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1

Carbonation Mechanism of Reservoir Rock by Supercritical Carbon...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technologies Project Type Topic 2 Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Reservoir Rock Chemical Interactions Project Description Supercritical CO2 is currently becoming a more...

2

Carbonation Mechanism of Reservoir Rock by Supercritical Carbon Dioxide  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Carbonation Mechanism of Reservoir Rock by Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Carbonation Mechanism of Reservoir Rock by Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Geothermal Lab Call Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Carbonation Mechanism of Reservoir Rock by Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Project Type / Topic 1 Laboratory Call for Submission of Applications for Research, Development and Analysis of Geothermal Technologies Project Type / Topic 2 Supercritical Carbon Dioxide / Reservoir Rock Chemical Interactions Project Description Supercritical CO2 is currently becoming a more common fluid for extracting volatile oil and fragrance compounds from various raw materials that are used in perfumery. Furthermore, its use as a heat transmission fluid is very attractive because of the greater uptake capability of heat from hot reservoir rock, compared with that of water. However, one concern was the reactivity of CO2 with clay and rock minerals in aqueous and non-aqueous environments. So if this reaction leads to the formation of water-soluble carbonates, such formation could be detrimental to the integrity of wellbore infrastructure.

3

Supercritical Carbon Dioxide / Reservoir Rock Chemical Interactions | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Supercritical Carbon Dioxide / Reservoir Rock Chemical Interactions Supercritical Carbon Dioxide / Reservoir Rock Chemical Interactions Jump to: navigation, search Geothermal Lab Call Projects for Supercritical Carbon Dioxide / Reservoir Rock Chemical Interactions Loading map... {"format":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"limit":200,"offset":0,"link":"all","sort":[""],"order":[],"headers":"show","mainlabel":"","intro":"","outro":"","searchlabel":"\u2026 further results","default":"","geoservice":"google","zoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","forceshow":true,"showtitle":true,"hidenamespace":false,"template":false,"title":"","label":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"locations":[{"text":"

4

Synchrotron X-ray Studies of Supercritical Carbon Dioxide/ Reservoir...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Synchrotron X-ray Studies of Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Reservoir Rock Interfaces Geothermal Lab Call Project Jump to:...

5

Formation of rare earth carbonates using supercritical carbon dioxide  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention relates to a process for the rapid, high yield conversion of select rare earth oxides or hydroxides, to their corresponding carbonates by contact with supercritical carbon dioxide.

Fernando, Quintus (Tucson, AZ); Yanagihara, Naohisa (Zacopan, MX); Dyke, James T. (Santa Fe, NM); Vemulapalli, Krishna (Tuscon, AZ)

1991-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

6

Solubilities of phenols in supercritical carbon dioxide  

SciTech Connect

Equilibrium solubilities of pure anthracene at 50 C, 1-naphthol at 35, 45, and 55 C, and hydroquinone at 35 and 45 C in supercritical carbon dioxide over a pressure range of about 85--300 bar have been measured using a supercritical fluid extractor coupled with an external high-pressure liquid chromatographer. The solubility results, along with those for other phenols reported in the literature, are correlated with the translated-modified Peng Robinson equation of state.

Coutsikos, P.; Magoulas, K.; Tassios, D. [National Technical Univ. of Athens (Greece)

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

SunShot Initiative: 10-Megawatt Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Turbine  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

10-Megawatt Supercritical Carbon 10-Megawatt Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Turbine to someone by E-mail Share SunShot Initiative: 10-Megawatt Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Turbine on Facebook Tweet about SunShot Initiative: 10-Megawatt Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Turbine on Twitter Bookmark SunShot Initiative: 10-Megawatt Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Turbine on Google Bookmark SunShot Initiative: 10-Megawatt Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Turbine on Delicious Rank SunShot Initiative: 10-Megawatt Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Turbine on Digg Find More places to share SunShot Initiative: 10-Megawatt Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Turbine on AddThis.com... Concentrating Solar Power Systems Components Competitive Awards CSP Research & Development Thermal Storage CSP Recovery Act Baseload CSP SunShot Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative

8

Coiled tubing drilling with supercritical carbon dioxide  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for increasing the efficiency of drilling operations by using a drilling fluid material that exists as supercritical fluid or a dense gas at temperature and pressure conditions existing at a drill site. The material can be used to reduce mechanical drilling forces, to remove cuttings, or to jet erode a substrate. In one embodiment, carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) is used as the material for drilling within wells in the earth, where the normal temperature and pressure conditions cause CO.sub.2 to exist as a supercritical fluid. Supercritical carbon dioxide (SC--CO.sub.2) is preferably used with coiled tube (CT) drilling equipment. The very low viscosity SC--CO.sub.2 provides efficient cooling of the drill head, and efficient cuttings removal. Further, the diffusivity of SC--CO.sub.2 within the pores of petroleum formations is significantly higher than that of water, making jet erosion using SC--CO.sub.2 much more effective than water jet erosion. SC--CO.sub.2 jets can be used to assist mechanical drilling, for erosion drilling, or for scale removal. A choke manifold at the well head or mud cap drilling equipment can be used to control the pressure within the borehole, to ensure that the temperature and pressure conditions necessary for CO.sub.2 to exist as either a supercritical fluid or a dense gas occur at the drill site. Spent CO.sub.2 can be vented to the atmosphere, collected for reuse, or directed into the formation to aid in the recovery of petroleum.

Kolle , Jack J. (Seattle, WA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Control strategies for supercritical carbon dioxide power conversion systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The supercritical carbon dioxide (S-C02) recompression cycle is a promising advanced power conversion cycle which couples well to numerous advanced nuclear reactor designs. This thesis investigates the dynamic simulation ...

Carstens, Nathan, 1978-

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Synthesis of Amides and Lactams in Supercritical Carbon Dioxide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Supercritical carbon dioxide can be employed as an environmentally friendly alternative to conventional organic solvents for the synthesis of a variety of carboxylic amides. The addition of amines to ketenes generated in ...

Mak, Xiao Yin

11

SunShot Initiative: Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Turbo-Expander and Heat  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Turbo-Expander and Heat Exchangers to someone by E-mail Share SunShot Initiative: Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Turbo-Expander and Heat Exchangers on Facebook Tweet about SunShot Initiative: Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Turbo-Expander and Heat Exchangers on Twitter Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Turbo-Expander and Heat Exchangers on Google Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Turbo-Expander and Heat Exchangers on Delicious Rank SunShot Initiative: Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Turbo-Expander and Heat Exchangers on Digg Find More places to share SunShot Initiative: Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Turbo-Expander and Heat Exchangers on AddThis.com... Concentrating Solar Power Systems Components

12

Cobalt carbonyl catalyzed olefin hydroformylation in supercritical carbon dioxide  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of olefin hydroformylation is provided wherein an olefin reacts with a carbonyl catalyst and with reaction gases such as hydrogen and carbon monoxide in the presence of a supercritical reaction solvent, such as carbon dioxide. The invention provides higher yields of n-isomer product without the gas-liquid mixing rate limitation seen in conventional Oxo processes using liquid media.

Rathke, Jerome W. (Lockport, IL); Klingler, Robert J. (Westmount, IL)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Cobalt carbonyl catalyzed olefin hydroformylation in supercritical carbon dioxide  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of olefin hydroformylation is provided wherein an olefin reacts with a carbonyl catalyst and with reaction gases such as hydrogen and carbon monoxide in the presence of a supercritical reaction solvent, such as carbon dioxide. The invention provides higher yields of n-isomer product without the gas-liquid mixing rate limitation seen in conventional Oxo processes using liquid media.

Rathke, J.W.; Klingler, R.J.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

14

Cobalt carbonyl catalyzed olefin hydroformylation in supercritical carbon dioxide  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of olefin hydroformylation is provided wherein an olefin reacts with a carbonyl catalyst and with reaction gases such as hydrogen and carbon monoxide in the presence of a supercritical reaction solvent, such as carbon dioxide. The invention provides higher yields of n-isomer product without the gas-liquid mixing rate limitation seen in conventional Oxo processes using liquid media.

Rathke, J.W.; Klingler, R.J.

1993-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

15

Corrosion of various engineering alloys in supercritical carbon dioxide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The corrosion resistance of ten engineering alloys were tested in a supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO 2) environment for up to 3000 hours at 610°C and 20MPa. The purpose of this work was to evaluate each alloy as a potential ...

Gibbs, Jonathan Paul

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Fabrication of activated carbon fibers/carbon aerogels composites by gelation and supercritical drying  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fabrication of activated carbon fibers/carbon aerogels composites by gelation and supercritical August 2003) Activated carbon fiber/carbon aerogel (ACF/CA) composites were fabricated by gelling. The ACFs can reinforce the related carbon aerogels when they originally have low mass density and are weak

Liu, Jie

17

Supercritical carbon dioxide cycle control analysis.  

SciTech Connect

This report documents work carried out during FY 2008 on further investigation of control strategies for supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO{sub 2}) Brayton cycle energy converters. The main focus of the present work has been on investigation of the S-CO{sub 2} cycle control and behavior under conditions not covered by previous work. An important scenario which has not been previously calculated involves cycle operation for a Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor (SFR) following a reactor scram event and the transition to the primary coolant natural circulation and decay heat removal. The Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) Plant Dynamics Code has been applied to investigate the dynamic behavior of the 96 MWe (250 MWt) Advanced Burner Test Reactor (ABTR) S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle following scram. The timescale for the primary sodium flowrate to coast down and the transition to natural circulation to occur was calculated with the SAS4A/SASSYS-1 computer code and found to be about 400 seconds. It is assumed that after this time, decay heat is removed by the normal ABTR shutdown heat removal system incorporating a dedicated shutdown heat removal S-CO{sub 2} pump and cooler. The ANL Plant Dynamics Code configured for the Small Secure Transportable Autonomous Reactor (SSTAR) Lead-Cooled Fast Reactor (LFR) was utilized to model the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle with a decaying liquid metal coolant flow to the Pb-to-CO{sub 2} heat exchangers and temperatures reflecting the decaying core power and heat removal by the cycle. The results obtained in this manner are approximate but indicative of the cycle transient performance. The ANL Plant Dynamics Code calculations show that the S-CO{sub 2} cycle can operate for about 400 seconds following the reactor scram driven by the thermal energy stored in the reactor structures and coolant such that heat removal from the reactor exceeds the decay heat generation. Based on the results, requirements for the shutdown heat removal system may be defined. In particular, the peak heat removal capacity of the shutdown heat removal loop may be specified to be 1.1 % of the nominal reactor power. An investigation of the oscillating cycle behavior calculated by the ANL Plant Dynamics Code under specific conditions has been carried out. It has been found that the calculation of unstable operation of the cycle during power reduction to 0 % may be attributed to the modeling of main compressor operation. The most probable reason for such instabilities is the limit of applicability of the currently used one-dimensional compressor performance subroutines which are based on empirical loss coefficients. A development of more detailed compressor design and performance models is required and is recommended for future work in order to better investigate and possibly eliminate the calculated instabilities. Also, as part of such model development, more reliable surge criteria should be developed for compressor operation close to the critical point. It is expected that more detailed compressor models will be developed as a part of validation of the Plant Dynamics Code through model comparison with the experiment data generated in the small S-CO{sub 2} loops being constructed at Barber-Nichols Inc. and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). Although such a comparison activity had been planned to be initiated in FY 2008, data from the SNL compression loop currently in operation at Barber Nichols Inc. has not yet become available by the due date of this report. To enable the transient S-CO{sub 2} cycle investigations to be carried out, the ANL Plant Dynamics Code for the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle was further developed and improved. The improvements include further optimization and tuning of the control mechanisms as well as an adaptation of the code for reactor systems other than the Lead-Cooled Fast Reactor (LFR). Since the focus of the ANL work on S-CO{sub 2} cycle development for the majority of the current year has been on the applicability of the cycle to SFRs, work has started on modification of the ANL Plant Dynamics Code to allow

Moisseytsev, A.; Sienicki, J. J. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

2011-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

18

NETL: Demonstration of a Novel Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Power Cycle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oxy-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control Oxy-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control Demonstration of a Novel Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Power Cycle Utilizing Pressurized Oxy-Combustion in Conjunction with Cryogenic Compression Project No.: DE-FE0009395 Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) is developing a novel supercritical carbon dioxide (sCO2) advanced power system utilizing pressurized oxy-combustion in conjunction with cryogenic compression. The proposed power system offers a leap in overall system efficiency while producing an output stream of sequestration ready CO2 at pipeline pressures. The system leverages developments in pressurized oxy-combustion technology and recent developments in sCO2 power cycles to achieve high net cycle efficiencies and produce CO2 at pipeline pressures without requiring additional compression of the flue gas.

19

Supercritical Fluid Assisted Synthesis and Processing of Carbon Nanotubes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) constitute one of the most fascinating nanomaterials with specific properties and enormous applications. Taking advantages of the unique properties of supercritical fluids (SCFs), various techniques have been developed to produce and process CNTs and related nanostructured materials when conventional techniques become unviable. Herein we propose a critical review of these SCF based techniques. The most relevant characteristics of each technique and the enabled novel structures and functions which are difficult to accomplish by traditional techniques are highlighted.

Ye, Sufang; Wu, Fengming; Ye, Xiangrong; Lin, Yuehe

2009-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

20

The design, synthesis, and optimization of nanomaterials fabricated in supercritical carbon dioxide .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis presents investigations into the design and synthesis of nanomaterials in supercritical carbon dioxide (sc-CO?) as well as novel experimental design methodologies. First, the… (more)

Casciato, Michael John

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rocks supercritical carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Feasibility of Supercritical Carbon Dioxide as a Drilling Fluid for Deep Underbalanced Drilling Operations.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Feasibility of drilling with supercritical carbon dioxide to serve the needs of deep underbalanced drilling operations has been analyzed. A case study involving underbalanced drilling… (more)

Gupta, Anamika

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Study of Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Power Cycle for Low Grade Heat Conversion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research on supercritical carbon dioxide power cycles has been mainly focused on high temperature applications, such as Brayton cycle in a nuclear power plant. This paper conducts a comprehensive study on the feasibility of a CO2-based supercritical power cycle for low-grade heat conversion. Energy and exergy analyses of the cycle were conducted to discuss the obstacles as well as the potentials of using supercritical carbon dioxide as the working fluid for supercritical Rankine cycle, Carbon dioxide has desirable qualities such as low critical temperature, stability, little environmental impact and low cost. However, the low critical temperature might be a disadvantage for the condensation process. Comparison between a carbon dioxide-based supercritical Rankine cycle and an organic fluid-based supercritical Rankine cycle showed that the former needs higher pressure to achieve the same efficiency and a heat recovery system is necessary to desuperheat the turbine exhaust and pre-heat the pressure charged liquid.

Vidhi, Rachana [University of South Florida, Tampa; Goswami, Yogi D. [University of South Florida, Tampa; Chen, Huijuan [University of South Florida, Tampa; Stefanakos, Elias [University of South Florida, Tampa; Kuravi, Sarada [University of South Florida, Tampa; Sabau, Adrian S [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Extraction of iron and calcium from low rank coal by supercritical carbon dioxide with entrainers  

SciTech Connect

Iron and calcium were extracted from low rank coal with supercritical carbon dioxide and methanol, ethanol, acetic acid, acetyl acetone, ethanol and acetic acid, or acetyl acetone and water entrainers at 313.2 K and 15.0 MPa. The low rank coal used in this study was Berau coal from Indonesia. The addition of methanol, ethanol, or acetic acid entrainers in supercritical carbon dioxide showed very limited effect on enhancement of the recovery rates of Fe. The recovery rates of Fe from dried coal by supercritical carbon dioxide with acetyl acetone were low however, the addition of acetyl acetone with water in supercritical carbon dioxide remarkably enhanced the recovery rates of Fe. Water seems to play an important role in extracting Fe from coal with supercritical carbon dioxide and acetyl acetone. On the other hand, the extraction rates of Ca with supercritical carbon dioxide and water, methanol, ethanol, and acetyl acetone entrainers were very low. The addition of acetic acid with or without water in supercritical carbon dioxide slightly enhanced the recovery rates of Ca. The addition of acetic acid with ethanol in supercritical carbon dioxide remarkably enhanced the recovery rates of Ca. The effect of carbon dioxide flow rate and coal particle size on the recovery rates of Fe were examined. The recovery rate of Fe increased with increasing carbon dioxide flow rate and with decreasing particle size of the low rank coal.

Iwai, Y.; Okamoto, N.; Ohta, S.; Arai, Y.; Sakanishi, K. [Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

2007-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

24

Carbon-catalyzed gasification of organic feedstocks in supercritical water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spruce wood charcoal, macadamia shell charcoal, coal activated carbon, and coconut shell activated carbon catalyze the gasification of organic compounds in supercritical water. Feedstocks studied in this paper include glycerol, glucose, cellobiose, whole biomass feedstocks (depithed bagasse liquid extract and sewage sludge), and representative Department of Defense (DoD) wastes (methanol, methyl ethyl ketone, ethylene glycol, acetic acid, and phenol). The effects of temperature, pressure, reactant concentration, weight hourly space velocity, and the type of catalyst on the gasification of glucose are reported. Complete conversion of glucose (22% by weight in water) to a hydrogen-rich synthesis gas was realized at a weight hourly space velocity (WHSV) of 22.2 h{sup {minus}1} in supercritical water at 600 C, 34.5 MPa. Complete conversions of the whole biomass feeds were also achieved at the same temperature and pressure. The destruction efficiencies for the representative DoD wastes were also high. Deactivation of the carbon catalyst was observed after 4 h of operation without swirl in the entrance region of the reactor, but the carbon gasification efficiency remained near 100% for more than 6 h when a swirl generator was employed in the entrance of the reactor.

Xu, X.; Matsumura, Y.; Stenberg, J.; Antal, M.J. Jr. [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States). Hawaii Natural Energy Inst.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Void-free micro-pattern of nickel fabricated by electroplating with supercritical carbon dioxide emulsion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Void-free micro-pattern of nickel was fabricated electrochemically by applying supercritical carbon dioxide emulsion (Sc-CO"2-E). Evolution of hydrogen gas bubbles is usually the cause of defect and pinholes for microstructures fabricated electrochemically ... Keywords: Micro-pattern, Microstructure, Nickel, Supercritical carbon dioxide emulsion, Void-free

Tso-Fu Mark Chang; Toshikazu Tasaki; Chiemi Ishiyama; Masato Sone

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Effects of supercritical carbon dioxide treatment on bending properties of micro-sized SU-8 Specimens  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The bending properties of micro-sized photoresist patterns are quantitatively evaluated using micro-sized SU-8 cantilever type test specimens to clarify the effects of supercritical carbon dioxide-treatment (ScCO"2-treatment). The SU-8 specimens were ... Keywords: Bending strength, Degree of crosslinking, Micro-sized materials, Photoresist, SU-8, Supercritical carbon dioxide

Chiemi Ishiyama; Tso-Fu Mark Chang; Masato Sone

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

An Exploration of the Effect of Temperature on Different Alloys in a Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the constant effort to increase efficiency, safety margins, and lower cost, a new breed of nuclear reactors, Generation IV, is being developed in which supercritical carbon dioxide (SCO?) is a prime coolant candidate. ...

Dunlevy, Michael William

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Power conversion system design for supercritical carbon dioxide cooled indirect cycle nuclear reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO?) cycle is a promising advanced power conversion cycle which couples nicely to many Generation IV nuclear reactors. This work investigates the power conversion system design and ...

Gibbs, Jonathan Paul

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Tools for supercritical carbon dioxide cycle analysis and the cycle's applicability to sodium fast reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor (SFR) and the Supercritical Carbon Dioxide (S-C0?) Recompression cycle are two technologies that have the potential to impact the power generation landscape of the future. In order for their ...

