Sample records for roller compacted concrete

  1. Disk-shaped Compact Tension Test for Asphalt Concrete Fracture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paulino, Glaucio H.

    Disk-shaped Compact Tension Test for Asphalt Concrete Fracture by M.P.Wagoner, W.G. Buttlar and G geometry is the ability to test cylindrical cores obtained from in-place asphalt concrete pavements finalizing the specimen geometry, a typical asphalt concrete surface mixture was tested at various

  2. CONCRETE OPTIMISATION WITH REGARD TO PACKING DENSITY AND RHEOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    CONCRETE OPTIMISATION WITH REGARD TO PACKING DENSITY AND RHEOLOGY François de Larrard LCPC Centre/organizers): .............. Keywords: packing density, rheology, grading curve, optimisation, self-compacting concrete, roller-compacted concrete. Author contacts Authors E-Mail Fax Postal address LCPC Centre de Nantes François de Larrard

  3. Numerical Simulation of Impact Rollers for Estimating the Influence Depth of Soil Compaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Kukjoo

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    will estimate more precisely the depth of influence for impact rollers. To do so, the general purpose finite element computer program LS-DYNA is used for numerical predictions. The finite element study is carried out with three-dimensional models. A simplified...

  4. Disk-shaped Compact Tension Test for Plain Concrete A. Amirkhanian1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paulino, Glaucio H.

    Disk-shaped Compact Tension Test for Plain Concrete A. Amirkhanian1 , D. Spring1 , J. Roesler1 , K cracking prediction of concrete pavement systems. The single-edge notched beam test has been used energy in asphalt concrete using the disk-shaped compact tension (DCT) test. The benefit of this specimen

  5. Gurson's plasticity coupled to damage as a CAP model for concrete compaction in dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Gurson's plasticity coupled to damage as a CAP model for concrete compaction in dynamics Fabrice (compaction) but also the plastic strains in compression and cracking in tension. Recently, new dynamic is generally described by means of the plasticity theory where the spherical and the deviatoric responses

  6. Roller Cam Positioners

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowden, Gordon B.

    2010-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Roller Cam Positioners could support the LCLS undulator sections allowing micron sized alignment adjustment of each undulator in 5 degrees of freedom. The supports are kinematic with the number of degrees of freedom matched to the number of constraints. Ton loads are supported on simple ball bearings. Motion is intrinsically bounded. Positioning mechanisms are based on pure rolling motion with sub-micron hysteresis and micron resolution. This note describes a general purpose positioning mechanism suitable for undulator support.

  7. A thermodynamic approach for compaction of asphaltic composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koneru, Saradhi

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    and Focus of Current Work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 B. Outline of the Thesis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 C. Notations Used . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 II LITERATURE REVIEW... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 b. Asphalt Binder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 C. Compaction Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 1. Field Compaction Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 a. Static Steel Wheel Rollers . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 b...

  8. Rolling, Rolling, Rolling: Roller Window Shades | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    anyway, even if our windows were of the highest efficiency. One of my colleagues in a solar energy group I belonged to was a distributor of a high R-value quilted roller window...

  9. D0 Carriage Roller Bearing Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaques, Al; /Fermilab

    1989-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    All of the ordered Tychoway rollers, to be used under the cryostat carriages on the center beam, have to be modified to accommodate a keyed way used to guide the cryostat along these same ways. A 0.320 x 0.406 inch notch is machined along one of the longer lower edges in order to create a 0.640 x 0.406 inch keyway when two of these notched rollers are bolted together (side by side) for installation. This keyway will fit over a .635 x .375 inch key, which is inserted into the ways. Due to the close fit, the rollers were sent to the Fermi Inspection Dept. to double check the machined notch dimensions and tolerances. Included is the drawing sent to the Tychoway manufacturer, who machined the notch, and the results of the measurements taken by the Inspection Dept. The tolerance on the 0.320 inch dimension is {+-} 0.002 inches. Only three of the initial ten rollers fall within the tolerance; No.3, 9 and 10 (they were numbered by the Inspection Dept.). The other seven, plus one of the 'good' rollers, can be matched up to meet the required dimensions of a 0.640 {+-} 0.004 inch keyway. Since only four rollers will be used on the keyed way per cryostat, the worst matches can be installed on the non-keyed side of the cryostat. A table listing the best possible matches and their subsequent dimensions and tolerances is given.

  10. Phyllosilicate orientation demonstrates early timing of compactional stabilization in calcite-cemented concretions in the Barnett Shale (Late Mississippian), Fort Worth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -cemented concretions in the Barnett Shale (Late Mississippian), Fort Worth Basin, Texas (U.S.A) Ruarri J. Day-Stirrat a in revised form 8 April 2008 Accepted 16 April 2008 Keywords: Barnett Shale Goniometry Concretions Fabric Calcite-cemented zones in the prolific gas-producing Barnett Shale (Ft. Worth Basin, Texas) preserve very

  11. Analysis of Process Variable Effects on the Roller Imprinting Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vijayaraghavan, Athulan; Hayse-Gregson, Stuart; Valdez, Rodolfo; Dornfeld, David

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of metal forming processes, Computers and Structures, Vol.2006). A roller embossing process for rapid fabrication ofdesign of industrial forging processes, Journal of Material

  12. Performance of Integrated Systems of Automated Roller Shade Systems and Daylight Responsive Dimming Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Byoung-Chul

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Roller Shade Systems and Daylight Responsive Dimming SystemsRoller Shade Systems and Daylight Responsive Dimming SystemsBerkeley, CA 94720 Abstract Daylight responsive dimming

  13. Sensing roller for in-process thickness measurement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Novak, J.L.

    1996-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for processing materials by sensing roller, in which the sensing roller has a plurality of conductive rings (electrodes) separated by rings of dielectric material. Sensing capacitances or impedances between the electrodes provides information on thicknesses of the materials being processed, location of wires therein, and other like characteristics of the materials. 6 figs.

  14. System for automatically aligning a support roller system under a rotating body

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Singletary, B. Huston (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two support rings on a rotatable drum respectively engage conically tapered nd surfaces of support rollers mounted on pivot universally relative to its axis of rotation and translate therealong. Rotation of the drum on differential conical support roller diameters causes pivotal steering and axial translation of support roller until roller is centered on support rings.

  15. System for automatically aligning a support roller system under a rotating body

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Singletary, B.H.

    1982-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Two support rings on a rotatable drum respectively engage conically tapered end surfaces of support rollers mounted on pivot universally relative to its axis of rotation and translate therealong. Rotation of the drum on differential conical support roller diameters causes pivotal steering and axial translation of support roller until roller is centered on support rings.

  16. Evaluation of the effects of crumb rubber and SBR on rutting resistance of asphalt concrete

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shih, Chuang-Tsair; Tia, Mang; Ruth, B.E. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the results of a study to evaluate the effects of addition of crumb rubber (CR) and styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR) on the rutting resistance of asphalt concrete. These two additives were blended with an AC-20 and an AC-30 grade asphalt cements at different levels of concentrations. These modified and unmodified asphalt blends were tested at intermediate and high temperatures to evaluate their rutting resistance characteristics. They were also used to make Florida type S-I structural surface mixtures. These mixtures were made into Marshall-size specimens by using Gyratory Testing Machine (GTM) equipped with air-roller to compact and density to three compaction levels which simulate three different conditions in the pavement. The FDOT`s (Florida Department of Transportation) Loaded Wheel Tester was also used to evaluate the rutting resistance of these asphalt mixtures. The test results indicate that the modified asphalt mixtures show relatively better rutting resistance and shear resistance as compared with the unmodified asphalt mixtures.

  17. And maybe that's feminist in a way?: Feminisms and Feminist Identity in Women's Flat Track Roller Derby Revival

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glorioso, Michelle

    2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    , the rink filled with the sound of plastic slamming against polished concrete, and they slid to a halt while simultaneously turning to face the commotion. Gauze! Ice! Coaches rushed to the jammer, with a first aid kit and a bag of ice. From where I... for women are not unique (consider womens rugby or womens ice hockey), roller derby is uniquely a full-contact sport created by women and only for women without being duplicated from an existing all- or mostly-male sport. The revival project began...

  18. Oak Leaf Roller and Springtime Defoliation of Live Oak Trees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drees, Bastiaan M.

    2004-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication explains how to minimize damage to live oak trees by the oak leaf roller and an associated caterpillar species, which occur throughout Texas but are most damaging in the Hill Country and South Texas....

  19. EVALUATION OF A LOW FRICTION - HIGH EFFICIENCY ROLLER BEARING ENGINE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kolarik, Robert V. II; Shattuck, Charles W.; Copper, Anthony P.

    2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This Low Friction (High Efficiency Roller Bearing) Engine (LFE) report presents the work done by The Timken Company to conduct a technology demonstration of the benefits of replacing hydrodynamic bearings with roller bearings in the crankshaft and camshaft assemblies of an internal combustion engine for the purpose of collecting data sufficient to prove merit. The engines in the present study have been more extensively converted to roller bearings than any previous studies (40 needle roller bearings per engine) to gain understanding of the full potential of application of bearing technology. The project plan called for comparative testing of a production vehicle which was already respected for having demonstrated low engine friction levels with a rollerized version of that engine. Testing was to include industry standard tests for friction, emissions and fuel efficiency conducted on instrumented dynamometers. Additional tests for fuel efficiency, cold start resistance and other measures of performance were to be made in the actual vehicle. Comparative measurements of noise, vibration and harshness (NVH), were planned, although any work to mitigate the suspected higher NVH level in the rollerized engine was beyond the scope of this project. Timken selected the Toyota Avalon with a 3.5L V-6 engine as the test vehicle. In an attempt to minimize cost and fabrication time, a made-from approach was proposed in which as many parts as possible would be used or modified from production parts to create the rollerized engine. Timken commissioned its test partner, FEV Engine Technology, to do a feasibility study in which they confirmed that using such an approach was possible to meet the required dimensional restrictions and tolerances. In designing the roller bearing systems for the crank and cam trains, Timken utilized as many production engine parts as possible. The crankshafts were produced from production line forgings, which use Timken steel, modified with special machining and heat treatment. Timken designed and manufactured all of the roller bearing related components such as the thrust bearing package. The production connecting rods and camshafts could not be used for the roller bearing engine, so new ones were produced according to the teams designs using Timken steel. The remaining miscellaneous components were designed and procured by FEV. Timken prepared a display version of the crankshaft portion of the production engine without connecting rods which could be driven by a motor through a cogged-belt and electrically actuated clutch arrangement. A modified version was also made in which the engine was outfitted with roller bearings on the main bearing positions. Preliminary tests showed that the rollerized engine was running with 1/3 less friction than the standard display engine. Additional friction testing and noise characterization was cut short because of shipping damage to the rollerized engine display and because of other project priorities. The team did successfully demonstrate the ability to package roller bearings satisfactorily in numerous locations in a typical automotive engine. The scope of this project did not include durability demonstration and that subject would have to be addressed in any follow-on work. In the actual test phase, the rollerized engine did show significantly less friction in motored dynamometer tests compared to its production equivalent. The 5-10% improvement measured in this study was about half that seen in other studies. However, the fired test results did not show a reduction in friction which did not match prior experience or expectations. Subsequent teardown and inspection of the rollerized engine revealed potential sources of excessive friction in the experimental application. These features would be eliminated in a design not based on modification of production parts. The team is confident (based on experience) that friction reduction would be realized with proper modifications.

  20. Engine testing of ceramic cam-roller followers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalish, Y. (Detroit Diesel Corp., MI (United States))

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For several years, DDC has been developing monolithic ceramic heat engine components. One of the components, developed for an application in our state-of-the-art on-highway, heavy-duty diesel engine, the Series 60, is a silicon nitride cam-roller follower. Prior to starting this program, each valve train component in the Series 60 was considered for conversion to a ceramic material. Many advantages and disadvantages (benefits and risks) were considered. From this effort, one component was selected, the cam-roller follower. Using a system design approach, a ceramic cam-roller follower offered functional improvement at a reasonable cost. The purpose of the project was to inspect and test 100 domestically produced silicon nitride cam-roller followers built to the requirements of the DDC series 60 engine.

  1. Engine testing of ceramic cam-roller followers. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalish, Y. [Detroit Diesel Corp., MI (United States)

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For several years, DDC has been developing monolithic ceramic heat engine components. One of the components, developed for an application in our state-of-the-art on-highway, heavy-duty diesel engine, the Series 60, is a silicon nitride cam-roller follower. Prior to starting this program, each valve train component in the Series 60 was considered for conversion to a ceramic material. Many advantages and disadvantages (benefits and risks) were considered. From this effort, one component was selected, the cam-roller follower. Using a system design approach, a ceramic cam-roller follower offered functional improvement at a reasonable cost. The purpose of the project was to inspect and test 100 domestically produced silicon nitride cam-roller followers built to the requirements of the DDC series 60 engine.

  2. atd roller bearing: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    regions. Ng, Sum Huan 2008-01-01 18 Roller-Cast Poly-Dimethylsiloxane as a Non-Hermetic Encapsulant for MEMS Packaging. Open Access Theses and Dissertations Summary: ??This...

  3. MEASUREMENTS OF SHALLOW WATER BREAKING WAVE ROLLERS Merrick C. Haller and Patricio Cataln

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haller, Merrick

    . Since there is a lack of shallow water roller measurements, investigators have instead used the waveMEASUREMENTS OF SHALLOW WATER BREAKING WAVE ROLLERS Merrick C. Haller and Patricio Cataln 1 Ocean water and wave roller transformation in the surf zone. The approach is new in the sense

  4. Commissioning and Verification Procedures for the Automated Roller Shade System at

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Commissioning and Verification Procedures for the Automated Roller Shade System at The New York for verification testing of a newly installed automated roller shade system. The automated roller shade system has-available system works prior to building occupancy. A high dynamic range luminance measurement tool, developed

  5. Concrete Domains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kahn, Gilles; Plotkin, Gordon

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper introduces the theory of a particular kind of computation domains called concrete domains. The purpose of this theory is to find a satisfactory framework for the notions of coroutine computation and sequentiality ...

  6. Pin and roller attachment system for ceramic blades

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shaffer, James E. (Maitland, FL)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a turbine, a plurality of blades are attached to a turbine wheel by way of a plurality of joints which form a rolling contact between the blades and the turbine wheel. Each joint includes a pin and a pair of rollers to provide rolling contact between the pin and an adjacent pair of blades. Because of this rolling contact, high stress scuffing between the blades and the turbine wheel reduced, thereby inhibiting catastrophic failure of the blade joints.

  7. Pin and roller attachment system for ceramic blades

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shaffer, J.E.

    1995-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    In a turbine, a plurality of blades are attached to a turbine wheel by way of a plurality of joints which form a rolling contact between the blades and the turbine wheel. Each joint includes a pin and a pair of rollers to provide rolling contact between the pin and an adjacent pair of blades. Because of this rolling contact, high stress scuffing between the blades and the turbine wheel reduced, thereby inhibiting catastrophic failure of the blade joints. 3 figs.

  8. Municipal Solid Waste as an Energy Source by Roller-Grate Incineration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karnoski, P. J.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Grumman/VKW (Duesseldorf) Roller-Grate System was developed specifically to mass-burn municipal solid wastes achieving efficient combustion by a rolling and mixing action of the fuel bed, and independent control of primary air and roller speed...

  9. A testing technique for concrete under confinement at high rates of strain P. Forquin1,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 A testing technique for concrete under confinement at high rates of strain P. Forquin1, , F://lmsX.polytechnique.fr/LMSX/ Abstract: A testing device is presented for the experimental study of dynamic compaction of concrete under numerical simulations of tests involving a set of 4 different concrete-like behaviours and different

  10. Summary of Concrete Overlays Existing concrete pavement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Summary of Concrete Overlays Existing concrete pavement with surface distresses Prepared surface Monolithic pavement with new concrete surface Existing asphalt pavement with surface distresses Milled pavement with asphalt surface distresses Milled and cleaned surface New 25 in. (5.112.7 cm) bonded

  11. Concrete Pavement Surface Characteristics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Broom, Belt, Carpet) Shot Peened Exposed Aggregate Porous (Pervious) Concrete Milled HMA and SurfaceImproving Concrete Pavement Surface Characteristics Pooled Fund TPF-5(139) National Concrete do with this knowledge? #12;Better Design and Construction Practices for Texturing Concrete Pavement

  12. The effect of machine and material parameters on rare earth roller separation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Esther, S.B. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study addresses the affect of machine and material factors on the separation of PET plastic and aluminum on the Rare Earth Roller magnetic separator. The purposes of this study are to gain a better understanding of ...

  13. Strip track-off and buckling between transport rollers W.B. Fraser1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGuinness, Mark

    Strip track-off and buckling between transport rollers W.B. Fraser1 , C. Macaskill1 , M. Mc millimetres and a depth of less than a millimetre. The ridge typically wanders in the lateral direction around

  14. The application of fiber optic sensors to the monitoring of roller element bearing systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Juarez, Juan Carlos

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE APPLICATION OF FIBER OPTIC SENSORS TO THE MONITORING OF ROLLER ELEMENT BEARING SYSTEMS A Thesis by JUAN CARLOS JUAREZ Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 2002 Major Subject: Electrical Engineering THE APPLICATION OF FIBER OPTIC SENSORS TO THE MONITORING OF ROLLER ELEMENT BEARING SVSTEMS A Thesis by . IIJAN CARLOS JUAREZ Submitted to Texas A&M University...

  15. Concrete Material Models Concrete_1: Concrete Model with No Tensile Strength

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Filippou, Filip C.

    Concrete Material Models Concrete_1: Concrete Model with No Tensile Strength INPUT Concrete_1, matID ¢f fc cu u, , ,e e0 Definitions (Fig. 1): fc : concrete compressive strength at 28 days (compression is negative) A0 : concrete strain at maximum strength (compression is negative) fcu : concrete crushing

  16. Insulating polymer concrete

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schorr, H. Peter (Douglaston, NY); Fontana, Jack J. (Shirley, NY); Steinberg, Meyer (Melville, NY)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A lightweight insulating polymer concrete formed from a lightweight closed cell aggregate and a water resistance polymeric binder.

  17. Dynamic strength of concrete

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Logunova, V.A.; Rudenko, V.V.; Radionov, A.K.; Sokolov, I.B.

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recommendations for evaluating the dynamic strength of concrete structures at hydroelectric power stations are given. Both existing and planned structures are addressed. Equations are provided for determing the design compressive and tensile strength of concrete. A formula is provided for determining design dynamic strength of concrete of various ages under uniform compression. 3 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  18. CONCRETE PAVEMENT Reference Manual

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CONCRETE PAVEMENT Reference Manual Prepared for Federal Highway Administration Office of Pavement by National Concrete Pavement Technology Center at Iowa State University 2711 South Loop Drive, Suite 4700 No. 3. Recipient's Catalog No. 4. Title and Subtitle 5. Report Date February 2008 Concrete Pavement

  19. Pervasive liquid metal based direct writing electronics with roller-ball pen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, Yi; Zhang, Qin [Beijing Key Lab of CryoBiomedical Eng. and Key Lab of Cryogenics, Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)] [Beijing Key Lab of CryoBiomedical Eng. and Key Lab of Cryogenics, Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Liu, Jing, E-mail: jliu@mail.ipc.ac.cn [Beijing Key Lab of CryoBiomedical Eng. and Key Lab of Cryogenics, Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China) [Beijing Key Lab of CryoBiomedical Eng. and Key Lab of Cryogenics, Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Medicine, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A roller-ball pen enabled direct writing electronics via room temperature liquid metal ink was proposed. With the rolling to print mechanism, the metallic inks were smoothly written on flexible polymer substrate to form conductive tracks and electronic devices. The contact angle analyzer and scanning electron microscope were implemented to disclose several unique inner properties of the obtained electronics. An ever high writing resolution with line width and thickness as 200 ?m and 80 ?m, respectively was realized. Further, with the administration of external writing pressure, GaIn{sub 24.5} droplets embody increasing wettability on polymer which demonstrates the pervasive adaptability of the roller-ball pen electronics.

  20. National Concrete Pavement Technology Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .5 " concrete overlay with 1" asphalt interlayer (non porous surface mix) ·Pours- one 22' pass and one 16' ftNational Concrete Pavement Technology Center Concrete Overlay Technology TTCC/NC2 Meeting Savannah patches in 2008 Shortcut (2) to CD Drive.lnk #12;Need to Move Concrete Overlays Forward Concrete Overlay

  1. Custom 3D-Printed Rollers for Frieze Pattern Cookies Robert Hanson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Custom 3D-Printed Rollers for Frieze Pattern Cookies Robert Hanson Towson University, Emeritus a method for converting images of repeating patterns, e.g., Roman friezes or Escher tessellations, into 3D-printed the world of mathematics and the art of cooking. Fractal cookies based on stretching and folding [1] and 3D-printed

  2. Concrete chemistry: Chemical admixtures, sprayed concrete, concrete binders and current R&D

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davies, Christopher

    Concrete chemistry: Chemical admixtures, sprayed concrete, concrete binders and current R&D Dr Roar Myrdal, R&D Director Construction Chemicals, Normet International Ltd. Adjunct Prof. Concrete Technology ­ School of Engineering ABSTRACT A short overview of chemical admixtures for concrete ­ types and how

  3. Strict $\\infty $-categories. Concrete Duality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. V. Kondratiev

    2006-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    An elementary theory of strict $\\infty $-categories with application to concrete duality is given. New examples of first and second order concrete duality are presented.

  4. DIVISON 03 CONCRETE 03300 CAST-IN-PLACE CONCRETE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -IN-PLACE CONCRETE A. Design Considerations 1. Testing and inspection will be required for cast-in-place concrete of the Building Code. All testing and inspection of concrete work will be contracted for and paid for directly by the University, regardless of building class. The A/E must specify all testing and inspection of concrete work

  5. ParadigmParadigm Concrete RecyclingConcrete Recycling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ParadigmParadigm Concrete RecyclingConcrete Recycling #12;Recycled ConcreteRecycled Concrete Whatever steel goes into PCC must comeWhatever steel goes into PCC must come out for recycleout for recycle Aggregates have a big impact on the costAggregates have a big impact on the cost of recyclingof recycling

  6. Electrokinetic decontamination of concrete

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lomasney, H.L.; SenGupta, A.K.; Yachmenev, V.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    ELECTROSORB Electrokinetic Extraction Technology, developed by ISOTRON Corp., offers a cost-effective approach to treating contaminated concrete. Heavy metals/radionuclides trapped in concrete can be extracted using this process if they are chemically solubilized; solubilizers used are citric acid alone and a mixture of citric and nitric acids. A DC electric field is applied across the contaminated concrete to electrokinetically transport the solubilized contaminants from the concrete pores to a collector on the concrete surface. The collector is an extraction pad laid on the surface. The pad provides confinement for a planar electrode and solubilizer solution; it is operated under a vacuum to hold the pad against the concrete surface. Operation requires little attendance, reducing the workers` health hazards. The process incorporates a mechanism for recycling the solubilizer solution. A field demonstration of the process took place in Building 21 of DOE`s Mound facility in Miamisburg, OH, over 12 days in June 1996. The thorium species present in this building`s concrete floors included ThO{sub 2} and thorium oxalate. The nitric acid was found to facilitate Th extraction.

  7. Pecos River Compact (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation authorizes the state's entrance into the Pecos River Compact, a joint agreement between the states of New Mexico and Texas. The compact is administered by the Pecos River Compact...

  8. Seismic demands in precast concrete diaphragms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schoettler, Matthew John

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reinforced and Prestressed Concrete Walls. Journal ofPrestressed and Precast Concrete Structures. PCI Journal ,methodology for precast concrete diaphragms part 2: Research

  9. Sustainability of Concrete forSustainability of Concrete for Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertini, Robert L.

    Sustainability of Concrete forSustainability of Concrete for Infrastructure Dr. Jason H. Ideker limits sustainability in concrete materials? ­ Degradation: Alkali-silica reaction ­ Environmental for infrastructure rehabilitation and rapid repair ­ Instrumentation and monitoring to track performance · Testing

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of concrete

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burgoyne, Chris

    velocity Relates Elastic modulus to speed of sound Assumes Concrete heterogeneous Can be affected by steel Modulus related to speed of sound Strength of concrete related to modulus Location of flaws structure In both cases procedure is destructive Systems to monitor concrete modulus Ultra-sonic pulse

  11. Corrective action decision document for the Roller Coaster Lagoons and North Disposal Trench (Corrective Action Unit Number 404)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The North Disposal Trench, located north of the eastern most lagoon, was installed in 1963 to receive solid waste and construction debris from the Operation Roller Coaster man camp. Subsequent to Operation Roller Coaster, the trench continued to receive construction debris and range cleanup debris (including ordnance) from Sandia National Laboratories and other operators. A small hydrocarbon spill occurred during Voluntary Corrective Action (VCA) activities (VCA Spill Area) at an area associated with the North Disposal Trench Corrective Action Site (CAS). Remediation activities at this site were conducted in 1995. A corrective action investigation was conducted in September of 1996 following the Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP); the detailed results of that investigation are presented in Appendix A. The Roller Coaster Lagoons and North Disposal Trench are located at the Tonopah Test Range (TTR), a part of the Nellis Air Force Range, which is approximately 225 kilometers (140 miles) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada, by air.

  12. High temperature polymer concrete

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fontana, J.J.; Reams, W.

    1984-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention is concerned with a polymer concrete composition, which is a two-component composition useful with many bases including metal. Component A, the aggregate composition, is broadly composed of silica, silica flour, portland cement, and acrylamide, whereas Component B, which is primarily vinyl and acrylyl reactive monomers, is a liquid system.

  13. Electroosmotic decontamination of concrete

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bostick, W.D.; Bush, S.A.; Marsh, G.C.; Henson, H.M. [Oak Ridge K-25 Site, TN (United States); Box, W.D.; Morgan, I.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is described for the electroosmotic decontamination of concrete surfaces, in which an electrical field is used to induce migration of ionic contaminants from porous concrete into an electrolyte solution that may be disposed of as a low-level liquid radioactive waste (LLRW); alternately, the contaminants from the solution can be sorbed onto anion exchange media in order to prevent contaminant buildup in the solution and to minimize the amount of LLRW generated. We have confirmed the removal of uranium (and infer the removal of {sup 99}Tc) from previously contaminated concrete surfaces. In a typical experimental configuration, a stainless steel mesh is placed in an electrolyte solution contained within a diked cell to serve as the negative electrode (cathode) and contaminant collection medium, respectively, and an existing metal penetration (e.g., piping, conduit, or rebar reinforcement within the concrete surface) serves as the positive electrode (anode) to complete the cell. Typically we have achieved 70 to >90% reductions in surface activity by applying <400 V and <1 A for 1--3 h (energy consumption of 0.4--12 kWh/ft{sup 2}).

  14. NSTX LTXPEGASUS Compact CTF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    isotope retention. ST-CTF Compact ST-CTF at ~ 10 MA range provide a compact nuclear component test to NSTX. Large vacuum vessel, no stabilizing plates, excellent set of profile and boundary diagnostics

  15. Red River Compact (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Red River Compact Commission administers the Red River Compact to ensure that Texas receives its equitable share of quality water from the Red River and its tributaries as apportioned by the...

  16. Rio Grande Compact (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation authorizes the state's entrance into the Rio Grande Compact, a joint agreement between the states of Colorado, New Mexico, and Texas. The compact is administered by the Rio Grande...

  17. Canadian River Compact (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Canadian River Commission administers the Canadian River Compact which includes the states of New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas. Signed in 1950 by the member states, the Compact was subsequently...

  18. Blast simulator wall tests : experimental methods and mitigation strategies for reinforced concrete and concrete Masonry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oesterle, Michael G.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Foam-protected reinforced concrete structures under impact:and Repair of Reinforced Concrete with Carbon Overlays."Polymer Reinforcement for Concrete Structures (FRPRCS-08),

  19. Design and Application of Low Compaction Energy Concrete for Use in Slip-form Concrete

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    used were different types of clays, fly ash and magnesium oxide. The addition of polypropylene fibers Institute for TEA- 21 funded projects designated A215 DISCLAIMER: The contents of this report reflect

  20. Performance of Integrated Systems of Automated Roller Shade Systems and Daylight Responsive Dimming Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Byoung-Chul; Choi, An-Seop; Jeong, Jae-Weon; Lee, Eleanor S.

    2010-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Daylight responsive dimming systems have been used in few buildings to date because they require improvements to improve reliability. The key underlying factor contributing to poor performance is the variability of the ratio of the photosensor signal to daylight workplane illuminance in accordance with sun position, sky condition, and fenestration condition. Therefore, this paper describes the integrated systems between automated roller shade systems and daylight responsive dimming systems with an improved closed-loop proportional control algorithm, and the relative performance of the integrated systems and single systems. The concept of the improved closed-loop proportional control algorithm for the integrated systems is to predict the varying correlation of photosensor signal to daylight workplane illuminance according to roller shade height and sky conditions for improvement of the system accuracy. In this study, the performance of the integrated systems with two improved closed-loop proportional control algorithms was compared with that of the current (modified) closed-loop proportional control algorithm. In the results, the average maintenance percentage and the average discrepancies of the target illuminance, as well as the average time under 90percent of target illuminance for the integrated systems significantly improved in comparison with the current closed-loop proportional control algorithm for daylight responsive dimming systems as a single system.

  1. Department of Energy and Mineral Engineering Spring Roller Design to Increase the Lifespan of Asphalt Compactor Wiper Blades

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demirel, Melik C.

    the Lifespan of Asphalt Compactor Wiper Blades By: Thomas Krupa, Eric Resch, Phillip Yesenosky, John Marshall, Asset Kusmanov Overview Volvo CE's asphalt compactors have a polymer wiper blade that is used life. o The roller was tested five times as long as the wipers and never showed any change in diameter

  2. Blast simulator wall tests : experimental methods and mitigation strategies for reinforced concrete and concrete Masonry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oesterle, Michael G.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    suited for testing reinforced concrete and concrete masonrytesting on mitigation strategies of reinforced concrete andConcrete Masonry Unit COR Coefficient of Restitution DIF Dynamic Increase Factor EMRTC Energetic Materials Research and Testing

  3. Seismic demands in precast concrete diaphragms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schoettler, Matthew John

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2004). Load testing of a Precast Concrete Double-Tee FlangeStructural Testing, SP 211-8, American Concrete Institute,shake table testing of a precast concrete building, was

  4. Preferred orientation of ettringite in concrete fractures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wenk, Hans-Rudolf

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Z. (1988). Cement and Concrete Research , 18 , 823-829.R. (2006). Cement and Concrete Research 36 , 364-370.P.K. & Monteiro, P.J.M. (2006). Concrete. Microstructure,

  5. Asphalt and Asphaltic Concrete

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, A. R.

    1914-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , and combined curb and gutter furnished and set, the rate for resetting old curbing; the rate per cubic yard for extra concrete, if any is used; the price per cubic yard for broken stone or gravel; the rate per square yard for paving and for relaying old...- tified and given access to the same at least ten days be- fore it is required for use, and any work in which re- jected cement was used will be rejected altogether. 5. The cement shall be packed in strong bags having printed on the outside the brand...

  6. Hot roller embossing system equipped with a temperature margin-based controller

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Seyoung, E-mail: seyoungkim@kimm.re.kr; Son, Youngsu; Lee, Sunghee; Ham, Sangyong; Kim, Byungin [Department of Robotics and Mechatronics, Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials (KIMM), Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A temperature control system was proposed for hot roller embossing. The roll surface was heated using induction coils and cooled with a circulating chilled water system. The temperature of the roll surface was precisely controlled by a temperature margin-based control algorithm that we developed. Implementation of the control system reduced deviations in the roll surface temperature to less than 2?C. The tight temperature control and the ability to rapidly increase and decrease the roll temperature will allow optimum operating parameters to be developed quickly. The temperature margin-based controller could also be used to optimize the time course of electrical power and shorten the cooling time by choosing an appropriate temperature margin, possibly for limited power consumption. The chiller-equipped heating roll with the proposed control algorithm is expected to decrease the time needed to determine the optimal embossing process.

  7. Edge coating apparatus with movable roller applicator for solar cell substrates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pavani, Luca; Abas, Emmanuel

    2012-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A non-contact edge coating apparatus includes an applicator for applying a coating material on an edge of a solar cell substrate and a control system configured to drive the applicator. The control system may drive the applicator along an axis to maintain a distance with an edge of the substrate as the substrate is rotated to have the edge coated with a coating material. The applicator may include a recessed portion into which the edge of the substrate is received for edge coating. For example, the applicator may be a roller with a groove. Coating material may be introduced into the groove for application onto the edge of the substrate. A variety of coating materials may be employed with the apparatus including hot melt ink and UV curable plating resist.

  8. Flaw-detection characteristics of the compact MIB-4 betatron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boiko, D.A.; Filimonov, A.A.; Chakhlov, V.L.

    1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The compact pulse betatron using electrons accelerated to an energy of up to 4 MeV (MIB-4) is designed for the radiographic inspection of reinforced-concrete structures and buildings, welded joints, various materials, and assemblies. Information which refines and complements the method of inspecting parts by means of the MIB-4 device is provided. The results obtained in testing this equipment abroad are given.

  9. Interstate Mining Compact (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation authorizes the state's entrance into the Interstate Mining Compact, a multi-state governmental agency / organization that represents the natural resource and related environmental...

