [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Instituto Literario No. 100. Estado de Mexico, 50000 (Mexico); Espinosa, Guillermo [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Circuito Exterior Ciudad Universitaria, Mexico D.F. Cp.04510 (Mexico)

    2013-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the results of measurements of indoor radon concentrations in the X-ray rooms of a selection of hospitals in the metropolitan area of Mexico City. The metropolitan area of Mexico City is Mexico's largest metropolitan area by population; the number of patients requiring the use of X-rays is also the highest. An understanding of indoor radon concentrations in X-ray rooms is necessary for the estimation of the radiological risk to which patients, radiologists and medical technicians are exposed. The indoor radon concentrations were monitored for a period of six months using nuclear track detectors (NTD) consisting of a closed-end cup system with CR-39 (Lantrack Registered-Sign ) polycarbonate as detector material. The indoor radon concentrations were found to be between 75 and 170 Bq m{sup -3}, below the USEPA-recommended indoor radon action level for working places of 400 Bq m{sup -3}. It is hoped that the results of this study will contribute to the establishment of recommended action levels by the Mexican regulatory authorities responsible for nuclear safety.

  6. Regulatory analysis for the resolution of Generic Issue 143: Availability of chilled water system and room cooling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leung, V.T.

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the regulatory analysis for Generic Issue (GI-143), {open_quotes}Availability of Chilled Water System and Room Cooling.{close_quotes} The heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems and related auxiliaries are required to provide control of environmental conditions in areas in light water reactor (LWR) plants that contain safety-related equipment. In some plants, the HVAC and chilled water systems serve to maintain a suitable environment for both safety and non-safety-related areas. Although some plants have an independent chilled water system for the safety-related areas, the heat removal capability often depends on the operability of other supporting systems such as the service water system or the component cooling water system. The operability of safety-related components depends upon operation of the HVAC and chilled water systems to remove heat from areas containing the equipment. If cooling to dissipate the heat generated is unavailable, the ability of the safety-related equipment to operate as intended cannot be assured. Typical components or areas in the nuclear power plant that could be affected by the failure of cooling from HVAC or chilled water systems include the (1) emergency switchgear and battery rooms, (2) emergency diesel generator room, (3) pump rooms for residual heat removal, reactor core isolation cooling, high-pressure core spray, and low-pressure core spray, and (4) control room. The unavailability of such safety-related equipment or areas could cause the core damage frequency (CDF) to increase significantly.

  7. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Operator Performance Metrics for Control Room Modernization: A Practical Guide for Early Design Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronald Boring; Roger Lew; Thomas Ulrich; Jeffrey Joe

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As control rooms are modernized with new digital systems at nuclear power plants, it is necessary to evaluate the operator performance using these systems as part of a verification and validation process. There are no standard, predefined metrics available for assessing what is satisfactory operator interaction with new systems, especially during the early design stages of a new system. This report identifies the process and metrics for evaluating human system interfaces as part of control room modernization. The report includes background information on design and evaluation, a thorough discussion of human performance measures, and a practical example of how the process and metrics have been used as part of a turbine control system upgrade during the formative stages of design. The process and metrics are geared toward generalizability to other applications and serve as a template for utilities undertaking their own control room modernization activities.

  8. Room temperature ferromagnetism in Co-doped amorphous carbon composites from the spin polarized semiconductor band

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hsu, H. S., E-mail: hshsu@mail.nptu.edu.tw; Chien, P. C.; Chang, Y. Y. [Department of Applied Physics, National Pingtung University, Pingtung 900, Taiwan (China); Sun, S. J. [Department of Applied Physics, National University of Kaohsiung, Kaohsiung 811, Taiwan (China); Lee, C. H. [Department of Engineering and System Science, National Tsing-Hua University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China)

    2014-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This study provides conclusive evidence of room temperature ferromagnetism in Co-doped amorphous carbon (a-C) composites from the spin polarized semiconductor band. These composites are constructed from discontinuous [Co(3?nm)/a-C(d{sub c} nm)]{sub 5} multilayers with d{sub c}?=?3?nm and d{sub c}?=?6?nm. Only remnant circular dichroism (CD) was observed from the d{sub c}?=?3?nm sample but not when d{sub c}?=?6?nm. In addition, the remnant CD peaks at 5.5?eV, which is comparable with the absorption peak associated with the C ?-?* gap transition. We suggest that the possible mechanism for this coupling can be considered as a magnetic proximity effect in which a ferromagnetic moment in the C medium is induced by Co/C interfaces.

  9. On the Mechanism of Above Room Temperature Superconductivity and Superfluidity by Relativistic Quantum Mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reginald B. Little

    2014-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A comprehensive theory of superconductivity (SC) and superfluidity (SF) is presented of new types III and IV at temperatures into millions of degrees involving phase transitions of fermions in heat reservoirs to form general relativistic triple quasi-particles of 3 fermions interacting to boson-fermion pairs. Types 0, I, and II SC/SF are deduced from such triples as: thermally dressed, relativistic fermionic vortices; spin coupled, dressed, fermionic vortical pairs (diamagnetic bosons); and spinrevorbitally coupled, dressed fermionic, vortical pairs (ferromagnetic bosons). All known SC, SF and trends in critical temperatures (Tc) are thereby explained. The recently observed SC/SF in nano-graphene systems is explained. The above room temperature SC/SF is predicted and modeled by transformations of intense thermal boson populations of heat reservoirs to relativistic mass, weight, spin and magnetism for further reasoning over compression to electricity, weak phenomena and strong phenomena for connecting general relativism and quantum mechanics.

  10. Method for stabilizing low-level mixed wastes at room temperature

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wagh, A.S.; Singh, D.

    1997-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A method to stabilize solid and liquid waste at room temperature is provided comprising combining solid waste with a starter oxide to obtain a powder, contacting the powder with an acid solution to create a slurry, said acid solution containing the liquid waste, shaping the now-mixed slurry into a predetermined form, and allowing the now-formed slurry to set. The invention also provides for a method to encapsulate and stabilize waste containing cesium comprising combining the waste with Zr(OH){sub 4} to create a solid-phase mixture, mixing phosphoric acid with the solid-phase mixture to create a slurry, subjecting the slurry to pressure; and allowing the now pressurized slurry to set. Lastly, the invention provides for a method to stabilize liquid waste, comprising supplying a powder containing magnesium, sodium and phosphate in predetermined proportions, mixing said powder with the liquid waste, such as tritium, and allowing the resulting slurry to set. 4 figs.

  11. Blue photoluminescence enhancement in laser-irradiated 6H-SiC at room temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Yan; Ji, Lingfei, E-mail: ncltji@bjut.edu.cn; Lin, Zhenyuan; Jiang, Yijian [Institute of Laser Engineering, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100124 (China); Zhai, Tianrui [College of Applied Science, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100124 (China)

    2014-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Blue photoluminescence (PL) of 6H-SiC irradiated by an ultraviolet laser can be observed at room temperature in dark condition. PL spectra with Gaussian fitting curve of the irradiated SiC show that blue luminescence band (?440?nm) is more pronounced than other bands. The blue PL enhancement is the combined result of the improved shallow N-donor energy level and the unique surface state with Si nanocrystals and graphene/Si composite due to the effect of photon energy input by the short-wavelength laser irradiation. The study can provide a promising route towards the preparation of well-controlled blue photoluminescence material for light-emitting devices.

  12. Direct Observation of Room-Temperature Polar Ordering in Colloidal GeTe Nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Polking, Mark J.; Zheng, Haimei; Urban, Jeffrey J.; Milliron, Delia J.; Chan, Emory; Caldwell, Marissa A.; Raoux, Simone; Kisielowski, Christian F.; Ager III, Joel W.; Ramesh, Ramamoorthy; Alivisatos, A.P.

    2009-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Ferroelectrics and other materials that exhibit spontaneous polar ordering have demonstrated immense promise for applications ranging from non-volatile memories to microelectromechanical systems. However, experimental evidence of polar ordering and effective synthetic strategies for accessing these materials are lacking for low-dimensional nanomaterials. Here, we demonstrate the synthesis of size-controlled nanocrystals of the polar material germanium telluride (GeTe) using colloidal chemistry and provide the first direct evidence of room-temperature polar ordering in nanocrystals less than 5 nm in size using aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy. Synchrotron x-ray diffraction and Raman studies demonstrate a sizeable polar distortion and a reversible size-dependent polar phase transition in these nanocrystals. The stability of polar ordering in solution-processible nanomaterials suggests an economical avenue to Tbit/in2-density non-volatile memory devices and other applications.

  13. On the Mechanism of Above Room Temperature Superconductivity and Superfluidity by Relativistic Quantum Mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reginald B. Little

    2015-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A comprehensive theory of superconductivity (SC) and superfluidity (SF) is presented of new types III and IV at temperatures into millions of degrees involving phase transitions of fermions in heat reservoirs to form general relativistic triple quasi-particles of 3 fermions interacting to boson-fermion pairs. Types 0, I, and II SC/SF are deduced from such triples as: thermally dressed, relativistic fermionic vortices; spin coupled, dressed, fermionic vortical pairs (diamagnetic bosons); and spinrevorbitally coupled, dressed fermionic, vortical pairs (ferromagnetic bosons). All known SC, SF and trends in critical temperatures (Tc) are thereby explained. The recently observed SC/SF in nano-graphene systems is explained. The above room temperature SC/SF is predicted and modeled by transformations of intense thermal boson populations of heat reservoirs to relativistic mass, weight, spin and magnetism for further reasoning over compression to electricity, weak phenomena and strong phenomena for connecting general relativism and quantum mechanics.