Ludington, Alexander R. (Alexander Rockwell)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Selective Extraction of Uranium from Liquid or Supercritical Carbon Dioxide  

SciTech Connect

Current liquid-liquid extraction processes used in recycling irradiated nuclear fuel rely on (1) strong nitric acid to dissolve uranium oxide fuel, and (2) the use of aliphatic hydrocarbons as a diluent in formulating the solvent used to extract uranium. The nitric acid dissolution process is not selective. It dissolves virtually the entire fuel meat which complicates the uranium extraction process. In addition, a solvent washing process is used to remove TBP degradation products, which adds complexity to the recycling plant and increases the overall plant footprint and cost. A liquid or supercritical carbon dioxide (l/sc -CO2) system was designed to mitigate these problems. Indeed, TBP nitric acid complexes are highly soluble in l/sc -CO2 and are capable of extracting uranium directly from UO2, UO3 and U3O8 powders. This eliminates the need for total acid dissolution of the irradiated fuel. Furthermore, since CO2 is easily recycled by evaporation at room temperature and pressure, it eliminates the complex solvent washing process. In this report, we demonstrate: (1) A reprocessing scheme starting with the selective extraction of uranium from solid uranium oxides into a TBP-HNO3 loaded Sc-CO2 phase, (2) Back extraction of uranium into an aqueous phase, and (3) Conversion of recovered purified uranium into uranium oxide. The purified uranium product from step 3 can be disposed of as low level waste, or mixed with enriched uranium for use in a reactor for another fuel cycle. After an introduction on the concept and properties of supercritical fluids, we first report the characterization of the different oxides used for this project. Our extraction system and our online monitoring capability using UV-Vis absorbance spectroscopy directly in sc-CO2 is then presented. Next, the uranium extraction efficiencies and kinetics is demonstrated for different oxides and under different physical and chemical conditions: l/sc -CO2 pressure and temperature, TBP/HNO3 complex used, reductant or complexant used for selectivity, and ionic liquids used as supportive media. To complete the extraction and recovery cycle, we then demonstrate uranium back extraction from the TBP loaded sc-CO2 phase into an aqueous phase and the characterization of the uranium complex formed at the end of this process. Another aspect of this project was to limit proliferation risks by either co-extracting uranium and plutonium, or by leaving plutonium behind by selectively extracting uranium. We report that the former is easily achieved, since plutonium is in the tetravalent or hexavalent oxidation state in the oxidizing environment created by the TBP-nitric acid complex, and is therefore co-extracted. The latter is more challenging, as a reductant or complexant to plutonium has to be used to selectively extract uranium. After undertaking experiments on different reducing or complexing systems (e.g., AcetoHydroxamic Acid (AHA), Fe(II), ascorbic acid), oxalic acid was chosen as it can complex tetravalent actinides (Pu, Np, Th) in the aqueous phase while allowing the extraction of hexavalent uranium in the sc-CO2 phase. Finally, we show results using an alternative media to commonly used aqueous phases: ionic liquids. We show the dissolution of uranium in ionic liquids and its extraction using sc-CO2 with and without the presence of AHA. The possible separation of trivalent actinides from uranium is also demonstrated in ionic liquids using neodymium as a surrogate and diglycolamides as the extractant.

Farawila, Anne F.; O'Hara, Matthew J.; Wai, Chien M.; Taylor, Harry Z.; Liao, Yu-Jung

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

31

Optimization and Comparison of Direct and Indirect Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Power Plant Cycles for Nuclear Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There have been a number of studies involving the use of gases operating in the supercritical mode for power production and process heat applications. Supercritical carbon dioxide (CO2) is particularly attractive because it is capable of achieving relatively high power conversion cycle efficiencies in the temperature range between 550 C and 750 C. Therefore, it has the potential for use with any type of high-temperature nuclear reactor concept, assuming reactor core outlet temperatures of at least 550 C. The particular power cycle investigated in this paper is a supercritical CO2 Recompression Brayton Cycle. The CO2 Recompression Brayton Cycle can be used as either a direct or indirect power conversion cycle, depending on the reactor type and reactor outlet temperature. The advantage of this cycle when compared to the helium Brayton cycle is the lower required operating temperature; 550 C versus 850 C. However, the supercritical CO2 Recompression Brayton Cycle requires an operating pressure in the range of 20 MPa, which is considerably higher than the required helium Brayton cycle operating pressure of 8 MPa. This paper presents results of analyses performed using the UniSim process analyses software to evaluate the performance of both a direct and indirect supercritical CO2 Brayton Recompression cycle for different reactor outlet temperatures. The direct supercritical CO2 cycle transferred heat directly from a 600 MWt reactor to the supercritical CO2 working fluid supplied to the turbine generator at approximately 20 MPa. The indirect supercritical CO2 cycle assumed a helium-cooled Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR), operating at a primary system pressure of approximately 7.0 MPa, delivered heat through an intermediate heat exchanger to the secondary indirect supercritical CO2 Brayton Recompression cycle, again operating at a pressure of about 20 MPa. For both the direct and indirect cycles, sensitivity calculations were performed for reactor outlet temperature between 550 C and 850 C. The UniSim models used realistic component parameters and operating conditions to model the complete reactor and power conversion systems. CO2 properties were evaluated, and the operating ranges of the cycles were adjusted to take advantage of the rapidly changing properties of CO2 near the critical point. The results of the analyses showed that, for the direct supercritical CO2 power cycle, thermal efficiencies in the range of 40 to 50% can be achieved. For the indirect supercritical CO2 power cycle, thermal efficiencies were approximately 10% lower than those obtained for the direct cycle over the same reactor outlet temperature range.

Edwin A. Harvego; Michael G. McKellar

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Carbon-nitrogen bond-forming reactions in supercritical and expanded-liquid carbon dioxide media : green synthetic chemistry with multiscale reaction and phase behavior modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The goal of this work was to develop a detailed understanding of carbon-nitrogen (C-N) bond-forming reactions of amines carried out in supercritical and expanded-liquid carbon dioxide (CO2) media. Key motivations behind ...

Ciccolini, Rocco P

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Metal corrosion in a supercritical carbon dioxide - liquid sodium power cycle.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A liquid sodium cooled fast reactor coupled to a supercritical carbon dioxide Brayton power cycle is a promising combination for the next generation nuclear power production process. For optimum efficiency, a microchannel heat exchanger, constructed by diffusion bonding, can be used for heat transfer from the liquid sodium reactor coolant to the supercritical carbon dioxide. In this work, we have reviewed the literature on corrosion of metals in liquid sodium and carbon dioxide. The main conclusions are (1) pure, dry CO{sub 2} is virtually inert but can be highly corrosive in the presence of even ppm concentrations of water, (2) carburization and decarburization are very significant mechanism for corrosion in liquid sodium especially at high temperature and the mechanism is not well understood, and (3) very little information could be located on corrosion of diffusion bonded metals. Significantly more research is needed in all of these areas.

Moore, Robert Charles; Conboy, Thomas M.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Studies of the Chemical and Pore Structures of the Carbon Aerogels Synthesized by Gelation and Supercritical Drying  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Studies of the Chemical and Pore Structures of the Carbon Aerogels Synthesized by Gelation August 2003 ABSTRACT: The carbon aerogels prepared by a new method through gelation and supercritical are discussed. We found that all of these carbon aerogel (CA-IPA) samples have almost the same carbon and oxygen

Liu, Jie

35

Pore size effects on the sorption of supercritical carbon dioxide in mesoporous CPG-10 silica  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Excess sorption isotherms of supercritical carbon dioxide in mesoporous CPG-10 silica glasses with nominal pore sizes of 75 (7.5 nm) and 350 (35 nm) were measured gravimetrically at 35 C and 50 C and pressures of 0-200 bar. Formation of broad maxima in the excess sorption was observed at fluid densities below the bulk critical density. Positive values of excess sorption were measured at bulk densities below about 0.65-0.7 g/cm3, whereas zero and negative values were obtained at higher densities, indicating that the interfacial fluid becomes less dense than the corresponding bulk fluid at high fluid densities. A shift of the excess sorption peak position to higher fluid density is found with increasing pore width. The excess sorption of CO2 normalized to the specific surface area is higher for the 35 nm pore size material, suggesting pore confinement effects. Conversely, the pore volume normalized excess sorption is higher for the 7.5 nm pore size material. Assessment of mean pore density reveals regions of constant pore fluid density, located between the excess sorption peak and the adsorption/depletion transition. Both materials exhibit such regions of constant mean pore fluid density as a function of bulk CO2 density at the lower temperature of 35 C, but not at 50 C. The results of this study suggest that the CO2 storage capacity in quartz-rich reservoirs is higher for sites with low temperature and rock textures characterized by narrow pores with high surface to volume ratios.

Rother, Gernot [ORNL; Krukowski, Elizabeth G [ORNL; Wallacher, Dirk [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin; Grimm, Nico [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin; Bodnar, Robert J [ORNL; Cole, David [Ohio State University

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Fundamental study of CO2-H2O-mineral interactions for carbon sequestration, with emphasis on the nature of the supercritical fluid-mineral interface.  

SciTech Connect

In the supercritical CO2-water-mineral systems relevant to subsurface CO2 sequestration, interfacial processes at the supercritical fluid-mineral interface will strongly affect core- and reservoir-scale hydrologic properties. Experimental and theoretical studies have shown that water films will form on mineral surfaces in supercritical CO2, but will be thinner than those that form in vadose zone environments at any given matric potential. The theoretical model presented here allows assessment of water saturation as a function of matric potential, a critical step for evaluating relative permeabilities the CO2 sequestration environment. The experimental water adsorption studies, using Quartz Crystal Microbalance and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy methods, confirm the major conclusions of the adsorption/condensation model. Additional data provided by the FTIR study is that CO2 intercalation into clays, if it occurs, does not involve carbonate or bicarbonate formation, or significant restriction of CO2 mobility. We have shown that the water film that forms in supercritical CO2 is reactive with common rock-forming minerals, including albite, orthoclase, labradorite, and muscovite. The experimental data indicate that reactivity is a function of water film thickness; at an activity of water of 0.9, the greatest extent of reaction in scCO2 occurred in areas (step edges, surface pits) where capillary condensation thickened the water films. This suggests that dissolution/precipitation reactions may occur preferentially in small pores and pore throats, where it may have a disproportionately large effect on rock hydrologic properties. Finally, a theoretical model is presented here that describes the formation and movement of CO2 ganglia in porous media, allowing assessment of the effect of pore size and structural heterogeneity on capillary trapping efficiency. The model results also suggest possible engineering approaches for optimizing trapping capacity and for monitoring ganglion formation in the subsurface.

Bryan, Charles R.; Dewers, Thomas A.; Heath, Jason E.; Wang, Yifeng; Matteo, Edward N.; Meserole, Stephen P.; Tallant, David Robert

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Evaluation and Optimization of a Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Power Conversion Cycle for Nuclear Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There have been a number of studies involving the use of gases operating in the supercritical mode for power production and process heat applications. Supercritical carbon dioxide (CO2) is particularly attractive because it is capable of achieving relatively high power conversion cycle efficiencies in the temperature range between 550°C and 750°C. Therefore, it has the potential for use with any type of high-temperature nuclear reactor concept, assuming reactor core outlet temperatures of at least 550°C. The particular power cycle investigated in this paper is a supercritical CO2 Recompression Brayton Cycle. The CO2 Recompression Brayton Cycle can be used as either a direct or indirect power conversion cycle, depending on the reactor type and reactor outlet temperature. The advantage of this cycle when compared to the helium Brayton Cycle is the lower required operating temperature; 550°C versus 850°C. However, the supercritical CO2 Recompression Brayton Cycle requires an operating pressure in the range of 20 MPa, which is considerably higher than the required helium Brayton cycle operating pressure of 8 MPa. This paper presents results of analyses performed using the UniSim process analyses software to evaluate the performance of the supercritical CO2 Brayton Recompression Cycle for different reactor outlet temperatures. The UniSim model assumed a 600 MWt reactor power source, which provides heat to the power cycle at a maximum temperature of between 550°C and 750°C. The UniSim model used realistic component parameters and operating conditions to model the complete power conversion system. CO2 properties were evaluated, and the operating range for the cycle was adjusted to take advantage of the rapidly changing conditions near the critical point. The UniSim model was then optimized to maximize the power cycle thermal efficiency at the different maximum power cycle operating temperatures. The results of the analyses showed that power cycle thermal efficiencies in the range of 40 to 50% can be achieved.

Edwin A. Harvego; Michael G. McKellar

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

A Comparison of Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Power Cycle Configurations with an Emphasis on CSP Applications (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

Recent research suggests that an emerging power cycle technology using supercritical carbon dioxide (s-CO2) operated in a closed-loop Brayton cycle offers the potential of equivalent or higher cycle efficiency versus supercritical or superheated steam cycles at temperatures relevant for CSP applications. Preliminary design-point modeling suggests that s-CO2 cycle configurations can be devised that have similar overall efficiency but different temperature and/or pressure characteristics. This paper employs a more detailed heat exchanger model than previous work to compare the recompression and partial cooling cycles, two cycles with high design-point efficiencies, and illustrates the potential advantages of the latter. Integration of the cycles into CSP systems is studied, with a focus on sensible heat thermal storage and direct s-CO2 receivers. Results show the partial cooling cycle may offer a larger temperature difference across the primary heat exchanger, thereby potentially reducing heat exchanger cost and improving CSP receiver efficiency.

Neises, T.; Turchi, C.

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

In Situ Molecular Spectroscopic Evidence for CO2 Intercalation into Montmorillonite in Supercritical Carbon Dioxide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The interaction of anhydrous supercritical CO2 (scCO2) with both kaolinite and ~1W (i.e. close to but less than one layer of hydration) calcium-saturated montmorillonite was investigated under conditions relevant to geologic carbon sequestration (50 °C and 90 bar). The CO2 molecular environment was probed in situ using a combination of three novel high-pressure techniques: X-ray diffraction, magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy. We report the first direct evidence that the expansion of montmorillonite under scCO2 conditions is due to CO2 migration into the interlayer. Intercalated CO2 molecules are rotationally constrained and do not appear to react with waters to form bicarbonate or carbonic acid. In contrast, CO2 does not intercalate into kaolinite. The findings show that predicting the seal integrity of caprock will have complex dependence on clay mineralogy and hydration state.

Loring, John S.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Turcu, Romulus VF; Thompson, Christopher J.; Miller, Quin RS; Martin, Paul F.; Hu, Jian Z.; Hoyt, David W.; Qafoku, Odeta; Ilton, Eugene S.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Rosso, Kevin M.

2012-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

40

The Effect of Heterogeneity on Matrix Acidizing of Carbonate Rocks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In matrix acidizing, the goal is to dissolve minerals in the rock to increase well productivity. This is accomplished by injecting an application-specific solution of acid into the formation at a pressure between the pore pressure and fracture pressure. A hydrochloric acid solution is used in carbonate reservoirs, which actually dissolves the calcite rock matrix in the form of conductive channels called wormholes. These wormholes propagate from the wellbore out into the reservoir, bypassing the damaged zone. In matrix acidizing of carbonates, there are four parameters that affect performance: the concentration of calcite present, injection rate of the acid, reaction type, and heterogeneity. Of these parameters, this paper will focus on how rock heterogeneity affects performance. To do this, a coreflood and acidizing apparatus was used to acidize heterogeneous limestone core samples. Rock characterizations and volumetric measurements were considered with the results from these experiments, which made it possible to correlate and quantify the results with rock and volume parameters. It was found that the core samples with more and larger heterogeneities generally required less acid (measured in pore volumes) to achieve breakthrough, that is, a wormhole created axially from one end of the core to the other. This value for pore volumes to breakthrough was one to two orders of magnitude less than more homogeneous samples. The general procedure and best practices for acidizing the core samples is also detailed in this thesis. This procedure was followed for preparation, coreflooding, and acidizing for all core samples.

Keys, Ryan S.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rocks supercritical carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Program on Technology Innovation: Drying of Low-Rank Coal with Supercritical Carbon Dioxide (CO2) in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study is part of the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Technology Innovation Program to assess the potential to achieve increased process efficiency and reduced capital cost by drying low-rank coal with supercritical carbon dioxide (SCCO2). This study follows the EPRI report Program on Technology Innovation: Assessment of the Applicability of Drying Low-Rank Coal With Supercritical Carbon Dioxide in IGCC Plants (1016216), which concluded that this system has potential benefits with respect to...

2010-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

42

Development of a Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Brayton Cycle: Improving PBR Efficiency and Testing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Generation IV reactors will need to be intrinsically safe, having a proliferation-resistant fuel cycle and several advantages relative to existing light water reactor (LWR). They, however, must still overcome certain technical issues and the cost barrier before it can be built in the U.S. The establishment of a nuclear power cost goal of 3.3 cents/kWh is desirable in order to compete with fossil combined-cycle, gas turbine power generation. This goal requires approximately a 30 percent reduction in power cost for stateof-the-art nuclear plants. It has been demonstrated that this large cost differential can be overcome only by technology improvements that lead to a combination of better efficiency and more compatible reactor materials. The objectives of this research are (1) to develop a supercritical carbon dioxide Brayton cycle in the secondary power conversion side that can be applied to the Very-High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (VHTR), (2) to improve the plant net efficiency by using the carbon dioxide Brayton cycle, and (3) to test material compatibility at high temperatures and pressures. The reduced volumetric flow rate of carbon dioxide due to higher density compared to helium will reduce compression work, which

Chang H. Oh; Thomas Lillo; William Windes; Terry Totemeier; Bradley Ward; Richard Moore; Robert Barner; Chang H. Oh; Thomas Lillo; William Windes; Terry Totemeier; Bradley Ward; Richard Moore; Robert Barner

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Supercritical fluid extraction  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of extracting metalloid and metal species from a solid or liquid material by exposing the material to a supercritical fluid solvent containing a chelating agent. The chelating agent forms chelates that are soluble in the supercritical fluid to allow removal of the species from the material. In preferred embodiments, the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the chelating agent is a fluorinated or lipophilic crown ether or fluorinated dithiocarbamate. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing contaminants from industrial waste without using acids or biologically harmful solvents. The chelate and supercritical fluid can be regenerated, and the contaminant species recovered, to provide an economic, efficient process.

Wai, Chien M. (Moscow, ID); Laintz, Kenneth (Pullman, WA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Experimental and simulation studies of sequestration of supercritical carbon dioxide in depleted gas reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

he feasibility of sequestering supercritical CO2 in depleted gas reservoirs. The experimental runs involved the following steps. First, the 1 ft long by 1 in. diameter carbonate core is inserted into a viton Hassler sleeve and placed inside an aluminum coreholder that is then evacuated. Second, with or without connate water, the carbonate core is saturated with methane. Third, supercritical CO2 is injected into the core with 300 psi overburden pressure. From the volume and composition of the produced gas measured by a wet test meter and a gas chromatograph, the recovery of methane at CO2 breakthrough is determined. The core is scanned three times during an experimental run to determine core porosity and fluid saturation profile: at start of the run, at CO2 breakthrough, and at the end of the run. Runs were made with various temperatures, 20°C (68°F) to 80°C (176°F), while the cell pressure is varied, from 500 psig (3.55 MPa) to 3000 psig (20.79 MPa) for each temperature. An analytical study of the experimental results has been also conducted to determine the dispersion coefficient of CO2 using the convection-dispersion equation. The dispersion coefficient of CO2 in methane is found to be relatively low, 0.01-0.3 cm2/min.. Based on experimental and analytical results, a 3D simulation model of one eighth of a 5-spot pattern was constructed to evaluate injection of supercritical CO2 under typical field conditions. The depleted gas reservoir is repressurized by CO2 injection from 500 psi to its initial pressure 3,045 psi. Simulation results for 400 bbl/d CO2 injection may be summarized as follows. First, a large amount of CO2 is sequestered: (i) about 1.2 million tons in 29 years (0 % initial water saturation) to 0.78 million tons in 19 years (35 % initial water saturation) for 40-acre pattern, (ii) about 4.8 million tons in 112 years (0 % initial water saturation) to 3.1 million tons in 73 years (35 % initial water saturation) for 80-acre pattern. Second, a significant amount of natural gas is also produced: (i) about 1.2 BSCF or 74 % remaining GIP (0 % initial water saturation) to 0.78 BSCF or 66 % remaining GIP (35 % initial water saturation) for 40-acre pattern, (ii) about 4.5 BSCF or 64 % remaining GIP (0 % initial water saturation) to 2.97 BSCF or 62 % remaining GIP (35 % initial water saturation) for 80-acre pattern. This produced gas revenue could help defray the cost of CO2 sequestration. In short, CO2 sequestration in depleted gas reservoirs appears to be a win-win technology.

Seo, Jeong Gyu

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Hanford/Rocky Flats collaboration on development of supercritical carbon dioxide extraction to treat mixed waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Proposals for demonstration work under the Department of Energy`s Mixed Waste Focus Area, during the 1996 through 1997 fiscal years included two applications of supercritical carbon dioxide to mixed waste pretreatment. These proposals included task RF15MW58 of Rocky Flats and task RL46MW59 of Hanford. Analysis of compatibilities in wastes and work scopes yielded an expectation of substantial collaboration between sites whereby Hanford waste streams may undergo demonstration testing at Rocky Flats, thereby eliminating the need for test facilities at Hanford. This form of collaboration is premised the continued deployment at Rocky Flats and the capability for Hanford samples to be treated at Rocky Flats. The recent creation of a thermal treatment contract for a facility near Hanford may alleviate the need to conduct organic extraction upon Rocky Flats wastes by providing a cost effective thermal treatment alternative, however, some waste streams at Hanford will continue to require organic extraction. Final site waste stream treatment locations are not within the scope of this document.