  10. DATABASE FOR PREMATURE CONCRETE DETERIORATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    0-4085-P3 DATABASE FOR PREMATURE CONCRETE DETERIORATION Author: Kevin J. Folliard Project 0. This product presents the architecture for a database to collect relevant information on materials and mixture in developing and populating various materials- and structures-specific databases for both new concrete

  11. CRAD, Nuclear Facility Construction - Structural Concrete, May...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    CRAD, Nuclear Facility Construction - Structural Concrete, May 29, 2009 CRAD, Nuclear Facility Construction - Structural Concrete, May 29, 2009 May 29, 2009 Nuclear Facility...

  12. Nuclear Power Plant Concrete Structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basu, Prabir [International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)] [International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA); Labbe, Pierre [Electricity of France (EDF)] [Electricity of France (EDF); Naus, Dan [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A nuclear power plant (NPP) involves complex engineering structures that are significant items of the structures, systems and components (SSC) important to the safe and reliable operation of the NPP. Concrete is the commonly used civil engineering construction material in the nuclear industry because of a number of advantageous properties. The NPP concrete structures underwent a great degree of evolution, since the commissioning of first NPP in early 1960. The increasing concern with time related to safety of the public and environment, and degradation of concrete structures due to ageing related phenomena are the driving forces for such evolution. The concrete technology underwent rapid development with the advent of chemical admixtures of plasticizer/super plasticizer category as well as viscosity modifiers and mineral admixtures like fly ash and silica fume. Application of high performance concrete (HPC) developed with chemical and mineral admixtures has been witnessed in the construction of NPP structures. Along with the beneficial effect, the use of admixtures in concrete has posed a number of challenges as well in design and construction. This along with the prospect of continuing operation beyond design life, especially after 60 years, the impact of extreme natural events ( as in the case of Fukushima NPP accident) and human induced events (e.g. commercial aircraft crash like the event of September 11th 2001) has led to further development in the area of NPP concrete structures. The present paper aims at providing an account of evolution of NPP concrete structures in last two decades by summarizing the development in the areas of concrete technology, design methodology and construction techniques, maintenance and ageing management of concrete structures.

  13. Laboratory compaction of cohesionless sands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delphia, John Girard

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on the maximum dry unit weight during compaction. Three different laboratory compaction methods were used: 1) Standard Proctor', 2) Modified Proctor; and 3) Vibrating hammer. The effects of the grain size distribution, particle shape and laboratory compaction...

  14. Reasoning with Concrete Domains Carsten Lutz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Carsten

    Reasoning with Concrete Domains Carsten Lutz RWTH Aachen, LuFg Theoretical Computer Science. Concrete domains allow the integration of description logic reasoning with reasoning about concrete objects for building real­world applications, is widely accepted. How­ ever, the complexity of reasoning with concrete

  15. NCC Technical Training Opportunity in Concrete

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NCC Technical Training Opportunity in Concrete Pavement Technology National Concrete Consortium training through the National Concrete Pavement Technology Center (CP Tech Center). · Michigan Tech for Concrete Pavement: You may select specific subjects within the manual for emphasis if that is of interest

  16. Testing of concrete by laser ablation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Flesher, Dann J. (Benton City, WA); Becker, David L. (Kennewick, WA); Beem, William L. (Kennewick, WA); Berry, Tommy C. (Kennewick, WA); Cannon, N. Scott (Kennewick, WA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of testing concrete in a structure in situ, by: directing a succession of pulses of laser radiation at a point on the structure so that each pulse effects removal of a quantity of concrete and transfers energy to the concrete; detecting a characteristic of energy which has been transferred to the concrete; determining, separately from the detecting step, the total quantity of concrete removed by the succession of pulses; and calculating a property of the concrete on the basis of the detected energy characteristic and the determined total quantity of concrete removed.

  17. Testing of concrete by laser ablation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Flesher, D.J.; Becker, D.L.; Beem, W.L.; Berry, T.C.; Cannon, N.S.

    1997-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is disclosed for testing concrete in a structure in situ, by: directing a succession of pulses of laser radiation at a point on the structure so that each pulse effects removal of a quantity of concrete and transfers energy to the concrete; detecting a characteristic of energy which has been transferred to the concrete; determining, separately from the detecting step, the total quantity of concrete removed by the succession of pulses; and calculating a property of the concrete on the basis of the detected energy characteristic and the determined total quantity of concrete removed. 1 fig.

  18. CONCRETE PAVING & TEXTURING FOR SUSTAINABILITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    CONCRETE PAVING & TEXTURING FOR SUSTAINABILITY Bernard Igbafen Izevbekhai, Research Operations 2012 #12;OUTLINE #12;SUSTAINABILITY Meeting the needs of the present generation without compromising Brundtland Commission in 1987: Successful application of the principles of sustainable development lies

  19. Corrosion resistance of concrete reinforcement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward-Waller, Elizabeth, 1982-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this thesis is to investigate the mechanism of corrosion of steel reinforcement in concrete and epoxy coated reinforcing bars as corrosion resistant alternatives. Several case studies explore the durability ...

  20. Nanogranular origin of concrete creep

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vandamme, Matthieu

    Concrete, the solid that forms at room temperature from mixing Portland cement with water, sand, and aggregates, suffers from time-dependent deformation under load. This creep occurs at a rate that deteriorates the durability ...

  1. Compact microchannel system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Griffiths, Stewart

    2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides compact geometries for the layout of microchannel columns through the use of turns and straight channel segments. These compact geometries permit the use of long separation or reaction columns on a small microchannel substrate or, equivalently, permit columns of a fixed length to occupy a smaller substrate area. The new geometries are based in part on mathematical analyses that provide the minimum turn radius for which column performance in not degraded. In particular, we find that straight channel segments of sufficient length reduce the required minimum turn radius, enabling compact channel layout when turns and straight segments are combined. The compact geometries are obtained by using turns and straight segments in overlapped or nested arrangements to form pleated or coiled columns.

  2. Electrically conductive polymer concrete coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fontana, J.J.; Elling, D.; Reams, W.

    1990-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A sprayable electrically conductive polymer concrete coating for vertical d overhead applications is described. The coating is permeable yet has low electrical resistivity (<10 ohm-cm), good bond strength to concrete substrates, and good weatherability. A preferred formulation contains about 60 wt % calcined coke breeze, 40 wt % vinyl ester with 3.5 wt % modified bentonite clay. Such formulations apply evenly and provide enough rigidity for vertical or overhead structures so there is no drip or sag.

  3. Electrically conductive polymer concrete coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fontana, Jack J. (Shirley, NY); Elling, David (Centereach, NY); Reams, Walter (Shirley, NY)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A sprayable electrically conductive polymer concrete coating for vertical d overhead applications is described. The coating is permeable yet has low electrical resistivity (<10 ohm-cm), good bond strength to concrete substrates, and good weatherability. A preferred formulation contains about 60 wt % calcined coke breeze, 40 wt % vinyl ester with 3.5 wt % modified bentonite clay. Such formulations apply evenly and provide enough rigidity for vertical or overhead structures so there is no drip or sag.

  4. Electrically conductive polymer concrete coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fontana, J.J.; Elling, D.; Reams, W.

    1988-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A sprayable electrically conductive polymer concrete coating for vertical and overhead applications is described. The coating is permeable yet has low electrical resistivity (<10 ohm-cm), good bond strength to concrete substrates, and good weatherability. A preferred formulation contains about 60 wt% calcined coke breeze, 40 wt% vinyl ester resin with 3.5 wt% modified bentonite clay. Such formulations apply evenly and provide enough rigidity for vertical or overhead structures so there is no drip or sag. 4 tabs.

  5. Field drilling tests on improved geothermal unsealed roller-cone bits. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendrickson, R.R.; Jones, A.H.; Winzenried, R.W.; Maish, A.B.

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development and field testing of a 222 mm (8-3/4 inch) unsealed, insert type, medium hard formation, high-temperature bit are described. Increased performance was gained by substituting improved materials in critical bit components. These materials were selected on bases of their high temperature properties, machinability and heat treatment response. Program objectives required that both machining and heat treating could be accomplished with existing rock bit production equipment. Six of the experimental bits were subjected to air drilling at 240/sup 0/C (460/sup 0/F) in Franciscan graywacke at the Geysers (California). Performances compared directly to conventional bits indicate that in-gage drilling time was increased by 70%. All bits at the Geysers are subjected to reaming out-of-gage hole prior to drilling. Under these conditions the experimental bits showed a 30% increase in usable hole drilled, compared with the conventional bits. The materials selected improved roller wear by 200%, friction per wear by 150%, and lug wear by 150%. These tests indicate a potential well cost savings of 4 to 8%. Savings of 12% are considered possible with drilling procedures optimized for the experimental bits.

  6. Seismic design, testing and analysis of reinforced concrete wall buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Panagiotou, Marios

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    based on the material testing data of concrete cylinders inDESIGN, TESTING AND ANALYSIS OF REINFORCED CONCRETE WALLDESIGN, TESTING AND ANALYSIS OF REINFORCED CONCRETE WALL

  7. Reliability based assessment of FRP rehabilitation of reinforced concrete girders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilcox, Patrick Carlo

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Polymer Reinforcing Bars in Concrete Environment. 2002 ,Corrosion of Steel in Concrete; Wiley-VCH: Weinheim, 2004.Mitchell, D. Prestressed Concrete Structures; Prentice Hall:

  8. Seismic design, testing and analysis of reinforced concrete wall buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Panagiotou, Marios

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Slender Reinforced Concrete Walls. Structural Journal,T. (1975). Reinforced Concrete Structures. John Wiley &Design of Reinforced Concrete and Masonry Buildings. John

  9. Nonlinear seismic response analysis of steel-concrete composite frames

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbato, Michele

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    formulation of nonlinear steel- concrete composite beam ele-Behaviour of Composite Steel and Concrete Struc- turalE. (2001). Analysis of steel-concrete composite frames with

  10. Large-Scale Testing of Steel-Reinforced Concrete (SRC) Coupling Beams Embedded into Reinforced Concrete Structural Walls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Motter, Christopher John

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Concrete Cylinder Testing the latter stages of testing, concrete spalling was observedObtained from Concrete Cylinder Testing f' c,test (ksi) ? 0,

  11. Nuclear Facility Construction - Structural Concrete, May 29,...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Nuclear Facility Construction - Structural Concrete, May 29, 2009 (HSS CRAD 64-15, Rev. 0) Nuclear Facility Construction - Structural Concrete, May 29, 2009 (HSS CRAD 64-15, Rev....

  12. The behaviour of concrete structures in fire

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fletcher, Ian A; Welch, Stephen; Torero, Jose L; Carvel, Ricky O; Usmani, Asif

    2007-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The nature of concrete-based structures means that they generally perform very well in fire. However, concrete is a complex material and its properties can change dramatically when exposed to high temperatures. This paper provides a state...

  13. PERFORMANCE-RELATED SPECIAL PROVISION FOR HIGH PERFORMANCE CONCRETE MIX DESIGNS FOR CONCRETE SUPERSTRUCTURE (Tollway)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PERFORMANCE-RELATED SPECIAL PROVISION FOR HIGH PERFORMANCE CONCRETE MIX DESIGNS FOR CONCRETE of designing and furnishing high performance portland cement concrete for special applications to the decks the Illinois Tollway with a methodology to assure high quality concrete with reduced shrinkage potential, while

  14. ACHIEVING "GREEN" CONCRETE THROUGH THE USE OF HIGH PERFORMANCE FIBER REINFORCED CONCRETE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chao, Shih-Ho

    , the porous and brittle nature of concrete, when interacting with environmental actions such as weathering1 ACHIEVING "GREEN" CONCRETE THROUGH THE USE OF HIGH PERFORMANCE FIBER REINFORCED CONCRETE Shih-Ho Chao1 , A. M., ASCE ABSTRACT Concrete is one of the most widely used materials for infrastructure all

  15. Industrial Optimization Compact Course

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirches, Christian

    Industrial Optimization Compact Course and Challenge Workshop Optimization plays a crucial role of the processes are typically nonlinear and dyna- mic. Thus, complex dynamic optimization or optimal control in industrial optimization. February 17­20, 2014 ·9.00­17.00 IWR ·Im Neuenheimer Feld 368 ·69120 Heidelberg www

  16. Undesired drying of concrete and cement paste

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langendoen, Koen

    Undesired drying of concrete and cement paste is a nightmare for any construction engineer of the concrete or cement paste surface. Inspired by the art of molecular cooking a team of TU Delft scientists for instance sodium alginates. When sprayed on the surface of concrete or cement paste, a rapid chemical

  17. Recommended Practice for Accepting New Concrete Pavement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Recommended Practice for Accepting New Concrete Pavement Surfaces for Tire/Pavement Noise Designation: CPSCP PP 1-11 (rev 3/1/2011) National Concrete Pavement Technology Center 2711 South Loop Drive, Suite 4700 Ames, IA 50010 #12;PP 1-1 CPSCP Recommended Practice for Accepting New Concrete Pavement

  18. PCC Mix Designs Using Recycled Concrete

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    PCC Mix Designs Using Recycled Concrete Pavements Mary E. Vancura, Derek Tompkins, & Lev Khazanovich 21st Annual Transportation Research Conference #12;·! Reassessment of recycled concrete aggregate (RCA) use in rigid pavements ·! History of RCA use ·! Characteristics of RCA concrete ·! RCA production

  19. Concrete Domains and Nominals United Carlos Areces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Carsten

    Concrete Domains and Nominals United Carlos Areces University of Amsterdam The Netherlands carlos(D), the extension of ALC with concrete domains, is known to be PSpace-complete, in this article we show on the concrete domain D used). The proof is by a reduction of a NExpTime-complete variant of the domino problem

  20. Progress in Compact Toroid Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dolan, Thomas James

    2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The term "compact toroids" as used here means spherical tokamaks, spheromaks, and field reversed configurations, but not reversed field pinches. There are about 17 compact toroid experiments under construction or operating, with approximate parameters listed in Table 1.

  1. Sabine River Compact (Multiple States)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Sabine River Compact Commission administers the Sabine River Compact to ensure that Texas receives its equitable share of quality water from the Sabine River and its tributaries as apportioned...

  2. Quick-setting concrete and a method for making quick-setting concrete

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wagh, Arun S. (Joliet, IL); Singh, Dileep (Westmont, IL); Pullockaran, Jose D. (Trenton, NJ); Knox, Lerry (Glen Ellyn, IL)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for producing quick setting concrete is provided comprising hydrng a concrete dry mixture with carbonate solution to create a slurry, and allowing the slurry to cure. The invention also provides for a quick setting concrete having a predetermined proportion of CaCO.sub.3 of between 5 and 23 weight percent of the entire concrete mixture, and whereby the concrete has a compression strength of approximately 4,000 pounds per square inch (psi) within 24 hours after pouring.

  3. Compact Spreader Schemes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Placidi, M.; Jung, J. -Y.; Ratti, A.; Sun, C.

    2014-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes beam distribution schemes adopting a novel implementation based on low amplitude vertical deflections combined with horizontal ones generated by Lambertson-type septum magnets. This scheme offers substantial compactness in the longitudinal layouts of the beam lines and increased flexibility for beam delivery of multiple beam lines on a shot-to-shot basis. Fast kickers (FK) or transverse electric field RF Deflectors (RFD) provide the low amplitude deflections. Initially proposed at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) as tools for beam diagnostics and more recently adopted for multiline beam pattern schemes, RFDs offer repetition capabilities and a likely better amplitude reproducibility when compared to FKs, which, in turn, offer more modest financial involvements both in construction and operation. Both solutions represent an ideal approach for the design of compact beam distribution systems resulting in space and cost savings while preserving flexibility and beam quality.

  4. Global Compact for Higher Education Institutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Global Compact for Higher Education Institutions Communicating on Progress for Universit Laval Guide to the United Nations Global Compact for Higher Education Institutions: Implementing the Global to the United Nations Global Compact for Higher Education Institutions: Implementing the Global Compact

  5. EFFECTIVE TENSILE STRESS-STRAIN CHARACTERISTICS FOR REINFORCED CONCRETE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EFFECTIVE TENSILE STRESS-STRAIN CHARACTERISTICS FOR REINFORCED CONCRETE L. Hwang, Graduate Student of reinforced concrete structures, the concrete continues to contribute to the effective stiffness of structures for reinforced concrete developed for analysis of reinforced and/or prestressed concrete structures. The model

  6. Accretion in Compact Binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrew R. King

    2003-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Compact binaries have long been a paradigm for accretion theory. Much of our present view of how accretion occurs comes directly from the comparison of theory with observations of these sources. Since theory differs little for other objects such as active galaxies, increasing efforts have recently gone into searching for correspondences in observed behaviour. This chapter aims at giving a concise summary of the field, with particular emphasis on new developments since the previous edition of this book. These developments have been significant. Much of the earlier literature implicitly assumed that accreting binaries were fairly steady sources accreting most of the mass entering their vicinity, often with main-sequence companions, and radiating the resulting accretion luminosity in rough isotropy. We shall see that in reality these assumptions fail for the majority of systems. Most are transient; mass ejection in winds and jets is extremely common; a large (sometimes dominant) fraction of even short-period systems have evolved companions whose structure deviates significantly from the zero-age main sequence; and the radiation pattern of many objects is significantly anisotropic. It is now possible to give a complete characterization of the observed incidence of transient and persistent sources in terms of the disc instability model and formation constraints. X-ray populations in external galaxies, particularly the ultraluminous sources, are revealing important new insights into accretion processes and compact binary evolution.

  7. Susquehanna River Basin Compact (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation enables the state's entrance into the Susquehanna River Basin Compact, which provides for the conservation, development, and administration of the water resources of the...

  8. Concrete Pour in NSLS-II Ring

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Bruno Semon

    2013-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The mezzanine floor of the ring building tunnel for NSLS-II was completed when the last concrete was placed in February 2011.

  9. Pentek concrete scabbling system: Baseline report; Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pentek concrete scabbling system consists of the MOOSE{reg_sign} scabbler, the SQUIRREL{reg_sign}-I and SQUIRREL{reg_sign}-III scabblers, and VAC-PAC. The scabblers are designed to scarify concrete floors and slabs using cross section, tungsten carbide tipped bits. The bits are designed to remove concrete in 3/8 inch increments. The bits are either 9-tooth or demolition type. The scabblers are used with a vacuum system designed to collect and filter the concrete dust and contamination that is removed from the surface. The safety and health evaluation during the human factors assessment focused on two main areas: noise and dust.

  10. Optimization Online - Concrete Structure Design Using Mixed ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andres Guerra

    2009-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Nov 26, 2009 ... Abstract: We present a mixed-integer nonlinear programming (MINLP) formulation to achieve minimum-cost designs for reinforced concrete...

  11. Thermal Analyses Thermal Resistance of Precast Concrete Wall Panels with Concrete

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyer, Christian

    ) analyses. 3-D analyses are more accurate since the concrete ribs act as thermal bridges to both horizontal considered are as follows: cavity insulation thickness concrete conductivity stud channel conductivity channel increases too. The cavity R-value is calculated by ignoring the effect of the concrete web. Assume

  12. Development of a Reaction Signature for Combined Concrete Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghanem, Hassan A.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    stresses in concrete. When those stresses exceed the tensile strength of concrete, cracks occur. The main objective of this study was to address a method of testing concrete materials as a combination to assist engineers to effectively mitigate ASR...

  13. Journal of Educational Psychology Applying Grounded Coordination Challenges to Concrete

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Journal of Educational Psychology Applying Grounded Coordination Challenges to Concrete Learning, M. I. (2013, August 19). Applying Grounded Coordination Challenges to Concrete Learning Materials.1037/a0034098 #12;Applying Grounded Coordination Challenges to Concrete Learning Materials: A Study

  14. Effect of confinement on shear dominated reinforced concrete elements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powanusorn, Suraphong

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    ) to incorporate the effect of confinement due to transverse reinforcement by adjusting the peak stress and peak strain of confined concrete in compression. The peak stress of confined concrete was determined from the five-parameter failure surface for concrete...

  15. Effect of confinement on shear dominated reinforced concrete elements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powanusorn, Suraphong

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    ) to incorporate the effect of confinement due to transverse reinforcement by adjusting the peak stress and peak strain of confined concrete in compression. The peak stress of confined concrete was determined from the five-parameter failure surface for concrete...

  16. The life cycle assessment of concrete manufacturing in Kuwait

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    El Mostafa, Mayce (Mayce A.)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Concrete is the second most widely used material in the world after water. Annually 9,120 million tons of concrete are produced, which is an equivalent of 1.3 tons of concrete per individual. As the world's primary ...

  17. High temperature polymer concrete compositions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fontana, Jack J. (Shirley, NY); Reams, Walter (Shirley, NY)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention is concerned with a polymer concrete composition, which is a two-component composition useful with many bases including metal. Component A, the aggregate composition, is broadly composed of silica, silica flour, portland cement, and acrylamide, whereas Component B, which is primarily vinyl and acrylyl reactive monomers, is a liquid system. A preferred formulation emphasizing the major necessary components is as follows: ______________________________________ Component A: Silica sand 60-77 wt. % Silica flour 5-10 wt. % Portland cement 15-25 wt. % Acrylamide 1-5 wt. % Component B: Styrene 50-60 wt. % Trimethylolpropane 35-40 wt. % trimethacrylate ______________________________________ and necessary initiators, accelerators, and surfactants.

  18. Learning from Roman Seawater Concrete

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9 5 -ofLearning from Roman Seawater Concrete Print

  19. Learning from Roman Seawater Concrete

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9 5 -ofLearning from Roman Seawater Concrete

  20. GUTs on Compact Type IIB Orientifolds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blumenhagen, Ralph; /Munich, Max Planck Inst.; Braun, Volker; /Dublin Inst.; Grimm, Thomas W.; /Bonn U.; Weigand, Timo; /SLAC

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We systematically analyze globally consistent SU(5) GUT models on intersecting D7-branes in genuine Calabi-Yau orientifolds with O3- and O7-planes. Beyond the well-known tadpole and K-theory cancellation conditions there exist a number of additional subtle but quite restrictive constraints. For the realization of SU(5) GUTs with gauge symmetry breaking via U(1)Y flux we present two classes of suitable Calabi-Yau manifolds defined via del Pezzo transitions of the elliptically fibred hypersurface P{sub 1,1,1,6,9}[18] and of the Quintic P{sub 1,1,1,1,1}[5], respectively. To define an orientifold projection we classify all involutions on del Pezzo surfaces. We work out the model building prospects of these geometries and present five globally consistent string GUT models in detail, including a 3-generation SU(5) model with no exotics whatsoever. We also realize other phenomenological features such as the 10 10 5{sub H} Yukawa coupling and comment on the possibility of moduli stabilization, where we find an entire new set of so-called swiss-cheese type Calabi-Yau manifolds. It is expected that both the general constrained structure and the concrete models lift to F-theory vacua on compact Calabi-Yau fourfolds.

  1. Compact acoustic refrigerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bennett, G.A.

    1992-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A compact acoustic refrigeration system actively cools components, e.g., electrical circuits, in a borehole environment. An acoustic engine includes first thermodynamic elements for generating a standing acoustic wave in a selected medium. An acoustic refrigerator includes second thermodynamic elements located in the standing wave for generating a relatively cold temperature at a first end of the second thermodynamic elements and a relatively hot temperature at a second end of the second thermodynamic elements. A resonator volume cooperates with the first and second thermodynamic elements to support the standing wave. To accommodate the high heat fluxes required for heat transfer to/from the first and second thermodynamic elements, first heat pipes transfer heat from the heat load to the second thermodynamic elements and second heat pipes transfer heat from first and second thermodynamic elements to the borehole environment. 18 figs.

  2. Compact acoustic refrigerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bennett, Gloria A. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A compact acoustic refrigeration system actively cools components, e.g., electrical circuits (22), in a borehole environment. An acoustic engine (12, 14) includes first thermodynamic elements (12) for generating a standing acoustic wave in a selected medium. An acoustic refrigerator (16, 26, 28) includes second thermodynamic elements (16) located in the standing wave for generating a relatively cold temperature at a first end of the second thermodynamic elements (16) and a relatively hot temperature at a second end of the second thermodynamic elements (16). A resonator volume (18) cooperates with the first and second thermodynamic elements (12, 16) to support the standing wave. To accommodate the high heat fluxes required for heat transfer to/from the first and second thermodynamic elements (12, 16), first heat pipes (24, 26) transfer heat from the heat load (22) to the second thermodynamic elements (16) and second heat pipes (28, 32) transfer heat from first and second thermodynamic elements (12, 16) to the borehole environment.

  3. Compact vacuum insulation embodiments

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benson, D.K.; Potter, T.F.

    1992-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    An ultra-thin compact vacuum insulation panel is comprised of two hard, but bendable metal wall sheets closely spaced apart from each other and welded around the edges to enclose a vacuum chamber. Glass or ceramic spacers hold the wall sheets apart. The spacers can be discrete spherical beads or monolithic sheets of glass or ceramic webs with nodules protruding therefrom to form essentially point' or line' contacts with the metal wall sheets. In the case of monolithic spacers that form line' contacts, two such spacers with the line contacts running perpendicular to each other form effectively point' contacts at the intersections. Corrugations accommodate bending and expansion, tubular insulated pipes and conduits, and preferred applications are also included. 26 figs.

  4. Compact vacuum insulation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benson, David K. (Golden, CO); Potter, Thomas F. (Denver, CO)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ultra-thin compact vacuum insulation panel is comprised of two hard, but bendable metal wall sheets closely spaced apart from each other and welded around the edges to enclose a vacuum chamber. Glass or ceramic spacers hold the wall sheets apart. The spacers can be discrete spherical beads or monolithic sheets of glass or ceramic webs with nodules protruding therefrom to form essentially "point" or "line" contacts with the metal wall sheets. In the case of monolithic spacers that form "line" contacts, two such spacers with the line contacts running perpendicular to each other form effectively "point" contacts at the intersections. Corrugations accommodate bending and expansion, tubular insulated pipes and conduits, and preferred applications are also included.

  5. Compact vacuum insulation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benson, D.K.; Potter, T.F.

    1993-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    An ultra-thin compact vacuum insulation panel is comprised of two hard, but bendable metal wall sheets closely spaced apart from each other and welded around the edges to enclose a vacuum chamber. Glass or ceramic spacers hold the wall sheets apart. The spacers can be discrete spherical beads or monolithic sheets of glass or ceramic webs with nodules protruding therefrom to form essentially point'' or line'' contacts with the metal wall sheets. In the case of monolithic spacers that form line'' contacts, two such spacers with the line contacts running perpendicular to each other form effectively point'' contacts at the intersections. Corrugations accommodate bending and expansion, tubular insulated pipes and conduits, and preferred applications are also included.

  6. Compact vacuum insulation embodiments

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benson, David K. (Golden, CO); Potter, Thomas F. (Denver, CO)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ultra-thin compact vacuum insulation panel is comprised of two hard, but bendable metal wall sheets closely spaced apart from each other and welded around the edges to enclose a vacuum chamber. Glass or ceramic spacers hold the wall sheets apart. The spacers can be discrete spherical beads or monolithic sheets of glass or ceramic webs with nodules protruding therefrom to form essentially "point" or "line" contacts with the metal wall sheets. In the case of monolithic spacers that form "line" contacts, two such spacers with the line contacts running perpendicular to each other form effectively "point" contacts at the intersections. Corrugations accommodate bending and expansion, tubular insulated pipes and conduits, and preferred applications are also included.

  7. Quick-setting concrete and a method for making quick-setting concrete

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wagh, A.S.; Singh, D.; Pullockaran, J.D.; Knox, L.

    1997-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for producing quick setting concrete is provided comprising mixing a concrete dry mixture with carbonate solution to create a slurry, and allowing the slurry to cure. The invention also provides for a quick setting concrete having a predetermined proportion of CaCO{sub 3} of between 5 and 23 weight percent of the entire concrete mixture, and whereby the concrete has a compression strength of approximately 4,000 pounds per square inch (psi) within 24 hours after pouring. 2 figs.

  8. Radionuclide Retention in Concrete Wasteforms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wellman, Dawn M.; Jansik, Danielle P.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Cordova, Elsa A.

    2012-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Assessing long-term performance of Category 3 waste cement grouts for radionuclide encasement requires knowledge of the radionuclide-cement interactions and mechanisms of retention (i.e., sorption or precipitation); the mechanism of contaminant release; the significance of contaminant release pathways; how wasteform performance is affected by the full range of environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the process of wasteform aging under conditions that are representative of processes occurring in response to changing environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the effect of wasteform aging on chemical, physical, and radiological properties; and the associated impact on contaminant release. This knowledge will enable accurate prediction of radionuclide fate when the wasteforms come in contact with groundwater. Data collected throughout the course of this work will be used to quantify the efficacy of concrete wasteforms, similar to those used in the disposal of LLW and MLLW, for the immobilization of key radionuclides (i.e., uranium, technetium, and iodine). Data collected will also be used to quantify the physical and chemical properties of the concrete affecting radionuclide retention.

  9. SURVEY OF MODELS FOR CONCRETE DEGRADATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spencer, Benjamin W [Idaho National Laboratory; Huang, Hai [Idaho Nation Laboratory

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Concrete has been used in the construction of nuclear facilities because of two primary properties: its structural strength and its ability to shield radiation. Concrete structures have been known to last for hundreds of years, but they are also known to deteriorate in very short periods of time under adverse conditions. The use of concrete in nuclear facilities for containment and shielding of radiation and radioactive materials has made its performance crucial for the safe operation of the facility. The goal of this report is to review and document the main aging mechanisms of concern for concrete structures in nuclear power plants (NPPs) and the models used in simulations of concrete aging and structural response of degraded concrete structures. This is in preparation for future work to develop and apply models for aging processes and response of aged NPP concrete structures in the Grizzly code. To that end, this report also provides recommendations for developing more robust predictive models for aging effects of performance of concrete.

  10. Comprehensive Database on Concrete Creep and Shrinkage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Comprehensive Database on Concrete Creep and Shrinkage Zdenek P. Bazant and Guang-Hua Li Structural Database on Concrete Creep and Shrinkage Zdenek P. Bazant1 and Guang-Hua Li2 Abstract: As a sequel to the first large database created at Northwestern University in 1978, the paper presents a further

  11. Semirealism, Concrete Structures and Theory Change Michel Ghins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chakravartty, Anjan

    Semirealism, Concrete Structures and Theory Change Michel Ghins Received: 15 November 2012 metaphysics for scientific realism. First, if particulars and laws are concrete structures, namely actual

  12. aggregate concrete beams: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    FIBRE REINFORCED HIGH PERFORMANCE CONCRETE Engineering Websites Summary: -456 STEEL FIBRE REINFORCED HIGH PERFORMANCE CONCRETE BEAM-COLUMN JOINTS SUBJECTED TO CYCLIC LOADING...

  13. autoclaved aerated concrete: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    on the compressive, flexural strength, and split tensile test of polymer modified steel fibre reinforced concrete (PSFC) concrete was examined. Including SBR latex at a certain %...

  14. STRUCTURAL PERFORMANCE OF DEGRADED REINFORCED CONCRETE MEMBERS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Braverman, J.I.; Miller, C.A.; Ellingwood, B.R.; Naus, D.J.; Hofmayer, C.H.; Bezler, P.; Chang, T.Y.

    2001-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the results of a study to evaluate, in probabilistic terms, the effects of age-related degradation on the structural performance of reinforced concrete members at nuclear power plants. The paper focuses on degradation of reinforced concrete flexural members and shear walls due to the loss of steel reinforcing area and loss of concrete area (cracking/spalling). Loss of steel area is typically caused by corrosion while cracking and spalling can be caused by corrosion of reinforcing steel, freeze-thaw, or aggressive chemical attack. Structural performance in the presence of uncertainties is depicted by a fragility (or conditional probability of failure). The effects of degradation on the fragility of reinforced concrete members are calculated to assess the potential significance of various levels of degradation. The fragility modeling procedures applied to degraded concrete members can be used to assess the effects of degradation on plant risk and can lead to the development of probability-based degradation acceptance limits.

  15. Use of a BCD for compaction control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Yanfeng

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Compaction of soil is essential in the construction of highways, airports, buildings, and bridges. Typically compaction is controlled by measuring the dry density and the water content of the compacted soil and checking that target values have been...

  16. Early diagenesis and sequential stratigraphic development of calcite concretions from the Middle Devonian Hamilton Group, central New York state

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dix, G.R.; Mullins, H.T.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hamilton Group represents the initial westward progradational cycle of the Middle Devonian Catskill delta beginning with a distal, dysaerobic, black shale facies (Marcellus Fm) that evolves upward into more shallow, and better oxygenated, siliciclastics and limestones. On the basis of empirical solidity-porosity data and published compaction curves, iron-poor calcite concretions record a sequential increase in depth of burial for initial formation, from the base to the top of the Hamilton Group. Subsurface diagenetic depths range from as little as 1 m to a maximum of 125 m indicating shallow-burial diagenesis for the origin of most of the concretions. However, burial depths for concretion formation calculated from delta/sup 18/OPDB paleotemperatures are significantly greater ranging from 400 to 600 m. In contrast, concretions from Devonian sandstones in the Ivy Point Member (Ludlowville Fm) are iron-rich calcite with positive delta/sup 13/CPDB values and record similar burial depths (approx. 570 m) calculated by both delta/sup 18/OPDB and solidity-compaction data. Trends in delta/sup 13/C isotopes indicate that iron-poor calcite was derived from zones of sulfate-reduction and upper methanogenesis whereas iron-rich calcite was derived from the lower part of the methanogenesis diagenetic zone. Petrographic and SEM data indicate that most concretions have undergone subsequent burial diagenesis. Greater burial depth for concretion formation in younger stratigraphic units is explained as a consequence of greater subsurface depth at which carbonate is evolved due to deepening of the oxidation zone in the upper subsurface.