  14. Environmental effect on room-temperature ductility of isothermally forged TiAl-base alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakamura, Morihiko; Hashimoto, Kenki (National Research Inst. for Metals, Tokyo (Japan)); Itoh, Naoyuki (Nippon Steel Corp., Chiba (Japan)); Tsujimoto, Tokuzo (Ibaraki Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Engineering); Suzuki, Toshiyuki (Kougakuin Univ., Tokyo (Japan))

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Isothermally forged TiAl-base alloy (Al-rich, Mn-containing, and Cr-containing TiAl) were heat-treated in various conditions, and equiaxed grain structures consisting of [gamma] and [alpha][sub 2] or [beta] phases were obtained. The heat-treated alloys were tensile tested in vacuum and air at room temperature, and the environmental effect on tensile elongation was studied. The ductility of the alloys consisting of equiaxed [gamma] grains and a large amount of [alpha][sub 2] grains was not largely affecting by laboratory air, and a decrease in the amount of [alpha][sub 2] grains resulted in a large reduction of ductility in air. The [beta] phase in the Cr-containing alloy improved the ductility in vacuum, but it resulted in a large reduction of ductility in air.

  15. Room temperature broadband coherent terahertz emission induced by dynamical photon drag in graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maysonnave, J; Wang, F; Maero, S; Berger, C; de Heer, W; Norris, T B; De Vaulchier, L A; Dhillon, S; Tignon, J; Ferreira, R; Mangeney, J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nonlinear couplings between photons and electrons in new materials give rise to a wealth of interesting nonlinear phenomena. This includes frequency mixing, optical rectification or nonlinear current generation, which are of particular interest for generating radiation in spectral regions that are difficult to access, such as the terahertz gap. Owing to its specific linear dispersion and high electron mobility at room temperature, graphene is particularly attractive for realizing strong nonlinear effects. However, since graphene is a centrosymmetric material, second-order nonlinearities a priori cancel, which imposes to rely on less attractive third-order nonlinearities. It was nevertheless recently demonstrated that dc-second-order nonlinear currents as well as ultrafast ac-currents can be generated in graphene under optical excitation. The asymmetry is introduced by the excitation at oblique incidence, resulting in the transfer of photon momentum to the electron system, known as the photon drag effect. Here...

  16. Human factors engineering evaluation of the Advanced Test Reactor Control Room

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boone, M.P.; Banks, W.W.

    1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The information presented here represents preliminary findings related to an ongoing human engineering evaluation of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Control Room. Although many of the problems examined in this report have been previously noted by ATR operations personnel, the systematic approach used in this investigation produced many new insights. While many violations of Human Engineering military standards (MIL-STD) are noted, and numerous recommendations made, the recommendations should be examined cautiously. The reason for our suggested caution lies in the fact that many ATR operators have well over 10-years experience in operating the controls, meters, etc. Hence, it is assumed adaptation to the existing system is quite developed and the introduction of hardware/control changes, even though the changes enhance the system, may cause short-term (or long-term, depending upon the amount of operator experience and training) adjustment problems for operators adapting to the new controls/meters and physical layout.

  17. Using micro saint to predict performance in a nuclear power plant control room

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawless, M.T.; Laughery, K.R. [Micro Analysis and Design, Inc., Boulder, CO (United States); Persenky, J.J. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requires a technical basis for regulatory actions. In the area of human factors, one possible technical basis is human performance modeling technology including task network modeling. This study assessed the feasibility and validity of task network modeling to predict the performance of control room crews. Task network models were built that matched the experimental conditions of a study on computerized procedures that was conducted at North Carolina State University. The data from the {open_quotes}paper procedures{close_quotes} conditions were used to calibrate the task network models. Then, the models were manipulated to reflect expected changes when computerized procedures were used. These models` predictions were then compared to the experimental data from the {open_quotes}computerized conditions{close_quotes} of the North Carolina State University study. Analyses indicated that the models predicted some subsets of the data well, but not all. Implications for the use of task network modeling are discussed.

  18. Room temperature ferromagnetism in Co defused CdTe nanocrystalline thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rao, N. Madhusudhana; Kaleemulla, S.; Begam, M. Rigana [Materials Physics Division, School of Advanced Sciences, VIT University, Vellore - 632 014 (India)

    2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanocrystalline Co defused CdTe thin films were prepared using electron beam evaporation technique by depositing CdTe/Co/CdTe stacked layers with different Co thickness onto glass substrate at 373 K followed by annealing at 573K for 2 hrs. Structural, morphological and magnetic properties of of all the Co defused CdTe thin films has been investigated. XRD pattern of all the films exhibited zinc blende structure with <111> preferential orientation without changing the crystal structure of the films. The grain size of the films increased from 31.5 nm to 48.1 nm with the increase of Co layer thickness from 25nm to 100nm. The morphological studies showed that uniform texture of the films and the presence of Co was confirmed by EDAX. Room temperature magnetization curves indicated an improved ferromagnetic behavior in the films with increase of the Co thickness.

  19. A magnetically shielded room with ultra low residual field and gradient

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Altarev, I.; Chesnevskaya, S.; Gutsmiedl, E.; Kuchler, F.; Lins, T.; Marino, M.; McAndrew, J.; Niessen, B.; Paul, S.; Petzoldt, G.; Singh, J.; Stoepler, R.; Stuiber, S.; Sturm, M.; Taubenheim, B. [Physikdepartment, Technische Universität München, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Babcock, E. [Jülich Center for Neutron Science, Lichtenbergstrasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Beck, D.; Sharma, S. [Physics Department, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Burghoff, M.; Fan, I. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt Berlin, D-10587 Berlin (Germany); and others

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A versatile and portable magnetically shielded room with a field of (700 ± 200) pT within a central volume of 1 m × 1 m × 1 m and a field gradient less than 300 pT/m, achieved without any external field stabilization or compensation, is described. This performance represents more than a hundredfold improvement of the state of the art for a two-layer magnetic shield and provides an environment suitable for a next generation of precision experiments in fundamental physics at low energies; in particular, searches for electric dipole moments of fundamental systems and tests of Lorentz-invariance based on spin-precession experiments. Studies of the residual fields and their sources enable improved design of future ultra-low gradient environments and experimental apparatus. This has implications for developments of magnetometry beyond the femto-Tesla scale in, for example, biomagnetism, geosciences, and security applications and in general low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements.

  20. From molten salts to room temperature ionic liquids: Simulation studies on chloroaluminate systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salanne, Mathieu; Seitsonen, Ari P; Madden, Paul A; Kirchner, Barbara; 10.1039/C1FD00053E

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An interaction potential including chloride anion polarization effects, constructed from first-principles calculations, is used to examine the structure and transport properties of a series of chloroaluminate melts. A particular emphasis was given to the study of the equimolar mixture of aluminium chloride with 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride, which forms a room temperature ionic liquid EMI-AlCl 4. The structure yielded by the classical simulations performed within the framework of the polarizable ion model is compared to the results obtained from entirely electronic structure-based simulations: An excellent agreement between the two flavors of molecular dynamics is observed. When changing the organic cation EMI+ by an inorganic cation with a smaller ionic radius (Li+, Na+, K+), the chloroaluminate speciation becomes more complex, with the formation of Al2Cl 7- in small amounts. The calculated transport properties (diffusion coefficients, electrical conductivity and viscosity) of EMI-AlCl4 are in good ag...

  1. Searching Room Temperature Ferromagnetism in Wide Gap Semiconductors Fe-doped Strontium Titanate and Zinc Oxide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pereira, LMC; Wahl, U

    Scientic findings in the very beginning of the millennium are taking us a step further in the new paradigm of technology: spintronics. Upgrading charge-based electronics with the additional degree of freedom of the carriers spin-state, spintronics opens a path to the birth of a new generation of devices with the potential advantages of non-volatility and higher processing speed, integration densities and power efficiency. A decisive step towards this new age lies on the attribution of magnetic properties to semiconductors, the building block of today's electronics, that is, the realization of ferromagnetic semiconductors (FS) with critical temperatures above room temperature. Unfruitful search for intrinsic RT FS lead to the concept of Dilute(d) Magnetic Semiconductors (DMS): ordinary semiconductor materials where 3 d transition metals randomly substitute a few percent of the matrix cations and, by some long-range mechanism, order ferromagnetically. The times are of intense research activity and the last few ...

  2. Preparation of room temperature terahertz detector with lithium tantalate crystal and thin film

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Jun, E-mail: ueoewj@gmail.com; Gou, Jun; Li, Weizhi [State Key Lab of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices, School of Optoelectronic Information, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China)] [State Key Lab of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices, School of Optoelectronic Information, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Research on room temperature terahertz (THz) detector is essential for promoting the application of THz science and technology. Both lithium tantalate crystal (LiTaO{sub 3}) and lithium tantalate thin film were used to fabricate the THz detector in this paper. Polishing process were used to reduce the thickness of LiTaO{sub 3} crystal slice by chemical mechanical polishing techniques and an improved sol-gel process was used to obtain high concentration LiTaO{sub 3} precursor solution to fabricate LiTaO{sub 3} thin film. Three dimension models of two THz detectors were set up and the temperature increasing map of two devices were simulated using finite element method. The lowest noise equivalent power value for terahertz detector using pyroelectric material reaches 6.8 × 10{sup ?9} W at 30 Hz operating frequency, which is suitable for THz imaging application.

  3. Method for stabilizing low-level mixed wastes at room temperature

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wagh, Arun S. (Joliet, IL); Singh, Dileep (Westmont, IL)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method to stabilize solid and liquid waste at room temperature is provided comprising combining solid waste with a starter oxide to obtain a powder, contacting the powder with an acid solution to create a slurry, said acid solution containing the liquid waste, shaping the now-mixed slurry into a predetermined form, and allowing the now-formed slurry to set. The invention also provides for a method to encapsulate and stabilize waste containing cesium comprising combining the waste with Zr(OH).sub.4 to create a solid-phase mixture, mixing phosphoric acid with the solid-phase mixture to create a slurry, subjecting the slurry to pressure; and allowing the now pressurized slurry to set. Lastly, the invention provides for a method to stabilize liquid waste, comprising supplying a powder containing magnesium, sodium and phosphate in predetermined proportions, mixing said powder with the liquid waste, such as tritium, and allowing the resulting slurry to set.