Hendrickson, D.W.; Biyani, R.K. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Brown, C.M.; Teter, W.L. [Kaiser-Hill Co., Golden, CO (United States)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Directed Self-assembly of Nanoparticles at the Polymer Surface by Highly Compressible Supercritical Carbon Dioxide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report a versatile route for self-assembly of polymer-soluble nanoparticles at the polymer surface using highly compressible supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO{sub 2}). Polystyrene and poly(methyl methacrylate)-based nanocomposite thin films with functionalized polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane and phenyl C{sub 61} butyric acid methyl ester nanoparticles were prepared on Si substrates and exposed to scCO{sub 2} at different pressures under the isothermal condition of 36 C. The resultant structures could be then preserved by the vitrification process of the glassy polymers via quick pressure quench to atmospheric pressure and subsequently characterized by using various surface sensitive experimental techniques in air. We found that the surface segregation of these nanoparticles is induced in the close vicinity of P = 8.2 MPa where the excess absorption of the fluid into the polymers maximizes. However, when the film thickness becomes less than about 4R{sub g} thick (where R{sub g} is the radius of polymer gyration), the uniform dispersion of the nanoparticles is favorable instead even at the same CO{sub 2} conditions. We clarify that the phase transition is correlated with the emergence of a concentration gradient of the fluid at the polymer/CO{sub 2} interface and is a general phenomenon for different polymer-nanoparticle interactions.

M Asada; P Gin; M Endoh; S Satija; T Taniguchi; T Koga

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

47

Supercritical Carbon Dioxide-Soluble Ligands for Extracting Actinide Metal Ions from Porous Solids  

SciTech Connect

Numerous types of actinide-bearing waste materials are found throughout the DOE complex. Most of these wastes consist of large volumes of non-hazardous materials contaminated with relatively small quantities of actinide elements. Separation of these wastes into their inert and radioactive components would dramatically reduce the costs of stabilization and disposal. For example, the DOE is responsible for decontaminating concrete within 7000 surplus contaminated buildings. The best technology now available for removing surface contamination from concrete involves removing the surface layer by grit blasting, which produces a large volume of blasting residue containing a small amount of radioactive material. Disposal of this residue is expensive because of its large volume and fine particulate nature. Considerable cost savings would result from separation of the radioactive constituents and stabilization of the concrete dust. Similarly, gas diffusion plants for uranium enrichment contain valuable high-purity nickel in the form of diffusion barriers. Decontamination is complicated by the extremely fine pores in these barriers, which are not readily accessible by most cleaning techniques. A cost-effective method for the removal of radioactive contaminants would release this valuable material for salvage. The objective of this project is to develop novel, substituted diphosphonic acid ligands that can be used for supercritical carbon dioxide extraction of actinide ions from solid wastes. Specifically, selected diphosphonic acids, which are known to form extremely stable complexes with actinides in aqueous and organic solution, are to be rendered carbon dioxide-soluble by the introduction of appropriate alkyl- or silicon-containing substituents. The metal complexation chemistry of these new ligands in SC-CO2 will then be investigated and techniques for their use in actinide extraction from porous solids developed.

Dietz, Mark L.

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Corrosion in Supercritical carbon Dioxide: Materials, Environmental Purity, Surface Treatments, and Flow Issues  

SciTech Connect

The supercritical CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle is gaining importance for power conversion in the Generation IV fast reactor system because of its high conversion efficiencies. When used in conjunction with a sodium fast reactor, the supercritical CO{sub 2} cycle offers additional safety advantages by eliminating potential sodium-water interactions that may occur in a steam cycle. In power conversion systems for Generation IV fast reactors, supercritical CO{sub 2} temperatures could be in the range of 30°C to 650°C, depending on the specific component in the system. Materials corrosion primarily at high temperatures will be an important issue. Therefore, the corrosion performance limits for materials at various temperatures must be established. The proposed research will have four objectives centered on addressing corrosion issues in a high-temperature supercritical CO{sub 2} environment: Task 1: Evaluation of corrosion performance of candidate alloys in high-purity supercritical CO{sub 2}: The following alloys will be tested: Ferritic-martensitic Steels NF616 and HCM12A, austenitic alloys Incoloy 800H and 347 stainless steel, and two advanced concept alloys, AFA (alumina forming austenitic) steel and MA754. Supercritical CO{sub 2} testing will be performed at 450°C, 550°C, and 650°C at a pressure of 20 MPa, in a test facility that is already in place at the proposing university. High purity CO{sub 2} (99.9998%) will be used for these tests. Task 2: Investigation of the effects of CO, H{sub 2}O, and O{sub 2} impurities in supercritical CO{sub 2} on corrosion: Impurities that will inevitably present in the CO{sub 2} will play a critical role in dictating the extent of corrosion and corrosion mechanisms. These effects must be understood to identify the level of CO{sub 2} chemistry control needed to maintain sufficient levels of purity to manage corrosion. The individual effects of important impurities CO, H{sub 2}O, and O{sub 2} will be investigated by adding them separately to high purity CO{sub 2}. Task 3: Evaluation of surface treatments on the corrosion performance of alloys in supercritical CO{sub 2}: Surface treatments can be very beneficial in improving corrosion resistance. Shot peening and yttrium and aluminum surface treatments will be investigated. Shot peening refines the surface grain sizes and promotes protective Cr-oxide layer formation. Both yttrium and aluminum form highly stable oxide layers (Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}), which can get incorporated in the growing Fe-oxide layer to form an impervious complex oxide to enhance corrosion resistance. Task 4: Study of flow-assisted corrosion of select alloys in supercritical CO{sub 2} under a selected set of test conditions: To study the effects of flow-assisted corrosion, tests will be conducted in a supercritical CO{sub 2} flow loop. An existing facility used for supercritical water flow studies at the proposing university will be modified for use in this task. The system is capable of flow velocities up to 10 m/s and can operate at temperatures and pressures of up to 650°C and 20 MPa, respectively. All above tasks will be performed in conjunction with detailed materials characterization and analysis using scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS), x-ray diffraction (XRD), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) techniques, and weight change measurements. Inlet and outlet gas compositions will be monitored using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GCMS).

Sridharan, Kumar; Anderson, Mark

2013-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

49

Extraction of semivolatile organic compounds from high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters by supercritical carbon dioxide  

SciTech Connect

Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) using unmodified carbon dioxide has been explored as an alternative method for the extraction of semivolatile organic compounds from high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters. HEPA filters provide the final stage of containment on many exhaust systems in US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities by preventing the escape of chemical and radioactive materials entrained in the exhausted air. The efficiency of the filters is tested by the manufacturer and DOE using dioctylphthalate (DOP), a substance regulated by the US Environmental Protection Agency under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. Therefore, the filters must be analyzed for semivolatile organics before disposal. Ninety-eight acid, base, and neutral semivolatile organics were spiked onto blank HEPA material and extracted using SFE, Soxhlet, automated Soxhlet, and sonication techniques. The SFE conditions were optimized using a Dionex SFE-703 instrument. Average recoveries for the 98 semivolatile compounds are 82.7% for Soxhlet, 74.0% for sonication, 70.2% for SFE, and 62.9% for Soxtec. Supercritical fluid extraction reduces the extraction solvent volume to 10--15 mL, a factor of 20--30 less than Soxhlet and more than 5 times less than Soxtec and sonication. Extraction times of 30--45 min are used compared to 16--18 h for Soxhlet extraction.

Schilling, J.B.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

A Computational Study on the Thermal-Hydraulic Behavior of Supercritical Carbon Dioxide in Various Printed Circuit Heat Exchanger Designs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There has been an ever-increasing demand for power generation, which is predicted to grow as society becomes more advanced. However, tradition fossil fuels are beginning to deplete, and there is a great necessity for alternative fuel sources that will bridge the gap between energy production and consumption. To decrease the high demand alternative fuel sources are gaining in popularity. The supercritical carbon dioxide Brayton power cycle has been proposed as a possible cycle for nuclear and concentrated solar power generation. Two main advantages of having supercritical carbon dioxide are the large property variations and component size associated with power cycle. Forced convection heat transfer of supercritical carbon dioxide in printed circuit heat exchanger geometries were investigated in the following study using a finite volume framework and the FLUENT 12.1 code. The geometries of interest were: non- chamfered zig-zag, chamfered zig-zag, and air foil. Flow through the three geometries was in the horizontal orientation and subject to a heating mode operation. A range of testing conditions were explored, including operating pressures between 7.5 to 10.2 MPa with the mass flux ranging from 326 to 762 kg/m2-s. Due to the turbulent nature of this problem, the k?E with enhanced wall treatment and shear stress transport k?? turbulence models were considered. With this addition a total of 54 simulations were performed. Results indicated that there was an increase in the heat transfer coefficient as the supercritical carbon dioxide reached the pseudocritical temperature, conversely as there was an increase in operating pressure, the heat transfer coefficient decreased. Nevertheless, this increase near the pseudocritical temperature was due to a sharp increase in the specific heat. Mass flux effects indicated that there was an increase in heat transfer as the mass flux was increased. This was due to the increase in Reynolds number near the pseudocritical temperature. Next, pressure losses were investigated for the three geometries. The non-chamfered zig-zag channel had the greatest pressure loss associated with it, while the air foil channel had the least. Based on the results, the ratio of the friction factor to heat transfer for the non-chamfered and chamfered zig-zag geometries were approximately 2.65 and 1.57 times higher than for the air foil, thus leading to the idea that the air foil channel may be best suited for practical applications. Finally, the simulation results were compared to experimental data and existing correlations. Many existing correlations failed to accurately predict the magnitude of heat transfer, although they exhibited a similar trend. A new correlation was developed for the zig-zag geometries based on the numerical data obtained during this investigation and published experimental data. The new correlation is able to predict the maximum heat transfer coefficient within 12.4%.

Matsuo, Bryce

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Rock Physics of Geologic Carbon Sequestration/Storage  

SciTech Connect

This report covers the results of developing the rock physics theory of the effects of CO{sub 2} injection and storage in a host reservoir on the rock?s elastic properties and the resulting seismic signatures (reflections) observed during sequestration and storage. Specific topics addressed are: (a) how the elastic properties and attenuation vary versus CO{sub 2} saturation in the reservoir during injection and subsequent distribution of CO{sub 2} in the reservoir; (b) what are the combined effects of saturation and pore pressure on the elastic properties; and (c) what are the combined effects of saturation and rock fabric alteration on the elastic properties. The main new results are (a) development and application of the capillary pressure equilibrium theory to forecasting the elastic properties as a function of CO{sub 2} saturation; (b) a new method of applying this theory to well data; and (c) combining this theory with other effects of CO{sub 2} injection on the rock frame, including the effects of pore pressure and rock fabric alteration. An important result is translating these elastic changes into synthetic seismic responses, specifically, the amplitude-versus-offset (AVO) response depending on saturation as well as reservoir and seal type. As planned, three graduate students participated in this work and, as a result, received scientific and technical training required should they choose to work in the area of monitoring and quantifying CO{sub 2} sequestration.

Dvorkin, Jack; Mavko, Gary

2013-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

52

Pressure buildup during supercritical carbon dioxide injection from a partially penetrating borehole into gas reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

interface solution for carbon dioxide injection into porousJ.E. Fluid Dynamics of Carbon Dioxide Disposal into SalineGeologic storage of carbon dioxide as a climate change

Mukhopadhyay, S.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Mechanistic Modeling of an Underbalanced Drilling Operation Utilizing Supercritical Carbon Dioxide.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Mechanistic modeling of an underbalanced drilling operation using carbon dioxide has been developed in this research. The use of carbon dioxide in an underbalanced drilling… (more)

ALAdwani, Faisal Abdullah

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

A high-pressure atomic force microscope for imaging in supercritical carbon dioxide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A high-pressure atomic force microscope (AFM) that enables in situ, atomic scale measurements of topography of solid surfaces in contact with supercritical CO{sub 2} (scCO{sub 2}) fluids has been developed. This apparatus overcomes the pressure limitations of the hydrothermal AFM and is designed to handle pressures up to 100 atm at temperatures up to ?350 K. A standard optically-based cantilever deflection detection system was chosen. When imaging in compressible supercritical fluids such as scCO{sub 2} , precise control of pressure and temperature in the fluid cell is the primary technical challenge. Noise levels and imaging resolution depend on minimization of fluid density fluctuations that change the fluid refractive index and hence the laser path. We demonstrate with our apparatus in situ atomic scale imaging of a calcite (CaCO{sub 3}) mineral surface in scCO{sub 2}; both single, monatomic steps and dynamic processes occurring on the (10{overbar 1}4) surface are presented. This new AFM provides unprecedented in situ access to interfacial phenomena at solid–fluid interfaces under pressure.

Lea, A.S.; Higgins, S.R.; Knauss, K.G.; Rosso, K.M.

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

55

A high-pressure atomic force microscope for imaging in supercritical carbon dioxide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A high-pressure atomic force microscope (AFM) that enables in-situ, atomic scale measurements of topography of solid surfaces in contact with supercritical CO2 (scCO2) fluids has been developed. This apparatus overcomes the pressure limitations of the hydrothermal AFM and is designed to handle pressures up to 100 atm at temperatures up to ~ 350 K. A standard optically-based cantilever deflection detection system was chosen. When imaging in compressible supercritical fluids such as scCO2, precise control of pressure and temperature in the fluid cell is the primary technical challenge. Noise levels and imaging resolution depend on minimization of fluid density fluctuations that change the fluid refractive index and hence the laser path. We demonstrate with our apparatus in-situ atomic scale imaging of a calcite (CaCO3) mineral surface in scCO2; both single, monatomic steps and dynamic processes occurring on the (10¯14) surface are presented. This new AFM provides unprecedented in-situ access to interfacial phenomena at solid-fluid interfaces under pressure.

Lea, Alan S.; Higgins, Steven R.; Knauss, Kevin G.; Rosso, Kevin M.

2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

56

Simulation of binary mixture adsorption of methane and CO{sub 2} at supercritical conditions in carbons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Knowledge of the adsorption behavior of coal-bed gases, mainly under supercritical high-pressure conditions, is important for optimum design of production processes to recover coal-bed methane and to sequester CO{sub 2} in coal-beds. Here, we compare the two most rigorous adsorption methods based on the statistical mechanics approach, which are Density Functional Theory (DFT) and Grand Canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) simulation, for single and binary mixtures of methane and carbon dioxide in slit-shaped pores ranging from around 0.75 to 7.5 nm in width, for pressure up to 300 bar, and temperature range of 308-348 K, as a preliminary study for the CO{sub 2} sequestration problem. For single component adsorption, the isotherms generated by DFT, especially for CO{sub 2}, do not match well with GCMC calculation, and simulation is subsequently pursued here to investigate the binary mixture adsorption. For binary adsorption, upon increase of pressure, the selectivity of carbon dioxide relative to methane in a binary mixture initially increases to a maximum value, and subsequently drops before attaining a constant value at pressures higher than 300 bar. While the selectivity increases with temperature in the initial pressure-sensitive region, the constant high-pressure value is also temperature independent. Optimum selectivity at any temperature is attained at a pressure of 90-100 bar at low bulk mole fraction of CO{sub 2}, decreasing to approximately 35 bar at high bulk mole fractions.

Kurniawan, Y.; Bhatia, S.K.; Rudolph, V. [University of Queensland, Brisbane, Qld. (Australia). Division of Chemical Engineering

2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

57

Interaction of Rock Minerals with Carbon Dioxide and Brine: ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

behavior and to predict carbonate precipitation under equilibrium conditions. An expanded thermochemical database from Lawrence Berkley Laboratory is now being used to evaluate...

58

Numerical Investigation of Thermal Hydraulic Behavior of Supercritical Carbon Dioxide in Compact Heat Exchangers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The present work seeks to investigate the thermal hydraulic (heat transfer and fluid dynamics) behavior of supercritical (Sc) fluids at both the fundamental and applied levels. The thermal hydraulics of these fluids is not very well known although they have been used in various applications. There are drastic changes in the thermal and hydraulic properties of fluids at supercritical conditions. There has been a lot of focus to effectively utilize these properties changes in many applications such as heat exchangers. This work focuses on studying the forced convective heat transfer of Sc-CO2 in a series of mini semi-circular horizontal tubes and a zig-zag shaped horizontal channel. The problems were investigated numerically by second-order finite volume method using a commercial software FLUENT. Three dimensional Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) models were developed to simulate the flow and heat transfer for three different geometries – a single semi-circular channel, a series of nine parallel semi-circular channels and a zig-zag channel. Grid and accuracy refinement studies were carried out to assess numerical errors. All the computational meshes developed for this study incorporated the first node cell within the viscous sub-layer i.e. y heat transfer solution for these problems. The present numerical work focuses on improving the CFD model and methodologies in order to capture the experimental data of the heat transfer spike at the super critical conditions. Local and average heat transfer coefficients near the critical point were determined from measured wall temperatures and calculated local bulk temperatures. The numerical results are compared with the experiments. The numerical predictions do not convincingly agree with the experiments. This could be because of the incapability of turbulent models to capture the flow physics accurately due to the rapid changes in the fluid properties near critical conditions.

Fatima, Roma

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Influence of Rock Types on Seismic Monitoring of CO2 Sequestration in Carbonate Reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Although carbonates hold more than 60 percent of the world's oil reserves, they, nevertheless, exhibit much lower average recovery factor values than terrigenous sandstone reservoirs. Thus, utilization of advanced enhanced oil recovery (EOR) techniques such as high pressure CO2 injection may normally be required to recover oil in place in carbonate reservoirs. This study addresses how different rock types can influence the seismic monitoring of CO2 sequestration in carbonates. This research utilizes an elastic parameter, defined in a rock physics model of poroelasticity and so-­called as the frame flexibility factor, to successfully quantify the carbonate pore types in core samples available from the Great Bahama Bank (GBB). This study shows that for carbonate samples of a given porosity the lower the frame flexibility factors the higher is the sonic wave velocity. Generally, samples with frame flexibility values of 4 are rocks with intercrystalline and microporosity. Hence, different carbonate pore geometries can be quantitatively predicted using the elastic parameters capable of characterizing the porous media with a representation of their internal structure on the basis of the flexibility of the frame and pore connectivity. In this research, different fluid substitution scenarios of liquid and gaseous CO2 saturations are demonstrated to characterize the variations in velocity for carbonate-specific pore types. The results suggest that the elastic response of CO2 flooded rocks is mostly governed by pore pressure conditions and carbonate rock types. Ultrasonic P-­wave velocities in the liquid-­phase CO2 flooded samples show a marked decrease in the order of 0.6 to 16 percent. On the contrary, samples flooded with gaseous-­phase CO2 constitute an increase in P-­wave velocities for moldic and intraframe porosities, while establishing a significant decrease for samples with intercrystalline and micro-­porosities. Such velocity variations are explained by the stronger effect of density versus compressibility, accounting for the profound effect of pore geometries on the acoustic properties in carbonates. The theoretical results from this research could be a useful guide for interpreting the response of time-­lapse seismic monitoring of carbonate formations following CO2 injection at depth. In particular, an effective rock-­physics model can aid in better discrimination of the profound effects of different pore geometries on seismic monitoring of CO2 sequestration in carbonates.

Mammadova, Elnara

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Method for sizing and desizing yarns with liquid and supercritical carbon dioxide solvent  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is a method of sizing and desizing yarn, or more specifically to a method of coating yarn with size and removing size from yarn with liquid carbon dioxide solvent. 3 figs.

Fulton, J.L.; Yonker, C.R.; Hallen, R.R.; Baker, E.G.; Bowman, L.E.; Silva, L.J.

1999-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rocks supercritical carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Method for sizing and desizing yarns with liquid and supercritical carbon dioxide solvent  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is a method of sizing and desizing yarn, or more specifically to a method of coating yarn with size and removing size from yarn with liquid carbon dioxide solvent.

Fulton, John L. (Richland, WA); Yonker, Clement R. (Richland, WA); Hallen, Richard R. (Richland, WA); Baker, Eddie G. (Richland, WA); Bowman, Lawrence E. (Richland, WA); Silva, Laura J. (Richland, WA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

In Situ Infrared Spectroscopic Study of Brucite Carbonation in Dry to Water-Saturated Supercritical Carbon Dioxide  

SciTech Connect

In geologic carbon sequestration, while part of the injected carbon dioxide will dissolve into host brine, some will remain as neat to water saturated super critical CO2 (scCO2) near the well bore and at the caprock, especially in the short-term life cycle of the sequestration site. Little is known about the reactivity of minerals with scCO2 containing variable concentrations of water. In this study, we used high-pressure infrared spectroscopy to examine the carbonation of brucite (Mg(OH)2) in situ over a 24 hr reaction period with scCO2 containing water concentrations between 0% and 100% saturation, at temperatures of 35, 50, and 70 °C, and at a pressure of 100 bar. Little or no detectable carbonation was observed when brucite was reacted with neat scCO2. Higher water concentrations and higher temperatures led to greater brucite carbonation rates and larger extents of conversion to magnesium carbonate products. The only observed carbonation product at 35 °C was nesquehonite (MgCO3 • 3H2O). Mixtures of nesquehonite and magnesite (MgCO3) were detected at 50 °C, but magnesite was more prevalent with increasing water concentration. Both an amorphous hydrated magnesium carbonate solid and magnesite were detected at 70 °C, but magnesite predominated with increasing water concentration. The identity of the magnesium carbonate products appears strongly linked to magnesium water exchange kinetics through temperature and water availability effects.