  17. Compact vacuum insulation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benson, D.K.; Potter, T.F.

    1992-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Improved compact insulation panel is provided which is comprised of two adjacent metal sheets spaced close together with a plurality of spherical, or other discretely shaped, glass or ceramic beads optimally positioned between the sheets to provide support and maintain the spacing between the metal sheets when the gases there between are evacuated to form a vacuum. These spherical glass beads provide the maximum support while minimizing thermal conductance. In its preferred embodiment; these two metal sheets are textured with ribs or concave protrusions in conjunction with the glass beads to maximize the structural integrity of the panels while increasing the spacing between beads, thereby reducing the number of beads and the number of thermal conduction paths. Glass or porcelain-enameled liners in combination with the glass spacers and metal sidewalls effectively decrease thermal conductivity, and various laminates, including wood, porcelain-enameled metal, and others effectively increase the strength and insulation capabilities of the panels. Also, a metal web is provided to hold the spacers in place, and strategic grooves are shown to accommodate expansion and contraction or shaping of the panels. 35 figs.

  18. Compact vacuum insulation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benson, David K. (Golden, CO); Potter, Thomas F. (Denver, CO)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Improved compact insulation panel is provided which is comprised of two adjacent metal sheets spaced close together with a plurality of spherical, or other discretely shaped, glass or ceramic beads optimally positioned between the sheets to provide support and maintain the spacing between the metal sheets when the gases therebetween are evacuated to form a vacuum. These spherical glass beads provide the maximum support while minimizing thermal conductance. In its preferred embodiment; these two metal sheets are textured with ribs or concave protrusions in conjunction with the glass beads to maximize the structural integrity of the panels while increasing the spacing between beads, thereby reducing the number of beads and the number of thermal conduction paths. Glass or porcelain-enameled liners in combination with the glass spacers and metal sidewalls effectively decrease thermal conductivity, and variious laminates, including wood, porcelain-enameled metal, and others effectively increase the strength and insulation capabilities of the panels. Also, a metal web is provided to hold the spacers in place, and strategic grooves are shown to accommodate expansion and contraction or shaping of the panels.

  19. Compact neutron generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Lou, Tak Pui

    2005-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A compact neutron generator has at its outer circumference a toroidal shaped plasma chamber in which a tritium (or other) plasma is generated. A RF antenna is wrapped around the plasma chamber. A plurality of tritium ion beamlets are extracted through spaced extraction apertures of a plasma electrode on the inner surface of the toroidal plasma chamber and directed inwardly toward the center of neutron generator. The beamlets pass through spaced acceleration and focusing electrodes to a neutron generating target at the center of neutron generator. The target is typically made of titanium tubing. Water is flowed through the tubing for cooling. The beam can be pulsed rapidly to achieve ultrashort neutron bursts. The target may be moved rapidly up and down so that the average power deposited on the surface of the target may be kept at a reasonable level. The neutron generator can produce fast neutrons from a T-T reaction which can be used for luggage and cargo interrogation applications. A luggage or cargo inspection system has a pulsed T-T neutron generator or source at the center, surrounded by associated gamma detectors and other components for identifying explosives or other contraband.

  20. Compaction managed mirror bend achromat

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Douglas, David (Yorktown, VA)

    2005-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for controlling the momentum compaction in a beam of charged particles. The method includes a compaction-managed mirror bend achromat (CMMBA) that provides a beamline design that retains the large momentum acceptance of a conventional mirror bend achromat. The CMMBA also provides the ability to tailor the system momentum compaction spectrum as desired for specific applications. The CMMBA enables magnetostatic management of the longitudinal phase space in Energy Recovery Linacs (ERLs) thereby alleviating the need for harmonic linearization of the RF waveform.

  1. New considerations for compact cyclotrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marshall, Eric S. (Eric Scott)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A compact cyclotron built with superconducting magnets could be a transformative solution to many scientific problems facing the defense, medical, and energy industries today. This thesis discusses three potential applications ...

  2. MESOSCALE SIMULATIONS OF POWDER COMPACTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lomov, Ilya; Fujino, Don; Antoun, Tarabay; Liu, Benjamin [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P. O. Box 808, Livermore CA 94551 (United States)

    2009-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Mesoscale 3D simulations of shock compaction of metal and ceramic powders have been performed with an Eulerian hydrocode GEODYN. The approach was validated by simulating a well-characterized shock compaction experiment of a porous ductile metal. Simulation results using the Steinberg material model and handbook values for solid 2024 aluminum showed good agreement with experimental compaction curves and wave profiles. Brittle ceramic materials are not as well studied as metals, so a simple material model for solid ceramic (tungsten carbide) has been calibrated to match experimental compaction curves. Direct simulations of gas gun experiments with ceramic powders have been performed and showed good agreement with experimental data. The numerical shock wave profile has same character and thickness as that measured experimentally using VISAR. The numerical results show reshock states above the single-shock Hugoniot line as observed in experiments. We found that for good quantitative agreement with experiments 3D simulations are essential.

  3. Yellowstone River Compact (North Dakota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Yellowstone River Compact, agreed to by the States of Montana, North Dakota, and Wyoming, provides for an equitable division and apportionment of the waters of the Yellowstone River, as well as...

  4. Modeling of Sulfate Resistance of Flyash Blended Cement Concrete Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mobasher, Barzin

    Modeling of Sulfate Resistance of Flyash Blended Cement Concrete Materials Barzin Mobasher1. A simplified model is presented which used cement chemistry, concrete physics, and mechanics to develop of hardened concrete, principally the cement paste, caused by exposure of concrete to sulfates and moisture

  5. Center for By-Products Utilization High Durability Concrete Using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saldin, Dilano

    TESTING · Fresh Concrete Properties ·Unit Weight (ASTM C 138) ·Air Content (ASTM C 237) ·Slump (ASTM C 143Center for By-Products Utilization High Durability Concrete Using High-Carbon Fly Ash and Pulp Mill-Products Utilization Durable Concrete in Northern Climates · Producing durable concrete in a freezing and thawing

  6. Concrete and Sustainable Development Special Publication ACI 206, 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyer, Christian

    C. Meyer Concrete and Sustainable Development 1 Special Publication ACI 206, 2002 Concrete Materials Science to Application ­ A Tribute to Surendra P. Shah American Concrete Institute, Farmington Hills, MI Concrete and Sustainable Development By C. Meyer Synopsis: The United States is a country

  7. 1 INTRODUCTION 1.1 Textile reinforced concrete

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 INTRODUCTION 1.1 Textile reinforced concrete Textile reinforced concrete (TRC) is a new cementi on the funda- mentals of shortcut glass fibre reinforced concrete. In order to increase the effectiveness of the fibres embedded in the concrete matrix, the fibres are aligned in the direction of the tensile stresses

  8. Model-Driven Analysis and Synthesis of Textual Concrete Syntax

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Model-Driven Analysis and Synthesis of Textual Concrete Syntax Pierre-Alain Muller1 , Frédéric textual concrete syntaxes with meta-models is still a challenge. Textual concrete syntaxes compilers to generate parsers. Unfortunately, these generated parsers produce concrete syntax trees, leaving

  9. Carbon dioxide sequestration in concrete in different curing environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    Carbon dioxide sequestration in concrete in different curing environments Y.-m. Chun, T.R. Naik, USA ABSTRACT: This paper summarizes the results of an investigation on carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration in concrete. Concrete mixtures were not air entrained. Concrete mixtures were made containing

  10. Amr Abdelrahman, PhD Professor of Concrete Structures,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amr Abdelrahman, PhD Professor of Concrete Structures, Structural Engineering Dept., Ain Shams Behavior and Design of Reinforced and Prestressed Concrete Structures and Masonry Wall Design. He conducts concrete members and design of prestressed concrete members. He is a member in the Egyptian Code for Design

  11. POURED EARTH AS CONCRETE Lionel RONSOUX, Mariette MOEVUS, Yves JORAND,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 POURED EARTH AS CONCRETE Lionel RONSOUX, Mariette MOEVUS, Yves JORAND, Sandrine MAXIMILIEN and Contemporary Architecture Keywords: poured earth, clay concrete, grain packing, clay dispersion Abstract: In order to pour an earthen material in a liquid state, as a concrete, technologies used by concrete

  12. Progress Update: H4 Basin Concrete Pour

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2012-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The Recovery Act funded project in the H area basin. A concrete ditch built longer than half a mile to prevent contaminated water from expanding and to reduce the footprint on the environment.

  13. Air leakage of Insulated Concrete Form houses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Durschlag, Hannah (Hanna Rebekah)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Air leakage has been shown to increase building energy use due to additional heating and cooling loads. Although many construction types have been examined for leakage, an exploration of a large number of Insulated Concrete ...

  14. Semantic Social Network Analysis, a concrete case

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    Semantic Social Network Analysis, a concrete case Guillaume Erto, Orange Labs, guillaume permitting a high degree of interaction between participants, and social network analysis (SNA) seeks) shared by the members of these networks. These enriched representations of social networks, combined

  15. Shrinkage - cracking characteristics of structural lightweight concrete

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKeen, Robert Gordon

    1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1969 ABSTRACT Shrinkage-Cracking Characteristics of Structural Lightweight Concrete (August 1969) B. S. C. E. , Texas AERY University Directed by: if. B. Ledbetter Tests were conducted to det. trains the effect of coarse. s -gre- gate type...'csults indicated that both unrestrained shrinkage and concret. c water loss relate to restrained shrinkage stress. Unrestrained shrinks e did not indicate. cracking ter. dency while we+ er loss provided an indi cati on of cr cking tendency. ACRRO!Jr. ROOD. i...

  16. Performance of Reinforced Concrete Column Lap Splices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alberson, Ryan M.

    2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    PERFORMANCE OF REINFORCED CONCRETE COLUMN LAP SPLICES A Thesis by RYAN ALBERSON Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE August 2009 Major Subject: Civil Engineering PERFORMANCE OF REINFORCED CONCRETE COLUMN LAP SPLICES A Thesis by RYAN ALBERSON Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment...

  17. Experimental damage-gas flow correlations for cyclically loaded reinforced concrete walls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soppe, Travis E.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of work focused on testing reinforced concrete panels underof work focused on testing reinforced concrete panels underfocuses on testing nine reinforced concrete wall panels

  18. Seismic Performance, Modeling, and Failure Assessment of Reinforced Concrete Shear Wall Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tuna, Zeynep

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    J.W. , (2009). Testing and Reinforced Concrete Coupling2010). "Testing and Modeling of Reinforced Concrete Couplingscale testing of four-story reinforced concrete and post-

  19. InstantaneousIn-SituDetermination of Water-CementRatio of Fresh Concrete

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mancio, Mauricio; Moore, Jeffrey R.; Brooks, Zenzile; Monteiro, Paulo J. M.; Glaser, Steve D.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    microstructure of concrete, and testing methods. Steven D.resistivity; fresh concrete; nondestructive testing; qualityin concrete structures, and nondestructive testing methods.

  20. Characterization of Effective Built-in Curling and Concrete Pavement Cracking on the Palmdale Test Sections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rao, Shreenath; Roesler, Jeffery R.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Concrete and Implications for Choice of Testing Standard.J. R. Non-Destructive Testing of Concrete Pavements forAsphalt Concrete Accelerated Pavement Testing American

  1. Experimental simulations of explosive loading on structural components : reinforced concrete columns with advanced composite jackets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodrguez-Nikl, Tonatiuh

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    5]. 3.A.4 Material Testing Concrete Concrete cylinders wereConcrete Institute ANFO Ammonium Nitrate and Fuel Oil ASTM ASTM International (American Society for Testing

  2. Improving the design and performance of concrete bridges in seismic regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tobolski, Matthew Joseph

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    compression testing for both concrete and grout are listedcompression testing for both concrete and grout are listedcompression testing for both concrete and grout are listed

  3. Hybrid Simulation of the Seismic Response of Squat Reinforced Concrete Shear Walls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whyte, Catherine Alexandra

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ACI Symposium on Reinforced Concrete Structures in SeismicStudies of Reinforced Concrete Walled Bents under Static2009. Update to ASCE/SEI 41 Concrete Provisions, PEER Report

  4. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Oportunities for the Concrete Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kermeli, Katerina

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Armor. 2010. Sustainable Concrete Plant Guidelines, Pilot-B. Ivery, J. Flaherty. 2004. Concrete Batch Plant Operator.National Ready Mixed Concrete Association Fleet Benchmarking

  5. Reliability-based characterization of prefabricated FRP composites for rehabilitation of concrete structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jin, Sung-Jun

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    FRP Strengthening of Reinforced Concrete Structures, Ph.D.for Prestressed Concrete Bridge Girders Strengthened withof Reinforced Normal Weight Concrete Members, Structural

  6. Experimental damage-gas flow correlations for cyclically loaded reinforced concrete walls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soppe, Travis E.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    vessels. Cement and Concrete research, 32, XTRACT (2007).of air permeability in a concrete shear wall subjected tocharacteristics in cracked concrete. Nuclear Engineering

  7. Emerging Energy-efficiency and CO2 Emission-reduction Technologies for Cement and Concrete Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasanbeigi, Ali

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2010. Cement and concrete nanoscience and nanotechnology.of 100 Percent Fly Ash Concrete. 2005 World of Coal Ash (carbon dioxide in precast concrete. TECHNOLOGY REVIEW A

  8. Life-Cycle Evaluation of Concrete Building Construction as a Strategy for Sustainable Cities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadel, Alexander

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Portland Cement Concrete. P. C. A. [PCA]. Marceau, M.L. ,BIBM) (2009). Sustainable Benefits of Concrete Structures.Brussels, Belgium, European Concrete Platform ASBL ( Bureau

  9. A novel technique for the production of cool colored concrete tile and asphalt shingle roofing products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levinson, Ronnen

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for providing concrete tiles, and Lou Hahn of GAF-Elk forof cool colored concrete tile and asphalt shingle roofingsolar-reflective nonwhite concrete tile and asphalt shingle

  10. Compact passive wireless reinforced concrete corrosion initiation sensor that can be installed in existing steel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    with a resolution of less than 10 mV. The sensor is 25 mm in diameter and is intended to be installed by drilling of reinforcement steel is Cl- ingression from the de-icing salts used extensively to clear snow and ice in winter

  11. Compact orthogonal NMR field sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gerald, II, Rex E. (Brookfield, IL); Rathke, Jerome W. (Homer Glen, IL)

    2009-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor for emitting two orthogonal electro-magnetic fields in a common space. More particularly, a replacement inductor for existing NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) sensors to allow for NMR imaging. The Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor has a conductive coil and a central conductor electrically connected in series. The central conductor is at least partially surrounded by the coil. The coil and central conductor are electrically or electro-magnetically connected to a device having a means for producing or inducing a current through the coil and central conductor. The Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor can be used in NMR imaging applications to determine the position and the associated NMR spectrum of a sample within the electro-magnetic field of the central conductor.

  12. Compact monolithic capacitive discharge unit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roesler, Alexander W. (Tijeras, NM); Vernon, George E. (Rio Rancho, NM); Hoke, Darren A. (Albuquerque, NM); De Marquis, Virginia K. (Tijeras, NM); Harris, Steven M. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2007-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A compact monolithic capacitive discharge unit (CDU) is disclosed in which a thyristor switch and a flyback charging circuit are both sandwiched about a ceramic energy storage capacitor. The result is a compact rugged assembly which provides a low-inductance current discharge path. The flyback charging circuit preferably includes a low-temperature co-fired ceramic transformer. The CDU can further include one or more ceramic substrates for enclosing the thyristor switch and for holding various passive components used in the flyback charging circuit. A load such as a detonator can also be attached directly to the CDU.

  13. Compact accelerator for medical therapy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Caporaso, George J.; Chen, Yu-Jiuan; Hawkins, Steven A.; Sampayan, Stephen E.; Paul, Arthur C.

    2010-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A compact accelerator system having an integrated particle generator-linear accelerator with a compact, small-scale construction capable of producing an energetic (.about.70-250 MeV) proton beam or other nuclei and transporting the beam direction to a medical therapy patient without the need for bending magnets or other hardware often required for remote beam transport. The integrated particle generator-accelerator is actuable as a unitary body on a support structure to enable scanning of a particle beam by direction actuation of the particle generator-accelerator.

  14. Protocols for Authorized Release of Concrete

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Agatha Marie; Meservey, Richard Harlan; Chen, S.Y.; Powell, James Edward; PArker, F.

    2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Much of the clean or slightly contaminated concrete from Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) activities could be re-used. Currently, there is no standardized approach, or protocol, for managing the disposition of such materials. Namely, all potential disposition options for concrete, including authorized release for re-use, are generally not fully evaluated in D&D projects, so large quantities have been unduly disposed of as low-level radioactive waste. As a result, costs of D&D have become prohibitively high, hindering expedient cleanup of surplus facilities. The ability to evaluate and implement the option of authorized release of concrete from demolition would result in significant cost savings, while maintaining protection of environmental health and safety, across the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), Argonne National Laboratory East (ANL-E), and Vanderbilt University have teamed to develop a protocol for the authorized release of concrete, based on the existing DOE guidance of Order 5400.5, that applies across the DOE complex. The protocol will provide a streamlined method for assessing risks and costs, and reaching optimal disposal options, including re-use of the concrete within the DOE system.

  15. Mesoscale Simulations of Power Compaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lomov, I; Fujino, D; Antoun, T; Liu, B

    2009-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Mesoscale 3D simulations of metal and ceramic powder compaction in shock waves have been performed with an Eulerian hydrocode GEODYN. The approach was validated by simulating shock compaction of porous well-characterized ductile metal using Steinberg material model. Results of the simulations with handbook values for parameters of solid 2024 aluminum have good agreement with experimental compaction curves and wave profiles. Brittle ceramic materials are not so well studied as metals, so material model for ceramic (tungsten carbide) has been fitted to shock compression experiments of non-porous samples and further calibrated to match experimental compaction curves. Direct simulations of gas gun experiments with ceramic powder have been performed and showed good agreement with experimental data. Numerical shock wave profile has same character and thickness as measured with VISAR. Numerical results show reshock states above the single-shock Hugoniot line also observed in experiments. They found that to receive good quantitative agreement with experiment it is essential to perform 3D simulations.

  16. Flow conditions of fresh mortar and concrete in different pipes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobsen, Stefan, E-mail: stefan.jacobsen@ntnu.n [Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Dept of Structural Engineering, Trondheim (Norway); Haugan, Lars; Hammer, Tor Arne [SINTEF Byggforsk AS Building and Infrastructure, Trondheim (Norway); Kalogiannidis, Evangelos [Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Dept of Structural Engineering, Trondheim (Norway)

    2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The variation in fresh concrete flow rate over the pipe cross section was investigated on differently coloured and highly flowable concrete mixes flowing through pipes of different materials (rubber, steel, acryl). First, uncoloured (gray) concrete was poured through the pipe and the pipe blocked. Similar but coloured (black) concrete was then poured into the pipe filled with gray concrete, flowing after the gray concrete for a while before being blocked and hardened. The advance of the colouring along the pipe wall (showing boundary flow rate) was observed on the moulded concrete surface appearing after removing the pipe from the hardened concrete. The shapes of the interfaces between uncoloured and coloured concrete (showing variation of flow rate over the pipe cross section) were observed on sawn surfaces of concrete half cylinders cut along the length axes of the concrete-filled pipe. Flow profiles over the pipe cross section were clearly seen with maximum flow rates near the centre of the pipe and low flow rate at the pipe wall (typically rubber pipe with reference concrete without silica fume and/or stabilizers). More plug-shaped profiles, with long slip layers and less variation of flow rate over the cross section, were also seen (typically in smooth acrylic pipes). Flow rate, amount of concrete sticking to the wall after flow and SEM-images of pipe surface roughness were observed, illustrating the problem of testing full scale pumping.

  17. The implications of compartment fire non-uniformity for the membrane action of reinforced concrete slabs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deeny, Susan

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to the complexity of concrete material behaviour and also due to concretes reputation of superior fire performance. Concrete technology is, however, continually evolving; structures are increasingly slender, more highly stressed and have higher compressive...

  18. Structural Performance of a Full-Depth Precast Concrete Bridge Deck System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mander, Thomas

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    -depth concrete bridge deck overhangs, accelerating the construction of concrete bridge decks, by using full-depth precast prestressed concrete deck panels. Full-depth precast overhang panels in combination with cast-in-place (CIP) reinforced concrete...

  19. Nuclear Concrete Materials Database Phase I Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ren, Weiju [ORNL; Naus, Dan J [ORNL

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The FY 2011 accomplishments in Phase I development of the Nuclear Concrete Materials Database to support the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program are summarized. The database has been developed using the ORNL materials database infrastructure established for the Gen IV Materials Handbook to achieve cost reduction and development efficiency. In this Phase I development, the database has been successfully designed and constructed to manage documents in the Portable Document Format generated from the Structural Materials Handbook that contains nuclear concrete materials data and related information. The completion of the Phase I database has established a solid foundation for Phase II development, in which a digital database will be designed and constructed to manage nuclear concrete materials data in various digitized formats to facilitate electronic and mathematical processing for analysis, modeling, and design applications.

  20. TRANSPORT THROUGH CRACKED CONCRETE: LITERATURE REVIEW

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langton, C.

    2012-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Concrete containment structures and cement-based fills and waste forms are used at the Savannah River Site to enhance the performance of shallow land disposal systems designed for containment of low-level radioactive waste. Understanding and measuring transport through cracked concrete is important for describing the initial condition of radioactive waste containment structures at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and for predicting performance of these structures over time. This report transmits the results of a literature review on transport through cracked concrete which was performed by Professor Jason Weiss, Purdue University per SRR0000678 (RFP-RQ00001029-WY). This review complements the NRC-sponsored literature review and assessment of factors relevant to performance of grouted systems for radioactive waste disposal. This review was performed by The Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses, San Antonio, TX, and The University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen Scotland and was focused on tank closure. The objective of the literature review on transport through cracked concrete was to identify information in the open literature which can be applied to SRS transport models for cementitious containment structures, fills, and waste forms. In addition, the literature review was intended to: (1) Provide a framework for describing and classifying cracks in containment structures and cementitious materials used in radioactive waste disposal, (2) Document the state of knowledge and research related to transport through cracks in concrete for various exposure conditions, (3) Provide information or methodology for answering several specific questions related to cracking and transport in concrete, and (4) Provide information that can be used to design experiments on transport through cracked samples and actual structures.

  1. Concrete material characterization reinforced concrete tank structure Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winkel, B.V.

    1995-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to document the Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility (MWTF) Project position on the concrete mechanical properties needed to perform design/analysis calculations for the MWTF secondary concrete structure. This report provides a position on MWTF concrete properties for the Title 1 and Title 2 calculations. The scope of the report is limited to mechanical properties and does not include the thermophysical properties of concrete needed to perform heat transfer calculations. In the 1970`s, a comprehensive series of tests were performed at Construction Technology Laboratories (CTL) on two different Hanford concrete mix designs. Statistical correlations of the CTL data were later generated by Pacific Northwest Laboratories (PNL). These test results and property correlations have been utilized in various design/analysis efforts of Hanford waste tanks. However, due to changes in the concrete design mix and the lower range of MWTF operating temperatures, plus uncertainties in the CTL data and PNL correlations, it was prudent to evaluate the CTL data base and PNL correlations, relative to the MWTF application, and develop a defendable position. The CTL test program for Hanford concrete involved two different mix designs: a 3 kip/in{sup 2} mix and a 4.5 kip/in{sup 2} mix. The proposed 28-day design strength for the MWTF tanks is 5 kip/in{sup 2}. In addition to this design strength difference, there are also differences between the CTL and MWTF mix design details. Also of interest, are the appropriate application of the MWTF concrete properties in performing calculations demonstrating ACI Code compliance. Mix design details and ACI Code issues are addressed in Sections 3.0 and 5.0, respectively. The CTL test program and PNL data correlations focused on a temperature range of 250 to 450 F. The temperature range of interest for the MWTF tank concrete application is 70 to 200 F.

  2. Interstate Oil and Gas Conservation Compact (Montana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation authorizes the State to join the Interstate Compact for the Conservation of Oil and Gas. The Compact is an agreement that has been entered into by 30 oil- and gas-producing states,...

  3. Interstate Oil and Gas Conservation Compact (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation authorizes the State to join the Interstate Compact for the Conservation of Oil and Gas. The Compact is an agreement that has been entered into by 30 oil- and gas-producing states,...

  4. Detection Of Concrete Deterioration By Staining

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Guthrie, Jr., George D. (Santa Fe, NM); Carey, J. William (Santa Fe, NM)

    1999-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A method using concentrated aqueous solutions of sodium cobaltinitrite and a rhodamine dye is described which can be used to identify concrete that contains gels formed by the alkali-silica reaction (ASR), and to identify degraded concrete which results in a porous or semi-permeable paste due to carbonation or leaching. These solutions present little health or environmental risk, are readily applied, and rapidly discriminate between two chemically distinct gels; K-rich, Na--K--Ca--Si gels are identified by yellow staining, and alkali-poor, Ca--Si gels are identified by pink staining.

  5. Evaluation of a microplane model for progressive fracture in concrete

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loper, James Harris

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ). These test results laid the foundation for researchers to attack the problem of modeling concrete subjected to multiaxial stresses. Today, many computer codes exist which can model aspects of the behavior of concrete (Colville and Abbasi 1974; Bazant...

  6. FRP-to-concrete bond behaviour under high strain rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Xiaoqin

    2012-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Fibre reinforced polymer (FRP) composites have been used for strengthening concrete structures since early 1990s. More recently, FRP has been used for retrofitting concrete structures for high energy events such as impact ...

  7. Maintenance-based design of concrete parking structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoakes, Christopher D. (Christopher David)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study is to determine what type of preventative maintenance for a concrete parking structure will produce the maximum economic benefit. Existing models for concrete deterioration are analyzed for their ...

  8. Identification of Concrete Incompatibilities Using Cement Paste Rheology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jang, Se Hoon

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    measurements instead of traditional workability tests (i.e., slump cone test) can have great potential in detecting those incompatibilities in concrete before the concrete is placed, which can, in turn, avoid related workability problems and setting time...

  9. Material flow analysis of concrete in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Low, Man-Shi

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Concrete is the second most consumed material in the world after water. Due to the sheer mass of concrete consumed annually and its associated resource and environmental impacts, improving the materials management of ...

  10. Automated crack control analysis for concrete pavement construction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jang, Se Hoon

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The focus of this research is on the control of random cracking in concrete paving by using sawcut notch locations in the early stages of construction. This is a major concern in concrete pavement construction. This research also addresses a...

  11. Lightweight concrete : investigations into the production of natural fiber reinforcement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garbis, Leonidia Maria

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the benefits of adding natural fiber tensile reinforcement to aerated concrete. Concrete is a great composite material which can be created in various proportions and with various ...

  12. Set in stone? A perspective on the concrete sustainability challenge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vliet, Krystyn Van J.

    As the most abundant engineered material on Earth, concrete is essential to the physical infrastructure of all modern societies. There are no known materials that can replace concrete in terms of cost and availability. ...

  13. Controlling Thermal Properties of Asphalt Concrete and its Multifunctional Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shi, Xijun

    2014-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    ) by controlling thermal properties of the construction materials. To change thermal properties of asphalt concrete, expanded polypropylene (EPP) pellet and graphite were selected as the additives and mixed into asphalt concrete. Experimental tests are classified...

  14. Effect of Materials and Curing Period on Shrinkage of Concrete

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    West, Maria B.

    2010-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    shrinkage reducing admixture at a dosage rate of 2 percent by weight of cement reduced the shrinkage of concrete nearly 32 percent after 365 days. The shrinkage reducing admixture, however, produced concrete that at times exhibited an unstable air content....

  15. Illinois: Ozinga Concrete Runs on Natural Gas and Opens Private...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Illinois: Ozinga Concrete Runs on Natural Gas and Opens Private Station Illinois: Ozinga Concrete Runs on Natural Gas and Opens Private Station November 6, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis...

  16. Hybrid Simulation of the Seismic Response of Squat Reinforced Concrete Shear Walls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whyte, Catherine Alexandra

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    quasi-static reinforced concrete testing protocol from ITGOn the days of testing, three concrete cylinders from the

  17. Compact neutron generator development at LBNL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Generator Development at LBNL J. Reijonen, G. English, R.Technology Group in LBNL. The compact axial extraction

  18. axisymmetric concrete structure: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Structural Walls University of California eScholarship Repository Summary: Nonlinear Analysis of Presetressed Concrete Structures Under Monotonic and Cyclic...

  19. United Nations Global Compact The UN Global Compact is a strategic policy initiative for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chatziantoniou, Damianos

    United Nations Global Compact The UN Global Compact is a strategic policy initiative for businesses in the world. The Global Compact pursues two complementary objectives: 1. Mainstream the ten principles the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). Participation in the Global Compact is open to degree-granting academic

  20. Glass Concrete Thin Sheets Reinforced with Prestressed Aramid Fabrics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyer, Christian

    Glass Concrete Thin Sheets Reinforced with Prestressed Aramid Fabrics Gregor Vilkner Submitted Glass Concrete Thin Sheets Reinforced with Prestressed Aramid Fabrics Gregor Vilkner Thin sheet concrete crushed glass as aggregate, a multitude of different esthetic effects can be produced, which again open up

  1. BOND PROPERTIES OF CFCC PRESTRESSING STRANDS IN PRETENSIONED CONCRETE BEAMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BOND PROPERTIES OF CFCC PRESTRESSING STRANDS IN PRETENSIONED CONCRETE BEAMS by Nolan G. Domenico plastic prestressing strands (CFCC) in pretensioned concrete beams. The bond characteristics are examined for 15.2 mm diameter and 12.5 mm diameter seven-wire CFCC strands. Ten prestressed concrete beams

  2. NExpTime-complete Description Logics with Concrete Domains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baader, Franz

    that reasoning with the concrete do- main D (i.e., testing the satis#12;ability of #12;nite conjunctionsChapter 1 NExpTime-complete Description Logics with Concrete Domains Carsten Lutz Abstract. Description Logics (DLs) incorporating concrete domains are useful formalisms for integrated reasoning about

  3. TTUS FP&C Design & Building Standards Division 3 Concrete

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gelfond, Michael

    All concrete products shall be designed, formed, transported, placed, tested, and finished in strict accordance with the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) and the American Concrete Institute, and submit test reports during concrete placement. Page 1 of 4 #12;TTUS FP&C Design & Building

  4. TRNEWS279MARCHAPRIL2012 The authors are Concrete

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harms, Kyle E.

    . Most prefer the Standard Test Method for Electrical Indication of Concrete's Ability to Resist Chloride measurements across a wide range of permeability values, sample testing ages, and concrete mix designs (FigureTRNEWS279MARCH­APRIL2012 46 The authors are Concrete Research Engineers, Louisiana Transportation

  5. SERVICEABILITY LIMIT STATES OF CONCRETE BEAMS PRESTRESSED BY CFRP BARS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    reinforcements. The experimental program consisted of testing eight concrete beams prestressed by CFRP bars beams prestressed by Leadline CFRP bars were tested, in addition to two concrete beams prestressedAbstract SERVICEABILITY LIMIT STATES OF CONCRETE BEAMS PRESTRESSED BY CFRP BARS by Amr A

  6. Experimental and Analytical Reexamination of Classic Concrete Beam Tests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vecchio, Frank J.

