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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "roof ice melt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Complex systems influence melting of Greenland ice sheet  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Complex systems influence melting of Greenland ice sheet Complex systems influence melting of Greenland ice sheet International research team's field work shows that, well, things...

2

Regelation: why does ice melt under pressure?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Unlike other unusual materials whose bonds contract under compression, the O:H nonbond undergoes contraction and the H-O bond elongation towards O:H and H-O length symmetry in water and ice. The energy drop of the H-O bond dictates the melting point Tm depression of ice. Once the pressure is relieved, the O:H-O bond fully recovers its initial state, resulting in Regelation.

Chang Q Sun

2015-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

3

Regelation: why does ice melt under pressure?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Unlike other unusual materials whose bonds contract under compression, the O:H nonbond undergoes contraction and the H-O bond elongation towards O:H and H-O length symmetry in water and ice. The energy drop of the H-O bond dictates the melting point Tm depression of ice. Once the pressure is relieved, the O:H-O bond fully recovers its initial state, resulting in Regelation.

Sun, Chang Q

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

NOTES AND CORRESPONDENCE Surface Melting over Ice Shelves and Ice Sheets as Assessed from Modeled  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NOTES AND CORRESPONDENCE Surface Melting over Ice Shelves and Ice Sheets as Assessed from Modeled of ice shelves and their progenitor ice sheets. To explore the magnitude of surface melt occurring over) and most of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GIS) by the year 2500. Capping CO2 concentrations at present

Meissner, Katrin Juliane

5

THE CONTRIBUTION OF GREENLAND ICE SHEET MELTING TO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE CONTRIBUTION OF GREENLAND ICE SHEET MELTING TO GLOBAL SEA-LEVEL CHANGE Conor Mc three major sources, the Greenland ice sheet, Antarctica, and other eustatic components. Each has its own predictable spatial signal, and particular attention was paid to the Greenland ice sheet, given

6

A model of the threedimensional evolution of Arctic melt ponds on firstyear and multiyear sea ice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ice. In the summer the upper layers of sea ice and snow melts producing meltwater that accumulatesA model of the threedimensional evolution of Arctic melt ponds on firstyear and multiyear sea ice F in Arctic melt ponds on the surface of sea ice. An accurate estimate of the fraction of the sea ice surface

Feltham, Daniel

7

Melting of small Arctic ice caps observed from ERS scatterometer time series  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Melting of small Arctic ice caps observed from ERS scatterometer time series Laurence C. Smith,1 of melt onset can be observed over small ice caps, as well as the major ice sheets and multi-year sea ice for 14 small Arctic ice caps from 1992­2000. Interannual and regional variability in the timing of melt

Smith, Laurence C.

8

07/06/2009 Melting Ice Could Lead to Massive Waves of Climate Refugees Treehugger 06/30/2009 MELTING GREENLAND ICE SHEETS MAY THREATEN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/30/2009 MELTING GREENLAND ICE SHEETS MAY THREATEN NORTHEAST U.S., CANADA Federal News Service 06/30/2009 Sea raises spectre of displaced humanity peopleandplanet.net 06/16/2009 Melting Greenland Ice Sheets May Report - Online 06/02/2009 Melting Greenland Ice Sheets May Threaten Northeast, Canada usagnet 06

Hu, Aixue

9

Ion fractionation and percolation in ice cores with seasonal melting John C. Moore*, Aslak Grinsted **  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and with the type of data that was expected to come from ice caps with seasonal melt. The objective of this paperIon fractionation and percolation in ice cores with seasonal melting John C. Moore*, Aslak Grinsted that suffer limited seasonal melting. We show that the impact in the case of at least one Svalbard ice core

Moore, John

10

Sediment Melt-Migration Dynamics in Perennial Antarctic Lake Ice Steven M. Jepsen*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

melting through laboratory ice at 22 uC in simulated summer conditions, with warmer ice producing faster boundaries was pronounced in laboratory ice warmer than 21 uC. This mechanism produced a flux of 0.1 g m22 hrSediment Melt-Migration Dynamics in Perennial Antarctic Lake Ice Steven M. Jepsen* Edward E. Adams

Priscu, John C.

11

Eddy-resolving simulations of the Fimbul Ice Shelf cavity circulation: Basal melting and exchange with open ocean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that govern the heat supply to ice shelves in the Eastern Weddell Sea. The simulations confirm the low melt

Lilly, Jonathan

12

NorthNorth Sea ice and glaciers are melting, permafrost is thawing, tundra  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

], in which rising temperatures produce short- er winters and less extensive snow and ice cover, with ripple#12;NorthNorth in the Sea ice and glaciers are melting, permafrost is thawing, tundra scientists yielding to shrubs--and changes will affect not just the Arctic but the entire planet REDUCTION IN SEA ICE

Sturm, Matthew

13

Basal melt rates beneath Whillans Ice Stream, West Antarctica  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Basal water lubricates and enables the fast flow of the West Antarctic ice streams which exist under low gravitational driving stress. Identification of sources and rates of basal meltwater production can provide insight into the dynamics of ice...

Beem, Lucas H.; Jezek, Ken C.; Van Der Veen, C. J.

2010-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

14

Controls on Eurasian coastal sea ice formation, melt onset and decay from ERS scatterometry: regional contrasts and effects of river  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

first-year sea ice (FYI) are observed in the Eurasian Arctic using the C-band (5.3 GHz) European RemoteControls on Eurasian coastal sea ice formation, melt onset and decay from ERS scatterometry and Kolyma rivers. Melt onset of the sea ice surface is associated with abrupt changes in s0 40, with values

Smith, Laurence C.

15

Neglecting ice-atmosphere interactions underestimates ice sheet melt in millennial-scale deglaciation simulations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Laurentide and Innutian ice sheets during the Last Glacialclimate of the laurentide ice sheet at the LGM, J. Clim. ,1958), The flow law of ice: A discussion of the assumptions

Pritchard, M. S.; Bush, A. B.; Marshall, S. J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Melt and collapse of buried water ice: An alternative hypothesis for the formation of chaotic terrains on Mars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Melt and collapse of buried water ice: An alternative hypothesis for the formation of chaotic: T. Spohn Keywords: Mars chaotic terrain heat flux outflow channel Chaotic terrains if these features can form by melting and collapse of buried water ice in a confined basin. 2D thermal modelling

Utrecht, Universiteit

17

Neglecting ice-atmosphere interactions underestimates ice sheet melt in millennial-scale deglaciation simulations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

produce an interactive coupled integration: Atmospheric dynamics were equilibrated to an initial iceconstant ice albedos. None of these cases is able to produceproduce substantial deglaciation on a realistic timescale is attributed to the use of temporally invariant ice

Pritchard, M. S.; Bush, A. B.; Marshall, S. J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Roof Renovations  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The roof of a Federal building is a common placement for a number of renewable energy technologies, so they should be addressed anytime a roof renovation is undertaken, including roof-mounted...

19

GREENLAND INLAND ICE MELT-OFF: ANALYSIS OF GLOBAL GRAVITY DATA FROM THE GRACE SATELLITES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GREENLAND INLAND ICE MELT-OFF: ANALYSIS OF GLOBAL GRAVITY DATA FROM THE GRACE SATELLITES Allan A) in meters starting at 29 July 2002 and ending at 25 August 2010. Results focussing on Greenland show indications of a transition taking place in the mass loss in Greenland from mid-2004 to early 2006. Index

20

ARM - Lesson Plans: When Floating Ice Melts in the Sea  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUC : XDCResearch Related InformationAcid RainThe Pacific and ElWhen Floating Ice

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "roof ice melt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

White Roofs  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Secretary Steven Chu discusses the benefits of switching to white roofs and light colored pavements.

Chu, Steven

2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

22

Project EARTH-13-RK2: Melting and water drainage from ice-stream margins: theory and computation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project EARTH-13-RK2: Melting and water drainage from ice-stream margins: theory and computation sheets that represent an enormous reservoir of water. The mass of this reservoirs is set by a balance importance. Answers will require a deep understanding of the mechanics of ice sheets, and in particular

Henderson, Gideon

23

Effect of the potential melting of the Greenland Ice Sheet on the Meridional Overturning Circulation and global climate in the future  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effect of the potential melting of the Greenland Ice Sheet on the Meridional Overturning February 2011 Keywords: Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation Sea level Greenland Ice Sheet Global of the Greenland Ice Sheet since the mid-1990s. This increased ice sheet mass loss might be an evidence of global

Han, Weiqing

24

Sum-frequency spectroscopic studies: I. Surface melting of ice, II. Surface alignment of polymers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Surface vibrational spectroscopy via infrared-visible sum-frequency generation (SFG) has been established as a useful tool to study the structures of different kinds of surfaces and interfaces. This technique was used to study the (0001) face of hexagonal ice (Ih). SFG spectra in the O-H stretch frequency range were obtained at various sample temperatures. For the vapor(air)/ice interface, the degree of orientational order of the dangling OH bonds at the surface was measured as a function of temperature. Disordering sets in around 200 K and increases dramatically with temperature, which is strong evidence of surface melting of ice. For the other ice interfaces (silica/OTS/ice and silica/ice), a similar temperature dependence of the hydrogen bonded OH stretch peak was observed; the free OH stretch mode, however, appears to be different from that of the vapor (air)/ice interface due to interactions at the interfaces. The technique was also used to measure the orientational distributions of the polymer chains on a rubbed polyvinyl alcohol surface. Results show that the polymer chains at the surface appear to be well aligned by rubbing, and the adsorbed liquid crystal molecules are aligned, in turn, by the surface polymer chains. A strong correlation exists between the orientational distributions of the polymer chains and the liquid crystal molecules, indicating that the surface-induced bulk alignment of a liquid crystal film by rubbed polymer surfaces is via an orientational epitaxy-like mechanism. This thesis also contains studies on some related issues that are crucial to the above applications. An experiment was designed to measure SFG spectra in both reflection and transmission. The result confirms that SFG in reflection is generally dominated by the surface contribution. Another issue is the motional effect due to fast orientational motion of molecules at a surface or interface. Calculations show that the effect is significant if the molecular orientation varies over a broad range within the vibrational relaxation time. The stretch vibration of the free OH bonds at the vapor/water interface is used to illustrate the importance of the effect.

Wei, Xing

2000-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

25

A three-phase free boundary problem with melting ice and dissolving gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We develop a mathematical model for a three-phase free boundary problem in one dimension that involves the interactions between gas, water and ice. The dynamics are driven by melting of the ice layer, while the pressurized gas also dissolves within the meltwater. The model incorporates a Stefan condition at the water-ice interface along with Henry's law for dissolution of gas at the gas-water interface. We employ a quasi-steady approximation for the phase temperatures and then derive a series solution for the interface positions. A non-standard feature of the model is an integral free boundary condition that arises from mass conservation owing to changes in gas density at the gas-water interface, which makes the problem non-self-adjoint. We derive a two-scale asymptotic series solution for the dissolved gas concentration, which because of the non-self-adjointness gives rise to a Fourier series expansion in eigenfunctions that do not satisfy the usual orthogonality conditions. Numerical simulations of the original governing equations are used to validate the series approximations.

Maurizio Ceseri; John M. Stockie

2014-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

26

A MATHEMATICAL MODEL OF SAP EXUDATION IN MAPLE TREES GOVERNED BY ICE MELTING, GAS DISSOLUTION AND OSMOSIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A MATHEMATICAL MODEL OF SAP EXUDATION IN MAPLE TREES GOVERNED BY ICE MELTING, GAS DISSOLUTION consumed in photosynthesis reactions in the leaves to produce the sugars needed for growth and other life contains 2 to 3% sugar by weight (primarily sucrose) and can be processed by repeated boiling to produce

Stockie, John

27

arXiv:1408.2487v2[physics.ao-ph]22Aug2014 Ising model for melt ponds on Arctic sea ice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

arXiv:1408.2487v2[physics.ao-ph]22Aug2014 Ising model for melt ponds on Arctic sea ice Yi-Ping Ma,1, USA The albedo of melting Arctic sea ice, a key parameter in climate modeling, is determined by pools of water on the ice surface. Recent observations show an onset of pond complexity at a critical area

Golden, Kenneth M.

28

Cool Roofs Webinar  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A webinar presented by Blaise Stoltenberg and Kosol Kiatreungwattana of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory about roofs designed to maintain a lower roof temperature than traditional roofs in order to reduce energy bills.

29

How ice shelf morphology controls basal melting Christopher M. Little,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

temperature, circulation, and mixing in the open ocean and the coupling of this external forcing to the sub shelf base, ice shelf morphology plays a critical role in linking external, subsurface heat sources idealized ice shelves, forced with subsurface ocean temperatures ranging from À2.0°C to 1.5°C. In the sub

Oppenheimer, Michael

30

A model of melt pond evolution on sea ice P. D. Taylor and D. L. Feltham  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

short-wave radiation. The difference in solar energy ab- sorption between pond-covered and bare sea ice Observation and Modelling, Department of Space and Climate Physics, University College London, London, UK ponds influence the summertime energy and mass balance through the albedo-feedback mechanism [Ebert

Feltham, Daniel

31

CO2 isotopes as tracers of firn air diffusion and age in an Arctic ice cap with summer melting, Devon Island, Canada  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and the effects of summer melting. The 14 CO2 profile from the permeable firn includes the 1963 thermonuclear peak, and accumulation rates were calibrated with the depth of the 1963 thermonuclear 3 H peak. The average ages for CO2 and the ice matrix. Calibrated with the 1963 peak for thermonuclear 14 CO2, a 21.2-year reaction halftime

Chappellaz, Jérôme

32

The Melting of Greenland William H. Lipscomb  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

). AnAn ice capice cap is a mass of glacier ice smaller than 50,000 kmis a mass of glacier ice smaller is negligibleSurface melting is negligible Antarctic ice thicknessAntarctic ice thickness (British Antarctic of the Greenland iceMuch of the Greenland ice sheet may have meltedsheet may have melted Greenland minimum extent

Born, Andreas

33

Photovoltaic roof heat flux  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

designs (relatively) Photovoltaic Solar P a n e l AtmosphereCALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Photovoltaic Roof Heat Flux A ThesisABSTRACT OF T H E THESIS Photovoltaic Roof Heat Flux by

Samady, Mezhgan Frishta

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

IMPROVED ROOF STABILIZATION TECHNOLOGIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) remediation sites have performed roof repair and roof replacement to stabilize facilities prior to performing deactivation and decommissioning (D&D) activities. This project will review the decision criteria used by these DOE sites, along with the type of repair system used for each different roof type. Based on this information, along with that compiled from roofing experts, a decision-making tool will be generated to aid in selecting the proper roof repair systems. Where appropriate, innovative technologies will be reviewed and applied to the decision-making tool to determine their applicability. Based on the results, applied research and development will be conducted to develop a method to repair these existing roofing systems, while providing protection for the D and D worker in a cost-efficient manner.

M.A. Ebadian, Ph.D.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Energy 101: Cool Roofs  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

This edition of Energy 101 takes a look at how switching to a cool roof can save you money and benefit the environment.

None

2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

36

Why Cool Roofs?  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

By installing a cool roof at DOE, the federal government and Secretary Chu are helping to educate families and businesses about the important energy and cost savings that can come with this simple, low-cost technology. Cool roofs have the potential to quickly and dramatically reduce global carbon emissions while saving money every month on consumers' electrical bills.

Chu, Steven

2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

37

Are seasonal calving dynamics forced by buttressing from ice mélange or undercutting by melting? Outcomes from full-Stokes simulations of Store Gletscher, West Greenland  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from observations, which show upwelling of dirty, subglacially derived meltwater near the centre of the calving ice front during summer months (Chauché et al., 2013)20 (Fig. 1). The high melt rates are caused by entrainment of warm ambient fjord water... ; Rignot and Kanagaratnam, 2006; Howat et al., 2007), raising con- cerns about its future response to changing global climate and the impact this might have on global sea level. The two factors, which govern this loss, are (1) an overall neg- ative surface...

Todd, J.; Christo?ersen, P.

2014-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

38

Photovoltaic roof heat flux  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

under the offset unit's solar panel, the hf formula (16) wasdrop below the angle unit's solar panel at night time. D u rfor both the units, the solar panel covered roof was a heat

Samady, Mezhgan Frishta

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Solar Roof Cooling by Evaporation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Roof air conditioning load is reduced by 85% to 90%. The cooler roof also protects and extends roof life. My presentation today will cover an old, square foot, and generally speaking, it will old technique -- one that has been gaining in show a...

Patterson, G. V.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

DIFFRACTION STUDIES OF ICE Alexe BOSAK  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ic 28o halo observed at least 7 times since 1629 octahedral particles of ice Ic! #12;Cooling downDIFFRACTION STUDIES OF ICE Alexeï BOSAK European Synchrotron Radiation Facility #12;Ice as the mild threat ice Ih the only ice in the crust #12;Ice as the absolute weapon Ice IX : melting point 45.8°C

Titov, Anatoly

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "roof ice melt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Ice shelf-ocean interactions in a general circulation model : melt-rate modulation due to mean flow and tidal currents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Interactions between the ocean circulation in sub-ice shelf cavities and the overlying ice shelf have received considerable attention in the context of observed changes in flow speeds of marine ice sheets around Antarctica. ...

Dansereau, Véronique

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Roofs | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to: navigation, searchVirginia BlueRiverwoods,RockRipple,Rollingwood, Texas: Energy|RomeRoofs

43

Energy saving potential of various roof technologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Unconventional roof technologies such as cool roofs and green roofs have been shown to reduce building heating and cooling load. Although previous studies suggest potential for energy savings through such technologies, ...

Ray, Stephen D. (Stephen Douglas)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Solar Roof Cooling by Evaporation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is generally recognized that as much as 60% of the air conditioning load in a building is generated by solar heat from the roof. This paper on SOLAR ROOF COOLING BY EVAPORATION is presented in slide form, tracing the history of 'nature's way...

Patterson, G. V.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

One Panel One Roof, DOE Powering Solar Workforce | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

One Panel One Roof, DOE Powering Solar Workforce One Panel One Roof, DOE Powering Solar Workforce...

46

Green roofs: potential at LANL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Green roofs, roof systems that support vegetation, are rapidly becoming one of the most popular sustainable methods to combat urban environmental problems in North America. An extensive list of literature has been published in the past three decades recording the ecological benefits of green roofs; and now those benefits have been measured in enumerated data as a means to analyze the costs and returns of green roof technology. Most recently several studies have made substantial progress quantifying the monetary savings associated with storm water mitigation, the lessoning of the Urban Heat Island, and reduction of building cooling demands due to the implementation of green roof systems. Like any natural vegetation, a green roof is capable of absorbing the precipitation that falls on it. This capability has shown to significantly decrease the amount of storm water runoff produced by buildings as well as slow the rate at which runoff is dispensed. As a result of this reduction in volume and velocity, storm drains and sewage systems are relieved of any excess stress they might experience in a storm. For many municipalities and private building owners, any increase in storm water mitigation can result in major tax incentives and revenue that does not have to be spent on extra water treatments. Along with absorption of water, vegetation on green roofs is also capable of transpiration, the process by which moisture is evaporated into the air to cool ambient temperatures. This natural process aims to minimize the Urban Heat Island Effect, a phenomenon brought on by the dark and paved surfaces that increases air temperatures in urban cores. As the sun distributes solar radiation over a city's area, dark surfaces such as bitumen rooftops absorb solar rays and their heat. That heat is later released during the evening hours and the ambient temperatures do not cool as they normally would, creating an island of constant heat. Such excessively high temperatures induce heat strokes, heat exhaustion, and pollution that can agitate the respiratory system. The most significant savings associated with green roofs is in the reduction of cooling demands due to the green roof's thermal mass and their insulating properties. Unlike a conventional roof system, a green roof does not absorb solar radiation and transfer that heat into the interior of a building. Instead the vegetation acts as a shade barrier and stabilizes the roof temperature so that interior temperatures remain comfortable for the occupants. Consequently there is less of a demand for air conditioning, and thus less money spent on energy. At LANL the potential of green roof systems has already been realized with the construction of the accessible green roof on the Otowi building. To further explore the possibilities and prospective benefits of green roofs though, the initial capital costs must be invested. Three buildings, TA-03-1698, TA-03-0502, and TA-53-0031 have all been identified as sound candidates for a green roof retrofit project. It is recommended that LANL proceed with further analysis of these projects and implementation of the green roofs. Furthermore, it is recommended that an urban forestry program be initiated to provide supplemental support to the environmental goals of green roofs. The obstacles barring green roof construction are most often budgetary and structural concerns. Given proper resources, however, the engineers and design professionals at LANL would surely succeed in the proper implementation of green roof systems so as to optimize their ecological and monetary benefits for the entire organization.

Pacheco, Elena M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Rain on the Roof-Evaporative Spray Roof Cooling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper describes evaporative spray roof cooling systems, their components, performance and applications in various climates and building types. The evolution of this indirect evaporative cooling technique is discussed. Psychrometric and sol...

Bachman, L. R.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Sustainable roofs with real energy savings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper addresses the general concept of sustainability and relates it to the building owner`s selection of a low-slope roof. It offers a list of performance features of sustainable roofs. Experiences and data relevant to these features for four unique roofs are then presented which include: self-drying systems, low total equivalent warming foam insulation, roof coatings and green roofs. The paper concludes with a list of sustainable roofing features worth considering for a low-slope roof investment. Building owners and community developers are showing more interest in investing in sustainability. The potential exists to design, construct, and maintain roofs that last twice as long and reduce the building space heating and cooling energy loads resulting from the roof by 50% (based on the current predominant design of a 10-year life and a single layer of 1 to 2 in. (2.5 to 5.1 cm) of insulation). The opportunity to provide better low-slope roofs and sell more roof maintenance service is escalating. The general trend of outsourcing services could lead to roofing companies` owning the roofs they install while the traditional building owner owns the rest of the building. Such a situation would have a very desirable potential to internalize the costs of poor roof maintenance practices and high roof waste disposal costs, and to offer a profit for installing roofs that are more sustainable. 14 refs., 12 figs.

Christian, J.E.; Petrie, T.W.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

49

Ice electrode electrolytic cell  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention relates to a method and apparatus for removing heavy metals from waste water, soils, or process streams by electrolytic cell means. The method includes cooling a cell cathode to form an ice layer over the cathode and then applying an electric current to deposit a layer of the heavy metal over the ice. The metal is then easily removed after melting the ice. In a second embodiment, the same ice-covered electrode can be employed to form powdered metals.

Glenn, David F. (Idaho Falls, ID); Suciu, Dan F. (Idaho Falls, ID); Harris, Taryl L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Ingram, Jani C. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Ice electrode electrolytic cell  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention relates to a method and apparatus for removing heavy metals from waste water, soils, or process streams by electrolytic cell means. The method includes cooling a cell cathode to form an ice layer over the cathode and then applying an electric current to deposit a layer of the heavy metal over the ice. The metal is then easily removed after melting the ice. In a second embodiment, the same ice-covered electrode can be employed to form powdered metals.

Glenn, D.F.; Suciu, D.F.; Harris, T.L.; Ingram, J.C.

1993-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

51

Advanced Energy Efficient Roof System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Energy consumption in buildings represents 40 percent of primary U.S. energy consumption, split almost equally between residential (22%) and commercial (18%) buildings.1 Space heating (31%) and cooling (12%) account for approximately 9 quadrillion Btu. Improvements in the building envelope can have a significant impact on reducing energy consumption. Thermal losses (or gains) from the roof make up 14 percent of the building component energy load. Infiltration through the building envelope, including the roof, accounts for an additional 28 percent of the heating loads and 16 percent of the cooling loads. These figures provide a strong incentive to develop and implement more energy efficient roof systems. The roof is perhaps the most challenging component of the building envelope to change for many reasons. The engineered roof truss, which has been around since 1956, is relatively low cost and is the industry standard. The roof has multiple functions. A typical wood frame home lasts a long time. Building codes vary across the country. Customer and trade acceptance of new building products and materials may impede market penetration. The energy savings of a new roof system must be balanced with other requirements such as first and life-cycle costs, durability, appearance, and ease of construction. Conventional residential roof construction utilizes closely spaced roof trusses supporting a layer of sheathing and roofing materials. Gypsum board is typically attached to the lower chord of the trusses forming the finished ceiling for the occupied space. Often in warmer climates, the HVAC system and ducts are placed in the unconditioned and otherwise unusable attic. High temperature differentials and leaky ducts result in thermal losses. Penetrations through the ceilings are notoriously difficult to seal and lead to moisture and air infiltration. These issues all contribute to greater energy use and have led builders to consider construction of a conditioned attic. The options considered to date are not ideal. One approach is to insulate between the trusses at the roof plane. The construction process is time consuming and costs more than conventional attic construction. Moreover, the problems of air infiltration and thermal bridges across the insulation remain. Another approach is to use structurally insulated panels (SIPs), but conventional SIPs are unlikely to be the ultimate solution because an additional underlying support structure is required except for short spans. In addition, wood spline and metal locking joints can result in thermal bridges and gaps in the foam. This study undertook a more innovative approach to roof construction. The goal was to design and evaluate a modular energy efficient panelized roof system with the following attributes: (1) a conditioned and clear attic space for HVAC equipment and additional finished area in the attic; (2) manufactured panels that provide structure, insulation, and accommodate a variety of roofing materials; (3) panels that require support only at the ends; (4) optimal energy performance by minimizing thermal bridging and air infiltration; (5) minimal risk of moisture problems; (6) minimum 50-year life; (7) applicable to a range of house styles, climates and conditions; (8) easy erection in the field; (9) the option to incorporate factory-installed solar systems into the panel; and (10) lowest possible cost. A nationwide market study shows there is a defined market opportunity for such a panelized roof system with production and semi-custom builders in the United States. Senior personnel at top builders expressed interest in the performance attributes and indicate long-term opportunity exists if the system can deliver a clear value proposition. Specifically, builders are interested in (1) reducing construction cycle time (cost) and (2) offering increased energy efficiency to the homebuyer. Additional living space under the roof panels is another low-cost asset identified as part of the study. The market potential is enhanced through construction activity levels in target marke

Jane Davidson

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

52

Solar Roof Cooling by Evaporation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SOLAR ROOF COOLING BY EVAPORATION Fanjet Evaporative Roof Cooling Windsor Lake Landing #1 Windsor Point Road Columbia, S.C. 29206 G. V. Patterson National Sales Manager Evaporation is nature's way of cooling. By the The American Society... penetration through will include current engineering techniques, sys out the course of the day. tem designs and documented cases of 20% to 30% reduction in air-conditioning run time. Dr. John Yellott of the Yellott Solar Energy Labo ratories in Phoenix...

Patterson, G. V.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

On the phase diagram of water with density functional theory potentials: the melting temperature of Ice I-h with the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof and Becke-Lee-Yang-Parr functionals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The melting temperature (Tm) of ice Ih was determined from constant enthalphy (NPH) Born-Oppenheimer Molecular Dynamics (BOMD) simulations to be 417±3 K for the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (PBE) and 411±4 K for the Becke-Lee-Yang-Parr (BLYP) density functionals using a coexisting ice (Ih)-liquid phase at constant pressures of P = 2,500 and 10,000 bar and a density ? = 1 g/cm3, respectively. This suggests that ambient condition simulations at ? = 1 g/cm3 will rather describe a supercooled state that is overstructured when compared to liquid water. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy Office of Basic Energy Sciences' Chemical Sciences program. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

Yoo, Soohaeng; Zeng, Xiao Cheng; Xantheas, Sotiris S.

2009-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

54

STATE OF CALIFORNIA ENVELOPE INSULATION; ROOFING; FENESTRATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STATE OF CALIFORNIA ENVELOPE ­ INSULATION; ROOFING; FENESTRATION CEC-CF-6R-ENV-01 (Revised 08/09) CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION INSTALLATION CERTIFICATE CF-6R-ENV-01 Envelope ­ Insulation; Roofing:__________________________________ Brand Name:_______________________________ Thickness (inches):_________________________ Thermal

55

Using Green Roofs to Minimize Roof Runoff Pollution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Design (LEED) programprogram Increased insulation and energy efficiencyIncreased insulation and energy efficiency #12;10/31/2008 2 Wildlife Habitat Photo Courtesy Penn State Center for Green Roof Research GreenTested membranes highly recommended ­­ Plastic root barrier above membrane?Plastic root barrier above membrane

Clark, Shirley E.

56

Impact of underwater-ice evolution on Arctic summer sea ice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Impact of underwater-ice evolution on Arctic summer sea ice Dirk Notz,1,4 Miles G. McPhee,2 M. Grae the simultaneous growth and ablation of a layer of ice between an under-ice melt pond and the underlying ocean. Such ``false bottoms'' are the only significant source of ice formation in the Arctic during summer. Analytical

Worster, M. Grae

57

Ice Shelf Water plume flow beneath Filchner-Ronne Ice Shelf, Antarctica  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ice Shelf Water plume flow beneath Filchner-Ronne Ice Shelf, Antarctica Paul R. Holland,1 Daniel L Filchner- Ronne Ice Shelf, Antarctica and its underlying ocean cavity. Ice Shelf Water (ISW) plumes are initiated by the freshwater released from a melting ice shelf and, if they rise, may become supercooled

Feltham, Daniel

58

SOLAR ROOF POWERS THE NJIT CAMPUS CENTER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SOLAR ROOF POWERS THE NJIT CAMPUS CENTER THE SKY'S THE LIMIT: BERNADETTE MOKE SITS ON THE ROOF, ARE 160 SOLAR PANELS, SOME OF WHICH AUTOMATICALLY FOLLOW THE PATH OF THE SUN. 10 NJITMAGAZINE COVER STORY'S THE LIMIT: SOLAR ROOF POWERS THE NJIT CAMPUS CENTER "The solar panels even move a little at night," says

Bieber, Michael

59

View of NY harbor from the JOIDES Resolution! in an ice-free world (73 m rise)!  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Caps:! Melting land ice adds to ocean volume, but not sea ice! IPCC2001! Alpine! #12;Why Is global sea level Is rising today?! .! Melting mountain glaciers/ice caps ("alpine" and! continental ice sheets error: 20-60 cm (does not include ice sheet melting)! http://www.realclimate.org/images/sealevel_1.jpg

60

Evaluation of Roof Bolting Requirements Based on In-Mine Roof Bolter Drilling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Roof bolting is the most popular method for underground openings in the mining industry, especially in the bedded deposits such as coal. In fact, all U.S. underground coal mine entries are roof-bolted as required by law. However, roof falls still occur frequently in the roof bolted entries. The two possible reasons are: the lack of knowledge of and technology to detect the roof geological conditions in advance of mining, and lack of roof bolting design criteria for modern roof bolting systems. This research is to develop a method for predicting the roof geology and stability condition in real time during roof bolting operation. Based on this information, roof bolting design criteria for modern roof bolting systems will be developed for implementation in real time. For the prediction of roof geology and stability condition in real time, a micro processor was used and a program developed to monitor and record the drilling parameters of roof bolter. These parameters include feed pressure, feed flow (penetration rate), rotation pressure, rotation rate, vacuum pressure, oil temperature of hydraulic circuit, and signals for controlling machine. From the results of a series of laboratory and underground tests so far, feed pressure is found to be a good indicator for identifying the voids/fractures and estimating the roof rock strength. The method for determining quantitatively the location and the size of void/fracture and estimating the roof rock strength from the drilling parameters of roof bolter was developed. Also, a set of computational rules has been developed for in-mine roof using measured roof drilling parameters and implemented in MRGIS (Mine Roof Geology Information System), a software package developed to allow mine engineers to make use of the large amount of roof drilling parameters for predicting roof geology properties automatically. For the development of roof bolting criteria, finite element models were developed for tensioned and fully grouted bolting designs. Numerical simulations were performed to investigate the mechanisms of modern roof bolting systems including both the tension and fully grouted bolts. Parameters to be studied are: bolt length, bolt spacing, bolt size/strength, grout annulus, in-situ stress condition, overburden depth, and roof geology (massive strata, fractured, and laminated or thinly-bedded). Based on the analysis of the mechanisms of both bolting systems and failure modes of the bolted strata, roof bolting design criteria and programs for modern roof bolting systems were developed. These criterion and/or programs were combined with the MRGIS for use in conjunction with roof bolt installation.

Syd S. Peng

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "roof ice melt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Glacier melt contribution to streamflow1 Neil Schaner1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, firn, or ice. We50 include all ice caps (ice sheets covering less than 50,000 km2 ) and other permanent1 Glacier melt contribution to streamflow1 Neil Schaner1 , Nathalie Voisin2 , Bart Nijssen1 gross domestic product,28 resides in areas that rely on snow or glacier melt for a majority of its water

Washington at Seattle, University of

62

Seasonal glacier melt contribution to streamflow Neil Schaner  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

source is perennial snow, firn, or ice. We include all ice caps (ice sheets covering less than 50,000 km21 Seasonal glacier melt contribution to streamflow Neil Schaner Department of Civil is the population at risk to future glacier changes. We estimate an upper bound on glacier melt contribution

Washington at Seattle, University of

63

A New Model to Construct Ice Stream Surface Elevation Profiles and Calculate Contributions to Sea-Level Rise  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

melting is responsible for, 60% comes from glaciers and ice caps.and ice caps will continue to be the dominant contributor to sea-level rise from the land ice-melting

Adachi, Yosuke

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Ice deformation near SHEBA R. W. Lindsay  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the vicinity of the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean (SHEBA) ice camp that is suitable for forcing factor for regional heat fluxes, ice growth and melt rates, and ice strength [Maykut, 1982Ice deformation near SHEBA R. W. Lindsay Polar Science Center, University of Washington, Seattle

Lindsay, Ron

65

Biogeochemistry in Sea Ice: CICE model developments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Polar primary production unfolds in a dynamic sea ice environment, and the interactions of sea ice with ocean support and mediate this production. In spring, for example, fresh melt water contributes to the shoaling of the mixed layer enhancing ice edge blooms. In contrast, sea ice formation in the fall reduces light penetration to the upper ocean slowing primary production in marine waters. Polar biogeochemical modeling studies typically consider these types of ice-ocean interactions. However, sea ice itself is a biogeochemically active medium, contributing a significant and, possibly, essential source of primary production to polar regions in early spring and fall. Here we present numerical simulations using the Los Alamos Sea Ice Model (CICE) with prognostic salinity and sea ice biogeochemistry. This study investigates the relationship between sea ice multiphase physics and sea ice productivity. Of particular emphasis are the processes of gravity drainage, melt water flushing, and snow loading. During sea ice formation, desalination by gravity drainage facilitates nutrient exchange between ocean and ice maintaining ice algal blooms in early spring. Melt water flushing releases ice algae and nutrients to underlying waters limiting ice production. Finally, snow loading, particularly in the Southern Ocean, forces sea ice below the ocean surface driving an upward flow of nutrient rich water into the ice to the benefit of interior and freeboard communities. Incorporating ice microphysics in CICE has given us an important tool for assessing the importance of these processes for polar algal production at global scales.

Jeffery, Nicole [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hunke, Elizabeth [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Elliott, Scott [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Turner, Adrian [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

66

Self drying roofs: What! No dripping!  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many roofs are replaced because water accumulates in portions of the roofing system.These accumulations can cause dripping, accelerated membrane failure, poor thermal performance, the threat of structural decay, and the depreciation of building assets. Traditionally, the roofing industry has been concerned with controlling the inflow of water into the roof. An example of this strategy would be the development of a more reliable membrane. However, roof membranes inevitably leak. For this reason, the roof design strategy of the future must be concerned with controlling water outflow. The requirements of this type of roof system are described. Under normal operating conditions (no leaks), the total moisture content of a self-drying roof system shall not increase with time and condensation shall not occur under the membrane during winter uptake. Moisture vapor movement by convection must be eliminated and the flow of water by gravity through imperfections in the roof system must be controlled. After a leak has occurred, no condensation on the upper surface of the deck shall be tolerated and the water introduced by the leak must be dissipated to the building interior in a minimum amount of time. Finite difference computer modeling is used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the design. The impact of deck and insulation permeance, climate, leaks, and wintertime water uptake are simulated. A database of simulations is qualitatively described; this database will be used in future work to produce a simplified means of assessing the design parameters of a self-drying roof system.