Loring, John S.; Thompson, Christopher J.; Zhang, Changyong; Wang, Zheming; Schaef, Herbert T.; Rosso, Kevin M.

2012-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

63

Rock Physics-Based Carbonate Reservoir Pore Type Evaluation by Combining Geological, Petrophysical and Seismic Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pore type variations account for complex velocity-porosity relationship and intensive permeability heterogeneity and consequently low oil and gas recovery in carbonate reservoir. However, it is a challenge for geologist and geophysicist to quantitatively estimate the influences of pore type complexity on velocity variation at a given porosity and porosity-permeability relationship. A new rock physics-based integrated approach in this study was proposed to quantitatively characterize the diversity of pore types and its influences on wave propagation in carbonate reservoir. Based on above knowledge, permeability prediction accuracy from petrophysical data can be improved compared to conventional approach. Two carbonate reservoirs with different reservoir features, one is a shallow carbonate reservoir with average high porosity (>10%) and another one is a supper-deep carbonate reservoir with average low porosity (Permian basin, West Texas. Meanwhile, the complex paleokarst system is explained by using a carbonate platform hydrological model, similar to modern marine hydrological environments within carbonate islands. How to evaluate carbonate reservoir permeability heterogeneity from 3D seismic data has been a dream for reservoir geoscientists, which is a key factor to optimize reservoir development strategy and enhance reservoir recovery. A two-step seismic inversions approach by integrating angle-stack seismic data and rock physics model is proposed to characterize pore-types complexity and further to identify the relative high permeability gas-bearing zones in low porosity reservoir (< 5%) using ChangXing super-deep carbonate reservoir as an example. Compared to the conventional permeability calculation method by best-fit function between porosity and permeability, the results in this study demonstrate that gas zones and non-gas zones in low porosity reservoir can be differentiated by using above integrated permeability characterization method.

Dou, Qifeng

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Topography-sensitive copper deposition in supercritical solutions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Topography-sensitive deposition, a preferential growth mode in a narrow concave feature, of copper in supercritical solutions is reported. Experiments were carried out in supercritical carbon dioxide at 13MPa with a maximum temperature of 230^oC, using ... Keywords: Capillary condensation, Copper, Nanorod, Supercritical fluid

E. Kondoh; K. Nagano; C. Yamamoto; J. Yamanaka

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Advanced Characterization of Fractured Reservoirs in Carbonate Rocks: The Michigan Basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main objective of this project is for a university-industry consortium to develop a comprehensive model for fracture carbonate reservoirs based on the ''data cube'' concept using the Michigan Basin as a prototype. This project combined traditional historical data with 2D and 3D seismic data as well as data from modern logging tools in a novel way to produce a new methodology for characterizing fractured reservoirs in carbonate rocks. Advanced visualization software was used to fuse the data and to image it on a variety of scales, ranging from basin-scale to well-scales.

Wood, James R.; Harrison, William B.

2000-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

66

Advanced Characterization of Fractured Reservoirs in Carbonate Rocks: The Michigan Basin  

SciTech Connect

The main objective of this project is for a university-industry consortium to develop a comprehensive model for fracture carbonate reservoirs based on the ''data cube'' concept using the Michigan Basin as a prototype. This project combined traditional historical data with 2D and 3D seismic data as well as data from modern logging tools in a novel way to produce a new methodology for characterizing fractured reservoirs in carbonate rocks. Advanced visualization software was used to fuse the data and to image it on a variety of scales, ranging from basin-scale to well-scales.

Wood, J.R.; Harrison, W.B.

2001-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

67

Supercritical CO2Brayton Cycle Control Strategy for Autonomous Liquid Metal-Cooled Reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This presentation discusses a supercritical carbon dioxide brayton cycle control strategy for autonomous liquid metal-cooled reactors.

Moisseytsev, A.; Sienicki, J.J.

2004-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

68

NREL: Concentrating Solar Power Research - 10-Megawatt Supercritical...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Turbine Test-Thermodynamic Cycle to Revolutionize CSP Systems Advancing concentrating solar power (CSP) systems to the target cost of 0.06...

69

Nanostructured Materials: Symthesis in Supercritical Fluids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This chapter summarizes the recent developent of synthesis and characterization of nanostructured materials synthesized in supercritical fluids. Nanocomposite catalysts such as Pt and Pd on carbon nanotube support have been synthesized and used for fuel cell applications.

Lin, Yuehe; Ye, Xiangrong; Wai, Chien M.

2009-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

70

Basic Engineering Research for D and D of R Reactor Storage Pond Sludge: Electrokinetics, Carbon Dioxide Extraction, and Supercritical Water Oxidation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Large quantities of mixed low level waste (MLLW) that fall under the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) exist and will continue to be generated during D and D operations at DOE sites across the country. The standard process for destruction of MLLW is incineration, which has an uncertain future. The extraction and destruction of PCBs from MLLW was the subject of this research Supercritical Fluid Extraction (SFE) with carbon dioxide with 5% ethanol as cosolvent and Supercritical Waster Oxidation (SCWO) were the processes studied in depth. The solid matrix for experimental extraction studies was Toxi-dry, a commonly used absorbent made from plant material. PCB surrogates were 1.2,4-trichlorobenzene (TCB) and 2-chlorobiphenyl (2CBP). Extraction pressures of 2,000 and 4,000 psi and temperatures of 40 and 80 C were studied. Higher extraction efficiencies were observed with cosolvent and at high temperature, but pressure little effect. SCWO treatment of the treatment of the PCB surrogates resulted in their destruction below detection limits.

Michael A. Matthews; David A. Bruce,; Thomas A. Davis; Mark C. Thies; John W. Weidner; Ralph E. White

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Dewetting of silica surfaces upon reactions with supercritical CO2 and brine: Pore-scale studies in micromodels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Influence of Compressed Carbon Dioxide on the Capillarity ofof supercritical carbon dioxide on silica. Langmuir 2001,Silica Surfaces and the Carbon Dioxide Molecule. J Phys Chem

Kim, Y.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

WETTABILITY ALTERATION OF CARBONATE ROCK MEDIATED BY BIOSURFACTANT PRODUCED FROM HIGH-STARCH AGRICULTURAL EFFLUENTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surfactants can be used to alter wettability of reservoir rock, increasing spontaneous imbibition and thus improving oil yields. Commercial synthetic surfactants are often prohibitively expensive and so a crude preparation of the anionic biosurfactant, surfactin, from Bacillus subtilis grown on high-starch industrial and agricultural effluents has been proposed as an economical alternative. To assess the effectiveness of the surfactin, it is compared to commercially available surfactants. In selecting a suitable benchmark surfactant, two metrics are examined: the ability of the surfactants to alter wettability at low concentrations, and the degree to which they are absorbed onto reservoir matrix. We review the literature to survey the adsorption models that have been developed to describe surfactant adsorption in porous media. These models are evaluated using the experimental data from this study. Crushed carbonate rock samples are cleaned and aged in crude oil. The wettability change mediated by dilute solutions of commercial anionic surfactants and surfactin is assessed using a two-phase separation; and surfactant loss due to retention and adsorption the rock is determined.

Mehdi Salehi; Stephen Johnson; Gregory Bala; Jenn-Tai Liang

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Development of the ANL plant dynamics code and control strategies for the supercritical carbon dioxide Brayton cycle and code validation with data from the Sandia small-scale supercritical carbon dioxide Brayton cycle test loop.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Significant progress has been made in the ongoing development of the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) Plant Dynamics Code (PDC), the ongoing investigation and development of control strategies, and the analysis of system transient behavior for supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO{sub 2}) Brayton cycles. Several code modifications have been introduced during FY2011 to extend the range of applicability of the PDC and to improve its calculational stability and speed. A new and innovative approach was developed to couple the Plant Dynamics Code for S-CO{sub 2} cycle calculations with SAS4A/SASSYS-1 Liquid Metal Reactor Code System calculations for the transient system level behavior on the reactor side of a Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor (SFR) or Lead-Cooled Fast Reactor (LFR). The new code system allows use of the full capabilities of both codes such that whole-plant transients can now be simulated without additional user interaction. Several other code modifications, including the introduction of compressor surge control, a new approach for determining the solution time step for efficient computational speed, an updated treatment of S-CO{sub 2} cycle flow mergers and splits, a modified enthalpy equation to improve the treatment of negative flow, and a revised solution of the reactor heat exchanger (RHX) equations coupling the S-CO{sub 2} cycle to the reactor, were introduced to the PDC in FY2011. All of these modifications have improved the code computational stability and computational speed, while not significantly affecting the results of transient calculations. The improved PDC was used to continue the investigation of S-CO{sub 2} cycle control and transient behavior. The coupled PDC-SAS4A/SASSYS-1 code capability was used to study the dynamic characteristics of a S-CO{sub 2} cycle coupled to a SFR plant. Cycle control was investigated in terms of the ability of the cycle to respond to a linear reduction in the electrical grid demand from 100% to 0% at a rate of 5%/minute. It was determined that utilization of turbine throttling control below 50% load improves the cycle efficiency significantly. Consequently, the cycle control strategy has been updated to include turbine throttle valve control. The new control strategy still relies on inventory control in the 50%-90% load range and turbine bypass for fine and fast generator output adjustments, but it now also includes turbine throttling control in the 0%-50% load range. In an attempt to investigate the feasibility of using the S-CO{sub 2} cycle for normal decay heat removal from the reactor, the cycle control study was extended beyond the investigation of normal load following. It was shown that such operation is possible with the extension of the inventory and the turbine throttling controls. However, the cycle operation in this range is calculated to be so inefficient that energy would need to be supplied from the electrical grid assuming that the generator could be capable of being operated in a motoring mode with an input electrical energy from the grid having a magnitude of about 20% of the nominal plant output electrical power level in order to maintain circulation of the CO{sub 2} in the cycle. The work on investigation of cycle operation at low power level will be continued in the future. In addition to the cycle control study, the coupled PDC-SAS4A/SASSYS-1 code system was also used to simulate thermal transients in the sodium-to-CO{sub 2} heat exchanger. Several possible conditions with the potential to introduce significant changes to the heat exchanger temperatures were identified and simulated. The conditions range from reactor scram and primary sodium pump failure or intermediate sodium pump failure on the reactor side to pipe breaks and valve malfunctions on the S-CO{sub 2} side. It was found that the maximum possible rate of the heat exchanger wall temperature change for the particular heat exchanger design assumed is limited to {+-}7 C/s for less than 10 seconds. Modeling in the Plant Dynamics Code has been compared with available data from the Sandia Natio

Moisseytsev, A.; Sienicki, J. J. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

2011-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

74

Experimental investigation and thermodynamic modeling of extraction of heavy metal ions from aqueous solutions by chelation in supercritical carbon dioxide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wastewater streams containing heavy metals are common in industry. To prevent the contamination of clean water sources, the Clean Water Act specifies limits on the heavy metal concentrations of industrial waste water. This creates a strong need for developing cost effective and environmentally friendly metal removal technologies. Solvent extraction has been recognized as one of the best methods for removing metals from wastewater. Although the metals are easily removed, this process has two major disadvantages. First, the solvent/metal solution must be subsequently purified. Second, since the solvent may be miscible in the aqueous phase, the residual solvent must be removed from the water stream. These disadvantages can be eliminated by substituting conventional organic solvents with supercritical fluids. The main objective of this research has been to investigate the potential and feasibility of heavy metal ion extraction through chelation in supercritical CO2. Copper has been chosen as the model contaminant as it is frequently found in industrial waste streams. Different chelating agents have been tested to find the most appropriate one for copper. Analytical methods have been developed to quantify supercritical and aqueous phase compositions. Specifically, an Atomic Absorption Analyzer and a Gas Chromatograph have been employed. Copper ions have been successfully extracted up to 97% on different isotherms. Considering the phase equilibria and the thirteen reactions taking place in the system, a thermodynamic model has been developed. This model predicts the system pH which is a important factor in design of metal extraction units. With the model the efficiency of the extraction with different chelating agents at different temperatures and pressures is easily estimated. The model is also capable of calculating the concentrations of chemical species present in the system. This study proposed a novel and viable technique for the remediation of metal ions in waste water streams. In conjunction with the developed model the efficiency of this process for a specific industrial application can be accurately estimated. The results of this study demonstrate that this process is both environmentally friendly and economically feasible for wide spread industrial use.

Uyansoy, Hakki

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Experimental study of potential wellbore cement carbonation by various phases of carbon dioxide during geologic carbon sequestration  

SciTech Connect

Hydrated Portland cement was reacted with carbon dioxide (CO2) in supercritical, gaseous, and aqueous phases to understand the potential cement alteration processes along the length of a wellbore, extending from deep CO2 storage reservoir to the shallow subsurface during geologic carbon sequestration. The 3-D X-ray microtomography (XMT) images displayed that the cement alteration was significantly more extensive by CO2-saturated synthetic groundwater than dry or wet supercritical CO2 at high P (10 MPa)-T (50°C) conditions. Scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) analysis also exhibited a systematic Ca depletion and C enrichment in cement matrix exposed to CO2-saturated groundwater. Integrated XMT, XRD, and SEM-EDS analyses identified the formation of extensive carbonated zone filled with CaCO3(s), as well as the porous degradation front and the outermost silica-rich zone in cement after exposure to CO2-saturated groundwater. The cement alteration by CO2-saturated groundwater for 2-8 months overall decreased the porosity from 31% to 22% and the permeability by an order of magnitude. Cement alteration by dry or wet supercritical CO2 was slow and minor compared to CO2-saturated groundwater. A thin single carbonation zone was formed in cement after exposure to wet supercritical CO2 for 8 months or dry supercritical CO2 for 15 months. Extensive calcite coating was formed on the outside surface of a cement sample after exposure to wet gaseous CO2 for 1-3 months. The chemical-physical characterization of hydrated Portland cement after exposure to various phases of carbon dioxide indicates that the extent of cement carbonation can be significantly heterogeneous depending on CO2 phase present in the wellbore environment. Both experimental and geochemical modeling results suggest that wellbore cement exposure to supercritical, gaseous, and aqueous phases of CO2 during geologic carbon sequestration is unlikely to damage the wellbore integrity because cement alteration by all phases of CO2 is dominated by carbonation reaction. This is consistent with previous field studies of wellbore cement with extensive carbonation after exposure to CO2 for 3 decades. However, XMT imaging indicates that preferential cement alteration by supercritical CO2 or CO2-saturated groundwater can occur along the cement-steel or cement-rock interfaces. This highlights the importance of further investigation of cement degradation along the interfaces of wellbore materials to ensure permanent geologic carbon storage.

Jung, Hun Bok; Um, Wooyong

2013-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

76

Multidisciplinary Imaging of Rock Properties in Carbonate Reservoirs for Flow-Unit Targeting  

SciTech Connect

During the period major accomplishments were in (1) characterization of facies and cyclicity in subsurface cores and in outcrop, (2) construction of a preliminary stratigraphic framework, (3) definition of rock fabrics, and (4) correlation of 3-D seismic data.

Ruppel, Stephen C.

2002-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

77

Carbon deposition during brittle rock deformation: Changes in electrical properties of fault zones and potential geoelectric phenomena during earthquakes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To investigate potential mechanisms for geoelectric phenomena accompanying earthquakes, we have deformed hollow cylinders of Sioux quartzite to failure in the presence of carbonaceous pore fluids and investigated the resulting changes in electrical conductivity and carbon distribution. Samples were loaded at room temperature or 400 C by a hydrostatic pressure at their outer diameter, increasing pressure at a constant rate to {approx}290 MPa. Pore fluids consisted of pure CO, CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4} and a 1:1 mixture of CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4}, each with pore pressures of 2.0 to 4.1 MPa. Failure occurred by the formation of mode II shear fractures transecting the hollow cylinder walls. Radial resistivities of the cylinders fell to 2.9 to 3.1 M{Omega}-m for CO tests and 15.2 to 16.5 M{Omega}-m for CO{sub 2}:CH{sub 4} tests, compared with >23 M{Omega}-m for dry, undeformed cylinders. Carbonaceous fluids had no discernable influence on rock strength. Based on mapping using electron microprobe techniques, carbon occurs preferentially as quasi-continuous films on newly-formed fracture surfaces, but these films are absent from pre-existing surfaces in those same experiments. The observations support the hypothesis that electrical conductivity of rocks is enhanced by the deposition of carbon on fracture surfaces and imply that electrical properties may change in direct response to brittle deformation. They also suggest that the carbon films formed nearly instantaneously as the cracks formed. Carbon film deposition may accompany the development of microfracture arrays prior to and during fault rupture and thus may be capable of explaining precursory and coseismic geoelectric phenomena.

Mathez, E A; Roberts, J J; Duba, A G; Kronenberg, A K; Karner, S L

2008-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

78

Supercritical Fluid Extraction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In supercritical fluid extraction, many options are available for achieving and controlling the desired selectivity, which is extremely sensitive to variations in pressure, temperature, and choice of solvent. The ability of supercritical fluids to vaporize relatively nonvolatile compounds at moderate temperatures can reduce the energy requirements compared to distillation and liquid extraction.

Johnston, K. P.; Flarsheim, W. M.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

S&TR | May 2005: Locked in Rock: Sequestering Carbon Dioxide...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

abundant greenhouse gas is carbon dioxide (CO2). Many climate research studies focus on developing technologies to greatly reduce the atmospheric levels of CO2. One approach...

80

MULTIDISCIPLINARY IMAGING OF ROCK PROPERTIES IN CARBONATE RESERVOIRS FOR FLOW-UNIT TARGETING  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Excellent progress has been made on all project objectives and goals. All tasks have been completed in the Phase 1 study area, the initial area of project focus. Primary elements of this work include the following: The stratigraphic architecture has been established through correlation of wireline logs guided by core and outcrop studies of facies and cyclicity. A porosity model has been developed that creates a basis for calculation of porosity for wells in the study area. Rock fabrics have been defined by sampling, analysis, and description of cores and used to create transforms for calculating permeability and oil saturation from porosity data. Finally, a preliminary 3-D model has been constructed that incorporates stratigraphic architecture, rock-fabric data, and petrophysical data. Reservoir volumetrics calculated from the model show that a very large fraction of the original oil in place remains.

Stephen C. Ruppel

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rocks supercritical carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Thermophysical Properties of Pore-confined Supercritical CO2 by Vibrating Tube Densimetry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Properties of fluids confined in pore systems are needed for modeling fluid flow, fluid-rock interactions, and changes in reservoir porosity. The properties of CO2-rich fluids are particularly relevant to geothermal heat mining using carbon dioxide instead of water. While manometric, volumetric, and gravimetric techniques have been used successfully to investigate adsorption of low-density subcritical vapors, the results have not been satisfactory at higher, liquid-like densities of supercritical fluids. Even if the requirements for high experimental accuracy in the neighborhood of the critical region were met, these methods are fundamentally unable to deliver the total adsorption capacity, since the properties (e.g. density) of the adsorbed phase are in general not known. In this work we utilize vibrating tube densimetry for the first time to measure the total amount of fluid contained within a mesoporous solid. The method is first demonstrated using propane at subcritical and supercritical temperatures between 35 C and 97 C confined in silica aerogel (density 0.2 g cm-3, porosity 90%) that was synthesized inside Hastelloy U-tubes. Sorption and desorption of carbon dioxide on the same solid was measured at 35 C at pressures to 120 bar (density to 0.767 g cm-3). The results show total adsorption increasing monotonically with increasing pressure, unlike excess adsorption isotherms which show a maximum close to the critical density.