  4. Experimental Observation of the Inverse Spin Hall Effect at Room Temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Baoli; Shi, Junren; Wang, Wenxin; Zhao, Hongming; Li, Dafang; /Beijing, Inst. Phys.; Zhang, Shoucheng; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Xue, Qikun; Chen, Dongmin; /Beijing, Inst. Phys.

    2010-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We observe the inverse spin Hall effect in a two-dimensional electron gas confined in Al-GaAs/InGaAs quantum wells. Specifically, they find that an inhomogeneous spin density induced by the optical injection gives rise to an electric current transverse to both the spin polarization and its gradient. The spin Hall conductivity can be inferred from such a measurement through the Einstein relation and the onsager relation, and is found to have the order of magnitude of 0.5(e{sup 2}/h). The observation is made at the room temperature and in samples with macroscopic sizes, suggesting that the inverse spin Hall effects is a robust macroscopic transport phenomenon.

  5. CW Room Temperature Re-Buncher for the Project X Front End

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Romanov, Gennady; Awida, Mohamed H.; Chen, Meiyu; Gonin, Ivan V.; Kazakov, Sergey; Kostin, Roman; Lebedev, Valeri; Solyak, Nikolay; Yakovlev, Vyacheslav P.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    At Fermilab there is a plan to construct the Project X Injector Experiment (PXIE) facility - a prototype of the front end of the Project X, a multi-MW proton source based on superconducting linac. The construction and successful operations of this facility will validate the concept for the Project X front end, thereby minimizing the primary technical risk element within the Project. The room temperature front end of the linac contains an ion source, an RFQ accelerator and a Medium Energy Beam Transport (MEBT) section comprising a high bandwidth bunch selective chopper. The MEBT length is about 10 m, so three re-bunching CW cavities are used to support the beam longitudinal dynamics. The paper reports a RF design of the re-bunchers along with preliminary beam dynamic and thermal analysis of the cavities.

  6. CDZNTE ROOM-TEMPERATURE SEMICONDUCTOR GAMMA-RAY DETECTOR FOR NATIONAL-SECURITY APPLICATIONS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CAMARDA,G.S.; BOLOTNIKOV, A.E.; CUI, Y.; HOSSAIN, A.; KOHMAN, K.T.; JAMES, R.B.

    2007-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    One important mission of the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration is to develop reliable gamma-ray detectors to meet the widespread needs of users for effective techniques to detect and identify special nuclear- and radioactive-materials. Accordingly, the Nonproliferation and National Security Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory was tasked to evaluate existing technology and to develop improved room-temperature detectors based on semiconductors, such as CdZnTe (CZT). Our research covers two important areas: Improving the quality of CZT material, and exploring new CZT-based gamma-ray detectors. In this paper, we report on our recent findings from the material characterization and tests of actual CZT devices fabricated in our laboratory and from materials/detectors supplied by different commercial vendors. In particular, we emphasize the critical role of secondary phases in the current CZT material and issues in fabricating the CZT detectors, both of which affect their performance.

  7. Could light harvesting complexes exhibit non-classical effects at room temperature?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mark M. Wilde; James M. McCracken; Ari Mizel

    2009-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Mounting experimental and theoretical evidence suggests that coherent quantum effects play a role in the efficient transfer of an excitation from a chlorosome antenna to a reaction center in the Fenna-Matthews-Olson protein complex. However, it is conceivable that a satisfying alternate interpretation of the results is possible in terms of a classical theory. To address this possibility, we consider a class of classical theories satisfying the minimal postulates of macrorealism and frame Leggett-Garg-type tests that could rule them out. Our numerical simulations indicate that even in the presence of decoherence, several tests could exhibit the required violations of the Leggett-Garg inequality. Remarkably, some violations persist even at room temperature for our decoherence model.

  8. Computational modeling and analysis of airflow in a tritium storage room

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Z. (Zukun); Konecni, S. (Snezana); Whicker, J. J. (Jeffrey J.)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, a commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code, CFX-5.5, was utilized to assess flow field characteristics, and to simulate tritium gas releases and subsequent transport in a storage room in the tritium handling facility at Los Alamos. This study was done with mesh refinement and results compared. The results show a complex, ventilation-induced flow field with vortices, velocity gradients, and stagnant air pockets. This paper also explains the timedependent gas dispersion results. The numerical analysis method used in this study provides important information that is possible to be validated with an experimental technique of aerosol tracer measurement method frequently used at Los Alamos. Application of CFD can have a favorable impact on the design of ventilation systems and worker safety with consideration to facility costs.

  9. Iron-aluminum alloys having high room-temperature and method for making same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sikka, V.K.; McKamey, C.G.

    1993-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A wrought and annealed iron-aluminum alloy is described consisting essentially of 8 to 9.5% aluminum, an effective amount of chromium sufficient to promote resistance to aqueous corrosion of the alloy, and an alloying constituent selected from the group of elements consisting of an effective amount of molybdenum sufficient to promote solution hardening of the alloy and resistance of the alloy to pitting when exposed to solutions containing chloride, up to about 0.05% carbon with up to about 0.5% of a carbide former which combines with the carbon to form carbides for controlling grain growth at elevated temperatures, and mixtures thereof, and the balance iron, wherein said alloy has a single disordered [alpha] phase crystal structure, is substantially non-susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement, and has a room-temperature ductility of greater than 20%.

  10. Above room-temperature ferromagnetism of Mn delta-doped GaN nanorods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Y. T.; Wadekar, P. V.; Kao, H. S.; Chen, T. H.; Chen, Q. Y.; Tu, L. W., E-mail: lwtu@faculty.nsysu.edu.tw [Department of Physics and Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung 80424, Taiwan (China); Huang, H. C.; Ho, N. J. [Department of Materials and Optoelectronic Science and Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung 80424, Taiwan (China)

    2014-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    One-dimensional nitride based diluted magnetic semiconductors were grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. Delta-doping technique was adopted to dope GaN nanorods with Mn. The structural and magnetic properties were investigated. The GaMnN nanorods with a single crystalline structure and with Ga sites substituted by Mn atoms were verified by high-resolution x-ray diffraction and Raman scattering, respectively. Secondary phases were not observed by high-resolution x-ray diffraction and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. In addition, the magnetic hysteresis curves show that the Mn delta-doped GaN nanorods are ferromagnetic above room temperature. The magnetization with magnetic field perpendicular to GaN c-axis saturates easier than the one with field parallel to GaN c-axis.

  11. Free Radical Polymerization of Styrene and Methyl Methacrylate in Various Room Temperature Ionic Liquids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Hongwei [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Hong, Kunlun [ORNL; Mays, Jimmy [ORNL

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Conventional free radical polymerization of styrene and methyl methacrylate was carried out in various room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs). The RTILs used in this research encompass a wide range of cations and anions. Typical cations include imidazolium, phosphonium, pyridinium, and pyrrolidinium; typical anions include amide, borate, chloride, imide, phosphate, and phosphinate. Reactions are faster and polymers obtained usually have higher molecular weights when compared to polymerizations carried out in volatile organic solvents under the same conditions. This shows that rapid rates of polymerization and high molecular weights are general features of conventional radical polymerizations in RTILs. Attempts to correlate the polarities and viscosities of the RTILs with the polymerization behavior fail to yield discernible trends.

  12. Nanowire-based frequency-selective capacitive photodetector for resonant detection of infrared radiation at room temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bandyopadhyay, Saumil, E-mail: saumilb@mit.edu [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA and Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23284 (United States)

    2014-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Characteristics of a capacitive infrared photodetector that works at room temperature by registering a change in capacitance upon illumination are reported. If used in an ideal resonant inductor-resistor-capacitor circuit, it can exhibit zero dark current, zero standby power dissipation, infinite detectivity, and infinite light-to-dark contrast ratio. It is also made frequency-selective by employing semiconductor nanowires that selectively absorb photons of energies close to the nanowire's bandgap. Based on measured parameters, the normalized detectivity is estimated to be ?3?×?10{sup 7} Jones for 1.6??m IR wavelength at room temperature.

  13. Patterned silicon substrates: a common platform for room temperature GaN and ZnO polariton lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zuniga-Perez, J; Hahe, R; Rashid, M J; Bouchoule, S; Brimont, C; Disseix, P; Duboz, J Y; Gommé, G; Guillet, T; Jamadi, O; Lafosse, X; Leroux, M; Leymarie, J; Li, Feng; Réveret, F; Semond, F

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new platform for fabricating polariton lasers operating at room temperature is introduced: nitride-based distributed Bragg reflectors epitaxially grown on patterned silicon substrates. The patterning allows for an enhanced strain relaxation thereby enabling to stack a large number of crack-free AlN/AlGaN pairs and achieve cavity quality factors of several thousands with a large spatial homogeneity. GaN and ZnO active regions are epitaxially grown thereon and the cavities are completed with top dielectric Bragg reflectors. The two structures display strong-coupling and polariton lasing at room temperature and constitute an intermediate step in the way towards integrated polariton devices.