Desjarlais, A.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

67

Retrieval of Melt Pond Coverage from MODIS using Optimal Estimation   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

results showed an error in melt pond coverage estimation of 1.1%. The technique was then applied to Svalbard sea ice over the 2003 melt season to produce an estimate of melt pond coverage evolution. This melt pond evolution showed a similar general trend...

Dodd, Emma

2011-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

68

Why Cool Roofs? | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

technology. Cool roofs have the potential to quickly and dramatically reduce global carbon emissions while saving money every month on consumers' electrical bills. Speakers...

69

115GLACIERS AND ICE CAPSCHAPTER 6B Glaciers and Ice Caps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

115GLACIERS AND ICE CAPSCHAPTER 6B 6B Glaciers and Ice Caps Michael Zemp (lead author, Department of Sciences, China) #12;116 GLOBAL OUTLOOK FOR ICE AND SNOW Summary Glaciers and ice caps are among the most hazards. Because they are close to the melting point and react strongly to climate change, glaciers

Fountain, Andrew G.

70

View of NY harbor from the JOIDES Resolution in an ice-free world (73 m rise)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

less dense global 20th century warming ~0.6°C 1.6 mm/yr sea-level rise Melting Glaciers & Ice Caps? Melting Mountain Glaciers and Ice Caps: Alpine glaciers 0.6 mm/yr Greenland Ice Cap IPCC2001: near 0-80 cm IPPC 2007 error: 20-60 cm (does not include ice sheet melting) http

71

Energy Performance Aspects of a Florida Green Roof  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ENERGY PERFORMANCE ASPECTS OF A FLORIDA GREEN ROOF Jeffrey K. Sonne Senior Research Engineer Florida Solar Energy Center Cocoa, FL ABSTRACT Previous green roof studies have found that planted roofs significantly reduce roof temperatures... and roof heat flux, and simulations indicate cooling load reductions of up to 25%. This monitored study evaluates summer and winter energy performance aspects of a green roof on a central Florida university building addition that was completed in 2005...

Sonne, J.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Thermal Performance of Vegetative Roofing Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Vegetative roofing, otherwise known as green or garden roofing, has seen tremendous growth in the last decade in the United States. The numerous benefits that green roofs provide have helped to fuel their resurgence in industrial and urban settings. There are many environmental and economical benefits that can be realized by incorporating a vegetative roof into the design of a building. These include storm-water retention, energy conservation, reduction in the urban heat island effect, increased longevity of the roofing membrane, the ability of plants to create biodiversity and filter air contaminants, and beautification of the surroundings by incorporating green space. The vegetative roof research project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was initiated to quantify the thermal performance of various vegetative roofing systems relative to black and white roofs. Single Ply Roofing Institute (SPRI) continued its long-term commitment to cooperative research with ORNL in this project. Low-slope roof systems for this study were constructed and instrumented for continuous monitoring in the mixed climate of East Tennessee. This report summarizes the results of the annual cooling and heating loads per unit area of three vegetative roofing systems with side-by-side comparison to black and white roofing systems as well as a test section with just the growing media without plants. Results showed vegetative roofs reduced heat gain (reduced cooling loads) compared to the white control system due to the thermal mass, extra insulation, and evapo-transpiration associated with the vegetative roofing systems. The 4-inch and tray systems reduced the heat gain by approximately 61%, while the reduction with the 8-inch vegetative roof was found to be approximately 67%. The vegetative roofing systems were more effective in reducing heat gain than in reducing heat losses (heating loads). The reduction in heat losses for the 4-inch and tray systems were found to be approximately 40% in the mixed climate of East Tennessee. It should be noted that these values are climate dependent. Vegetative roofs also reduced the temperature (heat exposure) and temperature fluctuations (thermal stress) experienced by the membrane. In the cooling season of East Tennessee, the average peak temperature of the 4-inch and tray systems was found to be approximately 94 F cooler than the control black roofing system. The average temperature fluctuations at the membrane for the 4-inch and tray systems were found to be approximately 10 F compared to 125 F for black and 64 F for white systems. As expected, the 8-inch vegetative roof had the lowest fluctuations at approximately 2 F. Future work will include modeling of the energy performance of vegetative roof panels in the test climate of East Tennessee. The validated model then will be used to predict energy use in roofs with different insulation levels and in climates different from the test climate.

Desjarlais, Andre Omer [ORNL; Zaltash, Abdolreza [ORNL; Atchley, Jerald Allen [ORNL; Ennis, Mike J [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Lightweight, self-ballasting photovoltaic roofing assembly  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A photovoltaic roofing assembly comprises a roofing membrane (102), a plurality of photovoltaic modules (104, 106, 108) disposed as a layer on top of the roofing membrane (102), and a plurality of pre-formed spacers, pedestals or supports (112, 114, 116, 118, 120, 122) which are respectively disposed below the plurality of photovoltaic modules (104, 106, 108) and integral therewith, or fixed thereto. Spacers (112, 114, 116, 118, 120, 122) are disposed on top of roofing membrane (102). Membrane (102) is supported on conventional roof framing, and attached thereto by conventional methods. In an alternative embodiment, the roofing assembly may have insulation block (322) below the spacers (314, 314', 315, 315'). The geometry of the preformed spacers (112, 114, 116, 118, 120, 122, 314, 314', 315, 315') is such that wind tunnel testing has shown its maximum effectiveness in reducing net forces of wind uplift on the overall assembly. Such construction results in a simple, lightweight, self-ballasting, readily assembled roofing assembly which resists the forces of wind uplift using no roofing penetrations.

Dinwoodie, Thomas L. (Berkeley, CA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Lightweight, self-ballasting photovoltaic roofing assembly  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A photovoltaic roofing assembly comprises a roofing membrane (102), a plurality of photovoltaic modules (104, 106, 108) disposed as a layer on top of the roofing membrane (102), and a plurality of pre-formed spacers, pedestals or supports (112, 114, 116, 118, 120, 122) which are respectively disposed below the plurality of photovoltaic modules (104, 106, 108) and integral therewith, or fixed thereto. Spacers (112, 114, 116, 118, 120, 122) are disposed on top of roofing membrane (102). Membrane (102) is supported on conventional roof framing, and attached thereto by conventional methods. In an alternative embodiment, the roofing assembly may have insulation block (322) below the spacers (314, 314', 315, 315'). The geometry of the preformed spacers (112, 114, 116, 118, 120, 122, 314, 314', 315, 315') is such that wind tunnel testing has shown its maximum effectiveness in reducing net forces of wind uplift on the overall assembly. Such construction results in a simple, lightweight, self-ballasting, readily assembled roofing assembly which resists the forces of wind uplift using no roofing penetrations.

Dinwoodie, T.L.

1998-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

75

Lightweight, self-ballasting photovoltaic roofing assembly  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A photovoltaic roofing assembly comprises a roofing membrane (102), a plurality of photovoltaic modules (104, 106, 108) disposed as a layer on top of the roofing membrane (102), and a plurality of pre-formed spacers, pedestals or supports (112, 114, 116, 118, 120, 122) which are respectively disposed below the plurality of photovoltaic modules (104, 106, 108) and integral therewith, or fixed thereto. Spacers (112, 114, 116, 118, 120, 122) are disposed on top of roofing membrane (102). Membrane (102) is supported on conventional roof framing, and attached thereto by conventional methods. In an alternative embodiment, the roofing assembly may have insulation block (322) below the spacers (314, 314', 315, 315'). The geometry of the pre-formed spacers (112, 114, 116, 118, 120, 122, 314, 314', 315, 315') is such that wind tunnel testing has shown its maximum effectiveness in reducing net forces of wind uplift on the overall assembly. Such construction results in a simple, lightweight, self-ballasting, readily assembled roofing assembly which resists the forces of wind uplift using no roofing penetrations.

Dinwoodie, Thomas L.

2006-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

76

Effects of solar photovoltaic panels on roof heat transfer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the energy performance of  photovoltaic roofs, ASHRAE Trans A thermal model for photovoltaic systems, Solar Energy, Effects of Solar Photovoltaic Panels on Roof Heat Transfer 

Dominguez, Anthony; Kleissl, Jan; Luvall, Jeffrey C

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Countries Commit to White Roofs, Potentially Offsetting the Emissions...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Countries Commit to White Roofs, Potentially Offsetting the Emissions of Over 300 Power Plants Countries Commit to White Roofs, Potentially Offsetting the Emissions of Over 300...

78

Accelerated Aging of Roofing Surfaces | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Accelerated Aging of Roofing Surfaces Accelerated Aging of Roofing Surfaces Emerging Technologies Project for the 2013 Building Technologies Office's Program Peer Review...

79

Project Overcoat - An Exploration of Exterior Insulation Strategies for 1-1/2-Story Roof Applications in Cold Climates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development of an alternative method to interior-applied insulation strategies or exterior applied 'band-aids' such as heat tapes and ice belts may help reduce energy needs of millions of 1-1/2 story homes while reducing the risk of ice dam formation. A potential strategy for energy improvement of the roof is borrowed from new construction best practices: Here an 'overcoat' of a continuous air, moisture, and thermal barrier is applied on the outside of the roof structure for improved overall performance. The continuous insulation of this approach facilitates a reduction in thermal bridging which could further reduce energy consumption and bring existing homes closer to meeting the Building America goals for energy reduction. Research favors an exterior approach to deep energy retrofits and ice dam prevention in existing homes. The greatest amount of research focuses on whole house deep energy retrofits leaving a void in roof-only applications. The research is also void of data supporting the hygrothermal performance, durability, constructability, and cost of roof-only exterior overcoat strategies. Yet, contractors interviewed for this report indicate an understanding that exterior approaches are most promising for mitigating ice dams and energy loss and are able to sell these strategies to homeowners.

Ojczyk, C.; Mosiman, G.; Huelman, P.; Schirber, T.; Yost, P.; Murry, T.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

ARTICLE IN PRESS Kinetics of convective crystal dissolution and melting,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Department of Geological Sciences, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1063, USA5 Received 25 instability (similar to melting of ice) with or 14 without water (although presence of warm water may increase the dissociation rate). Dissociation of methane hydrate 15 into gas and water is similar to ice melting

Zhang, Youxue

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "roof ice melt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Postdoctoral position Antarctic ice sheet modelling Free University of Brussels (VUB)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

systems and ice caps, and in ice sheets in both polar regions (Greenland and Antarctica). The project as improved treatments for basal processes (basal sliding below ice sheet, basal melting below ice shelvesPostdoctoral position ­ Antarctic ice sheet modelling Free University of Brussels (VUB) The Ice

Huybrechts, Philippe

82

THE SHRINKING ARCTIC ICE CAP From the IPCC* Summary For Policymakers...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE SHRINKING ARCTIC ICE CAP From the IPCC* Summary For Policymakers... "Sea ice is projected] - a phenomenon sometimes referred to as "Arctic amplification". As Arctic temperatures rise, sea ice melts for the 20th century. The rate at which the modeled 21st century Arctic warming and sea ice melting occurs

83

Energy 101: Cool Roofs | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

slows the transfer of heat inside but doesn't eliminate it. Researchers have measured energy savings up to 10 to 15 percent for homes with cool roof coatings. And if a standard...

84

Maui County- Solar Roofs Initiative Loan Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

In September 2002, Maui Electric Company (MECO) and the County of Maui teamed up to launch the Maui Solar Roofs Initiative to increase the use of renewable energy in Maui County. MECO administers...

85

Design considerations for retractable-roof stadia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

As existing open-air or fully enclosed stadia are reaching their life expectancies, cities are choosing to replace them with structures with moving roofs. This kind of facility provides protection from weather for spectators, ...

Frazer, Andrew H., 1981-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Ice sheets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is eroding West Antarctic Ice Sheet. Geophysical Researchand Yungel, J. (2000). Greenland Ice Sheet: High-Elevation2004). The west Antarctic ice sheet and long term climate

Bentley, Charles G.; Thomas, Robert H.; Velicogna, Isabella

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Roof Coating Procedures and Their Productivity Gains  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

benefit of the installation of different roof coating technologies and comparable application procedures of these technologies are ambiguous. The focal point of this research is to determine the effective correlation between various commercially... available roof coatings, and productivity gains associated with these energy saving strategies. This type of situation is evidenced in the justification of energy rebates distributed by Florida Power & Light in exchange for the application of Energy Star...

Bonaby, J.; Schaub, D.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Historical and future black carbon deposition on the three ice caps: Ice core measurements and model simulations from 1850 to 2100  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Historical and future black carbon deposition on the three ice caps: Ice core measurements black carbon deposition on the three ice caps: Ice core measurements and model simulations from 1850 tends to enhance snow and ice melting due to the absorption caused by the increased BC deposition

89

Weathering of Roofing Materials-An Overview  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An overview of several aspects of the weathering of roofing materials is presented. Degradation of materials initiated by ultraviolet radiation is discussed for plastics used in roofing, as well as wood and asphalt. Elevated temperatures accelerate many deleterious chemical reactions and hasten diffusion of material components. Effects of moisture include decay of wood, acceleration of corrosion of metals, staining of clay, and freeze-thaw damage. Soiling of roofing materials causes objectionable stains and reduces the solar reflectance of reflective materials. (Soiling of non-reflective materials can also increase solar reflectance.) Soiling can be attributed to biological growth (e.g., cyanobacteria, fungi, algae), deposits of organic and mineral particles, and to the accumulation of flyash, hydrocarbons and soot from combustion.

Berdahl, Paul; Akbari, Hashem; Levinson, Ronnen; Miller, William A.

2006-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

90

In-situ aging of roof systems containing polyisocyanurate roof insulation foamed with alternative blowing agents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experimental polyisocyanurate (PIR) foam roof insulations with permeable facers were installed in roofing systems and continuously monitored for thermal performance for four years. The foams were produced using a specific formulation that represented current technology in 1989 and were blown with CFC-11, HCFC-123, and HCFC-141b. These foams were installed in roof systems comprised of loosely-laid insulation boards covered by either a loosely-laid single ply white or black membrane. The in-situ testing was carried out on an outdoor test facility, the Roof Thermal Research Apparatus (RTRA). Additional specimens of these foams were aged in the laboratory and periodically evaluated using laboratory measurement equipment. This paper summarizes the in-situ data compiled to date, compares these data with the laboratory results, and examines whether the proposed laboratory procedure for accelerating the aging of foams by the slicing and scaling method accurately predicts the aging characteristics of these materials installed in roof systems. These experiments are part of a joint industry/government project established to evaluate the technical viability of alternative HCFC blowing agents for rigid closed-cell polyisocyanurate foam roof insulations. Members of the project are the US Department of Energy (DOE)/Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the Society of the Plastics Industry-Polyurethane Division (SPI), the Polyisocyanurate Insulation Manufacturers Association (PIMA), and the National Roofing Contractors Association (NRCA).

Desjarlais, A.O.; Christian, J.E.; Graves, R.S.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Comparative Summer Thermal Performance of Finished and Unfinished Metal Roofing Products with Composition Shingles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of five roofing systems against a control roof using dark shingles. The intent of the testing is to evaluate how roofing systems impact residential cooling energy use. Recent testing emphasizes evaluation of how increasingly popular metal roofing systems...

Parker, D. S.; Sherwin, J.; Sonne, J.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

XXII ICTAM, 2529 August 2008, Adelaide, Australia EXPERIMENTAL AND THEORETICAL MODELLING OF ICE SHEETSHELF GROUNDING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

melting of the polar ice caps due to global warming, a dynamical collapse of the ice sheets has the dynamical stability of shelving ice sheets. INTRODUCTION The Antarctic ice cap contains several tensXXII ICTAM, 25­29 August 2008, Adelaide, Australia EXPERIMENTAL AND THEORETICAL MODELLING OF ICE

Worster, M. Grae

93

Energy Performance Aspects of a Florida Green Roof Part 2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Green roof installation in the United States is growing at a significant rate. There are a number of reasons for this growth including rainwater runoff reduction and aesthetic benefits. Energy performance evaluations of green roofs, the subject...

Sonne, J.; Parker, D.

94

Cool Roofs: Your Questions Answered | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Answer: The West Building cool roof is estimated to save about 2,000 per year in reduced energy costs. In the spring, we will also be installing a cool roof on the Headquarters'...

95

Seismic Evidence For A Hydrothermal Layer Above The Solid Roof...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

roof is overlain by a 150-200-m-thick low-velocity zone that may correspond to a fracture zone that hosts the hydrothermal circulation, and the roof itself may be the...

96

Indirect Benefits (Increased Roof Life and HVAC Savings) from...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Indirect Benefits (Increased Roof Life and HVAC Savings) from a Solar PV System at the San Jos Convention Center Indirect Benefits (Increased Roof Life and HVAC Savings) from a...

97

Energy Saving "Cool Roofs" Installed at Y-12 | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Home Field Offices Welcome to the NNSA Production Office NPO News Releases Energy Saving "Cool Roofs" Installed at Y-12 Energy Saving "Cool Roofs" Installed at Y-12 The...

98

Energy Saving 'Cool Roofs' Installed at Y-12 | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Photo Gallery Jobs Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home NNSA Blog Energy Saving 'Cool Roofs' Installed at Y-12 Energy Saving 'Cool Roofs' Installed at Y-12...

99

Effects of solar photovoltaic panels on roof heat transfer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the underside of the tilted solar panels and the surface of the roof under the solar panel (Fig.  2).  An air temperature of the  solar panel is similar to the roof 

Dominguez, Anthony; Kleissl, Jan; Luvall, Jeffrey C

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Cool Roof Resource Guide for Federal Agencies (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Resource guide containing information and links for the evaluation and installation of cool roofs within the Federal Government

Not Available

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "roof ice melt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Evolution of cool-roof standards in the United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Design (LEED) Green Building Rating System assigns one rating point for the use of a cool roof in its Sustainable

Akbari, Hashem

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Cost Analysis of Roof-Only Air Sealing and Insulation Strategies on 1 1/2-Story Homes in Cold Climates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The External Thermal and Moisture Management System (ETMMS), typically seen in deep energy retrofits, is a valuable approach for the roof-only portions of existing homes, particularly the 1 1/2-story home. It is effective in reducing energy loss through the building envelope, improving building durability, reducing ice dams, and providing opportunities to improve occupant comfort and health.

Ojczyk, C.

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

what is a cool roof? what is the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the value, the `cooler' the roof. Solar Re ectance: the ability of a roof to re ect solar energy Thermal) as an alternative to solar reflectance and thermal emittance values · Energy and cost savings can be 20% depending Commission recogniz- es for certifying the solar reflectance and thermal emittance values of roofing products

104

PERFORMANCE EVALUATION OF A SUSTAINABLE AND ENERGY EFFICIENT RE-ROOFING TECHNOLOGY USING FIELD-TEST DATA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three test attics were constructed to evaluate a new sustainable method of re-roofing utilizing photo-voltaic (PV) laminates, metal roofing panels, and PCM heat sink in the Envelope Systems Research Apparatus (ESRA) facility in the ORNL campus. Figure 1 is a picture of the three attic roofs located adjacent to each other. The leftmost roof is the conventional shingle roof, followed by the metal panel roof incorporating the cool-roof coating, and third from left is the roof with the PCM. On the PCM roof, the PV panels are seen as well; they're labelled from left-to-right as panels 5, 6 and 7. The metal panel roof consists of three metal panels with the cool-roof coating; in further discussion this is referred to as the infrared reflective (IRR) metal roof. The IRR metal panels reflect the incoming solar radiation and then quickly re-emit the remaining absorbed portion, thereby reducing the solar heat gain of the attic. Surface reflectance of the panels were measured using a Solar Spectrum Reflectometer. In the 0.35-2.0 {mu}m wavelength interval, which accounts for more than 94% of the solar energy, the IRR panels have an average reflectance of 0.303. In the infrared portion of the spectrum, the IRR panel reflectance is 0.633. The PCM roof consists of a layer of macro-encapsulated bio-based PCM at the bottom, followed by a 2-cm thick layer of dense fiberglass insulation with a reflective surface on top, and metal panels with pre-installed PV laminates on top. The PCM has a melting point of 29 C (84.2 F) and total enthalpy between 180 and 190 J/g. The PCM was macro-packaged in between two layers of heavy-duty plastic foil forming arrays of PCM cells. Two air cavities, between PCM cells and above the fiberglass insulation, helped the over-the-deck natural air ventilation. It is anticipated that during summer, this extra ventilation will help in reducing the attic-generated cooling loads. The extra ventilation, in conjunction with the PCM heat sink, are used to minimize thermal stresses due to the PV laminates on sunny days. In PV laminates sunlight is converted into electricity and heat simultaneous. In case of building integrated applications, a relatively high solar absorption of amorphous silicon laminates can be utilized during the winter for solar heating purposes with PCM providing necessary heat storage capacity. However, PV laminates may also generate increased building cooling loads during the summer months. Therefore, in this project, the PCM heat sink was to minimize summer heat gains as well. The PCM-fibreglass-PV assembly and the IRR metal panels are capable of being installed directly on top of existing shingle roofs during re-roofing, precluding the need for recycling or disposal of waste materials. The PV laminates installed on the PCM attic are PVL-144 models from Uni-Solar. Each laminate contains 22 triple junction amorphous silicon solar cells connected in series. The silicon cells are of dimensions 356 mm x 239 mm (14-in. x 9.4-in.). The PVL-144 laminate is encapsulated in durable ETFE (poly-ethylene-co-tetrafluoroethylene) high light-transmissive polymer. Table 1 lists the power, voltage and current ratings of the PVL-144 panel.

Biswas, Kaushik [ORNL; Miller, William A [ORNL; Childs, Phillip W [ORNL; Kosny, Jan [ORNL; Kriner, Scott [Metal Construction Association, Glenview, IL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Covered Product Category: Cool Roof Products  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

FEMP provides acquisition guidance across a variety of product categories, including cool roof products, which are an ENERGY STAR®-qualified product category. Federal laws and requirements mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law.

106

Permeable Pavements, Green Roofs, and Cisterns  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and water harvesting through them, such as asphalt and con- systems or cisterns. This new fact sheet crete and improve the water quality of runoff from new residential and commercial developments by using stormwater including the use of permeable pave- (sufaces that do not allow water to filter ments, green roofs

Hunt, William F.

107

Update on the Million Solar Roofs Initiative  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Million Solar Roofs Initiative, announced by the President in June of 1997, spans a period of twelve years and intends to increase domestic deployment of solar technologies. This paper presents an overview of the development of the initiative and significant activities to date.

Herig, C.

1999-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

108

Evolution of cool-roof standards in the United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Roofs that have high solar reflectance and high thermal emittance stay cool in the sun. A roof with lower thermal emittance but exceptionally high solar reflectance can also stay cool in the sun. Substituting a cool roof for a noncool roof decreases cooling-electricity use, cooling-power demand, and cooling-equipment capacity requirements, while slightly increasing heating-energy consumption. Cool roofs can also lower citywide ambient air temperature in summer, slowing ozone formation and increasing human comfort. Provisions for cool roofs in energy-efficiency standards can promote the building- and climate-appropriate use of cool roofing technologies. Cool-roof requirements are designed to reduce building energy use, while energy-neutral cool-roof credits permit the use of less energy-efficient components (e.g., larger windows) in a building that has energy-saving cool roofs. Both types of measures can reduce the life-cycle cost of a building (initial cost plus lifetime energy cost). Since 1999, several widely used building energy-efficiency standards, including ASHRAE 90.1, ASHRAE 90.2, the International Energy Conservation Code, and California's Title 24 have adopted cool-roof credits or requirements. This paper reviews the technical development of cool-roof provisions in the ASHRAE 90.1, ASHRAE 90.2, and California Title 24 standards, and discusses the treatment of cool roofs in other standards and energy-efficiency programs. The techniques used to develop the ASHRAE and Title 24 cool-roof provisions can be used as models to address cool roofs in building energy-efficiency standards worldwide.

Akbari, Hashem; Akbari, Hashem; Levinson, Ronnen

2008-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

109

Status of cool roof standards in the United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since 1999, several widely used building energy efficiency standards, including ASHRAE 90.1, ASHRAE 90.2, the International Energy Conservation Code, and California's Title 24 have adopted cool roof credits or requirements. We review the technical development of cool roof provisions in the ASHRAE 90.1, ASHRAE 90.2, and California Title 24 standards, and discuss the treatment of cool roofs in other standards and energy-efficiency programs. The techniques used to develop the ASHRAE and Title 24 cool roof provisions can be used as models to address cool roofs in building energy standards worldwide.

Akbari, Hashem; Levinson, Ronnen

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

SHAPE-CONSTRAINED SEGMENTATION APPROACH FOR ARCTIC MULTIYEAR SEA ICE FLOE ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SHAPE-CONSTRAINED SEGMENTATION APPROACH FOR ARCTIC MULTIYEAR SEA ICE FLOE ANALYSIS Yuliya Tarabalka Research Association, MD, USA. e-mail: yuliya.tarabalka@inria.fr ABSTRACT The melting of sea ice, it is important to investigate how rapidly sea ice floes melt. For this purpose, a new TempoSeg method

Boyer, Edmond

111

ARM - Lesson Plans: When Land Ice Melts  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUC : XDCResearch Related InformationAcid RainThe Pacific and ElWhen Floating

112

Passive ice freezing-releasing heat pipe  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A heat pipe device has been developed which permits completely passive ice formation and periodic release of ice without requiring the ambient temperature to rise above the melting point of water. This passive design enables the maximum amount of cooling capacity to be stored in the tank.

Gorski, Anthony J. (Lemont, IL); Schertz, William W. (Batavia, IL)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

6, 20592090, 2006 Ice nucleation in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

intermediate solubility and melting temperatures) nucleated ice at the same temperature as aqueous sulfuric Discussions Ice nucleation in sulfuric acid/organic aerosols: implications for cirrus cloud formation M. R. Beaver1 , M. J. Elrod2 , R. M. Garland1 , and M. A. Tolbert1 1 Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry

Boyer, Edmond

114

Where might we find evidence of a Last Interglacial West Antarctic Ice Sheet collapse in Antarctic ice core records?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

increased melting from valley glaciers and small ice caps (estimated ~0.6±0.1 m, Radi and Hock, 2010), oceanWhere might we find evidence of a Last Interglacial West Antarctic Ice Sheet collapse in Antarctic ice core records? S.L. Bradley a, , M. Siddall a , G.A. Milne b , V. Masson-Delmotte c , E. Wolff d

Siddall, Mark

115

Aging and weathering of cool roofing membranes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Aging and weathering can reduce the solar reflectance of cool roofing materials. This paper summarizes laboratory measurements of the solar spectral reflectance of unweathered, weathered, and cleaned samples collected from single-ply roofing membranes at various sites across the United States. Fifteen samples were examined in each of the following six conditions: unweathered; weathered; weathered and brushed; weathered, brushed and then rinsed with water; weathered, brushed, rinsed with water, and then washed with soap and water; and weathered, brushed, rinsed with water, washed with soap and water, and then washed with an algaecide. Another 25 samples from 25 roofs across the United States and Canada were measured in their unweathered state, weathered, and weathered and wiped. We document reduction in reflectivity resulted from various soiling mechanisms and provide data on the effectiveness of various cleaning approaches. Results indicate that although the majority of samples after being washed with detergent could be brought to within 90% of their unweathered reflectivity, in some instances an algaecide was required to restore this level of reflectivity.

Akbari, Hashem; Berhe, Asmeret A.; Levinson, Ronnen; Graveline,Stanley; Foley, Kevin; Delgado, Ana H.; Paroli, Ralph M.

2005-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

116

Simulation of the Fennoscandian ice sheet during the last glaciation using  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sliding is triggered when basal temperatures reach melting point of ice sliding is proportional to power- mechanical ice sheet model coupled to an isostatic adjustment model. The model predicts thermal conditions

117

E-Print Network 3.0 - amery ice shelf Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

enhance basal ice shelf melting around Antarctica Summary: to the absence of local ISM cooling. Only at the Amery ice shelf (AIS) is our ISM one order of magnitude higher... and...

118

Model estimates of the mass balance of the Greenland and Antartic ice sheets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The six possible combinations of two climate models and three methods for calculating the melting of snow and ice are used to estimate current values of accumulation and ablation on the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets. ...

Bugnion, Véronique.

119

E-Print Network 3.0 - artic sea ice Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

C S C I E N C E S Summary: are melting most rapidly? Which types of melting ice cause sea level rise? And what have been the main... contributors to sea level rise so far? What are...

120

Airtightness Results of Roof-Only Air Sealing Strategies on 1-1/2 Story Homes in Cold Climates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this second study on solutions to ice dams in 1-1/2 story homes, five test homes located in both cold and very cold climates were analyzed for air leakage reduction rates following modifications by independent contractors on owner-occupied homes. The reason for choosing this house type was they are very common in our area and very difficult to air seal and insulate effectively. Two projects followed a roof-only Exterior Thermal Moisture Management System (ETMMS) process. One project used an interior-only approach to roof air sealing and insulation. The remaining two projects used a deep energy retrofit approach for whole house (foundation wall, above grade wall, roof) air leakage and heat loss reduction. All were asked to provide information regarding project goals, process, and pre and post-blower door test results. Additional air leakage reduction data was provided by several NorthernSTAR Building America industry partners for interior-applied, roof-only modifications on 1-1/2 story homes. The data represents homes in the general market as well as homes that were part of the state of Minnesota weatherization program. A goal was to compare exterior air sealing methods with interior approaches. This pool of data enabled us to compare air tightness data from over 220 homes using similar air seal methods.

Ojczyk, C.; Murry, T.; Mosiman, G.

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "roof ice melt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Seasonal variation of upwelling in the Alaskan Beaufort Sea: Impact of sea ice cover  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that lateral ocean heat flux from the shelf to the basin melts a substantial amount of ice in the marginal iceSeasonal variation of upwelling in the Alaskan Beaufort Sea: Impact of sea ice cover Lena M to characterize differences in upwelling near the shelf break in the Alaskan Beaufort Sea due to varying sea ice

Pickart, Robert S.

122

Seasonal variation of upwelling in the Alaskan Beaufort Sea: Impact of sea ice cover  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ocean heat flux42 from the shelf to the basin melts a substantial amount of ice in the marginal ice Seasonal variation of upwelling in the Alaskan Beaufort Sea: Impact of sea ice cover Lena M the shelfbreak in the Alaskan Beaufort Sea due to3 varying sea-ice conditions. The record is divided into three

Pickart, Robert S.

123

Multiple effects of ice load changes and associated stress change on magmatic systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Pressure release melting due to ice cap retreat in Iceland may at present times generate a similar amount that part of this magma may be captured in the crust, rather than being erupted. Gradual retreat of ice caps retreat of ice caps and glaciers worldwide; many of which are located in volcanic regions. The reduced ice

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

124

Lomonosovfonna and Holtedahlfonna ice cores reveal eastwest disparities of the Spitsbergen environment since AD 1700  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Centre, Tromsø, Norway ABSTRACT. An ice core extracted from Holtedahlfonna ice cap, western Spitsbergen developed for these low-altitude ice caps. For instance, Iizuka and others (2002) and Grinsted and others (2006) found good summer melting indices based on ion concentrations of snow and ice from Austfonna

Howat, Ian M.

125

Evolution of cool-roof standards in the United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2000 Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings 1:1-11 (to energy efficiency standards for buildings. Online ataddress cool roofs in building energy-efficiency standards

Akbari, Hashem

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Energy Department Completes Cool Roof Installation on DC Headquarters...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

50 degrees cooler. A study by researchers at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) found that using cool roofs and cool pavements in cities around the world can help...

127

Secretary Chu Announces Steps to Implement Cool Roofs at DOE...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

emissions. A recent study by researchers at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) found that using cool roofs and cool pavements in cities around the world can help...

128

Evolution of cool-roof standards in the United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

reduce building energy use, while energy-neutral cool-roofbuilding when the roof is cooler than the inside air. One can develop an energy-neutral

Akbari, Hashem

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Evolution of cool-roof standards in the United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2006. Inclusion of solar reflectance and thermal emittanceuse photovoltaic, solar- thermal, or roof-garden systems2006. Inclusion of solar reflectance and thermal emittance

Akbari, Hashem

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Flourescent Pigments for High-Performance Cool Roofing and Facades...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

class of dark-colored pigments for cool metal roof and faade coatings that incorporate near-infrared fluorescence and reflectance to improve energy performance. Image: PPG...

131

Cool roofs as an energy conservation measure for federal buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have developed initial estimates of the potential benefits of cool roofs on federal buildings and facilities (building scale) as well as extrapolated the results to all national facilities under the administration of the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP). In addition, a spreadsheet ''calculator'' is devised to help FEMP estimate potential energy and cost savings of cool roof projects. Based on calculations for an average insulation level of R-11 for roofs, it is estimated that nationwide annual savings in energy costs will amount to $16M and $32M for two scenarios of increased roof albedo (moderate and high increases), respectively. These savings, corresponding to about 3.8 percent and 7.5 percent of the base energy costs for FEMP facilities, include the increased heating energy use (penalties) in winter. To keep the cost of conserved energy (CCE) under $0.08 kWh-1 as a nationwide average, the calculations suggest that the incremental cost for cool roofs should not exceed $0.06 ft-2, assuming that cool roofs have the same life span as their non-cool counterparts. However, cool roofs usually have extended life spans, e.g., 15-30 years versus 10 years for conventional roofs, and if the costs of re-roofing are also factored in, the cutoff incremental cost to keep CCE under $0.08 kWh-1 can be much higher. In between these two ends, there is of course a range of various combinations and options.

Taha, Haider; Akbari, Hashem

2003-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

132

Journal of Climate, 2005, Vol 18, p 2903-2921 Maintenance of the Sea-Ice Edge  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

location the principal drivers of the oceanic heat flux that melts sea ice are absorbed solar radiation radiation is the largest component of the ocean energy budget, and the large seasonal range of insolation pole depends primarily on coastlines, ice motion, and the melt rate at the ice-ocean interface. At any

Bitz, Cecilia

133

In Shock Compression of Condensed Matter-2003, Ed. M. Furnish, Portland, OR, 2003. A NEW H2O ICE HUGONIOT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Collisions on icy planetary bodies produce impact melt water, redistribute ground ice, and deposit thermalIn Shock Compression of Condensed Matter-2003, Ed. M. Furnish, Portland, OR, 2003. 1 A NEW H2O ICE the onset of phase transformations on the ice Hugoniot, and consequently, the criteria for shock melting

Stewart, Sarah T.

134

Cool roof Q+A 011.doc 29 July 2009 Cool Roof Q & A (draft)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

thermal radiation. Thus, a cool roof should have both high "solar reflectance" (ability to reflect, also measured on a scale of 0 to 1). The solar reflectance and thermal emittance of a surface sunlight, measured on a scale of 0 to 1) and high "thermal emittance" (ability to emit thermal radiation

135

Vapor deposition of water on graphitic surfaces: Formation of amorphous ice, bilayer ice, ice I, and liquid water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Carbonaceous surfaces are a major source of atmospheric particles and could play an important role in the formation of ice. Here we investigate through molecular simulations the stability, metastability, and molecular pathways of deposition of amorphous ice, bilayer ice, and ice I from water vapor on graphitic and atomless Lennard-Jones surfaces as a function of temperature. We find that bilayer ice is the most stable ice polymorph for small cluster sizes, nevertheless it can grow metastable well above its region of thermodynamic stability. In agreement with experiments, the simulations predict that on increasing temperature the outcome of water deposition is amorphous ice, bilayer ice, ice I, and liquid water. The deposition nucleation of bilayer ice and ice I is preceded by the formation of small liquid clusters, which have two wetting states: bilayer pancake-like (wetting) at small cluster size and droplet-like (non-wetting) at larger cluster size. The wetting state of liquid clusters determines which ice polymorph is nucleated: bilayer ice nucleates from wetting bilayer liquid clusters and ice I from non-wetting liquid clusters. The maximum temperature for nucleation of bilayer ice on flat surfaces, T{sub B}{sup max} is given by the maximum temperature for which liquid water clusters reach the equilibrium melting line of bilayer ice as wetting bilayer clusters. Increasing water-surface attraction stabilizes the pancake-like wetting state of liquid clusters leading to larger T{sub B}{sup max} for the flat non-hydrogen bonding surfaces of this study. The findings of this study should be of relevance for the understanding of ice formation by deposition mode on carbonaceous atmospheric particles, including soot.