Gruszkiewicz, Miroslaw {Mirek} S [ORNL; Wesolowski, David J [ORNL; Cole, David R [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Multiphase Sequestration Geochemistry: Model for Mineral Carbonation  

SciTech Connect

Carbonation of formation minerals converts low viscosity supercritical CO2 injected into deep saline reservoirs for geologic sequestration into an immobile form. Until recently the scientific focus of mineralization reactions with reservoir rocks has been those that follow an aqueous-mediated dissolution/precipitation mechanism, driven by the sharp reduction in pH that occurs with CO2 partitioning into the aqueous phase. For sedimentary basin formations the kinetics of aqueous-mediated dissolution/precipitation reactions are sufficiently slow to make the role of mineralization trapping insignificant over a century period. For basaltic saline formations aqueous-phase mineralization progresses at a substantially higher rate, making the role of mineralization trapping significant, if not dominant, over a century period. The overlooked mineralization reactions for both sedimentary and basaltic saline formations, however, are those that occur in liquid or supercritical CO2 phase; where, dissolved water appears to play a catalyst role in the formation of carbonate minerals. A model is proposed in this paper that describes mineral carbonation over sequestration reservoir conditions ranging from dissolved CO2 in aqueous brine to dissolved water in supercritical CO2. The model theory is based on a review of recent experiments directed at understanding the role of water in mineral carbonation reactions of interest in geologic sequestration systems occurring under low water contents.

White, Mark D.; McGrail, B. Peter; Schaef, Herbert T.; Hu, Jian Z.; Hoyt, David W.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Wurstner, Signe K.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

MULTIDISCIPLINARY IMAGING OF ROCK PROPERTIES IN CARBONATE RESERVOIRS FOR FLOW-UNIT TARGETING  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Despite declining production rates, existing reservoirs in the US contain large quantities of remaining oil and gas that constitute a huge target for improved diagnosis and imaging of reservoir properties. The resource target is especially large in carbonate reservoirs, where conventional data and methodologies are normally insufficient to resolve critical scales of reservoir heterogeneity. The objectives of the research described in this report were to develop and test such methodologies for improved imaging, measurement, modeling, and prediction of reservoir properties in carbonate hydrocarbon reservoirs. The focus of the study is the Permian-age Fullerton Clear Fork reservoir of the Permian Basin of West Texas. This reservoir is an especially appropriate choice considering (a) the Permian Basin is the largest oil-bearing basin in the US, and (b) as a play, Clear Fork reservoirs have exhibited the lowest recovery efficiencies of all carbonate reservoirs in the Permian Basin.

Stephen C. Ruppel

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Supercritical separation process for complex organic mixtures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is disclosed for separating low molecular weight components from complex aqueous organic mixtures. The process includes preparing a separation solution of supercritical carbon dioxide with an effective amount of an entrainer to modify the solvation power of the supercritical carbon dioxide and extract preselected low molecular weight components. The separation solution is maintained at a temperature of at least about 70.degree. C. and a pressure of at least about 1,500 psi. The separation solution is then contacted with the organic mixtures while maintaining the temperature and pressure as above until the mixtures and solution reach equilibrium to extract the preselected low molecular weight components from the organic mixtures. Finally, the entrainer/extracted components portion of the equilibrium mixture is isolated from the separation solution.

Chum, Helena L. (Arvada, CO); Filardo, Giuseppe (Palermo, IT)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Supercritical separation process for complex organic mixtures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is disclosed for separating low molecular weight components from complex aqueous organic mixtures. The process includes preparing a separation solution of supercritical carbon dioxide with an effective amount of an entrainer to modify the solvation power of the supercritical carbon dioxide and extract preselected low molecular weight components. The separation solution is maintained at a temperature of at least about 70 C and a pressure of at least about 1,500 psi. The separation solution is then contacted with the organic mixtures while maintaining the temperature and pressure as above until the mixtures and solution reach equilibrium to extract the preselected low molecular weight components from the organic mixtures. Finally, the entrainer/extracted components portion of the equilibrium mixture is isolated from the separation solution. 1 fig.

Chum, H.L.; Filardo, G.

1990-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

86

Nano Particles – Supercritical Fluid Process  

Scientists at Idaho National Laboratory have invented a new method of producing quantum particles of varying dimensions by employing supercritical ...

87

Supercritical fluid reverse micelle systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

of 1 ) United States Patent 5,158,704 Fulton ,   et al. October 27, 1992 Supercritical fluid reverse micelle systems

Fulton, John L. (Richland, WA); Smith, Richard D. (Richland, WA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

The sacrificial oxide etching of poly-Si cantilevers having high aspect ratios using supercritical CO2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The aqueous etchants used in conventional wet etching for the micromachining of integrated circuits and MEMS devices often encumber the processes with a stiction problem. A dry etching method with anhydrous HF/pyridine in supercritical carbon dioxide ... Keywords: Cantilever, Etching, MEMS, Poly-Si, Sacrificial oxide, Supercritical carbon dioxide

Ha Soo Hwang; Jae Hyun Bae; Jae Mok Jung; Kwon Taek Lim

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Strontium Isotopic Composition of Paleozoic Carbonate Rocks in the Nevada Test Site Vicinity, Clark, Lincoln, and Nye Counties, Nevada and Inyo County, California.  

SciTech Connect

Ground water moving through permeable Paleozoic carbonate rocks represents the most likely pathway for migration of radioactive contaminants from nuclear weapons testing at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. The strontium isotopic composition (87Sr/86Sr) of ground water offers a useful means of testing hydrochemical models of regional flow involving advection and reaction. However, reaction models require knowledge of 87Sr/86Sr data for carbonate rock in the Nevada Test Site vicinity, which is scarce. To fill this data gap, samples of core or cuttings were selected from 22 boreholes at depth intervals from which water samples had been obtained previously around the Nevada Test Site at Yucca Flat, Frenchman Flat, Rainier Mesa, and Mercury Valley. Dilute acid leachates of these samples were analyzed for a suite of major- and trace-element concentrations (MgO, CaO, SiO2, Al2O3, MnO, Rb, Sr, Th, and U) as well as for 87Sr/86Sr. Also presented are unpublished analyses of 114 Paleozoic carbonate samples from outcrops, road cuts, or underground sites in the Funeral Mountains, Bare Mountain, Striped Hills, Specter Range, Spring Mountains, and ranges east of the Nevada Test Site measured in the early 1990's. These data originally were collected to evaluate the potential for economic mineral deposition at the potential high-level radioactive waste repository site at Yucca Mountain and adjacent areas (Peterman and others, 1994). Samples were analyzed for a suite of trace elements (Rb, Sr, Zr, Ba, La, and Ce) in bulk-rock powders, and 87Sr/86Sr in partial digestions of carbonate rock using dilute acid or total digestions of silicate-rich rocks. Pre-Tertiary core samples from two boreholes in the central or western part of the Nevada Test Site also were analyzed. Data are presented in tables and summarized in graphs; however, no attempt is made to interpret results with respect to ground-water flow paths in this report. Present-day 87Sr/86Sr values are compared to values for Paleozoic seawater present at the time of deposition. Many of the samples have 87Sr/86Sr compositions that remain relatively unmodified from expected seawater values. However, rocks underlying the northern Nevada Test Site as well as rocks exposed at Bare Mountain commonly have elevated 87Sr/86Sr values derived from post-depositional addition of radiogenic Sr most likely from fluids circulating through rubidium-rich Paleozoic strata or Precambrian basement rocks.

James B. Paces; Zell E. Peterman; Kiyoto Futa; Thomas A. Oliver; and Brian D. Marshall.

2007-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

90

Micromodel Investigations of CO2 Exsolution from Carbonated Water in Sedimentary Rocks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, carbon dioxide exsolution from carbonated water is directly observed under reservoir conditions (9MPa and 45oC). Fluorescence microscopy and image analysis are used to quantitatively characterize bubble formation, morphology, and mobility. Observations indicate the strong influence of interfacial tension and pore-geometry on bubble growth and evolution. Most of the gas exhibits little mobility during the course of depressurization and clogs water flow paths. However, a snap-off mechanism mobilizes a small portion of the trapped gas along the water flow paths. This feature contributes to the transport of the dispersed exsolved gas phase and the formation of intermittent gas flow. A new definition of critical gas saturation is proposed accordingly as the minimum saturation that snap-off starts to produce mobile bubbles. Low mobility of the water phase and CO2 phase in exsolution is explained by formation of dispersed CO2 bubbles which block water flow and lack the connectivity to create a mobile gas phase.

Zuo, Lin; Zhang, Changyong; Falta, Ronald W.; Benson, Sally M.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Ultra supercritical steamside oxidation  

SciTech Connect

Ultra supercritical (USC) power plants offer the promise of higher efficiencies and lower emissions, which are part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Vision 21 goals. Most current coal power plants in the U.S. operate at a maximum steam temperature of 538 C. However, new supercritical plants worldwide are being brought into service with steam temperatures of up to 620 C. Vision 21 goals include steam temperatures of up to 760 C. This research examines the steamside oxidation of advanced alloys for use in USC systems. Emphasis is placed on alloys for high- and intermediate-pressure turbine sections. Initial results of this research are presented.

Holcomb, Gordon R.; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Ziomek-Moroz, M.; Alman, David A.; Ochs, Thomas L.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

ADVANCED CHARACTERIZATION OF FRACTURED RESERVOIRS IN CARBONATE ROCKS: THE MICHIGAN BASIN  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of the study was to collect and analyze existing data on the Michigan Basin for fracture patterns on scales ranging form thin section to basin. The data acquisition phase has been successfully concluded with the compilation of several large digital databases containing nearly all the existing information on formation tops, lithology and hydrocarbon production over the entire Michigan Basin. These databases represent the cumulative result of over 80 years of drilling and exploration. Plotting and examination of these data show that contrary to most depictions, the Michigan Basin is in fact extensively faulted and fractured, particularly in the central portion of the basin. This is in contrast to most of the existing work on the Michigan Basin, which tends to show relatively simple structure with few or minor faults. It also appears that these fractures and faults control the Paleozoic sediment deposition, the subsequent hydrocarbon traps and very likely the regional dolomitization patterns. Recent work has revealed that a detailed fracture pattern exists in the interior of the Central Michigan Basin, which is related to the mid-continent gravity high. The inference is that early Precambrian, ({approx}1 Ga) rifting events presumed by many to account for the gravity anomaly subsequently controlled Paleozoic sedimentation and later hydrocarbon accumulation. There is a systematic relationship between the faults and a number of gas and oil reservoirs: major hydrocarbon accumulations consistently occur in small anticlines on the upthrown side of the faults. The main tools used in this study to map the fault/fracture patterns are detailed, close-interval (CI = 10 feet) contouring of the formation top picks accompanied by a new way of visualizing the data using a special color spectrum to bring out the third dimension. In addition, recent improvements in visualization and contouring software were instrumental in the study. Dolomitization is common in the Michigan Basin, and it is crucial in developing reservoir quality rocks in some fields. Data on the occurrence of dolomite was extracted from driller's reports for all reported occurrences in Michigan, nearly 50 fields and over 500 wells. A digital database was developed containing the geographic location of all these wells (latitude-longitude) as well as the elevation of the first encounter of dolomite in the field/reservoir. Analysis shows that these dolomite occurrences are largely confined to the center of the basin, but with some exceptions, such as N. Adams Field. Further, some of the dolomite occurrences show a definite relationship to the fracture pattern described above, suggesting a genetic relationship that needs further work. Other accomplishments of this past reporting period include obtaining a complete land grid for the State of Michigan and further processing of the high and medium resolution DEM files. We also have measured new fluid inclusion data on dolomites from several fields that suggest that the dolomitization occurred at temperatures between 100 and 150 C. Finally, we have extracted the lithologic data for about 5000 wells and are in the process of integrating this data into the overall model for the Michigan Basin.

James R. Wood; William B. Harrison

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Fischer-Tropsch synthesis in supercritical fluids. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to investigate Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis (FTS) in the supercritical phase employing a commercial precipitated iron catalysts. As the supercritical fluid the authors used propane and n-hexane. The catalyst had a nominal composition of 100 Fe/5 Cu/4.2 K/25 SiO{sub 2} on mass basis and was used in a fixed bed reactor under both normal (conventional) and supercritical conditions. Experimental data were obtained at different temperatures (235 C, 250 C, and 260 C) and synthesis gas feed compositions (H{sub 2}/CO molar feed ratio of 0.67, 1.0 and 2.0) in both modes of operation under steady state conditions. The authors compared the performance of the precipitated iron catalyst in the supercritical phase, with the data obtained in gas phase (fixed bed reactor) and slurry phase (STS reactor). Comparisons were made in terms of bulk catalyst activity and various aspects of product selectivity (e.g. lumped hydrocarbon distribution and olefin content as a function of carbon number). In order to gain better understanding of the role of intraparticle mass transfer during FTS under conventional or supercritical conditions, the authors have measured diffusivities of representative hydrocarbon products in supercritical fluids, as well as their effective diffusion rates into the pores of catalyst at the reaction conditions. They constructed a Taylor dispersion apparatus to measure diffusion coefficients of hydrocarbon products of FTS in sub and supercritical ethane, propane, and hexane. In addition, they developed a tracer response technique to measure the effective diffusivities in the catalyst pores at the same conditions. Based on these results they have developed an equation for prediction of diffusion in supercritical fluids, which is based on the rough hard sphere theory.

Akgerman, A.; Bukur, D.B.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

94

Investigating Sequestration Potential of Carbonate Rocks during Tertiary Recovery from a Billion Barrel Oil Field, Weyburn, Saskatchewan: the Geoscience Framework (IEA Weyburn CO2 Monitoring Project)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sequestration Potential of Carbonate Rocks during Tertiary Sequestration Potential of Carbonate Rocks during Tertiary Recovery from a Billion Barrel Oil Field, Weyburn, Saskatchewan: the Geoscience Framework (IEA Weyburn CO 2 Monitoring and Storage Project) G. Burrowes (Geoffrey_Burrowes@pancanadian.ca; 403-290-2796) PanCanadian Resources 150 - 9 th Avenue S.W., P.O. Box 2850 Calgary, Alberta, Canada T2P 2S5 C. Gilboy (cgilboy@sem.gov.sk.ca; 306-787-2573) Petroleum Geology Branch, Saskatchewan Energy and Mines 201 Dewdney Avenue East Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada S4N 4G3 Introduction In Western Canada the application of CO 2 injection for enhanced, 'tertiary' oil recovery is a relatively recent addition to the arsenal available to reservoir engineers. The first successful application of CO 2 as a miscible fluid in Western Canada began in 1984 at Joffre Field, a

95

Dynamic response of the supercritical C0? Brayton recompression cycle to various system transients  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The supercritical carbon dioxide (SC0?) power conversion system has been suggested for use with many of the Generation IV nuclear reactors. The SC0? cycle is highly attractive because of its low operating temperatures and ...

Trinh, Tri Q. (Tri Quang)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Extraction of metals using supercritical fluid and chelate forming legand  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of extracting metalloid and metal species from a solid or liquid material by exposing the material to a supercritical fluid solvent containing a chelating agent is described. The chelating agent forms chelates that are soluble in the supercritical fluid to allow removal of the species from the material. In preferred embodiments, the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the chelating agent is a fluorinated .beta.-diketone. In especially preferred embodiments the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide, and the chelating agent comprises a fluorinated .beta.-diketone and a trialkyl phosphate, or a fluorinated .beta.-diketone and a trialkylphosphine oxide. Although a trialkyl phosphate can extract lanthanides and actinides from acidic solutions, a binary mixture comprising a fluorinated .beta.-diketone and a trialkyl phosphate or a trialkylphosphine oxide tends to enhance the extraction efficiencies for actinides and lanthanides. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing contaminants from industrial waste without using acids or biologically harmful solvents. The method is particularly useful for extracting actinides and lanthanides from acidic solutions. The chelate and supercritical fluid can be regenerated, and the contaminant species recovered, to provide an economic, efficient process.

Wai, Chien M. (Moscow, ID); Laintz, Kenneth E. (Los Alamos, NM)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Extraction of metals using supercritical fluid and chelate forming ligand  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of extracting metalloid and metal species from a solid or liquid material by exposing the material to a supercritical fluid solvent containing a chelating agent is described. The chelating agent forms chelates that are soluble in the supercritical fluid to allow removal of the species from the material. In preferred embodiments, the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the chelating agent is a fluorinated {beta}-diketone. In especially preferred embodiments the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide, and the chelating agent comprises a fluorinated {beta}-diketone and a trialkyl phosphate, or a fluorinated {beta}-diketone and a trialkylphosphine oxide. Although a trialkyl phosphate can extract lanthanides and actinides from acidic solutions, a binary mixture comprising a fluorinated {beta}-diketone and a trialkyl phosphate or a trialkylphosphine oxide tends to enhance the extraction efficiencies for actinides and lanthanides. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing contaminants from industrial waste without using acids or biologically harmful solvents. The method is particularly useful for extracting actinides and lanthanides from acidic solutions. The chelate and supercritical fluid can be regenerated, and the contaminant species recovered, to provide an economic, efficient process. 7 figs.

Wai, C.M.; Laintz, K.E.

1998-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

98

A Thermodynamic Model for Predicting Mineral Reactivity in Supercritical Carbon Dioxide: I. Phase Behavior of Carbon Dioxide - Water - Chloride Salt Systems Across the H2O-Rich to the CO2-Rich Regions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Phase equilibria in mixtures containing carbon dioxide, water, and chloride salts have been investigated using a combination of solubility measurements and thermodynamic modeling. The solubility of water in the CO2-rich phase of ternary mixtures of CO2, H2O and NaCl or CaCl2 was determined, using near infrared spectroscopy, at 90 atm and 40 to 100 °C. These measurements fill a gap in the experimental database for CO2 water salt systems, for which phase composition data have been available only for the H2O-rich phases. A thermodynamic model for CO2 water salt systems has been constructed on the basis of the previously developed Mixed-Solvent Electrolyte (MSE) framework, which is capable of modeling aqueous solutions over broad ranges of temperature and pressure, is valid to high electrolyte concentrations, treats mixed-phase systems (with both scCO2 and water present) and can predict the thermodynamic properties of dry and partially water-saturated supercritical CO2 over broad ranges of temperature and pressure. Within the MSE framework the standard-state properties are calculated from the Helgeson-Kirkham-Flowers equation of state whereas the excess Gibbs energy includes a long-range electrostatic interaction term expressed by a Pitzer-Debye-Hückel equation, a virial coefficient-type term for interactions between ions and a short-range term for interactions involving neutral molecules. The parameters of the MSE model have been evaluated using literature data for both the H2O-rich and CO2-rich phases in the CO2 - H2O binary and for the H2O-rich phase in the CO2 - H2O - NaCl / KCl / CaCl2 / MgCl2 ternary and multicompontent systems. The model accurately represents the properties of these systems at temperatures from 0°C to 300 °C and pressures up to ~4000 atm. Further, the solubilities of H2O in CO2-rich phases that are predicted by the model are in agreement with the new measurements for the CO2 - H2O - NaCl and CO2 - H2O - CaCl2 systems. Thus, the model can be used to predict the effect of various salts on the water content and water activity in CO2-rich phases on the basis of parameters determined from the properties of aqueous systems. Given the importance of water activity in CO2-rich phases for mineral reactivity, the model can be used as a foundation for predicting mineral transformations across the entire CO2/H2O composition range from aqueous solution to anhydrous scCO2. An example application using the model is presented which involves the transformation of forsterite to nesquehonite as a function of temperature and water content in the CO2-rich phase.

Springer, Ronald D.; Wang, Zheming; Anderko, Andre; Wang, Peiming; Felmy, Andrew R.

2012-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

99

Supercritical CO2 Tech Team  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Supercritical CO2 is a highly technical team focused on different heat source applications of the sCO2 Brayton Cycle.

100

Ultra Supercritical Steamside Oxidation  

SciTech Connect

Ultra supercritical (USC) power plants offer the promise of higher efficiencies and lower emissions, which are goals of the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Power Systems Initiatives. Most current coal power plants in the U.S. operate at a maximum steam temperature of 538 C. However, new supercritical plants worldwide are being brought into service with steam temperatures of up to 620 C. Current Advanced Power Systems goals include coal generation at 60% efficiency, which require steam temperatures of up to 760 C. This research examines the steamside oxidation of advanced alloys for use in USC systems, with emphasis placed on alloys for high- and intermediate-pressure turbine sections. Initial results of this research are presented.

Holcomb, Gordon R.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Ziomek-Moroz, Malgorzata

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rocks supercritical carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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101

Ultra Supercritical Steamside Oxidation  

SciTech Connect

Ultra supercritical (USC) power plants offer the promise of higher efficiencies and lower emissions, which are goals of the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Power Systems Initiatives. Most current coal power plants in the U.S. operate at a maximum steam temperature of 538 C. However, new supercritical plants worldwide are being brought into service with steam temperatures of up to 620 C. Current Advanced Power Systems goals include coal generation at 60% efficiency, which require steam temperatures of up to 760 C. This research examines the steamside oxidation of advanced alloys for use in USC systems, with emphasis placed on alloys for high- and intermediate-pressure turbine sections. Initial results of this research are presented.