  14. BLIND RT60 ESTIMATION ROBUST ACROSS ROOM SIZES AND SOURCE DISTANCES Baldwin Dumortier1,2,3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    BLIND RT60 ESTIMATION ROBUST ACROSS ROOM SIZES AND SOURCE DISTANCES Baldwin Dumortier1 be blindly es- timated from a speech or music signal. Current methods often implicitly assume sound sources. This paper features two contributions. Firstly, we propose a blind RT60 estimation method

  15. Processing Age-hardenable Alloys by Equal-Channel Angular Pressing at Room Temperature: Strategies and Advantages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gubicza, Jenõ

    Processing Age-hardenable Alloys by Equal-Channel Angular Pressing at Room Temperature: Strategies, Poland 3 Departments of Aerospace & Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, University of SouthernZnMg alloys, precipitation, Guinier-Preston zones, Equal-Channel Angular Pressing, strengthening, elongation

  16. How the Number and Placement of Sensors Controlling Room Air Distribution Systems Affect Energy Use and Comfort

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, D.; Arens, E.; Webster, T.; Shi, M.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , ISRACVE, ASHRAE, 1993 Li, Y., M. Sandberg, and L. Fuchs. ?Vertical temperature profiles in rooms ventilated by displacement: full-scale measurement and nodal modeling.? Indoor Air, 1992. Vol. 2, pp. 225-243. Linden, P.F., G.F. Lane-Serff,, and D...

  17. Importance of the Return Air Opening to Degree of Turbulence in a I-Grade Clean Operating Room

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheng, S.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    room in conditions that insure a degree of cleanliness and supply velocity. The size of the return air opening has been analyzed by comparing the results of the numerical simulation and experiment. The results will help the design of the I-grade clean...

  18. Kenninger Renewable Energy and Power Systems Seminar February 24, 2014 10:30 am Room ME 2054

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ginzel, Matthew

    Kenninger Renewable Energy and Power Systems Seminar February 24, 2014 10:30 am Room ME 2054 Dr investigation on model wind farm operated in a wind tunnel have shown that power generated by turbines, are associated with 54% of the total energy transport from ATBL. The wind tunnel studies performed included model

  19. Kenninger Renewable Energy and Power Systems Seminar April 21, 2014 10:30 am Room ME 2054

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ginzel, Matthew

    Kenninger Renewable Energy and Power Systems Seminar April 21, 2014 10:30 am Room ME 2054 Dr review advances in physical modeling and design of electrochemical capacitors for applications ranging materials. Third, the seminar will present efforts in optimizing and controlling light transfer

  20. Determination of Thermal Diffusivities, Thermal Conductivities, and Sound Speeds of Room-Temperature Ionic Liquids by the Transient Grating Technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reid, Scott A.

    Determination of Thermal Diffusivities, Thermal Conductivities, and Sound Speeds of Room. The experiments give thermal diffusivities from which thermal conductivities can be determined, sound speeds not only on the sound speed but also on the thermal diffusivity and acoustic damping of the RTILs

  1. Men-Tzung Lo Engineering Building V-C Room 304 Tel: +886-3-426-9734

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Men-Tzung Lo Engineering Building V-C Room 304 Tel: +886-3-426-9734 300 Jhongda Road Chungli,Taiwan 32001 Email: mzlo@ncu.edu.tw BIOGRAPHY Men-Tzung Lo, Ph.D., is Associate Research Scientist of Center · Neuroscience Letters · Physica A: Statistical Mechanics and its Applications · PLOS ONE · Sensors · Soil

  2. hal-00132485,version1-21Feb2007 Liquid nitrogen to room temperature thermometry using niobium nitride thin films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    hal-00132485,version1-21Feb2007 Liquid nitrogen to room temperature thermometry using niobium´eel, CNRS-UJF, 25 avenue des Martyrs, 38042 Grenoble, France (Dated: February 21, 2007) Niobium nitride thin, the interesting properties of niobium nitride (NbN) as well as amorphous Nb-Si have been ex- tensively used

  3. STAT798Y, SURVIVAL ANALYSIS -Fall, 2012 Tu-Th 9:30-10:45 AM, Room EGR 3106

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Raymond L.

    STAT798Y, SURVIVAL ANALYSIS - Fall, 2012 Tu-Th 9:30-10:45 AM, Room EGR 3106 Instructor: Professor G 410 and Stat 700 or equivalent (with consent of the instructor). Course Description: Survival analysis concerns the statistical theory and meth- ods for the analysis of time-to-event data or lifetime data

  4. Brookhaven National Laboratory/National Synchrotron Light Source Subject: Operation of Nano-material Hood in Room 1-128

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    -material Hood in Room 1-128 Number: LS-ESH-0051 Revision: 1 Effective: 10/01/2007 Page 1 of 1 Keith Klaus John Procedure on Nanomaterial ES&H requires work that could generate dispersible nanoparticles be conducted of this file is the one on-line in the NSLS ESH website. Before using a printed copy, verify

  5. Operating and Safety Procedure for all Radiation Devices in Rooms 1420, 2407 and 2408, Chemistry, Texas A & M

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meagher, Mary

    device. 1.5 Service personal : Individual who is not an employee of Texas A & M University whose dutiesOperating and Safety Procedure for all Radiation Devices in Rooms 1420, 2407 and 2408, Chemistry devices. 1.2 Instrument User : An employee of Texas A & M University who has been trained in the use

  6. SRNL PHASE II SHELF LIFE STUDIES - SERIES 1 ROOM TEMPERATURE AND HIGH RELATIVE HUMIDITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mickalonis, J.; Duffey, J.

    2012-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Phase II, Series 1 shelf-life corrosion testing for the Department of Energy Standard 3013 container is presented and discussed in terms of the localized corrosion behavior of Type 304 stainless steel in contact with moist plutonium oxide and chloride salt mixtures and the potential impact to the 3013 inner container. This testing was designed to address the influence of temperature, salt composition, initial salt moisture, residual stress and type of oxide/salt contact on the relative humidity inside a 3013 container and the initiation and propagation of localized corrosion, especially stress corrosion cracking. The integrated plan is being conducted by Los Alamos National Laboratory and SRNL. SRNL is responsible for conducting a corrosion study in small scale vessels containing plutonium oxide and chloride salts under conditions of humidity, temperature and oxide/salt compositions both within the limits of 3013 storage conditions as well as beyond the 3013 storage requirements to identify margins for minimizing the initiation of stress corrosion cracking. These worst case conditions provide data that bound the material packaged in 3013 containers. Phase I of this testing was completed in 2010. The Phase II, Series 1 testing was performed to verify previous results from Phase I testing and extend our understanding about the initiation of stress corrosion cracking and pitting that occur in 304L under conditions of room temperature, high humidity, and a specific plutonium oxide/salt chemistry. These results will aid in bounding the safe storage conditions of plutonium oxides in 3013 containers. A substantial change in the testing was the addition of the capability to monitor relative humidity during test exposure. The results show that under conditions of high initial moisture ({approx}0.5 wt%) and room temperature stress corrosion cracking occurred in 304L teardrop coupons in contact with the oxide/salt mixture at times as short as 85 days. In all cases, the cracking appeared to be associated with pitting or localized general corrosion. Crack initiation at other sites, such as surface imperfections or inclusions, cannot be excluded. Cracks appear in most cases to initiate through an intergranular mode and transition to a transgranular mode.

  7. Regulations governing the use of University library and computer room/area facilities and services 2013/2014 Page 1 of 7

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aickelin, Uwe

    regulations controlling use. Details may be found in the Manuscripts and Special Collections sectionPOLICY Regulations governing the use of University library and computer room/area facilities and services 2013/2014 Page 1 of 7 Regulations governing the use of University library and computer room

  8. IEEE ELECTRON DEVICE LETTERS, VOL. 29, NO. 8, AUGUST 2008 867 On the Source of Jitter in a Room-Temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohseni, Hooman

    IEEE ELECTRON DEVICE LETTERS, VOL. 29, NO. 8, AUGUST 2008 867 On the Source of Jitter in a Room infrared photon detector was studied by exploring the relation between lateral charge transfer and jitter. The jitter of the device was measured to be 15 ps at room temperature. The jitter was almost independent

  9. The 3rd International Conference of IIR on Magnetic Refrigeration at Room Temperature, Des Moines, Iowa, U.S.A, 11-15 May 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    The 3rd International Conference of IIR on Magnetic Refrigeration at Room Temperature, Des Moines of Design of Experiments (DOE) method in magnetic refrigeration (MR) understanding and optimization and magnetocaloric effect (MCE). 1. INTRODUCTION Room temperature magnetic refrigeration has been shown

  10. CANR | Cooperative Extension | REC | UD Home | UD Directory | UD Daily | Find It (A-Z) | BUDDY | Room Schedules | Figure Eight Thu, Dec-06-07 Fall Faculty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    Technology > Policies & Procedures > Research > Grant Proposal Preparation > Work Request Forms > UD Webforms glass panes with acrylic panels, placing new grow-lites in every room, and installing a new cooling and heating system with a state of the art automated climate control system. Many of the rooms were furnished

  11. Room temperature performance of mid-wavelength infrared InAsSb nBn detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soibel, Alexander; Hill, Cory J.; Keo, Sam A.; Hoglund, Linda; Rosenberg, Robert; Kowalczyk, Robert; Khoshakhlagh, Arezou; Fisher, Anita; Ting, David Z.-Y.; Gunapala, Sarath D. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Dr., Pasadena, California 91030 (United States)

    2014-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, we investigate the high temperature performance of mid-wavelength infrared InAsSb-AlAsSb nBn detectors with cut-off wavelengths near 4.5??m. The quantum efficiency of these devices is 35% without antireflection coatings and does not change with temperature in the 77–325?K temperature range, indicating potential for room temperature operation. The current generation of nBn detectors shows an increase of operational bias with temperature, which is attributed to a shift in the Fermi energy level in the absorber. Analysis of the device performance shows that operational bias and quantum efficiency of these detectors can be further improved. The device dark current stays diffusion limited in the 150?K–325?K temperature range and becomes dominated by generation-recombination processes at lower temperatures. Detector detectivities are D*(?)?=?1?×?10{sup 9} (cm Hz{sup 0.5}/W) at T?=?300?K and D*(?)?=?5?×?10{sup 9} (cm Hz{sup 0.5}/W) at T?=?250?K, which is easily achievable with a one stage TE cooler.