Lupi, Laura; Kastelowitz, Noah; Molinero, Valeria, E-mail: Valeria.Molinero@utah.edu [Department of Chemistry, The University of Utah, 315 South 1400 East, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112-0850 (United States)

2014-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

136

Basal melting of snow on early Mars: A possible origin of some valley Michael H. Carr  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that valley networks could have formed as a result of basal melting of thick snow and ice deposits. Depending in part by basal melting of the south polar cap [Clifford, 1987], this cannot be the only mechanismBasal melting of snow on early Mars: A possible origin of some valley networks Michael H. Carr U. S

Head III, James William

137

High Efficiency Solar Integrated Roof Membrane Product  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project was designed to address the Solar Energy Technology Program objective, to develop new methods to integrate photovoltaic (PV) cells or modules within a building-integrated photovoltaic (BIPV) application that will result in lower installed cost as well as higher efficiencies of the encapsulated/embedded PV module. The technology assessment and development focused on the evaluation and identification of manufacturing technologies and equipment capable of producing such low-cost, high-efficiency, flexible BIPV solar cells on single-ply roofing membranes.

Partyka, Eric; Shenoy, Anil

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

138

List of Roofs Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpInc Place:KeystoneSolarList ofPassive SolarRoofs Incentives Jump to:

139

Cool Roof Calculator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin:EnergyWisconsin:2003) | OpenMinor PermitControllingCook, Minnesota: Energy3Roof

140

Energy 101: Cool Roofs | Department of Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing Zirconia Nanoparticles asSecond stage ofDefects on . GradeCool Roofs Energy 101:

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "roof ice melt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Next Generation Attics and Roof Systems  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l L d F S iPartnership Program |MillionNext Generation Attics and Roof

142

Rooftop Membrane Temperature Reductions with Green Roof Technology in South-Central Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Early green roof cooling and energy reduction research in North America took place in Canada and the northern latitudes of the United States, where green roofs reduced rooftop temperatures by 70% to 90%. Less is known about green roof technology...

Dvorak, B.

143

Estimating Heat and Mass Transfer Processes in Green Roof Systems: Current Modeling Capabilities and Limitations (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation discusses estimating heat and mass transfer processes in green roof systems: current modeling capabilities and limitations. Green roofs are 'specialized roofing systems that support vegetation growth on rooftops.'

Tabares Velasco, P. C.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Roofing in the Urban Environment: Pollution Source of Opportunity for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

demand ­ surrogate for organics · Heavy metals and major cations (copper, h i d i l d i ichromium1 Roofing in the Urban Environment: Pollution Source of Opportunity for Source Control? Shirley E Facility Metal Range (mg/L) Average % COV (%) Direct roof runoff from 7 storms Metal Range (mg/L) Average

Clark, Shirley E.

145

Roofing in the Urban Environment: Pollution Source of Opportunity for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· Heavy metals and major cations (copper, h i d i l d i ichromium, cadmium, lead, zinc, arsenic, calcium1 Roofing in the Urban Environment: Pollution Source of Opportunity for Source Control? Shirley E Dissolved: 35 12,200 Dissolved: 11,900 From Good 1993 Galvanized uncoated Roofing ­ Airport Facility Metal

Clark, Shirley E.

146

Hygrothermal Performance of West Coast Wood Deck Roofing System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Simulations of roofing assemblies are necessary in order to understand and adequately predict actual the hygrothermal performance. At the request of GAF, simulations have been setup to verify the difference in performance between white and black roofing membrane colors in relation to critical moisture accumulation for traditional low slope wood deck roofing systems typically deployed in various western U.S. Climate Zones. The performance of these roof assemblies has been simulated in the hygrothermal calculation tool of WUFI, from which the result was evaluated based on a defined criterion for moisture safety. The criterion was defined as the maximum accepted water content for wood materials and the highest acceptable moisture accumulation rate in relation to the risk of rot. Based on the criterion, the roof assemblies were certified as being either safe, risky or assumed to fail. The roof assemblies were simulated in different western climates, with varying insulation thicknesses, two different types of wooden decking, applied with varying interior moisture load and with either a high or low solar absorptivity at the roof surface (black or white surface color). The results show that the performance of the studied roof assemblies differs with regard to all of the varying parameters, especially the climate and the indoor moisture load.

Pallin, Simon B [ORNL; Kehrer, Manfred [ORNL; Desjarlais, Andre Omer [ORNL

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Fourier analysis of conductive heat transfer for glazed roofing materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For low-rise buildings, roof is the most exposed surface to solar radiation. The main mode of heat transfer from outdoor via the roof is conduction. The rate of heat transfer and the thermal impact is dependent on the thermophysical properties of roofing materials. Thus, it is important to analyze the heat distribution for the various types of roofing materials. The objectives of this paper are to obtain the Fourier series for the conductive heat transfer for two types of glazed roofing materials, namely polycarbonate and polyfilled, and also to determine the relationship between the ambient temperature and the conductive heat transfer for these materials. Ambient and surface temperature data were collected from an empirical field investigation in the campus of Universiti Teknologi MARA Shah Alam. The roofing materials were installed on free-standing structures in natural ventilation. Since the temperature data are generally periodic, Fourier series and numerical harmonic analysis are applied. Based on the 24-point harmonic analysis, the eleventh order harmonics is found to generate an adequate Fourier series expansion for both glazed roofing materials. In addition, there exists a linear relationship between the ambient temperature and the conductive heat transfer for both glazed roofing materials. Based on the gradient of the graphs, lower heat transfer is indicated through polyfilled. Thus polyfilled would have a lower thermal impact compared to polycarbonate.

Roslan, Nurhana Lyana; Bahaman, Nurfaradila; Almanan, Raja Noorliyana Raja; Ismail, Razidah [Faculty of Computer and Mathematical Sciences, Universiti Teknologi MARA, 40450 Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia); Zakaria, Nor Zaini [Faculty of Applied Sciences, Universiti Teknologi MARA, 40450 Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia)

2014-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

148

PRESSURIZATION OF FIXED ROOF STORAGE TANKS DUE TO EXTERNAL FIRES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PRESSURIZATION OF FIXED ROOF STORAGE TANKS DUE TO EXTERNAL FIRES Fabien FouiHen, INERIS, Parc. Reflections led on this accident have pushed to consider the phenomenon of tank pressurization as a potential initiating event of the fire ball observed. In concrete terms, when a fixed roof storage tank is surrounded

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

149

E-Print Network 3.0 - antisolar insulated roof Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

made of? Green roof benefits: Insulates building,lowering heating costs Absorption of rainwater... including a green roof. A green ... Source: Kane, Andrew S. - Aquatic...

150

Effectiveness of Cool Roof Coatings with Ceramic Particles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Liquid applied coatings promoted as cool roof coatings, including several with ceramic particles, were tested at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, Tenn., for the purpose of quantifying their thermal performances. Solar reflectance measurements were made for new samples and aged samples using a portable reflectometer (ASTM C1549, Standard Test Method for Determination of Solar Reflectance Near Ambient Temperature Using a Portable Solar Reflectometer) and for new samples using the integrating spheres method (ASTM E903, Standard Test Method for Solar Absorptance, Reflectance, and Transmittance of Materials Using Integrating Spheres). Thermal emittance was measured for the new samples using a portable emissometer (ASTM C1371, Standard Test Method for Determination of Emittance of Materials Near Room 1 Proceedings of the 2011 International Roofing Symposium Temperature Using Portable Emissometers). Thermal conductivity of the coatings was measured using a FOX 304 heat flow meter (ASTM C518, Standard Test Method for Steady-State Thermal Transmission Properties by Means of the Heat Flow Meter Apparatus). The surface properties of the cool roof coatings had higher solar reflectance than the reference black and white material, but there were no significant differences among coatings with and without ceramics. The coatings were applied to EPDM (ethylene propylene diene monomer) membranes and installed on the Roof Thermal Research Apparatus (RTRA), an instrumented facility at ORNL for testing roofs. Roof temperatures and heat flux through the roof were obtained for a year of exposure in east Tennessee. The field tests showed significant reduction in cooling required compared with the black reference roof (~80 percent) and a modest reduction in cooling compared with the white reference roof (~33 percent). The coating material with the highest solar reflectivity (no ceramic particles) demonstrated the best overall thermal performance (combination of reducing the cooling load cost and not incurring a large heating penalty cost) and suggests solar reflectivity is the significant characteristic for selecting cool roof coatings.

Brehob, Ellen G [ORNL] [ORNL; Desjarlais, Andre Omer [ORNL] [ORNL; Atchley, Jerald Allen [ORNL] [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Building America Case Study: Cost Analysis of Roof-Only Air Sealing and Insulation Strategies on 1-1/2 Story Homes in Cold Climates, Minneapolis, MN (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The External Thermal and Moisture Management System (ETMMS), typically seen in deep energy retrofits, is a valuable approach for the roof-only portions of existing homes, particularly the 1 1/2-story home. It is effective in reducing energy loss through the building envelope, improving building durability, reducing ice dams, and providing opportunities to improve occupant comfort and health.

Not Available

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Age characteristics in a multidecadal Arctic sea ice simulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Results from adding a tracer for age of sea ice to a sophisticated sea ice model that is widely used for climate studies are presented. The consistent simulation of ice age, dynamics, and thermodynamics in the model shows explicitly that the loss of Arctic perennial ice has accelerated in the past three decades, as has been seen in satellite-derived observations. Our model shows that the September ice age average across the Northern Hemisphere varies from about 5 to 8 years, and the ice is much younger (about 2--3 years) in late winter because of the expansion of first-year ice. We find seasonal ice on average comprises about 5% of the total ice area in September, but as much as 1.34 x 10{sup 6} km{sup 2} survives in some years. Our simulated ice age in the late 1980s and early 1990s declined markedly in agreement with other studies. After this period of decline, the ice age began to recover, but in the final years of the simulation very little young ice remains after the melt season, a strong indication that the age of the pack will again decline in the future as older ice classes fail to be replenished. The Arctic ice pack has fluctuated between older and younger ice types over the past 30 years, while ice area, thickness, and volume all declined over the same period, with an apparent acceleration in the last decade.

Hunke, Elizabeth C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bitz, Cecllia M [UNIV. OF WASHINGTON

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Flexible shaft and roof drilling system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system for drilling holes in the roof of a mine has a flexible shaft with a pair of oppositely wound, coaxial flat bands. One of the flat bands defines an inner spring that is wound right handed into a helical configuration, adjacent convolutions being in nesting relationship to one another. The other flat band defines an outer spring that is wound left handed into a helical configuration about the inner band, adjacent convolutions being nesting relationship with one another. A transition member that is configured to hold a rock bit is mounted to one end of the flexible shaft. When torque and thrust are applied to the flexible shaft by a driver, the inner spring expands outwardly and the outer spring contracts inwardly to form a relatively rigid shaft.

Blanz, John H. (Carlisle, MA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Hydrological and biogeochemical cycling along the Greenland ice sheet margin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Global warming has led to a significant increase in Greenland ice sheet (GrIS) melt and runoff since 1990, resulting in escalated export of fresh water and associated sediment to the surrounding North Atlantic and Arctic ...

Bhatia, Maya Pilar, 1979-

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, Contribution of Icelandic ice caps to sea level rise:1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, Contribution of Icelandic ice caps - 2 BJ¨ORNSSON ET AL.: MASS LOSS FROM ICELANDIC ICE CAPS In total, Icelandic ice caps contain 3,600 km3 of ice, which if melted would3 raise sea level by 1 cm. Here, we present an overview of mass

Berthier, Etienne

156

Arctic sea ice extent small as never before Alerting message from the Arctic: The extent the the Arctic sea ice has reached on Sep. 8  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Arctic sea ice extent small as never before Alerting message from the Arctic: The extent the the Arctic sea ice has reached on Sep. 8 with 4.240 million km2 a new historic minimum (Figure 1). Physicists of the University of Bremen now confirm the apprehension existing since July 2011 that the ice melt in the Arctic

Bremen, Universität

157

Evaporative Roof Cooling- A Simple Solution to Cut Cooling Costs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Since the “Energy Crisis” Evaporative Roof Cooling Systems have gained increased acceptance as a cost effective method to reduce the high cost of air conditioning. Documented case histories in retro-fit installations show direct energy savings...

Abernethy, D.

158

Plain Talk About Condensation and Radiation Below Metal Roof Assemblies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

During recent decades an increasing number of users have chosen metal roofing for various commercial, industrial and institutional buildings. Because of several advantages, construction of new pre-engineered and "hybrid" buildings has outpaced low...

Ward, L.

159

Evaporative Roof Cooling - A Simple Solution to Cut Cooling Costs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Since the "Energy Crisis" Evaporative Roof Cooling Systems have gained increased acceptance as a cost effective method to reduce the high cost of air conditioning. Documented case histories in retrofit installations show direct energy savings...

Abernethy, D.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Passive ice freezing-releasing heat pipe. [Patent application  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A heat pipe device has been developed which permits completely passive ice formation and periodic release of ice without requiring the ambient temperature to rise above the melting point of water. This passive design enables the maximum amount of cooling capacity to be stored in the tank.

Gorski, A.J.; Schertz, W.W.

1980-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "roof ice melt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Arctic catastrophes in an idealized sea ice model Ian Eisenman  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

thermodynamics, varying open water fraction, an energy balance atmosphere, and scalable CO2. We find that summer.e., reflectiveness) between sea ice and the open water that is exposed when it melts. Bare or snow-covered sea ice reflects most sunlight back to space, while the dark ocean surface absorbs most incident light. Global

Eisenman, Ian

162

Archimedean Ice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The striking boundary dependency (the Arctic Circle phenomenon) exhibited in the ice model on the square lattice extends to other planar set-ups. We present these findings for the triangular and the Kagome lattices. Critical connectivity results guarantee that ice configurations can be generated using the simplest and most efficient local actions. Height functions are utilized throughout the analysis. At the end there is a surprise in store: on the remaining Archimedean lattice for which the ice model can be defined, the 3.4.6.4. lattice, the long range behavior is completely different from the other cases.

Kari Eloranta

2009-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

163

The Atmospheric Response to Realistic Reduced Summer Arctic Sea Ice Anomalies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the continued ice melt [Polyakov et al., 2005], and recent work shows that heat from the Atlantic layer can91 The Atmospheric Response to Realistic Reduced Summer Arctic Sea Ice Anomalies Uma S. Bhatt,1 and Robert A. Tomas3 The impact of reduced Arctic summer sea ice on the atmosphere is investigated by forcing

Bhatt, Uma

164

Modelling West Antarctic ice sheet growth and collapse through the past five million years  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, isolated ice caps on West Antarctic islands. Transitions between glacial, intermediate and collapsed states temperature and specified sea level. A new parameterization of sub- ice-shelf ocean melt based on modernLETTERS Modelling West Antarctic ice sheet growth and collapse through the past five million years

165

Sensitivity of Vatnajokull ice cap hydrology and dynamics to climate warming over the next 2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and is the largest nonpolar ice cap in Europe. Because it is temperate (isothermal at the melting point) and storesSensitivity of Vatnajo¨kull ice cap hydrology and dynamics to climate warming over the next 2] The sensitivity of Vatnajo¨kull ice cap to future climate change is examined using spatially distributed coupled

Flowers, Gwenn

166

Ice cores from Svalbarduseful archives of past climate and pollution history  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ice cores from the relatively low-lying ice caps in Svalbard have not been widely exploitedIce cores from Svalbard­­useful archives of past climate and pollution history Elisabeth Isaksson a in climatic and environmental studies due to uncertainties about the effect of melt water percolation. However

Moore, John

167

Mid-Pliocene sea level and continental ice volume based on coupled benthic Mg/Ca  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by rising sea level caused by the melting of alpine glaciers and small ice caps and portionsMid-Pliocene sea level and continental ice volume based on coupled benthic Mg/Ca palaeotemperatures composition of seawater, and estimate continental ice volume and sea-level variability during the Mid

168

Viscous flow lobes in central Taylor Valley, Antarctica: Origin as remnant buried glacial ice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

its terminus, the ESL flows at a rate of 2.4 to 6.7 mm a-1 . The loose drift that caps the buried ice temperatures show that intermittent melting is most likely possible during summer months where buried ice is 35Viscous flow lobes in central Taylor Valley, Antarctica: Origin as remnant buried glacial ice Kate

Marchant, David R.

169

TERAGRID 2007 CONFERENCE, MADISON, WI 1 Cyberinfrastructure for Remote Sensing of Ice Sheets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TERAGRID 2007 CONFERENCE, MADISON, WI 1 Cyberinfrastructure for Remote Sensing of Ice Sheets Dr rise and melting ice sheets is the application domain of this project. It is an issue of global impor of computationally intensive tools and models that will help them measure and predict the response of ice sheets

170

Inclusion of cool roofs in nonresidential Title 24 prescriptive requirements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Roofs that have high solar reflectance (high ability to reflect sunlight) and high thermal emittance (high ability to radiate heat) tend to stay cool in the sun. The same is true of low-emittance roofs with exceptionally high solar reflectance. Substituting a cool roof for a noncool roof tends to decrease cooling electricity use, cooling power demand, and cooling-equipment capacity requirements, while slightly increasing heating energy consumption. Cool roofs can also lower the ambient air temperature in summer, slowing ozone formation and increasing human comfort. DOE-2.1E building energy simulations indicate that use of a cool roofing material on a prototypical California nonresidential building with a low-sloped roof yields average annual cooling energy savings of approximately 300 kWh/1000 ft2 [3.2 kWh/m2], average annual natural gas deficits of 4.9 therm/1000 ft2 [5.6 MJ/m2], average source energy savings of 2.6 MBTU/1000 ft2 [30 MJ/m2], and average peak power demand savings of 0. 19 kW/1000 ft2 [2.1 W/m2]. The 15-year net present value (NPV) of energy savings averages $450/1000 ft2 [$4.90/m2] with time dependent valuation (TDV), and $370/1000 ft2 [$4.00/m2] without TDV. When cost savings from downsizing cooling equipment are included, the average total savings (15-year NPV + equipment savings) rises to $550/1000 ft2 [$5.90/m2] with TDV, and to $470/1000 ft2 [$5.00/m2] without TDV. Total savings range from 0.18 to 0.77 $/ft2 [1.90 to 8.30 $/m2] with TDV, and from 0.16 to 0.66 $/ft2 [1.70 to 7.10 $/m2] without TDV, across California's 16 climate zones. The typical cost premium for a cool roof is 0.00 to 0.20 $/ft2 [0.00 to 2.20 $/m2]. Cool roofs with premiums up to $0.20/ft2 [$2.20/m2] are expected to be cost effective in climate zones 2 through 16; those with premiums not exceeding $0.18/ft2 [$1.90/m2] are expected to be also cost effective in climate zone 1. Hence, this study recommends that the year-2005 California building energy efficiency code (Title 24, Pa rt 6 of the California Code of Regulations) for nonresidential buildings with low-sloped roofs include a cool-roof prescriptive requirement in all California climate zones. Buildings with roofs that do not meet prescriptive requirements may comply with the code via an ''overall-envelope'' approach (non-metal roofs only), or via a performance approach (all roof types).

Levinson, Ronnen; Akbari, Hashem; Konopacki, Steve; Bretz, Sarah

2002-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

171

Comparison of Software Models for Energy Savings from Cool Roofs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A web-based Roof Savings Calculator (RSC) has been deployed for the United States Department of Energy as an industry-consensus tool to help building owners, manufacturers, distributors, contractors and researchers easily run complex roof and attic simulations. This tool employs modern web technologies, usability design, and national average defaults as an interface to annual simulations of hour-by-hour, whole-building performance using the world-class simulation tools DOE-2.1E and AtticSim in order to provide estimated annual energy and cost savings. In addition to cool reflective roofs, RSC simulates multiple roof and attic configurations including different roof slopes, above sheathing ventilation, radiant barriers, low-emittance roof surfaces, duct location, duct leakage rates, multiple substrate types, and insulation levels. A base case and energy-efficient alternative can be compared side-by-side to estimate monthly energy. RSC was benchmarked against field data from demonstration homes in Ft. Irwin, California; while cooling savings were similar, heating penalty varied significantly across different simulation engines. RSC results reduce cool roofing cost-effectiveness thus mitigating expected economic incentives for this countermeasure to the urban heat island effect. This paper consolidates comparison of RSC s projected energy savings to other simulation engines including DOE-2.1E, AtticSim, Micropas, and EnergyPlus, and presents preliminary analyses. RSC s algorithms for capturing radiant heat transfer and duct interaction in the attic assembly are considered major contributing factors to increased cooling savings and heating penalties. Comparison to previous simulation-based studies, analysis on the force multiplier of RSC cooling savings and heating penalties, the role of radiative heat exchange in an attic assembly, and changes made for increased accuracy of the duct model are included.

New, Joshua Ryan [ORNL; Miller, William A [ORNL; Huang, Yu (Joe) [White Box Technologies; Levinson, Ronnen [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Empirically Derived Strength of Residential Roof Structures for Solar Installations.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Engineering certification for the installation of solar photovoltaic (PV) modules on wood roofs is often denied because existing wood roofs do not meet structural design codes. This work is intended to show that many roofs are actually sufficiently strong given the conservatism in codes, documented allowable strengths, roof structure system effects, and beam composite action produced by joist-sheathing interaction. This report provides results from a testing program to provide actual load carrying capacity of residential rooftops. The results reveal that the actual load carrying capacity of structural members and systems tested are significantly stronger than allowable loads provided by the International Residential Code (IRC 2009) and the national structural code found in Minimum Design Loads for Buildings and Other Structures (ASCE 7-10). Engineering analysis of residential rooftops typically ignores the system affects and beam composite action in determining rooftop stresses given a potential PV installation. This extreme conservatism combined with conservatism in codes and published allowable stress values for roof building materials (NDS 2012) lead to the perception that well built homes may not have adequate load bearing capacity to enable a rooftop PV installation. However, based on the test results presented in this report of residential rooftop structural systems, the actual load bearing capacity is several times higher than published values (NDS 2012).

Dwyer, Stephen F.; Sanchez, Alfred; Campos, Ivan A.; Gerstle, Walter H.

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

The satellite gravimetry measurements from GRACE enable analysis of mass changes on Earth, including recent mass loss from ice sheets and glaciers. However, GRACE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

several large ice caps exist, and a southern part (SCAA), with two large ice caps, many smaller glaciers is positive on the high areas of the ice caps, and negative along most glacier edges. SMB on the tundra in winter that melts again each summer. ICE LOSS Tip: check the video! FINAL NOTES 1. Only now we are able

Utrecht, Universiteit

174

Solare Cell Roof Tile And Method Of Forming Same  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A solar cell roof tile includes a front support layer, a transparent encapsulant layer, a plurality of interconnected solar cells and a backskin layer. The front support layer is formed of light transmitting material and has first and second surfaces. The transparent encapsulant layer is disposed adjacent the second surface of the front support layer. The interconnected solar cells has a first surface disposed adjacent the transparent encapsulant layer. The backskin layer has a first surface disposed adjacent a second surface of the interconnected solar cells, wherein a portion of the backskin layer wraps around and contacts the first surface of the front support layer to form the border region. A portion of the border region has an extended width. The solar cell roof tile may have stand-offs disposed on the extended width border region for providing vertical spacing with respect to an adjacent solar cell roof tile.

Hanoka, Jack I. (Brookline, MA); Real, Markus (Oberberg, CH)

1999-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

175

Melt containment member  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A tubular melt containment member for transient containment of molten metals and alloys, especially reactive metals and alloys, includes a melt-contacting layer or region that comprises an oxygen-deficient rare earth oxide material that is less reactive as compared to the counterpart stoichiometric rare earth oxide. The oxygen-deficient (sub-stoichiometric) rare earth oxide can comprise oxygen-deficient yttria represented by Y.sub.2O.sub.3-x wherein x is from 0.01 to 0.1. Use of the oxygen-deficient rare earth oxide as the melt-contacting layer or region material reduces reaction with the melt for a given melt temperature and melt contact time.

Rieken, Joel R.; Heidloff, Andrew J.

2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

176

Asphalt roofing industry Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy modified bitumen  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Request for Emissions Testing at Four Asphalt Roofing and Processing Facilities was submitted by the US EPA Emission Standards Division (ESD), Minerals and Inorganic Chemicals Group (MICG) to the Emission Measurement Center (EMC). The Emission Measurement Center directed Midwest Research Institute (MRI) to conduct emissions testing at asphalt roofing plants. This report presents results of MRI`s FTIR and Method 25A testing conducted at US Intec in Port Arthur, Texas. The field measurements were performed in September 1997 under several test conditions for both controlled and uncontrolled emissions.

NONE

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Iced Coffee Iced Yerba Mate "Tea"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Iced Coffee Iced Yerba Mate "Tea" Iced Yerba Mate Latte Iced Chai Tea Latte Original, Green Tea Canned Soda Xing Tea Bottled Water Arizona Teas Energy Drinks Red Bull, SF Red Bull & Bing Jones Sodas $0 Cafe au Lait Hot Tea Yerba Mate "Tea" Yerba Mate Latte Chai Tea Latte - Original, Green Tea, or Sugar

178

Vegetated Roof Water-Balance Model: Experimental and Model Results  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

urbanization effects on the water cycle. Although there are many stormwater best management practices (BMPs (ET) and soil media water storage between storm events. Lazzarin et al. (2005) estimated that ET ratesVegetated Roof Water-Balance Model: Experimental and Model Results James A. Sherrard Jr.1

179

Preliminary Analysis of Energy Consumption For Cool Roofing Measures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

decisions by offering design requirements and establishing building codes. Over the last decade, muchPreliminary Analysis of Energy Consumption For Cool Roofing Measures By Joe Mellott, Joshua New to reduce energy demand by reflecting sunlight away from structures and back into the atmosphere. By use

Wang, Xiaorui "Ray"

180

The area and volume of sea ice in the Arc-tic Ocean is decreasing, with some predict-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, while loss of sea ice could cause stress for polar bears. Moreover, global climate may be affected ice forms in winter,which melts and/or gets exported out of the Arctic. The recent decrease in summer of this community is evi- dence that the sea ice cap has not disap- peared during the Quaternary. The remains

Long, Bernard

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "roof ice melt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Modelling the impact of superimposed ice on the mass balance of an Arctic glacier under scenarios of future climate change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

). A consequence of climatic warming in the high Arctic will be an increase in surface melting of glaciers and ice component of the mass accumulation of many glaciers and ice caps in thModelling the impact of superimposed ice on the mass balance of an Arctic glacier under scenarios

182

Temperature profile for glacial ice at the South Pole: Implications for life in a nearby subglacial lake  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-induced melting temperature of freshwater ice. To produce the strong radar signal, the frozen lake must consistTemperature profile for glacial ice at the South Pole: Implications for life in a nearby subglacial by P. Buford Price, April 22, 2002 Airborne radar has detected 100 lakes under the Antarctic ice cap

Price, P. Buford

183

Green Roof Media Selection forGreen Roof Media Selection for the Minimization of Pollutantthe Minimization of Pollutant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Decreased roofing costs Increased insulation and energy efficiencyIncreased insulation and energy efficiency ­­ U for retrofits Tested membranes highly recommendedTested membranes highly recommended ­­ Plastic root barrier above membrane?Plastic root barrier above membrane? ­­ Flood testing and leak detection units

Clark, Shirley E.

184

Load test of the 277W Building high bay roof deck and support structure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 277W Building high bay roof area was load tested according to the approved load-test procedure, WHC-SD-GN-TP-30015, Revision 1. The 277W Building is located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site and has the following characteristics: roof deck -- wood decking supported by 4 x 14 timber purlins; roof membrane -- tar and gravel; roof slope -- flat (<10 deg); and roof elevation -- maximum height of about 63 ft. The 227W Building was visited in March 1994 for a visual inspection. During this inspection, cracked areas were visible in the decking, but it was not possible to determine whether these cracks extended completely through the decking, which is 2-in. thick. The building was revisited in March 1994 for the purpose of writing this test report. Because the roof requires personnel access, a test was determined to be the best way to qualify the roof. The conclusions are that the roof has been qualified for 500-lb total roof load and that the ``No Roof Access`` signs can be changed to ``Roof Access Restricted`` signs.

McCoy, R.M.

1994-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

185

Cryoconite Hole Ecosystems in Antarctic Glacier Ice Brent C. Christner, Montana State University, Department of Land  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by solar irradiation, melting a portion of the overlying ice. The austral summer is also a time when new) represent the top of the food chain. Although it is still uncertain if #12;these metazoans are active

Christner, Brent C.

186

Decadal to seasonal variability of Arctic sea ice albedo  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A controlling factor in the seasonal and climatological evolution of the sea ice cover is its albedo $\\alpha$. Here we analyze Arctic data from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) Polar Pathfinder and assess the seasonality and variability of broadband albedo from a 23 year daily record. We produce a histogram of daily albedo over ice covered regions in which the principal albedo transitions are seen; high albedo in late winter and spring, the onset of snow melt and melt pond formation in the summer, and fall freeze up. The bimodal late summer distribution demonstrates the combination of the poleward progression of the onset of melt with the coexistence of perennial bare ice with melt ponds and open water, which then merge to a broad peak at $\\alpha \\gtrsim $ 0.5. We find the interannual variability to be dominated by the low end of the $\\alpha$ distribution, highlighting the controlling influence of the ice thickness distribution and large-scale ice edge dynamics. The statistics obtained pro...

Agarwal, S; Wettlaufer, J S

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Effect of Surface Mass on Roof Thermal Performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EFFECT OF SURFACE MASS ON ROOF THERMAL PERFORMANCE KENNETH E. WILKES, PAUL H. SHIPP, AND JOHN P. SANDERS Staff Members Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee ABSTRACT The roof of a building is exposed to the most severe... 10 a0 so 4a 30 0 I1 Y J4 49 I0 12 M 88 101 110 IS1 144 158 Ilpra I. Cq.ria*n of I(ururm4 ad ?rdIoud mrm. T-raru... .I!A Y.&t Pluu. for am lara luf krh Wan hmr ?*rid T-rmauma 01- tor rr.41otlnu HEAVY PAVER, MAY 1 - MAY 7, 1986 -MI CHLn J I I...

Wilkes, K. E.; Shipp, P. H.; Sanders, J. P.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Thermal Performance Evaluation of Innovative Metal Building Roof Assemblies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In order to meet the coming energy codes, multiple layers of various insulation types will be required. The demand for greater efficiency has pushed insulation levels beyond the cavity depth. These experiments show the potential for improving metal building roof thermal performance. Additional work is currently being done by several stakeholders, so the data is expanding. These experiments are for research and development purposes, and may not be viable for immediate use.

Walker, Daniel James [ORNL; Zaltash, Abdolreza [ORNL; Atchley, Jerald Allen [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Roofing as a Contributor to Urban Runoff Pollution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at: http://www.eng.ua.edu/~rpitt Map courtesy of U.S. Geological Website on Acid Rain #12;2 Roof · Summer 2002: Laboratory TCLP (acid rain simulation) · Fall/Winter 2002 and Spring 2003: Laboratory Testing Set-Up at Penn State Harrisburg During Rain Event, August 2005 pH Rainfall pH Range: 3.9 ­ 6

Clark, Shirley E.

190

A Study of the Energy-Saving Potential of Metal Roofs Incorporating Dynamic Insulation Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article presents various metal roof configurations that were tested at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Tennessee, U.S. between 2009 and 2013, and describes their potential for reducing the attic-generated space-conditioning loads. These roofs contained different combinations of phase-change material, rigid insulation, low emittance surface, and above-sheathing ventilation with standing-seam metal panels on top. These roofs were designed to be installed on existing roofs decks, or on top of asphalt shingles for retrofit construction. All the tested roofs showed the potential for substantial energy savings compared to an asphalt shingle roof, which was used as a control for comparison. The roofs were constructed on a series of adjacent attics separated at the gables using thick foam insulation. The attics were built on top of a conditioned room. All attics were vented at the soffit and ridge. The test roofs and attics were instrumented with an array of thermocouples. Heat flux transducers were installed in the roof deck and attic floor (ceiling) to measure the heat flows through the roof and between the attic and conditioned space below. Temperature and heat flux data were collected during the heating, cooling and swing seasons over a three-year period. Data from previous years of testing have been published. Here, data from the latest roof configurations being tested in year three of the project are presented. All test roofs were highly effective in reducing the heat flows through the roof and ceiling, and in reducing the diurnal attic-temperature fluctuations.

Biswas, Kaushik [ORNL; Miller, William A [ORNL; Kriner, Scott [Metal Construction Association, Glenview, IL; Manlove, Gary [Metanna, Monument, CO

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Thermal resistance of prototypical cellular plastic roof insulations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A cooperative industry/government project was initiated in 1989 to evaluate the viability of alternative hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) as blowing agents in polyisocyanurate (PIR) boardstock for roofing applications. Five sets of PIR boardstock were produced to industry specifications for current roof insulation technology. The boardstock allowed the performance of four alternative blowing agents (HCFC-123, HCFC-14lb, and two blends of HCFC-123 and HCFC-14lb) to compared to CFC-11. Laboratory and field tests show the relative thermal performance of the individual PIR boards. One set of laboratory tests show the thermal conductivity (k) from 0 to 50{degree}C (30 to 120{degree}F) of boards prior to installation and as a function of time after exposure to field conditions in the Roof Thermal Research Apparatus (0, 9, and 15 months). Another set of laboratory tests show k as a function of aging time 24{degree}C (75{degree}F) and 65{degree}C (150{degree}F) for full-thickness, half-thickness, and quarter-thickness specimens. These test results and modeling calculations show the value of thin specimen testing as an accelerated aging procedure. 24 refs., 5 figs., 7 tabs.

McElroy, D.L.; Graves, R.S.; Weaver, F.J.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Interannual variability of Arctic sea ice export into the East Greenland Current  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Interannual variability of Arctic sea ice export into the East Greenland Current K. A. Cox,1 J. D cycle, Arctic sea ice decline, and increasing Greenland glacial melt. Here we use new d18 O data from the East Greenland Current system at Cape Farewell and Denmark Strait to determine the relative proportions

Rohling, Eelco

193

Home Atmosphere Sea Ice Ocean Land Greenland Biology , L.-S. Bai  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Home Atmosphere Sea Ice Ocean Land Greenland Biology Greenland J. E. Box 1 , L.-S. Bai 1 , R across the southern half of Greenland led to substantially higher west coast sea ice thickness and concentration. Even so, record-setting summer temperatures around Greenland, combined with an intense melt

Box, Jason E.