Holcomb, Gordon R.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Ziomek-Moroz, Malgorzata

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

AVESTAR® - Supercritical Once-Through (SCOT) Pulverized Coal Dynamic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Supercritical Once-Through (SCOT) Pulverized Coal Dynamic Simulator Supercritical Once-Through (SCOT) Pulverized Coal Dynamic Simulator A new U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) cooperative research and development agreement to develop, test, and deploy a dynamic simulator and operator training system (OTS) could eventually help commercialize important carbon capture technologies at the nation's power plants. The high-fidelity, real-time OTS for a generic supercritical once-through (SCOT) pulverized-coal power plant will be installed at the National Energy Technology Laboratory's (NETL's) Advanced Virtual Energy Simulation Training and Research (AVESTAR) Center in Morgantown, W.Va. It will be used for collaborative research, industry workforce training, and engineering education on SCOT plant operations and control under the agreement signed with Invensys Operations Management.

103

Organic matter characteristics of CenomanianTuronian source rocks: implications for petroleum and gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and shale source rocks . In: Petroleum Geochemistry and Source Rock Potential of Carbonate Rocks (Ed. by G of petroleum . In: Petroleum Geochemistry and Source Rock Potential of Carbonate Rocks (Ed. by G. Palacas of petroleum in Mesozoic reservoirs to carbonate source rocks of Jurassic Smackover Formation, southwestern

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

104

Susceptibility of Granite Rock to scCO2/Water at 200 degrees C and 250 degrees C  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Granite rock comprising anorthoclase-type albite and quartz as its major phases and biotite mica as the minor one was exposed to supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO{sub 2})/water at 250 C and 13.78 MPa pressure for 104 hours. For comparison purpose, four other rocks, albite, hornblende, diorite, and quartz, also were exposed. During the exposure of granite, ionic carbonic acid, known as the wet carbonation reactant, preferentially reacted with anorthoclase-type albite and biotite, rather than with quartz. The susceptibility of biotite to wet carbonation was higher than that of anorthoclase-type albite. All the carbonation by-products of anorthoclase-type albite were amorphous phases including Na- and K-carbonates, a kaolinite clay-like compound, and silicon dioxide, while wet carbonation converted biotite into potassium aluminum silicate, siderite, and magnesite in crystalline phases and hydrogen fluoride (HF). Three of these reaction by-products, Na- and K-carbonates and HF, were highly soluble in water. Correspondingly, the carbonated top surface layer, about 1.27 mm thick as carbonation depth, developed porous microstructure with numerous large voids, some of which have a size of {>=} 10 {mu}m, reflecting the erosion of granite by the leaching of these water-soluble reaction by-products. Comparing with this carbonation depth, its depth of other minerals was considerable lower, particularly, for hornblende and diorite with 0.07 and 0.02 mm, while no carbonate compound was detected in quartz. The major factor governing these low carbonation depths in these rocks was the formation of water-insensitive scale-like carbonate by-products such as calcite (CaCO{sub 3}), siderite (FeCO{sub 3}), and magnesite (MgCO{sub 3}). Their formation within the superficial layer of these minerals served as protective barrier layer that inhibits and retards further carbonation of fresh underlying minerals, even if the exposure time was extended. Thus, the coverage by this barrier layer of the non-carbonated surfaces of the underlying rock was reason why the hornblende and diorite exhibited a minimum depth of carbonation. Under exposure to the scCO{sub 2}/water at 200 C and 10.34 MPa pressure for up to 42 days, the ranking of the magnitude of erosion caused by wet carbonation was in the following order; granite > albite > hornblende > diorite > quartz. The eroding-caused weight loss of granite (0.88 %) was {approx}2.4, {approx}5.2, {approx}9.8, and {approx}17.6 times greater than that of albite, hornblends, diorite, and quartz, respectively.

Sugama, T.; Gill, S., Ecker, L., Butcher, T., Warren, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Analysis of reservoir heterogeneities due to shallowing-upward cycles in carbonate rocks of the Pennsylvanian Wahoo Limestone of Northeastern Alaska. Annual report, October 1990--September 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary objective of this project is to develop an integrated database to characterize reservoir heterogeneities resulting from numerous small-scale shallowing-upward cycles (parasequences) comprising the carboniferous Pennsylvanian Wahoo Limestone. The Wahoo Limestone is the upper formation of an extensive carbonate platform sequence of the Carboniferous Lisburne Group which is widely exposed in the Brooks Range and is a widespread hydrocarbon reservoir unit in the subsurface of the North Slope of Alaska. A principal goal is to determine lateral and vertical variations in the complex mosaic of carbonate facies comprising the Wahoo Limestone. This report presents the preliminary results of research accomplished by a team of specialists in carbonate petrology, biostratigraphy, and diagenesis during the 1990--1991 fiscal year.It includes a summary of regional geological framework studies, a discussion conodont analyses, an overview of diagenetic studies, a brief description of progress in computerized database development, and appendices containing some of the new data on petrographic analyses, conodont analyses, and locality and sample information. Our correlation scheme, which uses cyclic stratigraphy, biostratigraphy, and cement stratigraphy, will allow interpretation of the depositional history and paleogeographic evolution of the region. We have developed predictive facies models and will make paleogeographic maps to illustrate different stages in the history of the Wahoo carbonate ramp. Our detailed analyses of the Wahoo Limestone will provide a basis for interpreting correlative rocks in the adjacent subsurface of the coastal plain of ANWR, a potential hydrocarbon lease-sale area. In a broader sense, our work will provide an excellent generic example of carbonate shallowing-upward cycles which typify carbonate sediments.

Watts, K.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Analysis of reservoir heterogeneities due to shallowing-upward cycles in carbonate rocks of the Pennsylvanian Wahoo Limestone of Northeastern Alaska  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary objective of this project is to develop an integrated database to characterize reservoir heterogeneities resulting from numerous small-scale shallowing-upward cycles (parasequences) comprising the carboniferous Pennsylvanian Wahoo Limestone. The Wahoo Limestone is the upper formation of an extensive carbonate platform sequence of the Carboniferous Lisburne Group which is widely exposed in the Brooks Range and is a widespread hydrocarbon reservoir unit in the subsurface of the North Slope of Alaska. A principal goal is to determine lateral and vertical variations in the complex mosaic of carbonate facies comprising the Wahoo Limestone. This report presents the preliminary results of research accomplished by a team of specialists in carbonate petrology, biostratigraphy, and diagenesis during the 1990--1991 fiscal year.It includes a summary of regional geological framework studies, a discussion conodont analyses, an overview of diagenetic studies, a brief description of progress in computerized database development, and appendices containing some of the new data on petrographic analyses, conodont analyses, and locality and sample information. Our correlation scheme, which uses cyclic stratigraphy, biostratigraphy, and cement stratigraphy, will allow interpretation of the depositional history and paleogeographic evolution of the region. We have developed predictive facies models and will make paleogeographic maps to illustrate different stages in the history of the Wahoo carbonate ramp. Our detailed analyses of the Wahoo Limestone will provide a basis for interpreting correlative rocks in the adjacent subsurface of the coastal plain of ANWR, a potential hydrocarbon lease-sale area. In a broader sense, our work will provide an excellent generic example of carbonate shallowing-upward cycles which typify carbonate sediments.

Watts, K.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Fayalite Dissolution and Siderite Formation in Water-Saturated Supercritical CO2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Olivines, a significant constituent of basaltic rocks, have the potential to immobilize permanently CO2 after it is injected in the deep subsurface, due to carbonation reactions occurring between CO2 and the host rock. To investigate the reactions of fayalitic olivine with supercritical CO2 (scCO2) and formation of mineral carbonates, experiments were conducted at temperatures of 35 °C to 80 °C, 90 atm pressure and anoxic conditions. For every temperature, the dissolution of fayalite was examined both in the presence of liquid water and H2O-saturated scCO2. The experiments were conducted in a high pressure batch reactor at reaction time extending up to 85 days. The newly formed products were characterized using a comprehensive suite of bulk and surface characterization techniques X-ray diffraction, Transmission/Emission Mössbauer Spectroscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy coupled with Focused Ion Beam, and High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy. Siderite with rhombohedral morphology was formed at 35 °C, 50 °C, and 80 °C in the presence of liquid water and scCO2. In H2O-saturated scCO2, the formation of siderite was confirmed only at high temperature (80 °C). Characterization of reacted samples in H2O-saturated scCO2 with high resolution TEM indicated that siderite formation initiated inside voids created during the initial steps of fayalite dissolution. Later stages of fayalite dissolution result in the formation of siderite in layered vertical structures, columns or pyramids with a rhombus base morphology.

Qafoku, Odeta; Kovarik, Libor; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Ilton, Eugene S.; Arey, Bruce W.; Tucek, Jiri; Felmy, Andrew R.

2012-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

108

Research on virtual assembly of supercritical boiler  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Supercritical boiler is an important measure to solve problems like electricity shortage or energy intensity, with its high combustion efficiency. As supercritical boiler is a large and complex product, it may appear some problems of collision, location ... Keywords: interaction, lightweight model, supercritical boiler, virtools, virtual assembly, virtual reality

Pi-Guang Wei; Wen-Hua Zhu; Hao Zhou

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Effects of coal interaction with supercritical CO{sub 2}: physical structure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is known that polar solvents swell coal, break hydrogen-bonds in the macromolecular structure, and enhance coal liquefaction efficiencies. The effects of drying, interaction with supercritical CO{sub 2} and degassing on the physical structure of coal have been studied using gas sorption technique and a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Both drying and interaction with supercritical CO{sub 2} drastically change the micropore and mesopore surface area, absolute volume, and volume distribution in both bituminous coal and lignite. Degassing removes debris in the pore space which allows for better analysis of the changes in the morphology that were induced by drying and exposure to supercritical CO{sub 2}. SEM reveals that interaction of bituminous coal with supercritical CO{sub 2} results in an abundance of carbon structures similar to the maceral collinite.

Gathitu, B.B.; Chen, W.Y.; McClure, M. [University of Mississippi, University, MS (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

110

Supercritical Fluid Extraction of Plutonium and Americium from Soil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) of plutonium and americium from soil was successfully demonstrated using supercritical fluid carbon dioxide solvent augmented with organophosphorus and beta-diketone complexants. Spiked Idaho soils were chemically and radiologically characterized, then extracted with supercritical fluid carbon dioxide at 2,900 psi and 65°C containing varying concentrations of tributyl phosphate (TBP) and thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTA). A single 45 minute SFE with 2.7 mol% TBP and 3.2 mol% TTA provided as much as 88% ± 6.0 extraction of americium and 69% ± 5.0 extraction of plutonium. Use of 5.3 mol% TBP with 6.8 mol% of the more acidic beta-diketone hexafluoroacetylacetone (HFA) provided 95% ± 3.0 extraction of americium and 83% ± 5.0 extraction of plutonium in a single 45 minute SFE at 3,750 psi and 95°C. Sequential chemical extraction techniques were used to chemically characterize soil partitioning of plutonium and americium in pre-SFE soil samples. Sequential chemical extraction techniques demonstrated that spiked plutonium resides primarily (76.6%) in the sesquioxide fraction with minor amounts being absorbed by the oxidizable fraction (10.6%) and residual fractions (12.8%). Post-SFE soils subjected to sequential chemical extraction characterization demonstrated that 97% of the oxidizable, 78% of the sesquioxide and 80% of the residual plutonium could be removed using SFE. These preliminary results show that SFE may be an effective solvent extraction technique for removal of actinide contaminants from soil.

Fox, Robert Vincent; Mincher, Bruce Jay

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Supercritical Fluid Extraction of Plutonium and Americium from Soil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) of plutonium and americium from soil was successfully demonstrated using supercritical fluid carbon dioxide solvent augmented with organophosphorus and beta-diketone complexants. Spiked Idaho soils were chemically and radiologically characterized, then extracted with supercritical fluid carbon dioxide at 2,900 psi and 65 C containing varying concentrations of tributyl phosphate (TBP) and thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTA). A single 45 minute SFE with 2.7 mol% TBP and 3.2 mol% TTA provided as much as 88% {+-} 6.0 extraction of americium and 69% {+-} 5.0 extraction of plutonium. Use of 5.3 mol% TBP with 6.8 mol% of the more acidic beta-diketone hexafluoroacetylacetone (HFA) provided 95% {+-} 3.0 extraction of americium and 83% {+-} 5.0 extraction of plutonium in a single 45 minute SFE at 3,750 psi and 95 C. Sequential chemical extraction techniques were used to chemically characterize soil partitioning of plutonium and americium in pre-SFE soil samples. Sequential chemical extraction techniques demonstrated that spiked plutonium resides primarily (76.6%) in the sesquioxide fraction with minor amounts being absorbed by the oxidizable fraction (10.6%) and residual fractions (12.8%). Post-SFE soils subjected to sequential chemical extraction characterization demonstrated that 97% of the oxidizable, 78% of the sesquioxide and 80% of the residual plutonium could be removed using SFE. These preliminary results show that SFE may be an effective solvent extraction technique for removal of actinide contaminants from soil.

Fox, R.V.; Mincher, B.J.

2002-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

112

Extension of the supercritical carbon dioxide brayton cycle to low reactor power operation: investigations using the coupled anl plant dynamics code-SAS4A/SASSYS-1 liquid metal reactor code system.  

SciTech Connect

Significant progress has been made on the development of a control strategy for the supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO{sub 2}) Brayton cycle enabling removal of power from an autonomous load following Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor (SFR) down to decay heat levels such that the S-CO{sub 2} cycle can be used to cool the reactor until decay heat can be removed by the normal shutdown heat removal system or a passive decay heat removal system such as Direct Reactor Auxiliary Cooling System (DRACS) loops with DRACS in-vessel heat exchangers. This capability of the new control strategy eliminates the need for use of a separate shutdown heat removal system which might also use supercritical CO{sub 2}. It has been found that this capability can be achieved by introducing a new control mechanism involving shaft speed control for the common shaft joining the turbine and two compressors following reduction of the load demand from the electrical grid to zero. Following disconnection of the generator from the electrical grid, heat is removed from the intermediate sodium circuit through the sodium-to-CO{sub 2} heat exchanger, the turbine solely drives the two compressors, and heat is rejected from the cycle through the CO{sub 2}-to-water cooler. To investigate the effectiveness of shaft speed control, calculations are carried out using the coupled Plant Dynamics Code-SAS4A/SASSYS-1 code for a linear load reduction transient for a 1000 MWt metallic-fueled SFR with autonomous load following. No deliberate motion of control rods or adjustment of sodium pump speeds is assumed to take place. It is assumed that the S-CO{sub 2} turbomachinery shaft speed linearly decreases from 100 to 20% nominal following reduction of grid load to zero. The reactor power is calculated to autonomously decrease down to 3% nominal providing a lengthy window in time for the switchover to the normal shutdown heat removal system or for a passive decay heat removal system to become effective. However, the calculations reveal that the compressor conditions are calculated to approach surge such that the need for a surge control system for each compressor is identified. Thus, it is demonstrated that the S-CO{sub 2} cycle can operate in the initial decay heat removal mode even with autonomous reactor control. Because external power is not needed to drive the compressors, the results show that the S-CO{sub 2} cycle can be used for initial decay heat removal for a lengthy interval in time in the absence of any off-site electrical power. The turbine provides sufficient power to drive the compressors. Combined with autonomous reactor control, this represents a significant safety advantage of the S-CO{sub 2} cycle by maintaining removal of the reactor power until the core decay heat falls to levels well below those for which the passive decay heat removal system is designed. The new control strategy is an alternative to a split-shaft layout involving separate power and compressor turbines which had previously been identified as a promising approach enabling heat removal from a SFR at low power levels. The current results indicate that the split-shaft configuration does not provide any significant benefits for the S-CO{sub 2} cycle over the current single-shaft layout with shaft speed control. It has been demonstrated that when connected to the grid the single-shaft cycle can effectively follow the load over the entire range. No compressor speed variation is needed while power is delivered to the grid. When the system is disconnected from the grid, the shaft speed can be changed as effectively as it would be with the split-shaft arrangement. In the split-shaft configuration, zero generator power means disconnection of the power turbine, such that the resulting system will be almost identical to the single-shaft arrangement. Without this advantage of the split-shaft configuration, the economic benefits of the single-shaft arrangement, provided by just one turbine and lower losses at the design point, are more important to the overall cycle performance. Therefore, the single-shaft

Moisseytsev, A.; Sienicki, J. J. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

2012-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

113

Training and Research on Probabilistic Hydro-Thermo-Mechanical Modeling of Carbon Dioxide Geological Sequestration in Fractured Porous Rocks  

SciTech Connect

Colorado School of Mines conducted research and training in the development and validation of an advanced CO{sub 2} GS (Geological Sequestration) probabilistic simulation and risk assessment model. CO{sub 2} GS simulation and risk assessment is used to develop advanced numerical simulation models of the subsurface to forecast CO2 behavior and transport; optimize site operational practices; ensure site safety; and refine site monitoring, verification, and accounting efforts. As simulation models are refined with new data, the uncertainty surrounding the identified risks decrease, thereby providing more accurate risk assessment. The models considered the full coupling of multiple physical processes (geomechanical and fluid flow) and describe the effects of stochastic hydro-mechanical (H-M) parameters on the modeling of CO{sub 2} flow and transport in fractured porous rocks. Graduate students were involved in the development and validation of the model that can be used to predict the fate, movement, and storage of CO{sub 2} in subsurface formations, and to evaluate the risk of potential leakage to the atmosphere and underground aquifers. The main major contributions from the project include the development of: 1) an improved procedure to rigorously couple the simulations of hydro-thermomechanical (H-M) processes involved in CO{sub 2} GS; 2) models for the hydro-mechanical behavior of fractured porous rocks with random fracture patterns; and 3) probabilistic methods to account for the effects of stochastic fluid flow and geomechanical properties on flow, transport, storage and leakage associated with CO{sub 2} GS. The research project provided the means to educate and train graduate students in the science and technology of CO{sub 2} GS, with a focus on geologic storage. Specifically, the training included the investigation of an advanced CO{sub 2} GS simulation and risk assessment model that can be used to predict the fate, movement, and storage of CO{sub 2} in underground formations, and the evaluation of the risk of potential CO{sub 2} leakage to the atmosphere and underground aquifers.

Gutierrez, Marte

2013-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

114

Extraction of metals and/or metalloids from acidic media using supercritical fluids and salts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for extracting metalloid and metal species from a solid or liquid material by exposing the material to a fluid solvent, particularly supercritical carbon dioxide, containing a chelating agent. The chelating agent forms chelates that are soluble in the fluid to allow removal of the species from the material. In preferred embodiments, the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the chelating agent comprises a trialkyl phosphate, a triaryl phosphate, a trialkylphosphine oxide, a triarylphosphine oxide, or mixtures thereof. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing contaminants from industrial waste. The method is particularly useful for extracting actinides from acidic solutions, and the process can be aided by the addition of nitrate salts. The chelate and supercritical fluid can be regenerated, and the contaminant species recovered, to provide an economic, efficient process. 7 figs.

Wai, C.M.; Smart, N.G.; Lin, Y.

1998-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

115

Extraction of metals and/or metalloids from acidic media using supercritical fluids and salts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of extracting metalloid and metal species from a solid or liquid material by exposing the material to a fluid solvent, particularly supercritical carbon dioxide, containing a chelating agent is described. The chelating agent forms chelates that are soluble in the fluid to allow removal of the species from the material. In preferred embodiments, the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the chelating agent comprises a trialkyl phosphate, a triaryl phosphate, a trialkylphosphine oxide, a triarylphosphine oxide, or mixtures thereof. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing contaminants from industrial waste. The method is particularly useful for extracting actinides from acidic solutions, and the process can be aided by the addition of nitrate salts. The chelate and supercritical fluid can be regenerated, and the contaminant species recovered, to provide an economic, efficient process.

Wai, Chien M. (Moscow, ID); Smart, Neil G. (Moscow, ID); Lin, Yuehe (Moscow, ID)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

PULSE RADIOLYSIS IN SUPERCRITICAL RARE GAS FLUIDS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recently, supercritical fluids have become quite popular in chemical and semiconductor industries for applications in chemical synthesis, extraction, separation processes, and surface cleaning. These applications are based on: the high dissolving power due to density build-up around solute molecules, and the ability to tune the conditions of a supercritical fluid, such as density and temperature, that are most suitable for a particular reaction. The rare gases also possess these properties and have the added advantage of being supercritical at room temperature. Information about the density buildup around both charged and neutral species can be obtained from fundamental studies of volume changes in the reactions of charged species in supercritical fluids. Volume changes are much larger in supercritical fluids than in ordinary solvents because of their higher compressibility. Hopefully basic studies, such as discussed here, of the behavior of charged species in supercritical gases will provide information useful for the utilization of these solvents in industrial applications.