    Experimental and Analytical Reexamination of Classic Concrete Beam Tests F. J. Vecchio1 and W. Shim CE Database subject headings: Beams; Concrete; Tests; Ductility; Finite elements; Models; Shear paper describing the testing of a series of 12 reinforced concrete beams Bresler and Scordelis 1963

  7. Silica dust control when drilling concrete Page 1 of 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knowles, David William

    Silica dust control when drilling concrete Page 1 of 2 Drilling into concrete releases a fine sandy and routinely drill into concrete are at risk of developing this disease. Controlling the dust Hammer drills are available with attached dust removal systems. These draw dust from the drill end, down the attachment

  8. Guide Specification for Highway Construction Texturing Concrete Pavement for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guide Specification for Highway Construction Texturing Concrete Pavement for Reduced Tire/Pavement Noise using Diamond Grinding Designation: CPSCP GS 1-11 (rev 3/1/2011) National Concrete Pavement for Highway Construction Texturing Concrete Pavement for Reduced Tire/Pavement Noise using Diamond Grinding

  9. The Description Logic ALCN HR+ Extended with Concrete Domains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moeller, Ralf

    The Description Logic ALCN HR+ Extended with Concrete Domains: A Practically Motivated Approach, role hierarchies, transitively closed roles, generalized concept inclusions, and concrete domains. As in other languages based on concrete domains (e.g. ALC(D)) a so-called ex- istential predicate restriction

  10. Building Cathedrals and Breaking down Reinforced Concrete Walls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Broué, Michel - Institut de Mathématiques de Jussieu, Université Paris 7

    Building Cathedrals and Breaking down Reinforced Concrete Walls Michel Brou´e Institut Henri distinction between great mathematicians Concrete walls breakers Michel Brou´e (Institut Henri Poincar´e) John Concrete walls breakers Cathedrals builders Michel Brou´e (Institut Henri Poincar´e) John Thompson

  11. Adapting Optimization Techniques to Description Logics with Concrete Domains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haarslev, Volker

    Adapting Optimization Techniques to Description Logics with Concrete Domains Anni-Yasmin Turhan backtracking and model merging can be adapted to description logics with concrete domains. We propose al) a new requirement for concrete domains in order to enable dependency directed backtracking for all clash

  12. Guide to Dowel LoadTransfer Systems for Jointed Concrete

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guide to Dowel LoadTransfer Systems for Jointed Concrete Roadway Pavements TECH BRIEF SEPTEMBER 2011 #12;#12;GUIDE TO DOWEL LOAD TRANSFER SYSTEMS FOR JOINTED CONCRETE ROADWAY PAVEMENTS i Technical and Subtitle Guide to Dowel Load Transfer Systems for Jointed Concrete Roadway Pavements 5. Report Date

  13. Effects of g Radiation on Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Concrete

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    North Texas, University of

    Effects of g Radiation on Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Concrete Gonzalo Marti´nez-Barrera,1,2 Luis F% of nylon fibers. The fiber-containing polymer concretes (PCs) were subjected to 5, 10, 50, and 100 k Engineers INTRODUCTION AND SCOPE It is well known that polymer concrete (PC) is three to five times stronger

  14. Designing Precast Concrete Cross Wall Joints Against Progressive Collapse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birmingham, University of

    Designing Precast Concrete Cross Wall Joints Against Progressive Collapse Researcher: Mohamad concrete cross wall constructions. Ronan Point Collapse (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ronan_Point) #12;Due gap is listed as follows: · Limited number of studies for designing precast concrete cross wall

  15. Concrete Browsing Of A Graphical Toolkit Library Denys Duchier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duchier, Denys

    Concrete Browsing Of A Graphical Toolkit Library Denys Duchier Department of Computer Science and promote reuse. This paper introduces Concrete Browsing as an improved method of consult- ing a graphical library, and Spreading Computation as novel paradigm for search and retrieval. A concrete browser allows

  16. From Abstract to Concrete Norms in Agent Institutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dignum, Frank

    From Abstract to Concrete Norms in Agent Institutions Davide Grossi and Frank Dignum Utrecht accounts for how (abstract) norms can be incorporated in the (concrete) procedures constituting. This abstract is organized as follows. In Section 2 we make the problem we are focusing on concrete by means

  17. Concrete Browsing Of A Graphical Toolkit Library Denys Duchier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duchier, Denys

    Concrete Browsing Of A Graphical Toolkit Library Denys Duchier Department of Computer Science and promote reuse. This paper introduces Concrete Browsing as an improved method of consult­ ing a graphical library, and Spreading Computation as novel paradigm for search and retrieval. A concrete browser allows

  18. CIVE 452 Spring 1998 Design of Reinforced Concrete Structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eberhard, Marc O.

    CIVE 452 Spring 1998 Design of Reinforced Concrete Structures Instructor: M.O. Eberhard Office: 233 of concrete and steel (CIVE 363). The purpose of the course is to provide seniors with an introduction to the behavior and design of reinforced concrete structures. Course Outline Text Reading 1. Introduction Ch. 1, 2

  19. Compressive Strength of Gamma-Irradiated Polymer Concrete

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    North Texas, University of

    Compressive Strength of Gamma-Irradiated Polymer Concrete Gonzalo Marti´nez-Barrera,1,2 Uriel concrete (PC) was developed by using differ- ent concentrations of silica sand as aggregate of Plastics Engineers INTRODUCTION Polymer concrete (PC) is a particulate composite where thermoset resins

  20. COLORADO DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Sustainability of Concrete Pavement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    COLORADO DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Sustainability of Concrete Pavement I-225 - Mississippi to 6 · 2 Mile Reconstruction Existing: · 4 Lane Divided Highway · 8" Concrete Pavement (Recycled on-site) · 4" Asphalt Overlay (Recycled off-site) Project Design: · 6 Lane Divided Highway · 13" Concrete

  1. Model coupling friction and adhesion for steel-concrete interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Model coupling friction and adhesion for steel- concrete interfaces Michel Raous Laboratoire de: In this paper the interface behaviour between steel and concrete, during pull out tests, is numerically a variable friction coefficient in order to simulate the behaviour of the steel-concrete interface during

  2. The Description Logic ALCNHR + Extended with Concrete Domains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haarslev, Volker

    The Description Logic ALCNHR + Extended with Concrete Domains: A Practically Motivated Approach restrictions, role hierarchies, transitively closed roles, generalized concept inclusions, and concrete domains. As in other languages based on concrete domains (e.g. ALC(D)) a so­called ex­ istential predicate restriction

  3. Adapting Optimization Techniques to Description Logics with Concrete Domains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haarslev, Volker

    Adapting Optimization Techniques to Description Logics with Concrete Domains Anni­Yasmin Turhan backtracking and model merging can be adapted to description logics with concrete domains. We propose al) a new requirement for concrete domains in order to enable dependency directed backtracking for all clash

  4. NExpTime-complete Description Logics with Concrete Domains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baader, Franz

    NExpTime-complete Description Logics with Concrete Domains Carsten Lutz LuFG Theoretical Computer Science RWTH Aachen, Germany lutz@cs.rwth-aachen.de Abstract. Concrete domains are an extension \\concrete properties" of objects such as sizes, weights, and durations. It is known that reasoning with ALC

  5. Concrete vs. Abstract Problem Formats: A Disadvantage of Prior Knowledge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heckler, Andrew F.

    Concrete vs. Abstract Problem Formats: A Disadvantage of Prior Knowledge Andrew F. Heckler experiments examine the effects of varying the relative concreteness of physics word problems on student performance.Previous studies have found that concrete representations benefit performance for relatively

  6. Effects of elevated temperatures on mechanical properties of concrete containing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    North Texas, University of

    Effects of elevated temperatures on mechanical properties of concrete containing haematite and A. Beycioglu5 Concretes containing different proportions of haematite (15, 30, 45 and 60%) were of concretes were determined according to ASTM C39 and ASTM C469. A rule based Mamdani type fuzzy logic model

  7. A NOVEL MICROWAVE CAMERA FOR NDE OF CONCRETE STRUCTURES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Flaviis, Franco

    A NOVEL MICROWAVE CAMERA FOR NDE OF CONCRETE STRUCTURES By Maria Q. Feng1 , Yoo Jin Kim2 , Franco De Flaviis3 , and Luis Jofre 4 ABSTRACT: Nondestructive assessment of concrete structures heavily and cracks inside concrete caused by aging, deterioration, and seismic loading. The authors have developed

  8. The Transfer of Scientific Principles Using Concrete and Idealized

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldstone, Robert

    The Transfer of Scientific Principles Using Concrete and Idealized Simulations Robert L. Goldstone the first simulation was manipulated. The elements either remained concrete throughout the simulation, remained idealized, or switched midway into the simulation from concrete to idealized or vice versa

  9. Blast simulator wall tests : experimental methods and mitigation strategies for reinforced concrete and concrete Masonry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oesterle, Michael G.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of three blocks with two mortar joints and both cells fully16 in. concrete blocks with two mortar joints (Figure 6.21).between the mortar joints and the block were equal to 200

  10. Compact portable diffraction moire interferometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deason, Vance A. (Shelley, ID); Ward, Michael B. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A compact and portable moire interferometer used to determine surface deformations of an object. The improved interferometer is comprised of a laser beam, optical and fiber optics devices coupling the beam to one or more evanescent wave splitters, and collimating lenses directing the split beam at one or more specimen gratings. Observation means including film and video cameras may be used to view and record the resultant fringe patterns.

  11. Compact portable diffraction moire interferometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deason, V.A.; Ward, M.B.

    1988-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A compact and portable moire interferometer used to determine surface deformations of an object. The improved interferometer is comprised of a laser beam, optical and fiber optics devices coupling the beam to one or more evanescent wave splitters, and collimating lenses directing the split beam at one or more specimen gratings. Observations means including film and video cameras may be used to view and record the resultant fringe patterns. 7 figs.

  12. Compact magnetic energy storage module

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prueitt, Melvin L. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A superconducting compact magnetic energy storage module in which a plurality of superconducting toroids, each having a toroidally wound superconducting winding inside a poloidally wound superconducting winding, are stacked so that the flow of electricity in each toroidally wound superconducting winding is in a direction opposite from the direction of electrical flow in other contiguous superconducting toroids. This allows for minimal magnetic pollution outside of the module.

  13. Compact magnetic energy storage module

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prueitt, M.L.

    1994-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A superconducting compact magnetic energy storage module in which a plurality of superconducting toroids, each having a toroidally wound superconducting winding inside a poloidally wound superconducting winding, are stacked so that the flow of electricity in each toroidally wound superconducting winding is in a direction opposite from the direction of electrical flow in other contiguous superconducting toroids. This allows for minimal magnetic pollution outside of the module. 4 figures.

  14. Concrete Property and Radionuclide Migration Tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wellman, Dawn M.; Mattigod, Shas V.; Powers, Laura; Parker, Kent E.; Clayton, Libby N.; Wood, Marcus I.

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Waste Management Project provides safe, compliant, and cost-effective waste management services for the Hanford Site and the DOE Complex. Part of theses services includes safe disposal of LLW and MLLW at the Hanford Low-Level Waste Burial Grounds (LLBG) in accordance with the requirements listed in DOE Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management. To partially satisfy these requirements, a Performance Assessment (PA) analyses were completed and approved. DOE Order 435.1 also requires that continuing data collection be conducted to enhance confidence in the critical assumptions used in these analyses to characterize the operational features of the disposal facility that are relied upon to satisfy the performance objectives identified in the Order. One critical assumption is that concrete will frequently be used as waste form or container material to control and minimize the release of radionuclide constituents in waste into the surrounding environment. Data was collected to (1) quantify radionuclide migration through concrete materials similar to those used to encapsulate waste in the LLBG, (2) measure the properties of the concrete materials, especially those likely to influence radionuclide migration, and (3) quantify the stability of U-bearing solid phases of limited solubility in concrete.

  15. Lateral stability of long precast concrete beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burgoyne, Chris

    buckling L length of beam vx lateral deection measured in the minor- axis direction (which rotates with yLateral stability of long precast concrete beams T. J. Stratford, BA, BEng, and C. J. Burgoyne, BA, making them more susceptible to buckling failure. This paper shows that once the beam is positioned

  16. Morley Symposium on Concrete Plasticity and its Application. University of Cambridge 23 THE PLASTICITY OF UNREINFORCED CONCRETE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burgoyne, Chris

    Morley Symposium on Concrete Plasticity and its Application. University of Cambridge 23 rd July, 2007 THE PLASTICITY OF UNREINFORCED CONCRETE Jacques HEYMAN Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge, UK Keywords: Mass concrete, plasticity 1 THE MATERIAL If a material is to be structurally useful

  17. Compact

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration would like submit the followingth Lomonosov1 COMMUNITY

  18. Surface treated polypropylene (PP) fibres for reinforced concrete

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lpez-Buenda, Angel M., E-mail: buendia@uv.es [AIDICO Technological Institute of Construction, Benjamin Franklin 17, 46380 Paterna, Valencia (Spain); Romero-Snchez, Mara Dolores [AIDICO Technological Institute of Construction, Marble Technical Unit, Cam de Castella 4, 03660 Novelda. Alicante (Spain)] [AIDICO Technological Institute of Construction, Marble Technical Unit, Cam de Castella 4, 03660 Novelda. Alicante (Spain); Climent, Vernica [Lafarge Cementos, Polgono Sepes, Isaac Newton s/n, 46500 Sagunto, Valencia (Spain)] [Lafarge Cementos, Polgono Sepes, Isaac Newton s/n, 46500 Sagunto, Valencia (Spain); Guillem, Celia [AIDICO Technological Institute of Construction, Marble Technical Unit, Cam de Castella 4, 03660 Novelda. Alicante (Spain)] [AIDICO Technological Institute of Construction, Marble Technical Unit, Cam de Castella 4, 03660 Novelda. Alicante (Spain)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Surface treatments on a polypropylene (PP) fibre have contributed to the improvement of fibre/concrete adhesion in fibre-reinforced concrete. The treatments to the PP fibre were characterized by contact angle measurements, ATR-IR and XPS to analyse chemical alterations. The surface topography and fibre/concrete interaction were analysed by several microscopic techniques, namely optical petrographic, and scanning electron microscopy. Treatment modified the surface chemistry and topography of the fibre by introducing sodium moieties and created additional fibre surface roughness. Modifications in the fibre surface led to an increase in the adhesion properties between the treated fibres and concrete and an improvement in the mechanical properties of the fibre-reinforced concrete composite as compared to the concrete containing untreated PP fibres. Compatibility with the concrete and increased roughness and mineral surface was also improved by nucleated portlandite and ettringite mineral association anchored on the alkaline PP fibre surface, which is induced during treatment.

  19. Recycling of PET bottles as fine aggregate in concrete

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frigione, Mariaenrica, E-mail: mariaenrica.frigione@unisalento.i [Department of Engineering for Innovation, University of Salento, Via per Monteroni, 73100 Lecce (Italy)

    2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An attempt to substitute in concrete the 5% by weight of fine aggregate (natural sand) with an equal weight of PET aggregates manufactured from the waste un-washed PET bottles (WPET), is presented. The WPET particles possessed a granulometry similar to that of the substituted sand. Specimens with different cement content and water/cement ratio were manufactured. Rheological characterization on fresh concrete and mechanical tests at the ages of 28 and 365 days were performed on the WPET/concretes as well as on reference concretes containing only natural fine aggregate in order to investigate the influence of the substitution of WPET to the fine aggregate in concrete. It was found that the WPET concretes display similar workability characteristics, compressive strength and splitting tensile strength slightly lower that the reference concrete and a moderately higher ductility.

  20. An Alternative Mechanism for Accelerated Carbon Sequestration in Concrete

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haselbach, Liv M.; Thomle, Jonathan N.

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The increased rate of carbon dioxide sequestration (carbonation) is desired in many primary and secondary life applications of concrete in order to make the life cycle of concrete structures more carbon neutral. Most carbonation rate studies have focused on concrete exposed to air under various conditions. An alternative mechanism for accelerated carbon sequestration in concrete was investigated in this research based on the pH change of waters in contact with pervious concrete which have been submerged in carbonate laden waters. The results indicate that the concrete exposed to high levels of carbonate species in water may carbonate faster than when exposed to ambient air, and that the rate is higher with higher concentrations. Validation of increased carbon dioxide sequestration was also performed via thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). It is theorized that the proposed alternative mechanism reduces a limiting rate effect of carbon dioxide dissolution in water in the micro pores of the concrete.

  1. The Cooling of Compact Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dany Page; Ulrich Geppert; Fridolin Weber

    2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The cooling of a compact star depends very sensitively on the state of dense matter at supranuclear densities, which essentially controls the neutrino emission, as well as on the structure of the stellar outer layers which control the photon emission. Open issues concern the hyperon population, the presence of meson condensates, superfluidity and superconductivity, and the transition of confined hadronic matter to quark matter. This paper describes these issues and presents cooling calculations based on a broad collection of equations of state for neutron star matter and strange matter. These results are tested against the body of observed cooling data.

  2. Two Piece Compaction Die Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coffey, Ethan N [ORNL

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Compaction dies used to create europium oxide and tantalum control plates were modeled using ANSYS 11.0. Two-piece designs were considered in order to make the dies easier to assemble than the five-piece dies that were previously used. The two areas of concern were the stresses at the interior corner of the die cavity and the distortion of the cavity wall due to the interference fit between the two pieces and the pressure exerted on the die during the compaction process. A successful die design would have stresses less than the yield stress of the material and a maximum wall distortion on the order of 0.0001 in. Design factors that were investigated include the inner corner radius, the value of the interference fit, the compaction force, the size of the cavity, and the outer radius and geometry of the outer ring. The results show that for the europium oxide die, a 0.01 in. diameter wire can be used to create the cavity, leading to a 0.0055 in. radius corner, if the radial interference fit is 0.003 in. For the tantalum die, the same wire can be used with a radial interference fit of 0.001 in. Also, for the europium oxide die with a 0.003 in. interference fit, it is possible to use a wire with a diameter of 0.006 in. for the wire burning process. Adding a 10% safety factor to the compaction force tends to lead to conservative estimates of the stresses but not for the wall distortion. However, when the 10% safety factor is removed, the wall distortion is not affected enough to discard the design. Finally, regarding the europium oxide die, when the cavity walls are increased by 0.002 in. per side or the outer ring is made to the same geometry as the tantalum die, all the stresses and wall distortions are within the desired range. Thus, the recommendation is to use a 0.006 in. diameter wire and a 0.003 in. interference fit for the europium oxide die and a 0.01 in. diameter wire and a 0.001 in. interference fit for the tantalum die. The dies can also be made to have the same outer geometry if desired.

  3. Wearability of Portland Cement Concrete Pavement Finishes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKeen, William Rew

    1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Major Subject: Civil Engineering NEARABILITY OF PORTLAND CENENT CONCRETE PAPFNENT FIVISNFS A Thesis by Nilliam Rem NcKeen Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committ e) (Nember) August 1971 ABSTRACT Hearabil'tv of Portland Cement... portland cement, and an air entrainment admixture. Standard laboratory tests were performed on all aggregates to determine their properties. iv The test specimens were molded in a controlled environmental room and the anpropriate surface finish (burlap...

  4. Compacted carbon for electrochemical cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greinke, R.A.; Lewis, I.C.

    1997-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention provides compacted carbon that is useful in the electrode of an alkali metal/carbon electrochemical cell of improved capacity selected from the group consisting of: (a) coke having the following properties: (1) an x-ray density of at least 2.00 grams per cubic centimeters, (2) a closed porosity of no greater than 5%, and (3) an open porosity of no greater than 47%; and (b) graphite having the following properties: (1) an x-ray density of at least 2.20 grams per cubic centimeters, (2) a closed porosity of no greater than 5%, and (3) an open porosity of no greater than 25%. This invention also relates to an electrode for an alkali metal/carbon electrochemical cell comprising compacted carbon as described above and a binder. This invention further provides an alkali metal/carbon electrochemical cell comprising: (a) an electrode as described above, (b) a non-aqueous electrolytic solution comprising an organic aprotic solvent and an electrolytically conductive salt and an alkali metal, and (c) a counter electrode. 10 figs.

  5. Compact submanifolds supporting singular interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaynak, Burak Tevfik, E-mail: burak.kaynak@boun.edu.tr; Teoman Turgut, O., E-mail: turgutte@boun.edu.tr

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A quantum particle moving under the influence of singular interactions on embedded surfaces furnish an interesting example from the spectral point of view. In these problems, the possible occurrence of a bound-state is perhaps the most important aspect. Such systems can be introduced as quadratic forms and generically they do not require renormalization. Yet an alternative path through the resolvent is also beneficial to study various properties. In the present work, we address these issues for compact surfaces embedded in a class of ambient manifolds. We discover that there is an exact bound state solution written in terms of the heat kernel of the ambient manifold for a range of coupling strengths. Moreover, we develop techniques to estimate bounds on the ground state energy when several surfaces, each of which admits a bound state solution, coexist. -- Highlights: Schrdinger operator with singular interactions supported on compact submanifolds. Exact bound-state solution in terms of the heat kernel of the ambient manifold. Generalization of the variational approach to a collection of submanifolds. Existence of a lower bound for a unique ground state energy.

  6. Hydrostatic compaction of Microtherm HT.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Broome, Scott Thomas; Bauer, Stephen J.

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two samples of jacketed Microtherm{reg_sign}HT were hydrostatically pressurized to maximum pressures of 29,000 psi to evaluate both pressure-volume response and change in bulk modulus as a function of density. During testing, each of the two samples exhibited large irreversible compactive volumetric strains with only small increases in pressure; however at volumetric strains of approximately 50%, the Microtherm{reg_sign}HT stiffened noticeably at ever increasing rates. At the maximum pressure of 29,000 psi, the volumetric strains for both samples were approximately 70%. Bulk modulus, as determined from hydrostatic unload/reload loops, increased by more than two-orders of magnitude (from about 4500 psi to over 500,000 psi) from an initial material density of {approx}0.3 g/cc to a final density of {approx}1.1 g/cc. An empirical fit to the density vs. bulk modulus data is K = 492769{rho}{sup 4.6548}, where K is the bulk modulus in psi, and {rho} is the material density in g/cm{sup 3}. The porosity decreased from 88% to {approx}20% indicating that much higher pressures would be required to compact the material fully.

  7. Radionuclide Retention in Concrete Waste Forms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mattigod, Shas V.; Bovaird, Chase C.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Wood, Marcus I.

    2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Assessing long-term performance of Category 3 waste cement grouts for radionuclide encasement requires knowledge of the radionuclide-cement interactions and mechanisms of retention (i.e., sorption or precipitation); the mechanism of contaminant release; the significance of contaminant release pathways; how waste form performance is affected by the full range of environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the process of waste form aging under conditions that are representative of processes occurring in response to changing environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the effect of waste form aging on chemical, physical, and radiological properties; and the associated impact on contaminant release. This knowledge will enable accurate prediction of radionuclide fate when the waste forms come in contact with groundwater. The information presented in the report provides data that 1) quantify radionuclide retention within concrete waste form materials similar to those used to encapsulate waste in the Low-Level Waste Burial Grounds (LLBG); 2) measure the effect of concrete waste form properties likely to influence radionuclide migration; and 3) quantify the stability of uranium-bearing solid phases of limited solubility in concrete.

  8. Compact approach to fusion power reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hagenson, R.L.; Krakowski, R.A.; Bathke, C.G.; Miller, R.L.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The potential of the Reversed-Field Pinch (RFP) for development into an efficient, compact, copper-coil fusion reactor has been quantified by comprehensive parametric tradeoff studies. These compact systems promise to be competitive in size, power density, and cost to alternative energy sources. Conceptual engineering designs that largely substantiate these promising results have since been completed. This 1000-MWe(net) design is described along with a detailed rationale and physics/technology assessment for the compact approach to fusion.

  9. Method for preparing porous metal hydride compacts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ron, M.; Gruen, D.M.; Mendelsohn, M.H.; Sheft, I.

    1980-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for preparing porous metallic-matrix hydride compacts which can be repeatedly hydrided and dehydrided without disintegration. A mixture of a finely divided metal hydride and a finely divided matrix metal is contacted with a poison which prevents the metal hydride from dehydriding at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The mixture of matrix metal and poisoned metal hydride is then compacted under pressure at room temperature to form porous metallic-matrix hydride compacts.

  10. Method for preparing porous metal hydride compacts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ron, Moshe (Haifa, IL); Gruen, Dieter M. (Downers Grove, IL); Mendelsohn, Marshall H. (Woodridge, IL); Sheft, Irving (Oak Park, IL)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for preparing porous metallic-matrix hydride compacts which can be repeatedly hydrided and dehydrided without disintegration. A mixture of a finely divided metal hydride and a finely divided matrix metal is contacted with a poison which prevents the metal hydride from dehydriding at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The mixture of matrix metal and poisoned metal hydride is then compacted under pressure at room temperature to form porous metallic-matrix hydride compacts.

  11. Convolution type operators on locally compact groups

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shtein--~erg, Convolution Type Operators on Locally Compact Groups [in Russian],. Manuscript Deposited in the All-Union Institute of Scientific and Technical...

  12. Covered Product Category: Compact Fluorescent Lamps

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    FEMP provides acquisition guidance across a variety of product categories, including compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs), which are an ENERGY STAR-qualified product category.

  13. Interstate Mining Compact Commission (multi-state)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Interstate Mining Compact is a multi-state governmental agency / organization that represents the natural resource and related environmental protection interests of its member states. Currently...

  14. Compact Solid State Cooling Systems: Compact MEMS Electrocaloric Module

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    BEETIT Project: UCLA is developing a novel solid-state cooling technology to translate a recent scientific discovery of the so-called giant electrocaloric effect into commercially viable compact cooling systems. Traditional air conditioners use noisy, vapor compression systems that include a polluting liquid refrigerant to circulate within the air conditioner, absorb heat, and pump the heat out into the environment. Electrocaloric materials achieve the same result by heating up when placed within an electric field and cooling down when removedeffectively pumping heat out from a cooler to warmer environment. This electrocaloric-based solid state cooling system is quiet and does not use liquid refrigerants. The innovation includes developing nano-structured materials and reliable interfaces for heat exchange. With these innovations and advances in micro/nano-scale manufacturing technologies pioneered by semiconductor companies, UCLA is aiming to extend the performance/reliability of the cooling module.

  15. Analytical and Experimental Assessment of Seismic Vulnerability of Beam-Column Joints without Transverse Reinforcement in Concrete Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hassan, Wael M.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Deformations in Reinforced Concrete BeamColumn Joints?,P. , ?Update to ASCE/SEI 41 Concrete Provisions?, EarthquakeEffective Stiffness of Reinforced Concrete Columns?, Pacific

  16. Phased array compaction cell for measurement of the transversely isotropic elastic properties of compacting sediments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nihei, K.T.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    compaction and chemical diagenesis on the microfabric andAt early stages of diagenesis, clay-rich sediments can

  17. Concrete decontamination by Electro-Hydraulic Scabbling (EHS). Topical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Electro-Hydraulic Scabbling (EHS) technology and equipment for decontaminating concrete structures from radionuclides, organic substances, and hazardous metals is being developed by Textron Systems Division (TSD). This wet scabbling technique involves the generation of powerful shock waves and intense cavitation by a strong pulsed electric discharge in a water layer at the concrete surface. The high pressure impulse results in stresses which crack and peel off a concrete layer of a controllable thickness. Scabbling produces contaminated debris of relatively small volume which can be easily removed, leaving clean bulk concrete. This new technology is being developed under Contract No. DE-AC21-93MC30164. The project objective is to develop and demonstrate a cost-efficient, rapid, controllable process to remove the surface layer of contaminated concrete while generating minimal secondary waste. The primary target of this program is uranium-contaminated concrete floors which constitute a substantial part of the contaminated area at DOE weapon facilities.

  18. University of North Carolina at Charlotte Design and Construction Manual Section 2, Division 03 Concrete

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie,Jiang (Linda)

    . American Concrete Institute (ACI) B. American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) C. Portland Cement ­ Concrete SECTION 2 DIVISION 03 CONCRETE #12;University of North Carolina at Charlotte Design and Construction Manual Section 2, Division 03 ­ Concrete DIVISION 3 - CONCRETE Note: This is a guide for Designers

  19. Coupled Damage and Plasticity Modelling in Transient Dynamic Analysis of Concrete

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coupled Damage and Plasticity Modelling in Transient Dynamic Analysis of Concrete F. Gatuingt Abstract In a concrete structure subjected to an explosion, for example a concrete slab, the material on the same concrete. Computations of split Hopkinson tests on confined concrete, a tensile test with scabbing

  20. asphalt concrete overlays: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    experimental results for concrete containing virgin limestone Paulino, Glaucio H. 71 Life Cycle Assessment of Reclaimed Asphalt Pavement Energy Storage, Conversion and Utilization...

  1. Sustained concrete attack by low-temperature, fragmented core debris

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tarbell, W.W.; Bradley, D.R.; Blose, R.E.; Ross, J.W.; Gilbert, D.W.

    1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Four experiments were performed to study the interactions between low-temperature core debris and concretes typical of reactor structures. The tests addressed accident situations where the core debris is at elevated temperature, but not molten. Concrete crucibles were formed in right-circular cylinders with 45 kg of steel spheres (approx.3-mm diameter) as the debris simulant. The debris was heated by an inductive power supply to nominal temperatures of 1473 K to 1673 K. Two tests were performed on each of two concrete types using either basalt or limestone aggregate. For each concrete, one test was performed with water atop the debris while the second had no water added. The results show that low-temperature core debris will erode either basalt or limestone-common sand concretes. Downward erosion rates of 3 to 4 cm/hr were recorded for both concrete types. The limestone concrete produced a crust layer within the debris bed that was effective in preventing the downward intrusion of water. The basalt concrete crust was formed above the debris and consisted of numerous, convoluted, thin layers. Carbon dioxide and water release from the decomposition of concrete were partially reduced by the metallic debris to yield carbon monoxide and hydrogen, respectively. The overlying water pool did not effect the reduction reactions.

  2. Optimization of Flexural capacity Of Reinforced fibrous concrete ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D Suji

    2005-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Dec 22, 2005 ... Optimization of Flexural capacity Of Reinforced fibrous concrete Beams Using Genetic Algorithm. D Suji (suji_mohan2002 ***at*** yahoo.com)

  3. On Concrete Universals: A Modern Treatment using Category Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Ellerman

    2014-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Today it would be considered "bad Platonic metaphysics" to think that among all the concrete instances of a property there could be a universal instance so that all instances had the property by virtue of participating in that concrete universal. Yet there is a mathematical theory, category theory, dating from the mid-20th century that shows how to precisely model concrete universals within the "Platonic Heaven" of mathematics. This paper, written for the philosophical logician, develops this category-theoretic treatment of concrete universals along with a new concept to abstractly model the functions of a brain.

  4. Dynamic Impact Analyses and Tests of Concrete Overpacks - 13638

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Sanghoon; Cho, Sang-Soon; Kim, Ki-Young; Jeon, Je-Eon; Seo, Ki-Seog [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)] [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Concrete cask is an option for spent nuclear fuel interim storage which is prevailingly used in US. A concrete cask usually consists of metallic canister which confines the spent nuclear fuel and concrete overpack. When the overpack undergoes a severe missile impact which might be caused by a tornado or an aircraft crash, it should sustain acceptable level of structural integrity so that its radiation shielding capability and the retrievability of canister are maintained. Missile impact against a concrete overpack involves two damage modes, local damage and global damage. Local damage of concrete is usually evaluated by empirical formulas while the global damage is evaluated by finite element analysis. In many cases, those two damage modes are evaluated separately. In this research, a series of numerical simulations are performed using finite element analysis to evaluate the global damage of concrete overpack as well as its local damage under high speed missile impact. We consider two types of concrete overpack, one with steel in-cased concrete without reinforcement and the other with partially-confined reinforced concrete. The numerical simulation results are compared with test results and it is shown that appropriate modeling of material failure is crucial in this analysis and the results are highly dependent on the choice of failure parameters. (authors)

  5. An investigation of tendon sheathing filler migration into concrete

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naus, D.J.; Oland, C.B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During some of the inspections at nuclear power plants with prestressed concrete containments, it was observed that the containments has experienced leakage of the tendon sheathing filler (i.e., streaks). The objective of this activity was to provide an indication of the extent of tendon sheathing filler leakage into the concrete and its affects on concrete properties. Literature was reviewed and concrete core samples were obtained from the Trojan Nuclear Plant and tested. The literature primarily addressed effects of crude or lubricating oils that are known to cause concrete damage. However, these materials have significantly different characteristics relative to the materials used as tendon sheathing fillers. Examination and testing of the concrete cores indicated that the appearance of tendon sheathing filler on the concrete surface was due to leakage from the conduits and its subsequent migration through cracks that were present. Migration of the tendon sheathing filler was confined to the cracks and there was no perceptible movement into the concrete. Results of compressive strength testing indicated that the concrete quality was consistent in the containment and that the strength had increased over 40% in 25.4 years relative to the average compressive strength at 28-days age.

  6. UNIT NUMBER SWMU 175 UNIT NAME: Concrete Rubble Pile (28...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    75 UNIT NAME: Concrete Rubble Pile (28) REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: Outside Security Fence, East of C-360 Building in KPDES Outfall Ditch 002. APPROXIMATE DIMENSIONS: 400 ft...

  7. asphalt concrete surfaces: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Polymer Eythor Thorhallsson M that was done on concrete cylinders confined with basalt fibre reinforced polymer (BFRP) and examination of its of more ductile behaviour. Key...

  8. Cooling of Color Superconducting Compact Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Blaschke

    2006-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We review the status of research on the cooling of compact stars, with emphasis on the influence of color superconducting quark matter phases. Although a consistent microscopic approach is not yet available, severe constraints on the phase structure of matter at high densities come from recent mass and cooling observations of compact stars.

  9. The Compressor: Concurrent, Incremental, and Parallel Compaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petrank, Erez

    The Compressor: Concurrent, Incremental, and Parallel Compaction Haim Kermany Erez Petrank Dept non-intrusive compactor is still missing. In this paper we present the Compressor, a novel compaction, thereby allowing acceptable runs on large heaps. Furthermore, the Compressor is the first compactor

  10. Exploration of Compact Stellarators as Power Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at San Diego, University of

    Exploration of Compact Stellarators as Power Plants: Initial Results from ARIES-CS Study Farrokh, see: http://aries.ucsd.edu/ #12;Exploration and Optimization of Compact Stellarators as Power Plants in the context of power plant studies, e.g., particle loss Divertor (location, particle and energy distribution

  11. Compacted Soil Liner Interface Strength Importance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Case Study Compacted Soil Liner Interface Strength Importance Timothy D. Stark, F.ASCE1 ; Hangseok interface is not the geomembrane (GM)/compacted low-permeability soil liner (LPSL) but a soilsoil interface placing the cover soil from bottom to top. DOI: 10.1061/(ASCE)GT.1943-5606 .0000556. 2012 American

  12. Why Python? 1) readable, compact, simple syntax

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spang, Rainer

    Starting with Python #12;Why Python? 1) readable, compact, simple syntax 2) documented 3) memory output shown using green text 5 True 27 10/19/2010 6 #12;Scope · Declarations are global · Cannot for usually compacter, while more general. for - doing X for each element of S. can simulate while loops

  13. Non-compact versions of Edwards' Theorem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gogus, Nihat G; Poletsky, Evgeny A

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Edwards' Theorem establishes duality between a convex cone in the space of continuous functions on a compact space and the set of representing or Jensen measures for this cone. In this paper we prove non-compact versions of this theorem.