194

Remote sensing of Greenland ice sheet using multispectral near-infrared and visible radiances  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Remote sensing of Greenland ice sheet using multispectral near-infrared and visible radiances Petr microwave methods. The method should be useful for long-term monitoring of the melt area of the Greenland of MODIS retrievals of the western portion of the Greenland ice sheet over the period 2000 to 2006

Dozier, Jeff

195

Palaeoproterozoic ice houses and the evolution of oxygen-mediating enzymes: the case for a late  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Palaeoproterozoic ice houses and the evolution of oxygen-mediating enzymes: the case for a late evolved. One solution to the first problem is the accumulation of photochemically produced H2O2 at the surface of the glaciers and its subsequent incorporation into ice. Melting at the glacier base would

196

Temperature profile for glacial ice at the South Pole: Implications for life nearby subglacial lake  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Temperature profile for glacial ice at the South Pole: Implications for life nearby subglacial lake deep of South of #9°C, which is 7°C below pressure­induced melting temperature freshwater produce contamination Lake Vostok. semiempirical expression strain vs. stress, estimate shear depth show Ice

Woschnagg, Kurt

197

Information fusion for estimation of summer MIZ ice concentration from SAR imagery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we define the concept of information fusion and show how we used it to estimate summer sea ice concentration in the marginal ice zone (MIZ) from single-channel SAR satellite imagery, We used data about melt stage, wind speed...

Haverkamp, Donna S.; Tsatsoulis, Costas

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Sensitivity of Low Sloped Roofs Designs to Initial Water and Air Leakage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.Sc. Research Scientist VTT, Espoo, Finland Andre Desjarlais. B.Sc.E Program Manager, Oak Ridge National Laboratory 1 Bethel Valley Rd, Oak Ridge TN, 37831-6070 ABSTRACT Liquid water in low sloped roofs almost always causes problems... roofs in Finland (area varying from 200 m2 up to 5 000 m2). A laboratory hot box apparatus (Kouhia and Nieminen, 1999) was also used to further quantify the performance of the grooved roof ventilation system and to show the thermal consequences...

Karagiozis, A.; Desjarlais, A.; Salonvaara, M.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Monitoring the Energy-Use Effects of Cool Roofs on California Commercial Buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solar-reflective roofs stay cooler in the sun than solar-absorptive roofs. Such ''cool'' roofs achieve lower surface temperatures that reduce heat conduction into the building and the building's cooling load. The California Energy Commission has funded research in which Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) has measured the electricity use and peak demand in commercial buildings to document savings from implementing the Commission's Cool Roofs program. The study seeks to determine the savings achieved by cool roofs by monitoring the energy use of a carefully selected assortment of buildings participating in the Cool Roofs program. Measurements were needed because the peak savings resulting from the application of cool roofs on different types of buildings in the diverse California climate zones have not been well characterized to date. Only a few occupancy categories (e.g., office and retail buildings) have been monitored before this, and those were done under a limited number of climatic conditions. To help rectify this situation, LBNL was tasked to select the buildings to be monitored, measure roof performance before and after replacing a hot roof by a cool roof, and document both energy and peak demand savings resulting from installation of cool roofs. We monitored the effects of cool roofs on energy use and environmental parameters in six California buildings at three different sites: a retail store in Sacramento; an elementary school in San Marcos (near San Diego); and a 4-building cold storage facility in Reedley (near Fresno). The latter included a cold storage building, a conditioning and fruit-palletizing area, a conditioned packing area, and two unconditioned packing areas (counted as one building).

Akbari, Hashem; Levinson, Ronnen; Konopaki, Steve; Rainer, Leo

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Comparison of the Perception of Facility Managers on Green Roofs Attributes and Barriers to their Implementation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on Green Roofs Wong et, al (2005) conducted a study on perception of building professionals on the issues of green roofs. The objective of the study was to determine the current perception of building professionals on the issues of green roof... development and any conflicting opinions among them. Wong et, al (2005) used two components for the field study, a self-administered postal survey questionnaire and interviews. The survey was conducted among three target populations, architectural firms...

Ferrer Garcia, Eduardo R

2014-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "roof ice melt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Greenland ice sheet surface mass-balance variability: 19912003 Byrd Polar Research Center, The Ohio State University, 1090 Carmack Road, Columbus, OH 43210-1002, USA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Greenland ice sheet surface mass-balance variability: 1991­2003 J.E. BOX Byrd Polar Research Center. There is little evidence for a total ice-sheet surface mass-balance trend, although the meltwater runoff has a positive trend and, combined with iceberg discharge and basal melting estimates, suggests the ice sheet

Box, Jason E.

202

ARM - What About Melting Polar Ice Caps and Sea Levels?  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUCProductstwrmr

203

Complex systems influence melting of Greenland ice sheet  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New SubstationCleanCommunity Involvement andMISR, and4 NComplex

204

Cooling energy savings potential of light-colored roofs for residential and commercial buildings in 11 US metropolitan areas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Light-colored roofs reflect more sunlight than dark roofs, thus they keep buildings cooler and reduce air-conditioning demand. Typical roofs in the United States are dark, which creates a potential for savings energy and money by changing to reflective roofs. In this report, the authors make quantitative estimates of the impact of roof color by simulating prototypical buildings with light- and dark-colored roofs and calculating savings by taking the differences in annual cooling and heating energy use, and peak electricity demand. Monetary savings are calculated using local utility rates. Savings are estimated for 11 U.S. Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSAs) in a variety of climates.

Konopacki, S.; Akbari, H.; Pomerantz, M.; Gabersek, S.; Gartland, L.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Asphalt Roofing Shingles Into Energy Project Summary Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Based on a widely cited September, 1999 report by the Vermont Agency of Natural Resources, nearly 11 million tons of asphalt roofing shingle wastes are produced in the United States each year. Recent data suggests that the total is made up of about 9.4 million tons from roofing tear-offs and about 1.6 million tons from manufacturing scrap. Developing beneficial uses for these materials would conserve natural resources, promote protection of the environment and strengthen the economy. This project explored the feasibility of using chipped asphalt shingle materials in cement manufacturing kilns and circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boilers. A method of enhancing the value of chipped shingle materials for use as fuel by removing certain fractions for use as substitute raw materials for the manufacture of new shingles was also explored. Procedures were developed to prevent asbestos containing materials from being processed at the chipping facilities, and the frequency of the occurrence of asbestos in residential roofing tear-off materials was evaluated. The economic feasibility of each potential use was evaluated based on experience gained during the project and on a review of the well established use of shingle materials in hot mix asphalt. This project demonstrated that chipped asphalt shingle materials can be suitable for use as fuel in circulating fluidized boilers and cement kilns. More experience would be necessary to determine the full benefits that could be derived and to discover long term effects, but no technical barriers to full scale commercial use of chipped asphalt shingle materials in these applications were discovered. While the technical feasibility of various options was demonstrated, only the use of asphalt shingle materials in hot mix asphalt applications is currently viable economically.

Jameson, Rex, PE

2008-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

206

Arctic ice islands  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development of offshore oil and gas resources in the Arctic waters of Alaska requires offshore structures which successfully resist the lateral forces due to moving, drifting ice. Ice islands are floating, a tabular icebergs, up to 60 meters thick, of solid ice throughout their thickness. The ice islands are thus regarded as the strongest ice features in the Arctic; fixed offshore structures which can directly withstand the impact of ice islands are possible but in some locations may be so expensive as to make oilfield development uneconomic. The resolution of the ice island problem requires two research steps: (1) calculation of the probability of interaction between an ice island and an offshore structure in a given region; and (2) if the probability if sufficiently large, then the study of possible interactions between ice island and structure, to discover mitigative measures to deal with the moving ice island. The ice island research conducted during the 1983-1988 interval, which is summarized in this report, was concerned with the first step. Monte Carlo simulations of ice island generation and movement suggest that ice island lifetimes range from 0 to 70 years, and that 85% of the lifetimes are less then 35 years. The simulation shows a mean value of 18 ice islands present at any time in the Arctic Ocean, with a 90% probability of less than 30 ice islands. At this time, approximately 34 ice islands are known, from observations, to exist in the Arctic Ocean, not including the 10-meter thick class of ice islands. Return interval plots from the simulation show that coastal zones of the Beaufort and Chukchi Seas, already leased for oil development, have ice island recurrences of 10 to 100 years. This implies that the ice island hazard must be considered thoroughly, and appropriate safety measures adopted, when offshore oil production plans are formulated for the Alaskan Arctic offshore. 132 refs., 161 figs., 17 tabs.

Sackinger, W.M.; Jeffries, M.O.; Lu, M.C.; Li, F.C.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Fluid Migration During Ice/Rock Planetesimal Differentiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/water reaction, which will depend on the rate at which water can be segregated from a melting ice/rock core. For the liquid water phase to migrate toward the surface, the denser rock phase must compact. The primary question that this thesis will answer is how...

Raney, Robert 1987-

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

208

Attic or Roof? An Evaluation of Two Advanced Weatherization Packages  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project examines implementation of advanced retrofit measures in the context of a large-scale weatherization program and the archetypal Chicago brick bungalow. One strategy applies best practice air sealing methods and a standard insulation method to the attic floor. The other strategy creates an unvented roof assembly using materials and methods typically available to weatherization contractors. Through implementations of the retrofit strategies in a total of eight (8) test homes, the research found that the two different strategies achieve similar reductions in air leakage measurement (55%) and predicted energy performance (18%) relative to the pre-retrofit conditions.

Neuhauser, K.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Evaluation of a Direct Evaporative Roof-Spray Cooling System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

involved several steps. PVC tubing, with special spray orifices, was mounted on wooden blodts. Solenoid valves were connected to the PVC tubing and then to the controller which activated them. The controller was also connected to a 95 degree F thermo.... The remainder of the thermocouples were used with thermal flux meters to measure the heat flux through the roof. Four thermal flux meters were built by placing a piece of plexiglass (k = 0.1125 Btulh ft F) with a thermo-. couple on each side between two...

Carrasco, A.; Pittard, R.; Kondepudi, S. N.; Somasundaram, S.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Urban Heat Islands: Cool Roof Infrastructure | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up from theDepartment of Dept. ofUSA RSDepartment of Energy Updated31,Cool Roof

211

Ice friction: The effects of surface roughness, structure, and hydrophobicity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of surface roughness, structure, and hydrophobicity on ice friction is studied systematically over a wide range of temperature and sliding speeds using several metallic interfaces. Hydrophobicity in combination with controlled roughness at the nanoscale is achieved by femtosecond laser irradiation to mimic the lotus effect on the slider's surface. The controlled roughness significantly increases the coefficient of friction at low sliding speeds and temperatures well below the ice melting point. However, at temperatures close to the melting point and relatively higher speeds, roughness and hydrophobicity significantly decrease ice friction. This decrease in friction is mainly due to the suppression of capillary bridges in spite of the presence of surface asperities that facilitate their formation. Finally, grooves oriented in the sliding direction also significantly decrease friction in the low velocity range compared to scratches and grooves randomly distributed over a surface.

Kietzig, Anne-Marie; Hatzikiriakos, Savvas G.; Englezos, Peter [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1Z3 (Canada)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

212

CAVERN ROOF STABILITY FOR NATURAL GAS STORAGE IN BEDDED SALT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents research performed to develop a new stress-based criterion for predicting the onset of damage in salt formations surrounding natural gas storage caverns. Laboratory tests were conducted to investigate the effects of shear stress, mean stress, pore pressure, temperature, and Lode angle on the strength and creep characteristics of salt. The laboratory test data were used in the development of the new criterion. The laboratory results indicate that the strength of salt strongly depends on the mean stress and Lode angle. The strength of the salt does not appear to be sensitive to temperature. Pore pressure effects were not readily apparent until a significant level of damage was induced and the permeability was increased to allow penetration of the liquid permeant. Utilizing the new criterion, numerical simulations were used to estimate the minimum allowable gas pressure for hypothetical storage caverns located in a bedded salt formation. The simulations performed illustrate the influence that cavern roof span, depth, roof salt thickness, shale thickness, and shale stiffness have on the allowable operating pressure range. Interestingly, comparison of predictions using the new criterion with that of a commonly used criterion indicate that lower minimum gas pressures may be allowed for caverns at shallow depths. However, as cavern depth is increased, less conservative estimates for minimum gas pressure were determined by the new criterion.

Kerry L. DeVries; Kirby D. Mellegard; Gary D. Callahan; William M. Goodman

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Digging the New York City Skyline: Soil Fungal Communities in Green Roofs and City Parks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

microbes across the greater New York City area is locally variable. Green roof fungal communities wereDigging the New York City Skyline: Soil Fungal Communities in Green Roofs and City Parks Krista L a number of benefits, including decreased urban heat island effects and reduced energy costs for buildings

Fierer, Noah

214

Studies of Photovoltaic Roofing Systems at Wind Engineering and Fluids Laboratory at Colorado State University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Studies of Photovoltaic Roofing Systems at Wind Engineering and Fluids Laboratory at Colorado State for Testing of Models of Photovoltaic Roofing Systems, at Wind Engineering and Fluids Laboratory, Colorado issues considered in this process. Over several decades, researchers affiliated with Wind Engineering

215

GREEN ROOFS -A BMP FOR URBAN STORMWATER QUALITY? Brett V. Long1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GREEN ROOFS - A BMP FOR URBAN STORMWATER QUALITY? Brett V. Long1 , A.M.ASCE, Shirley E. Clark2 , M: khb4@psu.edu ABSTRACT The focus of this research is the impact of green roofs on urban stormwater a mix that produced the "best" overall reduction in pollutants from simulated rainwater. Because

Clark, Shirley E.

216

A guidebook for insulated low-slope roof systems. IEA Annex 19, Low-slope roof systems: International Energy Agency Energy Conservation in Buildings and Community Systems Programme  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Low-slope roof systems are common on commercial and industrial buildings and, to a lesser extent, on residential buildings. Although insulating materials have nearly always been a component of low-slope roofs, the amount of insulation used has increased in the past two decades because of escalation of heating and cooling costs and increased awareness of the need for energy conservation. As the amount of insulation has increased, the demand has intensified for design, installation, and maintenance information specifically for well-insulated roofs. Existing practices for design, installation, and maintenance of insulated roofs have evolved from experience. Typically, these practices feature compromises due to the different properties of materials making up a given roof system. Therefore, they should be examined from time to time to ensure that they are appropriate as new materials continue to enter the market and as the data base on existing systems expands. A primary purpose of this International Energy Agency (IEA) study is to assess current roofing insulation practices in the context of an accumulating data base on performance.

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Assessment of technologies for constructing self-drying low-slope roofs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Issues associated with removing excessive moisture from low-slope roofs have been assessed. The economic costs associated with moisture trapped in existing roofs have been estimated. The evidence suggests that existing moisture levels cause approximately a 40% overall reduction in the R-value of installed roofing insulation in the United States. Excess operating costs are further increased by a summertime heat transfer mode unique to wet insulation, caused by the daily migration of water within the roof. By itself, this effect can increase peak electrical demand for air conditioning by roughly 15 W/m{sup 2} of roofing, depending on the type of insulation. This effect will increase peak demand capacity required of utilities in any geographic region (e.g., 900 MW in the South). A simple formula has been derived for predicting the effect that self-drying roofs can have upon time-averaged construction costs. It is presumed that time-averaged costs depend predominantly upon (1) actual service life and (2) the likelihood that the less expensive recover membranes can be installed safely over old roofs. For example, an increase in service life from 15 to 20 years should reduce the current cost of roofing ($12 billion/year) by 21%. Another simple formula for predicting the reroofing waste volume indicates that an increase in service life from 15 to 20 years might reduce the current estimated 0.4 billion ft{sup 3}/year of waste by 25%. A finite-difference computer program has been used to study the flow of heat and moisture within typical existing roofs for a variety of US climates. Nearly all publicly available experimental drying data have been consulted. The drying times for most existing low-slope roofs in the United States are controlled largely climate and the permeability of the structural deck to water vapor.

Kyle, D.M.; Desjarlais, A.O.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Quantifying air pollution removal by green roofs in Chicago Jun Yang a,c,*, Qian Yu b  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quantifying air pollution removal by green roofs in Chicago Jun Yang a,c,*, Qian Yu b , Peng Gong c t The level of air pollution removal by green roofs in Chicago was quantified using a dry deposition model. The result showed that a total of 1675 kg of air pollutants was removed by 19.8 ha of green roofs in one year

Yu, Qian

219

Theory of ice-skating  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Almost frictionless skating on ice relies on a thin layer of melted water insulating mechanically the blade of the skate from ice. Using the basic equations of fluid mechanics and Stefan law, we derive a set of two coupled equations for the thickness of the film and the length of contact, a length scale which cannot be taken as its value at rest. The analytical study of these equations allows to define a small a-dimensional parameter depending on the longitudinal coordinate which can be neglected everywhere except close to the contact points at the front and the end of the blade, where a boundary layer solution is given. This solution provides without any calculation the order of magnitude of the film thickness, and its dependence with respect to external parameters like the velocity and mass of the skater and the radius of profile and bite angle of the blade, in good agreement with the numerical study. Moreover this solution also shows that a lubricating water layer of macroscopic thickness always exists for...

Berre, Martine Le

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Formation of lobate debris aprons on Mars: Assessment of regional ice sheet collapse and debris-cover armoring  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

not have attained temperatures near or above the ice melting point and retained their current shape, a findFormation of lobate debris aprons on Mars: Assessment of regional ice sheet collapse and debris Keywords: Mars, climate Mars, surface Mars, polar geology Mars, polar caps a b s t r a c t Lobate debris

Marchant, David R.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "roof ice melt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

nature photonics | VOL 1 | OCTOBER 2007 | www.nature.com/naturephotonics 551 elting polar ice caps or the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

polar ice caps or the fantasy of freezing oceans in cataclysmic Hollywood films are graphic arranged, undergoes a phase change to the regular crystalline atomic construction of ice on freezing, and back on melting. This is a phase change between disordered and ordered states. So what use

Zheludev, Nikolay

222

Using ice cores from the East Antarctic Ice Sheet, scientists have been able to study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using ice cores from the East Antarctic Ice Sheet, scientists have been able to study ice's ice sheets. Ice sheets are huge areas of permanent ice. There are only three ice sheets on Earth: the Greenland Ice Sheet, the West Antarctic Ice Sheet, and the East Antarctic Ice Sheet. The Greenland Ice Sheet

223

Arctic sea ice modeling with the material-point method.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Arctic sea ice plays an important role in global climate by reflecting solar radiation and insulating the ocean from the atmosphere. Due to feedback effects, the Arctic sea ice cover is changing rapidly. To accurately model this change, high-resolution calculations must incorporate: (1) annual cycle of growth and melt due to radiative forcing; (2) mechanical deformation due to surface winds, ocean currents and Coriolis forces; and (3) localized effects of leads and ridges. We have demonstrated a new mathematical algorithm for solving the sea ice governing equations using the material-point method with an elastic-decohesive constitutive model. An initial comparison with the LANL CICE code indicates that the ice edge is sharper using Materials-Point Method (MPM), but that many of the overall features are similar.

Peterson, Kara J.; Bochev, Pavel Blagoveston

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Application of Spray Foam Insulation Under Plywood and Oriented Strand Board Roof Sheathing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Unvented roof strategies with open cell and closed cell spray polyurethane foam insulation sprayed to the underside of roof sheathing have been used since the mid-1990's to provide durable and efficient building enclosures. However, there have been isolated moisture related incidents reported anecdotally that raise potential concerns about the overall hygrothermal performance of these systems. The incidents related to rainwater leakage and condensation concerns. Condensation concerns have been extensively studied by others and are not further discussed in this report. This project involved hygrothermal modeling of a range of rainwater leakage and field evaluations of in-service residential roofs using spray foam insulation. All of the roof assemblies modeled exhibited drying capacity to handle minor rainwater leakage. All field evaluation locations of in-service residential roofs had moisture contents well within the safe range for wood-based sheathing. Explorations of eleven in-service roof systems were completed. The exploration involved taking a sample of spray foam from the underside of the roof sheathing, exposing the sheathing, then taking a moisture content reading. All locations had moisture contents well within the safe range for wood-based sheathing. One full-roof failure was reviewed, as an industry partner was involved with replacing structurally failed roof sheathing. In this case the manufacturer's investigation report concluded that the spray foam was installed on wet OSB based on the observation that the spray foam did not adhere well to the substrate and the pore structure of the closed cell spray foam at the ccSPF/OSB interface was indicative of a wet substrate.

Grin, A.; Smegal, J.; Lstiburek, J.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Neglecting ice-atmosphere interactions underestimates ice sheet melt in millennial-scale deglaciation simulations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pergamon Press, New York. Peltier, W. R. (1985), The LAGEOSWu, P. , and W. R. Peltier (1982), Viscous gravitationalmodel based on Wu and Peltier [1982] and Peltier [1985]. A

Pritchard, M. S.; Bush, A. B.; Marshall, S. J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Direct Measurement of Competing Quantum Effects on the Kinetic Energy of Heavy Water upon Melting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Even at room temperature, quantum mechanics plays a major role in determining the quantitative behaviour of light nuclei, changing significantly the values of physical properties such as the heat capacity. However, other observables appear to be only weakly affected by nuclear quantum effects (NQEs): for instance, the melting temperatures of light and heavy water differ by less than 4 K. Recent theoretical work has attributed this to a competition between intra and inter molecular NQEs, which can be separated by computing the anisotropy of the quantum kinetic energy tensor. The principal values of this tensor change in opposite directions when ice melts, leading to a very small net quantum mechanical effect on the melting point. This paper presents the first direct experimental observation of this phenomenon, achieved by measuring the deuterium momentum distributions n(p) in heavy water and ice using Deep Inelastic Neutron Scattering (DINS), and resolving their anisotropy. Results from the experiments, supple...

Romanelli, Giovanni; Manolopoulos, David E; Pantalei, Claudia; Senesi, Roberto; Andreani, Carla

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Uncertainty analysis and validation of the estimation of effective hydraulic properties: application to green roof  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the hydraulic properties of each component of the GRS, namely bark compost and pozzolan, were ob- tained comparisons with conventional roofs. For that purpose13 they developped an energy balance model adapated to GR

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

228

INSTALLATION CERTIFICATE CF-6R-ENV-01 Envelope Insulation; Roofing; Fenestration (Page 1 of 3)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INSTALLATION CERTIFICATE CF-6R-ENV-01 Envelope ­ Insulation; Roofing; Fenestration (Page 1 of 3:__________________________________ Brand Name:_______________________________ Thickness (inches):_________________________ Thermal:_______________________________ Thickness (inches):_________________________ Thermal Resistance (R-Value):_________________ Perimeter

229

Income Tax Deduction for Solar-Powered Roof Vents or Fans  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Indiana allows taxpayers to take a deduction on solar-powered roof fans (or vent, also sometimes called an attic fan) installed in a home that the taxpayer owns or leases. The deduction is for 50%...

230

Reduced Energy and Maintenance Costs Using Polyurethane as a Replacement Roof System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

&M System Facilities Planning Department modified the specifications developed by the Physical Plant for use in new construction. In the retrofit system, the urethane foam was applied to the existing roof system, which added to any pre...

Scott, G. D.

231

Improving the System Life of Basic Oxygen and Electric Arc Furnace Hoods, Roofs, and Side Vents  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This factsheet describes the benefits of a high-performance aluminum bronze alloy to basic oxygen furnace and electric arc furnace components such as hoods, roofs, and side vents.

232

Sustainable Roofscapes: Developing a green roof implementation model for Tucson, AZ  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sustainable Roofscapes: Developing a green roof implementation model for Tucson, AZ BRENT JACOBSEN Advisor: Dr. Margaret Livingston School of Landscape Architecture and Planning College of Architecture and Landscape Architecture Special Acknowledgements: The University of Arizona, Technology and Research

Fay, Noah

233

Green Roof Water Harvesting and Recycling Effects on Soil and Water Chemistry and Plant Physiology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

lost must eventually be replaced, leading to increased maintenance costs. A growing medium that holds its structure and does not lose much organic matter through time is desirable. Media loss should be minimized to keep runoff pollution from the roof... to a minimum (Aitkenhead-Peterson et al. 2011a; Gregoire and Clausen 2011). Sediments that leave a green roof can contain pollutants and nutrients along with it thereby adding to the nutrient and pollutant load (U.S.EPA 2011). Plant species...

Laminack, Kirk Dickison

2014-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

234

The case for cool roofs Ronnen Levinson, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, RMLevinson@LBL.gov  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

typical of roofing, a national cool roof campaign could save 5.7 quad of net primary energy with a present value of $33B. Net energy conservation could reduce CO2 emissions by 0.25 Gt, and global cooling would years save 3.0 quad of net primary energy with a present value of $15.5B, at little to no extra cost

235

Mobile Ice Nucleus Spectrometer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This first year report presents results from a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) study to assess the flow and temperature profiles within the mobile ice nucleus spectrometer.

Kulkarni, Gourihar R.; Kok, G. L.

2012-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

236

Ice Drilling Gallonmilkjugs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ice Drilling Materials · Gallonmilkjugs · Syringes,largeand small · Pitchers · Spraybottles · 13x9? ·Isitbettertosquirtthewaterslowlyorasquicklyaspossible? ·Doestherateatwhichyousquirtthewaterchangethediameteroftheholes? ·Doesthetypeof`drill

Saffman, Mark

237

CX-008978: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Parking Garage Gutter Replacement and Installation of Roof Ice Melt System CX(s) Applied: B2.3, B2.5 Date: 08/01/2012 Location(s): West Virginia Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

238

Melting of iron-aluminide alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The melting of Fe{sub 3}Al-based alloys at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and commercial vendors is described. The melting processes evaluated includes are melting, air-induction melting (AIM), vacuum-induction melting (VIM), and electroslag remelting (ESR). The quality of the ingots studied are base on internal soundness and the surface finish obtained. The ingots were analyzed for recovery of various elements during melting. The impurity levels observed in the alloys by various melting processes were compared. Recommendations are made for viable processes for commercial melting of these alloys. 1 ref., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

Sikka, V.K.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Plasma arc melting of zirconium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Zirconium, like some other refractory metals, has an undesirable sensitivity to interstitials such as oxygen. Traditionally, zirconium is processed by electron beam melting to maintain minimum interstitial contamination. Electron beam melted zirconium, however, does not respond positively to mechanical processing due to its large grain size. The authors undertook a study to determine if plasma arc melting (PAM) technology could be utilized to maintain low interstitial concentrations and improve the response of zirconium to subsequent mechanical processing. The PAM process enabled them to control and maintain low interstitial levels of oxygen and carbon, produce a more favorable grain structure, and with supplementary off-gassing, improve the response to mechanical forming.

Tubesing, P.K.; Korzekwa, D.R.; Dunn, P.S.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

240

Metal roofing Shingle roofing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Old attics act almost like a pressure cookers. They absorb thermal energy all day long and get hotter

Hutcheon, James M.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "roof ice melt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Reionization on ice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The case for substantial far infrared ice emission in local ultraluminous infrared galaxies, expected based on the presence of mid-infrared ice absorption in their spectra and the known far infrared optical properties of ice, is still largely unsupported by direct observation owing to insufficient far infrared spectral coverage. Some marginal supportive evidence is presented here. A clear consequence of far infrared ice emission is the need to extend the range of redshifts considered for submillimeter sources. This is demonstrated via the example of HDF 850.1. The solid phase of the ISM during reionization may be dominated by ice, and this could lead to the presence of reionization sources in submillimeter source catalogs. Submillimeter sources not detected at 24 micron in the GOODS-N field are examined. Two candidate reionization sources are identified at 3.6 micron through possible Gunn-Peterson saturation in the Z band.

C. C. Dudley; M. Imanishi; P. R. Maloney

2006-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

242

Condition Assessment Survey (CAS) Program. Deficiency standards and inspections methods manual: Volume 5, 0.05 Roofing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

General information is presented for asset determinant factor/CAS repair codes/CAS cost factors; guide sheet tool & material listing; testing methods; inspection frequency; standard system design life tables; and system work breakdown structure. Deficiency standards and inspection methods are presented for built-up membrane; single- ply membrane; metal roofing systems; coated foam membrane; shingles; tiles; parapets; roof drainage system; roof specialties; and skylights.

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

A Supersolid Skin Covering both Water and Ice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The mysterious nature and functionality of water and ice skins remain baffling to the community since 1859 when Farady firstly proposed liquid skin lubricating ice. Here we show the presence of supersolid phase that covers both water and ice using Raman spectroscopy measurements and quantum calculations. In the skin of two molecular layers thick, molecular undercoordination shortens the H-O bond by ~16% and lengthens the OH nonbond by ~25% through repulsion between electron pairs on adjacent O atoms, which depresses the density from 0.92 for bulk ice to 0.75 gcm-3. The O:H-O cooperative relaxation stiffens the H-O stretching phonon from 3200/3150 cm-1 to the same value of 3450 cm-1 and raises the melting temperature of both skins by up to ~310 K. Numerical derivatives on the viscosity and charge accumulation suggests that the elastic, polarized, and thermally stable supersolid phase makes the ice frictionless and water skin hydrophobic and ice like at room temperature.

Sun, Chang Q

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Very ice rich permafrost Moderately ice rich permafrost  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TK lake Very ice rich permafrost Permafrost forest Moderately ice rich permafrost Open Bog Open Fen characteristics (mainly ice content) and burn severity determine trajectories of ecosystem succession post in the presence of moderately ice rich permafrost but have high resilience only under low burn severity in very

Ruess, Roger W.

245

Ice Cream with a Heart Create a new Clemson Ice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ice Cream with a Heart Contest! Create a new Clemson Ice Cream flavor! Raise money for your favorite charity! Win a free Clemson Ice Cream party for your organization! Enter at www organizations. The contest is called Ice Cream with a Heart and its purpose is to help student organizations

Duchowski, Andrew T.

246

Stand Persistence of `prestige' Buffalograss (Bouteloua Dactyloides) [Synonym Buchloe Dactyloides] Grown Under Simulated Green Roof Conditions During Summer in Oklahoma.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The purpose of this research was to test the stand persistence of Prestige Buffalograss green roofs under simulated greenhouse conditions using average temperature conditions for… (more)

Beitz, Mary Kathryn

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Building America Webinar: High-Performance Enclosure Strategies, Part I: Unvented Roof Systems and Innovative Advanced Framing Strategies  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation was delivered at the February 12, 2015, Building America webinar, High-Performance Enclosure Strategies, Part I: Unvented Roof Systems and Innovative Advanced Framing Strategies.

248

Design Principles and Case Study Analysis for Low Impact Development Practices - Green Roofs, Rainwater Harvesting and Vegetated Swales.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This thesis on Low Impact Development (LID) Practices provides design guidelines and principles for three important LID practices: green roofs, rainwater harvesting and bioswales. The… (more)

Ramesh, Shalini

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Building American Webinar: High-Performance Enclosure Strategies, Part I: Unvented Roof Systems and Innovative Advanced Framing Strategies  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This webinar, held on February 12, 2015, focused on methods to design and build roof and wall systems for high performance homes that optimize energy and moisture performance.

250

CLM prescribes all solar absorption to occur in the top-most snow layer. However, our SNow, ICe, and Aerosol Radiative model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CLM prescribes all solar absorption to occur in the top-most snow layer. However, our SNow, ICe. Albedo decrease over the Tibetan Plateau indicates less snow cover, caused by sub-surface melt and ice accurate remotely-sensed surface reflectance over snow- covered regions, and shows that snow parameters may

Zender, Charles

251

Scaleable Clean Aluminum Melting Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The project entitled 'Scaleable Clean Aluminum Melting Systems' was a Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADAs) between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Secat Inc. The three-year project was initially funded for the first year and was then canceled due to funding cuts at the DOE headquarters. The limited funds allowed the research team to visit industrial sites and investigate the status of using immersion heaters for aluminum melting applications. Primary concepts were proposed on the design of furnaces using immersion heaters for melting. The proposed project can continue if the funding agency resumes the funds to this research. The objective of this project was to develop and demonstrate integrated, retrofitable technologies for clean melting systems for aluminum in both the Metal Casting and integrated aluminum processing industries. The scope focused on immersion heating coupled with metal circulation systems that provide significant opportunity for energy savings as well as reduction of melt loss in the form of dross. The project aimed at the development and integration of technologies that would enable significant reduction in the energy consumption and environmental impacts of melting aluminum through substitution of immersion heating for the conventional radiant burner methods used in reverberatory furnaces. Specifically, the program would couple heater improvements with furnace modeling that would enable cost-effective retrofits to a range of existing furnace sizes, reducing the economic barrier to application.

Han, Q.; Das, S.K. (Secat, Inc.)

2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

252

Application of Spray Foam Insulation Under Plywood and OSB Roof Sheathing (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Spray polyurethane foams (SPFs) have advantages over alternative insulation methods because they provide air sealing in complex assemblies, particularly roofs. Spray foam can provide the thermal, air, and vapor control layers in both new and retrofit construction. Unvented roof strategies with open cell and closed cell SPF insulation sprayed to the underside of roof sheathing have been used since the mid-1990s to provide durable and efficient building enclosures. However, there have been isolated incidents of failures (either sheathing rot or SPF delamination) that raise some general concerns about the hygrothermal performance and durability of these systems. The primary risks for roof systems are rainwater leaks, condensation from diffusion and air leakage, and built-in construction moisture. This project directly investigated rain and indirectly investigated built-in construction moisture and vapor drives. Research involved both hygrothermal modeling of a range of rain water leakage scenarios and field evaluations of in-service residential roofs. Other variables considered were climate zone, orientation, interior relative humidity, and the vapor permeance of the coating applied to the interior face of open cell SPF.

Not Available

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

High latitudes present extreme conditions for the measurement and estimation of airsea and ice fluxes, limiting understanding of related physical processes and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High latitudes present extreme conditions for the measurement and estimation of air­sea and ice of the Earth's climate. HigH-LatitudE OcEan and SEa icE SurfacE fLuxES: cHaLLEngES fOr cLimatE rESEarcH by Mark change can manifest itself in astonishing ways. Arctic sea ice extent at the end of the melt season

Renfrew, Ian

254

*Deborah E. Eason, Garrett Ito, John M. Sinton Insights into melt and chemical transport rates in the mantle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

*Deborah E. Eason, Garrett Ito, John M. Sinton Insights into melt and chemical transport rates Greenland Ice-Core Project (NGRIP) Members (2004) Nature Sinton, J., Grönvold, K., Sæmundsson, K. (2005) G3. These data supplement existing fini- and post-glacial data [Sinton et al., 2005] to form a detailed eruptive

Geist, Dennis

255

Global ice sheet modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The University of Maine conducted this study for Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as part of a global climate modeling task for site characterization of the potential nuclear waste respository site at Yucca Mountain, NV. The purpose of the study was to develop a global ice sheet dynamics model that will forecast the three-dimensional configuration of global ice sheets for specific climate change scenarios. The objective of the third (final) year of the work was to produce ice sheet data for glaciation scenarios covering the next 100,000 years. This was accomplished using both the map-plane and flowband solutions of our time-dependent, finite-element gridpoint model. The theory and equations used to develop the ice sheet models are presented. Three future scenarios were simulated by the model and results are discussed.

Hughes, T.J.; Fastook, J.L. [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States). Institute for Quaternary Studies

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Evolution of supra-glacial lakes across the Greenland Ice Sheet   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We used 268 cloud-free Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) images spanning the melt seasons 2003 and 2005-2007 to study the seasonal evolution of supra-glacial lakes in three different regions of the Greenland ice sheet. Lake area...

Sundal, Aud

2008-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

257

The Ross Sea Response to Evolving Ocean-Ice Interactions in a Changing Climate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

decade (1994–2007) mostly (50%) from larger melt water inputs from the Pine Island (17.7 km^3 per decade) and Dotson (14.8 km^3 per decade) glaciers. Two decades of steady (1978-2000) strengthening of sea ice productivity (200 km^3 per decade) within...