HOLROYD,R.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Hot rocks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Four kilometers down below the orange earth of Australia¿s Cooper Basin lies some of the hottest nonvolcanic rock in the world¿rock that the geothermal industry had never seriously considered using to make electricity. But next month Geodynamics, an ...

S. Upson

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Characterization of carbonaceous materials using extraction with supercritical pentane  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of carbonaceous adsorbents is limited by irreversible adsorption of some compounds so the use of supercritical pentane as an extracting solvent was examined. Carbon black appeared to be broken down slowly, but continuously, by the penane. To see if other types of carbon behaved similarly, high purity graphite, technical grade graphites, active carbons, and charcoals were examined. The extracts were characterized by uv spectroscopy, packed column chromatography using flame ionization and flame photometric detectors, and capillary GC/MS. The extracts were characteristic for each class of carbonaceous material. The high purity graphite yielded large, polycyclic aromatic compounds; the technical grade graphites yielded alkanes and alkyl-substituted benzenes and naphthalenes; the active carbons yielded alkanes, dienes, and small amounts of alkyl-substituted benzenes; and the charcoals yielded almost entirely alkanes in small amounts.

Fetzer, J.C.; Graham, J.A.; Arrendale, R.R.; Klee, M.S.; Rogers, L.B.

1980-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

119

Supercritical plants to come online in 2009  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A trio of coal-fired power plants using supercritical technology set to enter service this year. These are: We Energies is Elm Road Generating Station in Wisconsin, a two-unit, 1,230 MW supercritical plant that will burn bituminous coal; a 750 MW supercritical coal-fired power plant at the Comanche Generating Station in Pueblo, Colo., the third unit at the site; and Luminant's Oak Grove plant in Texas which will consist of two supercritical, lignite-fueled power generation units. When complete, the plant will deliver about 1,6000 MW. Some details are given on each of these projects. 2 photos.

Spring, N.

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

120

Hot Dry Rock - Summary  

SciTech Connect

Hot Dry Rock adds a new flexibility to the utilization of geothermal energy. Almost always the approach has been to limit that utilization to places where there is a natural source of water associated with a source of heat. Actually, the result was that steam was mined. Clearly there are much larger heat resources available which lack natural water to transport that energy to the surface. Also, as is found in hydrothermal fields being mined for steam, the water supply finally gets used up. There is a strong motive in the existing capital investment to revitalize those resources. Techniques for introducing, recovering and utilizing the water necessary to recover the heat from below the surface of the earth is the subject of this session. Implicit in that utilization is the ability to forecast with reasonable accuracy the busbar cost of that energy to the utility industry. The added element of supplying the water introduces costs which must be recovered while still supplying energy which is competitive. Hot Dry Rock technology can supply energy. That has been proved long since. The basic barrier to its use by the utility industry has been and remains proof to the financial interests that the long term cost is competitive enough to warrant investment in a technology that is new to utility on-grid operations. As the opening speaker for this session states, the test that is underway will ''simulate the operations of a commercial facility in some ways, but it will not show that energy from HDR can be produced at a variety of locations with different geological settings''. Further, the Fenton Hill system is a research facility not designed for commercial production purposes, but it can give indications of how the system must be changed to provide economic HDR operations. And so it is that we must look beyond the long term flow test, at the opportunities and challenges. Proving that the huge HDR resources can be accessed on a worldwide scale must involve the construction of additional sites, preferably to the specifications of the now Federal geothermal community. These facilities will have to be engineered to produce and market energy at competitive prices. At the same time, we must not rest on our technological laurels, though they be many. Design and operational techniques have been conceived which could lead to improved economics and operations for HDR. These must be pursued and where merit is found, vigorously pursued. Accelerated research and development ought to include revolutionary drilling techniques, reservoir interrogation, and system modeling to assure the competitiveness and geographical diversity of applications of HDR. Much of this work will be applicable to the geothermal industry in general. More advanced research ought to include such innovations as the utilization of other operating fluids. Supercritical carbon dioxide and the ammonia/water (Kalina) cycle have been mentioned. But even as the near and more distant outlook is examined, today's work was reported in the HDR session. The start-up operations for the current test series at the Fenton Hill HDR Pilot Plant were described. The surface plant is complete and initial operations have begun. While some minor modifications to the system have been required, nothing of consequence has been found to impede operations. Reliability, together with the flexibility and control required for a research system were shown in the system design, and demonstrated by the preliminary results of the plant operations and equipment performance. Fundamental to the overall success of the HDR energy resource utilization is the ability to optimize the pressure/flow impedance/time relationships as the reservoir is worked. Significant new insights are still being developed out of the data which will substantially affect the operational techniques applied to new systems. However, again, these will have to be proved to be general and not solely specific to the Fenton Hill site. Nevertheless, high efficiency use of the reservoir without unintended reservoir grow

Tennyson, George P. Jr.

1992-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rocks supercritical carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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121

Numerical studies of fluid-rock interactions in EnhancedGeothermal Systems (EGS) with CO2 as working fluid  

SciTech Connect

There is growing interest in the novel concept of operating Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) with CO{sub 2} instead of water as heat transmission fluid. Initial studies have suggested that CO{sub 2} will achieve larger rates of heat extraction, and can offer geologic storage of carbon as an ancillary benefit. Fluid-rock interactions in EGS operated with CO{sub 2} are expected to be vastly different in zones with an aqueous phase present, as compared to the central reservoir zone with anhydrous supercritical CO{sub 2}. Our numerical simulations of chemically reactive transport show a combination of mineral dissolution and precipitation effects in the peripheral zone of the systems. These could impact reservoir growth and longevity, with important ramifications for sustaining energy recovery, for estimating CO{sub 2} loss rates, and for figuring tradeoffs between power generation and geologic storage of CO{sub 2}.

Xu, Tianfu; Pruess, Karsten; Apps, John

2008-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

122

Method and apparatus for dissociating metals from metal compounds extracted into supercritical fluids  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for dissociating metal-ligand complexes in a supercritical fluid by treating the metal-ligand complex with heat and/or reducing or oxidizing agents is described. Once the metal-ligand complex is dissociated, the resulting metal and/or metal oxide form fine particles of substantially uniform size. In preferred embodiments, the solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the ligand is a .beta.-diketone such as hexafluoroacetylacetone or dibutyldiacetate. In other preferred embodiments, the metals in the metal-ligand complex are copper, silver, gold, tungsten, titanium, tantalum, tin, or mixtures thereof. In preferred embodiments, the reducing agent is hydrogen. The method provides an efficient process for dissociating metal-ligand complexes and produces easily-collected metal particles free from hydrocarbon solvent impurities. The ligand and the supercritical fluid can be regenerated to provide an economic, efficient process.

Wai, Chien M. (Moscow, ID); Hunt, Fred H. (Moscow, ID); Smart, Neil G. (Workington, GB); Lin, Yuehe (Richland, WA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Method for separating metal chelates from other materials based on solubilities in supercritical fluids  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for separating a desired metal or metalloi from impurities using a supercritical extraction process based on solubility differences between the components, as well as the ability to vary the solvent power of the supercritical fluid, is described. The use of adduct-forming agents, such as phosphorous-containing ligands, to separate metal or metalloid chelates in such processes is further disclosed. In preferred embodiments, the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the chelating agent is selected from the group consisting of .beta.-diketones; phosphine oxides, such as trialkylphosphine oxides, triarylphosphine oxides and alkylarylphosphine oxides; phosphinic acids; carboxylic acids; phosphates, such as trialkylphosphates, triarylphosphates and alkylarylphosphates; crown ethers; dithiocarbamates; phosphine sulfides; phosphorothioic acids; thiophosphinic acids; halogenated analogs of these chelating agents; and mixtures of these chelating agents. In especially preferred embodiments, at least one of the chelating agents is fluorinated.

Wai, Chien M. (Moscow, ID); Smart, Neil G. (Workington, GB); Phelps, Cindy (Moscow, ID)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Thermodynamic Phase Stability in Gasification Carbon Feedstock ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Conference Tools for 2014 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition ... Symposium, Energy Technologies and Carbon Dioxide Management ... Abstract Scope, Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle for power production is considered a clean ... of Differently Heat Treated Steels in CCS Environment with Supercritical CO2.

125

Properties of CO2-Rich Pore Fluids and Their Effect on Porosity...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Development and Analysis of Geothermal Technologies Project Type Topic 2 Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Reservoir Rock Chemical Interactions Project Description While...

126

ULTRA-SUPERCRITICAL STEAM CORROSION  

SciTech Connect

Efficiency increases in fossil energy boilers and steam turbines are being achieved by increasing the temperature and pressure at the turbine inlets well beyond the critical point of water. To allow these increases, advanced materials are needed that are able to withstand the higher temperatures and pressures in terms of strength, creep, and oxidation resistance. As part of a larger collaborative effort, the Albany Research Center (ARC) is examining the steam-side oxidation behavior for ultrasupercritical (USC) steam turbine applications. Initial tests are being done on six alloys identified as candidates for USC steam boiler applications: ferritic alloy SAVE12, austenitic alloy Super 304H, the high Cr-high Ni alloy HR6W, and the nickel-base superalloys Inconel 617, Haynes 230, and Inconel 740. Each of these alloys has very high strength for its alloy type. Three types of experiments are planned: cyclic oxidation in air plus steam at atmospheric pressure, thermogravimetric ana lysis (TGA) in steam at atmospheric pressure, and exposure tests in supercritical steam up to 650 C (1202 F) and 34.5 MPa (5000 psi). The atmospheric pressure tests, combined with supercritical exposures at 13.8, 20.7, 24.6, and 34.5 MPa (2000, 3000, 4000, and 5000 psi) should allow the determination of the effect of pressure on the oxidation process.

Holcomb, G.R.; Alman, D.E.; Bullard, S.B.; Covino, B.S., Jr.; Cramer, S.D.; Ziomek-Moroz, M.

2003-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

127

Stability analysis of supercritical water cooled reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Supercritical Water-Cooled Reactor (SCWR) is a concept for an advanced reactor that will operate at high pressure (25MPa) and high temperature (500°C average core exit). The high coolant temperature as it leaves the ...

Zhao, Jiyun, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Analysis of a supercritical hydrogen liquefaction cycle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work, a supercritical hydrogen liquefaction cycle is proposed and analyzed numerically. If hydrogen is to be used as an energy carrier, the efficiency of liquefaction will become increasingly important. By examining ...

Staats, Wayne Lawrence

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Supercritical fluid reverse micelle separation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of separating solute material from a polar fluid in a first polar fluid phase is provided. The method comprises combining a polar fluid, a second fluid that is a gas at standard temperature and pressure and has a critical density, and a surfactant. The solute material is dissolved in the polar fluid to define the first polar fluid phase. The combined polar and second fluids, surfactant, and solute material dissolved in the polar fluid is maintained under near critical or supercritical temperature and pressure conditions such that the density of the second fluid exceeds the critical density thereof. In this way, a reverse micelle system defining a reverse micelle solvent is formed which comprises a continuous phase in the second fluid and a plurality of reverse micelles dispersed in the continuous phase. The solute material is dissolved in the polar fluid and is in chemical equilibrium with the reverse micelles. The first polar fluid phase and the continuous phase are immiscible. The reverse micelles each comprise a dynamic aggregate of surfactant molecules surrounding a core of the polar fluid. The reverse micelle solvent has a polar fluid-to-surfactant molar ratio W, which can vary over a range having a maximum ratio W[sub o] that determines the maximum size of the reverse micelles. The maximum ratio W[sub o] of the reverse micelle solvent is then varied, and the solute material from the first polar fluid phase is transported into the reverse micelles in the continuous phase at an extraction efficiency determined by the critical or supercritical conditions. 27 figures.

Fulton, J.L.; Smith, R.D.

1993-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

130

Supercritical fluid reverse micelle separation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of separating solute material from a polar fluid in a first polar fluid phase is provided. The method comprises combining a polar fluid, a second fluid that is a gas at standard temperature and pressure and has a critical density, and a surfactant. The solute material is dissolved in the polar fluid to define the first polar fluid phase. The combined polar and second fluids, surfactant, and solute material dissolved in the polar fluid is maintained under near critical or supercritical temperature and pressure conditions such that the density of the second fluid exceeds the critical density thereof. In this way, a reverse micelle system defining a reverse micelle solvent is formed which comprises a continuous phase in the second fluid and a plurality of reverse micelles dispersed in the continuous phase. The solute material is dissolved in the polar fluid and is in chemical equilibrium with the reverse micelles. The first polar fluid phase and the continuous phase are immiscible. The reverse micelles each comprise a dynamic aggregate of surfactant molecules surrounding a core of the polar fluid. The reverse micelle solvent has a polar fluid-to-surfactant molar ratio W, which can vary over a range having a maximum ratio W.sub.o that determines the maximum size of the reverse micelles. The maximum ratio W.sub.o of the reverse micelle solvent is then varied, and the solute material from the first polar fluid phase is transported into the reverse micelles in the continuous phase at an extraction efficiency determined by the critical or supercritical conditions.

Fulton, John L. (Richland, WA); Smith, Richard D. (Richland, WA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Petrographic, Mineralogic, and Geochemical Studies of Hydrocarbon-derived Authigenic Carbonate Rock from Gas Venting, Seepage, Free Gas, and Gas Hydrate Sites in the Gulf of Mexico and offshore India  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Authigenic carbonate rock (ACR) is derived from microbial oxidation of methane, biodegradation of crude oil, and oxidation of sedimentary organic matter. The precipitation of ACR was characterized petrographically, mineralogically, and geochemically. ACR collected from the seafloor in the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) and ACR recovered from drilled cores in the Krishna-Godawari (KG) basin offshore India were used. All study sites are associated with hydrocarbon gas venting, seepage, free gas, or gas hydrate. ACR from the GOM is densely cemented and extremely irregular in shape, whereas ACR from offshore India is generally an oval-shaped smooth nodule and also densely cemented. The dominant mineral in ACR is authigenic calcite. ACR contains carbon derived from sedimentary organic carbon oxidation that geologically sequesters much fossil carbon. Bulk carbon and oxygen isotopes of ACR were measured. ACR from the GOM is strongly depleted in 13C with ?13C of ?42.5? and enriched in 18O with ?18O of 4.67?. The ?13C of hydrocarbon is typically more depleted in 13C than in the associated ACR. The reason is that authigenic carbonate cements from hydrocarbon oxidation generally enclose skeletal material characterized by normal marine carbonate. Three groups that represent different hydrocarbon sources to ACR were classified in this study: primary carbon sources to ACR from (1) methane plus biodegraded oil, (2) methane, or (3) biodegraded oil. Wide ranges in ?13C (?49.12 to 14.06?) and ?18O ( 1.27 to 14.06?) were observed in ACR from offshore India. In sediments, the ?13C may be affected by differences in the rate of organic carbon oxidation, which generate varying ?13C with depth during methanogenesis. Based on the wide range in ?13C, ACR from offshore India was classified: (1) ?13C may reflect high rates of organic carbon oxidation, (2) ACR may be derived primarily from methane oxidation, and (3) ?13C may reflect low rates of organic carbon oxidation. ?18O values are heavier than those of normal marine carbonates. The ?18O may be caused by reaction with deep-sourced water that was isotopically heavier than ambient seawater. Some samples may reflect heavy ?18O from gas hydrate decomposition, but it would not cause significant heavy oxygen isotopes.

Jung, Woodong

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Supercritical fluid-based extraction/processing: then and now  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An expert in supercritical fluid technologies reviews past, present, and future developments in this field as they relate to lipids. Supercritical fluid-based extraction/processing: then and now Inform Magazine Inform Archives Processing Jerry W. King

133

Supercritical/Solid Catalyst (SSC) - Energy Innovation Portal  

Idaho National Laboratory. Contact INL About This Technology Technology Marketing Summary Supercritical/Solid Catalyst (SSC) is a tested ...

134

Topping PCFB combustion plant with supercritical steam pressure  

SciTech Connect

Research is being conducted to develop a new type of coal fired plant for electric power generation. This new type of plant, called a second generation or topping pressurized circulating fluidized bed combustion (topping PCFB) plant, offers the promise of efficiencies greater than 46 percent (HHV), with both emissions and a cost of electricity that are significantly lower than conventional pulverized coal fired plants with scrubbers. The topping PCFB plant incorporates the partial gasification of coal in a carbonizer, the combustion of carbonizer char in a pressurized circulating fluidized bed combustor (PCFB), and the combustion of carbonizer fuel gas in a topping combustor to achieve gas turbine inlet temperatures of 2,300 F and higher. After completing pilot plant tests of a carbonizer, a PCFB, and a gas turbine topping combustor, all being developed for this new plant, the authors calculated a higher heating value efficiency of 46.2 percent for the plant. In that analysis, the plant operated with a conventional 2,400 psig steam cycle with 1,000 F superheat and reheat steam and a 2.5 inch mercury condenser back pressure. This paper identifies the efficiency gains that this plant will achieve by using supercritical pressure steam conditions.

Robertson, A. [Foster Wheeler Development Corp., Livingston, NJ (United States); White, J. [Parsons Power Group Inc., Reading, PA (United States)

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Surface Studies of HSLA Steel after Electrochemical Corrosion in Supercritical CO2-H2O Environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In aqueous phase saturated with CO2, X-65 sample underwent general corrosion with formation of FeCO3. In supercritical CO2 containing water phase, two major regions are present on the sample surface after the EIS experiment. One region covered with corrosion products identified as FeCO3 and the other containing Fe, oxygen, and carbon-rich islands embedded in metal matrix identified as {alpha}-Fe. Precipitation of FeCO3 from Fe2+ and CO3 2- is responsible for formation of passive layer in oxygen-deficient, CO2 rich aqueous environment. Mechanisms of corrosion degradation occurring in supercritical CO2 as a function. Transport of supercritical CO{sub 2} is a critical element for carbon capture from fossil fuel power plants and underground sequestration. Although acceptable levels of water in supercritical CO{sub 2} (up to {approx} 5 x 10{sup -4}g/dm{sup 3}) have been established, their effects on the corrosion resistance of pipeline steels are not fully known. Moreover, the presence of SO{sub 2}, O{sub 2} impurities in addition to the water can make the fluid more corrosive and, therefore, more detrimental to service materials. Also, in this case, limited data are available on materials performance of carbon steels. to advance this knowledge, other service alloys are being investigated in the high pressure high temperature cell containing impure CO{sub 2} fluids using reliable non-destructive in-situ electrochemical methods. The electrochemical results are being augmented by a number of surface analyses of the corroded surfaces.

Ziomek-Moroz, M. Holcomb, G. Tylczak, J Beck, J Fedkin, M. Lvov, S.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

SPECIAL HEAT TRANSFER PHENOMENA FOR SUPERCRITICAL FLUIDS  

SciTech Connect

Present-day knowledge concerning the molecular structure of supercritical fluids is briefly reviewed. It is shown that liquid-like and gas- like phases may coexist at supercritical pressures, although they may not be in equllibrium with each other. it is postulated that on the basis of the coexistence of these two phases a "boiling-like" phenomenon may provide the mechanism of heat transfer to supercritical fluids at high heat fluxes and certain other conditions. An unusual mode of heat transfer was actually observed at supercritical pressures during tests which produced the high heat fluxes and other conditions under which such "boiling" would be expected. The tests and the various conditions are briefly described. An emission of high-frequeney, high- intensity sounds usually accompanied these tests. It is shown that similar screaming sounds were heard during boiling at subcritical pressures, giving further support to the hypothesis that "boiling" may occur at supercritical pressures. A seeond possible explanation for the unusual mode of heat transfer is based on boundarylayer stability considerations. At high heat fluxes large density differences exist between the bulk of the fluid and the fluid in the boundary layer near the wall. A breakdown of the boundary layer may be caused by the build-up of ripples between its low-density fluid and the high-density bulk fluid, in a manner quite similar to the breaking of ocean waves at high wind velocities. It is pointed out that the density variation of supercritical fluide may be used to advantage by certrifuging boundary layers. (auth)

Goldmann, K.

1956-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Solid catalyzed isoparaffin alkylation at supercritical fluid and near-supercritical fluid conditions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to an improved method for the alkylation reaction of isoparaffins with olefins over solid catalysts including contacting a mixture of an isoparaffin, an olefin and a phase-modifying material with a solid acid catalyst member under alkylation conversion conditions at either supercritical fluid, or near-supercritical fluid conditions, at a temperature and a pressure relative to the critical temperature(T.sub.c) and the critical pressure(P.sub.c) of the reaction mixture. The phase-modifying phase-modifying material is employed to promote the reaction's achievement of either a supercritical fluid state or a near-supercritical state while simultaneously allowing for decreased reaction temperature and longer catalyst life.