  12. REVIEW Of COMPUTERIZED PROCEDURE GUIDELINES FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANT CONTROL ROOMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David I Gertman; Katya Le Blanc; Ronald L Boring

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Computerized procedures (CPs) are recognized as an emerging alternative to paper-based procedures for supporting control room operators in nuclear power plants undergoing life extension and in the concept of operations for advanced reactor designs. CPs potentially reduce operator workload, yield increases in efficiency, and provide for greater resilience. Yet, CPs may also adversely impact human and plant performance if not designed and implemented properly. Therefore, it is important to ensure that existing guidance is sufficient to provide for proper implementation and monitoring of CPs. In this paper, human performance issues were identified based on a review of the behavioral science literature, research on computerized procedures in nuclear and other industries, and a review of industry experience with CPs. The review of human performance issues led to the identification of a number of technical gaps in available guidance sources. To address some of the gaps, we developed 13 supplemental guidelines to support design and safety. This paper presents these guidelines and the case for further research.

  13. Room temperature alcohol sensing by oxygen vacancy controlled TiO{sub 2} nanotube array

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hazra, A.; Dutta, K.; Bhowmik, B.; Bhattacharyya, P., E-mail: pb-etc-besu@yahoo.com [Nano-Thin Films and Solid State Gas Sensor Devices Laboratory, Department of Electronics and Telecommunication Engineering, Indian Institute of Engineering Science and Technology (IIEST), Shibpur, Howrah (India); Chattopadhyay, P. P. [Department of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Engineering Science and Technology (IIEST), Shibpur, Howrah (India)

    2014-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Oxygen vacancy (OV) controlled TiO{sub 2} nanotubes, having diameters of 50–70?nm and lengths of 200–250?nm, were synthesized by electrochemical anodization in the mixed electrolyte comprising NH{sub 4}F and ethylene glycol with selective H{sub 2}O content. The structural evolution of TiO{sub 2} nanoforms has been studied by field emission scanning electron microscopy. Variation in the formation of OVs with the variation of the structure of TiO{sub 2} nanoforms has been evaluated by photoluminescence and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The sensor characteristics were correlated to the variation of the amount of induced OVs in the nanotubes. The efficient room temperature sensing achieved by the control of OVs of TiO{sub 2} nanotube array has paved the way for developing fast responding alcohol sensor with corresponding response magnitude of 60.2%, 45.3%, and 36.5% towards methanol, ethanol, and 2-propanol, respectively.

  14. Scalable Architecture for a Room Temperature Solid-State Quantum Information Processor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Norman Y. Yao; Liang Jiang; Alexey V. Gorshkov; Peter C. Maurer; Geza Giedke; J. Ignacio Cirac; Mikhail D. Lukin

    2010-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The realization of a scalable quantum information processor has emerged over the past decade as one of the central challenges at the interface of fundamental science and engineering. Much progress has been made towards this goal. Indeed, quantum operations have been demonstrated on several trapped ion qubits, and other solid-state systems are approaching similar levels of control. Extending these techniques to achieve fault-tolerant operations in larger systems with more qubits remains an extremely challenging goal, in part, due to the substantial technical complexity of current implementations. Here, we propose and analyze an architecture for a scalable, solid-state quantum information processor capable of operating at or near room temperature. The architecture is applicable to realistic conditions, which include disorder and relevant decoherence mechanisms, and includes a hierarchy of control at successive length scales. Our approach is based upon recent experimental advances involving Nitrogen-Vacancy color centers in diamond and will provide fundamental insights into the physics of non-equilibrium many-body quantum systems. Additionally, the proposed architecture may greatly alleviate the stringent constraints, currently limiting the realization of scalable quantum processors.

  15. Heats of vaporization of room temperature ionic liquids by tunable vacuum ultraviolet photoionization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chambreau, Steven D.; Vaghjiani, Ghanshyam L.; To, Albert; Koh, Christine; Strasser, Daniel; Kostko, Oleg; Leone, Stephen R.

    2009-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The heats of vaporization of the room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) N-butyl-N-methylpyrrolidinium bistrifluorosulfonylimide, N-butyl-N-methylpyrrolidinium dicyanamide, and 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium dicyanamide are determined using a heated effusive vapor source in conjunction with single photon ionization by a tunable vacuum ultraviolet synchrotron source. The relative gas phase ionic liquid vapor densities in the effusive beam are monitored by clearly distinguished dissociative photoionization processes via a time-of-flight mass spectrometer at a tunable vacuum ultraviolet beamline 9.0.2.3 (Chemical Dynamics Beamline) at the Advanced Light Source synchrotron facility. Resulting in relatively few assumptions, through the analysis of both parent cations and fragment cations, the heat of vaporization of N-butyl-N-methylpyrrolidinium bistrifluorosulfonylimide is determined to be Delta Hvap(298.15 K) = 195+-19 kJ mol-1. The observed heats of vaporization of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium dicyanamide (Delta Hvap(298.15 K) = 174+-12 kJ mol-1) and N-butyl-N-methylpyrrolidinium dicyanamide (Delta Hvap(298.15 K) = 171+-12 kJ mol-1) are consistent with reported experimental values using electron impact ionization. The tunable vacuum ultraviolet source has enabled accurate measurement of photoion appearance energies. These appearance energies are in good agreement with MP2 calculations for dissociative photoionization of the ion pair. These experimental heats of vaporization, photoion appearance energies, and ab initio calculations corroborate vaporization of these RTILs as intact cation-anion ion pairs.

  16. Molecular and crystal structure of n-hexyloxybenzoic anhydride at low and room temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Konstantinov, I. I., E-mail: konst@ips.ac.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Topchiev Institute of Petrochemical Synthesis (Russian Federation); Churakov, A. V.; Kuz'mina, L. G. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Kurnakov Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry (Russian Federation)

    2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The crystal and molecular structures of n-hexyloxybenzoic anhydride, C{sub 6}H{sub 13}-O-C{sub 6}H{sub 4}-C(O)-O-C(O)-C{sub 6}H{sub 4}-C{sub 6}H{sub 13}, at low (120 K) and room (296 K) temperatures have been investigated. The molecule has an asymmetric bent structure. The dihedral angle between the benzene ring planes is 48.5 deg. The aliphatic chain on one side of the molecule has a transoid orientation with respect to the 'internal' C4 atom of the closest benzene ring, whereas the aliphatic chain on the other side has a cissoid orientation with respect to the analogous C(4A) atom. The crystal packing does not exhibit any pronounced separation of the crystal space into closely packed aromatic or loosely packed aliphatic regions. No weak directional interactions are observed in the packing; this fact explains the absence of liquid-crystal properties for this compound.

  17. New insights into designing metallacarborane based room temperature hydrogen storage media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bora, Pankaj Lochan; Singh, Abhishek K. [Materials Research Centre, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India)] [Materials Research Centre, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India)

    2013-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Metallacarboranes are promising towards realizing room temperature hydrogen storage media because of the presence of both transition metal and carbon atoms. In metallacarborane clusters, the transition metal adsorbs hydrogen molecules and carbon can link these clusters to form metal organic framework, which can serve as a complete storage medium. Using first principles density functional calculations, we chalk out the underlying principles of designing an efficient metallacarborane based hydrogen storage media. The storage capacity of hydrogen depends upon the number of available transition metal d-orbitals, number of carbons, and dopant atoms in the cluster. These factors control the amount of charge transfer from metal to the cluster, thereby affecting the number of adsorbed hydrogen molecules. This correlation between the charge transfer and storage capacity is general in nature, and can be applied to designing efficient hydrogen storage systems. Following this strategy, a search for the best metallacarborane was carried out in which Sc based monocarborane was found to be the most promising H{sub 2} sorbent material with a 9 wt.% of reversible storage at ambient pressure and temperature.

  18. Hydraulic testing around Room Q: Evaluation of the effects of mining on the hydraulic properties of Salado Evaporites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Domski, P.S.; Upton, D.T. [INTERA, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Beauheim, R.L. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Room Q is a 109-m-long cylindrical excavation in the Salado Formation at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site. Fifteen boreholes were drilled and instrumented around Room Q so that tests could be conducted to determine the effects of room excavation on the hydraulic properties of the surrounding evaporate rocks. Pressure-buildup and pressure-pulse tests were conducted in all of the boreholes before Room Q was mined. The data sets from only eight of the boreholes are adequate for parameter estimation, and five of those are of poor quality. Constant-pressure flow tests and pressure-buildup tests were conducted after Room Q was mined, producing eleven interpretable data sets, including two of poor quality. Pre-mining transmissivities interpreted from the three good-quality data sets ranged from 1 x 10{sup -15} to 5 x 10{sup -14} m{sup 2}/s (permeability-thickness products of 2 x 10{sup -22} to 9 x 10{sup -21} m{sup 3}) for test intervals ranging in length from 0.85 to 1.37 m. Pre-mining average permeabilities, which can be considered representative of undisturbed, far-field conditions, were 6 x 10{sup -20} and 8 x 10{sup -20} m{sup 2} for anhydrite, and 3 x 10{sup -22} m{sup 2} for halite. Post-mining transmissivities interpreted from the good-quality data sets ranged from 1 x 10{sup -16} to 3 x 10{sup -13} m{sup 2}/s (permeability-thickness products of 2 x 10{sup -23} to 5 x 10{sup -20} m{sup 3}). Post-mining average permeabilities for anhydrite ranged from 8 x 10{sup -20} to 1 x 10{sup -19} m{sup 2}. The changes in hydraulic properties and pore pressures that were observed can be attributed to one or a combination of three processes: stress reduction, changes in pore connectivity, and flow towards Room Q. The effects of the three processes cannot be individually quantified with the available data.