  14. CPI Concrete Plant International 2 | 2013 www.cpi-worldwide.com2 PRECAST CONCRETE ELEMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to the inherent lack of thermal conductivity in CFRP composites. In addition to offering solid structural and ther with discrete zones of solid concrete can provide a high degree of structural composite action, but also creates, but compromises thermal effi- ciency by creating thermal breaks in the insulation. Carbon-fiber reinforced polymer

  15. Experimental and Analytical Studies on Old Reinforced Concrete Buildings with Seismically Vulnerable Beam-Column Joints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PARK, SANGJOON

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    concrete thickness of the beam cross- sections were measured after testingconducted at the testing day. Table B.3 Concrete cylindertesting (d) EW beam (c) NS beam Figure V.52 Failure of SP4 after removing concrete

  16. Analytical and experimental study of seismic performance of reinforced concrete frames infilled with masonry walls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stavridis, Andreas

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of concrete and implications for choice of testingTable Testing of Gravity Load Designed Reinforced ConcreteConcrete Institute ASCE American Society of Civil Engineers ASTM American Society for Testing

  17. Analytical Modeling of Cyclic Shear - Flexure Interaction in Reinforced Concrete Structural Walls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolozvari, Kristijan

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Strength of Concrete at the Day of Testing (Tran,Strength of Concrete at the Day of Testing (Tran, 2012) No.concrete compressive strengths at the time of testing ranged

  18. Seismic Performance of Reinforced Concrete Bridges Allowed to Uplift During Multi-Directional Excitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Espinoza, Andres Oscar

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    were cast for testing concrete compressive strength at 7strength of column concrete on testing day was about 4.7Concrete Cylinders.. 39 Table 3.4: Testing

  19. Construction and Preliminary HVS Tests of Pre-Cast Concrete Pavement Slabs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kohler, Erwin R.; du Plessis, Louw; Theyse, Hechter

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cast Concrete Pavement Slabs with HVS Testing. TechnicalCast Concrete Pavement Slabs with HVS Testing Signatures: E.subgrade. FWD testing on the centers of the concrete slabs

  20. Transportation Research Board AFN 10: Basic Research and Emerging Technologies in Concrete

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Transportation Research Board AFN 10: Basic Research and Emerging Technologies in Concrete I will identify potential problems related to concrete materials, and develop research needs statement within STATEMENT AND BACKGROUND The chloride induced corrosion of steel reinforcement embedded in concrete

  1. Experimental and Theoretical Studies on Mechanical Properties of Complex Oxides in Concrete

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moon, Juhyuk

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    0 to 100% slag, Cement and Concrete Research, 40 (2010) 971-ray microscopy, Cement and Concrete Research, 35 (2005) 351-ray microscopy, Cement and Concrete Research, 28 (1998) 411-

  2. CONCRETE STRUCTURE DESIGN USING MIXED-INTEGER NONLINEAR PROGRAMMING WITH COMPLEMENTARITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CONCRETE STRUCTURE DESIGN USING MIXED-INTEGER NONLINEAR PROGRAMMING WITH COMPLEMENTARITY programming (MINLP) formulation to achieve mini- mum-cost designs for reinforced concrete (RC) structures for concrete, steel reinforcing bars, and formwork according to typical contractor methods. Restrictions

  3. A TIME-DEPENDENT METHOD FOR CHARACTERIZING THE DIFFUSION OF RADON-222 IN CONCRETE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zapalac, Geordie H.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coefficient of Radon in Concrete", Health Phys. 30, 263. Didiffusion of radon through concrete. The source loop exposesa 2.5-cm sample taken from a different type of concrete.

  4. Development of load and resistance factor design for FRP strengthening of reinforced concrete structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atadero, Rebecca Anne

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Design for FRP Strengthening of Reinforced Concrete. In 7 thFRP) Reinforcement for Concrete Structure; Shield, C.K. ,G.C. Fatigue Performance of Concrete Beams Strengthened with

  5. InstantaneousIn-SituDetermination of Water-CementRatio of Fresh Concrete

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mancio, Mauricio; Moore, Jeffrey R.; Brooks, Zenzile; Monteiro, Paulo J. M.; Glaser, Steve D.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    method for cement content determination of fresh concrete.Cement and Concrete Research, 1980. 10(1): p. 23-34. Hime,the cement content of plastic concrete. ASTM Bulletin, 1955.

  6. Sensitivity Analysis of 2002 Design Guide Distress Prediction Models for Jointed Plain Concrete Pavement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kannekanti, Venkata N.; Harvey, John T

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for Jointed Plain Concrete Pavement Venkata Kannekanti andfeatures, portland cement concrete (PCC) strength, andj o i n t e d p l a i n concrete pavement (JPCP) module o f

  7. Modeling and Simulation of Electromutagenic Processes for Multiscale Modification of Concrete Jinko Kanno1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kanno,Jinko

    Modeling and Simulation of Electromutagenic Processes for Multiscale Modification of Concrete Jinko Engineering Program, Louisiana Tech University ABSTRACT Concrete contains numerous pores that allow of concrete with solid materials or nanoparticles tends to improve the strength significantly. In this paper

  8. Earth pressures on reinforced concrete box culverts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Dale Evan

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . 28 day Compressive Strength in psi 3000 4150 Max. Water/Cement Ratio in gallons/sack Slump Range in inches 7. 0 3-4 5. 4 - 5. 7 3. 5 - 5. 5 Note: 1 yd = 0. 765 m , 1 psi = 6. 89 kpa, 1 in. = 2. 54 cm. , 3 3 1 sack of cement = 94 lb, 1 lb...-structure interface. It also provides the highest degree of 6000 5000 '"4000 ~ 3000 C. I2000 0 0 7 14 21 28 35 Time (days) FIG. 3 - Measured Concrete Compressive Strength (1 psi 6. 89 kpa) 42 PLAN 14 ~ ~ 11 15 ~ ~ 12 & 16 + ~ 13 ~ 8 ~ 9 ~ 10 5 ~ 3...

  9. Decontamination of large horizontal concrete surfaces outdoors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barbier, M.M.; Chester, C.V.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A study is being conducted of the resources and planning that would be required to clean up an extensive contamination of the outdoor environment. As part of this study, an assessment of the fleet of machines needed for decontaminating large outdoor surfaces of horizontal concrete will be attempted. The operations required are described. The performance of applicable existing equipment is analyzed in terms of area cleaned per unit time, and the comprehensive cost of decontamination per unit area is derived. Shielded equipment for measuring directional radiation and continuously monitoring decontamination work are described. Shielding of drivers' cabs and remote control vehicles is addressed.

  10. Compaction characteristics of crushed limestone using the Gyratory Testing Machine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parsons, Walter Herbert, III

    1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    adjustments; screw T for fine adjustments. Tighten lock nuts for S and T after the adjustment is made. Load a sample into the machine at the desired vertical pressure. 4. Press start button U, which will cause roller carriage AA to revolve. 5. After a... OP PREVIOUS RESEARCH III. THE GYRATORY TESTING MACHINE Development Description Operation Operating Instructions IV. THE RESEARCH PROGRAM Material and Sample Preparation PAGE 1. 5 19 Development of the Texas Highway Department Moisture...

  11. Performance-Based Concrete Pavement Mix Design System Performance-Based Design Guide for New and Rehabilitated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strategic Research Plan #12; Performance-Based Concrete Pavement Mix Design System Performance-Based Design Guide for New and Rehabilitated Concrete Pavements High-Speed Nondestructive Testing Pavements High-Speed Concrete Pavement Rehabilitation and Construction Concrete Pavement Business

  12. Meso-Scale Model for Simulations of Concrete Subjected to Cryogenic Temperatures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masad, Noor Ahmad

    2013-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    temperatures (Marshall, 1982). The air-entrained concrete has the ability to resist freezing-thawing cycles; therefore, it is recommended to be used in applications that need frost resistance. Air entrained concrete has air pores that can handle... and relief the pressure due to ice 13 formulation, however, the ice growth in non-air entrained concrete causes expand in cracks which lead to deterioration of concrete after many freeze-thaw cycles. 2.3 Concrete Plasticity Damage Models Concrete...

  13. Compacting Plastic-Bonded Explosive Molding Powders to Dense Solids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B. Olinger

    2005-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Dense solid high explosives are made by compacting plastic-bonded explosive molding powders with high pressures and temperatures for extended periods of time. The density is influenced by manufacturing processes of the powders, compaction temperature, the magnitude of compaction pressure, pressure duration, and number of repeated applications of pressure. The internal density variation of compacted explosives depends on method of compaction and the material being compacted.

  14. Radionuclide Retention in Concrete Wasteforms - FY13

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snyder, Michelle MV; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Lapierre, Robert; Dage, Denomy C.; Parker, Kent E.; Cordova, Elsa A.

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Assessing long-term performance of Category 3 waste cement grouts for radionuclide encasement requires knowledge of the radionuclide-cement interactions and mechanisms of retention (i.e., sorption or precipitation); the mechanism of contaminant release; the significance of contaminant release pathways; how wasteform performance is affected by the full range of environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the process of wasteform aging under conditions that are representative of processes occurring in response to changing environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the effect of wasteform aging on chemical, physical, and radiological properties; and the associated impact on contaminant release. This knowledge will enable accurate prediction of radionuclide fate when the wasteforms come in contact with groundwater. Data collected throughout the course of this work will be used to quantify the efficacy of concrete wasteforms, similar to those used in the disposal of low-level waste and mixed low-level waste, for the immobilization of key radionuclides (i.e., uranium, technetium, and iodine). Data collected will also be used to quantify the physical and chemical properties of the concrete affecting radionuclide retention.

  15. Perforation of thin unreinforced concrete slabs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cargile, J.D. [Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station, Vicksburg, MS (United States); Giltrud, M.E. [Defense Nuclear Agency, Washington, DC (United States); Luk, V.K. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses fourteen tests which were conducted to investigate the perforation of thin unreinforced concrete slabs. The 4340-steel projectile used in the test series is 50.8 mm in diameter, 355.6 mm in length, has a mass of 2.34 kg. and an ogive nose with caliber radius head of 3. The slabs, contained within steel culverts, are 1.52 m in diameter and consist of concrete with a nominal unconfined compressive strength of 38.2 MPa and maxima aggregate size of 9.5 mm. Slab thicknesses are 284.4, 254.0, 215.9 and 127.0 mm. Tests were conducted at impact velocities of about 313 m/s on all slab thicknesses and about 379 and 471 m/s on the 254.0-mm-thick slab. All tests were conducted at normal incidence to the slab. All tests were conducted at normal incidence to the slab. Information obtained from the tests used to determine the loading (deceleration) on the projectile during the perforation process, the velocity-displacement of the projectile as it perforated the slab, and the projectile position as damage occurred on the backface of the slab. The test projectile behaved essentially as a rigid body for all of the tests.

  16. Concrete decontamination by electro-hydraulic scabbling (EHS). Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Contamination of concrete structures by radionuclides, hazardous metals and organic substances (including PCB`s) occurs at many DOE sites. The contamination of concrete structures (walls, floors, ceilings, etc.) varies in type, concentration, and especially depth of penetration into the concrete. In many instances, only the surface layer of concrete is contaminated, up to a depth of one inch, according to estimates provided in the R and D ID document. Then, removal of the concrete surface layer (scabbling) is considered to be the most effective decontamination method. Textron Systems Corp. (TSC) has developed a scabbling concept based on electro-mechanical phenomena accompanying strong electric pulses generated by applying high voltage at the concrete/water interface. Depending on the conditions, the electric discharge may occur either through a waste layer or through the concrete body itself. This report describes the development, testing, and results of this electro-mechanical process. Phase 1 demonstrated the feasibility of the process for the controlled removal of a thin layer of contaminated concrete. Phase 2 designed, fabricated, and tested an integrated subscale unit. This was tested at Fernald. In Phase 3, the scabbling unit was reconfigured to increase its power and processing rate. Technology transfer to an engineering contracting company is continuing.

  17. Portland Cement Concrete Pavement Shannon Golden, Alabama DOT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Portland Cement Concrete Pavement Shannon Golden, Alabama DOT PORTLAND CEMENT CONCRETE PAVEMENT may be substituted for part of the required Portland cement. Substitution of mineral admixtures shall Cement shall not exceed the percentages shown in the following table: MAXIMUM ALLOWABLE SUBSTITUTION

  18. Performance of Concrete Made With Slag Cement and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Performance of Concrete Made With Slag Cement and Portland-Limestone Blended Cement Philadelphia;Today's Discussion ! The materials ! Slag cement ! Portland-limestone cement ! Use in concrete is slag cement? #12;! Non-metallic product of an iron blast furnace ! Granulated ! Ground ! Cementitious

  19. Electropositive bivalent metallic ion unsaturated polyester complexed polymer concrete

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sugama, T.; Kukacka, L.E.; Horn, W.H.

    1983-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Quick setting polymer concrete compositions are described which are mixtures of unsaturated polyesters and crosslinking monomers together with appropriate initiators and promoters in association with aggregate which may be wet and a source of bivalent metallic ions which will set to polymer concrete with excellent structural properties.

  20. Method for incorporating radioactive phosphoric acid solutions in concrete

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wolf, Gary A [Kennewick, WA; Smith, Jeffrey W [Lancaster, OH; Ihle, Nathan C [Walla Walla, WA

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for incorporating radioactive phosphoric acid solutions in concrete is described wherein the phosphoric acid is reacted with Ca(OH).sub.2 to form a precipitate of hydroxyapatite and the hydroxyapatite is mixed with portland cement to form concrete.

  1. NIST Special Publication 1173 Virtual Cement and Concrete

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;NIST Special Publication 1173 Virtual Cement and Concrete Testing Laboratory Version 9.5 User;Virtual Cement and Concrete Testing Laboratory Version 9.5 User Guide Jeffrey W. Bullard1 Materials-8615 This document serves as the user's guide for the Virtual Cement and Con- crete Testing Laboratory (VCCTL

  2. Hybrid FRP/Concrete Structural Members and Sami Rizkalla

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with differentfiber orientations partially and/or totallyfilled with concrete. Hollow FRP and steel tubes were testedHybrid FRP/Concrete Structural Members Amir Fam1 and Sami Rizkalla 2 Department of Civil, highway overhead sign structures and bridges. The experimental program included testing to failure tubes

  3. SMART TEXTILE REINFORCED CONCRETE SENSORY STRUCTURES Yiska Goldfeld1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    SMART TEXTILE REINFORCED CONCRETE SENSORY STRUCTURES Yiska Goldfeld1 , Oded Rabinovitch1 , Till Quadflieg2 , Barak Fishbain1 , Thomas Gries2 1 Faculty of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Technion the feasibility of a new class of smart textile reinforced concrete (TRC) structural elements with inherent

  4. Pultruded FRP Plank as Formwork and Reinforcement for Concrete Members

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russell, Jeffrey S.

    and sand, were epoxy bonded to the planks. Concrete beams using the aggregate-coated FRP planks were plank specimens greater than the steel rebar reinforced control specimen. ACI 440 equations were found control in a new bridge deck that was constructed without any reinforcing bars in the concrete deck (also

  5. Integrated Materials and Construction Practices (IMCP) for Concrete Pavement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Integrated Materials and Construction Practices (IMCP) for Concrete Pavement Workshop Participant Handbook Prepared for Prepared by Federal Highway Administration National Concrete Pavement Technology Center Office of Pavement Technology at Iowa State University 400 7th Street AW 2711 South Loop Drive

  6. Electropositive bivalent metallic ion unsaturated polyester complexed polymer concrete

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sugama, Toshifumi (Mastic Beach, NY); Kukacka, Lawrence E. (Port Jefferson, NY); Horn, William H. (Brookhaven, NY)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Quick setting polymer concrete compositions with excellent structural properties are disclosed; these polymer concrete compositions are mixtures of unsaturated polyesters and crosslinking monomers together with appropriate initiators and promoters in association with aggregate, which may be wet, and with a source of bivalent metallic ions.

  7. Electropositive bivalent metallic ion unsaturated polyester complexed polymer concrete

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sugama, T.; Kukacka, L.E.; Horn, W.H.

    1981-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Quick setting polymer concrete compositions which are mixtures of unsaturated polyesters and crosslinking monomers together with appropriate initiators and promoters in association with aggregate which may be wet and a source of bivalent metallic ions which will set to polymer concrete with excellent structural properties.

  8. Corrosion Repair and Corrosion Protection of Reinforced Concrete Structures in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Das, Suman

    11/14/2014 1 Corrosion Repair and Corrosion Protection of Reinforced Concrete Structures in Pulp and Paper Mills Vector Construction / Vector Corrosion Technologies www.vectorgroup.com www.vector-corrosion.com Presentation Outline · Introduction · Corrosion of Reinforced Concrete Structures · Protection of Chests

  9. THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY OF HEMP CONCRETES: VARIATION WITH FORMULATION, DENSITY AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    envelope and on the performance of systems. This behaviour is related to hygric and thermal propertiesTHERMAL CONDUCTIVITY OF HEMP CONCRETES: VARIATION WITH FORMULATION, DENSITY AND WATER CONTENT of formulation, density and water content on the thermal conductivity of hemp concretes. The investigations

  10. ARE DEICING SALTS NECESSARY TO PROMOTE SCALING IN CONCRETE?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    . Keywords: Concrete, cryosuction, durability, frost, poromechanics, porous media, thermo- dynamics, spallingARE DEICING SALTS NECESSARY TO PROMOTE SCALING IN CONCRETE? A. Fabbri1,2 , O. Coussy1 , T. Fen of the different phases that form the porous material. It eventually predicts that a less perme- able sample

  11. The Thermal Conductivity of Low Density Concretes Containing Perlite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yarbrough, D. W.

    concretes made from Portland cement and perlite has been measured near room temperature using an unguarded linear heat flow apparatus. Perlite based concretes having densities from 44.3 1b/ft 3 to 66.6 1b/ft 3 were found to have thermal conductivities...

  12. Method for incorporating radioactive phosphoric acid solutions in concrete

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wolf, G.A.; Smith, J.W.; Ihle, N.C.

    1982-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for incorporating radioactive phosphoric acid solutions in concrete is described wherein the phosphoric acid is reacted with Ca(OH)/sub 2/ to form a precipitate of hydroxyapatite and the hydroxyapatite is mixed with Portland cement to form concrete.

  13. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Oportunities for the Concrete Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kermeli, Katerina

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Testing and Materials (ASTM) C94. Standard Specification for Ready Mixed Concrete.Concrete. West Conshohocken, Pennsylvania. American Society for Testing

  14. Interlingual Encounter in Pierre Garnier and Niikuni Seiichis French-Japanese Concrete Poetry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, Elaine S.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    P. (1968d). Spatialisme et posie concrte [Spatialismand concrete poetry]. Paris: Gallimard. Garnier, P. (Gomringer, E. (1968). Concrete poetry (I. M. Sinor & M. E.

  15. Construction and Preliminary HVS Tests of Pre-Cast Concrete Pavement Slabs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kohler, Erwin R.; du Plessis, Louw; Theyse, Hechter

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    22 Figure 22. FWD data collection points on the concreteelastic moduli for the concrete, the cemented base, and the30 Figure 29. Backcalculated stiffness of concrete

  16. alkali-activated slag concrete: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    on the compressive, flexural strength, and split tensile test of polymer modified steel fibre reinforced concrete (PSFC) concrete was examined. Including SBR latex at a certain %...

  17. aggregates by relationship to concrete: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Concrete under Reversed Cyclic Loading by Jun Wei Behaviour and Analysis of Steel Fibre-Reinforced Concrete Subjected to Reversed Cyclic Loading Jun Wei Luo for developing...

  18. Numerical analysis of masonry-infilled reinforced concrete frames subjected to seismic loads and experimental evaluation of retrofit techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koutromanos, Ioannis

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    infill Load ratio age at testing Concrete frame Infill paneltesting of masonry infilled reinforced concrete frame, ASCE

  19. Microscale investigation of the corrosion performances of low-carbon and stainless steels in highly alkaline concretes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Itty, Pierre-Adrien

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    can diffuse through the porous concrete and react with thein concrete, oxygen diffuses through the porous hydrated

  20. Addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 404: Roller Coaster Lagoons and Trench, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lynn Kidman

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document constitutes an addendum to the September 1998, Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 404: Roller Coaster Lagoons and Trench, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada as described in the document Recommendations and Justifications for Modifications for Use Restrictions Established under the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (UR Modification document) dated February 2008. The UR Modification document was approved by NDEP on February 26, 2008. The approval of the UR Modification document constituted approval of each of the recommended UR modifications. In conformance with the UR Modification document, this addendum consists of: This cover page that refers the reader to the UR Modification document for additional information The cover and signature pages of the UR Modification document The NDEP approval letter The corresponding section of the UR Modification document This addendum provides the documentation justifying the cancellation of the URs for: CAS TA-03-001-TARC Roller Coaster Lagoons CAS TA-21-001-TARC Roller Coaster N. Disposal Trench These URs were established as part of Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) corrective actions and were based on the presence of contaminants at concentrations greater than the action levels established at the time of the initial investigation (FFACO, 1996; as amended August 2006). Since these URs were established, practices and procedures relating to the implementation of risk-based corrective actions (RBCA) have changed. Therefore, these URs were re-evaluated against the current RBCA criteria as defined in the Industrial Sites Project Establishment of Final Action Levels (NNSA/NSO, 2006c). This re-evaluation consisted of comparing the original data (used to define the need for the URs) to risk-based final action levels (FALs) developed using the current Industrial Sites RBCA process. The re-evaluation resulted in a recommendation to modify these URs to administrative URs. Administrative URs differ from standard URs in that they do not require onsite postings (i.e., signs) or other physical barriers (e.g., fencing, monuments), and they do not require periodic inspections (see Section 6.2 of the Industrial Sites Project Establishment of Final Action Levels [NNSA/NSO, 2006c]). These Administrative URs were based on a Remote Work Sites future land use scenario that was used to calculate the FAL. The administrative UR will protect workers from an exposure exceeding that used in the calculation of the FAL (i.e., 336 hours per year). Any proposed activity within these use restricted areas that would potentially cause an exposure exceeding this exposure limit would require approval from the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP). Requirements for inspecting and maintaining these URs will be canceled, and the postings and signage at each site will be removed. Fencing and posting may be present at these sites that are unrelated to the FFACO URs such as for radiological control purposes as required by the NV/YMP Radiological Control Manual (NNSA/NSO, 2004f). This modification will not affect or modify any non-FFACO requirements for fencing, posting, or monitoring at these sites.

  1. Compact, electro-hydraulic, variable valve actuation system providing...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Compact, electro-hydraulic, variable valve actuation system providing variable lift, timing and duration to enable high efficiency engine combustion control Compact,...

  2. A compact tritium AMS system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chiarappa, M L; Dingley, K H; Hamm, R W; Love, A H; Roberts, M L

    1999-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Tritium ({sup 3}H) is a radioisotope that is extensively utilized in biological and environmental research. For biological research, {sup 3}H is generally quantified by liquid scintillation counting requiring gram-sized samples and counting times of several hours. For environmental research, {sup 3}H is usually quantified by {sup 3}He in-growth which requires gram-sized samples and in-growth times of several months. In contrast, provisional studies at LLNL's Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry have demonstrated that Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) can be used to quantify {sup 3}H in milligram-sized biological samples with a 100 to 1000-fold improvement in detection limits when compared to scintillation counting. This increased sensitivity is expected to have great impact in the biological and environmental research community. However in order to make the {sup 3}H AMS technique more broadly accessible, smaller, simpler, and less expensive AMS instrumentation must be developed. To meet this need, a compact, relatively low cost prototype {sup 3}H AMS system has been designed and built based on a LLNL ion source/sample changer and an AccSys Technology, Inc. Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) linac. With the prototype system, {sup 3}/{sup 1}H ratios ranging from 1 x 10{sup -10} to 1 x 10{sup -13} have to be measured from milligram sized samples. With improvements in system operation and sample preparation methodology, the sensitivity limit of the system is expected to increase to approximately 1 x 10{sup -15}.

  3. Testing and evaluation of electrokinetic decontamination of concrete

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DePaoli, D.W.; Harris, M.T.; Ally, M.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Chemical Technology Div.] [and others

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goals and objectives of the technical task plan (TTP) are to (1) describe the nature and extent of concrete contamination within the Department of Energy (DOE) complex and emerging and commercial technologies applicable to these problems; (2) to match technologies to the concrete problems and recommend up to four demonstrations; (3) to initiate recommended demonstrations; and (4) to continue investigation and evaluation of the application of electrokinetic decontamination processes to concrete. This document presents findings of experimental and theoretical studies of the electrokinetic decontamination (EK) process and their implications for field demonstrations. This effort is an extension of the work performed under TTP 142005, ``Electroosmotic Concrete Decontamination. The goals of this task were to determine the applicability of EK for treating contaminated concrete and, if warranted, to evaluate EK as a potential technology for demonstration. 62 refs.

  4. SLAM: a sodium-limestone concrete ablation model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suo-Anttila, A.J.

    1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SLAM is a three-region model, containing a pool (sodium and reaction debris) region, a dry (boundary layer and dehydrated concrete) region, and a wet (hydrated concrete) region. The model includes a solution to the mass, momentum, and energy equations in each region. A chemical kinetics model is included to provide heat sources due to chemical reactions between the sodium and the concrete. Both isolated model as well as integrated whole code evaluations have been made with good results. The chemical kinetics and water migration models were evaluated separately, with good results. Several small and large-scale sodium limestone concrete experiments were simulated with reasonable agreement between SLAM and the experimental results. The SLAM code was applied to investigate the effects of mixing, pool temperature, pool depth and fluidization. All these phenomena were found to be of significance in the predicted response of the sodium concrete interaction. Pool fluidization is predicted to be the most important variable in large scale interactions.

  5. Post-Closure Inspection Report for Corrective Action Unit 407: Roller Coaster RadSafe Area Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, Calendar Year 2001

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. B. Campbell

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Post-closure monitoring requirements for the Roller Coaster RadSafe Area (Corrective Action Unit [CAU] 407) (Figure 1) are described in Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 407, Roller Coaster RadSafe Area, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, report number DOEN-694, October 2001. The Closure Report (CR) was submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) on April 24,2001. No issues with the post-closure monitoring plan, Section 5 .O, were raised. However, other concerns raised by stakeholders required that the CR be revised. Revision 1 of CR was issued in December of 2001 and was approved by NDEP on January 7,2002. Section 5.2 of the NDEP-approved CR calls for site inspections to be conducted within the first six months following completion of cover construction. Following the first six months, site inspection are to be conducted twice yearly for the next two years. This report provides the results of the six month post-construction site inspection. As stated in Section 5.2 of the CR, Post-closure site inspections at CAU 407 consists of the following: (1) Visual site inspections done twice a year to evaluate the condition of the cover and plant development. (2) Verification that the site is secure and condition of the fence and posted warning signs. (3) Notice of any subsidence, erosion, unauthorized excavation, etc., deficiencies that may compromise the integrity of the unit. (4) Remedy of any deficiencies within 90 days of discovery. (5) Preparation and submittal of an annual report. To meet the fiscal year 2002 post-closure inspection schedule, the first post-closure site inspection was conducted on November 6,2001. The site inspection was conducted after completion of the revegetation activities (October 24,2000) and submittal of revision 0 of the CR (October 31,2001). All site inspections were conducted in accordance with the Post-Closure Inspection requirements stated in revision 0 of the CR. This report includes copies of inspection checklist, photographs, recommendations, and conclusions. The Post-Closure Inspection Checklist is found in Attachment A, a copy of the field notes is found in Attachment By and copies of the inspection photographs are found in Attachment C.

  6. Review of Concrete Biodeterioration in Relation to Buried Nuclear Waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turick, C; Berry, C.

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Long-term storage of low level radioactive material in below ground concrete disposal units (DUs) (Saltstone Disposal Facility) is a means of depositing wastes generated from nuclear operations of the U.S. Department of Energy. Based on the currently modeled degradation mechanisms, possible microbial induced effects on the structural integrity of buried low level wastes must be addressed. Previous international efforts related to microbial impacts on concrete structures that house low level radioactive waste showed that microbial activity can play a significant role in the process of concrete degradation and ultimately structural deterioration. This literature review examines the recent research in this field and is focused on specific parameters that are applicable to modeling and prediction of the fate of concrete vaults housing stored wastes and the wastes themselves. Rates of concrete biodegradation vary with the environmental conditions, illustrating a need to understand the bioavailability of key compounds involved in microbial activity. Specific parameters require pH and osmotic pressure to be within a certain range to allow for microbial growth as well as the availability and abundance of energy sources like components involved in sulfur, iron and nitrogen oxidation. Carbon flow and availability are also factors to consider in predicting concrete biodegradation. The results of this review suggest that microbial activity in Saltstone, (grouted low level radioactive waste) is unlikely due to very high pH and osmotic pressure. Biodegradation of the concrete vaults housing the radioactive waste however, is a possibility. The rate and degree of concrete biodegradation is dependent on numerous physical, chemical and biological parameters. Results from this review point to parameters to focus on for modeling activities and also, possible options for mitigation that would minimize concrete biodegradation. In addition, key chemical components that drive microbial activity on concrete surfaces are discussed.

  7. INTRODUCTION Portland cement concrete (PCC) is the world's most versatile and utilized construction material. Modern concrete consists of six

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harms, Kyle E.

    INTRODUCTION Portland cement concrete (PCC) is the world's most versatile and utilized construction material. Modern concrete consists of six main ingredients: coarse aggregate, sand, portland cement sustainability has risen, engineers have looked to alternative binders such as fly ash, silica fume, slag cement

  8. A CMOS-compatible compact display

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Andrew R. (Andrew Raymond)

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Portable information devices demand displays with high resolution and high image quality that are increasingly compact and energy-efficient. Microdisplays consisting of a silicon CMOS backplane integrated with light ...

  9. Steady state compact toroidal plasma production

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Turner, William C. (Livermore, CA)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus and method for maintaining steady state compact toroidal plasmas. A compact toroidal plasma is formed by a magnetized coaxial plasma gun and held in close proximity to the gun electrodes by applied magnetic fields or magnetic fields produced by image currents in conducting walls. Voltage supply means maintains a constant potential across the electrodes producing an increasing magnetic helicity which drives the plasma away from a minimum energy state. The plasma globally relaxes to a new minimum energy state, conserving helicity according to Taylor's relaxation hypothesis, and injecting net helicity into the core of the compact toroidal plasma. Controlling the voltage so as to inject net helicity at a predetermined rate based on dissipative processes maintains or increases the compact toroidal plasma in a time averaged steady state mode.

  10. Gravitational waves from merging compact binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hughes, Scott A.

    Largely motivated by the development of highly sensitive gravitational-wave detectors, our understanding of merging compact binaries and the gravitational waves they generate has improved dramatically in recent years. ...

  11. Southern States Energy Compact (Multiple States)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Southern States Energy Compact provides for the proper employment and conservation of energy, and for the employment of energy-related facilities, materials, and products, within the context of...

  12. Belle Fourche River Compact (South Dakota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Belle Fourche River Compact, agreed to by South Dakota and Wyoming, seeks to provide for the most efficient use of the waters of the Belle Fourche River Basin for multiple purposes, and to...

  13. Compact reflective imaging spectrometer utilizing immersed gratings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chrisp, Michael P. (Danville, CA)

    2006-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A compact imaging spectrometer comprising an entrance slit for directing light, a first mirror that receives said light and reflects said light, an immersive diffraction grating that diffracts said light, a second mirror that focuses said light, and a detector array that receives said focused light. The compact imaging spectrometer can be utilized for remote sensing imaging spectrometers where size and weight are of primary importance.

  14. Compact binary mergers: an astrophysical perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Rosswog

    2010-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reviews the current understanding of double neutron star and neutron star black hole binaries. It addresses mainly (nuclear) astrophysics aspects of compact binary mergers and thus complements recent reviews that have emphasized the numerical relativity viewpoint. In particular, the paper discusses different channels to release neutron-rich matter into the host galaxy, connections between compact binary mergers and short Gamma-ray bursts and accompanying electromagnetic signals.

  15. Technology Selections for Cylindrical Compact Fabrication

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeffrey A. Phillips

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A variety of process approaches are available and have been used historically for manufacture of cylindrical fuel compacts. The jet milling, fluid bed overcoating, and hot press compacting approach being adopted in the U.S. AGR Fuel Development Program for scale-up of the compacting process involves significant paradigm shifts from historical approaches. New methods are being pursued because of distinct advantages in simplicity, yield, and elimination of process mixed waste. Recent advances in jet milling technology allow simplified dry matrix powder preparation. The matrix preparation method is well matched with patented fluid bed powder overcoating technology recently developed for the pharmaceutical industry and directly usable for high density fuel particle matrix overcoating. High density overcoating places fuel particles as close as possible to their final position in the compact and is matched with hot press compacting which fully fluidizes matrix resin to achieve die fill at low compacting pressures and without matrix end caps. Overall the revised methodology provides a simpler process that should provide very high yields, improve homogeneity, further reduce defect fractions, eliminate intermediate grading and QC steps, and allow further increases in fuel packing fractions.