Wiederwohl, Christina 1980-

2012-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

258

The ablation zone in northeast Greenland: ice types, albedos and impurities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

), Box 156, NO-9171 Longyearbyen, Norway E-mail: carl.egede.boggild@unis.no 2 Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195-1640, USA 3 Canadian Forest Service, Northern in the ablation zone (Hanna and others, 2005; Box and others, 2006). The major source of energy for melting ice

Warren, Stephen

259

Ice Formation in Gas-Diffusion Layers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the University of California. Ice Formation in Gas-Diffusionsub-freezing conditions, ice forms in the gas-diffusionstrategies exist to prevent ice formation, there is little

Dursch, Thomas

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

ICE Raids: Compounding Production, Contradiction, and Capitalism  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

America: Factories and ICE Raids Produce Citizens Americansubjects. ICE raids (re)produce workers’ contradictoryfactories and ICE raids have come to produce immigrant

Reas, Elizabeth I

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "roof ice melt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

In situ thermal performance of APP modified bitumen roof membranes coated with reflective coatings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A multi-faceted field research program regarding seven atactic polypropylene (APP) modified bitumen membrane roof systems and four reflective coatings began in 1991. This long-term project is evaluating the performance of various APP modified bitumen membranes (both coated and uncoated), the comparative performance of coating application soon after membrane installation versus preweathering, coating performance, and aspects of recoating. This paper is a progress report on the in situ thermal performance of the various types of coatings compared to the thermal performance of the exposed membrane. The thermal performance of an adjacent ballasted ethylene propylene diene terpolymer (EPDM) roofing system is also described.

Carlson, J.D.; Smith, T.L. (National Roofing Contractors Association, Rosemont, IL (United States)); Christian, J.E. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

In situ thermal performance of APP modified bitumen roof membranes coated with reflective coatings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A multi-faceted field research program regarding seven atactic polypropylene (APP) modified bitumen membrane roof systems and four reflective coatings began in 1991. This long-term project is evaluating the performance of various APP modified bitumen membranes (both coated and uncoated), the comparative performance of coating application soon after membrane installation versus preweathering, coating performance, and aspects of recoating. This paper is a progress report on the in situ thermal performance of the various types of coatings compared to the thermal performance of the exposed membrane. The thermal performance of an adjacent ballasted ethylene propylene diene terpolymer (EPDM) roofing system is also described.

Carlson, J.D.; Smith, T.L. [National Roofing Contractors Association, Rosemont, IL (United States); Christian, J.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

A new method for modelling roofing materials emissions on the city scale: Application for zinc in the city of Crteil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as an important source of environmental pollution. Roofing materials, in particular the metallic ones, are considered as a major source of urban runoff metal contaminations. In the context of the European Water Directive (2000/60 CE), an accurate evaluation of contaminant flows from roofs is thus required on the city

Boyer, Edmond

264

Instability leading to coal bumps and nonlinear evolutionary mechanisms for a coal-pillar-and-roof system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Instability leading to coal bumps and nonlinear evolutionary mechanisms for a coal mechanisms of the mechanical system that is composed of the stiff hosts (roof and floor) and the coal pillar using catastrophe theory. It is assumed that the roof is an elastic beam and the coal pillar is a strain

Jiao, Jiu Jimmy

265

Coherent radar ice thickness measurements over the Greenland ice sheet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We developed two 150-MHz coherent radar depth sounders for ice thickness measurements over the Greenland ice sheet. We developed one of these using connectorized components and the other using radio frequency integrated circuits (RFICs). Both...

Gogineni, S. Prasad; Tammana, Dilip; Braaten, David A.; Leuschen, C.; Legarsky, J.; Kanagaratnam, P.; Stiles, J.; Allen, C.; Jezek, K.; Akins, T.

2001-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

266

Dry melting of high albite  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The properties of albitic melts are central to thermodynamic models for synthetic and natural granitic liquids. The authors have analyzed published phase-equilibrium and thermodynamic data for the dry fusion of high albite to develop a more accurate equation for the Biggs free energy of this reaction to 30 kbar and 1,400 C. Strict criteria for reaction reversal were sued to evaluate the phase-equilibrium data, and the thermodynamic properties of solid and liquid albite were evaluated using the published uncertainties in the original measurements. Results suggest that neither available phase-equilibrium experiments nor thermodynamic data tightly constrain the location of the reaction. Experimental solidus temperatures at 1 atm range from 1,100 to 1,120 C. High-pressure experiments were not reversed completely and may have been affected by several sources of error, but the apparent inconsistencies among the results of the various experimentalists are eliminated when only half-reversal data are considered. Uncertainties in thermodynamic data yield large variations in permissible reaction slopes. Disparities between experimental and calculated melting curves are, therefore, largely attributable to these difficulties, and there is no fundamental disagreement between the available phase-equilibrium and thermodynamic data for the dry melting of albite. Consequently, complex speciation models for albitic melts, based on the assumption that these discrepancies represent a real characteristic of the system, are unjustified at this time.

Anovitz, L.M.: Blencoe, J.G.

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Designing for effective stationkeeping in ice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and intervention vessels for Arctic oil and gas. #12;2. An effective Ice Management system · Ice Management for the CIVArctic vessel. - Comparison with the ice model tests carried out in the Aker Arctic ice tank in May 2011

Nørvåg, Kjetil

268

Countries Commit to White Roofs, Potentially Offsetting the Emissions of Over 300 Power Plants  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

India, Mexico, and the United States have signed up to join the Cool Roofs Working Group, which was announced yesterday in Abu Dhabi at the second Clean Energy Ministerial -- a high-level global forum to promote policies and programs that advance clean energy technology, to share lessons learned and best practices and to encourage the transition to a global clean energy economy.

269

Rainwater harvesting system with roof catchment, gutter, downspout, storage and drip irrigation system.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and without access to municipal water may collect and store rainwater after obtaining a permit from the state) Basics of rainwater collection, calculation of: needs, collection and storage 2) Outdoor use 3) IndoorRainwater harvesting system with roof catchment, gutter, downspout, storage and drip irrigation

Stephens, Graeme L.

270

HEAT TRANSFERS IN A DOUBLE SKIN ROOF VENTILATED BY NATURAL CONVECTION IN SUMMER TIME  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 HEAT TRANSFERS IN A DOUBLE SKIN ROOF VENTILATED BY NATURAL CONVECTION IN SUMMER TIME P. H or in tropical and arid countries. In this work, radiation, convection and conduction heat transfers-dimensional numerical simulation of the heat transfers through the double skin reveals the most important parameters

Boyer, Edmond

271

EPIC-RoofNet: An Experimental Testbed for Solar-powered Wireless Sensor Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EPIC-RoofNet: An Experimental Testbed for Solar-powered Wireless Sensor Networks Amitangshu Pal through a shared folder. Keywords: Wireless sensor networks, solar harvesting, adaptive protocols experiments on solar-powered sensor nodes. Due to constraints in cost and size, the solar panels

Nasipuri, Asis

272

Effect of roof slope and thickness on the performance of a saltstone vault  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At the Savannah River Site, low-level radioactive decontaminated salt solution is mixed with slag, flyash, and cement to form a grout-like material called ``Saltstone.`` The Saltstone is poured into concrete vaults constructed at the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF). The SDF is designed for the release of contaminants in a slow, controlled manner over thousands of years. The impact of SDF on groundwater has been studied in a radiological performance assessment (PA). Groundwater models were used to predict the fluid flow and contaminant transport at SDF. The models predicted a spatial contaminant concentration distribution in groundwater as a function of time. This study focuses on the roof configuration of Saltstone vault, with special interests in cost-effectiveness. We conducted a study to evaluate the effect of roof slope and thickness on the performance of a Saltstone vault. Four roof configurations were simulated. The tool used for the simulation was ECLIPSE, a finite-difference petroleum reservoir engineering code with an environmental tracer option. Nitrate was used as the ``tracer`` contaminant. In this study, ECLIPSE solves the two-phase two-dimensional flow and transport problem up to 10,000 years. This paper describes a modeling study used to evaluate roof design options for the Saltstone vault.

Yu, A.D.; Lam, Poh-Sang; Hsu, R.H.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Ten Years at the Calif. Energy Commission White Roofs to Cool your Building, your City and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ten Years at the Calif. Energy Commission & White Roofs to Cool your Building, your City and (this" 32" 37" 42" 50" CEC Max Screen Area (1400 in2 or ~57.4 diagonal inches) Energy Star 3.0 TVs (10 is new !) Cool the World Arthur H. Rosenfeld, Former Commissioner California Energy Commission

Kammen, Daniel M.

274

Laying the Foundation for a Solar America: The Million Solar Roofs Initiative  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As the U.S. Department of Energy's Solar Energy Technology Program embarks on the next phase of its technology acceptance efforts under the Solar America Initiative, there is merit to examining the program's previous market transformation effort, the Million Solar Roofs Initiative. Its goal was to transform markets for distributed solar technologies by facilitating the installation of solar systems.

Strahs, G.; Tombari, C.

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Thermal Performance of Exposed Composed Roofs in Very Hot Dry Desert Region in Egypt (Toshky)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is considered the major part of the building envelop which exposed to high thermal load due to the high solar intensity and high outdoor air temperature through summer season which reach to 6 months. In Egypt the thermal effect of roof is increased as one go...

Khalil, M. H.; Sheble, S.; Morsey, M. S.; Fakhry, S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Homogeneous ice nucleation evaluated for several water models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this work, we evaluate by means of computer simulations the rate for ice homogeneous nucleation for several water models such as TIP4P, TIP4P/2005,TIP4P/ICE, and mW (following the same procedure as in Sanz et al. [J. Am. Chem. Soc.135, 15008 (2013)]) in a broad temperature range. We estimate the ice-liquid interfacial free-energy, and conclude that for all water models {\\gamma} decreases as the temperature decreases. Extrapolating our results to the melting temperature, we obtain a value of the interfacial free-energy between 25 and 32 mN/m in reasonable agreement with the reported experimental values. Moreover, we observe that the values of {\\gamma} depend on the chosen water model and this is a key factor when numerically evaluating nucleation rates, given that the kinetic prefactor is quite similar for all water models with the exception of the mW (due to the absence of hydrogens). Somewhat surprisingly the estimates of the nucleation rates found in this work for TIP4P/2005 are slightly higher than those of the mW model, even though the former has explicit hydrogens. Our results suggest that it may be possible to observe in computer simulations spontaneous crystallization of TIP4P/2005 at about 60 K below the melting point.

J. R. Espinosa; E. Sanz; C. Valeriani; C. Vega

2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

277

MEAT, POULTRY, Still contains ice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MEAT, POULTRY, SEAFOOD Still contains ice crystals and feels as cold, there will be some texture and Clavor loss. Discard DAIRY Still contains ice crystals and feels Ice cream, frozen yogurt Discard Discard Cheese (soft and semi-soft) Refreeze. May

Liskiewicz, Maciej

278

ice | proceedings Forensic Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ice | proceedings Forensic Engineering Volume 165 Issue FE4 November 2012 Forensic Engineering or economic damage. Research and practice papers are sought on traditional or modern forensic engineering, design and construction. Topics covered also include research and education best practice in forensic

Mottram, Toby

279

Hail ice impact on composite structures at glancing angles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

investigation of high velocity ice impacts on woven carbon/and ice sphere. .by trailing ice fragments. ..

Funai, Sho

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Global Cooling: Policies to Cool the World and Offset Global Warming from CO2 Using Reflective Roofs and Pavements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Increasing the solar reflectance of the urban surface reduce its solar heat gain, lowers its temperatures, and decreases its outflow of thermal infrared radiation into the atmosphere. This process of 'negative radiative forcing' can help counter the effects of global warming. In addition, cool roofs reduce cooling-energy use in air conditioned buildings and increase comfort in unconditioned buildings; and cool roofs and cool pavements mitigate summer urban heat islands, improving outdoor air quality and comfort. Installing cool roofs and cool pavements in cities worldwide is a compelling win-win-win activity that can be undertaken immediately, outside of international negotiations to cap CO{sub 2} emissions. We propose an international campaign to use solar reflective materials when roofs and pavements are built or resurfaced in temperate and tropical regions.

Akbari, Hashem; Levinson, Ronnen; Rosenfeld, Arthur; Elliot, Matthew

2009-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "roof ice melt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Formation of high density amorphous ice by decompression of ice VII and ice VIII at 135 K  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of ice Ih and are found to have very similar structures. By cooling liquid water along the water trans- forms into ice VIII when cooled . With this in mind Klug et al. were able to produce low densityFormation of high density amorphous ice by decompression of ice VII and ice VIII at 135 K Carl Mc

McBride, Carl

282

Research on the Effect of a Planting Roof on the Thermal Load of a Business Building  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ICEBO2006, Shenzhen, China Enve lope Technologies for Building Energy Efficiency Vol.II-4-2 Research on the Effect of a Planting Roof on the Thermal Load of a Business Building Weijie Zhang Jinshun Wu Yiran Wei Xudong Gao... ICEBO2006, Shenzhen, China Enve lope Technologies for Building Energy Efficiency Vol.II-4-2 room has been made and some theoretical relations between outdoor air temperature and indoor thermal load within certain region have been...

Zhang, W.; Wu, J.; Wei, Y.; Gao, X.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Impact of Reflective Roofing on Cooling Electrical Use and Peak Demand in a Florida Retail Mall  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on Energy Efficiency in Buildings, American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy, Washington D.C., Vol. 9, p. 1, August, 1992. Akbari, H., Bretz, S., Kurn, D.M. and Hanford, J., ?Peak Power and Cooling Energy Savings of High Albedo Roofs,? Energy... positive pressure dehumidified air ventilation in hot humid climates, quiet exhaust fan ventilation in cool climates, solar water heaters, heat pump water heaters, high efficiency right sized heating/cooling equipment, and gas fired combo space...

Parker, D. S.; Sonne, J. K.; Sherwin, J. R.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Hidden force floating ice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Because of the segmental specific-heat disparity of the hydrogen bond (O:H-O) and the Coulomb repulsion between oxygen ions, cooling elongates the O:H-O bond at freezing by stretching its containing angle and shortening the H-O bond with an association of larger O:H elongation, which makes ice less dense than water, allowing it to float.

Chang Q. Sun

2015-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

285

Ice Storm Supercomputer  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

"A new Idaho National Laboratory supercomputer is helping scientists create more realistic simulations of nuclear fuel. Dubbed 'Ice Storm,' this 2048-processor machine allows researchers to model and predict the complex physics behind nuclear reactor behavior. And with a new visualization lab, the team can see the results of its simulations on the big screen." For more information about INL research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

None

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

286

Roof and Attic Design Guidelines for new and retrofit Construction of Homes in Hot and Coild Climates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Some guidelines for improving the energy efficiency of roofs and attics are presented and are based on the research of the DOE Building Technology. The results of combined analytical and experimental studies were used to benchmark computer tools, which in turn, were used to simulate homes in hot and cold climates. Adding floor and roof insulation, above deck ventilation, radiant barriers, cool color shingle, metal or tile roofs, sealing the attic floor, sealing the duct system and sealing the attic were simulated to compute the cost of energy savings. Results are prioritized to help building owners make an informed economic decision when contemplating roof and attic retrofits. Sealing the attic floor is a top retrofit option. The sealed attic approach and a new prototype roof assembly an insulated and ventilated roof are good options for retrofit work but have paybacks ranging from 15 to 25 years. A new sealed attic concept was simulated and computations show its simple payback is about 10 to 12 years in hot and cold climates; its first cost is significantly reduced from that of a spray foam approach. For new construction the best option is to keep the ducts out of the attic, make sure the attic floor is sealed and add at least code level of insulation to the ceiling.

Desjarlais, Andre Omer [ORNL] [ORNL; LaFrance, Marc [International Energy Agency] [International Energy Agency

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Roof system effects on in-situ thermal performance of HCFC polyisocyanurate insulation. [Hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Industry-produced, permeably-faced, experimental polyisocyanurate (PIR) laminated boardstock foamed with several different hydrochlorofluorcarbons (HCFCS) is undergoing in-situ testing at the Building Envelopes Research User Center at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The overall objective of this research is to determine the long term thermal performance differences between PIR foamed with CFC-11 and PIR foamed with HCFC-123, HCFC-14lb and blends of HCFCs. Boards from the same batch were installed in outdoor test facilities and instrumented in part to determine if the insulation thermal performance aging characteristics are dependent on how they are handled and installed in the field. One of the major contributions of this research is the field validation of an accelerated thermal aging procedure. The laboratory measurements of the apparent thermal conductivity (k) of 10-mm-thick slices conducted over a period of less than a year are used to predict the k of 38-50-mm-thick PIR laminated board stock for 12--20 years after production. In situ thermal performance measurements of these well characterized three-year-old boards under white and under black ethylene propylene diene monomer (EPDM) membranes are compared with the accelerated aging procedure and with boards from the same batch in different roofing systems: mechanically attached EPDM, fully adhered EPDM, and built-up roof (BUR). The comparison indicates that this accelerated aging procedure should be seriously considered for providing in-service thermal performance information to building owners and roofing contractors.

Christian, J.E.; Desjarlais, A.O.; Courville, G.; Graves, R.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Roof system effects on in-situ thermal performance of HCFC polyisocyanurate insulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Industry-produced, permeably-faced, experimental polyisocyanurate (PIR) laminated boardstock foamed with several different hydrochlorofluorcarbons (HCFCS) is undergoing in-situ testing at the Building Envelopes Research User Center at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The overall objective of this research is to determine the long term thermal performance differences between PIR foamed with CFC-11 and PIR foamed with HCFC-123, HCFC-14lb and blends of HCFCs. Boards from the same batch were installed in outdoor test facilities and instrumented in part to determine if the insulation thermal performance aging characteristics are dependent on how they are handled and installed in the field. One of the major contributions of this research is the field validation of an accelerated thermal aging procedure. The laboratory measurements of the apparent thermal conductivity (k) of 10-mm-thick slices conducted over a period of less than a year are used to predict the k of 38-50-mm-thick PIR laminated board stock for 12--20 years after production. In situ thermal performance measurements of these well characterized three-year-old boards under white and under black ethylene propylene diene monomer (EPDM) membranes are compared with the accelerated aging procedure and with boards from the same batch in different roofing systems: mechanically attached EPDM, fully adhered EPDM, and built-up roof (BUR). The comparison indicates that this accelerated aging procedure should be seriously considered for providing in-service thermal performance information to building owners and roofing contractors.

Christian, J.E.; Desjarlais, A.O.; Courville, G.; Graves, R.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Safety aspects of EB melting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electron Beam melting technology, along with other vacuum metallurgical technologies, requires special attention to safety involving operation and maintenance of the EB furnace and systems. Although the EB industry has been relatively accident free, the importance of safety awareness and compliance becomes increasingly important. It is very important to provide a safe work environment for employees and economically important to protect the equipment from damage and potential downtime. Safety and accident prevention directly affects overhead costs by keeping accident insurance rates at a minimum. Routine safety requirements will be reviewed and safety aspects requiring extra attention will be addressed. Safety improvements and experiences of furnace users will be shared as examples.

Hainz, L.C. [Hainz Engineering Services, Inc., Albany, OR (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

290

Changes in black carbon deposition to Antarctica from two ice core records, A.D. 1850-2000  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate and Environment CRC, University of Tasmania, Hobart, TAS, Australia, [5] Australian Nuclear. (2007). In the cold room, previously cut one meter ice core sticks of 3x3cm, are melted continuously on a heated melter head specifically designed to eliminate contamination from the atmosphere

Meskhidze, Nicholas

291

Greenland Ice Sheet Retreat Since the Little Ice Age  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and I. Willis (2012), Greenland's shrinking ice cover: "fastfluctuations in southeast Greenland, Nat. Geosci. , 5(6),T. Decker (2011), Analysis of Greenland marine- terminating

Beitch, Marci Jillian

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Engineering Notes Ice Shape Characterization Using  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Engineering Notes Ice Shape Characterization Using Self-Organizing Maps Stephen T. McClain Baylor. Introduction DURING the validation and verification of ice accretion codes, predicted ice shapes must be compared with experimental measurements of wind-tunnel or atmospheric ice shapes. Current methods for ice

Tino, Peter

293

Ice Mass Balance Buoy: An Instrument to Measure and Attribute Changes in Ice Thickness  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ice Mass Balance Buoy: An Instrument to Measure and Attribute Changes in Ice Thickness Jacqueline A the Ice Mass Balance buoy (IMB) in response to the need for monitoring changes in the thickness of the Arctic sea ice cover. The IMB is an autonomous, ice-based system. IMB buoys provide a time series of ice

Geiger, Cathleen

294

Fire and Ice Issue 9  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

£s FIRE AND ICE # 9 IB FIRE ICE #9 A Blake/Avon slash fanzine r Available from: Kathleen Resch POBox 1766 Temple City, CA 91780 Kathleener@aol.com FIRE AND ICE # 9copyright © May, 2005 by Kathleen Resch for the contributors. No reprints... or reproduction without the written permission ofthe author/artist This is an amateur publication and is not p intended to infringe upon the rights ofany holders of"Blake's 7" copyrights. FIRE AND ICE 9 TABLE OF CONTENTS LEAVING ROOM 101 by Nova 2 TOO MANY...

Multiple Contributors

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

ICE Raids: Compounding Production, Contradiction, and Capitalism  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is just a cheap way of boosting ICE ‘criminal alien’ arrestRegardless of whether or not ICE is motivated by maintainingWorkers in America: Factories and ICE Raids Produce Citizens

Reas, Elizabeth I

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

ICE Pulse Oximeter Smart Alarm App Requirements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ICE Pulse Oximeter Smart Alarm App Requirements 6 March 2012 Revision 0 for an Integrated Clinical Environment (ICE) pulse oximetry monitoring app that provides.2 References [Purpose: List all ICE standards, and other standards and references

Huth, Michael

297

Therapeutic Hypothermia: Protective Cooling Using Medical Ice...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Therapeutic Hypothermia: Protective Cooling Using Medical Ice Slurry Technology available for licensing: Proprietary method and equipment for making an ice slurry coolant to induce...

298

Using Cool Roofs to Reduce Energy Use, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, and Urban Heat-island Effects: Findings from an India Experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the demand for cooling energy, urban trees indirectly reducesurfaces and shade trees to reduce energy use and improvethe energy savings and GHG benefits of cool roofs and tree

Akbari, Hashem

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Text-Alternative Version of Building America Webinar: High-Performance Enclosure Strategies, Part 1: Unvented Roof Systems and Innovative Advanced Framing Strategies  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This webinar, held on February 12, 2015, focused on methods to design and build roof and wall systems for high performance homes that optimize energy and moisture performance.

300

2, 383397, 2008 Extreme surface melt  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

surface snowmelt over high elevations (above 2000 m) of the Greenland ice sheet during summer of 2007Pa atmospheric thick- ness, and the net surface energy flux, linked in turn to southerly airflow over the ice10 Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR, 1979­1987) and the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "roof ice melt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Fire and Ice Issue 2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

^ $$% i&l /P^ \\0 rffej FIRE AND ICE AVAILABLE FROM Kathleen Resch PO Box 1766 Temple City, CA 91780 FIRE AND ICE II TABLE OF CONTENTS COVER by Phoenix FRONTISPIECE by Gayle Feyrer "Flashpoint" by Rachel Duncan 1 PEDESTAL by Thomas 2 "A Damn Fine...

Multiple Contributors

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Purification of tantalum by plasma arc melting  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Purification of tantalum by plasma arc melting. The level of oxygen and carbon impurities in tantalum was reduced by plasma arc melting the tantalum using a flowing plasma gas generated from a gas mixture of helium and hydrogen. The flowing plasma gases of the present invention were found to be superior to other known flowing plasma gases used for this purpose.

Dunn, Paul S. (Santa Fe, NM); Korzekwa, Deniece R. (Los Alamos, NM)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

The contribution of glacier melt to streamflow  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ongoing and projected future changes in glacier extent and water storage globally have lead to concerns about the implications for water supplies. However, the current magnitude of glacier contributions to river runoff is not well known, nor is the population at risk to future glacier changes. We estimate an upper bound on glacier melt contribution to seasonal streamflow by computing the energy balance of glaciers globally. Melt water quantities are computed as a fraction of total streamflow simulated using a hydrology model and the melt fraction is tracked down the stream network. In general, our estimates of the glacier melt contribution to streamflow are lower than previously published values. Nonetheless, we find that globally an estimated 225 (36) million people live in river basins where maximum seasonal glacier melt contributes at least 10% (25%) of streamflow, mostly in the High Asia region.

Schaner, Neil; Voisin, Nathalie; Nijssen, Bart; Lettenmaier, D. P.

2012-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

304

Dynamics of ice shelf rift propagation and iceberg calving inferred from geodetic and seismic observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2. Ice Shelves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5. Ice Rheology . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.vi Calving Glaciers and Ice

Bassis, Jeremy N.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Examinations of ice formation processes in Florida cumuli using ice nuclei measurements of anvil ice crystal particle residues  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

importance of different ice formation processes in cumuli and the cirrus anvils they produce. Cirrus playExaminations of ice formation processes in Florida cumuli using ice nuclei measurements of anvil ice crystal particle residues Anthony J. Prenni,1 Paul J. DeMott,1 Cynthia Twohy,2 Michael R. Poellot

306

4, 709732, 2007 Ice-shelf ocean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OSD 4, 709­732, 2007 Ice-shelf ­ ocean interactions at Fimbul Ice Shelf M. R. Price Title Page published in Ocean Science Discussions are under open-access review for the journal Ocean Science Ice-shelf ­ ocean interactions at Fimbul Ice Shelf, Antarctica from oxygen isotope ratio measurements M. R. Price 1

Boyer, Edmond

307

Climate Change and Variability Lake Ice, Fishes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Climate Change and Variability Lake Ice, Fishes and Water Levels John J. Magnuson Center to everything else." #12;The Invisible Present The Invisible Place Magnuson 2006 #12;Ice-on Day 2007 Peter W. Schmitz Photo Local Lake Mendota #12;Ice Breakup 2010 Lake Mendota March 20 #12;March 21 Ice Breakup 2010

Sheridan, Jennifer

308

2011-12 PROSPECTUS2011-12 PROSPECTUS WESLEYAN MEN'S ICE HOCKEYWESLEYAN MEN'S ICE HOCKEY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- ponents in its inaugural season. Former bench boss Dave Snyder, in whose honor the Wesleyan ice rink2011-12 PROSPECTUS2011-12 PROSPECTUS WESLEYAN MEN'S ICE HOCKEYWESLEYAN MEN'S ICE HOCKEY #12....................................Chris Potter/Jeff Gilarde Men's Ice Hockey..............Chris Potter Women's Ice Hockey.........Jodi Mc

Devoto, Stephen H.

309

ORIGINAL PAPER A bacterial ice-binding protein from the Vostok ice core  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to produce a 54 kDa ice-binding protein (GenBank EU694412) that is similar to ice-binding proteins previously- vival at sub-zero temperatures by producing proteins that bind to and inhibit the growth of ice crystalsORIGINAL PAPER A bacterial ice-binding protein from the Vostok ice core James A. Raymond Ã? Brent C

Christner, Brent C.

310

The Effects of Rotation and Ice Shelf Topography on Frazil-Laden Ice Shelf Water Plumes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Antarctica. In addition, it is found that the model only produces reasonable marine ice formation rates whenThe Effects of Rotation and Ice Shelf Topography on Frazil-Laden Ice Shelf Water Plumes PAUL R of the dynamics and thermodynamics of a plume of meltwater at the base of an ice shelf is presented. Such ice

Feltham, Daniel

311

Global simulations of ice nucleation and ice supersaturation with an improved cloud scheme in the Community  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and supersaturation in CAM. The new model is able to reproduce field observations of ice mass and mixed phase cloud are sensitive to the parameterization of ice clouds. These results indicate that ice clouds are potentiallyGlobal simulations of ice nucleation and ice supersaturation with an improved cloud scheme

Gettelman, Andrew

312

Sea-ice thickness measurement based on the dispersion of ice swell  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-azimuth angles. The parameterization, that includes finding the best modeled ice thickness, is performed by usingSea-ice thickness measurement based on the dispersion of ice swell David Marsana) ISTerre, CNRS propagating in the Arctic sea ice cover is exploited in order to locally measure the ice thickness

313

Electrical properties of saline ices and ice-silicate mixtures: geophysical and astrobiological consequences (Invited)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MR22A-05 Electrical properties of saline ices and ice-silicate mixtures: geophysical) electrical-properties measurements of laboratory- produced saline ice, salt hydrates, and ice-silicate cutoff. In ice-silicate mixtures, brine channels are evident above the eutectic temperature only when

Stillman, David E.

314

Comment on ``A quantitative framework for interpretation of basal ice facies formed by ice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

heave would be expected to produce were revealed beneath the Kamb Ice Stream by the pioneering boreholeComment on ``A quantitative framework for interpretation of basal ice facies formed by ice quantitative framework for interpretation of basal ice facies formed by ice accretion over subglacial sediment

Worster, M. Grae

315

alkali carbonate melts: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

8 Glass Transition and Melting Behavior of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Thermoplastic Composite, Studied by Materials Science Websites Summary: Glass Transition and Melting...

316

ITP Metal Casting: Advanced Melting Technologies: Energy Saving...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Advanced Melting Technologies: Energy Saving Concepts and Opportunities for the Metal Casting Industry ITP Metal Casting: Advanced Melting Technologies: Energy Saving Concepts and...

317

Energy-Efficient Melting and Direct Delivery of High Quality...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Energy-Efficient Melting and Direct Delivery of High Quality Molten Aluminum Energy-Efficient Melting and Direct Delivery of High Quality Molten Aluminum itmdelivery.pdf More...

318

Melting of superheated crystals initiates on vacancies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In a large variety of ideal crystals we found that when rapidly migrating atoms squash or annihilate a neighbouring vacancy and produce a disordered cluster, the heat of migration stored in the system exceeds the enthalpy increase required for the coordinating atoms of the vacancy to form a liquid phase, i.e. the liquid phase nucleates from vacancies. Furthermore volumetric analysis supports this well. This vacancy-decomposition model provides quantitative information on the melting point, the latent heat and the volume change upon melting and hence clarifies the mechanism of melting.

L. W. Wang; Q. Wang; K. Q. Lu

2010-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

319

The analysis of water use and water status of plants in a fluid-roof solar greenhouse  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1981 Major Subject: Soil Science THE ANALYSIS OF WATER USE AND WATER STATUS OF PLANTS IN A FLL'ID-ROOF SOLAR GREENHOUSE A Thesis by GARY CLAUDE HEATHMAN Approved as to style and content by: arrman o ommrttee ea o epart nt... em er Mem r May, 1981 ABSTRACT The Analysis of Water Use And Water Status of Plants in a Fluid-roof Solar Greenhouse. (May 1981) Gary Claude Heathman, B. S. , Texas A8;M University Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. C. H. M. van Bavel...

Heathman, Gary Claude

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Method of forming clathrate ice  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of forming clathrate ice in a supercooled water-based liquid contained in a vessel is disclosed. Initially, an oscillator device is located in the liquid in the vessel. The oscillator device is then oscillated ultrasonically so that small crystals are formed in the liquid. These small crystals serve as seed crystals for ice formation in the liquid and thereby prevent supercooling of the liquid. Preferably, the oscillating device is controlled by a thermostat which initiates operation of the oscillator device when the temperature of the liquid is lowered to the freezing point. Thereafter, the operation of the oscillator device is terminated when ice is sensed in the liquid by an ice sensor.

Hino, Toshiyuki (Tokyo, JP); Gorski, Anthony J. (Lemont, IL)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "roof ice melt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Method of forming calthrate ice  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of forming clathrate ice in a supercooled water-based liquid contained in a vessel is disclosed. Initially, an oscillator device is located in the liquid in the vessel. The oscillator device is then oscillated ultransonically so that small crystals are formed in the liquid. Thes small crystals serve as seed crystals for ice formation in the liquid and thereby prevent supercooling of the liquid. Preferably, the oscillating device is controlled by a thermostat which initiates operation of the oscillator device when the temperature of the liquid is lowered to the freezing point. Thereafter, the operation of the oscillator device is terminated when ice is sensed in the liquid by an ice sensor.

Hino, T.; Gorski, A.J.

1985-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

322

Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (E-SMARRT): Melting Efficiency Improvement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Steel foundries melt recycled scrap in electric furnaces and typically consume 35-100% excess energy from the theoretical energy requirement required to pour metal castings. This excess melting energy is multiplied by yield losses during casting and finishing operations resulting in the embodied energy in a cast product typically being three to six times the theoretical energy requirement. The purpose of this research project was to study steel foundry melting operations to understand energy use and requirements for casting operations, define variations in energy consumption, determine technologies and practices that are successful in reducing melting energy and develop new melting techniques and tools to improve the energy efficiency of melting in steel foundry operations.

Principal Investigator Kent Peaslee; Co-PIà ƒ  ¢Ã ‚  € à ‚  ™ s: Von Richards, Jeffrey Smith

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

323

PURIFICATION OF IRIDIUM BY ELECTRON BEAM MELTING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purification of iridium metal by electron beam melting has been characterized for 48 impurity elements. Chemical analysis was performed by glow discharge mass spectrographic (GDMS) analysis for all elements except carbon, which was analyzed by combustion. The average levels of individual elemental impurities in the starting powder varied from 37 g/g to 0.02 g/g. The impurity elements Li, Na, Mg, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Pd, Ag, Cd, Sn, Sb, Te, Ba, Ce, Tl, Pb, and Bi were not detectable following the purification. No significant change in concentration of the elements Ti, V, Zr, Nb, Mo, and Re was found. The elements B, C, Al, Si, Cr, Fe, Ru, Rh, and Pt were partially removed by vaporization during electron beam melting. Langmuir's equation for ideal vaporization into a vacuum was used to calculate for each impurity element the expected ratio of impurity content after melting to that before melting. Equilibrium vapor pressures were calculated using Henry's law, with activity coefficients obtained from published data for the elements Fe, Ti, and Pt. Activity coefficients were estimated from enthalpy data for Al, Si, V, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Zr, Nb, Mo, and Hf and an ideal solution model was used for the remaining elements. The melt temperature was determined from measured iridium weight loss. Excellent agreement was found between measured and calculated impurity ratios for all impurity elements. The results are consistent with some localized heating of the melt pool due to rastering of the electron beam, with an average vaporization temperature of 3100 K as compared to a temperature of 2965 K calculated for uniform heating of the melt pool. The results are also consistent with ideal mixing in the melt pool.

Ohriner, Evan Keith [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Josephson vortex lattice melting in Bi-2212  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The B-T diagram of Josephson vortex lattice melting in Bi-2212 is analyzed (B is magnetic induction parallel to the layers, T is temperature). It is shown that the Josephson vortex lattice melting at B > B* = 0.6-0.7 T is associated with Berezinsky-Kosterlitz-Thouless transition in individual Bi-2212 superconducting layers and is a second-order phase transition.

Latyshev, Yu. I.; Pavlenko, V. N., E-mail: vit@cplire.ru; Orlov, A. P. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Radio Engineering and Electronics (Russian Federation)

2007-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

325

An experimental and theoretical study of the ice accretion process during artificial and natural icing conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Real-time measurements of ice growth during artificial and natural icing conditions were conducted using an ultrasonic pulse-echo technique. This technique allows ice thickness to be measured with an accuracy of ?0.5 mm; ...