  19. Ionic liquid pretreatment of poplar wood at room temperature: swelling and incorporation of nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucas, Marcel [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Macdonald, Brian A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wagner, Gregory L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Joyce, Steven A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rector, Kirk D [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lignocellulosic biomass represents a potentially sustainable source of liquid fuels and commodity chemicals. It could satisfy the energy needs for transportation and electricity generation, while contributing substantially to carbon sequestration and limiting the accumulation of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. Potential feedstocks are abundant and include crops, agricultural wastes, forest products, grasses, and algae. Among those feedstocks, wood is mainly constituted of three components: cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin. The conversion process of lignocellulosic biomass typically consists of three steps: (1) pretreatment; (2) hydrolysis of cellulose and hemicellulose into fermentable sugars; and (3) fermentation of the sugars into liquid fuels (ethanol) and other commodity chemicals. The pretreatment step is necessary due to the complex structure of the plant cell wall and the chemical resistance of lignin. Most current pretreatments are energy-intensive and/or polluting. So it is imperative to develop new pretreatments that are economically viable and environmentally friendly. Recently, ionic liquids have attracted considerable interest, due to their ability to dissolve biopolymers, such as cellulose, lignin, native switchgrass, and others. Ionic liquids are also considered green solvents, since they have been successfully recycled at high yields for further use with limited efficiency loss. Also, a few microbial cellulases remain active at high ionic liquid concentration. However, all studies on the dissolution of wood in ionic liquids have been conducted so far at high temperatures, typically above 90 C. Development of alternative pretreatments at room temperature is desirable to eliminate the additional energy cost. In this study, thin sections of poplar wood were swollen at room temperature by a 3 h ionic liquid (1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate or EMIMAc) pretreatment. The pretreated sample was then exposed to an aqueous suspension of nanoparticles that resulted in the sample contraction and the deposition of nanoparticles onto the surface and embedded into the cell wall. To date, both silver and gold particles ranging in size from 40-100 nm have been incorporated into wood. Penetration of gold nanoparticles of 100 nm diameter in the cell walls was best confirmed by near-infrared confocal Raman microscopy, since the deposition of gold nanoparticles induces a significant enhancement of the Raman signal from the wood in their close proximity, an enhancement attributed to the surface-enhanced Raman effect (SERS). After rinsing with water, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Raman images of the same areas show that most nanoparticles remained on the pretreated sample. Raman images at different depths reveal that a significant number of nanoparticles were incorporated into the wood sample, at depths up to 4 {micro}m, or 40 times the diameter of the nanoparticles. Control experiments on an untreated wood sample resulted in the deposition of nanoparticles only at the surface and most nanoparticles were removed upon rinsing. This particle incorporation process enables the development of new pretreatments, since the nanoparticles have a high surface-to-volume ratio and could be chemically functionalized. Other potential applications for the incorporated nanoparticles include isotope tracing, catalysis, imaging agents, drug-delivery systems, energy-storage devices, and chemical sensors.

  20. Evaluation of exposure limits to toxic gases for nuclear reactor control room operators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahlum, D.D.; Sasser, L.B. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States))

    1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have evaluated ammonia, chlorine, Halon (actually a generic name for several halogenated hydro-carbons), and sulfur dioxide for their possible effects during an acute two-minute exposure in order to derive recommendations for maximum exposure levels. To perform this evaluation, we conducted a search to find the most pertinent literature regarding toxicity in humans and in experimental animals. Much of the literature is at least a decade old, not an unexpected finding since acute exposures are less often performed now than they were a few years ago. In most cases, the studies did not specifically examine the effects of two-minute exposures; thus, extrapolations had to be made from studies of longer-exposure periods. Whenever possible, we gave the greatest weight to human data, with experimental animal data serving to strengthen the conclusion arrived at from consideration of the human data. Although certain individuals show hypersensitivity to materials like sulfur dioxide, we have not attempted to factor this information into the recommendations. After our evaluation of the data in the literature, we held a small workshop. Major participants in this workshop were three consultants, all of whom were Diplomates of the American Board of Toxicology, and staff from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Our preliminary recommendations for two-minute exposure limits and the rationale for them were discussed and consensus reached on final recommendations. These recommendations are: (1) ammonia-300 to 400-ppm; (2) chlorine-30 ppm; (3) Halon 1301-5%; Halon 1211-2%; and (4) sulfur dioxide-100 ppm. Control room operators should be able to tolerate two-minute exposures to these levels, don fresh-air masks, and continue to operate the reactor if the toxic material is eliminated, or safely shut down the reactor if the toxic gas remains. 96 refs., 9 tabs.

  1. From Standard Model of particle physics to room-temperature superconductivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. E. Volovik

    2015-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Topological media are gapped or gapless fermionic systems, whose properties are protected by topology, and thus are robust to deformations of parameters of the system and generic. We discuss the class of gapless topological media, which contains the quantum vacuum of Standard Model in its symmetric phase, and condensed matter systems with zeroes in the energy spectrum, which form Fermi surfaces, Weyl and Dirac points, Dirac lines, Khodel-Shaginyan flat bands, etc. Some zeroes are topologically protected, being characterized by topological invariants, expressed in terms of Green's function. For stability of the others the ${\\bf p}$-space topology must be accompanied by symmetry. Vacua with Weyl points serve as a source of effective relativistic quantum fields emerging at low energy: chiral fermions, effective gauge fields and tetrad gravity emerge together in the vicinity of a Weyl point. The accompanying effects, such as chiral anomaly, electroweak baryo-production and chiral vortical effect, are expressed via the symmetry protected ${\\bf p}$-space invariants. The gapless topological media exhibit the bulk-surface and bulk-vortex correspondence: which in particular may lead to the flat band on the surface of the system or in the core of topological defects. The materials with flat band in bulk, on the surface or within the dislocations have singular density of states, which crucially influences the critical temperature of the superconducting transition in such media. While in all the known superconductors the transition temperature is exponentially suppressed as a function of the pairing interaction, in the flat band the transition temperature is proportional to the pairing interaction, and can be essentially higher. The ${\\bf p}$-space topology may give us the general recipe for search or artificial fabrication of the room-temperature superconductors.

  2. Experimental Determination of ETS Particle Deposition in a Low Ventilation Room

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, M.; Nematollahi, M.; Sextro, R.G.; Gadgil, A.J.; Nazaroff, W.W.

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Deposition on indoor surfaces is an important removal mechanism for tobacco smoke particles. We report measurements of deposition rates of environmental tobacco smoke particles in a room-size chamber. The deposition rates were determined from the changes in measured concentrations by correcting for the effects of coagulation and ventilation. The air flow turbulent intensity parameter was determined independently by measuring the air velocities in the chamber. Particles with diameters smaller than 0.25 {micro}m coagulate to form larger particles of sizes between 0.25-0.5 {micro}m. The effect of coagulation on the particles larger than 0.5 {micro}m was found to be negligible. Comparison between our measurements and calculations using Crump and Seinfeld's theory showed smaller measured deposition rates for particles from 0.1 to 0.3 {micro}m in diameter and greater measured deposition rates for particles larger than 0.6 {micro}m at three mixing intensities. Comparison of Nazaroff and Cass model for natural convection flow showed good agreement with the measurements for particles larger than 0.1 {micro}m in diameter, however, measured deposition rates exceeded model prediction by a factor of approximately four for particles in size range 0.05-0.1 {micro}m diameter. These results were used to predict deposition of sidestream smoke particles on interior surfaces. Calculations predict that in 10 hours after smoking one cigarette, 22% of total sidestream particles by mass will deposit on interior surfaces at 0.03 air change per hour (ACH), 6% will deposit at 0.5 ACH, and 3% will deposit at 1 ACH.

  3. Induced spin-polarization of EuS at room temperature in Ni/EuS multilayers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poulopoulos, P., E-mail: poulop@upatras.gr [Laboratory of High-Tech Materials, School of Engineering, University of Patras, 26504 Patras (Greece); Materials Science Department, University of Patras, 26504 Patras (Greece); Goschew, A.; Straub, A.; Fumagalli, P. [Institut für Experimentalphysik, Freie Universität Berlin, Arnimallee 14, D-14195 Berlin-Dahlem (Germany); Kapaklis, V.; Wolff, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Box 516, SE-751 20 Uppsala (Sweden); Delimitis, A. [Chemical Process and Energy Resources Institute (CPERI), Centre for Research and Technology Hellas (CERTH), 57001 Thermi, Thessaloniki (Greece); Wilhelm, F.; Rogalev, A. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), B.P.220, 38043 Grenoble (France); Pappas, S. D. [Laboratory of High-Tech Materials, School of Engineering, University of Patras, 26504 Patras (Greece); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Box 516, SE-751 20 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2014-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Ni/EuS multilayers with excellent multilayer sequencing are deposited via e-beam evaporation on the native oxide of Si(100) wafers at 4?×?10{sup ?9} millibars. The samples have very small surface and interface roughness and show sharp interfaces. Ni layers are nanocrystalline 4–8?nm thick and EuS layers are 2–4?nm thick and are either amorphous or nanocrystalline. Unlike for Co/EuS multilayers, all Eu ions are in divalent (ferromagnetic) state. We show a direct antiferromagnetic coupling between EuS and Ni layers. At room temperature, the EuS layers are spin-polarized due to the proximity of Ni. Therefore, Ni/EuS is a candidate for room-temperature spintronics applications.

  4. Human factors design, verification, and validation for two types of control room upgrades at a nuclear power plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the NUREG-0711 based human factors engineering (HFE) phases and associated elements required to support design, verification and validation (V&V), and implementation of a new plant process computer (PPC) and turbine control system (TCS) at a representative nuclear power plant. This paper reviews ways to take a human-system interface (HSI) specification and use it when migrating legacy PPC displays or designing displays with new functionality. These displays undergo iterative usability testing during the design phase and then undergo an integrated system validation (ISV) in a full scope control room training simulator. Following the successful demonstration of operator performance with the systems during the ISV, the new system is implemented at the plant, first in the training simulator and then in the main control room.