  16. Sulfate and acid resistant concrete and mortar

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liskowitz, John W. (Belle Mead, NJ); Wecharatana, Methi (Parsippany, NJ); Jaturapitakkul, Chai (Bangkok, TH); Cerkanowicz, deceased, Anthony E. (late of Livingston, NJ)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction and other applications, which hardenable mixtures demonstrate significant levels of acid and sulfate resistance while maintaining acceptable compressive strength properties. The acid and sulfate hardenable mixtures of the invention containing fly ash comprise cementitious materials and a fine aggregate. The cementitous materials may comprise fly ash as well as cement. The fine aggregate may comprise fly ash as well as sand. The total amount of fly ash in the hardenable mixture ranges from about 60% to about 120% of the total amount of cement, by weight, whether the fly ash is included as a cementious material, fine aggregate, or an additive, or any combination of the foregoing. In specific examples, mortar containing 50% fly ash and 50% cement in cementitious materials demonstrated superior properties of corrosion resistance.

  17. Sulfate and acid resistant concrete and mortar

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liskowitz, J.W.; Wecharatana, M.; Jaturapitakkul, C.; Cerkanowicz, A.E.

    1998-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction and other applications, which hardenable mixtures demonstrate significant levels of acid and sulfate resistance while maintaining acceptable compressive strength properties. The acid and sulfate hardenable mixtures of the invention containing fly ash comprise cementitious materials and a fine aggregate. The cementitous materials may comprise fly ash as well as cement. The fine aggregate may comprise fly ash as well as sand. The total amount of fly ash in the hardenable mixture ranges from about 60% to about 120% of the total amount of cement, by weight, whether the fly ash is included as a cementious material, fine aggregate, or an additive, or any combination of the foregoing. In specific examples, mortar containing 50% fly ash and 50% cement in cementitious materials demonstrated superior properties of corrosion resistance. 6 figs.

  18. Demonstration recommendations for accelerated testing of concrete decontamination methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dickerson, K.S.; Ally, M.R.; Brown, C.H.; Morris, M.I.; Wilson-Nichols, M.J.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A large number of aging US Department of Energy (DOE) surplus facilities located throughout the US require deactivation, decontamination, and decommissioning. Although several technologies are available commercially for concrete decontamination, emerging technologies with potential to reduce secondary waste and minimize the impact and risk to workers and the environment are needed. In response to these needs, the Accelerated Testing of Concrete Decontamination Methods project team described the nature and extent of contaminated concrete within the DOE complex and identified applicable emerging technologies. Existing information used to describe the nature and extent of contaminated concrete indicates that the most frequently occurring radiological contaminants are {sup 137}Cs, {sup 238}U (and its daughters), {sup 60}Co, {sup 90}Sr, and tritium. The total area of radionuclide-contaminated concrete within the DOE complex is estimated to be in the range of 7.9 {times} 10{sup 8} ft{sup 2}or approximately 18,000 acres. Concrete decontamination problems were matched with emerging technologies to recommend demonstrations considered to provide the most benefit to decontamination of concrete within the DOE complex. Emerging technologies with the most potential benefit were biological decontamination, electro-hydraulic scabbling, electrokinetics, and microwave scabbling.

  19. Effect of Concrete Wasteform Properties on Radionuclide Migration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wellman, Dawn M.; Bovaird, Chase C.; Mattigod, Shas V.; Parker, Kent E.; Ermi, Ruby M.; Wood, Marcus I.

    2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this investigation was to initiate numerous sets of concrete-soil half-cell tests to quantify 1) diffusion of I and Tc from concrete into uncontaminated soil after 1 and 2 years, 2) I and Re (set 1) and Tc (set 2) diffusion from fractured concrete into uncontaminated soil, and 3) evaluate the moisture distribution profile within the sediment half-cell. These half-cells will be section in FY2009 and FY2010. Additionally, 1) concrete-soil half-cells initiated during FY2007 using fractured prepared with and without metallic iron, half of which were carbonated using carbonated, were sectioned to evaluate the diffusion of I and Re in the concrete part of the half-cell under unsaturated conditions (4%, 7%, and 15% by wt moisture content), 2) concrete-soil half cells containing Tc were sectioned to measure the diffusion profile in the soil half-cell unsaturated conditions (4%, 7%, and 15% by wt moisture content), and 3) solubility measurements of uranium solid phases were completed under concrete porewater conditions. The results of these tests are presented.

  20. Soil Quality Information Sheet Rangeland Soil Quality--Compaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soil Quality Information Sheet Rangeland Soil Quality--Compaction USDA, Natural Resources Conservation Service May 2001 Rangeland Sheet 4 What is compaction? Soil compaction occurs when moist or wet soil aggregates are pressed together and the pore space between them is reduced. Compaction changes

  1. Compact Proof Certificates For Linear Logic Kaustuv Chaudhuri

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhuri, Kaustuv

    Compact Proof Certificates For Linear Logic Kaustuv Chaudhuri INRIA, France http://kaustuv.chaudhuri

  2. Carbonation and CO{sub 2} uptake of concrete

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Keun-Hyeok, E-mail: yangkh@kgu.ac.kr [Department of Plant Architectural Engineering, Kyonggi University, San 94-6, Iui-dong, Yeongtong-gu, Suwon, Kyonggi-do 443-760 (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Eun-A, E-mail: ssooaa@naver.com [Department of Architectural Engineering, Kyonggi University Graduate School, Seoul 120-702 (Korea, Republic of); Tae, Sung-Ho, E-mail: jnb55@hanyang.ac.kr [School of Architecture and Architectural Engineering, Hanyang University, 55 Hangyangdaehak-ro, Sangnok-gu, Ansan, Kyeonggi-do 426-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study developed a reliable procedure to assess the carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) uptake of concrete by carbonation during the service life of a structure and by the recycling of concrete after demolition. To generalize the amount of absorbable CO{sub 2} per unit volume of concrete, the molar concentration of carbonatable constituents in hardened cement paste was simplified as a function of the unit content of cement, and the degree of hydration of the cement paste was formulated as a function of the water-to-cement ratio. The contribution of the relative humidity, type of finishing material for the concrete surface, and the substitution level of supplementary cementitious materials to the CO{sub 2} diffusion coefficient in concrete was reflected using various correction factors. The following parameters varying with the recycling scenario were also considered: the carbonatable surface area of concrete crusher-runs and underground phenomena of the decreased CO{sub 2} diffusion coefficient and increased CO{sub 2} concentration. Based on the developed procedure, a case study was conducted for an apartment building with a principal wall system and an office building with a Rahmen system, with the aim of examining the CO{sub 2} uptake of each structural element under different exposure environments during the service life and recycling of the building. As input data necessary for the case study, data collected from actual surveys conducted in 2012 in South Korea were used, which included data on the surrounding environments, lifecycle inventory database, life expectancy of structures, and recycling activity scenario. Ultimately, the CO{sub 2} uptake of concrete during a 100-year lifecycle (life expectancy of 40 years and recycling span of 60 years) was estimated to be 15.5%17% of the CO{sub 2} emissions from concrete production, which roughly corresponds to 18%21% of the CO{sub 2} emissions from the production of ordinary Portland cement. - Highlights: CO{sub 2} uptake assessment approach owing to the concrete carbonation is developed. An equation to directly determine the absorbable CO{sub 2} amount in concrete is proposed. The carbonatable surface area of concrete crusher-runs for CO{sub 2} uptake is ascertained. This study provides typical data for uptake and emission of CO{sub 2} in concrete building.

  3. Analytical and numerical methods for processing Hopkinson Bar Loaded Bending test on concrete: a comparative study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Analytical and numerical methods for processing Hopkinson Bar Loaded Bending test on concrete on dynamic characteristics of concrete. Various techniques have been used to test concretes at high strain for concrete structures subjected to dynamic loading such as explosions or im- pacts require information

  4. Effect of Fiber Orientation and Ply Mix on Fiber Reinforced Polymer-Confined Concrete

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Entekhabi, Dara

    concrete by testing under uniaxial compression a designed array of plain concrete cylinders wrappedEffect of Fiber Orientation and Ply Mix on Fiber Reinforced Polymer-Confined Concrete Ching Au, A concrete lateral strain while the kink stress was found to upshift with increasing jacket stiffness

  5. 4 CONCRETE REPAIR BULLETIN MAY/JUNE2001 Laser Profilometry for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maerz, Norbert H.

    4 CONCRETE REPAIR BULLETIN MAY/JUNE2001 Laser Profilometry for Concrete Substrate Characterization and resins are non- corrosive, they are ideally suited for the repair and retrofitting of concrete bridges highly upon the quality of the bond between the concrete and the laminate. Experience has shown that when

  6. DESIGN GUIDELINES FOR CONCRETE BEAMS REINFORCED WITH MMFX MICROCOMPOSITE REINFORCING BARS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DESIGN GUIDELINES FOR CONCRETE BEAMS REINFORCED WITH MMFX MICROCOMPOSITE REINFORCING BARS M. Dawood: Corrosion of steel reinforcement in concrete structures and bridges is a major problem facing for concrete beams and slabs. The behavior of concrete beams reinforced with MMFX reinforcing bars is evaluated

  7. Properties of concrete paving blocks made with waste marble Osman Gencela,f,*, Cengiz Ozelb

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    North Texas, University of

    Properties of concrete paving blocks made with waste marble Osman Gencela,f,*, Cengiz Ozelb , Fuat: Concrete paving blocks Recycled aggregate Marble waste Concrete wear a b s t r a c t Marble industry. Waste marble is well usable instead of the usual aggregate in the concrete paving block production. ?

  8. Life-Cycle Evaluation of Concrete Building Construction as a Strategy for Sustainable Cities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadel, Alexander

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    manufacturing and transportation of slag Portland cement concrete. Volatile matter (mostly from additives

  9. Concrete international /january 2010 35 Portland limestone cement (PLC) is produced by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Concrete international /january 2010 35 Portland limestone cement (PLC) is produced by blending demonstration of PLC concrete in the late-fall construction of a parking lot at a ready mixed concrete plant near Gatineau, QC, Canada. The performance of the plastic and hardened concretes produced with PLC

  10. Predicting the Permeability of Pervious Concretes from Planar Images M.S. Sumanasooriya1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bentz, Dale P.

    -dimensional material structures. Introduction Pervious concrete (also called Enhanced Porosity Concrete, or porous1 Predicting the Permeability of Pervious Concretes from Planar Images M.S. Sumanasooriya1 , D-dimensional material structures of pervious concretes using two-dimensional digital images obtained from actual

  11. Strategy Guideline: Compact Air Distribution Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burdick, A.

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Strategy Guideline discusses the benefits and challenges of using a compact air distribution system to handle the reduced loads and reduced air volume needed to condition the space within an energy efficient home. Traditional systems sized by 'rule of thumb' (i.e., 1 ton of cooling per 400 ft2 of floor space) that 'wash' the exterior walls with conditioned air from floor registers cannot provide appropriate air mixing and moisture removal in low-load homes. A compact air distribution system locates the HVAC equipment centrally with shorter ducts run to interior walls, and ceiling supply outlets throw the air toward the exterior walls along the ceiling plane; alternatively, high sidewall supply outlets throw the air toward the exterior walls. Potential drawbacks include resistance from installing contractors or code officials who are unfamiliar with compact air distribution systems, as well as a lack of availability of low-cost high sidewall or ceiling supply outlets to meet the low air volumes with good throw characteristics. The decision criteria for a compact air distribution system must be determined early in the whole-house design process, considering both supply and return air design. However, careful installation of a compact air distribution system can result in lower material costs from smaller equipment, shorter duct runs, and fewer outlets; increased installation efficiencies, including ease of fitting the system into conditioned space; lower loads on a better balanced HVAC system, and overall improved energy efficiency of the home.

  12. Seismic rehabilitation of a reinforced concrete flat-slab structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jimenez, Laila Margarita

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effectiveness of seismic rehabilitation techniques used to eliminate punching shear failures was assessed for flat-slab structural systems. This type of retrofit was evaluated for a four-story reinforced concrete (RC) ...

  13. Compressive strength of concrete and mortar containing fly ash

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liskowitz, John W. (Belle Mead, NJ); Wecharatana, Methi (Parsippany, NJ); Jaturapitakkul, Chai (Bangkok, TH); Cerkanowicz, deceased, Anthony E. (late of Livingston, NJ)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction. The invention includes a method for predicting the compressive strength of such a hardenable mixture, which is very important for planning a project. The invention also relates to hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash which can achieve greater compressive strength than hardenable mixtures containing only concrete over the time period relevant for construction. In a specific embodiment, a formula is provided that accurately predicts compressive strength of concrete containing fly ash out to 180 days. In other specific examples, concrete and mortar containing about 15% to 25% fly ash as a replacement for cement, which are capable of meeting design specifications required for building and highway construction, are provided. Such materials can thus significantly reduce construction costs.

  14. Compressive strength of concrete and mortar containing fly ash

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liskowitz, J.W.; Wecharatana, M.; Jaturapitakkul, C.; Cerkanowicz, A.E.

    1997-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction. The invention includes a method for predicting the compressive strength of such a hardenable mixture, which is very important for planning a project. The invention also relates to hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash which can achieve greater compressive strength than hardenable mixtures containing only concrete over the time period relevant for construction. In a specific embodiment, a formula is provided that accurately predicts compressive strength of concrete containing fly ash out to 180 days. In other specific examples, concrete and mortar containing about 15% to 25% fly ash as a replacement for cement, which are capable of meeting design specifications required for building and highway construction, are provided. Such materials can thus significantly reduce construction costs. 33 figs.

  15. Compressive strength of concrete and mortar containing fly ash

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liskowitz, John W. (Belle Mead, NJ); Wecharatana, Methi (Parsippany, NJ); Jaturapitakkul, Chai (Bangkok, TH); Cerkanowicz, deceased, Anthony E. (late of Livingston, NJ)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction. The invention includes a method for predicting the compressive strength of such a hardenable mixture, which is very important for planning a project. The invention also relates to hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash which can achieve greater compressive strength than hardenable mixtures containing only concrete over the time period relevant for construction. In a specific embodiment, a formula is provided that accurately predicts compressive strength of concrete containing fly ash out to 180 days. In other specific examples, concrete and mortar containing about 15% to 25% fly ash as a replacement for cement, which are capable of meeting design specification required for building and highway construction, are provided. Such materials can thus significantly reduce construction costs.

  16. Compressive strength of concrete and mortar containing fly ash

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liskowitz, J.W.; Wecharatana, M.; Jaturapitakkul, C.; Cerkanowicz, A.E.

    1998-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction. The invention includes a method for predicting the compressive strength of such a hardenable mixture, which is very important for planning a project. The invention also relates to hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash which can achieve greater compressive strength than hardenable mixtures containing only concrete over the time period relevant for construction. In a specific embodiment, a formula is provided that accurately predicts compressive strength of concrete containing fly ash out to 180 days. In other specific examples, concrete and mortar containing about 15% to 25% fly ash as a replacement for cement, which are capable of meeting design specification required for building and highway construction, are provided. Such materials can thus significantly reduce construction costs. 33 figs.

  17. Viscoelastic{Viscoplastic Damage Model for Asphalt Concrete

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graham, Michael A.

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents a continuum model for asphalt concrete incorporating non- linear viscoelasticity, viscoplasticity, mechanically-induced damage and moisture- induced damage. The Schapery single-integral viscoelastic model describes the nonlinear...

  18. Design of wind turbines with Ultra-High Performance Concrete

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jammes, Franois-Xavier

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ultra-High Performance Concrete (UHPC) has proven an asset for bridge design as it significantly reduces costs. However, UHPC has not been applied yet to wind turbine technology. Design codes do not propose any recommendations ...

  19. Roman Seawater Concrete Holds the Secret to Cutting Carbon Emissions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Roman concrete from harbor installations that have survived 2,000 years of chemical attack and wave action, "one of the most durable construction materials on the planet," says...

  20. The Influence of Travelling Fires on a Concrete Frame

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Law, Angus; Stern-Gottfried, Jamie; Gillie, Martin; Rein, Guillermo

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Current structural fire design methods do not account for these types of fires. This paper applies a novel methodology for defining a family of possible heating regimes to a framed concrete structure using the concept of travelling fires. A finite...

  1. Concrete Industry Benefits from Ancient Romans and the ALS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    saw for the first time how an extraordinarily stable compound called calcium-aluminum-silicate-hydrate (C-A-S-H) plays an integral role in the structure of Roman seawater concrete,...

  2. Concrete Masonry Wall Retrofit Systems for Blast Protection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Carol Faye

    2013-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    unit (CMU) infill walls, commonly used in reinforced concrete or steel framed structures, are particularly vulnerable to blast loads. Facilities that incorporate CMU walls must either be hardened or retrofitted for explosive events. Conventional...

  3. Natural fiber reinforced aerated concrete : an experimental investigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garbis, Leonidia Maria

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study is to compare existing research with aerated concrete and fiber reinforcement to original experiments completed investigating the benefits of adding natural fiber tensile reinforcement to aerated ...

  4. asphalt concrete performance: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Robert L. 2014-01-01 23 Establishing material properties for thin asphalt concrete surfaces on granular bases Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary: of MASTER OF SCIENCE...

  5. Life cycle assessment of concrete pavements : impacts and opportunities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loijos, Alex (Alexander Nikos)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The concrete pavement network in the United States plays a crucial role in the economy by enabling the transport of people and goods, but it also leads to resource consumption and environmental impacts. This thesis is ...

  6. Development of polymer concrete vaults for natural gas regulator stations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fontana, J.J.; Miller, C.A.; Reams, W.; Elling, D.

    1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vaults for natural gas regulator stations have traditionally been fabricated with steel-reinforced portland cement concrete. Since these vaults are installed below ground level, they are usually coated with a water-proofing material to prevent the ingress of moisture into the vault. In some cases, penetrations for piping that are normally cast into the vault do not line up with the gas lines in the streets. This necessitates off-setting the lines to line up with the penetrations in the vault or breaking out new penetrations which could weaken the structure and/or allow water ingress. By casting the vaults using a new material of construction such as polymer concrete, a longer maintenance free service life is possible because the physical and durability properties of polymer concrete composites are much superior to those of portland cement concrete. The higher strengths of polymer concrete allow the design engineer to reduce the wall, floor, and ceiling thicknesses making the vaults lighter for easier transportation and installation. Penetrations can be cut after casting to match existing street lines, thus making the vault more universal and reducing the number of vaults that are normally in stock. The authors developed a steel-fiber reinforced polymer concrete composite that could be used for regulator vaults. Based on the physical properties of his new composite, vaults were designed to replace the BUG PV-008 and Con Ed GR-6 regulator vaults made of reinforced portland cement concrete. Quarter-scale models of the polymer concrete vaults were tested and the results reaffirmed the reduced wall thickness design. Two sets of vaults, cast by Hardinge Bros., were inspected by representatives of the utilities and BNL (Brookhaven National Laboratory), and were accepted for delivery. 6 refs., 5 figs., 12 tabs.

  7. Systems building of short span precast concrete bridges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steele, Marvin

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SYSTEMS BUILDING OF SHORT SPAN PRECAST CONCRETE BRIDGES A Thesis by MARVIN STEELE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AIIM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1975 Major... Subject: Civil Engineering SYSTEMS BUILDING OF SHORT SPAN PRECAST CONCRETE BRIDGES A Thesis by MARVIN STEELE Aoproved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) (Head of Department ( mber) fi (Member) May 1975 ABSTRACT Systems Building...

  8. Hydrogen production during fragmented debris/concrete interactions. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tarbell, W.W.; Blose, R.E.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the unlikely event that molten core debris escapes the reactor pressure vessel, the interactions of the debris with concrete and structural materials become the driving forces for severe accident phenomena. The Ex-vessel Core Debris Interactions Program at Sandia Laboratories is a research effort to characterize the nature of these interactions and the magnitude of safety-related phenomena such as hydrogen generation, aerosol production, and fission product release that arise because of the melt/concrete interactions.

  9. Nonlinear behavior of reinforced concrete structures subjected to ground motion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abraham, Moises Alberto

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NONLINEAR BEHAVIOR OF REINFORCED CONCRETE STRUCTURES SUBJECTED TO GROUND MOTION A Thesis by MOISES ALBERTO ABRAHAM Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A 5 M U ni vers i ty in partial fulfillment of the requirement I...' or the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1991 Major Subject: Civil Engineering NONLINEAR BEHAVIOR OF REINFORCED CONCRETE STRUCTURES SUBJECTED TO GROUND MOTION A Thesis by MOISES ALBERTO ABRAHAM Approved as to style and content by: James . organ (Chair...

  10. Water permeability and microstructure of three old concretes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hearn, N.; Detwiler, R.J.; Sframeli, C. (Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Civil Engineering)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurement of the permeability of concrete to water is complicated by the self-sealing phenomenon, the progressive reduction of flow during the test. Many researchers have attributed self sealing to the hydration of previously unreacted cement on exposure to water. This paper describes permeability tests on concretes continuously hydrated for 26 years. Backscattered electron images show that virtually no unhydrated cement remains in these specimens, yet they exhibit self-sealing behavior.

  11. Investigation for determining the curing characteristics of lightweight aggregate concrete

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlton, Thomas Arlis

    1955-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    desired gradatiani This burning produces an inert ~ highly porous material that will no longer soften in water gntil after World Mar II ~ the principal use of lightweight aggre- gates was in the manufacture of lightweight aoncrete building bloaks... or not the method of curing is of equal, lesser, or greater inportance for concrete made with lightweight aggregates ~ The prime need for curing concrete is to prevent the loss of water neoessary ta complete the hydratfen process in the os?cent The general...

  12. Study on concrete cask storage of spent fuel in Japan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Itoh, C. [Central Research Inst. of Electric Power Industry, Abiko, Chiba (Japan). Nuclear Fuel Cycle Dept.; Onodera, A.; Yamada, N. [Hitachi Zosen Corp., Tokyo (Japan). Nuclear Div.

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The present report describes the status of the first year`s work of a five-year-long study on concrete cask storage of spent fuel in Japan. Firstly, the proposed study program is elaborated to clarify the position of the present work. Then, the results of the study which have been obtained so far are described and the technical issues are addressed to make the concrete cask storage viable in Japan.

  13. Cylindrically Symmetric Models of Anisotropic Compact Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Abbas; Sumara Nazeer; M. A. Meraj

    2014-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we have discussed the possibility of forming anisotropic compact stars from cosmological constant as one of the competent candidates of dark energy with cylindrical symmetry. For this purpose, we have applied the analytical solution of Krori and Barua metric to a particular cylindrically symmetric spacetime. The unknown constants in Krori and Barua metric have been determined by using masses and radii of class of compact stars like 4$U$1820-30, Her X-1, SAX J 1808-3658. The properties of these stars have been analyzed in detail. In this setting the cosmological constant has been taken as a variable which depends on the radial coordinates. We have checked all the regularity conditions, stability and surface redshift of the compact stars 4$U$1820-30, Her X-1, SAX J 1808-3658.

  14. Laboratory-scale sodium-carbonate aggregate concrete interactions. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Westrich, H.R.; Stockman, H.W.; Suo-Anttila, A.

    1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of laboratory-scale experiments was made at 600/sup 0/C to identify the important heat-producing chemical reactions between sodium and carbonate aggregate concretes. Reactions between sodium and carbonate aggregate were found to be responsible for the bulk of heat production in sodium-concrete tests. Exothermic reactions were initiated at 580+-30/sup 0/C for limestone and dolostone aggregates as well as for hydrated limestone concrete, and at 540+-10/sup 0/C for dehydrated limestone concrete, but were ill-defined for dolostone concrete. Major reaction products included CaO, MgO, Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/, Na/sub 2/O, NaOH, and elemental carbon. Sodium hydroxide, which forms when water is released from cement phases, causes slow erosion of the concrete with little heat production. The time-temperature profiles of these experiments have been modeled with a simplified version of the SLAM computer code, which has allowed derivation of chemical reaction rate coefficients.

  15. Addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 404: Roller Coaster Sewage Lagoons and North Disposal Trench, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lynn Kidman

    2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document constitutes an addendum to the September 1998, Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 404: Roller Coaster Lagoons and Trench, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada as described in the document Recommendations and Justifications for Modifications for Use Restrictions Established under the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (UR Modification document) dated February 2008. The UR Modification document was approved by NDEP on February 26, 2008. The approval of the UR Modification document constituted approval of each of the recommended UR modifications. In conformance with the UR Modification document, this addendum consists of: This cover page that refers the reader to the UR Modification document for additional information The cover and signature pages of the UR Modification document The NDEP approval letter The corresponding section of the UR Modification document This addendum provides the documentation justifying the modification of the UR for CAS TA-03-001-TARC Roller Coaster Lagoons. This UR was established as part of Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) corrective actions and was based on the presence of contaminants at concentrations greater than the action levels established at the time of the initial investigation (FFACO, 1996; as amended August 2006). Since this UR was established, practices and procedures relating to the implementation of risk-based corrective actions (RBCA) have changed. Therefore, this UR was re-evaluated against the current RBCA criteria as defined in the Industrial Sites Project Establishment of Final Action Levels (NNSA/NSO, 2006c). This reevaluation consisted of comparing the original data (used to define the need for the UR) to risk-based final action levels (FALs) developed using the current Industrial Sites RBCA process. The re-evaluation resulted in a recommendation to modify the UR for CAS TA-03-001-TARC to an administrative UR. Administrative URs differ from standard URs in that they do not require onsite postings (i.e., signs) or other physical barriers (e.g., fencing, monuments), and they do not require periodic inspections (see Section 6.2 of the Industrial Sites Project Establishment of Final Action Levels [NNSA/NSO, 2006c]). This Administrative UR was based on a Remote Work Sites future land use scenario that was used to calculate the FAL. The administrative UR will protect workers from an exposure exceeding that used in the calculation of the FAL (i.e., 336 hours per year). Any proposed activity within these use restricted areas that would potentially cause an exposure exceeding this exposure limit would require approval from the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP). Requirements for inspecting and maintaining this UR will be canceled, and the postings and signage at each site will be removed. Fencing and posting may be present at these sites that are unrelated to the FFACO URs such as for radiological control purposes as required by the NV/YMP Radiological Control Manual (NNSA/NSO, 2004f). This modification will not affect or modify any non-FFACO requirements for fencing, posting, or monitoring at these sites.

  16. Remote vacuum compaction of compressible hazardous waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coyne, M.J.; Fiscus, G.M.; Sammel, A.G.

    1998-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A system is described for remote vacuum compaction and containment of low-level radioactive or hazardous waste comprising a vacuum source, a sealable first flexible container, and a sealable outer flexible container for receiving one or more first flexible containers. A method for compacting low level radioactive or hazardous waste materials at the point of generation comprising the steps of sealing the waste in a first flexible container, sealing one or more first containers within an outer flexible container, breaching the integrity of the first containers, evacuating the air from the inner and outer containers, and sealing the outer container shut. 8 figs.

  17. Remote vacuum compaction of compressible hazardous waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coyne, Martin J. (Pittsburgh, PA); Fiscus, Gregory M. (McMurray, PA); Sammel, Alfred G. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for remote vacuum compaction and containment of low-level radioactive or hazardous waste comprising a vacuum source, a sealable first flexible container, and a sealable outer flexible container for receiving one or more first flexible containers. A method for compacting low level radioactive or hazardous waste materials at the point of generation comprising the steps of sealing the waste in a first flexible container, sealing one or more first containers within an outer flexible container, breaching the integrity of the first containers, evacuating the air from the inner and outer containers, and sealing the outer container shut.

  18. COMPACT ACCELERATOR CONCEPT FOR PROTON THERAPY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caporaso, G; Sampayan, S; Chen, Y; Harris, J; Hawkins, S; Holmes, C; Krogh, M; Nelson, S; Nunnally, W; Paul, A; Poole, B; Rhodes, M; Sanders, D; Selenes, K; Sullivan, J; Wang, L; Watson, J

    2006-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A new type of compact induction accelerator is under development at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory that promises to increase the average accelerating gradient by at least an order of magnitude over that of existing induction machines. The machine is based on the use of high gradient vacuum insulators, advanced dielectric materials and switches and is being developed as a compact flash x-ray radiography source. Research describing an extreme variant of this technology aimed at proton therapy for cancer will be presented.

  19. VIII International Conference on Fracture Mechanics of Concrete and Concrete Structures C. Boulay, S. Staquet, M. Azenha, A. Deraemaeker, M. Crespini, J. Carette, J. Granja, B. Delsaute, C. Dumoulin, G. Karaiskos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    of concrete, Young's modulus, round robin test, dynamic testing, ultrasonic measurements Abstract: Early age static tests at the time of the concrete setting. This difference decreases as the concrete hardens. 1VIII International Conference on Fracture Mechanics of Concrete and Concrete Structures FraMCoS-8 C

  20. Assessment of FRP composite strengthened reinforced concrete bridge structures at the component and systems level through progressive damage and Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghosh, Kumar Kanti

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    as obtained from testing of the concrete used in the testTesting Techniques for FRP Rehabilitated Concrete: I ATesting Techniques for FRP Rehabilitated Concrete: II

  1. Achieving "Green" Concrete Through The Use Of High Performance FiberThe Use Of High Performance Fiber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chao, Shih-Ho

    Achieving "Green" Concrete Through The Use Of High Performance FiberThe Use Of High Performance Fiber Reinforced Concrete ShihShih--Ho Chao,Ho Chao, Ph.DPh.D Assistant Professor, Department of Civil, 2008 #12;What is D rable Concrete?What is D rable Concrete?What is Durable Concrete?What is Durable

  2. Preferential Path Profiling: Compactly Numbering Interesting Paths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chilimbi, Trishul

    preferential path profiling (PPP), that reduces the overhead of path profiling. PPP leverages the observation that most consumers of path profiles are only inter- ested in a subset of all program paths. PPP achieves produced by PPP. This compact path numbering enables our PPP implementation to record path information

  3. Compact range for variable-zone measurements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burnside, Walter D. (Columbus, OH); Rudduck, Roger C. (Columbus, OH); Yu, Jiunn S. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A compact range for testing antennas or radar targets includes a source for directing energy along a feedline toward a parabolic reflector. The reflected wave is a spherical wave with a radius dependent on the distance of the source from the focal point of the reflector.

  4. Compact Ultradense Objects in the Solar System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Rafelski; Ch. Dietl; L. Labun

    2013-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe properties and gravitational interactions of meteor-mass and greater compact ultra dense objects with nuclear density or greater (CUDO s). We discuss possible enclosure of CUDO s in comets, stability of these objects on impact with the Earth and Sun and show that the hypothesis of a CUDO core helps resolve issues challenging the understanding of a few selected cometary impacts.

  5. A Global Compact to End Poverty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Global Compact to End Poverty Jeffrey Sachs on stabilisation, transition and weapons of mass progress. We can realistically envision a world without extreme poverty by the year 2025 because. Sachs, The End of Poverty, 2005. WORLD ECONOMICS Vol. 6 No. 4 OctoberDecember 2005 11 Jeffrey D

  6. Pathway to a Compact SASE FEL Device

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dattoli, G; Petrillo, V; Rau, J V; Sabia, E; Spassovsky, I; Biedron, S G; Einstein, J; Milton, S V

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Newly developed high peak power lasers have opened the possibilities of driving coherent light sources operating with laser plasma accelerated beams and wave undulators. We speculate on the combination of these two concepts and show that the merging of the underlying technologies could lead to new and interesting possibilities to achieve truly compact, coherent radiator devices.

  7. Southeast Interstate Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Compact (multi-state)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Southeast Interstate Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Compact is administered by the Compact Commission. The Compact provides for rotating responsibility for the region's low-level...

  8. Production, Cost, and Soil Compaction Estimates for Two Western Juniper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dodson, Beth

    , Crook County Soil and Water Conservation District, Prineville, OR 97754. ABSTRACT: Harvesting trialsProduction, Cost, and Soil Compaction Estimates for Two Western Juniper Extraction Systems, production rates, and soil compaction impacts of two systems for harvesting western juniper (Juniperus

  9. Fundamental building blocks for a compact optoelectronic neural network processor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruedlinger, Benjamin Franklin, 1976-

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The focus of this thesis is interconnects within the Compact Optoelectronic Neural Network Processor. The goal of the Compact Optoelectronic Neural Network Processor Project (CONNPP) is to build a small, rugged neural ...

  10. Radionuclide Migration through Sediment and Concrete: 16 Years of Investigations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Mattigod, Shas V.; Snyder, Michelle MV; Powers, Laura; Whyatt, Greg A.; Wellman, Dawn M.

    2014-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The Waste Management Project provides safe, compliant, and cost-effective waste management services for the Hanford Site and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex. Part of these services includes safe disposal of low-level waste and mixed low-level waste at the Hanford Low-Level Waste Burial Grounds in accordance with the requirements of DOE Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management. To partially satisfy these requirements, performance assessment analyses were completed and approved. DOE Order 435.1 also requires continuing data collection to increase confidence in the critical assumptions used in these analyses to characterize the operational features of the disposal facility that are relied on to satisfy the performance objectives identified in the order. Cement-based solidification and stabilization is considered for hazardous waste disposal because it is easily done and cost-efficient. One critical assumption is that concrete will be used as a waste form or container material at the Hanford Site to control and minimize the release of radionuclide constituents in waste into the surrounding environment. Concrete encasement would contain and isolate the waste packages from the hydrologic environment and act as an intrusion barrier. Any failure of concrete encasement may result in water intrusion and consequent mobilization of radionuclides from the waste packages. The radionuclides iodine-129, selenium-75, technetium-99, and uranium-238 have been identified as long-term dose contributors (Mann et al. 2001; Wood et al. 1995). Because of their anionic nature in aqueous solutions, these constituents of potential concern may be released from the encased concrete by mass flow and/or diffusion and migrate into the surrounding subsurface environment (Serne et al. 1989; 1992; 1993a, b; 1995). Therefore, it is necessary to assess the performance of the concrete encasement structure and the ability of the surrounding soil to retard radionuclide migration. Each of the test methods performed throughout the lifetime of the project has focused on different aspects of the concrete waste form weathering process. Diffusion of different analytes [technetium-99 (Tc-99), iodine-125 (I-125), stable iodine (I), uranium (U), and rhenium (Re)] has been quantified from experiments under both saturated and unsaturated conditions. The water-saturated conditions provide a conservative estimate of the concretes performance in situ, and the unsaturated conditions provide a more accurate estimate of the diffusion of contaminants from the concrete.