Kirby, Mark Samuel

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Critical Mechanisms for the Formation of Extreme Arctic Sea-Ice Extent in the Summers of 2007 and 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A warming Arctic climate is undergoing significant e 21 nvironmental change, most evidenced by the reduction of Arctic sea-ice extent during the summer. In this study, we examine two extreme anomalies of September sea-ice extent in 2007 and 1996, and investigate the impacts of cloud fraction (CF), atmospheric precipitable water vapor (PWV), downwelling longwave flux (DLF), surface air temperature (SAT), pressure and winds on the sea-ice variation in 2007 and 1996 using both satellite-derived sea-ice products and MERRA reanalysis. The area of the Laptev, East Siberian and West Chukchi seas (70-90oN, 90-180oE) has experienced the largest variation in sea-ice extent from year-to-year and defined here as the Area Of Focus (AOF). The record low September sea-ice extent in 2007 was associated with positive anomalies 30 of CF, PWV, DLF, and SAT over the AOF. Persistent anti-cyclone positioned over the Beaufort Sea coupled with low pressure over Eurasia induced easterly zonal and southerly meridional winds. In contrast, negative CF, PWV, DLF and SAT anomalies, as well as opposite wind patterns to those in 2007, characterized the 1996 high September sea-ice extent. Through this study, we hypothesize the following positive feedbacks of clouds, water vapor, radiation and atmospheric variables on the sea-ice retreat during the summer 2007. The record low sea-ice extent during the summer 2007 is initially triggered by the atmospheric circulation anomaly. The southerly winds across the Chukchi and East Siberian seas transport warm, moist air from the north Pacific, which is not only enhancing sea-ice melt across the AOF, but also increasing clouds. The positive cloud feedback results in higher SAT and more sea-ice melt. Therefore, 40 more water vapor could be evaporated from open seas and higher SAT to form more clouds, which will enhance positive cloud feedback. This enhanced positive cloud feedback will then further increase SAT and accelerate the sea-ice retreat during the summer 2007.

Dong, Xiquan; Zib, Benjamin J.; Xi, Baike; Stanfield, Ryan; Deng, Yi; Zhang, Xiangdong; Lin, B.; Long, Charles N.

2014-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

327

Metal melting for volume reduction and recycle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper summarizes the experiences with melting contaminated steel materials for volume reduction and melting uranium-contaminated copper and aluminum for possible recycle. In the past there has not been an economic incentive to reduce the volume of low-level beta-gamma contaminated metallic scrap materials in the United States. With the rising cost of transportation and burial facility fees new interest in volume reduction is being generated. This new interest has been primarily focused at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) where the Waste Experimental Reduction Facility (WERF) was established to demonstrate both metal melting and incineration of combustible material for volume reduction. Other demonstration programs involving melting for volume reduction and recycle of aluminum and copper, as well as ferrous scrap, were related to the Cascade Improvement and Cascade Upgrade Programs (CIP/CUP) at the Paducah, Kentucky facility. While the melting demonstrations for the CIP/CUP material were not primarily based on economic incentives, several observations recorded during the programs are of interest with regard to melting of copper and aluminum. (4 refs., 8 tabs.)

Miller, R.L.

1987-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

328

amorphous ice transition: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

artificial and natural icing conditions MIT - DSpace Summary: Real-time measurements of ice growth during artificial and natural icing conditions were conducted using an...

329

alpine deep ice: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

artificial and natural icing conditions MIT - DSpace Summary: Real-time measurements of ice growth during artificial and natural icing conditions were conducted using an...

330

SILICATE MELT PROPERTIES AND VOLCANIC Youxue Zhang,1,2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SILICATE MELT PROPERTIES AND VOLCANIC ERUPTIONS Youxue Zhang,1,2 Zhengjiu Xu,2 Mengfan Zhu,1 2007. [1] Knowledge about the properties of silicate melts is needed by volcanologists and petrologists and diffusivity of volatile components in silicate melts, silicate melt viscosity, and the fragmentation condition

Zhang, Youxue

331

Comparison of Software Models for Energy Savings from Cool Roofs Joshua New, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (United States)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Comparison of Software Models for Energy Savings from Cool Roofs Joshua New, Oak Ridge National consolidates comparison of RSC's projected energy savings to other simulation engines including DOE-2.1E, Attic of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Building Technologies Office (BTO). The simulation engine used in the RSC

Tennessee, University of

332

he skies open and water gushes off roofs, down gutters and into drains. Heavy rain quickly overwhelms the drainage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

T he skies open and water gushes off roofs, down gutters and into drains. Heavy rain quickly risk heavy rain will cause flooding. Even if this isn't possible, water can be held in underground overwhelms the drainage network; before long, water backs up and starts creeping towards buildings. In cities

Brierley, Andrew

333

Roof-top solar energy potential under performance-based building energy codes: The case of Spain  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The quantification at regional level of the amount of energy (for thermal uses and for electricity) that can be generated by using solar systems in buildings is hindered by the availability of data for roof area estimation. In this note, we build on an existing geo-referenced method for determining available roof area for solar facilities in Spain to produce a quantitative picture of the likely limits of roof-top solar energy. The installation of solar hot water systems (SHWS) and photovoltaic systems (PV) is considered. After satisfying up to 70% (if possible) of the service hot water demand in every municipality, PV systems are installed in the remaining roof area. Results show that, applying this performance-based criterion, SHWS would contribute up to 1662 ktoe/y of primary energy (or 68.5% of the total thermal-energy demand for service hot water), while PV systems would provide 10 T W h/y of electricity (or 4.0% of the total electricity demand). (author)

Izquierdo, Salvador; Montanes, Carlos; Dopazo, Cesar; Fueyo, Norberto [Fluid Mechanics Group, University of Zaragoza and LITEC (CSIC), Maria de Luna 3, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

334

Melting Ice and Tangled Nets: Litigation and Conservation Policy in the US, Australia, and Canada  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Why the US, Canada, and Australia?13Model………………………..16 B. Canada, Australia, and CollaborativeMaritimus Conservation in  Canada: An Ecological Basis for 

Shaffer, Robert

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Melting Ice and Tangled Nets: Litigation and Conservation Policy in the US, Australia, and Canada  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

M. “Environmental Law in Australia and the United States: ACanada, and Australia?13 IV. LegalModel………………………..16 B. Canada, Australia, and Collaborative

Shaffer, Robert

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Sensitive response of the Greenland Ice Sheet to surface melt drainage over soft bed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by detailed energy balance observations. The Cryosphere 6, 199-209, doi:doi:10.5194/tc-6-199-2012 (2012). ... by frictional and geothermal heating accumulates at the 136 bed over the course of winter and is released together with the first SGL drainage 137 events. With either one of these factors included, our model was able to reproduce the 138 2010 spring...

Bougamont, M H; Christoffersen,P.; Hubbard, A. L.; Fitzpatrick, A. A.; Doyle, S. H.; Carter, S. P.

2014-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

337

Melting Ice and Tangled Nets: Litigation and Conservation Policy in the US, Australia, and Canada  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Clem and Clevo Wilson. “Ecotourism for the Survival of SeaTisdell and Clevo Wilson, “Ecotourism for the Survival of 

Shaffer, Robert

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Comparative laboratory evaluation of resin-grouted roof bolt elements. Report of Investigations/1985  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In laboratory testing, the Bureau of Mines established criteria by which common resin-grouted roof-bolting systems can be evaluated and compared. Ultimate strength and stiffness were determined for nontensioned full-column, point-anchor, tensioned full-column, and debondable resin-grouted bolts, and for variations on full-column bolts. Bolt performances were compared using the performance of the 3/4-in full-column resin-grouted bolt as the standard. New and innovative systems can also be qualitatively compared against this standard. Various host mediums were used in the testing: sandstone, concrete, simulated coal, simulated shale, and plaster. Bolt performances expected in other mediums can be inferred from the response patterns obtained in these mediums.

Bartels, J.R.; Pappas, D.M.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Entanglement monogamy of multipartite higher-dimensional quantum systems using convex-roof extended negativity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose replacing concurrence by convex-roof extended negativity (CREN) for studying monogamy of entanglement (MoE). We show that all proven MoE relations using concurrence can be rephrased in terms of CREN. Furthermore we show that higher-dimensional (qudit) extensions of MoE in terms of CREN are not disproven by any of the counterexamples used to disprove qudit extensions of MoE in terms of concurrence. We further test the CREN version of MoE for qudits by considering fully or partially coherent mixtures of a qudit W-class state with the vacuum and show that the CREN version of MoE for qudits is satisfied in this case as well. The CREN version of MoE for qudits is thus a strong conjecture with no obvious counterexamples.

Jeong San Kim; Anirban Das; Barry C. Sanders

2008-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

340

Ultra slow EB melting to reduce reactor cladding  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A process is described for making an electron beam melted fuel element liner material from sponge zirconium, the process comprising: electron beam melting sponge zirconium at a melting rate of less than 1 inch per hour to form an electron beam melted zirconium material containing less than 300 ppm iron, less than 400 ppm oxygen, and less than 5 ppm aluminum; and alloying the electron beam melted zirconium in a vacuum arc furnace with 0.1-2.0 weight percent of tin.

Worcester, S.A.; Woods, C.R.; Galer, G.S.; Propst, R.L.

1989-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "roof ice melt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Ross Ice Shelf in situ radio-frequency ice attenuation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have measured the in situ average electric field attenuation length for radio-frequency signals broadcast vertically through the Ross Ice Shelf. We chose a location, Moore Embayment, south of Minna Bluff, known for its high reflectivity at the ice-sea interface. We confirmed specular reflection and used the return pulses to measure the average attenuation length from 75-1250 MHz over the round-trip distance of 1155 m. We find the average electric field attenuation length to vary from 500 m at 75 MHz to 300 m at 1250 MHz, with an experimental uncertainty of 55 to 15 m. We discuss the implications for neutrino telescopes that use the radio technique and include the Ross Ice Shelf as part of their sensitive volume.

Taylor Barrella; Steven Barwick; David Saltzberg

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Moisture effects in low-slope roofs: Drying rates after water addition with various vapor retarders  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tests have been conducted in the Large Scale Climate Simulator (LSCS) of the US. Building Envelope Research Center at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to investigate downward drying rates of various unvented, low-slope roof systems. A secondary objective was to study heat flow patterns so as to understand how to control latent heat effects on impermeable heat flux transducers. Nine test sections were tested simultaneously. The sections had a p deck above fibrous-glass insulation and were examples of cold-deck systems. These five sections had various vapor retarder systems on a gypsum board ceiling below the insulation. The other four sections had a lightweight insulating concrete deck below expanded polystyrene insulation and the same vapor retarder systems, and were examples of warm-deck systems. The cold-deck systems had materials that were relatively permeable to water vapor, while the materials in the warm-deck systems were less permeable. All test sections were topped by an impermeable roofing membrane. The test sections were instrumented with thermocouples between all layers and with small heat flux transducers at the bottom and top of the fibrous-glass insulation and in the middle of the expanded polystyrene insulation. Two different kinds of moisture probes were used to qualitatively monitor the movement of the moisture. The heat flux measurements showed that heat conduction dominates the system using impermeable insulation materials, with only a slight increase due to increased thermal conductivity of wet expanded polystyrene. There was significant transfer of latent heat in the test sections with permeable insulation, causing the peak heat fluxes to increase by as much as a factor of two. With temperatures imposed that are typical of summer days, latent heat transfer associated with condensation and evaporation of moisture in the test sections was measured to be as important as the heat transfer by conduction.

Pedersen, C.R. [Technical Univ. of Denmark, Lyngby (Denmark); Petrie, T.W. [Marquette Univ., Milwaukee, WI (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Courville, G.E.; Desjarlais, A.O.; Childs, P.W.; Wilkes, K.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology: Melting Efficiency in Die Casting Operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project addressed multiple aspects of the aluminum melting and handling in die casting operations, with the objective of increasing the energy efficiency while improving the quality of the molten metal. The efficiency of melting has always played an important role in the profitability of aluminum die casting operations. Consequently, die casters need to make careful choices in selecting and operating melting equipment and procedures. The capital cost of new melting equipment with higher efficiency can sometimes be recovered relatively fast when it replaces old melting equipment with lower efficiency. Upgrades designed to improve energy efficiency of existing equipment may be well justified. Energy efficiency is however not the only factor in optimizing melting operations. Melt losses and metal quality are also very important. Selection of melting equipment has to take into consideration the specific conditions at the die casting shop such as availability of floor space, average quantity of metal used as well as the ability to supply more metal during peaks in demand. In all these cases, it is essential to make informed decisions based on the best available data.

David Schwam

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

344

Physical Controls on Ice Variability in the Bering Sea /  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

region. The model also produces less ice near much of thewinds (Figure 3.13c,d) produce more ice growth and more iceThe model produces variations in total ice area anomalies

Li, Linghan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

NOAA Technical Memorandum GLERL-135 Great Lakes Ice Cover Climatology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

____________________________________________________________________________ Great Lakes Ice Cover Climatology Update: Winters 2003, 2004, and 2005 Raymond A. Assel NOAA, Great..................................................................................................6 DATES OF FIRST (LAST) ICE AND ICE DURATION. .............................................................7 SEASONAL PROGRESSION OF ICE COVER

346

Scrap uranium recycling via electron beam melting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A program is underway at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to recycle scrap uranium metal. Currently, much of the material from forging and machining processes is considered radioactive waste and is disposed of by oxidation and encapsulation at significant cost. In the recycling process, uranium and uranium alloys in various forms will be processed by electron beam melting and continuously cast into ingots meeting applicable specifications for virgin material. Existing vacuum processing facilities at LLNL are in compliance with all current federal and state environmental, safety and health regulations for the electron beam melting and vaporization of uranium metal. One of these facilities has been retrofitted with an auxiliary electron beam gun system, water-cooled hearth, crucible and ingot puller to create an electron beam melt furnace. In this furnace, basic process R&D on uranium recycling will be performed with the goal of eventual transfer of this technology to a production facility.

McKoon, R.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Thermal Storage with Ice Harvesting Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Application of Harvesting Ice Storage Systems. Thermal storage systems are becoming widely accepted techniques for utility load management. This paper discusses the principles of ice harvesting equipment and their application to the multi...

Knebel, D. E.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Quantum Ice : a quantum Monte Carlo study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ice states, in which frustrated interactions lead to a macroscopic ground-state degeneracy, occur in water ice, in problems of frustrated charge order on the pyrochlore lattice, and in the family of rare-earth magnets collectively known as spin ice. Of particular interest at the moment are "quantum spin ice" materials, where large quantum fluctuations may permit tunnelling between a macroscopic number of different classical ground states. Here we use zero-temperature quantum Monte Carlo simulations to show how such tunnelling can lift the degeneracy of a spin or charge ice, stabilising a unique "quantum ice" ground state --- a quantum liquid with excitations described by the Maxwell action of 3+1-dimensional quantum electrodynamics. We further identify a competing ordered "squiggle" state, and show how both squiggle and quantum ice states might be distinguished in neutron scattering experiments on a spin ice material.

Nic Shannon; Olga Sikora; Frank Pollmann; Karlo Penc; Peter Fulde

2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

349

Heavy ion irradiation of crystalline water ice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Under cosmic irradiation, the interstellar water ice mantles evolve towards a compact amorphous state. Crystalline ice amorphisation was previously monitored mainly in the keV to hundreds of keV ion energies. We experimentally investigate heavy ion irradiation amorphisation of crystalline ice, at high energies closer to true cosmic rays, and explore the water-ice sputtering yield. We irradiated thin crystalline ice films with MeV to GeV swift ion beams, produced at the GANIL accelerator. The ice infrared spectral evolution as a function of fluence is monitored with in-situ infrared spectroscopy (induced amorphisation of the initial crystalline state into a compact amorphous phase). The crystalline ice amorphisation cross-section is measured in the high electronic stopping-power range for different temperatures. At large fluence, the ice sputtering is measured on the infrared spectra, and the fitted sputtering-yield dependence, combined with previous measurements, is quadratic over three decades of electronic ...

Dartois, E; Boduch, P; Brunetto, R; Chabot, M; Domaracka, A; Ding, J J; Kamalou, O; Lv, X Y; Rothard, H; da Silveira, E F; Thomas, J C

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Home Atmosphere Sea Ice Ocean Land Greenland Biology Greenland Ice Sheet Mass Balance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Home Atmosphere Sea Ice Ocean Land Greenland Biology Greenland Ice Sheet Mass Balance E. Hanna 1 ice loss over Greenland. Recent warm events are about the same magnitude, if not smaller, than those warming, remain incompletely understood. Satellite Observations The Greenland ice sheet (GrIS) contains 7

Box, Jason E.

351

Ice Stream C slowdown is not stabilizing West Antarctic Ice Sheet S Anandakrishnan RB Alleyy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ice Stream C slowdown is not stabilizing West Antarctic Ice Sheet S Anandakrishnan RB Alleyy RW Jacobelz H Conwayx March 24, 1999 Abstract Changes in the flow of ice stream C likely indicate a continuing part of ice stream C, West Antarctica largely stagnated over the last few centuries, while upglacier

Jacobel, Robert W.

352

Quenched by ice: Transient grating measurements of vibronic dynamics in bromine-doped ice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quenched by ice: Transient grating measurements of vibronic dynamics in bromine-doped ice I. U April 2006; published online 25 May 2006 In both water and in ice, the absorption spectra of bromine of the trapped molecule in its electronic B 3 0u state in ice. Independent of the initial excitation energy

Apkarian, V. Ara

353

Sea ice control of water isotope transport to Antarctica and implications for ice core interpretation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

associated with diabatic heating. The interior deuterium excess response is more strongly affected by sea ice ice and the local conditions may have remote influences [Jacobs and Comiso, 1997; StammerjohnSea ice control of water isotope transport to Antarctica and implications for ice core

Noone, David

354

New study details glacier ice loss following ice shelf July 25, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Ted #12;Scambos of the NSIDC produced detailed ice loss maps from 2001 to 2009 for the main tributaryNew study details glacier ice loss following ice shelf collapse July 25, 2011 Contact: Anthony Lane UMBC (410) 455-5793 alane@umbc.edu Katherine Leitzell National Snow and Ice Data Center University

Cambridge, University of

355

Ice Sample Production Techniques and Indentation Tests for Laboratory Experiments Simulating Ship Collisions with Ice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

questions involving the fracture of ice. METHODS For STePS2 investigations ice is variously produced usingIce Sample Production Techniques and Indentation Tests for Laboratory Experiments Simulating Ship Collisions with Ice Stephen E. Bruneau1 , Anna K. Dillenburg2 , and Simon Ritter2 1 Prof. of Civil

Bruneau, Steve

356

Numerical Age Computation of the Antarctic Ice Sheet for Dating Deep Ice Cores  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Numerical Age Computation of the Antarctic Ice Sheet for Dating Deep Ice Cores Bernd M¨ugge1 for the computation of the age of ice is discussed within the frame of numerical ice sheet modelling. The first method of a numerical diffusion term to stabilize the solution and therefore produces arbitrary results in a near

Calov, Reinhard

357

LABORATORY INDENTATION TESTS SIMULATING ICE-STRUCTURE INTERACTIONS USING CONE-SHAPED ICE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

involving closing speeds over 1500m/s. Ice was produced using distilled and chilled water, unLABORATORY INDENTATION TESTS SIMULATING ICE- STRUCTURE INTERACTIONS USING CONE-SHAPED ICE SAMPLES describes the results of a series of tests from 2010-2012 in which cone-shaped ice samples were crushed

Bruneau, Steve

358

Gas isotopes in ice reveal a vegetated central Greenland during ice sheet invasion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

= ) in the silty ice, reaching values as high as 22 mM [Tison et al., 1998]. Ammonium oxalate is produced duringGas isotopes in ice reveal a vegetated central Greenland during ice sheet invasion R. Souchez,1 J prevailing during build-up of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GIS) are not yet established. Here we use results from

Chappellaz, Jérôme

359

Developing Great Lakes Ice Model (GLIM) using CIOM (Coupled Ice-Ocean Model) in Lake Erie  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Developing Great Lakes Ice Model (GLIM) using CIOM (Coupled Ice- Ocean Model) in Lake Erie Primary of the ice-ocean models, assistance with development of project reports and scientific presentations will first start the implementation of the CIOM in Lake Erie, assemble satellite observations of ice cover

360

Satellite SAR Remote Sensing of Great Lakes Ice Cover, Part 2. Ice Classification and Mapping  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Satellite SAR Remote Sensing of Great Lakes Ice Cover, Part 2. Ice Classification and Mapping (freshwater) ice types using the Jet Propulsion Laboratory C-band scatterometer, together with surface-based ice physical characterization measurements and environmental parameters, were acquired concurrently

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "roof ice melt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Fire and Ice Issue 3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,fpl ^1 FIRE AND ICE Available from: Kathleen Resch PO Box 1766 Temple City,CA 91780 III © May, 1995 by Kathleen Resch for the contributors. No reprints or reproduction without the written permission of the author/artist. This is an amateur... publication and is not intended to infringe upon the rightsof "Blake's 7" copyright holders.. FIRE AND ICE TABLE OF CONTENTS THE GIFT by Pat Terra 1 "innerspace" by Pat Terra 24 WILD, BEAUTIFUL AND DAMNED by Gemini 25 SET THE NIGHT ON FIRE by Riley Cannon 40...

Multiple Contributors

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

AMSR-E Algorithm Theoretical Basis Document: Sea Ice Products  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the Arctic perennial ice regions, and the ice temperature is produced from an algorithm similar to the Nimbus1 AMSR-E Algorithm Theoretical Basis Document: Sea Ice Products Thorsten Markus and Donald J 20771 1. Overview The AMSR-E sea ice standard level 3 products include sea ice concentration, sea ice

Waliser, Duane E.

363

Method and apparatus for melting metals  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus for melting metals uses microwave energy as the primary source of heat. The metal or mixture of metals are placed in a ceramic crucible which couples, at least partially, with the microwaves to be used. The crucible is encased in a ceramic casket for insulation and placed within a microwave chamber. The chamber may be evacuated and refilled to exclude oxygen. After melting, the crucible may be removed for pouring or poured within the chamber by dripping or running into a heated mold within the chamber. Apparent coupling of the microwaves with softened or molten metal produces high temperatures with great energy savings.

Moore, Alan F.; Schechter, Donald E.; Morrow, Marvin Stanley

2006-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

364

IceCube Project Monthly Report Accomplishments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

staff from UW, IceCube collaborators, and Raytheon. · Conducted a Quarterly Status Meeting at UW-loaded schedule for on-ice activities that is coordinated with the Raytheon on-ice schedules. Construction Cost accurate application of escalation rates and revisions to actual cost data. Raytheon earned value data

Saffman, Mark

365

Surface Impedance Tomography for Antarctic Sea Ice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Surface Impedance Tomography for Antarctic Sea Ice C. Sampsona , K. M. Goldena , A. Gullya , A. P, Australia Abstract During the 2007 SIPEX expedition in pack ice off the coast of East Antarctica, we measured the electrical conductivity of sea ice via surface impedance tomography. Resistance data from

Golden, Kenneth M.

366

8, 87438771, 2008 Inhibition of ice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ACPD 8, 8743­8771, 2008 Inhibition of ice crystallisation B. J. Murray Title Page Abstract Chemistry and Physics Discussions Inhibition of ice crystallisation in highly viscous aqueous organic acid­8771, 2008 Inhibition of ice crystallisation B. J. Murray Title Page Abstract Introduction Conclusions

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

367

5, 37233745, 2005 characteristics of ice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ACPD 5, 3723­3745, 2005 Chemical characteristics of ice nuclei in anvil cirrus clouds C. H. Twohy and Physics Discussions Chemical characteristics of ice residual nuclei in anvil cirrus clouds: evidence for homogeneous and heterogeneous ice formation C. H. Twohy 1 and M. R. Poellot 2 1 College of Oceanic

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

368

The convective desalination of sea ice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

containing both liquid brine and solid (pure water) ice. Frad is the flux of penetrating solar radiation. Thus the thermal properties of sea ice are composed of those of the solid and liquid phases that make up sea ice. Fixed-salinity models used in older...

Rees Jones, David

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Ice Cream in a Bag Ingredients  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ice Cream in a Bag Ingredients: 1 tablespoon sugar 1/4 teaspoon vanilla extract 2 tablespoons soft fruit 1/2 cup skim milk For the freezer bag; not to be eaten: 1/3 cup rock salt Ice cubes Directions 1. Open a gallon size plastic bag. Add rock salt and fill half way up with ice. Shake to mix the salt

Liskiewicz, Maciej

370

3, 9991020, 2007 Summer sea ice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CPD 3, 999­1020, 2007 Summer sea ice during the early Holocene H. Goosse et al. Title Page Abstract on the early Holocene climate constrains the summer sea ice projections for the 21st century H. Goosse, E #12;CPD 3, 999­1020, 2007 Summer sea ice during the early Holocene H. Goosse et al. Title Page

Boyer, Edmond

371

2, 879921, 2006 Ice-sheet evolution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CPD 2, 879­921, 2006 Ice-sheet evolution during the last climatic cycle S. Charbit et al. Title reconstructions of the Northern Hemisphere ice sheets through the last glacial-interglacial cycle S. Charbit1 , C­921, 2006 Ice-sheet evolution during the last climatic cycle S. Charbit et al. Title Page Abstract

Boyer, Edmond

372

Formation and character of an ancient 19-m ice cover and underlying trapped brine in an ``ice-sealed'' east  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Formation and character of an ancient 19-m ice cover and underlying trapped brine in an ``ice bed year-round. New ice-core analysis and tempera- ture data show that beneath 19 m of ice is a water°C. The ice cover thickens at both its base and surface, sealing concentrated brine beneath. The ice

Priscu, John C.

373

Medical ice slurry production device  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to an apparatus for producing sterile ice slurries for medical cooling applications. The apparatus is capable of producing highly loaded slurries suitable for delivery to targeted internal organs of a patient, such as the brain, heart, lungs, stomach, kidneys, pancreas, and others, through medical size diameter tubing. The ice slurry production apparatus includes a slurry production reservoir adapted to contain a volume of a saline solution. A flexible membrane crystallization surface is provided within the slurry production reservoir. The crystallization surface is chilled to a temperature below a freezing point of the saline solution within the reservoir such that ice particles form on the crystallization surface. A deflector in the form of a reciprocating member is provided for periodically distorting the crystallization surface and dislodging the ice particles which form on the crystallization surface. Using reservoir mixing the slurry is conditioned for easy pumping directly out of the production reservoir via medical tubing or delivery through other means such as squeeze bottles, squeeze bags, hypodermic syringes, manual hand delivery, and the like.

Kasza, Kenneth E. (Palos Park, IL); Oras, John (Des Plaines, IL); Son, HyunJin (Naperville, IL)

2008-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

374

Pulsed-electron-beam melting of Fe  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pulsed (50 nsec) electron beams with deposited energies of 1.1 to 2.3 J/cm/sup 2/ have been used to rapidly melt a surface layer of Fe. Calculations show that this range of energies produces melt depths from 0.4 to 1.2 ..mu..m and melt times of 100 to 500 nsec. Optical microscopy and SEM of pulse treated polycrystalline foils show slip traces, as well as a general smoothing of surface features which shows that melting has occurred. TEM shows that the resolidified material is bcc, and that the material within a grain is epitaxial with the substrate. TEM also shows slip traces along (110) planes, as well as a high density of dislocations, both extended and loop. At the highest energy, subgrain boundaries are observed. Some samples were implanted with 1 x 10/sup 16/ Sn/cm/sup 2/ at 150 keV. After pulse treatment, the Sn depth profile was observed to have broadened, consistent with liquid phase diffusion. The Sn had the unexpected effect of suppressing slip at the sample surface.

Knapp, J.A.; Follstaedt, D.M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Analysis of an EBeam melting process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electron-Beam (EBeam) melting furnaces are routinely used to minimize the occurrence of second-phase particles in the processing of segregation-sensitive alloys. As one part of the process, a circulating electron beam impinges the surface of a crucible melt pool to help control the shape of the solidification front below. By modeling melt pool hydrodynamics, heat transfer, and the shape of solidification boundaries, we plan to optimize the dwell pattern of the beam so that the material solidifies with a composition as spatially homogeneous as possible. Both two-and three-dimensional models are being pursued with FIDAP 5.02, the former serving as a test bed for various degrees of model sophistication. A heat flux distribution is specified on the top of the domain to simulate the EBeam dwell pattern. In two dimensions it is found that an inertially-driven recirculation in the melt pool interacts with a counter-rotating buoyancy-driven recirculation, and that both recirculation influence heavily the shape of the solidification front. In three dimensions the inertial cell decays quickly with distance from the position of the inlet stream. Because the Rayleigh number can exceed 10{sup 7} for materials and operating conditions of interest, stability and the possibility of spontaneous transients are explored. 1 refs., 3 figs.

Schunk, P.R.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Energy Savings in Electric Arc Furnace Melting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Arc furnace melting which at one time was almost exclusively used to produce alloy steel and steel castings is now widely accepted in the industry as an efficient process to produce all types of steel and iron. Presently, about 28% of steel...

Lubbeck, W.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Design, development and validation of a training system for roof bolt equipment operators. Open file report, 21 September 1978-10 April 1982  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the approach, procedures, and results of a program to develop training materials for roof bolter operators. The objective of the program was to design and produce a training sequence which would prepare roof bolter trainees for job performance. Data were collected and analyzed using the general procedures of Instructional Systems Development (ISD). Input data came from previous roof bolter training analysis program. These data were expanded and structured through a series of ISD steps: objectives hierarchies, media selection, syllabus, lesson specifications, and training materials development. The resulting program consisted of an ordered sequence of 15 lessons. The media mix for the 15 lessons included lectures, slide-tape lessons, and hands-on instruction using operational roof bolters. Contents of all lessons were reviewed and approved by the Bureau of Mines.

Hinton, W.M. Jr.; Menzer, G.W.; Reilly, R.E.; Baker, R.M.

1982-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

378

Observed runoff, jokulhlaups and suspended sediment load from the Greenland ice at Kangerlussuaq, West Greenland, 2007 and 2008  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study fills the gap in hydrologic measurements of runoff exiting a part of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS), the Kangerlussuaq drainage area, West Greenland. The observations are of value for obtaining knowledge about the terrestrial freshwater and sediment output from part of the GrIS and the strip of land between the GrIS and the ocean, in the context of varying ice sheet surface melt and influx entering the ocean. High-resolution stage, discharge and suspended sediment load show a decrease in runoff of {approx} 25% and in sediment load of {approx} 40% from 2007 to 2008 in response to a decrease in the summer accumulated number of positive degree days. During the 2007 and 2008 runoff season, joekulhlaups are observed at Kangerlussuaq, drained from an ice-dammed lake at the margin of the GrIS.

Mernild, Sebastian Haugard [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hasholt, Bent [UNIV OF COPENHAGEN

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

DYNAMIC THERMALLY-DISCONNECTED BUILDING ENVELOPES A NEW PARADIGM FOR WALLS AND ROOFS IN LOW ENERGY BUILDINGS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes numerical and experimental analysis of a novel design concept. Traditionally the thermal design of building envelope assemblies is based on a static energy flow. However, building envelopes are subject to varying environmental conditions. This mismatch between the steady-state principles used in the design of roofs and walls and their dynamic operation results in relatively low thermal efficiency. Design work in support of the development of zero energy houses showed that conventional insulations may not be the most cost effective energy solution. Testing conducted on several strategies to thermally-disconnect wall and roof components showed 70% to 90% reductions in peak hour loads as compared to conventional building practice.

Miller, William A [ORNL] [ORNL; Kosny, Jan [ORNL] [ORNL; Zaltash, Abdolreza [ORNL] [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Thermal convection in a spherical shell with melting/freezing at either or both of its boundaries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In a number of geophysical or planetological settings (Earth's inner core, a silicate mantle crystallizing from a magma ocean, or an ice shell surrounding a deep water ocean) a convecting crystalline layer is in contact with a layer of its melt. Allowing for melting/freezing at one or both of the boundaries of the solid layer is likely to affect the pattern of convection in the layer. We study here the onset of thermal convection in a viscous spherical shell with dynamically induced melting/freezing at either or both of its boundaries. It is shown that the behavior of each interface depends on the value of a dimensional number P, which is the ratio of a melting/freezing timescale over a viscous relaxation timescale. A small value of P corresponds to permeable boundary conditions, while a large value of P corresponds to impermeable boundary conditions. The linear stability analysis predicts a significant effect of semi-permeable boundaries when the number P characterizing either of the boundary is small enough...

Deguen, Renaud

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "roof ice melt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Experimental studies of melting and crystallization processes in planetary interiors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Melting and crystallization processes on the Earth and Moon are explored in this thesis, and the topics of melt generation, transport, and crystallization are discussed in three distinct geologic environments: the Moon's ...

Krawczynski, Michael James

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Laurentide Ice Sheet meltwater and abrupt climate change during the last glaciation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A leading hypothesis to explain abrupt climate change during the last glacial cycle calls on fluctuations in the margin of the North American Laurentide Ice Sheet (LIS), which may have routed freshwater between the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) and North Atlantic, affecting North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) variability and regional climate. Paired measurements of {delta}O and Mg/Ca of foraminiferal calcite from GOM sediments reveal five episodes of LIS meltwater input from 28-45 thousand years ago (ka) that do not match the millennial-scale Dansgaard-Oeschger (D/O) warmings recorded in Greenland ice. We suggest that summer melting of the LIS may occur during Antarctic warming and likely contributed to sea-level variability during Marine Isotope Stage 3 (MIS 3).

Hill, H W; Flower, B P; Quinn, T M; Hollander, D J; Guilderson, T P

2005-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

383

The technical viability of alternative blowing agents in polyisocyanurate roof insulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper is a progress report on the initial results of laboratory test on a set of prototypical, experimental, polyisocyanurate (PIR) laminate boardstock produced to evaluate the viability of alternative hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) as blowing agents. All boardstock was produced from the same formulation and was not optimized for thermal performance. Boardstock made in the future may differ in performance from this set. Thermal resistance values are reported for PIR boards prepared with CFC-11, HCFC-123, HCFC-141b, and two blends of HCFC-123 and HCFC-141b. The primary purpose of the laboratory tests is to answer a key question: will foams produced with the alternative blowing agents yield the same outstanding thermal properties obtained with CFC-11 The CFC problem is enormous. Reductions in the production of CFC-11 and CFC-12 may lead to less efficient substitutes and increase annual US energy consumption for building applications alone by one (10{sup 15}Btu) or more (1). The current effort is a cooperative industry/government program to avoid this undesirable effect by establishing the viability of alternative blowing agents. The research project for CFC alternatives resulted from two workshops that involved participants from industry, government, and academia (2). At the initial workshop the participants prioritized 29 research projects of a CFC research menu. The second workshop focused on a single cooperative project, the long-term performance of substitute insulations containing HCFC-123 and HCFC-141b for roofing applications. 20 refs., 5 figs., 7 tabs.

McElroy, D.L.; Graves, R.S.; Weaver, F.J.; Yarbrough, D.W.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Using Cool Roofs to Reduce Energy Use, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, and Urban Heat-island Effects: Findings from an India Experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cool roofs, cool pavements, and urban vegetation reduce energy use in buildings, lower local air pollutant concentrations, and decrease greenhouse gas emissions from urban areas. This report summarizes the results of a detailed monitoring project in India and related simulations of meteorology and air quality in three developing countries. The field results quantified direct energy savings from installation of cool roofs on individual commercial buildings. The measured annual energy savings potential from roof-whitening of previously black roofs ranged from 20-22 kWh/m2 of roof area, corresponding to an air-conditioning energy use reduction of 14-26% in commercial buildings. The study estimated that typical annual savings of 13-14 kWh/m2 of roof area could be achieved by applying white coating to uncoated concrete roofs on commercial buildings in the Metropolitan Hyderabad region, corresponding to cooling energy savings of 10-19%. With the assumption of an annual increase of 100,000 square meters of new roof construction for the next 10 years in the Metropolitan Hyderabad region, the annual cooling energy savings due to whitening concrete roof would be 13-14 GWh of electricity in year ten alone, with cumulative 10-year cooling energy savings of 73-79 GWh for the region. The estimated savings for the entire country would be at least 10 times the savings in Hyderabad, i.e., more than 730-790 GWh. We estimated that annual direct CO2 reduction associated with reduced energy use would be 11-12 kg CO2/m2 of flat concrete roof area whitened, and the cumulative 10-year CO2 reduction would be approximately 0.60-0.65 million tons in India. With the price of electricity estimated at seven Rupees per kWh, the annual electricity savings on air-conditioning would be approximately 93-101 Rupees per m2 of roof. This would translate into annual national savings of approximately one billion Rupees in year ten, and cumulative 10-year savings of over five billion Rupees for cooling energy in India. Meteorological simulations in this study indicated that a reduction of 2C in air temperature in the Hyderabad area would be likely if a combination of increased surface albedo and vegetative cover are used as urban heat-island control strategies. In addition, air-temperature reductions on the order of 2.5-3.5C could be achieved if moderate and aggressive heat-island mitigation measures are adopted, respectively. A large-scale deployment of mitigation measures can bring additional indirect benefit to the urban area. For example, cooling outside air can improve the efficiency of cooling systems, reduce smog and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, and indirectly reduce pollution from power plants - all improving environmental health quality. This study has demonstrated the effectiveness of cool-roof technology as one of the urban heat-island control strategies for the Indian industrial and scientific communities and has provided an estimate of the national energy savings potential of cool roofs in India. These outcomes can be used for developing cool-roof building standards and related policies in India. Additional field studies, built upon the successes and lessons learned from this project, may be helpful to further confirm the scale of potential energy savings from the application of cooler roofs in various regions of India. In the future, a more rigorous meteorological simulation using urbanized (meso-urban) meteorological models should be conducted, which may produce a more accurate estimate of the air-temperature reductions for the entire urban area.