  5. IMPROVING CONTROL ROOM DESIGN AND OPERATIONS BASED ON HUMAN FACTORS ANALYSES OR HOW MUCH HUMAN FACTORS UPGRADE IS ENOUGH ?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HIGGINS,J.C.; OHARA,J.M.; ALMEIDA,P.

    2002-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    THE JOSE CABRERA NUCLEAR POWER PLANT IS A ONE LOOP WESTINGHOUSE PRESSURIZED WATER REACTOR. IN THE CONTROL ROOM, THE DISPLAYS AND CONTROLS USED BY OPERATORS FOR THE EMERGENCY OPERATING PROCEDURES ARE DISTRIBUTED ON FRONT AND BACK PANELS. THIS CONFIGURATION CONTRIBUTED TO RISK IN THE PROBABILISTIC SAFETY ASSESSMENT WHERE IMPORTANT OPERATOR ACTIONS ARE REQUIRED. THIS STUDY WAS UNDERTAKEN TO EVALUATE THE IMPACT OF THE DESIGN ON CREW PERFORMANCE AND PLANT SAFETY AND TO DEVELOP DESIGN IMPROVEMENTS.FIVE POTENTIAL EFFECTS WERE IDENTIFIED. THEN NUREG-0711 [1], PROGRAMMATIC, HUMAN FACTORS, ANALYSES WERE CONDUCTED TO SYSTEMATICALLY EVALUATE THE CR-LA YOUT TO DETERMINE IF THERE WAS EVIDENCE OF THE POTENTIAL EFFECTS. THESE ANALYSES INCLUDED OPERATING EXPERIENCE REVIEW, PSA REVIEW, TASK ANALYSES, AND WALKTHROUGH SIMULATIONS. BASED ON THE RESULTS OF THESE ANALYSES, A VARIETY OF CONTROL ROOM MODIFICATIONS WERE IDENTIFIED. FROM THE ALTERNATIVES, A SELECTION WAS MADE THAT PROVIDED A REASONABLEBALANCE BE TWEEN PERFORMANCE, RISK AND ECONOMICS, AND MODIFICATIONS WERE MADE TO THE PLANT.

  6. hal-00133055,version1-29Mar2007 Nuclear spin interferences in bulk water at room temperature.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    hal-00133055,version1-29Mar2007 Nuclear spin interferences in bulk water at room temperature. J in NMR pacs 03.67.-a: Quantum information pacs 67.57.Lm: Spin dynamics Abstract Nuclear spin interference in a static mag- netic field B0 4.7 T. For a homogeneity of B0 of the order of B0/B0 = 2 · 10-8 , the nuclear

  7. PHYSICAL FIDELITY CONSIDERATIONS FOR NRC ADVANCED REACTOR CONTROL ROOM TRAINING SIMULATORS USED FOR INSPECTOR/EXAMINER TRAINING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Branch, Kristi M.; Mitchell, Mark R.; Miller, Mark; Cochrum, Steven

    2010-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes research into the physical fidelity requirements of control room simulators to train U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff for their duties as inspectors and license examiners for next-generation nuclear power plants. The control rooms of these power plants are expected to utilize digital instrumentation and controls to a much greater extent than do current plants. The NRC is assessing training facility needs, particularly for control room simulators, which play a central role in NRC training. Simulator fidelity affects both training effectiveness and cost. Research has shown high simulation fidelity sometimes positively affects transfer to the operational environment but sometimes makes no significant difference or actually impedes learning. The conditions in which these different effects occur are often unclear, especially for regulators (as opposed to operators) about whom research is particularly sparse. This project developed an inventory of the tasks and knowledges, skills, and abilities that NRC regulators need to fulfill job duties and used expert panels to characterize the inventory items by type and level of cognitive/behavioral capability needed, difficulty to perform, importance to safety, frequency of performance, and the importance of simulator training for learning these capabilities. A survey of current NRC staff provides information about the physical fidelity of the simulator on which the student trained to the control room to which the student was assigned and the effect lack of fidelity had on learning and job performance. The study concludes that a high level of physical fidelity is not required for effective training of NRC staff.

  8. Symmetries and multiferroic properties of novel room-temperature magnetoelectrics: Lead iron tantalate – lead zirconate titanate (PFT/PZT)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sanchez, Dilsom A.; Ortega, N.; Kumar, Ashok; Roque-Malherbe, R.; Polanco, R.; Scott, J. F.; Katiyar, Ram S.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mixing 60-70% lead zirconate titanate with 40-30% lead iron tantalate produces a single-phase, low-loss, room-temperature multiferroic with magnetoelectric coupling: (PbZr?.??Ti?.??O?) (1-x)- (PbFe?.?Ta?.?O?)x. The present study combines x-ray scattering, magnetic and polarization hysteresis in both phases, plus a second-order dielectric divergence (to epsilon = 6000 at 475 K for 0.4 PFT; to 4000 at 520 K for 0.3 PFT) for an unambiguous assignment as a C2v-C4v (Pmm2-P4mm) transition. The material exhibits square saturated magnetic hysteresis loops with 0.1 emu/g at 295 K and saturation polarization Pr = 25 ?C/cm², which actually increases (to 40 ?C/cm²) in the high-T tetragonal phase, representing an exciting new room temperature oxide multiferroic to compete with BiFeO?. Additional transitions at high temperatures (cubic at T>1300 K) and low temperatures (rhombohedral or monoclinic at T<250 K) are found. These are the lowest-loss room-temperature multiferroics known, which is a great advantage for magnetoelectric devices.

  9. Thermomechanical room and canister region benchmark analyses between STEALTH-WI and SPECTROM-32: Draft final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dial, B.W.; Maxwell, D.E.; Yee, G.

    1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the benchmarking of the two-dimensional waste isolation version of STEALTH (designated STEALTH-WI) against the thermomechanical performance assessment calculations performed by RE/SPEC using SPECTROM-32. An axisymmetric, canister-scale (very-near-field) analysis was performed to compute the peak stress exerted by the salt on the waste package. A plane strain, room-scale (near-field) analysis was also performed to predict disposal room roof-to-floor closure and the temperatures at key locations in the vicinity of the disposal room. Comparisons between the STEALTH and SPECTROM-32 results showed that the temperature predictions agreed to within 5/degree/C, peak canister stresses better than 10%, and the average roof-to-floor closures within 30%. The stress and displacement differences were attributed to differences in the treatment of plasticity in the constitutive laws for salt employed in STEALTH and SPECTROM-32. The temperature differences were due to minor differences in the thermal models employed in STEALTH and SPECTROM- 41, the thermal analysis code which supplies temperatures for SPECTROM-32. 9 refs., 21 figs., 6 tabs.

  10. CUFit... your way.Enjoy a freelance workout in our fitness centre or cardio room,take an invigorating swim in our 50m pool, or take part in our CUFIT drop-in group fitness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carleton University

    supervised Fitness Centre.Give yourself a total body workout with cardiovascular machines, weight-lifting watching our sleekTVs in this spacious state of the art room.Cardio Room will be amalgamated into the new

  11. Digital Full-Scope Simulation of a Conventional Nuclear Power Plant Control Room, Phase 2: Installation of a Reconfigurable Simulator to Support Nuclear Plant Sustainability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronald L. Boring; Vivek Agarwal; Kirk Fitzgerald; Jacques Hugo; Bruce Hallbert

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Light Water Reactor Sustainability program has developed a control room simulator in support of control room modernization at nuclear power plants in the U.S. This report highlights the recent completion of this reconfigurable, full-scale, full-scope control room simulator buildout at the Idaho National Laboratory. The simulator is fully reconfigurable, meaning it supports multiple plant models developed by different simulator vendors. The simulator is full-scale, using glasstop virtual panels to display the analog control boards found at current plants. The present installation features 15 glasstop panels, uniquely achieving a complete control room representation. The simulator is also full-scope, meaning it uses the same plant models used for training simulators at actual plants. Unlike in the plant training simulators, the deployment on glasstop panels allows a high degree of customization of the panels, allowing the simulator to be used for research on the design of new digital control systems for control room modernization. This report includes separate sections discussing the glasstop panels, their layout to mimic control rooms at actual plants, technical details on creating a multi-plant and multi-vendor reconfigurable simulator, and current efforts to support control room modernization at U.S. utilities. The glasstop simulator provides an ideal testbed for prototyping and validating new control room concepts. Equally importantly, it is helping create a standardized and vetted human factors engineering process that can be used across the nuclear industry to ensure control room upgrades maintain and even improve current reliability and safety.

  12. Logistics W-FACE 2014 Location Day events will take place in Room 2188ME of the Mechanical Engineering Building, which is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Paul G.

    Logistics W-FACE 2014 Location Day events will take place in Room 2188ME of the Mechanical-9574234 or email fgutierrez3@wisc.edu for unanswered logistical questions. #12;

  13. Logistics W-FACE 2013 Location Day events will take place in Room 1153ME of the Mechanical Engineering Building, which is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Paul G.

    Logistics W-FACE 2013 Location Day events will take place in Room 1153ME of the Mechanical@wisc.edu if you have any additional logistical questions. #12;

  14. Infrared study on room-temperature atomic layer deposition of HfO{sub 2} using tetrakis(ethylmethylamino)hafnium and remote plasma-excited oxidizing agents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kanomata, Kensaku [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Yamagata University, 4-3-16 Jonan, Yonezawa 992-8510, Japan and Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, 5-3-1 Kojimachi, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-0083 (Japan); Ohba, Hisashi; Pungboon Pansila, P.; Ahmmad, Bashir; Kubota, Shigeru; Hirahara, Kazuhiro; Hirose, Fumihiko, E-mail: fhirose@yz.yamagata-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Yamagata University, 4-3-16 Jonan, Yonezawa 992-8510 (Japan)

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Room-temperature atomic layer deposition (ALD) of HfO{sub 2} was examined using tetrakis (ethylmethylamino)hafnium (TEMAH) and remote plasma-excited water and oxygen. A growth rate of 0.26?nm/cycle at room temperature was achieved, and the TEMAH adsorption and its oxidization on HfO{sub 2} were investigated by multiple internal reflection infrared absorption spectroscopy. It was observed that saturated adsorption of TEMAH occurs at exposures of ?1?×?10{sup 5}?L (1 L?=?1?×?10{sup ?6} Torr s) at room temperature, and the use of remote plasma-excited water and oxygen vapor is effective in oxidizing the TEMAH molecules on the HfO{sub 2} surface, to produce OH sites. The infrared study suggested that Hf–OH plays a role as an adsorption site for TEMAH. The reaction mechanism of room temperature HfO{sub 2} ALD is discussed in this paper.