  11. Report on aging of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naus, D.J.; Oland, C.B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Ellingwood, B.R. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Structural Aging Program provides the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission with potential structural safety issues and acceptance criteria for use in continued service assessments of nuclear power plant safety-related concrete structures. The program was organized under four task areas: Program Management, Materials Property Data Base, Structural Component Assessment/Repair Technology, and Quantitative Methodology for Continued Service Determinations. Under these tasks, over 90 papers and reports were prepared addressing pertinent aspects associated with aging management of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete structures. Contained in this report is a summary of program results in the form of information related to longevity of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete structures, a Structural Materials Information Center presenting data and information on the time variation of concrete materials under the influence of environmental stressors and aging factors, in-service inspection and condition assessments techniques, repair materials and methods, evaluation of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete structures, and a reliability-based methodology for current and future condition assessments. Recommendations for future activities are also provided. 308 refs., 61 figs., 50 tabs.

  12. Nondestructive detection and characterization of carbonation in concrete

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Gun; In, Chi-Won; Kurtis, Kimberly E. [Georgia Institute of Technology, School of Civil and Environmental Engineering (United States); Kim, Jin-Yeon [Georgia Institute of Technology, GW Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering (United States); Jacobs, Laurence J. [Georgia Institute of Technology, School of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Georgia Institute of Technology, GW Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering (United States)

    2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Exposure of concrete to the environment leads to changes in composition, microstructure, and properties; these effects often start from the surface of a concrete structure. A specific, widespread environmental effect is carbonation, where carbon dioxide penetrates the surface of concrete and reacts with calcium hydroxide that is a product of Portland cement hydration in concrete. Carbonation is of interest not only because it can lead to the initiation of reinforcement corrosion, but also carbon is increasingly used during curing to alter the surface properties of cement-based materials as a method to 'sink' carbon in cement-based materials. Nonlinear Rayleigh surface wave measurements are performed on uncarbonated and carbonated concrete samples to assess any mechanical changes induced by carbonation,. In order to minimize the effects of contact conditions, the generated signals are detected by a noncontact air-coupled transducer (100 kHz) at locations along the propagation axis. The nonlinearity parameter, ? is used to quantitatively characterize the degree of carbonation. To more accurately analyze the data, corrections are made for the effects of attenuation and diffraction. A comparison between the carbonated and uncarbonated samples demonstrates that pores and micro-cracks are affected by the carbonation product and these significantly change the measured nonlinearity parameter.

  13. A study of compaction methods for lunar soil simulants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ekkad, Rama Varadarajan

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , compaction by vibration, compaction under vacuum pressure under the simultaneous effect of vibration are examined. Duc to the increasing confining pressure, the air voids decrease and the particles will be more closely packed, thus increasing the relative... density. The research will be used to identify a convenient method for compacting samples for laboratory digging experiments. The results of the research conclude that compaction by using vacuum and vibration produce results which can be used to predict...

  14. Simulation of the degradation of a concrete/clay interface: influence of temperature, unsaturated conditions and porosity variations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burnol, A.; Dupros, F.; Spycher, N.; Xu, T.; Gaucher, E.C.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SIMULATION OF THE DEGRADATION OF A CONCRETE/CLAY INTERFACE:transport models applied to degradation of a concrete/clayused by the simulation of degradation of the concrete/clay

  15. Concrete Cleaning, Inc. centrifugal shot blaster: Baseline report; Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The centrifugal shot blaster is an electronically operated shot-blast machine that removes layer of concrete of varying depths. Hardened steel shot propelled at a high rate of speed abrades the surface of the concrete. The depth of material removed is determined by the rate of speed the machine is traveling and the volume of shot being fired into the blast chamber. The steel shot is reused until it is pulverized to dust, which is deposited in the waste container with the concrete being removed. Debris is continually vacuumed by a large dust collection system attached to the shot blaster. The safety and health evaluation during the human factors assessment focused on two main areas: noise and dust.

  16. Treatment of fly ash for use in concrete

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boxley, Chett; Akash, Akash; Zhao, Qiang

    2013-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for treating fly ash to render it highly usable as a concrete additive. A quantity of fly ash is obtained that contains carbon and which is considered unusable fly ash for concrete based upon foam index testing. The fly ash is mixed with an activator solution sufficient to initiate a geopolymerization reaction and for a geopolymerized fly ash. The geopolymerized fly ash is granulated. The geopolymerized fly ash is considered usable fly ash for concrete according to foam index testing. The geopolymerized fly ash may have a foam index less than 35% of the foam index of the untreated fly ash, and in some cases less than 10% of the foam index of the untreated fly ash. The activator solution may contain an alkali metal hydroxide, carbonate, silicate, aluminate, or mixtures thereof.

  17. Treatment of fly ash for use in concrete

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boxley, Chett (Park City, UT); Akash, Akash (Salt lake City, UT); Zhao, Qiang (Natick, MA)

    2012-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for treating fly ash to render it highly usable as a concrete additive. A quantity of fly ash is obtained that contains carbon and which is considered unusable fly ash for concrete based upon foam index testing. The fly ash is mixed with an activator solution sufficient to initiate a geopolymerization reaction and for a geopolymerized fly ash. The geopolymerized fly ash is granulated. The geopolymerized fly ash is considered usable fly ash for concrete according to foam index testing. The geopolymerized fly ash may have a foam index less than 35% of the foam index of the untreated fly ash, and in some cases less than 10% of the foam index of the untreated fly ash. The activator solution may contain an alkali metal hydroxide, carbonate, silicate, aluminate, or mixtures thereof.

  18. Treatment of fly ash for use in concrete

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boxley, Chett (Park City, UT)

    2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for treating fly ash to render it highly usable as a concrete additive. A quantity of fly ash is obtained that contains carbon and which is considered unusable fly ash for concrete based upon foam index testing. The fly ash is mixed with a quantity of spray dryer ash (SDA) and water to initiate a geopolymerization reaction and form a geopolymerized fly ash. The geopolymerized fly ash is granulated. The geopolymerized fly ash is considered usable fly ash for concrete according to foam index testing. The geopolymerized fly ash may have a foam index less than 40%, and in some cases less than 20%, of the foam index of the untreated fly ash. An optional alkaline activator may be mixed with the fly ash and SDA to facilitate the geopolymerization reaction. The alkaline activator may contain an alkali metal hydroxide, carbonate, silicate, aluminate, or mixtures thereof.

  19. Analysis of coupled transport phenomena in concrete at elevated temperatures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bene, Michal; Zeman, Jan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we study a non-linear numerical scheme arising from the implicit time discretization of the Ba\\v{z}ant-Thonguthai model for hygro-thermal behavior of concrete at high temperatures. Existence and uniqueness of the time-discrete solution in two dimensions is established using the theory of pseudomonotone operators in Banach spaces. Next, the spatial discretization is accomplished by the conforming finite element method. An illustrative numerical example shows that the numerical model reproduces well the rapid increase of pore pressure in wet concrete due to extreme heating. Such phenomenon is of particular interest for the safety assessment of concrete structures prone to thermally-induced spalling.

  20. Survey of four damage models for concrete.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leelavanichkul, Seubpong (University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT); Brannon, Rebecca Moss (University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT)

    2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Four conventional damage plasticity models for concrete, the Karagozian and Case model (K&C), the Riedel-Hiermaier-Thoma model (RHT), the Brannon-Fossum model (BF1), and the Continuous Surface Cap Model (CSCM) are compared. The K&C and RHT models have been used in commercial finite element programs many years, whereas the BF1 and CSCM models are relatively new. All four models are essentially isotropic plasticity models for which 'plasticity' is regarded as any form of inelasticity. All of the models support nonlinear elasticity, but with different formulations. All four models employ three shear strength surfaces. The 'yield surface' bounds an evolving set of elastically obtainable stress states. The 'limit surface' bounds stress states that can be reached by any means (elastic or plastic). To model softening, it is recognized that some stress states might be reached once, but, because of irreversible damage, might not be achievable again. In other words, softening is the process of collapse of the limit surface, ultimately down to a final 'residual surface' for fully failed material. The four models being compared differ in their softening evolution equations, as well as in their equations used to degrade the elastic stiffness. For all four models, the strength surfaces are cast in stress space. For all four models, it is recognized that scale effects are important for softening, but the models differ significantly in their approaches. The K&C documentation, for example, mentions that a particular material parameter affecting the damage evolution rate must be set by the user according to the mesh size to preserve energy to failure. Similarly, the BF1 model presumes that all material parameters are set to values appropriate to the scale of the element, and automated assignment of scale-appropriate values is available only through an enhanced implementation of BF1 (called BFS) that regards scale effects to be coupled to statistical variability of material properties. The RHT model appears to similarly support optional uncertainty and automated settings for scale-dependent material parameters. The K&C, RHT, and CSCM models support rate dependence by allowing the strength to be a function of strain rate, whereas the BF1 model uses Duvaut-Lion viscoplasticity theory to give a smoother prediction of transient effects. During softening, all four models require a certain amount of strain to develop before allowing significant damage accumulation. For the K&C, RHT, and CSCM models, the strain-to-failure is tied to fracture energy release, whereas a similar effect is achieved indirectly in the BF1 model by a time-based criterion that is tied to crack propagation speed.

  1. Time-resolved diagnostics for concrete target response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baum, D.W.; Kuklo, R.M.; Reaugh, J.E.; Simonson, S.C.

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to facilitate the design of advanced penetrating weapons for defeating land targets, the interaction of concrete with high-velocity penetrators needs to be better characterized. To aid in this effort, three new types of time-resolved diagnostics are being developed and have been used in two experiments and one demonstration: fiber optic arrays to localize penetrators in space and time, Fabry-Perot velocimetry to record the concrete particle velocity, which is related to the pressure, at specific locations within concrete targets, and micropower impulse radar to provide a non-intrusive measure of the penetrator position-time history in a target. The two experiments used the fiber optic array and the Fabry-Perot velocimeter to diagnose the response of concrete to penetration by a Viper shaped charge jet. The results were analyzed using the CALE continuum mechanics simulation program, for which a preliminary model of the material properties of concrete was developed. The fiber optic arrays recorded the bow shock at locations 6.4 and 16.9 cm from the front surfaces. The Fabry-Perot velocimeter measured a free-surface velocity of 0.13 km/s at a distance of 3 cm and obliquity 70{degree} from the jet, which was moving at an interface velocity of 4.0 km/s at a depth of 29 cm. These values imply a pressure of about 6.6 kbar at that location. The demonstration used micropower impulse radar with a pulse repetition frequency of 0.25 MHz and a cell size of 30 ps to detect and record the motion of a metal penetrator simulant moving inside a cylindrical concrete target.

  2. High-performance, high-volume fly ash concrete

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This booklet offers the construction professional an in-depth description of the use of high-volume fly ash in concrete. Emphasis is placed on the need for increased utilization of coal-fired power plant byproducts in lieu of Portland cement materials to eliminate increased CO{sub 2} emissions during the production of cement. Also addressed is the dramatic increase in concrete performance with the use of 50+ percent fly ash volume. The booklet contains numerous color and black and white photos, charts of test results, mixtures and comparisons, and several HVFA case studies.

  3. Quick setting water-compatible furfuryl alcohol polymer concretes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sugama, Toshifumi (Ridge, NY); Kukacka, Lawrence E. (Port Jefferson, NY); Horn, William H. (Brookhaven, NY)

    1982-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel quick setting polymer concrete composite comprising a furfuryl alcohol monomer, an aggregate containing a maximum of 8% by weight water, and about 1-10% trichlorotoluene initiator and about 20-80% powdered metal salt promoter, such as zinc chloride, based on the weight of said monomer, to initiate and promote polymerization of said monomer in the presence of said aggregate, within 1 hour after mixing at a temperature of -20.degree. C. to 40.degree. C., to produce a polymer concrete having a 1 hour compressive strength greater than 2000 psi.

  4. The Thermal Conductivity of Low Density Concretes Containing Perlite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yarbrough, D. W.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -Tov, "HEATING5 - An IBM 360 Heat Conduction Program," ORNL/CSD/tm-15(1977). Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831. [5J Expanded Shale Clay and Slate Institute, "Lightweight Concrete Information Sheet," No.4, Washington, D.C., 1958. [6J Moore..., J. P., R. S. Graves, J. G. Stradley, J. H. Hannah, and D. L. McElroy, "Some Thermal Transport Properties of a Limestone Concrete," ORNL/TM-2644 (August 1969), Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831. [7J Valore, R. C., Jr., "Cellular...

  5. Evaluation of Economic Impact of Three-Dimensional Modeling in Precast Concrete Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sacks, Rafael

    Evaluation of Economic Impact of Three-Dimensional Modeling in Precast Concrete Engineering Rafael (IT); Concrete, precast; Economic factors; Three-dimensional models. Introduction "The application to this; but the funda- mental reason undoubtedly was economic." (Mitchell 1977). Intuitive assessments

  6. Preliminary non-destructive assessment of moisture content, hydration and dielectric properties of Portland cement concrete

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Avelar Lezama, Ivan

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Moisture availability is a focal point in the structural development of young concrete. Under low humidity and hot weather conditions, concrete loses moisture rapidly as it hardens, and it is very difficult, if not impossible, ...

  7. Lightweight concrete : investigations into the production of variable density cellular materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cooke, Timothy Graham

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research focuses on the intersection between material composition and form in the development of a new type of concrete. As concrete is the most widely used building material in the world, innovation in this material ...

  8. Investigation of Conditions for Moisture Damage in Asphalt Concrete and Appropriate Laboratory Test Methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Qing

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Asphalt Concrete-Physical Testing. Final Report, #930-of Asphalt Concrete: Chemical Testing. Alabama Highwayconcrete mixes, it is preferred to use a mix that would have good moisture resistance under laboratory testing

  9. Lateral behavior of reinforced concrete columns supported on Type II shafts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Yujia

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    concrete strength reached the desired strength on the day of testingconcrete and reinforcing steel during the construction period and on the day of column-shaft assembly testing.during testing. However, the cracking of the concrete at the

  10. Experimental and Analytical Investigation of Reinforced Concrete Columns Subjected to Horizontal and Vertical Ground Motions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Hyerin

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    errors in concrete sampling and testing these cylinders areprocedure for concrete cylinder making and testing. Cylinderconcrete stress-strain relationship on the 72 day (1 cylinder) 3.21 Testing

  11. Investigation of Conditions for Moisture Damage in Asphalt Concrete and Appropriate Laboratory Test Methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harvey, John T; Lu, Qing

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Asphalt Concrete-Physical Testing. Final Report no.of Asphalt Concrete: Chemical Testing. Alabama Highwayconcrete mixes, it is preferable to use a mix that would have good moisture resistance under laboratory testing

  12. Modeling the ASR Induced Strains and Cracking of Reinforced Concrete Beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Li

    2013-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    the number and spacing of cracks of a partly restrained reinforced concrete beam affected by ASR gels. The model is validated with recent experimental results on large scale reinforced concrete specimens. Predictions agree well with the observed number...

  13. Seismic vulnerability of older reinforced concrete frame structures in Mid-America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beason, Lauren Rae

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This research quantifies the seismic vulnerability of older reinforced concrete frame structures located in Mid-America. After designing a representative three-story gravity load designed reinforced concrete frame structure, a nonlinear analytical...

  14. Environmental, Economic, and Social Impacts of Concrete Pavement Material Choices: A Life-Cycle Assessment Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Hyunsoung

    2014-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Transportation Agencies (STAs) in rendering better-informed decisions for the concrete pavement material choices, the major research objective is to analyze the environmental, economic, and social impacts of the four concrete pavement alternatives from...

  15. Practical limitations of single-span ultra-high performance concrete beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abrams, Daniel Scott

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since its development in the early 1970's, researchers have continued to push the limits of concrete mixtures through the creation of ultra-high performance concretes. The use of this class of materials has allowed designers ...

  16. Tall concrete buildings subject to vertically moving fires: A case study approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fletcher, Ian A

    regarded as safe in a fire situation as concrete is non-flammable and exhibits highly insulating material properties. The majority of current research relating to the impact of fire on structures examines other forms of construction. Research of concrete...

  17. Effect of Corrosion on the Seismic Response of a Single-Bent, Reinforced Concrete Bridge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harvat, Jessica

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of corrosion on a single-bent, reinforced concrete (RC) bridge subject to seismic loading is the primary focus of this research. This work attempts to determine the effects of decreasing rebar diameter and concrete cover spalling...

  18. The Effect of Elevated Temperature on Concrete Materials and Structures - a Literature Review.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naus, Dan J [ORNL

    2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this limited study was to provide an overview of the effects of elevated temperature on the behavior of concrete materials and structures. In meeting this objective the effects of elevated temperatures on the properties of ordinary Portland cement concrete constituent materials and concretes are summarized. The effects of elevated temperature on high-strength concrete materials are noted and their performance compared to normal strength concretes. A review of concrete materials for elevated-temperature service is presented. Nuclear power plant and general civil engineering design codes are described. Design considerations and analytical techniques for evaluating the response of reinforced concrete structures to elevated-temperature conditions are presented. Pertinent studies in which reinforced concrete structural elements were subjected to elevated temperatures are described.

  19. The use of nondestructive testing methods for the condition assessment of concrete bridge girders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unruh, Richard Cornelius, 1974-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There are over 594,000 publicly controlled bridges in the United States. Concrete and pre-stressed concrete bridges account for nearly 50% of the bridges in the US inventory. This proportion is increasing each year, as new ...

  20. Seismic fragility curves for reinforced concrete A Dissertation Submitted in Partial Fulfilment of the Requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seismic fragility curves for reinforced concrete buildings A Dissertation Submitted in Partial dissertation entitled "Seismic fragility curves for reinforced concrete frame and wall- frame buildings. Buildings designed for seismic loading, and buildings designed only for gravity loads, are considered

  1. Towards Prestressed Thin-Sheet Glass Concrete Products Gregor Vilkner and Christian Meyer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyer, Christian

    Towards Prestressed Thin-Sheet Glass Concrete Products Gregor Vilkner and Christian Meyer SYNOPSIS, and concrete technology. Christian Meyer, FACI, is a Professor of Civil Engineering at Columbia University

  2. A laboratory investigation of vibratory compaction of dry soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webster, Cecil Ray

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Standard Compaction Curve for Soil 3 (CL) 48 49 50 53 54 56 25 Effect of Frequency Variation on the Time Required to Achieve I/2 inch (12. 7 mm) of Settlement 57 26. Foot Size Effects on Compaction of Various Soils 59 27. Effect of Frequency... on the Compaction of Soil 1 (SP) Using Two Different Feet 63 28. Effect of Frequency on the Compaction of Soil 1 (SP) Using the Semi-Circular Foot with Various Static Weights 64 29. Effect of Frequency on the Compaction of Soil 1 (SP) Using the 5 Inch Diameter...

  3. Compact x-ray source and panel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sampayon, Stephen E. (Manteca, CA)

    2008-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A compact, self-contained x-ray source, and a compact x-ray source panel having a plurality of such x-ray sources arranged in a preferably broad-area pixelized array. Each x-ray source includes an electron source for producing an electron beam, an x-ray conversion target, and a multilayer insulator separating the electron source and the x-ray conversion target from each other. The multi-layer insulator preferably has a cylindrical configuration with a plurality of alternating insulator and conductor layers surrounding an acceleration channel leading from the electron source to the x-ray conversion target. A power source is connected to each x-ray source of the array to produce an accelerating gradient between the electron source and x-ray conversion target in any one or more of the x-ray sources independent of other x-ray sources in the array, so as to accelerate an electron beam towards the x-ray conversion target. The multilayer insulator enables relatively short separation distances between the electron source and the x-ray conversion target so that a thin panel is possible for compactness. This is due to the ability of the plurality of alternating insulator and conductor layers of the multilayer insulators to resist surface flashover when sufficiently high acceleration energies necessary for x-ray generation are supplied by the power source to the x-ray sources.

  4. The compactness of presupernova stellar cores

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sukhbold, Tuguldur; Woosley, S. E., E-mail: sukhbold@ucolick.org [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The success or failure of the neutrino-transport mechanism for producing a supernova in an evolved massive star is known to be sensitive not only to the mass of the iron core that collapses, but also to the density gradient in the silicon and oxygen shells surrounding that core. Here we study the systematics of a presupernova core's 'compactness' as a function of the mass of the star and the physics used in its calculation. Fine-meshed surveys of presupernova evolution are calculated for stars from 15 to 65 M {sub ?}. The metallicity and the efficiency of semiconvection and overshoot mixing are both varied and bare carbon-oxygen cores are explored as well as full hydrogenic stars. Two different codes, KEPLER and MESA, are used for the study. A complex interplay of carbon and oxygen burning, especially in shells, can cause rapid variations in the compactness for stars of very nearly the same mass. On larger scales, the distribution of compactness with main sequence mass is found to be robustly non-monotonic, implying islands of 'explodabilty,' particularly around 8-20 M {sub ?} and 25-30 M {sub ?}. The carbon-oxygen (CO) core mass of a presupernova star is a better, (though still ambiguous) discriminant of its core structure than the main sequence mass.

  5. The Evolution of Compact Binary Star Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Konstantin Postnov; Lev Yungelson

    2014-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We review the formation and evolution of compact binary stars consisting of white dwarfs (WDs), neutron stars (NSs), and black holes (BHs). Mergings of compact binary stars are expected to be the most important sources for the forthcoming gravitational-wave (GW) astronomy. In the first part of the review, we discuss observational manifestations of close binary stars with NS and/or black components and their merger rate, crucial points in the formation and evolution of compact stars in binary systems, including the treatment of the natal kicks which NSs and BHs acquire during the core collapse of massive stars and the common envelope phase of binary evolution, which are most relevant to the merging rates of NS-NS, NS-BH and BH-BH binaries. The second part of the review is devoted mainly to formation and evolution of binary WDs and their observational manifestations, including their role as progenitors of cosmologically important thermonuclear SN Ia. We also consider AM CVn-stars which are thought to be the best verification binary GW sources for future low-frequency GW space interferometers.

  6. Emerging Energy-efficiency and CO2 Emission-reduction Technologies for Cement and Concrete Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasanbeigi, Ali

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    titanium dioxide nanoparticles for self-cleaning concrete surfaces Development of cement-based nanocomposites for various applications Energy/

  7. Design and Construction Integration of a Continuous Precast Prestressed Concrete Bridge System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roy, Subha Lakshmi 1982-

    2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    NOMENCLATURE AASHTO American Association of State Highway Transportation Officials ACI American Concrete Institute AREMA American Railway Engineering and Maintenance-of-Way Association CIP Cast-in-place DAD Damage Avoidance Design Ec Concrete....1 State-of-the-art and Practice for Precast Concrete Deck Slabs Cast-in-place (CIP) reinforced concrete has been the most common form of bridge deck construction. The major disadvantage of CIP construction is the slow speed of construction. Since...

  8. Behavior of Concrete Piles Confined with CFRP Grid Lining Ding, Hatem. M. Seliem, Sami. H. Rizkalla,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Behavior of Concrete Piles Confined with CFRP Grid Lining Ding, Hatem. M. Seliem, Sami. H. Rizkalla spirals to confine precast concrete piles. The research focuses on the effectiveness of the confinement of the specified C-Grid on the concrete core of piles. The experimental program consists of a total of seven short

  9. Peel and Shear Fracture Characterization of Debonding in FRP Plated Concrete Affected by Moisture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Entekhabi, Dara

    polymer CFRP plated concrete systems by mechanically testing accelerated moisture conditioned mesoscalePeel and Shear Fracture Characterization of Debonding in FRP Plated Concrete Affected by Moisture fracture toughness as the quantification parameter of the CFRP-epoxy-concrete trilayer system, which

  10. [ ]May 2014 Portland cement concrete (PCC) overlays have been used with great success in many locations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harms, Kyle E.

    accelerated pavement testing on bonded concrete overlay pavements to be constructed at the Pavement Research testing; evaluate the structural bearing capacity of the concrete overlay pavement structures[ ]May 2014 PROBLEM Portland cement concrete (PCC) overlays have been used with great success

  11. Edinburgh Research Explorer The Dalmarnock Fire Tests on a Cast Insitu Concrete Structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Millar, Andrew J.

    Edinburgh Research Explorer The Dalmarnock Fire Tests on a Cast Insitu Concrete Structure Citation Fire Tests on a Cast Insitu Concrete Structure'. in Proceedings of the international Workshop Fire THE DALMARNOCK FIRE TESTS ON A CAST INSITU CONCRETE STRUCTURE Susan Deeny PhD Student University of Edinburgh, UK

  12. FRP Dowels for Concrete Pavements Darren Eddie, Junior Structural Engineer, Reid Crowther & Partners;

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    testing ofGFRP and steel dowels using a model of a concrete pavement slab joint subjected to static= L FRP Dowels for Concrete Pavements By Darren Eddie, Junior Structural Engineer, Reid Crowther - Introduction Joints are used in concrete pavements in order to control cracking due to thermal

  13. TEST ON PRESTRESSED CONCRETE BEAM WITH AFRP SPIRAL CONFINEMENT AND EXTERNAL ARAMID TENDONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burgoyne, Chris

    TEST ON PRESTRESSED CONCRETE BEAM WITH AFRP SPIRAL CONFINEMENT AND EXTERNAL ARAMID TENDONS C. J of spiral confinement. Keywords: Prestressed Concrete, Aramid Fibre, Confinement, Beam, Testing 1 #12;Chris concrete beam. Aramid Fibre Reinforced Polymers (AFRP) are used to make compression confinement in the form

  14. Concrete international /DECEMBER 2004 33 BY EDWARD J. GARBOCZI, JEFFREY W. BULLARD, AND DALE P. BENTZ

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bentz, Dale P.

    with virtual testing will result in tremendous time and cost savings to the cement and concrete industry of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)/Industry Virtual Cement and Concrete Testing's work follows, along with a general overview of what virtual testing of cement and concrete actually

  15. Application of digital image correlation to size effect tests of concrete S. Yasir Alam & A. Loukili

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Application of digital image correlation to size effect tests of concrete S. Yasir Alam & A beams. Three point bending tests are performed on scaled concrete beams in accordance with RILEM rec, reactor containments, bridges) and of labora- tory tests. In concrete structures, fracture is generally

  16. Laboratory Testing to Address the Potential for Damaging Hydraulic Pressure in the Concrete Tie Rail Seat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

    Laboratory Testing to Address the Potential for Damaging Hydraulic Pressure in the Concrete Tie of different combinations of concrete ties and fastening system components to RSD (1). TTC's tests resulted) is the most critical problem with concrete tie performance on North American freight railroads. Currently

  17. Fracture Behavior and Properties of Functionally Graded Fiber-Reinforced Concrete

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paulino, Glaucio H.

    the structural benefits of functionally graded concrete materials (FGCM) for rigid pavements by testing (testing and modeling) demonstrates the viability of FGCM for designing layered concrete pavements systemFracture Behavior and Properties of Functionally Graded Fiber-Reinforced Concrete Jeffery Roesler

  18. Monitoring of the creep and the relaxation hhh behaviour of concrete since setting time, hh hhhhhhhh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    experimental tests on the same ordinary concrete in order to investigate the early age mechanical behaviour in the laboratory of civil engineering at ULB for testing concrete in tension or in compression since setting time), France (2012)" #12;2 2. Test setup 2.1. Tested concrete description The mixture proportions

  19. Keynote Paper, Shah, Page 1/13 HEALTH MONITORING OF EARLY AGE CONCRETE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    relationship to the actual concrete in the structure. This calls for nondestructive test methods that offer potential for the application of nondestructive testing of concrete under field conditions. The resultsKeynote Paper, Shah, Page 1/13 HEALTH MONITORING OF EARLY AGE CONCRETE Thomas Voigt, Zhihui Sun

  20. IDENTIFICATION OF INHOMOGENEOUS CONCRETE COVER BY NON-CONTACT ULTRASONIC METHOD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    their irreversible damage. Various methods are available today for testing concrete structures. Among themIDENTIFICATION OF INHOMOGENEOUS CONCRETE COVER BY NON- CONTACT ULTRASONIC METHOD B.Piwakowski1 , Q Science, Kazimierz Wielki University, Bydgoszcz, Poland bogdan.piwakowski@ec-lille.fr ABSTRACT Concrete

  1. Non Destructive Testing of Concrete: Transfer from Laboratory to On-site Measurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Non Destructive Testing of Concrete: Transfer from Laboratory to On-site Measurement Vincent Vincent.garnier@univ-amu.fr ABSTRACT The evaluation of mechanical and chemical properties of concrete laws from the laboratory between non-destructive measurements and characteristics of the concrete

  2. Virtual Cement and Concrete Testing Laboratory Educational Version 2.0 User Guide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magee, Joseph W.

    1 Virtual Cement and Concrete Testing Laboratory Educational Version 2.0 User Guide Jeffrey W of the Virtual Cement and Concrete Testing Laboratory (VCCTL) software, version 2.0. Using the VCCTL software, cement hydration, computer modeling, concrete testing, microstructure, simulation, virtual laboratory

  3. Cross-cultural comparison of concrete recycling decision-making and implementation in construction industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tam, Vivian W.Y., E-mail: vivianwytam@gmail.co [School of Engineering, University of Western Sydney, Locked Bag 1797, Penrith South DC, NSW 1797 (Australia); Tam, Leona [College of Business and Public Administration, 2151 Constant Hall, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA 23529 (United States); Le, Khoa N. [School of Engineering, University of Western Sydney, Locked Bag 1797, Penrith South DC, NSW 1797 (Australia)

    2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Waste management is pressing very hard with alarming signals in construction industry. Concrete waste constituents major proportions of construction and demolition waste of 81% in Australia. To minimize concrete waste generated from construction activities, recycling concrete waste is one of the best methods to conserve the environment. This paper investigates concrete recycling implementation in construction. Japan is a leading country in recycling concrete waste, which has been implementing 98% recycling and using it for structural concrete applications. Hong Kong is developing concrete recycling programs for high-grade applications. Australia is making relatively slow progress in implementing concrete recycling in construction. Therefore, empirical studies in Australia, Hong Kong, and Japan were selected in this paper. A questionnaire survey and structured interviews were conducted. Power spectrum was used for analysis. It was found that 'increasing overall business competitiveness and strategic business opportunities' was considered as the major benefit for concrete recycling from Hong Kong and Japanese respondents, while 'rising concrete recycling awareness such as selecting suitable resources, techniques and training and compliance with regulations' was considered as the major benefit from Australian respondents. However, 'lack of clients' support', 'increase in management cost' and 'increase in documentation workload, such as working documents, procedures and tools' were the major difficulties encountered from Australian, Hong Kong, and Japanese respondents, respectively. To improve the existing implementation, 'inclusion of concrete recycling evaluation in tender appraisal' and 'defining clear legal evaluation of concrete recycling' were major recommendations for Australian and Hong Kong, and Japanese respondents, respectively.