Akbari, Hashem; Xu, Tengfang; Taha, Haider; Wray, Craig; Sathaye, Jayant; Garg, Vishal; Tetali, Surekha; Babu, M. Hari; Reddy, K. Niranjan

2011-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

385

New ice rules for nanoconfined monolayer ice from first principles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Understanding the structural tendencies of nanoconfined water is of great interest for nanoscience and biology, where nano/micro-sized objects may be separated by very few layers of water. Here we investigate the properties of ice confined to a quasi-2D monolayer by a featureless, chemically neutral potential, using density-functional theory simulations with a non-local van der Waals density functional. An ab initio random structure search reveals all the energetically competitive monolayer configurations to belong to only two of the previously-identified families, characterized by a square or honeycomb hydrogen-bonding network, respectively. From an in-depth analysis we show that the well-known ice rules for bulk ice need to be revised for the monolayer, with distinct new rules appearing for the two networks. All identified stable phases for both are found to be non-polar (but with a topologically non-trivial texture for the square) and, hence, non-ferroelectric, in contrast to the predictions of empirical f...

Corsetti, Fabiano; Artacho, Emilio

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Hydrous silicate melt at high pressure Mainak Mookherjee1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LETTERS Hydrous silicate melt at high pressure Mainak Mookherjee1 , Lars Stixrude2 & Bijaya Karki3 The structure and physical properties of hydrous silicate melts and the solubility of water in melts over most in structure to our finding that the water­silicate system becomes increasingly ideal at high pressure: we find

Stixrude, Lars

387

Supraglacial lakes on the Larsen B Ice Shelf, Antarctica, and Paakitsoq Region, Greenland: a comparative study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.epsl.2011.04.014. 427 Box, J. E., and K. Ski (2007), Remote sounding of Greenland supraglacial melt lakes: 428 implications for subglacial hydraulics, J. Glaciol., 53(181), 257–265, 429 doi:10.3189/172756507782202883. 430 Bromwich, D. H., J. P. Nicolas... , Geophys. Res. Lett., 39(16), L16504, 510 doi:10.1029/2012GL052413. 511 Mobley, C. D. (1994), Light and water: radiative transfer in natural waters. 512 Academic Press, San Diego, 592. 513 Phillips, H. A. (1998), Surface meltstreams on the Amery Ice...

Banwell, Alison F.; Caballero, Martamaria; Arnold, Neil S.; Glasser, Neil F.; Cathles, L. Mac; MacAyeal, Douglas R.

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Hydrogen ICE Vehicle Testing Activities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity teamed with Electric Transportation Applications and Arizona Public Service to develop and monitor the operations of the APS Alternative Fuel (Hydrogen) Pilot Plant. The Pilot Plant provides 100% hydrogen, and hydrogen and compressed natural gas (H/CNG)-blended fuels for the evaluation of hydrogen and H/CNG internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicles in controlled and fleet testing environments. Since June 2002, twenty hydrogen and H/CNG vehicles have accumulated 300,000 test miles and 5,700 fueling events. The AVTA is part of the Department of Energy’s FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program. These testing activities are managed by the Idaho National Laboratory. This paper discusses the Pilot Plant design and monitoring, and hydrogen ICE vehicle testing methods and results.

J. Francfort; D. Karner

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Core-melt source reduction system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A core-melt source reduction system for ending the progression of a molten core during a core-melt accident and resulting in a stable solid cool matrix. The system includes alternating layers of a core debris absorbing material and a barrier material. The core debris absorbing material serves to react with and absorb the molten core such that containment overpressurization and/or failure does not occur. The barrier material slows the progression of the molten core debris through the system such that the molten core has sufficient time to react with the core absorbing material. The system includes a provision for cooling the glass/molten core mass after the reaction such that a stable solid cool matrix results. 4 figs.

Forsberg, C.W.; Beahm, E.C.; Parker, G.W.

1995-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

390

Specific heat in two-dimensional melting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report the specific heat $c_N$ around the melting transition(s) of micrometer-sized superparamagnetic particles confined in two dimensions, calculated from fluctuations of positions and internal energy, and corresponding Monte Carlo simulations. Since colloidal systems provide single particle resolution, they offer the unique possibility to compare the experimental temperatures of peak position of $c_N(T)$ and symmetry breaking, respectively. While order parameter correlation functions confirm the Kosterlitz-Thouless-Halperin-Nelson-Young melting scenario where translational and orientational order symmetries are broken at different temperatures with an intermediate so called hexatic phase, we observe a single peak of the specific heat within the hexatic phase, with excellent agreement between experiment and simulation. Thus, the peak is not associated with broken symmetries but can be explained with the total defect density, which correlates with the maximum increase of isolated dislocations. The absence of a latent heat strongly supports the continuous character of both transitions.

Sven Deutschländer; Antonio M. Puertas; Georg Maret; Peter Keim

2014-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

391

Thermally efficient melting for glass making  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is an integrated process for the production of glass utilizing combustion heat to melt glassmaking materials in a glassmaking furnace. The fuel combusted to produce heat sufficient to melt the glassmaking materials is combusted with oxygen-enriched oxidant to reduce heat losses from the offgas of the glassmaking furnace. The process further reduces heat losses by quenching hot offgas from the glassmaking furnace with a process stream to retain the heat recovered from quench in the glassmaking process with subsequent additional heat recovery by heat exchange of the fuel to the glassmaking furnace, as well as the glassmaking materials, such as batch and cullet. The process includes recovery of a commercially pure carbon dioxide product by separatory means from the cooled, residual offgas from the glassmaking furnace.

Chen, Michael S. K. (Zionsville, PA); Painter, Corning F. (Allentown, PA); Pastore, Steven P. (Allentown, PA); Roth, Gary (Trexlertown, PA); Winchester, David C. (Allentown, PA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Core-melt source reduction system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A core-melt source reduction system for ending the progression of a molten core during a core-melt accident and resulting in a stable solid cool matrix. The system includes alternating layers of a core debris absorbing material and a barrier material. The core debris absorbing material serves to react with and absorb the molten core such that containment overpressurization and/or failure does not occur. The barrier material slows the progression of the molten core debris through the system such that the molten core has sufficient time to react with the core absorbing material. The system includes a provision for cooling the glass/molten core mass after the reaction such that a stable solid cool matrix results.

Forsberg, Charles W. (Oak Ridge, TN); Beahm, Edward C. (Oak Ridge, TN); Parker, George W. (Concord, TN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

ICE Solar | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,Ohio:GreerHiCalifornia: Energythe SecondInformation 3 -2ICE Solar Jump

394

Ice Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,Ohio:GreerHiCalifornia:ISI Solar Jump to: navigation, searchIbervilleIce

395

Low-melting point heat transfer fluid  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A low-melting point, heat transfer fluid made of a mixture of five inorganic salts including about 29.1-33.5 mol % LiNO.sub.3, 0-3.9 mol % NaNO.sub.3, 2.4-8.2 mol % KNO.sub.3, 18.6-19.9 mol % NaNO.sub.2, and 40-45.6 mol % KNO.sub.2. These compositions can have liquidus temperatures below 80.degree. C. for some compositions.

Cordaro, Joseph Gabriel (Oakland, CA); Bradshaw, Robert W. (Livermore, CA)

2010-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

396

FAFCO Ice Storage test report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Ice Storage Test Facility (ISTF) is designed to test commercial ice storage systems. FAFCO provided a storage tank equipped with coils designed for use with a secondary fluid system. The FAFCO ice storage system was tested over a wide range of operating conditions. Measured system performance during charging showed the ability to freeze the tank fully, storing from 150 to 200 ton-h. However, the charging rate showed significant variations during the latter portion of the charge cycle. During discharge cycles, the storage tank outlet temperature was strongly affected by the discharge rate and tank state of charge. The discharge capacity was dependent upon both the selected discharge rate and maximum allowable tank outlet temperature. Based on these tests, storage tank selection must depend on both charge and discharge conditions. This report describes FAFCO system performance fully under both charging and discharging conditions. While the test results reported here are accurate for the prototype 1990 FAFCO Model 200, currently available FAFCO models incorporate significant design enhancements beyond the Model 200. At least one major modification was instituted as a direct result of the ISTF tests. Such design improvements were one of EPRI`s primary goals in founding the ISTF.

Stovall, T.K.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Low cation coordination in oxide melts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The complete set of Faber-Ziman partial pair distribution functions for a rare earth oxide liquid were measured for the first time by combining aerodynamic levitation, neutron diffraction, high energy x-ray diffraction and isomorphic substitution using Y2 O3 and Ho2 O3 melts. The average Y- O coordination is measured to be 5.5(2), which is significantly less than the octahedral coordination of crystalline Y2 O3 (or Ho2 O3 ). Investigation of high temperature La2 O3 , ZrO2 , SiO2 , and Al2 O3 melts by x-ray diffraction and molecular dynamics simulations also show lower-than-crystal cation- oxygen coordination. These measurements suggest a general trend towards lower M-O coordination compared to their crystalline counterparts. It is found that this coordination number drop is larger for lower field strength, larger radius cations and is negligible for high field strength (network forming) cations. These findings have broad implications for predicting the local structure and related physical properties of metal-oxide melts and oxide glasses.

Skinner, Lawrie [State University of New York, Stony Brook] [State University of New York, Stony Brook; Benmore, Chris J [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL)] [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Du, Jincheng [University of North Texas] [University of North Texas; Weber, Richard [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL)] [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Neuefeind, Joerg C [ORNL] [ORNL; Tumber, Sonia [Materials Development, Inc., Evanston, IL] [Materials Development, Inc., Evanston, IL; Parise, John B [Stony Brook University (SUNY)] [Stony Brook University (SUNY)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

An Ice Lithography Instrument Anpan Han 1, John Chervinsky2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Page 1 An Ice Lithography Instrument Anpan Han 1, John Chervinsky2 , Daniel Branton3 , and J. A a new nano-patterning method called ice lithography, where ice is used as the resist. Water vapor. The vapor condenses, covering the sample with an amorphous layer of ice. To form a lift-off mask, ice

399

Proton Ordering of Cubic Ice Ic: Spectroscopy and Computer Simulations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by producing rotational Bjerrum L-defects.1 Ambient-pressure hexagonal ice, ice Ih, shows the lowest produced from ice Ih using hydroxide doping, for example, by freezing a 0.1 M KOH solution. Because ice IhProton Ordering of Cubic Ice Ic: Spectroscopy and Computer Simulations Philipp Geiger, Christoph

Dellago, Christoph

400

Controlling ice nucleation through surface hydrophilicity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ice formation is one of the most common and important processes on Earth and almost always occurs at the surface of a material. A basic understanding of how the physiochemical properties of a material's surface affects its ability to form ice has remained elusive. Here we use molecular dynamics simulations to directly probe heterogeneous ice nucleation at an hexagonal surface of a nanoparticle of varying hydrophilicity. Surprisingly, we find that structurally identical surfaces can both inhibit and promote ice formation and analogous to a chemical catalyst, it is found that an optimal interaction between the surface and the water exists for promoting ice nucleation. We use our microscopic understanding of the mechanism to design a modified surface in silico with enhanced ice nucleating ability.

Stephen J. Cox; Shawn M. Kathmann; Ben Slater; Angelos Michaelides

2015-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "roof ice melt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Behavior of melts during softening and melting down of iron ore sinter under load  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In order to achieve effective operation in the blast furnace, the distribution control and quality improvement of burden materials are very important. In spite of the difficulties in obtaining suitable samples and making direct observation, significant progress including the placement of probes into the stack, tuyere drilling and laboratory simulation studies has been made. Investigation of the behavior of melts during softening and melting down was carried out in the temperature range of 800 C to 1,515 C. In this report, emphasis is given to investigating the mineral formation and properties of melts during softening and melting down of the iron ore sinter. Sized coke layers were placed above and below the sample to maintain uniform upward flow of gas and insure a smooth downward flow of melts. When the temperature of the sample reached the set point during the test the power was shut off and the sample was cooled in the furnace air. The weight, the height, porosity and contraction of each sample were measured. Chemical composition, observation of microstructures, SEM analysis and X-ray diffraction analysis were conducted. Results are presented.

Cho, Y.H. [Research Inst. of Industrial Science and Technology, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Soiling of building envelope surfaces and its effect on solar reflectance - Part II: Development of an accelerate aging method for roofing materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highly reflective roofs can decrease the energy required for building air conditioning, help mitigate the urban heat island effect, and slow global warming. However, these benefits are diminished by soiling and weathering processes that reduce the solar reflectance of most roofing materials. Soiling results from the deposition of atmospheric particulate matter and the growth of microorganisms, each of which absorb sunlight. Weathering of materials occurs with exposure to water, sunlight, and high temperatures. This study developed an accelerated aging method that incorporates features of soiling and weathering. The method sprays a calibrated aqueous soiling mixture of dust minerals, black carbon, humic acid, and salts onto preconditioned coupons of roofing materials, then subjects the soiled coupons to cycles of ultraviolet radiation, heat and water in a commercial weatherometer. Three soiling mixtures were optimized to reproduce the site-specific solar spectral reflectance features of roofing products exposed for 3 years in a hot and humid climate (Miami, Florida); a hot and dry climate (Phoenix, Arizona); and a polluted atmosphere in a temperate climate (Cleveland, Ohio). A fourth mixture was designed to reproduce the three-site average values of solar reflectance and thermal emittance attained after 3 years of natural exposure, which the Cool Roof Rating Council (CRRC) uses to rate roofing products sold in the US. This accelerated aging method was applied to 25 products?single ply membranes, factory and field applied coatings, tiles, modified bitumen cap sheets, and asphalt shingles?and reproduced in 3 days the CRRC's 3-year aged values of solar reflectance. This accelerated aging method can be used to speed the evaluation and rating of new cool roofing materials.

Sleiman, Mohamad; Kirchstetter, Thomas W.; Berdahl, Paul; Gilbert, Haley; Quelen, Sarah; Marlot, Lea; Preble, Chelsea; Chen, Sharon; Montalbano, Amadine; Rosseler, Olivier; Akbari, Hashem; Levinson, Ronnen; Destaillats, Hugo

2013-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

403

Summer ICE@Tech Computing Camps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Summer ICE@Tech Computing Camps Session I: June 5th - June 9th Session II: July 10th ­ July 14th (404) 385-2273 Fax (404) 385-0965 http://www.cc.gatech.edu/campice 1 #12;2 Summer ICE@Tech Program Handbook #12;3 Summer ICE@Tech is a computing and technology program for students entering 10th , 11th

Guzdial, Mark

404

INDICATOR: LAKE ERIE ICE COVER Winter ice cover on Lake Erie affects the amount of heat and moisture transferred  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

102 INDICATOR: LAKE ERIE ICE COVER Background Winter ice cover on Lake Erie affects the amount of heat and moisture transferred between the lake and the atmosphere. During winter, ice and snow can decrease the amount of light available below the ice surface for photosynthesis. In the absence of an ice

405

Relationships between Water Wettability and Ice Adhesion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ice formation and accretion may hinder the operation of many systems critical to national infrastructure, including airplanes, power lines, windmills, ships, and telecommunications equipment. Yet despite the pervasiveness ...

Meuler, Adam J.

406

Dynamics of colloidal particles in ice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We use X-ray Photon Correlation Spectroscopy (XPCS) to probe the dynamics of colloidal particles in polycrystalline ice. During freezing, the dendritic ice morphology and rejection of particles from the ice created regions of high-particle-density, where some of the colloids were forced into contact and formed disordered aggregates. We find that the particles in these high density regions underwent ballistic motion coupled with both stretched and compressed exponential decays of the intensity autocorrelation function, and that the particles' characteristic velocity increased with temperature. We explain this behavior in terms of ice grain boundary migration.

Melissa Spannuth; S. G. J. Mochrie; S. S. L. Peppin; J. S. Wettlaufer

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

407

BISICLES Captures Details of Retreating Antarctic Ice  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

suggest that the shrinking West Antarctic ice sheet is contributing to global sea level rise. But until recently, scientists could not accurately model the physical...

408

Viscosity of interfacial water regulates ice nucleation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ice formation on solid surfaces is an important phenomenon in many fields, such as cloud formation and atmospheric icing, and a key factor for applications in preventing freezing. Here, we report temperature-dependent nucleation rates of ice for hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces. The results show that hydrophilic surface presents a lower ice nucleation rate. We develop a strategy to extract the thermodynamic parameters, J{sub 0} and ?, in the context of classical nucleation theory. From the extracted J{sub 0} and ?, we reveal the dominant role played by interfacial water. The results provide an insight into freezing mechanism on solid surfaces.

Li, Kaiyong; Chen, Jing; Zhang, Qiaolan; Zhang, Yifan [Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences (BNLMS), Key Laboratory of Green Printing, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China) [Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences (BNLMS), Key Laboratory of Green Printing, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Xu, Shun; Zhou, Xin [School of Physics, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China)] [School of Physics, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Cui, Dapeng; Wang, Jianjun, E-mail: wangj220@iccas.ac.cn; Song, Yanlin [Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences (BNLMS), Key Laboratory of Green Printing, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)] [Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences (BNLMS), Key Laboratory of Green Printing, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

2014-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

409

Ferritic steel melt and FLiBe/steel experiment : melting ferritic steel.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In preparation for developing a Z-pinch IFE power plant, the interaction of ferritic steel with the coolant, FLiBe, must be explored. Sandia National Laboratories Fusion Technology Department was asked to drop molten ferritic steel and FLiBe in a vacuum system and determine the gas byproducts and ability to recycle the steel. We tried various methods of resistive heating of ferritic steel using available power supplies and easily obtained heaters. Although we could melt the steel, we could not cause a drop to fall. This report describes the various experiments that were performed and includes some suggestions and materials needed to be successful. Although the steel was easily melted, it was not possible to drip the molten steel into a FLiBe pool Levitation melting of the drop is likely to be more successful.

Troncosa, Kenneth P.; Smith, Brandon M.; Tanaka, Tina Joan

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

white paper, 9 March 2009 An ice core to reconstruct Greenland ice sheet mass balance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

white paper, 9 March 2009 1 An ice core to reconstruct Greenland a handful of years suggest a profound Greenland ice sheet mass balance sensitivity (2000) found that the Greenland ice sheet lost as much as 2/3 its current

Box, Jason E.

411

Past Accumulation Rates of the Western Antarctic Ice Sheet Near an Ice Divide   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The study of accumulation rates of ice is a direct link to the evolution of ice sheet. It is believed by scientists that ice sheet evolution will aid in the mystery of climate change and may lead to predictions about climates in the future...

Child, Sarah

2009-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

412

The last Scandinavian Ice Sheet in northwestern Russia: ice flow patterns and decay dynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

U N C O R R EC TED PR O O F The last Scandinavian Ice Sheet in northwestern Russia: ice flow Sheet in northwestern Russia: ice flow patterns and decay dynamics. Boreas, Vol. 35, pp. xxxÁxxx. Oslo) in northwestern Russia took place after a period of periglacial conditions. Till of the last SIS, Bobrovo till

Ingólfsson, �lafur

413

Hail Ice Damage of Stringer-Stiffened Curved Composite Panels /  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Damage. Composite Structures 2003;62:213–21. Ice Drop.How to make clear ice. 28 February 2011. Victoria, BC,2011/02/how-to- make-clear-ice-that-actually-works/ Graham,

Le, Jacqueline Linh

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

ARKTOS: An intelligent system for SAR sea ice image classification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present an intelligent system for satellite sea ice image analysis named Advanced Reasoning using Knowledge for T ping Of Sea ice (ARKTOS). ARKTOS performs fully automated analysis of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) sea ice images by mimicking...

Soh, L. K.; Tsatsoulis, Costas; Gineris, D.; Bertoia, C.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Ice particle size matters | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickr FlickrGuidedCH2MLLCBasicsScience atIan Smith smit306 Primary tabsIce

416

Sandia National Laboratories: ice storms  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1development Sandia,evaluatingfullhigher-performancestoragei-GATE ECIS and i-GATE:ice

417

Reuse of steel and aluminium without melting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-of-life metal components that could be reused for each product, the catalogue formed the basis of a set of semi-structured interviews with industrial experts. The results suggest that approximately 30% of steel and aluminium used in current products could... Allwood J.M., Cullen J.M., Cooper D.R., Milford R.L., Patel A.C.H., Carruth M.A., McBrien M., 2010. Conserving our metal energy: avoiding melting steel and aluminium scrap to save energy and carbon. University of Cambridge, ISBN 978-0-903428-30-9 Allwood...

Cooper, Daniel

2014-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

418

The Patty Ice Arena User Responsibilities and Conduct is designed to create better communication between the patrons of the Patty Ice Arena and the Facilities Services' Patty Ice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PURPOSE: The Patty Ice Arena User Responsibilities and Conduct is designed to create better communication between the patrons of the Patty Ice Arena and the Facilities Services' Patty Ice Arena management or other misuse of any part of the Patty Ice Arena may result in an individual, team, or organization being

Wagner, Diane

419

Hail Ice Damage of Stringer-Stiffened Curved Composite Panels /  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of projectile SHI. Thus, the ice produces a more large-areaproduce uneven pressure/forces being applied onto the ice

Le, Jacqueline Linh

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Nanotextured Anti-Icing Surfaces | GE Global Research  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Demonstrate Promising Anti-icing Nano Surfaces GE Scientists Demonstrate Promising Anti-icing Nano Surfaces GE Global Research today presented new research findings on its...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "roof ice melt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Sandia National Laboratories: NASA Award for Marginal Ice Zone...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ClimateECClimateAnalysisNASA Award for Marginal Ice Zone Observations and Process Experiment (MIZOPEX) NASA Award for Marginal Ice Zone Observations and Process Experiment...

422

Heterogeneous Nucleation of Ice on Anthropogenic Organic Particles...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nucleation of Ice on Anthropogenic Organic Particles Collected in Mexico City. Heterogeneous Nucleation of Ice on Anthropogenic Organic Particles Collected in Mexico City....

423

Crystalline Ice Growth on Pt(111): Observation of a Hydrophobic...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Crystalline Ice Growth on Pt(111): Observation of a Hydrophobic Water Monolayer. Crystalline Ice Growth on Pt(111): Observation of a Hydrophobic Water Monolayer. Abstract: The...

424

The dependence of ice microphysics on aerosol concentration in...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The dependence of ice microphysics on aerosol concentration in arctic mixed-phase stratus clouds during ISDAC and M-PACE. The dependence of ice microphysics on aerosol...

425

NASA's sea ice program: present and future  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· New remote sensing applications Infer properties such as sea ice thickness from ICESat Research · WhatNASA's sea ice program: present and future Thomas Wagner, PhD Program Scientist, Cryosphere NASA for remote sensing · New algorithms to interpret satellite data Improvements to long term satellite record

Kuligowski, Bob

426

IceCube Project Monthly Report Accomplishments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;3 The latest revised estimates were modified to reflect the anticipated changes resulting from the Raytheon in Raytheon Polar Services completing the IceCube Laboratory. $1 million is from the lagging receipts. The on-ice Integrated Master Schedule is underway and being worked on this week with Raytheon Polar

Saffman, Mark

427

Ice Cover on the Great Lakes NATIONALOCEANIC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. At the base of the foodweb, algae support living organisms in the lakes, including valuable commercial by an incident that occurred in Lake Erie on a warm sunny day in February 2009 when a large ice flow broke awayIce Cover on the Great Lakes NATIONALOCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION U.S. D EPARTMENT

428

Ocean and Sea Ice SAF Technical Note  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ocean and Sea Ice SAF Technical Note SAF/OSI/CDOP/KNMI/TEC/RP/147 Validation of ASCAT 12.5-km winds The Ocean and Sea Ice Satellite Application Facility (OSI SAF) delivers an operational level 2 wind product produces a level 1 product with 12.5-km WVC spacing that has a resolution of approximately 25 km. Since

Stoffelen, Ad

429

Ocean and Sea Ice SAF Technical Note  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ocean and Sea Ice SAF Technical Note SAF/OSI/CDOP2/KNMI/TEC/RP/194 Quality Control of Ku. The OSCAT level 2a data are available in near-real time and OWDP is used at KNMI to produce the Ocean and Sea Ice (OSI) SAF wind product which is made available to users. A beta version of OWDP is also

Stoffelen, Ad

430

Largest Ice-Bank Promotes Load Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

California's largest ice-bank storage system is an example of how thermal storage can be applied to both new and existing buildings. At the Union Oil Company in Brea, California, one massive ice-storage system satisfies the air conditioning needs...

Brarmann, G. L.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Shallow Melt Apparatus for Semicontinuous Czochralski Crystal Growth  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In a single crystal pulling apparatus for providing a Czochralski crystal growth process, the improvement of a shallow melt crucible (20) to eliminate the necessity supplying a large quantity of feed stock materials that had to be preloaded in a deep crucible to grow a large ingot, comprising a gas tight container a crucible with a deepened periphery (25) to prevent snapping of a shallow melt and reduce turbulent melt convection; source supply means for adding source material to the semiconductor melt; a double barrier (23) to minimize heat transfer between the deepened periphery (25) and the shallow melt in the growth compartment; offset holes (24) in the double barrier (23) to increase melt travel length between the deepened periphery (25) and the shallow growth compartment; and the interface heater/heat sink (22) to control the interface shape and crystal growth rate.

Wang, T.; Ciszek, T. F.

2006-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

432

Now, Ze assumes |K|2 for water. But what about when we are looking at ice (Smith, 1984, J. Climate and Applied Met., 23, 1258-1260)?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to measure since the dielectric strength is incorporated as part of the radar constant). #12;Ice Water Water drops to radar 2. Dielectric factor decrease across melting level 3. Drop breakup and fall speed changesBZe Substituting values for |K|w 2 and |K|i 2, means we have to add 6.5 ­ 7.2 dB to our dBZe measurement to get

Rutledge, Steven

433

E-Print Network 3.0 - anti-icing Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Used Unserviceable No de-ice, anti-ice or related 73 - - - Wing tail... De-icing boots - 10 3 0 Wing tail bleed-air anti-ice - 3 0 0 Wing tail electric anti-ice - 2 0...

434

Magnetic Monopoles in Spin Ice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electrically charged particles, such as the electron, are ubiquitous. By contrast, no elementary particles with a net magnetic charge have ever been observed, despite intensive and prolonged searches. We pursue an alternative strategy, namely that of realising them not as elementary but rather as emergent particles, i.e., as manifestations of the correlations present in a strongly interacting many-body system. The most prominent examples of emergent quasiparticles are the ones with fractional electric charge e/3 in quantum Hall physics. Here we show that magnetic monopoles do emerge in a class of exotic magnets known collectively as spin ice: the dipole moment of the underlying electronic degrees of freedom fractionalises into monopoles. This enables us to account for a mysterious phase transition observed experimentally in spin ice in a magnetic field, which is a liquid-gas transition of the magnetic monopoles. These monopoles can also be detected by other means, e.g., in an experiment modelled after the celebrated Stanford magnetic monopole search.

Claudio Castelnovo; Roderich Moessner; Shivaji L. Sondhi

2007-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

435

Parameterizing Size Distribution in Ice Clouds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

PARAMETERIZING SIZE DISTRIBUTIONS IN ICE CLOUDS David L. Mitchell and Daniel H. DeSlover ABSTRACT An outstanding problem that contributes considerable uncertainty to Global Climate Model (GCM) predictions of future climate is the characterization of ice particle sizes in cirrus clouds. Recent parameterizations of ice cloud effective diameter differ by a factor of three, which, for overcast conditions, often translate to changes in outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) of 55 W m-2 or more. Much of this uncertainty in cirrus particle sizes is related to the problem of ice particle shattering during in situ sampling of the ice particle size distribution (PSD). Ice particles often shatter into many smaller ice fragments upon collision with the rim of the probe inlet tube. These small ice artifacts are counted as real ice crystals, resulting in anomalously high concentrations of small ice crystals (D < 100 µm) and underestimates of the mean and effective size of the PSD. Half of the cirrus cloud optical depth calculated from these in situ measurements can be due to this shattering phenomenon. Another challenge is the determination of ice and liquid water amounts in mixed phase clouds. Mixed phase clouds in the Arctic contain mostly liquid water, and the presence of ice is important for determining their lifecycle. Colder high clouds between -20 and -36 oC may also be mixed phase but in this case their condensate is mostly ice with low levels of liquid water. Rather than affecting their lifecycle, the presence of liquid dramatically affects the cloud optical properties, which affects cloud-climate feedback processes in GCMs. This project has made advancements in solving both of these problems. Regarding the first problem, PSD in ice clouds are uncertain due to the inability to reliably measure the concentrations of the smallest crystals (D < 100 µm), known as the “small mode”. Rather than using in situ probe measurements aboard aircraft, we employed a treatment of ice cloud optical properties formulated in terms of PSD parameters in combination with remote measurements of thermal radiances to characterize the small mode. This is possible since the absorption efficiency (Qabs) of small mode crystals is larger at 12 µm wavelength relative to 11 µm wavelength due to the process of wave resonance or photon tunneling more active at 12 µm. This makes the 12/11 µm absorption optical depth ratio (or equivalently the 12/11 µm Qabs ratio) a means for detecting the relative concentration of small ice particles in cirrus. Using this principle, this project tested and developed PSD schemes that can help characterize cirrus clouds at each of the three ARM sites: SGP, NSA and TWP. This was the main effort of this project. These PSD schemes and ice sedimentation velocities predicted from them have been used to test the new cirrus microphysics parameterization in the GCM known as the Community Climate Systems Model (CCSM) as part of an ongoing collaboration with NCAR. Regarding the second problem, we developed and did preliminary testing on a passive thermal method for retrieving the total water path (TWP) of Arctic mixed phase clouds where TWPs are often in the range of 20 to 130 g m-2 (difficult for microwave radiometers to accurately measure). We also developed a new radar method for retrieving the cloud ice water content (IWC), which can be vertically integrated to yield the ice water path (IWP). These techniques were combined to determine the IWP and liquid water path (LWP) in Arctic clouds, and hence the fraction of ice and liquid water. We have tested this approach using a case study from the ARM field campaign called M-PACE (Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment). This research led to a new satellite remote sensing method that appears promising for detecting low levels of liquid water in high clouds typically between -20 and -36 oC. We hope to develop this method in future research.

DeSlover, Daniel; Mitchell, David L.

2009-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

436

Electron beam skull melting and refining of secondary copper  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electron Beam Melting is the most efficient technology for metals and alloys refining. For secondary metals processing the Electron Beam Skull Melting (EBSM) with the electromagnetic stirring (EMS) of melt in the crucible was shown to be the most appropriate. The copper produced by EBSM with EMS possesses higher density and electric conductivity in comparison with other refining methods. The details for high power electrical machines were cast of the copper waste refined by EBSM technology.

Bychkov, Y.; Ladokhin, S. [Donetskvtortsvetmet, Donetsk (Ukraine)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

437

Electron beam melting state-of-the-art 1984  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1984 electron beam melting and refining appear poised for an important new growth phase. The driving force for this phase is improved production economics made possible by technological advances. There is also a new and exciting growth application for electron beam melting: its use for surface properties beneficiation. This article is based in part on the content of the Conference on Electron Beam Melting and Refining, The State-of-the-Art 1983, held in November 1983 in Reno, Nevada.

Bakish, R.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Retrograde Melting and Internal Liquid Gettering in Silicon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Retrograde melting (melting upon cooling) is observed in silicon doped with 3d transition metals, via synchrotron-based temperature-dependent X-ray microprobe measurements. Liquid metal-silicon droplets formed via retrograde melting act as efficient sinks for metal impurities dissolved within the silicon matrix. Cooling results in decomposition of the homogeneous liquid phase into solid multiple-metal alloy precipitates. These phenomena represent a novel pathway for engineering impurities in semiconductor-based systems.

Hudelson, Steve; Newman, Bonna K.; Bernardis, Sarah; Fenning, David P.; Bertoni, Mariana I.; Marcus, Matthew A.; Fakra, Sirine C.; Lai, Barry; Buonassisi, Tonio

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Evolution of shear-induced melting in dusty plasma  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The spatiotemporal development of melting is studied experimentally in a 2D dusty plasma suspension. Starting with an ordered lattice, and then suddenly applying localized shear, a pair of counter-propagating flow regions develop. A transition between two melting stages is observed before a steady state is reached. Melting spreads with a front that propagates at the transverse sound speed. Unexpectedly, coherent longitudinal waves are excited in the flow region.

Yan Feng; J. Goree; Bin Liu

2010-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

440

Plasma arc melting of titanium-tantalum alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Los Alamos has several applications for high temperature, oxidation and liquid-metal corrosion resistant materials. Further, materials property constraints are dictated by a requirement to maintain low density; e.g., less than the density of stainless steel. Liquid metal compatibility and density requirements have driven the research toward the Ti-Ta system with an upper bound of 60 wt% Ta-40 wt% Ti. Initial melting of these materials was performed in a small button arc melter with several hundred grams of material; however, ingot quantities were soon needed. But, refractory metal alloys whose constituents possess very dissimilar densities, melting temperatures and vapor pressures pose significant difficulty and require specialized melting practices. The Ti-Ta alloys fall into this category with the density of tantalum 16.5 g/cc and that of titanium 4.5 g/cc. Melting is further complicated by the high melting point of Ta(3020 C) and the relatively low boiling point of Ti(3287 C). Previous electron beam melting experience with these materials resulted, in extensive vaporization of the titanium and poor chemical homogeneity. Vacuum arc remelting(VAR) was considered as a melting candidate and discarded due to density and vapor pressure issues associated with electron beam. Plasma arc melting offered the ability to supply a cover gas to deal with vapor pressure issues as well as solidification control to help with macrosegregation in the melt and has successfully produced high quality ingots of the Ti-Ta alloys.

Dunn, P.; Patterson, R.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Haun, R. [Retech, Inc., Ukiah, CA (United States)

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "roof ice melt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Atomistic Study of the Melting Behavior of Single Crystalline...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and 110-oriented lateral facets, respectively. Citation: Wang Z, X Zu, F Gao, and WJ Weber.2007."Atomistic Study of the Melting Behavior of Single Crystalline Wurtzite Gallium...

442

Melt zones beneath five volcanic complexes in California: an...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

melt zones. 23 figs. Authors Goldstein, N. E.; Flexser and S. Published DOE Information Bridge, 1211984 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org...