  15. Room Temperature Copper(II)-Catalyzed Oxidative Cyclization of Enamides to 2,5-Disubstituted Oxazoles via Vinylic C–H Functionalization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheung, Chi Wai

    A copper(II)-catalyzed oxidative cyclization of enamides to oxazoles via vinylic C–H bond functionalization at room temperature is described. Various 2,5-disubstituted oxazoles bearing aryl, vinyl, alkyl, and heteroaryl ...

  16. Ecology and Analysis of Communities PLB 444 Instructor: Dr. Loretta Battaglia, Dept. of Plant Biology, LS II, Room 411. Tel: 618-453-3216; email

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nickrent, Daniel L.

    Ecology and Analysis of Communities PLB 444 Instructor: Dr. Loretta Battaglia, Dept. of Plant Biology, LS II, Room 411. Tel: 618-453-3216; email: lbattaglia@plant.siu.edu, Battaglia

  17. FINAL REPORT: Room Temperature Hydrogen Storage in Nano-Confined Liquids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    VAJO, JOHN

    2014-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    DOE continues to seek solid-state hydrogen storage materials with hydrogen densities of ?6 wt% and ?50 g/L that can deliver hydrogen and be recharged at room temperature and moderate pressures enabling widespread use in transportation applications. Meanwhile, development including vehicle engineering and delivery infrastructure continues for compressed-gas hydrogen storage systems. Although compressed gas storage avoids the materials-based issues associated with solid-state storage, achieving acceptable volumetric densities has been a persistent challenge. This project examined the possibility of developing storage materials that would be compatible with compressed gas storage technology based on enhanced hydrogen solubility in nano-confined liquid solvents. These materials would store hydrogen in molecular form eliminating many limitations of current solid-state materials while increasing the volumetric capacity of compressed hydrogen storage vessels. Experimental methods were developed to study hydrogen solubility in nano-confined liquids. These methods included 1) fabrication of composites comprised of volatile liquid solvents for hydrogen confined within the nano-sized pore volume of nanoporous scaffolds and 2) measuring the hydrogen uptake capacity of these composites without altering the composite composition. The hydrogen storage capacities of these nano-confined solvent/scaffold composites were compared with bulk solvents and with empty scaffolds. The solvents and scaffolds were varied to optimize the enhancement in hydrogen solubility that accompanies confinement of the solvent. In addition, computational simulations were performed to study the molecular-scale structure of liquid solvent when confined within an atomically realistic nano-sized pore of a model scaffold. Confined solvent was compared with similar simulations of bulk solvent. The results from the simulations were used to formulate a mechanism for the enhanced solubility and to guide the experiments. Overall, the combined experimental measurements and simulations indicate that hydrogen storage based on enhanced solubility in nano-confined liquids is unlikely to meet the storage densities required for practical use. Only low gravimetric capacities of < 0.5 wt% were achieved. More importantly, solvent filled scaffolds had lower volumetric capacities than corresponding empty scaffolds. Nevertheless, several of the composites measured did show significant (>~ 5x) enhanced hydrogen solubility relative to bulk solvent solubility, when the hydrogen capacity was attributed only to dissolution in the confined solvent. However, when the hydrogen capacity was compared to an empty scaffold that is known to store hydrogen by surface adsorption on the scaffold walls, including the solvent always reduced the hydrogen capacity. For the best composites, this reduction relative to an empty scaffold was ~30%; for the worst it was ~90%. The highest capacities were obtained with the largest solvent molecules and with scaffolds containing 3- dimensionally confined pore geometries. The simulations suggested that the capacity of the composites originated from hydrogen adsorption on the scaffold pore walls at sites not occupied by solvent molecules. Although liquid solvent filled the pores, not all of the adsorption sites on the pore walls were occupied due to restricted motion of the solvent molecules within the confined pore space.

  18. Techno-Economic Analysis of Indian Draft Standard Levels for RoomAir Conditioners

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McNeil, Michael A.; Iyer, Maithili

    2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Indian Bureau of Energy Efficiency (BEE) finalized its first set of efficiency standards and labels for room air conditioners in July of 2006. These regulations followed soon after the publication of levels for frost-free refrigerators in the same year. As in the case of refrigerators, the air conditioner program introduces Minimum Efficiency Performance Standards (MEPS) and comparative labels simultaneously, with levels for one to five stars. Also like the refrigerator program, BEE defined several successive program phases of increasing stringency. In support of BEE's refrigerator program, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) produced an analysis of national impacts of standards in collaboration with the Collaborative Labeling and Standards Program (CLASP). That analysis drew on LBNL's experience with standards programs in the United States, as well as many other countries. Subsequently, as part of the process for setting optimal levels for air conditioner regulations, CLASP commissioned LBNL to provide support to BEE in the form of a techno-economic evaluation of air conditioner efficiency technologies. This report describes the methodology and results of this techno-economic evaluation. The analysis consists of three components: (1) Cost effectiveness to consumers of efficiency technologies relative to current baseline. (2) Impacts on the current market from efficiency regulations. (3) National energy and financial impacts. The analysis relied on detailed and up-to-date technical data made available by BEE and industry representatives. Technical parameters were used in conjunction with knowledge about air conditioner use patterns in the residential and commercial sectors, and prevailing marginal electricity prices, in order to give an estimate of per-unit financial impacts. In addition, the overall impact of the program was evaluated by combining unit savings with market forecasts in order to yield national impacts. LBNL presented preliminary results of these analyses in May 2006, at a meeting of BEEs Technical Committee for Air Conditioners. This meeting was attended by a wide array of stakeholder, including industry representatives, engineers and consumer advocates. Comments made by stakeholders at this meeting are incorporated into the final analysis presented in this report. The current analysis begins with the Rating Plan drafted by BEE in 2006, along with an evaluation of the market baseline according to test data submitted by manufacturers. MEPS, label rating levels, and baseline efficiencies are presented in Section 2. First, we compare Indian MEPS with current standards in other countries, and assess their relative stringency. Baseline efficiencies are then used to estimate the fraction of models likely to remain on the market at each phase of the program, and the impact on market-weighted efficiency levels. Section 3 deals with cost-effectiveness of higher efficiency design options. The cost-benefit analysis is grounded in technical parameters provided by industry representatives in India. This data allows for an assessment of financial costs and benefits to consumers as a result of the standards and labeling program. A Life-Cycle Cost (LCC) calculation is used to evaluate the impacts of the program at the unit level, thus providing some insight into the appropriateness of the levels chosen, and additional opportunities for further ratcheting. In addition to LCC, we also calculate payback periods, cost of conserved energy (CCE), and return on investment (ROI). Finally, Section 4 covers national impacts. This is an extension of unit level estimates in the two previous sections. Extrapolation to the national level depends on a forecast of air conditioner purchases (shipments), which we describe here. Following the cost-benefit analysis, we construct several efficiency scenarios including the BEE plan, but also considering further potential for efficiency improvement. These are combined with shipments through a stock accounting model in order to forecast air conditioner energy consumption in each sc

  19. Microsoft PowerPoint - Chairs - Topics and Achievements (FINAL...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    September 17, 2014 www.energy.govEM 2 Hanford Advisory Board Achievements : * With the decommissioning of the Plutonium Finishing Plant's "McCluskey Room," the Hanford Nuclear...

  20. Photochemical preparation of CdS hollow microspheres at room temperature and their use in visible-light photocatalysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang Yuying [School of Chemistry and Environment, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Sun Fengqiang, E-mail: fengqiangsun@yahoo.c [School of Chemistry and Environment, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Key Laboratory of Electrochemical Technology on Energy Storage and Power Generation in GuangDong Universities, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Engineering Research Center of Materials and Technology for Electrochemical Energy Storage (Ministry of Education), South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Wu Tianxing; Wu Qingsong; Huang Zhong; Su Heng; Zhang Zihe [School of Chemistry and Environment, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China)

    2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    CdS hollow microspheres have been successfully prepared by a photochemical preparation technology at room temperature, using polystyrene latex particles as templates, CdSO{sub 4} as cadmium source and Na{sub 2}S{sub 2}O{sub 3} as both sulphur source and photo-initiator. The process involved the deposition of CdS nanoparticles on the surface of polystyrene latex particles under the irradiation of an 8 W UV lamp and the subsequent removal of the latex particles by dispersing in dichloromethane. Photochemical reactions at the sphere/solution interface should be responsible for the formation of hollow spheres. The as-prepared products were characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Such hollow spheres could be used in photocatalysis and showed high photocatalytic activities in photodegradation of methyl blue (MB) in the presence of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. The method is green, simple, universal and can be extended to prepare other sulphide and oxide hollow spheres. -- Graphical abstract: Taking polystyrene spheres dispersed in a precursor solution as templates, CdS hollow microspheres composed of nanoparticles were successfully prepared via a new photochemical route at room temperature. Display Omitted Research highlights: {yields} Photochemical method was first employed to prepare hollow microspheres. {yields} CdS hollow spheres were first prepared at room temperature using latex spheres. {yields} The polystyrene spheres used as templates were not modified with special groups. {yields}The CdS hollow microspheres showed high visible-light photocatalytic activities.