  4. PORTLAND CEMENT CONCRETE PAVEMENT FOR FLEXIBLE OVER RIGID COMPOSITE PAVEMENTS (Tollway)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PORTLAND CEMENT CONCRETE PAVEMENT FOR FLEXIBLE OVER RIGID COMPOSITE PAVEMENTS (Tollway) Effective portland cement concrete for special applications to composite pavements as shown and described. Developing concrete mix design(s) that meets the performance requirements for the intended pavement; 4

  5. Concrete Pavement I-285 under 5th runway at Hartsfield Jackson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Concrete Pavement Sweet as a James Page I-285 under 5th runway at Hartsfield Jackson International Concrete Paving project I-285 East Perimeter Fiscal 2012 GDOT placed 205,704 square yards of RCC Pavement Portland Cement Concrete Pavement State Route 96 Crawford / Peach Counties I-75 Tift County CRC Lane

  6. PRECAST REPLACEMENT OF CONCRETE PAVEMENT SLABS (Tollway) Effective: March 30, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PRECAST REPLACEMENT OF CONCRETE PAVEMENT SLABS (Tollway) Effective: March 30, 2009 Revised: October 19, 2012 DESCRIPTION. This work shall consist of the removal of existing concrete pavement, restoration of the subbase material, the installation of precast concrete pavement slabs in accordance

  7. An experimental evaluation of two effective medium theories for ultrasonic wave propagation in concrete

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    in concrete Jean-François Chaix*, Mathieu Rossat, Vincent Garnier, Gilles Corneloup. Laboratoire de and experimental data in concrete. As a consequence of its composition and manufacturing process, this material has of longitudinal waves to be described at the scale of materials such as concrete. The validity limits

  8. Making the abstract concrete 1 Running head: VISUALIZING MATHEMATICAL SOLUTION PROCEDURES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Making the abstract concrete 1 Running head: VISUALIZING MATHEMATICAL SOLUTION PROCEDURES Making the Abstract Concrete: Visualizing Mathematical Solution Procedures Katharina Scheiter University of Tuebingen) (2006) 9-25" DOI : 10.1016/j.chb.2005.01.009 #12;Making the abstract concrete 2 Abstract This article

  9. E. F. Redish 1 DTS Proposal Learning the Language of Science: Advanced Math for Concrete Thinkers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maryland at College Park, University of

    E. F. Redish 1 DTS Proposal Learning the Language of Science: Advanced Math for Concrete Thinkers, differential equations, and Fourier transforms, many concrete thinkers find these topics to be insurmount- able to teach abstract math to concrete thinkers could have a broad impact beyond physics. Many fields

  10. Numerical determination of the tensile response and the dissipated fracture energy of concrete: role of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Numerical determination of the tensile response and the dissipated fracture energy of concrete concrete can be considered as a mix of coarse aggregates with a mortar paste matrix. In this paper we of concrete. Each coarse aggregate is assumed to be circular with six different radiuses following

  11. SERVICEABILITY OF CONCRETE BEAMS PRESTRESSED BY CARBON FffiRE REINFORCED PLASTIC .RODS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SERVICEABILITY OF CONCRETE BEAMS PRESTRESSED BY CARBON FffiRE REINFORCED PLASTIC .RODS A of Manitoba to study the serviceability of concrete beams prestressed by carbon fibre reinforced plastic (CFRP) rods. The experimental program consisted of eight concrete beams prestressed by CFRP rods and two

  12. A continuum damage modelling of quasi-static fatigue strength of plain concrete

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    A continuum damage modelling of quasi-static fatigue strength of plain concrete S. H. Maia,b , F of concrete. The approach is based on the framework of continuum damage mechanics where the fatigue model fatigue tests have been performed on a concrete the formulation of which is close to the one used

  13. The Role of Concrete Marine Structures in the Recovery of Energy and Natural Resources from the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    The Role of Concrete Marine Structures in the Recovery of Energy and Natural Resources from Concrete materials are derived from some of the most abundant and economically available sources on this planet. Recent advancements in the development of concrete technology related to the durability, strength

  14. IMPACT OF ALTERNATIVE CEMENTITIOUS MATERIAL ON THE1 MECHANICAL AND TRANSFER PROPERTIES OF CONCRETE2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OF CONCRETE2 3 Alexandre Pavoine, David Harbec, Thierry Chaussadent, Arezki Tagnit-Hamou and Loïc4 Divet5. The subject of his PhD thesis was the risk of development of Delayed9 Ettringite Formation in concretes. His research interests include durability of concrete and the10 development of alternative materials

  15. Running head: CONCRETE PROSOCIAL GOALS MAXIMIZE HAPPINESS 1 Getting the Most out of Giving

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bogyo, Matthew

    Running head: CONCRETE PROSOCIAL GOALS MAXIMIZE HAPPINESS 1 Getting the Most out of Giving: Concretely Framing a Prosocial Goal Maximizes Happiness Melanie Rudda University of Houston Jennifer Aakerb Melcher Hall, Houston, TX 77204-6021; Email: mrrudd@bauer.uh.edu; Phone: 713.743.4572. #12;CONCRETE

  16. Hybrid Control Charts for Active Control and Monitoring of Concrete Strength

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mobasher, Barzin

    Hybrid Control Charts for Active Control and Monitoring of Concrete Strength Busaba Laungrungrong1 ; Barzin Mobasher2 ; Douglas Montgomery3 ; and Connie M. Borror4 Abstract: Concrete is the most widely used the efficiency of a concrete production process. Statistical process control is generally applied to gain

  17. MODELLING OF CONCRETE STRUCTURES AFFECTED BY INTERNAL SWELLING REACTIONS: COUPLINGS BETWEEN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Page 1 MODELLING OF CONCRETE STRUCTURES AFFECTED BY INTERNAL SWELLING REACTIONS: COUPLINGS BETWEEN of the affected concrete that generally leads to cracking and decrease of its mechanical properties of the concrete works and structural integrity. To manage with considered suffering structures, it is necessary

  18. From mind to matter: neural correlates of abstract and concrete mindsets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anat, Maril,

    From mind to matter: neural correlates of abstract and concrete mindsets Michael Gilead,1 Nira an abstract (vs concrete) mindset alters the way people construe the world, thereby exerting substantial an abstracting vs concretizing mindsets. Specifically, participants: (i) indicated why perform certain activities

  19. ASSESSING A RECLAIMED CONCRETE UP-CYCLING SCHEME THROUGH LIFE-CYCLE ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ASSESSING A RECLAIMED CONCRETE UP-CYCLING SCHEME THROUGH LIFE-CYCLE ANALYSIS Sylvain Guignot1 Concrete, aggregate, electro-fragmentation, recycling, life-cycle analysis Abstract The present study evaluates the environmental impacts of a recycling scheme for gravels from building concretes wastes

  20. The influence of abstract and concrete mindsets on anticipating and guiding others' self-regulatory effortsq

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freitas, Antonio L.

    The influence of abstract and concrete mindsets on anticipating and guiding others' self the impact of abstract and concrete mindsets on attention to goal-relevant aspects of others' situations. An abstract (relative to a concrete) mindset, by making accessible the cognitive operation of considering

  1. Linseed Oil-Based Concrete Surface Treatment -for Building and Highway Structures in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Linseed Oil-Based Concrete Surface Treatment -for Building and Highway Structures in Hong Kong Y using jour Canadian linseed oil- based sealants on concrete specimens madejrom G30120 and G45120 Keywords: Unseed Oil, Concrete Surface Treatment, Salt Spray Resistance, Carbonation, Bond Strength, Ultra

  2. A model for reactive porous transport during re-wetting of hardened concrete

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stockie, John

    A model for reactive porous transport during re-wetting of hardened concrete Michael Chapwanya residing in the porous concrete matrix. The main hypothesis in this model is that the reaction product hydration; Porous media; Reaction-diffusion equations; Vari- able porosity. 1. Introduction Concrete

  3. A MOVING-BOUNDARY PROBLEM FOR CONCRETE CARBONATION: GLOBAL EXISTENCE AND UNIQUENESS OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eindhoven, Technische Universiteit

    in a porous solid ­ concrete ­ which incorporates slow diffusive transport, interfacial exchange between wet of gaseous CO2 from the atmosphere penetrate the concrete via the unsaturated porous matrix. After enteringA MOVING-BOUNDARY PROBLEM FOR CONCRETE CARBONATION: GLOBAL EXISTENCE AND UNIQUENESS OF WEAK

  4. Concrete calcium leaching at variable temperature: experimental data and numerical model inverse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    , concrete porous solution is very basic (pH around 13) and several ionic species are highly concentrated [1Concrete calcium leaching at variable temperature: experimental data and numerical model inverse/DSU/SSIAD/BERIS, Fontenay-aux-Roses, France Abstract A simplified model for calcium leaching in concrete is presented

  5. Effect of Electric Arc Furnace Bag House Dust on Concrete Durability Researcher: Fahad Al-Mutlaq

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birmingham, University of

    Effect of Electric Arc Furnace Bag House Dust on Concrete Durability Researcher: Fahad Al billions of dollars annually. While steel is normally protected from corrosion in concrete by a passive of the effects of addition of Bag House Dust (BHD) on aspects of concrete durability. BHD is a fine powder

  6. Effect of coating on the hygric performance of a hemp concrete wall Yacine At Oumziane 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Effect of coating on the hygric performance of a hemp concrete wall Yacine Aït Ouméziane 1 , Sophie de Génie Mécanique, Rennes, France Keywords: building material, HAM modelling, hysteresis, hemp concrete, coating ABSTRACT Constructions built with environmentally friendly materials like hemp concrete

  7. Pentek concrete scabbling system: Baseline report; Greenbook (chapter)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pentek scabbling technology was tested at Florida International University (FIU) and is being evaluated as a baseline technology. This report evaluates it for safety and health issues. It is a commercially available technology and has been used for various projects at locations throughout the country. The Pentek concrete scabbling system consisted of the MOOSE, SQUIRREL-I, and SQUIRREL-III scabblers. The scabblers are designed to scarify concrete floors and slabs using cross-section, tungsten carbide tipped bits. The bits are designed to remove concrete in 318 inch increments. The bits are either 9-tooth or demolition type. The scabblers are used with a vacuum system designed to collect and filter the concrete dust and contamination that is removed from the surface. The safety and health evaluation conducted during the testing demonstration focused on two main areas of exposure: dust and noise. Dust exposure was minimal, but noise exposure was significant. Further testing for each of these exposures is recommended. Because of the outdoor environment where the testing demonstration took place, results may be inaccurate. It is feasible that the dust and noise levels will be higher in an enclosed operating environment. Other areas of concern were arm-hand vibration, whole-body vibration, ergonomics, heat stress, tripping hazards, electrical hazards, machine guarding, and lockout/tagout.

  8. Permeable Interlocking Concrete Pavement (PICP) for Stormwater Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Permeable Interlocking Concrete Pavement (PICP) for Stormwater Management Benefits and Uses Potential for Extended Pavement Life Due to Well Drained Base and Reduced Freeze-Thaw No curing time Cost Can Be Comparable for PICP with Reduced Stormwater Infrastructure VS. Standard Pavement

  9. Research in nondestructive evaluation techniques for nuclear reactor concrete structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clayton, Dwight; Smith, Cyrus [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the Materials Aging and Degradation (MAaD) Pathway of the Department of Energy's Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is to develop the scientific basis for understanding and predicting longterm environmental degradation behavior of material in nuclear power plants and to provide data and methods to assess the performance of systems, structures, and components (SSCs) essential to safe and sustained nuclear power plant operations. The understanding of aging-related phenomena and their impacts on SSCs is expected to be a significant issue for any nuclear power plant planning for long-term operations (i.e. service beyond the initial license renewal period). Management of those phenomena and their impacts during long-term operations can be better enable by improved methods and techniques for detection, monitoring, and prediction of SSC degradation. The MAaD Pathway R and D Roadmap for Concrete, 'Light Water Reactor Sustainability Nondestructive Evaluation for Concrete Research and Development Roadmap', focused initial research efforts on understanding the recent concrete issues at nuclear power plants and identifying the availability of concrete samples for NDE techniques evaluation and testing. [1] An overview of the research performed by ORNL in these two areas is presented here.

  10. INTERIM REPORT ON CONCRETE DEGRADATION MECHANISMS AND ONLINE MONITORING TECHNIQUES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahadevan, Sankaran; Agarwal, Vivek; Neal, Kyle; Kosson, David; Adams, Douglas

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The existing fleets of nuclear power plants in the United States have initial operating licenses of 40 years, though most these plants have applied for and received license extensions. As plant structures, systems, and components age, their useful lifeconsidering both structural integrity and performanceis reduced as a result of deterioration of the materials. The online monitoring of concrete structure conducted under the Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control Technologies Pathway of the Light Water Reactor Sustainability program at Idaho National Laboratory will develop and demonstrate concrete structures health monitoring capabilities. Assessment and management of aging concrete structures in nuclear plants require a more systematic approach than simple reliance on existing code margins of safety. Therefore, the structural health monitoring is required to produce actionable information regarding structural integrity that supports operational and maintenance decisions. Through this research project, several national laboratories and Vanderbilt University proposes to develop a framework of research activities for the health monitoring of nuclear power plant concrete structures that includes integration of four elementsdamage modeling, monitoring, data analytics, and uncertainty quantification. This report briefly discusses available techniques and ongoing challenges in each of the four elements of the proposed framework with emphasis on degradation mechanisms and online monitoring techniques.

  11. Concrete Company Aims Higher for More Wind Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Today, most steel towers that support utility-scale turbines stand about 80 meters tall, but the Tindall Corporation wants to go higher using precast concrete to raise turbines over 100 meters in height to capture stronger, steadier winds - and more energy.

  12. Salt Frost Deterioration in Concrete Pavement --Causes and Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salt Frost Deterioration in Concrete Pavement --Causes and Mitigation Zhichao Liu, Will Hansen and special effects such as surface tension and osmotic effect (salt solution). Below the nucleation the surface contains a salt solution, pore suction attracts surface liquid and additional ice growth may

  13. Concrete Structure Design Using Mixed-Integer Nonlinear ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Nov 24, 2009 ... we find an average cost savings over typical-practice design ... The demand on the RC elements in terms of displacements and forces depends on ... forces provided by the concrete, elastic-perfectly plastic material response ...... function values to find the best locally optimal solution, we use only the initial...

  14. Light weight concrete: 226 K contents and dose

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, K.N.

    gamma spectrometry. All the radionuclide contents except those for the PFA autoclave aerated concrete been determined using high- resolution gamma spectrometry. The results have been compared with those1 for construction materials for dwellings. The gamma-dose rate for an indoor environment

  15. Concrete Strength Data 1 0.45 2954

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vardeman, Stephen B.

    .5 2739 7 0.55 2652 8 0.55 2607 9 0.55 2583 0 #12;Response: Concrete Compressive Strength Summary of Fit.963004 26.75521 2765.889 9 Lack of Fit Source Lack of Fit Pure Error Total Error DF 1 6 7 Sum of Squares 672>F Press 8682.2673817 x 2 #12;

  16. NDE of Concrete Structures Strengthened with FRP Using Infrared Thermography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Entekhabi, Dara

    NDE of Concrete Structures Strengthened with FRP Using Infrared Thermography Monica A. STARNES the effectiveness of infrared thermography to estimate the width of subsurface flaws in fiber-reinforced polymer infrared thermography, i.e., not only detecting but also characterizing subsurface flaws. Finite element

  17. Crack-based analysis of concrete with brittle reinforcement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burgoyne, Chris

    { FaberMaunsell Ltd; University of Cambridge Brittle reinforcement (such as fibre-reinforced plastic to the surround- ing concrete, at a crack surface sL=sR s on the left/right side of a crack u increase in unbonded

  18. Development of a Reaction Signature for Combined Concrete Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghanem, Hassan A.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    chemical reaction between the reactive silica existent in some types of rocks and alkali hydroxides in the concrete pore water. The product of this reaction is a gel that is hygroscopic in nature. When the gel absorbs moisture, it swells leading to tensile...

  19. Center for By-Products Utilization Sustainable Concrete with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saldin, Dilano

    , and emission of greenhouse gases, by using recycled materials. · The global potential for CO2 reduction through; Responsible for about 7% of total anthropogenic CO2 emissions; and, Each construction activity involving-Products Utilization Why Sustainable Concrete? (cont'd) Global CO2 emissions from fossil fuels use and cement

  20. HYDRAULIC AND PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF SALTSTONE GROUTS AND VAULT CONCRETES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dixon, K; John Harbour, J; Mark Phifer, M

    2008-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF), located in the Z-Area of the Savannah River Site (SRS), is used for the disposal of low-level radioactive salt solution. The SDF currently contains two vaults: Vault 1 (6 cells) and Vault 4 (12 cells). Additional disposal cells are currently in the design phase. The individual cells of the saltstone facility are filled with saltstone. Saltstone is produced by mixing the low-level radioactive salt solution, with blast furnace slag, fly ash, and cement (dry premix) to form a dense, micro-porous, monolithic, low-level radioactive waste form. The saltstone is pumped into the disposal cells where it subsequently solidifies. Significant effort has been undertaken to accurately model the movement of water and contaminants through the facility. Key to this effort is an accurate understanding of the hydraulic and physical properties of the solidified saltstone. To date, limited testing has been conducted to characterize the saltstone. The primary focus of this task was to estimate the hydraulic and physical properties of three types of saltstone and two vault concretes. The saltstone formulations included saltstone premix batched with (1) Deliquification, Dissolution, and Adjustment (DDA) salt simulant (w/pm 0.60), (2) Actinide Removal Process (ARP)/Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) salt simulant (w/pm 0.60), and (3) Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) salt simulant (w/pm 0.60). The vault concrete formulations tested included the Vault 1/4 concrete and two variations of the Vault 2 concrete (Mix 1 and Mix 2). Wet properties measured for the saltstone formulations included yield stress, plastic viscosity, wet unit weight, bleed water volume, gel time, set time, and heat of hydration. Hydraulic and physical properties measured on the cured saltstone and concrete samples included saturated hydraulic conductivity, moisture retention, compressive strength, porosity, particle density, and dry bulk density. These properties were determined following a minimum 28 day curing period. Additional testing of the three saltstone formulations was conducted following a minimum 90 day curing period. The compressive strength of each saltstone and concrete material was measured at approximately 14, 28, 56, and 90 days. Recommended hydraulic property values for each saltstone grout and the vault concretes are provided. The hydraulic properties provided for each material include the saturated hydraulic conductivity, dry bulk density, particle density, and porosity. In addition, water retention data are presented for each material along with the van Genuchten transport parameters as determined using the RETC code.

  1. Numerical homogenization of concrete microstructures without explicit meshes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanahuja, Julien, E-mail: julien.sanahuja@edf.fr; Toulemonde, Charles, E-mail: charles.toulemonde@edf.fr

    2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Life management of electric hydro or nuclear power plants requires to estimate long-term concrete properties on facilities, for obvious safety and serviceability reasons. Decades-old structures are foreseen to be operational for several more decades. As a large number of different concrete formulations are found in EDF facilities, empirical models based on many experiments cannot be an option for a large fleet of power plant buildings. To build predictive models, homogenization techniques offer an appealing alternative. To properly upscale creep, especially at long term, a rather precise description of the microstructure is required. However, the complexity of the morphology of concrete poses several challenges. In particular, concrete is formulated to maximize the packing density of the granular skeleton, leading to aggregates spanning several length scales with small inter particle spacings. Thus, explicit meshing of realistic concrete microstructures is either out of reach of current meshing algorithms or would produce a number of degrees of freedom far higher than the current generic FEM codes capabilities. This paper proposes a method to deal with complex matrix-inclusions microstructures such as the ones encountered at the mortar or concrete scales, without explicitly meshing them. The microstructure is superimposed to an independent mesh, which is a regular Cartesian grid. This inevitably yields so called 'gray elements', spanning across multiple phases. As the reliability of the estimate of the effective properties highly depends on the behavior affected to these gray elements, special attention is paid to them. As far as the question of the solvers is concerned, generic FEM codes are found to lack efficiency: they cannot reach high enough levels of discretization with classical free meshes, and they do not take advantage of the regular structure of the mesh. Thus, a specific finite differences/finite volumes solver has been developed. At first, generic off-the-shelf linear system solvers were used. To further improve the efficiency in terms of memory requirements, specific variants of the preconditioned conjugate gradient were implemented. This allowed to homogenize the conductivity of a concrete-like microstructure using more than 10{sup 9} degrees of freedom on a rather common hardware for 2010 (a PC embedding 48 GB of RAM). Taking benefit of the properties of the regular Cartesian grid we have also investigated a multi-level method to improve the CPU efficiency of the code.

  2. Computers and Concrete, Vol. 3, No. 5 (2006) 313-334 313 Design optimization of reinforced concrete structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    incorporates optimal stiffness correlation among all structural members and results in cost savings over quadratic programming; cost savings; reinforced concrete; optimal stiffness distri- bution; optimal member correlation among structural members and results in cost savings over typical state-of-the-practice design

  3. Compact Imaging Spectrometer Utilizing Immersed Gratings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chrisp, Michael P. (Danville, CA); Lerner, Scott A. (Corvallis, OR); Kuzmenko, Paul J. (Livermore, CA); Bennett, Charles L. (Livermore, CA)

    2006-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A compact imaging spectrometer with an immersive diffraction grating that compensates optical distortions. The imaging spectrometer comprises an entrance slit for transmitting light, a system for receiving the light and directing the light, an immersion grating, and a detector array. The entrance slit, the system for receiving the light, the immersion grating, and the detector array are positioned wherein the entrance slit transmits light to the system for receiving the light and the system for receiving the light directs the light to the immersion grating and the immersion grating receives the light and directs the light through an optical element to the detector array.

  4. Raytheon's next generation compact inline cryocooler architecture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schaefer, B. R.; Bellis, L.; Ellis, M. J.; Conrad, T. [Raytheon Space and Airborne Systems, 2000 E. El Segundo Blvd., El Segundo, CA 90245 (United States)

    2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the 1970s, Raytheon has developed, built, tested and integrated high performance cryocoolers. Our versatile designs for single and multi-stage cryocoolers provide reliable operation for temperatures from 10 to 200 Kelvin with power levels ranging from 50 W to nearly 600 W. These advanced cryocoolers incorporate clearance seals, flexure suspensions, hermetic housings and dynamic balancing to provide long service life and reliable operation in all relevant environments. Today, sensors face a multitude of cryocooler integration challenges such as exported disturbance, efficiency, scalability, maturity, and cost. As a result, cryocooler selection is application dependent, oftentimes requiring extensive trade studies to determine the most suitable architecture. To optimally meet the needs of next generation passive IR sensors, the Compact Inline Raytheon Stirling 1-Stage (CI-RS1), Compact Inline Raytheon Single Stage Pulse Tube (CI-RP1) and Compact Inline Raytheon Hybrid Stirling/Pulse Tube 2-Stage (CI-RSP2) cryocoolers are being developed to satisfy this suite of requirements. This lightweight, compact, efficient, low vibration cryocooler combines proven 1-stage (RS1 or RP1) and 2-stage (RSP2) cold-head architectures with an inventive set of warm-end mechanisms into a single cooler module, allowing the moving mechanisms for the compressor and the Stirling displacer to be consolidated onto a common axis and in a common working volume. The CI cryocooler is a significant departure from the current Stirling cryocoolers in which the compressor mechanisms are remote from the Stirling displacer mechanism. Placing all of the mechanisms in a single volume and on a single axis provides benefits in terms of package size (30% reduction), mass (30% reduction), thermodynamic efficiency (>20% improvement) and exported vibration performance (?25 mN peak in all three orthogonal axes at frequencies from 1 to 500 Hz). The main benefit of axial symmetry is that proven balancing techniques and hardware can be utilized to null all motion along the common axis. Low vibration translates to better sensor performance resulting in simpler, more direct mechanical mounting configurations, eliminating the need for convoluted, expensive, massive, long lead damping hardware.

  5. Charlton Compact Power Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, click here.Telluric Survey asWest,CEICharlotte County, Virginia:Vermont:Compact

  6. Compact Power Inc CPI | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformationNew York:GovernorCommons Capital JumpCompact Power Inc CPI

  7. Mertol, Rizkalla, Zia and Mirmiran 2006 CBC FLEXURAL DESIGN USING HIGH-STRENGTH CONCRETE UP TO 20 KSI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mertol, Rizkalla, Zia and Mirmiran 2006 CBC 1 FLEXURAL DESIGN USING HIGH-STRENGTH CONCRETE UP TO 20 findings of the fundamental characteristics of high-strength concrete for the flexural design of bridge Design Specifications to extend the use of concrete strength up to 18 ksi. A total of 15 plain concrete

  8. Compact solid source of hydrogen gas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kravitz, Stanley H.; Hecht, Andrew M.; Sylwester, Alan P.; Bell, Nelson S.

    2004-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A compact solid source of hydrogen gas, where the gas is generated by contacting water with micro-disperse particles of sodium borohydride in the presence of a catalyst, such as cobalt or ruthenium. The micro-disperse particles can have a substantially uniform diameter of 1-10 microns, and preferably about 3-5 microns. Ruthenium or cobalt catalytic nanoparticles can be incorporated in the micro-disperse particles of sodium borohydride, which allows a rapid and complete reaction to occur without the problems associated with caking and scaling of the surface by the reactant product sodium metaborate. A closed loop water management system can be used to recycle wastewater from a PEM fuel cell to supply water for reacting with the micro-disperse particles of sodium borohydride in a compact hydrogen gas generator. Capillary forces can wick water from a water reservoir into a packed bed of micro-disperse fuel particles, eliminating the need for using an active pump.

  9. Compact wavefunctions from compressed imaginary time evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jarrod R. McClean; Aln Aspuru-Guzik

    2014-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Simulation of quantum systems promises to deliver physical and chemical predictions for the frontiers of technology. Unfortunately, the exact representation of these systems is plagued by the exponential growth of dimension with the number of particles, or colloquially, the curse of dimensionality. The success of approximation methods has hinged on the relative simplicity of physical systems with respect to the exponentially complex worst case. Exploiting this relative simplicity has required detailed knowledge of the physical system under study. In this work, we introduce a general and efficient black box method for many-body quantum systems that utilizes technology from compressed sensing to find the most compact wavefunction possible without detailed knowledge of the system. It is a Multicomponent Adaptive Greedy Iterative Compression (MAGIC) scheme. No knowledge is assumed in the structure of the problem other than correct particle statistics. This method can be applied to many quantum systems such as spins, qubits, oscillators, or electronic systems. As an application, we use this technique to compute ground state electronic wavefunctions of hydrogen fluoride and recover 98% of the basis set correlation energy or equivalently 99.996% of the total energy with $50$ configurations out of a possible $10^7$. Building from this compactness, we introduce the idea of nuclear union configuration interaction for improving the description of reaction coordinates and use it to study the dissociation of hydrogen fluoride and the helium dimer.

  10. ROSAT Observations of Compact Groups of Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Saracco; P. Ciliegi

    1994-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A search for X-ray emission from compact groups revealed detection from 8 out of the 12 HCG images extracted from the ROSAT public archive. For two of them the X-ray emission originates from galaxies in the group. On the contrary, three groups show an extended emission clearly caused by hot intracluster gas. A Raymond-Smith hot plasma model provides an excellent fit to the X-ray spectra. The estimated temperatures are distributed in a quite narrow range (from 0.73 to 0.92 keV) and are consistent, within the errors, with 0.9 keV. The luminosity ranging from 0.75 to $5.1\\cdot10^{42}$erg s$^{-1}$. The most relevant result is the low metal abundance surely detected in two of them and likely in a third that characterizes the hot gas cloud responsible for the X-ray emission. The data concerning the remaining 3 detected compact groups are not sufficient to discriminate with certainty between diffuse and/or point-like X-ray emission. However the results of the spectral analysis point to the presence of a hot gas again with low metal abundance.

  11. Strange Quark Matter and Compact Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fridolin Weber

    2004-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Astrophysicists distinguish between three different types of compact stars. These are white dwarfs, neutron stars, and black holes. The former contain matter in one of the densest forms found in the Universe which, together with the unprecedented progress in observational astronomy, make such stars superb astrophysical laboratories for a broad range of most striking physical phenomena. These range from nuclear processes on the stellar surface to processes in electron degenerate matter at subnuclear densities to boson condensates and the existence of new states of baryonic matter--like color superconducting quark matter--at supernuclear densities. More than that, according to the strange matter hypothesis strange quark matter could be more stable than nuclear matter, in which case neutron stars should be largely composed of pure quark matter possibly enveloped in thin nuclear crusts. Another remarkable implication of the hypothesis is the possible existence of a new class of white dwarfs. This article aims at giving an overview of all these striking physical possibilities, with an emphasis on the astrophysical phenomenology of strange quark matter. Possible observational signatures associated with the theoretically proposed states of matter inside compact stars are discussed as well. They will provide most valuable information about the phase diagram of superdense nuclear matter at high baryon number density but low temperature, which is not accessible to relativistic heavy ion collision experiments.

  12. Compact reactor/ORC power source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meier, K.L.; Kirchner, W.L.; Willcutt, G.J.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A compact power source that combines an organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) electric generator with a nuclear reactor heat source is being designed and fabricated. Incorporating existing ORC technology with proven reactor technology, the compact reactor/ORC power source offers high reliability while minimizing the need for component development. Thermal power at 125 kWt is removed from the coated particle fueled, graphite moderated reactor by heat pipes operating at 500/sup 0/C. Outside the reactor vessel and connected to the heat pipes are vaporizers in which the toluene ORC working fluid is heated to 370/sup 0/C. In the turbine-alternator-pump (TAP) combined-rotating unit, the thermal energy of the toluene is converted to 25 kWe of electric power. Lumped parameter systems analyses combined with a finite element thermal analysis have aided in the power source design. The analyses have provided assurance of reliable multiyear normal operation as well as full power operation with upset conditions, such as failed heat pipes and inoperative ORC vaporizers. Because of inherent high reliability, long life, and insensitivity to upset conditions, this power source is especially suited for use in remote, inaccessible locations where fuel delivery and maintenance costs are high. 10 refs.

  13. Tidal deformations of a spinning compact object

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paolo Pani; Leonardo Gualtieri; Andrea Maselli; Valeria Ferrari

    2015-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The deformability of a compact object induced by a perturbing tidal field is encoded in the tidal Love numbers, which depend sensibly on the object's internal structure. These numbers are known only for static, spherically-symmetric objects. As a first step to compute the tidal Love numbers of a spinning compact star, here we extend powerful perturbative techniques to compute the exterior geometry of a spinning object distorted by an axisymmetric tidal field to second order in the angular momentum. The spin of the object introduces couplings between electric and magnetic deformations and new classes of induced Love numbers emerge. For example, a spinning object immersed in a quadrupolar, electric tidal field can acquire some induced mass, spin, quadrupole, octupole and hexadecapole moments to second order in the spin. The deformations are encoded in a set of inhomogeneous differential equations which, remarkably, can be solved analytically in vacuum. We discuss certain subtleties in defining the multipole moments of the central object, which are due to the difficulty in separating the tidal field from the linear response of the object in the solution. By extending the standard procedure to identify the linear response in the static case, we prove analytically that the Love numbers of a Kerr black hole remain zero to second order in the spin. As a by-product, we provide the explicit form for a slowly-rotating, tidally-deformed Kerr black hole to quadratic order in the spin, and discuss its geodesic and geometrical properties.

  14. Compaction of Norphlet sandstones, Rankin County, Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McBride, E.F.

    1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fabric and porosity changes resulting from compaction were studied in sandstones from three cores sampled at depths between 15,900 and 22,500 ft. Point counts of 30 thin sections indicate that 0.4% of the rock volume was lost by ductile grain deformation and 3% by pressure solution at both grain contacts and at widely spaced stylolites. Pre-cement porosities of eolian sandstone range from 27 to 35% (mean = 29%), indicating that a total of from 10 to 18% porosity (mean = 16%) was lost by compaction (assuming 45% initial porosity). The difference between the total porosity loss and the sum of the other two processes is assumed to be the porosity lost by grain rearrangement (mean = 12.6%). The amount of pressure solution at grain contacts for each well is independent of depth, temperature, and amount of both quartz cement and total cement. Stylolites transect both grains and cements, which indicates they formed late in the diagenetic sequence. Silica released by pressure solution at quartz grain contacts could not be the sole source and was probably not even the major source of quartz cement in the formation, because cementation by quartz preceded the episode of strong pressure solution. In addition, the volume of silica released by pressure solution appears to have been inadequate to provide the volume of quartz cement present.

  15. Compact Stirling cooling of astronomical detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raskin, Gert; Pessemier, Wim; Padilla, Jesus Perez; Vandersteen, Jeroen

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MAIA, a three-channel imager targeting fast cadence photometry, was recently installed on the Mercator telescope (La Palma, Spain). This instrument observes a 9.4 x 14.1 arcmin field of view simultaneously in three color bands ($u$, $g$ and $r$), using three of the largest (un-) available frame-transfer CCDs, namely the 2k x 6k CCD42-C0 from e2v. As these detectors are housed in three separate cryostats, compact cooling devices are required that offer sufficient power to cool the large chips to a temperature of 165K. We explored a broad spectrum of cooling options and technologies to cool the MAIA detectors. Finally, compact free-piston Stirling coolers were selected, namely the CryoTel MT cryo-coolers from SUNPOWER, that can extract 5W of heat at a temperature of 77K. In this contribution we give details of the MAIA detector cooling solution. We also discuss the general usability of this type of closed-cycle cryo-coolers for astronomical detectors. They offer distinct advantages but the vibrations caused by ...

  16. advanced compact accelerator: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of suitable neutron sources that are compactible with installation in a hospital enviroment. A low-energy accelerator-based neutron source has the potential for meeting...

  17. Compact heat exchangers for condensation applications: Yesterday, today and tomorrow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Panchal, C.B.

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Compact heat exchangers are being increasingly considered for condensation applications in the process, cryogenic, aerospace, power and refrigeration industries. In this paper, different configurations available for condensation applications are analyzed and the current state-of-the-knowledge for the design of compact condensers is evaluated. The key technical issues for the design and development of compact heat exchangers for condensation applications are analyzed and major advantages are identified. The experimental data and performance prediction methods reported in the literature are analyzed to evaluate the present design capabilities for different compact heat-exchanger configurations. The design flexibility is evaluated for the development of new condensation applications, including integration with other process equipment.

  18. Poroelastic damage rheology: Dilation, compaction, and failure of rocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyakhovsky, Vladimir

    Poroelastic damage rheology: Dilation, compaction, and failure of rocks Yariv Hamiel Institute December 2004; Published 26 January 2005. Hamiel, Y., V. Lyakhovsky, and A. Agnon (2005), Poroelastic

  19. Development, Test and Demonstration of a Cost-Effective, Compact...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    taylor.pdf More Documents & Publications Development, Test and Demonstration of a Cost-Effective, Compact, Light-Weight, and Scalable High Temperature Inverter for HEVs, PHEVs, and...

  20. accreting compact stars: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of the millisecond brightness oscillations from low mass X-ray binaries during thermonuclear bursts can provide us with important information about compact star parameters....