443

Total reflection infrared spectroscopy of water-ice and frozen aqueous NaCl solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Liquid-like and liquid water at and near the surface of water-ice and frozen aqueous sodium chloride films were observed using attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy (ATR-IR). The concentration of NaCl ranged from 0.0001 to 0.01 M and the temperature varied from the melting point of water down to 256 K. The amount of liquid brine at the interface of the frozen films with the germanium ATR crystal increased with salt concentration and temperature. Experimental spectra are compared to reflection spectra calculated for a simplified morphology of a uniform liquid layer between the germanium crystal and the frozen film. This morphology allows for the amount of liquid observed in an experimental spectrum to be converted to the thickness of a homogenous layer with an equivalent amount of liquid. These equivalent thickness ranges from a nanometer for water-ice at 260 K to 170 nm for 0.01 M NaCl close to the melting point. The amounts of brine observed are over an order of magnitude less than the total liquid predicted by equilibrium thermodynamic models, implying that the vast majority of the liquid fraction of frozen solutions may be found in internal inclusions, grain boundaries, and the like. Thus, the amount of liquid and the solutes dissolved in them that are available to react with atmospheric gases on the surfaces of snow and ice are not well described by thermodynamic equilibrium models which assume the liquid phase is located entirely at the surface.

Walker, Rachel L.; Searles, Keith; Willard, Jesse A.; Michelsen, Rebecca R. H., E-mail: RMichelsen@rmc.edu [Department of Chemistry, Randolph-Macon College, P.O. Box 5005, Ashland, Virginia 23005 (United States)] [Department of Chemistry, Randolph-Macon College, P.O. Box 5005, Ashland, Virginia 23005 (United States)

2013-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

444

First data from DM-Ice17  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report the first analysis of background data from DM-Ice17, a direct-detection dark matter experiment consisting of 17 kg of NaI(Tl) target material. It was codeployed with IceCube 2457 m deep in the South Pole glacial ice in December 2010 and is the first such detector operating in the Southern Hemisphere. The background rate in the 6.5 - 8.0 keVee region is measured to be 7.9 +/- 0.4 counts/day/keV/kg. This is consistent with the expected background from the detector assemblies with negligible contributions from the surrounding ice. The successful deployment and operation of DM-Ice17 establishes the South Pole ice as a viable location for future underground, low-background experiments in the Southern Hemisphere. The detector assembly and deployment are described here, as well as the analysis of the DM-Ice17 backgrounds based on data from the first two years of operation after commissioning, July 2011 - June 2013.

DM-Ice Collaboration; :; J. Cherwinka; D. Grant; F. Halzen; K. M. Heeger; L. Hsu; A. J. F. Hubbard; A. Karle; M. Kauer; V. A. Kudryavtsev; C. Macdonald; R. H. Maruyama; S. Paling; W. Pettus; Z. P. Pierpoint; B. N. Reilly; M. Robinson; P. Sandstrom; N. J. C. Spooner; S. Telfer; L. Yang

2014-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

445

First Data from DM-Ice17  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report the first analysis of background data from DM-Ice17 a direct-detection dark matter experiment consisting of 17 kg of NaI(Tl) target material. It was successfully deployed 2457 m deep in South Pole glacial ice at the bottom of two IceCube strings in December 2010 and is the first such detector to be operating in the Southern Hemisphere. Data from the first two years of operation after commissioning, July 2011 - June 2013, are presented here. The background rate in the 6.5 - 8.0 kevee region is measured to be 7.9 +/- 0.4 counts/day/keV/kg. This is in agreement with the expected background from the crystal assemblies and is consistent with simulation. Background contributions from the surrounding ice were demonstrated to be negligible. The successful deployment and operation of DM-Ice17 establishes the South Pole ice as a location for future underground, low-background experiments in the Southern Hemisphere. The detector assembly, deployment, and analysis of the DM-Ice17 backgrounds are described.

:,; Grant, D; Halzen, F; Heeger, K M; Hsu, L; Hubbard, A J F; Karle, A; Kauer, M; Kudryavtsev, V A; Maruyama, R H; MacDonald, C; Paling, S; Pettus, W C; Pierpoint, Z P; Reilly, B N; Robinson, M; Sandstrom, P; Spooner, N J C; Telfer, S; Yang, L

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Low-melting point heat transfer fluid  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A low-melting point, heat transfer fluid comprising a mixture of LiNO.sub.3, NaNO.sub.3, KNO.sub.3, NaNO.sub.2 and KNO.sub.2 salts where the Li, Na and K cations are present in amounts of about 20-33.5 mol % Li, about 18.6-40 mol % Na, and about 40-50.3 mol % K and where the nitrate and nitrite anions are present in amounts of about 36-50 mol % NO.sub.3, and about 50-62.5 mol % NO.sub.2. These compositions can have liquidus temperatures between 70.degree. C. and 80.degree. C. for some compositions.

Cordaro, Joseph G. (Oakland, CA); Bradshaw, Robert W. (Livermore, CA)

2011-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

447

SNOW ON ANTARCTIC SEA ICE Robert A. Massom,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SNOW ON ANTARCTIC SEA ICE Robert A. Massom,1 Hajo Eicken,2 Christian Haas,3 Martin O. Jeffries,2 on Antarctic sea ice plays a complex and highly variable role in air-sea-ice interaction pro- cesses of thicker snow and thin- ner ice in the Antarctic relative to the Arctic (e.g., the importance of flooding

Warren, Stephen

448

Dynamics of Ice Nucleation on Water Repellent Surfaces Azar Alizadeh,*,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for nonicing applications. 1. INTRODUCTION Ice accretion on surfaces of aircraft, wind turbine blades, oil

Dhinojwala, Ali

449

GREAT LAKES ICE COVER RaymondA. Asset'  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

hydropower production and cooling water intakes, and damaging shore structures. Ice cover also impactsChapter 6 GREAT LAKES ICE COVER RaymondA. Asset' ABSTRACT: Theformation of ice on the Lallrentian (~rthe Great Lakes anel local weather and climate. The (I1Inllal seasonal and ~'Patialprogression of ice

450

FIRST PRINCIPLES MODELING FOR LIDAR SENSING OF COMPLEX ICE SURFACES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FIRST PRINCIPLES MODELING FOR LIDAR SENSING OF COMPLEX ICE SURFACES J. Kerekes, A. Goodenough, S of monitoring the dynamics and mass balance of glaciers, ice caps, and ice sheets. However, it is also known that ice surfaces can have complex 3-dimensional structure, which can challenge their accurate retrieval

Kerekes, John

451

Microstructure through an ice sheet Tobias Binder1, a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Microstructure through an ice sheet Tobias Binder1, a , Ilka Weikusat2, b , Johannes Freitag2, c.Garbe@iwr.uni-heidelberg.de, e Dietmar.Wagenbach@iup.uni-heidelberg.de, f Sepp.Kipfstuhl@awi.de Keywords: Ice, microstructure characterization, grain boundary curvature, image processing Abstract. Ice cores through an ice sheet can

Garbe, Christoph S.

452

ORIGINAL ARTICLE Diatom assemblages promote ice formation in large  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ORIGINAL ARTICLE Diatom assemblages promote ice formation in large lakes NA D'souza1,3 , Y evidence for the directed formation of ice by planktonic communities dominated by filamentous diatoms sampled from the ice-covered Laurentian Great Lakes. We hypothesize that ice formation promotes attachment

Lee Jr., Richard E.

453

Black carbon aerosols and the third polar ice cap  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent thinning of glaciers over the Himalayas (sometimes referred to as the third polar region) have raised concern on future water supplies since these glaciers supply water to large river systems that support millions of people inhabiting the surrounding areas. Black carbon (BC) aerosols, released from incomplete combustion, have been increasingly implicated as causing large changes in the hydrology and radiative forcing over Asia and its deposition on snow is thought to increase snow melt. In India BC emissions from biofuel combustion is highly prevalent and compared to other regions, BC aerosol amounts are high. Here, we quantify the impact of BC aerosols on snow cover and precipitation from 1990 to 2010 over the Indian subcontinental region using two different BC emission inventories. New estimates indicate that Indian BC emissions from coal and biofuel are large and transport is expected to expand rapidly in coming years. We show that over the Himalayas, from 1990 to 2000, simulated snow/ice cover decreases by {approx}0.9% due to aerosols. The contribution of the enhanced Indian BC to this decline is {approx}36%, similar to that simulated for 2000 to 2010. Spatial patterns of modeled changes in snow cover and precipitation are similar to observations (from 1990 to 2000), and are mainly obtained with the newer BC estimates.

Menon, Surabi; Koch, Dorothy; Beig, Gufran; Sahu, Saroj; Fasullo, John; Orlikowski, Daniel

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

454

Electron-beam scull melting with electromagnetic stirring of melt in crucible  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The technologies and equipment have been developed for electron-beam scull melting with electromagnetic stirring of melt for some Ni-based superalloys as well as for multi-component Ti-, Zr-, Nb-, and Mo-based alloys. Two types of scull crucible sets with electromagnetic stirring systems have been constructed, with the metal pouring by the crucible tilting or through the hole in the crucible bottom. In the second case slag does not fall into a mold, and the electron beam may be used for metal heating in the costing head, thus improving the quality of castings. The technologies developed allow to utilize scrap, cost part reverts, chips etc. thus saving virgin alloys. The electromagnetic stirring application permits to product multi-component alloys, to increase the mass of the metal poured, and to reduce the specific energy expenditure and metal loss through evaporation.

Ladokhin, S.V. [Institute for Casting Problems, Kiev (Ukraine)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

455

Vitrification of waste with conitnuous filling and sequential melting  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of filling a canister with vitrified waste starting with a waste, such as high-level radioactive waste, that is cooler than its melting point. Waste is added incrementally to a canister forming a column of waste capable of being separated into an upper zone and a lower zone. The minimum height of the column is defined such that the waste in the lower zone can be dried and melted while maintaining the waste in the upper zone below its melting point. The maximum height of the column is such that the upper zone remains porous enough to permit evolved gases from the lower zone to flow through the upper zone and out of the canister. Heat is applied to the waste in the lower zone to first dry then to raise and maintain its temperature to a target temperature above the melting point of the waste. Then the heat is applied to a new lower zone above the melted waste and the process of adding, drying and melting the waste continues upward in the canister until the entire canister is filled and the entire contents are melted and maintained at the target temperature for the desired period. Cooling of the melted waste takes place incrementally from the bottom of the canister to the top, or across the entire canister surface area, forming a vitrified product.

Powell, James R. (Shoreham, NY); Reich, Morris (Kew Gardens Hills, NY)

2001-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

456

Standard Reference Material 1751: Gallium Melting-Point Standard  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Standard Reference Material 1751: Gallium Melting-Point Standard Gregory F. Strouse NIST Special Publication 260-157 #12;#12;NIST Special Publication 260-157 XXXX Standard Reference Material 1751: Gallium Melting-Point Standard Gregory F. Strouse Chemical Science and Technology Laboratory Process Measurements

457

Electron beam melting and casting of zirconium and titanium alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The results of electron beam melting (EBM) and casting Zirconium and Titanium alloys are discussed. The data on different schedules used for EBM of this metals as well as equipment for crucible melting and special equipment for casting are described. The results of production of Zirconium and Titanium alloy mold castings for various purposes are presented.

Arzhakova, V.M.; Popov, E.I. [A.A. Bochvar All Union Scientific and Research Institute of Inorganic Materials, Moscow (Russian Federation); Dubrovski, V.A.; Frolov, V.I. [PO ChMZ, Glazov (Russian Federation); Ladohin, S.V.; Levitsky, N.I.; Chernyavsky, V.B. [Scientific and Research Institute of Casting, Kiev (Ukraine)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

458

Electron beam melting and refining state of the art 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the proceedings of the Electron Beam Melting and Refining - State of the Art 1995 Conference. It contains 23 of the 30 scheduled papers. Papers cover an array of electron beam melting applications, from industrial plating of metal strip, through government work on manufacturing and processing fissile alloys. Separate abstracts have been prepared for articles from this proceedings.

Bakish, R. [ed.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

459

An analysis of variations in isentropic melt productivity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An analysis of variations in isentropic melt productivity B y P. D. Asimow1 , M. M. Hirschmann1 productivity, cannot be determined directly from experiments and is commonly assumed to be constant on a ther- modynamic model of peridotite partial melting, we show that productivity for re- versible

Asimow, Paul D.

460

Detection of Nonthermal Melting by Ultrafast X-ray  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of super- heating of the interface but limited by the speed of sound. Typically, a layer a few tens, if a solid is heated to or above the melting temperature, nucleation of the liquid phase occurs around), which exceeds the melting temperature within several picoseconds. After nucleation of the liquid phase

Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "roof ice melt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Electron beam melting of charge based on titanium sponge  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An experience of 0.8 MW consumable box melting furnace operation and theoretical simulation have led to the further development of the FIKO plant under construction on the base of melting of two consumable box-like bullets which move opposite each other and form narrow heated space between melted butt ends. It allows to reduce vaporization, spatter and radiation losses by several times and to reach two times increase in melting rate and 99%(97%) yield for c.p. titanium (alloys) without furnace power add. Future furnace design will provide the optimum protection of vacuum pumps against chlorides, the safety when melting titanium sponge and will permit hot ingots to move to the special furnace for EB surface conditioning. The maximum productivity is to be 18,000 t/year. The furnace can be used for the manufacture of aluminum-, copper-, iron-, nickel-, tungsten-based alloys and others of any charge including salvage.

Tikhonovsky, A.L.; Tikhonovsky, K.A. [JS Co FIKO, Kiev (Ukraine)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

462

Observations of ice thickness and frazil ice in the St. Lawrence Island polynya from satellite imagery, upward looking sonar, and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oceanography: General: Remote sensing and electromagnetic processes (0689); 4540 Oceanography: Physical: Ice and growth of frazil and thin ice in polynyas play a critical role in the linkage of the atmospheric heatObservations of ice thickness and frazil ice in the St. Lawrence Island polynya from satellite

Washington at Seattle, University of

463

ice-surface lowering or some regional climate change induced by ice-surface lowering. If attributed solely to a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ice-surface lowering or some regional climate change induced by ice-surface lowering. If attributed solely to a change in ice-surface elevation, the 3° to 4°C warming at Siple Dome (16) would indicate 500 to 650 m of ice-surface lowering, assuming a free atmospheric lapse rate of 6°C per 1000 m

Flint-Garcia, Sherry

464

Communication: On the stability of ice 0, ice i, and I h D. Quigley, D. Alf, and B. Slater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Communication: On the stability of ice 0, ice i, and I h D. Quigley, D. Alfè, and B. Slater (2014) Communication: On the stability of ice 0, ice i, and Ih D. Quigley,1,a) D. Alfè,2 and B. Slater3

Alfè, Dario

465

The Phases of Water Ice in the Solar Nebula  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Understanding the phases of water ice that were present in the solar nebula has implications for understanding cometary and planetary compositions as well as internal evolution of these bodies. Here we show that amorphous ice formed more readily than previously recognized, with formation at temperatures ice to form. This processing would be a natural consequence of ice dynamics, and would allow for the trapping of noble gases and other volatiles in water ice in the outer solar nebula.

Ciesla, Fred J

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Design and Simulation for Architectural Geometry Figure 1: Daytime and nighttime scenes of designed roof by using the developed computational tools  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

roof by using the developed computational tools 031.PDF Keywords: Architectural Geometry, Procedural an innovative computational design tool used to edit architectural geometry interactively and demonstratesDesign and Simulation for Architectural Geometry Figure 1: Daytime and nighttime scenes of designed

467

Become One In A Million: Partnership Updates. Million Solar Roofs and Interstate Renewable Energy Council Annual Meeting, Washington, D.C., October 2005  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's Million Solar Roofs Initiative (MSR) is a unique public-private partnership aimed at overcoming market barriers for photovoltaics (PV), solar water heating, transpired solar collectors, solar space heating and cooling, and pool heating. This report contains annual progress reports from 866 partners across the United States.

Tombari, C.

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Quantifying fit in ice hockey skate boots.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Purpose. This study quantified fit of ice hockey skate boots by measuring the pressure (MP) at the foot/ankle-to-boot interface using three skate sizes. The relationship… (more)

Gheorghiu, Cristian R.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Scattering Properties of Oriented Hexagonal Ice Crystals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

To interpret the data from spaceborn lidar measurements, one must have a basic understanding of the backscattering of oriented ice particles. The conventional raytracing method is not applicable to the scattering of light by oriented particles...

Zhang, Feng

2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

470

Observations of the Askaryan Effect in Ice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report on the first observations of the Askaryan effect in ice: coherent impulsive radio Cherenkov radiation from the charge asymmetry in an electromagnetic (EM) shower. Such radiation has been observed in silica sand and rock salt, but this is the first direct observation from an EM shower in ice. These measurements are important since the majority of experiments to date that rely on the effect for ultra-high energy neutrino detection are being performed using ice as the target medium. As part of the complete validation process for the Antarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna (ANITA) experiment, we performed an experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) in June 2006 using a 7.5 metric ton ice target, yielding results fully consistent with theoretical expectations.

ANITA collaboration; P. W. Gorham; S. W. Barwick; J. J. Beatty; D. Z. Besson; W. R. Binns; C. Chen; P. Chen; J. M. Clem; A. Connolly; P. F. Dowkontt; M. A. DuVernois; R. C. Field; D. Goldstein; A. Goodhue; C. Hast; C. L. Hebert; S. Hoover; M. H. Israel; J. Kowalski; J. G. Learned; K. M. Liewer; J. T. Link; E. Lusczek; S. Matsuno; B. Mercurio; C. Miki; P. Miocinovic; J. Nam; C. J. Naudet; J. Ng; R. Nichol; K. Palladino; K. Reil; A. Romero-Wolf; M. Rosen; D. Saltzberg; D. Seckel; G. S. Varner; D. Walz; F. Wu

2007-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

471

Observations of the Askaryan Effect in Ice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report on the first observations of the Askaryan effect in ice: coherent impulsive radio Cherenkov radiation from the charge asymmetry in an electromagnetic (EM) shower. Such radiation has been observed in silica sand and rock salt, but this is the first direct observation from an EM shower in ice. These measurements are important since the majority of experiments to date that rely on the effect for ultra-high energy neutrino detection are being performed using ice as the target medium. As part of the complete validation process for the Antarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna (ANITA) experiment, we performed an experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) in June 2006 using a 7.5 metric ton ice target, yielding results fully consistent with theoretical expectations.

Barwick, S W; Besson, D Z; Binns, W R; Chen, P; Clem, J M; Connolly, A; Dowkontt, P F; Duvernois, M A; Field, R C; Goldstein, D; Goodhue, A; Gorham, P W; Hast, C; Hebert, C L; Hoover, S; Israel, M H; Kowalski, J; Learned, J G; Liewer, K M; Link, J T; Lusczek, E; Matsuno, S; Mercurio, B; Miki, C; Miocinovic, P; Nam, J; Naudet, C J; Ng, J; Nichol, R; Palladino, K J; Reil, K; Romero-Wolf, A; Rosen, M; Saltzberg, D; Secke, D; Varner, G S; Walz, D; Wu, F

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Observations of the Askaryan Effect in Ice  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on the first observations of the Askaryan effect in ice: coherent impulsive radio Cherenkov radiation from the charge asymmetry in an electromagnetic (EM) shower. Such radiation has been observed in silica sand and rock salt, but this is the first direct observation from an EM shower in ice. These measurements are important since the majority of experiments to date that rely on the effect for ultra-high energy neutrino detection are being performed using ice as the target medium. As part of the complete validation process for the Antarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna (ANITA) experiment, we performed an experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) in June 2006 using a 7.5 metric ton ice target, yielding results fully consistent with theoretical expectations.

Gorham, P.W.

2007-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

473

Weakening of ice by magnesium perchlorate hydrate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I show that perchlorate hydrates, which have been indirectly detected at high Martian circumpolar latitudes by the Phoenix Mars Lander, have a dramatic effect upon the rheological behavior of polycrystalline water ice under ...

Lenferink, Hendrik J., 1985-

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Development of a Mobile Ice Nucleus Counter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An ice nucleus counter has been constructed. The instrument uses built-in refrigeration systems for wall cooling. A cascade refrigeration system will allow the cold wall to operate as low as -70 deg C, and a single stage system can operate the warm wall at -45 deg C. A unique optical particle counter has been constructed using polarization detection of the scattered light. This allows differentiation of the particles exiting the chamber to determine if they are ice or liquid.

Kok, Gregory; Kulkarni, Gourihar

2014-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

475

115 year ice-core data from Akademii Nauk ice cap, Severnaya Zemlya: high-resolution record of Eurasian Arctic climate change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

115 year ice-core data from Akademii Nauk ice cap, Severnaya Zemlya: high-resolution record ABSTRACT. From 1999 to 2001 a 724 m deep ice core was drilled on Akademii Nauk ice cap, Severnaya Zemlya Greenland are needed. Therefore, in the Eurasian Arctic several ice cores from ice caps on Svalbard

Fischer, Hubertus

476

Intrinsic Route to Melt Fracture in Polymer Extrusion: AWeakly Nonlinear Subcritical Instability of Viscoelastic Poiseuille Flow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Intrinsic Route to Melt Fracture in Polymer Extrusion: AWeakly Nonlinear Subcritical Instability generic route to melt fracture via a weakly nonlinear subcritical instability of viscoelastic Poiseuille ``subcritical'') instability due to normal stress effects; this instability appears to make melt fracture

van Saarloos, Wim

477

E-Print Network 3.0 - aircraft icing hazards Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

effects on aircraft performance. Although anti-icing devices such as de-icing boots and heating strips... help, ice ... Source: Valasek, John - Department of Aerospace...

478

E-Print Network 3.0 - antarctic pack ice Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ice pack has... to state with certainty, whether the Antarctic continent is warming or cooling overall. Trends in sea ice... snowmelt over Alaska and eastern Siberia, and ice...

479

E-Print Network 3.0 - antarctic ice pack Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ice pack has... to state with certainty, whether the Antarctic continent is warming or cooling overall. Trends in sea ice... snowmelt over Alaska and eastern Siberia, and ice...

480

Spread of ice mass loss into northwest Greenland observed by GRACE and GPS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

oscillations and seasonal ice mass fluctuations, Eos Trans.2007), Rapid changes in ice discharge from Greenland outletW. et al. (2004), Greenland Ice Sheet: Increased coastal

Khan, Shfaqat Abbas; Wahr, John; Bevis, Michael; Velicogna, Isabella; Kendrick, Eric

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "roof ice melt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Assessment of ceramic coatings for metal fuel melting crucible  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to develop a coating method and material for crucibles to prevent material interactions with the U-Zr/U-TRU-Zr fuels during the manufacturing of SFR fuels. Refractory coatings were applied to niobium substrates by vacuum plasma-spray coating method. Melt dipping tests conducted were the coated rods lowered into the fuel melt at 1600 C. degrees, and withdrawn and cooled outside the crucible in the inert atmosphere of the induction furnace. Melt dipping tests of the coated Nb rods indicated that plasma-sprayed Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating doesn't form significant reaction layer between fuel melt and coating layer. Melt dipping tests of the coated Nb rods showed that TiC, TaC, and Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} coatings exhibited the promising performance among other ceramic coatings. These materials could be promising candidate materials for the reusable melt crucible of metal fuel for SFR. In addition, in order to develop the vacuum plasma-spray coating method for re-usable crucible of metal fuel slugs to be overcome the issue of thermal expansion mismatch between coating material and crucible, various combinations of coating conditions were investigated to find the bonding effect on the substrate in pursuit of more effective ways to withstand the thermal stresses. It is observed that most coating methods maintained sound coating state in U-Zr melt. (authors)

Kim, Ki-Hwan; Song, Hoon; Kim, Jong-Hwan; Oh, Seok-Jin; Kim, Hyung-Tae; Lee, Chan-Bock [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Yuseong, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Greenland ice sheet surface mass-balance modeling in a 131-year perspective, 1950-2080  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fluctuations in the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) surface mass-balance (SMB) and freshwater influx to the surrounding oceans closely follow climate fluctuations and are of considerable importance to the global eustatic sea level rise. SnowModel, a state-of-the-art snow-evolution modeling system, was used to simulate variations in the GrIS melt extent, surface water balance components, changes in SMB, and freshwater influx to the ocean. The simulations are based on the IPCC scenario AlB modeled by the HIRHAM4 RCM (using boundary conditions from ECHAM5 AOGCM) from 1950 through 2080. In-situ meteorological station (GC-Net and WMO DMI) observations from inside and outside the GrIS were used to validate and correct RCM output data before it was used as input for SnowModel. Satellite observations and independent SMB studies were used to validate the SnowModel output and confirm the model's robustness. We simulated a {approx}90% increase in end-of-summer surface melt extent (0.483 x 10{sup 6} km{sup 2}) from 1950 to 2080, and a melt index (above 2,000-m elevation) increase of 138% (1.96 x 10{sup 6} km{sup 2} x days). The greatest difference in melt extent occured in the southern part of the GrIS, and the greatest changes in the number of melt days was seen in the eastern part of the GrIS ({approx}50-70%) and was lowest in the west ({approx}20-30%). The rate of SMB loss, largely tied to changes in ablation processes, lead to an enhanced average loss of 331 km{sup 3} from 1950 to 2080, an average 5MB level of -99 km{sup 3} for the period 2070-2080. GrIS surface freshwater runoff yielded an eustatic rise in sea level from 0.8 {+-} 0.1 (1950-1959) to 1.9 {+-} 0.1 mm (2070-2080) sea level equivalent (SLE) y{sup -1}. The accumulated GrIS freshwater runoff contribution from surface melting equaled 160 mm SLE from 1950 through 2080.

Mernild, Sebastian Haugard [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Liston, Glen [COLORADO STATE UNIV.; Hiemstra, Christopher [COLORADO STATE UNIV.; Christensen, Jens [DANISH METEOROLOGICAL INS.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Geek-Up: K East Reactor Demolition, Retrograde Melting and Cloud Pattern Tracking  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Recovery Act funds help clean up the Hanford site, retrograde melting (melting as something cools) and how open-cell clouds could help predict climate change.

484

Energy Efficient Glass Melting - The Next Generation Melter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to demonstrate a high intensity glass melter, based on the submerged combustion melting technology. This melter will serve as the melting and homogenization section of a segmented, lower-capital cost, energy-efficient Next Generation Glass Melting System (NGMS). After this project, the melter will be ready to move toward commercial trials for some glasses needing little refining (fiberglass, etc.). For other glasses, a second project Phase or glass industry research is anticipated to develop the fining stage of the NGMS process.

David Rue

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Method for Synthesizing Extremeley High Temperature Melting Materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention relates to a method of synthesizing high-temperature melting materials. More specifically the invention relates to a containerless method of synthesizing very high temperature melting materials such as borides, carbides and transition-metal, lanthanide and actinide oxides, using an Aerodynamic Levitator and a laser. The object of the invention is to provide a method for synthesizing extremely high-temperature melting materials that are otherwise difficult to produce, without the use of containers, allowing the manipulation of the phase (amorphous/crystalline/metastable) and permitting changes of the environment such as different gaseous compositions.

Saboungi, Marie-Louise and Glorieux, Benoit

2005-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

486

Method For Synthesizing Extremely High-Temperature Melting Materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention relates to a method of synthesizing high-temperature melting materials. More specifically the invention relates to a containerless method of synthesizing very high temperature melting materials such as borides, carbides and transition-metal, lanthanide and actinide oxides, using an Aerodynamic Levitator and a laser. The object of the invention is to provide a method for synthesizing extremely high-temperature melting materials that are otherwise difficult to produce, without the use of containers, allowing the manipulation of the phase (amorphous/crystalline/metastable) and permitting changes of the environment such as different gaseous compositions.

Saboungi, Marie-Louise (Chicago, IL); Glorieux, Benoit (Perpignan, FR)

2005-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

487

Method for synthesizing extremely high-temperature melting materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The invention relates to a method of synthesizing high-temperature melting materials. More specifically the invention relates to a containerless method of synthesizing very high temperature melting materials such as carbides and transition-metal, lanthanide and actinide oxides, using an aerodynamic levitator and a laser. The object of the invention is to provide a method for synthesizing extremely high-temperature melting materials that are otherwise difficult to produce, without the use of containers, allowing the manipulation of the phase (amorphous/crystalline/metastable) and permitting changes of the environment such as different gaseous compositions.

Saboungi, Marie-Louise (Chicago, IL); Glorieux, Benoit (Perpignan, FR)

2007-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

488

Modeling of Antarctic sea ice in a general circulation model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A dynamic-thermodynamic sea ice model is developed and coupled with the Melbourne University general circulation model to simulate the seasonal cycle of the Antarctic sea ice distributions The model is efficient, rapid to compute, and useful for a range of climate studies. The thermodynamic part of the sea ice model is similar to that developed by Parkinson and Washington, the dynamics contain a simplified ice rheology that resists compression. The thermodynamics is based on energy conservation at the top surface of the ice/snow, the ice/water interface, and the open water area to determine the ice formation, accretion, and ablation. A lead parameterization is introduced with an effective partitioning scheme for freezing between and under the ice floes. The dynamic calculation determines the motion of ice, which is forced with the atmospheric wind, taking account of ice resistance and rafting. The simulated sea ice distribution compares reasonably well with observations. The seasonal cycle of ice extent is well simulated in phase as well as in magnitude. Simulated sea ice thickness and concentration are also in good agreement with observations over most regions and serve to indicate the importance of advection and ocean drift in the determination of the sea ice distribution. 64 refs., 15 figs., 2 tabs.

Wu, Xingren; Budd, W.F. [Antarctic Cooperative Research Centre, Tasmania (Australia)] [Antarctic Cooperative Research Centre, Tasmania (Australia); Simmonds, I. [School of Earth Sciences, Victoria (Australia)] [School of Earth Sciences, Victoria (Australia)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Ice nucleation and overseeding of ice in volcanic clouds A. J. Durant,1,2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that such ``overseeded'' volcanic clouds will exhibit enhanced ice crystal concentrations and smaller average ice crystal nucleation in volcanic plumes and clouds affects dynamics [Glaze et al., 1997; Herzog et al., 1998; Mastin- porting water to the stratosphere [Glaze et al., 1997] and these fluxes depend in part on the microphysics

Rose, William I.

490

Quantification of summertime water ice deposition on the Martian north polar ice cap  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We use observations from the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) of the north polar cap during late summer for two Martian years, to monitor the complete summer cycle of albedo and water ice grain size in order to place quantitative limits of the amount of water ice deposited in late summer. We establish here for the first time the complete spring to summer cycle of water ice grain sizes on the north polar cap. The apparent grain sizes grow until Ls=132, when they appear to shrink again, until they are obscured at the end of summer by the north polar hood. Under the assumption that the shrinking of grain sizes is due to the deposition of find grained ice, we quantify the amount of water ice deposited per Martian boreal summer, and estimate the amount of water ice that must be transported equatorward. Interestingly, we find that the relative amount of water ice deposited in the north cap during boreal summer (0.7-7 microns) is roughly equivalent to the average amount of water ice depos...

Brown, Adrian J; Becerra, Patricio; Byrne, Shane

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

ICED'09/Paper number (Contribution ID) 1 INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON ENGINEERING DESIGN, ICED'09  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ICED'09/Paper number (Contribution ID) 1 INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON ENGINEERING DESIGN, ICED'09 24 - 27 AUGUST 2009, STANFORD UNIVERSITY, STANFORD, CA, USA CREATIVITY THEORIES AND SCIENTIFIC DISCOVERY: A STUDY OF C-K THEORY AND INFUSED DESIGN ABSTRACT Creativity is central to human activity

Shai, Offer

492

ICED'09/373 1 INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON ENGINEERING DESIGN, ICED'09  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ICED'09/373 1 INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON ENGINEERING DESIGN, ICED'09 24 - 27 AUGUST 2009, STANFORD UNIVERSITY, STANFORD, CA, USA CREATIVITY THEORIES AND SCIENTIFIC DISCOVERY: A STUDY OF C-K THEORY AND INFUSED Creativity is central to human activity and is a powerful force in personal and organizational success

Reich, Yoram

493

The Role of Snow and Ice in the Climate System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Global snow and ice cover (the 'cryosphere') plays a major role in global climate and hydrology through a range of complex interactions and feedbacks, the best known of which is the ice - albedo feedback. Snow and ice cover undergo marked seasonal and long term changes in extent and thickness. The perennial elements - the major ice sheets and permafrost - play a role in present-day regional and local climate and hydrology, but the large seasonal variations in snow cover and sea ice are of importance on continental to hemispheric scales. The characteristics of these variations, especially in the Northern Hemisphere, and evidence for recent trends in snow and ice extent are discussed.

Barry, Roger (NSIDC) [NSIDC

2007-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

494

Variational bounds for the shear viscosity of gelling melts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study shear stress relaxation for a gelling melt of randomly crosslinked, interacting monomers. We derive a lower bound for the static shear viscosity $\\eta$, which implies that it diverges algebraically with a critical exponent $k\\ge 2\

Claas H. Köhler; Henning Löwe; Peter Müller; Annette Zippelius

2007-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

495

Melt extrusion and continuous manufacturing of pharmaceutical materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Melt extrusion is an alternative processing technique that operates continuously, reduces the total number of unit operations, allows for incorporation of difficult-to-process drug substances, and has the potential to ...

Bell, Erin R

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Melt generation in the Earth's mantle at Convergent Plate Margins  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The five geologic studies presented in this thesis document how the recycling of tectonic plates at subduction zones has a profound effect on the melting behavior of the Earth's mantle. Two experimental studies (Chapters ...

Till, Christy B

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

Hydrogenation reactions in interstellar CO ice analogues  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrogenation reactions of CO in inter- and circumstellar ices are regarded as an important starting point in the formation of more complex species. Previous laboratory measurements by two groups on the hydrogenation of CO ices resulted in controversial results on the formation rate of methanol. Our aim is to resolve this controversy by an independent investigation of the reaction scheme for a range of H-atom fluxes and different ice temperatures and thicknesses. Reaction rates are determined by using a state-of-the-art ultra high vacuum experimental setup to bombard an interstellar CO ice analog with room temperature H atoms. The reaction of CO + H into H2CO and subsequently CH3OH is monitored by a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer in a reflection absorption mode. In addition, after each completed measurement a temperature programmed desorption experiment is performed to identify the produced species. Different H-atom fluxes, morphologies, and ice thicknesses are tested. The formation of both formaldeh...

Fuchs, G W; Ioppolo, S; Romanzin, C; Bisschop, S E; Andersson, S; Van Dishoeck, E F; Linnartz, H

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

Characterization of electron beam melted uranium - 6% niobium ingots  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study was undertaken at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to characterize uranium, 6{percent} niobium ingots produced via electron beam melting,hearth refining and continuous casting and to compare this material with conventional VIM/skull melt /VAR material. Samples of both the ingot and feed material were analyzed for niobium, trace metallic elements, carbon, oxygen and nitrogen. Ingot samples were also inspected metallographically and via microprobe analysis.

McKoon, R.H.

1997-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

499

Method and apparatus for melt growth of crystalline semiconductor sheets  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An economical method is presented for forming thin sheets of crystalline silicon suitable for use in a photovoltaic conversion cell by solidification from the liquid phase. Two spatially separated, generally coplanar filaments wettable by liquid silicon and joined together at the end by a bridge member are immersed in a silicon melt and then slowly withdrawn from the melt so that a silicon crystal is grown between the edge of the bridge and the filaments.

Ciszek, T.F.; Hurd, J.L.

1981-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

500

Apparatus for melt growth of crystalline semiconductor sheets  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An economical method is presented for forming thin sheets of crystalline silicon suitable for use in a photovoltaic conversion cell by solidification from the liquid phase. Two spatially separated, generally coplanar filaments wettable by liquid silicon and joined together at the end by a bridge member are immersed in a silicon melt and then slowly withdrawn from the melt so that a silicon crystal is grown between the edge of the bridge and the filaments.

Ciszek, Theodore F. (Evergreen, CO); Hurd, Jeffery L. (Golden, CO)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z