Ginosar, Daniel M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Fox, Robert V. (Idaho Falls, ID); Kong, Peter C. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Chemical deposition methods using supercritical fluid solutions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for depositing a film of a desired material on a substrate comprises dissolving at least one reagent in a supercritical fluid comprising at least one solvent. Either the reagent is capable of reacting with or is a precursor of a compound capable of reacting with the solvent to form the desired product, or at least one additional reagent is included in the supercritical solution and is capable of reacting with or is a precursor of a compound capable of reacting with the first reagent or with a compound derived from the first reagent to form the desired material. The supercritical solution is expanded to produce a vapor or aerosol and a chemical reaction is induced in the vapor or aerosol so that a film of the desired material resulting from the chemical reaction is deposited on the substrate surface. In an alternate embodiment, the supercritical solution containing at least one reagent is expanded to produce a vapor or aerosol which is then mixed with a gas containing at least one additional reagent. A chemical reaction is induced in the resulting mixture so that a film of the desired material is deposited.

Sievers, Robert E. (Boulder, CO); Hansen, Brian N. (Boulder, CO)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Catalytic gasification of wet biomass in supercritical water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wet biomass (water hyacinth, banana trees, cattails, green algae, kelp, etc.) grows rapidly and abundantly around the world. As a biomass crop, aquatic species are particularly attractive because their cultivation does not compete with land-based agricultural activities designed to produce food for consumption or export. However, wet biomass is not regarded as a promising feed for conventional thermochemical conversion processes because the cost associated with drying it is too high. This research seeks to address this problem by employing water as the gasification medium. Prior work has shown that low concentrations of glucose (a model compound for whole biomass) can be completely gasified in supercritical water at 600{degrees}C and 34.5 Wa after a 30 s reaction time. Higher concentrations of glucose (up to 22% by weight in water) resulted in incomplete conversion under these conditions. The gas contained hydrogen, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, methane, ethane, propane, and traces of other hydrocarbons. The carbon monoxide and hydrocarbons are easily converted to hydrogen by commercial technology available in most refineries. This prior work utilized capillary tube reactors with no catalyst. A larger reactor system was fabricated and the heterogeneous catalytic gasification of glucose and wet biomass slurry of higher concentration was studied to attain higher conversions.

Antal, M.J. Jr.; Matsumura, Yukihiko; Xu, Xiaodong [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States)] [and others

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

140

Materials for Ultra-Supercritical Steam Power Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for Advanced Ultra-Supercritical for Advanced Ultra-Supercritical Steam Power Plants Background The first ultra-supercritical (USC) steam plants in the U.S. were designed, constructed, and operated in the late 1950s. The higher operating temperatures and pressures in USC plants were designed to increase the efficiency of steam plants. However, materials performance problems forced the reduction of steam temperatures in these plants, and discouraged further developmental efforts on low heat-rate units.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rocks supercritical carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Evaluation of Five Sedimentary Rocks Other Than Salt for Geologic Repository Siting Purposes  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE), in order to increase the diversity of rock types under consideration by the geologic disposal program, initiated the Sedimary ROck Program (SERP), whose immediate objectiv eis to evaluate five types of secimdnary rock - sandstone, chalk, carbonate rocks (limestone and dolostone), anhydrock, and shale - to determine the potential for siting a geologic repository. The evaluation of these five rock types, together with the ongoing salt studies, effectively results in the consideration of all types of relatively impermeable sedimentary rock for repository purposes. The results of this evaluation are expressed in terms of a ranking of the five rock types with respect to their potential to serve as a geologic repository host rock. This comparative evaluation was conducted on a non-site-specific basis, by use of generic information together with rock evaluation criteria (RECs) derived from the DOE siting guidelines for geologic repositories (CFR 1984). An information base relevant to rock evaluation using these RECs was developed in hydrology, geochemistry, rock characteristics (rock occurrences, thermal response, rock mechanics), natural resources, and rock dissolution. Evaluation against postclosure and preclosure RECs yielded a ranking of the five subject rocks with respect to their potential as repository host rocks. Shale was determined to be the most preferred of the five rock types, with sandstone a distant second, the carbonate rocks and anhydrock a more distant third, and chalk a relatively close fourth.

Croff, A.G.; Lomenick, T.F.; Lowrie, R.S.; Stow, S.H.

2003-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

142

A Mechanistic Model for Pipeline Steel Corrosion in Supercritical ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, A mechanistic model was established to investigate the corrosion mechanism of pipeline steel in supercritical CO2/SO2/O2/H2O environments.

143

Candidate Materials Evaluation for Supercritical Water-Cooled Reactor  

SciTech Connect

Final technical report on the corrosion, stress corrosion cracking, and radiation response of candidate materials for the supercritical water-cooled reactor concept.

T. R. Allen and G. S. Was

2008-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

144

Kinetics of Supercritical Water Reformation of Ethanol to H  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sep 16, 2007 ... Description Kinetics of the supercritical water reformation of ethanol was experimentally studied in a tubular reactor made of Inconel 625 alloy.

145

Study of Supercritical CO2 Emulsion in Ni Electroplating and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Study of Supercritical CO2 Emulsion in Ni Electroplating and Application in Fabrication of Defect-Free Micromechanical Component with High  ...

146

Corrosion of Candidate Alloys in High Temperature Supercritical  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Materials corrosion in high temperature supercritical CO2 will be an important consideration for this application. The results of corrosion evaluations of a wide ...

147

Exploration of supercritical water gasification of biomass using batch reactor .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The focus of this study is on gasification of a biomass in supercritical water. Vapor mass yield in a batch reactor after 20 minutes in… (more)

Venkitasamy, Chandrasekar

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Supercritical Water Gasification of Biomass & Biomass Model Compounds.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Supercritical water gasification (SCWG) is an innovative, modern, and effective destruction process for the treatment of organic compounds. Hydrogen production using SCWG of biomass or… (more)

Youssef, Emhemmed A.E.A

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Ultra supercritical turbines--steam oxidation  

SciTech Connect

Ultra supercritical (USC) power plants offer the promise of higher efficiencies and lower emissions, which are goals of the U.S. Department of Energy?s Advanced Power Systems Initiatives. Most current coal power plants in the U.S. operate at a maximum steam temperature of 538?C. However, new supercritical plants worldwide are being brought into service with steam temperatures of up to 620?C. Current Advanced Power Systems goals include coal generation at 60% efficiency, which would require steam temperatures of up to 760?C. This research examines the steamside oxidation of advanced alloys for use in USC systems, with emphasis placed on alloys for high- and intermediate-pressure turbine sections. Initial results of this research are presented.

Holcomb, Gordon R.; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Ziomek-Moroz, Margaret; Alman, David E.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Advanced Materials for Ultra Supercritical Boiler Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Road Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 304-285-4721 robert.romanosky@netl.doe.gov Patricia a. Rawls Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 412-386-5882 patricia.rawls@netl.doe.gov Robert M. Purgert Prime Contractor and Administrator Energy Industries of Ohio 6100 Oak Tree Boulevard, Suite 200 Independence, OH 44131-6914 216-643-2952 purgert@msn.com AdvAnced MAteriAls for UltrA sUpercriticAl Boiler systeMs Description A consortium led by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy (FE) has conducted the first phase of a multiyear program to develop materials technology for use in advanced ultra supercritical (USC) coal-fired power plants. The advanced materials developed in this project are essential for construction of

151

SEPARATION OF FISCHER-TROPSCH WAX FROM CATALYST BY SUPERCRITICAL EXTRACTION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this research project is to evaluate the potential of supercritical fluid (SCF) extraction for the recovery and fractionation of the wax product from the slurry bubble column (SBC) reactor of the Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) process. The wax, comprised mostly of branched and linear alkanes with a broad molecular weight distribution up to C{sub 100}, will be extracted with a hydrocarbon solvent that has a critical temperature near the operating temperature of the SBC reactor, i.e., 200-300 C. Initial work is being performed using n-hexane as the solvent. The success of the project depends on two factors. First, the supercritical solvent must be able to dissolve the F-T wax; furthermore, this must be accomplished at conditions that do not entrain the solid catalyst. Second, the extraction must be controlled so as not to favor the removal of the low molecular weight wax compounds. That is, a constant carbon-number distribution in the wax slurry must be maintained at steady-state column operation. Three major tasks are being undertaken to evaluate our proposed SCF extraction process. Task 1: Equilibrium solubility measurements for model F-T wax components in supercritical fluids at conditions representative of those in a SBC reactor. Task 2: Thermodynamic modeling of the measured VLE data for extending our results to real wax systems. Task 3: Process design studies of our proposed process. Additional details of the task structure are given.

MARK C. THIES; PATRICK C. JOYCE

1998-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

152

SEPARATION OF FISCHER-TROPSCH WAX FROM CATALYST BY SUPERCRITICAL EXTRACTION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this research project is to evaluate the potential of supercritical fluid (SCF) extraction for the recovery and fractionation of the wax product from the slurry bubble column (SBC) reactor of the Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) process. The wax, comprised mostly of branched and linear alkanes with a broad molecular weight distribution up to C{sub 100}, will be extracted with a hydrocarbon solvent that has a critical temperature near the operating temperature of the SBC reactor, i.e., 200-300 C. Initial work is being performed using n-hexane as the solvent. The success of the project depends on two factors. First, the supercritical solvent must be able to dissolve the F-T wax; furthermore, this must be accomplished at conditions that do not entrain the solid catalyst. Second, the extraction must be controlled so as not to favor the removal of the low molecular weight wax compounds. That is, a constant carbon-number distribution in the wax slurry must be maintained at steady-state column operation. Three major tasks are being undertaken to evaluate our proposed SCF extraction process. Task 1: Equilibrium solubility measurements for model F-T wax components in supercritical fluids at conditions representative of those in a SBC reactor. Task 2: Thermodynamic modeling of the measured VLE data for extending our results to real wax systems. Task 3: Process design studies of our proposed process. Additional details of the task structure are given.

MARK C. THIES; PATRICK C. JOYCE

1998-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

153

Supercritical water oxidation of landfill leachate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: > Thermal analysis of NH{sub 3} in supercritical water oxidation reaction. > Research on the catalytic reaction of landfill leachate by using response surface method. > Kinetic research of supercritical water oxidation of NH{sub 3} with and without MnO{sub 2} catalyst. - Abstract: In this paper, ammonia as an important ingredient in landfill leachate was mainly studied. Based on Peng-Robinson formulations and Gibbs free energy minimization method, the estimation of equilibrium composition and thermodynamic analysis for supercritical water oxidation of ammonia (SCWO) was made. As equilibrium is reached, ammonia could be totally oxidized in SCW. N{sub 2} is the main product, and the formation of NO{sub 2} and NO could be neglected. The investigation on SCWO of landfill leachate was conducted in a batch reactor at temperature of 380-500 deg. C, reaction time of 50-300 s and pressure of 25 MPa. The effect of reaction parameters such as oxidant equivalent ratio, reaction time and temperature were investigated. The results showed that COD and NH{sub 3} conversion improved as temperature, reaction time and oxygen excess increased. Compared to organics, NH{sub 3} is a refractory compound in supercritical water. The conversion of COD and NH{sub 3} were higher in the presence of MnO{sub 2} than that without catalyst. The interaction between reaction temperature and time was analyzed by using response surface method (RSM) and the results showed that its influence on the NH{sub 3} conversion was relatively insignificant in the case without catalyst. A global power-law rate expression was regressed from experimental data to estimate the reaction rate of NH{sub 3}. The activation energy with and without catalyst for NH{sub 3} oxidation were 107.07 {+-} 8.57 kJ/mol and 83.22 {+-} 15.62 kJ/mol, respectively.

Wang Shuzhong, E-mail: s_z_wang@yahoo.cn [School of Energy and Power Engineering of Xi' an Jiao Tong University, Xi'an 710049 (China); Guo Yang [School of Energy and Power Engineering of Xi' an Jiao Tong University, Xi'an 710049 (China); Chen Chongming [Hebei Electric Power Research Institute, Shijizhuang, Hebei 050021 (China); Zhang Jie; Gong Yanmeng; Wang Yuzhen [School of Energy and Power Engineering of Xi' an Jiao Tong University, Xi'an 710049 (China)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

154

Advanced Thermal Storage for Central Receivers with Supercritical Coolants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The principal objective of the study is to determine if supercritical heat transport fluids in a central receiver power plant, in combination with ceramic thermocline storage systems, offer a reduction in levelized energy cost over a baseline nitrate salt concept. The baseline concept uses a nitrate salt receiver, two-tank (hot and cold) nitrate salt thermal storage, and a subcritical Rankine cycle. A total of 6 plant designs were analyzed, as follows: Plant Designation Receiver Fluid Thermal Storage Rankine Cycle Subcritical nitrate salt Nitrate salt Two tank nitrate salt Subcritical Supercritical nitrate salt Nitrate salt Two tank nitrate salt Supercritical Low temperature H2O Supercritical H2O Two tank nitrate salt Supercritical High temperature H2O Supercritical H2O Packed bed thermocline Supercritical Low temperature CO2 Supercritical CO2 Two tank nitrate salt Supercritical High temperature CO2 Supercritical CO2 Packed bed thermocline Supercritical Several conclusions have been drawn from the results of the study, as follows: 1) The use of supercritical H2O as the heat transport fluid in a packed bed thermocline is likely not a practical approach. The specific heat of the fluid is a strong function of the temperatures at values near 400 °C, and the temperature profile in the bed during a charging cycle is markedly different than the profile during a discharging cycle. 2) The use of supercritical CO2 as the heat transport fluid in a packed bed thermocline is judged to be technically feasible. Nonetheless, the high operating pressures for the supercritical fluid require the use of pressure vessels to contain the storage inventory. The unit cost of the two-tank nitrate salt system is approximately $24/kWht, while the unit cost of the high pressure thermocline system is nominally 10 times as high. 3) For the supercritical fluids, the outer crown temperatures of the receiver tubes are in the range of 700 to 800 °C. At temperatures of 700 °C and above, intermetallic compounds can precipitate between, and within, the grains of nickel alloys. The precipitation leads to an increase in tensile strength, and a decrease in ductility. Whether the proposed tube materials can provide the required low cycle fatigue life for the supercritical H2O and CO2 receivers is an open question. 4) A ranking of the plants, in descending order of technical and economic feasibility, is as follows: i) Supercritical nitrate salt and baseline nitrate salt: equal ratings ii) Low temperature supercritical H2O iii) Low temperature supercritical CO2 iv) High temperature supercritical CO2 v) High temperature supercritical H2O 5) The two-tank nitrate salt thermal storage systems are strongly preferred over the thermocline systems using supercritical heat transport fluids.

Kelly, Bruce D.

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

155

Flow Stability of Supercritical Water Cooled Systems  

SciTech Connect

Research activities are ongoing worldwide to develop nuclear power plants with supercritical water cooled reactor (SCWR) with the purpose to achieve a high thermal efficiency and to improve their economical competitiveness. However, the strong variation of the thermal-physical properties of water in the vicinity of the pseudo-critical line results in challenging tasks in thermal-hydraulic design of a SCWR. One of the challenging tasks is to understand and to predict the dynamic behavior and flow stability of supercritical water cooled systems. Although extensive thermal-hydraulic research activities have been carried out worldwide, studies on flow stability of SC water cooled systems are scarce. The present study deals with the flow behavior of SC water cooled systems. For this purpose the computer code SASC was developed, which is applied to a simplified cooling system. The effect of various parameters on the flow behavior is investigated. The first results achieved up to now reveals a complicated dynamic performance of a system cooled by supercritical water. (authors)

Cheng, X.; Kuang, B.; Yang, Y.H. [School of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 1954 Hua Shan Road, Shanghai 200030 (China)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Materials for Advanced Ultra-Supercritical Steam Boilers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Materials for Advanced Ultra-Supercritical Steam Boilers Mike Santella ORNL 25th Annual Conference ­ For Profit Cost Sharing Consortium #12;2 26-May-2010 Materials for Advanced Ultra-Supercritical Steam Boilers Estimated Total Amount of Tubing for a Generic A-USC Boiler Images courtesy of The Babcock & Wilcox Company

157

Characterization of Oxide Layers Formed During Corrosion in Supercritical Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.edu ABSTRACT The Supercritical Water Reactor is one of the Generation IV nuclear power plant designs envisioned of the Generation IV nuclear power plant designs envisioned for its high thermal efficiency and plant simplification for the study of oxide growth in steels and in zirconium alloys during exposure to supercritical water. A very

Motta, Arthur T.

158

REVIEW OF THE STATUS OF SUPERCRITICAL WATER REACTOR TECHNOLOGY  

SciTech Connect

Supercritical water-reactor design studies are reviewed. The status of supercritical water technology relative to heat transfer and fluid flow, water chemistry, internal deposition on heated surfaces, plant power cycles, and reactor construction materials is reviewed. The direct cycle was found to offer the highest probability for achieving economic power. (C.J.G.)

Marchaterre, J.F.; Petrick, M.

1960-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

ASSEMBLAGES ON WASTE ROCK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Natural regeneration on waste rock was investigated at the old Wangaloa coal mine, south-east Otago. A 450-m long waste rock stack had been created 40–50 years ago, and has had little anthropogenic intervention since. The stack is made up of a gradient of three main waste rock types, defined as ‘silt-rich’, ‘mixed’, and ‘quartz-rich’, which reflect different proportions of loess siltstone and quartz gravel conglomerate. Plant species assemblages were quantified in four 5-m 2 quadrats in each waste rock type. Invertebrates were heat extracted from substrate cores (7 cm diameter; depth 5 cm) collected from quadrats over an eight-week period in spring 2003. Ordination analysis showed statistically distinct plant and invertebrate assemblages had arisen on each waste rock type. Revegetation patterns were dominated by native, woody individuals on all waste rock types, particularly manuka (Leptospermum scoparium) and kanuka (Kunzea ericoides). Plant cover on ‘silt-rich ’ waste rock was four-fold that on ‘quartz-rich ’ waste rock. Total numbers of invertebrates were highest on ‘quartz-rich’ waste rock, but richness greatest on ‘silt-rich ’ waste rock. Collembola dominated the fauna but their numbers were proportionally greatest in poorly vegetated areas. Further work is required to explain the absence of plants and invertebrates from local areas of waste rock. ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

C. G. Rufaut; S. Hammit; D. Craw; S. G. Clearwater

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership  

SciTech Connect

The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership in Phase I are organized into four areas: (1) Evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks that will be used to determine the location of pilot demonstrations in Phase II; (2) Development of GIS-based reporting framework that links with national networks; (3) Design of an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies, market-based opportunities for carbon management, and an economic/risk assessment framework; (referred to below as the Advanced Concepts component of the Phase I efforts) and (4) Initiation of a comprehensive education and outreach program. As a result of the Phase I activities, the groundwork is in place to provide an assessment of storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that complements the ongoing DOE research agenda in Carbon Sequestration. The geology of the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership Region is favorable for the potential sequestration of enormous volume of CO{sub 2}. The United States Geological Survey (USGS 1995) identified 10 geologic provinces and 111 plays in the region. These provinces and plays include both sedimentary rock types characteristic of oil, gas, and coal productions as well as large areas of mafic volcanic rocks. Of the 10 provinces and 111 plays, 1 province and 4 plays are located within Idaho. The remaining 9 provinces and 107 plays are dominated by sedimentary rocks and located in the states of Montana and Wyoming. The potential sequestration capacity of the 9 sedimentary provinces within the region ranges from 25,000 to almost 900,000 million metric tons of CO{sub 2}. Overall every sedimentary formation investigated has significant potential to sequester large amounts of CO{sub 2}. Simulations conducted to evaluate mineral trapping potential of mafic volcanic rock formations located in the Idaho province suggest that supercritical CO{sub 2} is converted to solid carbonate mineral within a few hundred years and permanently entombs the carbon. Although MMV for this rock type may be challenging, a carefully chosen combination of geophysical and geochemical techniques should allow assessment of the fate of CO{sub 2} in deep basalt hosted aquifers. Terrestrial carbon sequestration relies on land management practices and technologies to remove atmospheric CO{sub 2} where it is stored in trees, plants, and soil. This indirect sequestration can be implemented today and is on the front line of voluntary, market-based approaches to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions. Initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil Carbon (C) on rangelands, and forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Rangelands can store up to an additional 0.05 mt C/ha/yr, while the croplands are on average four times that amount. Estimates of technical potential for soil sequestration within the region in cropland are in the range of 2.0 M mt C/yr over 20 year time horizon. This is equivalent to approximately 7.0 M mt CO{sub 2}e/yr. The forestry sinks are well documented, and the potential in the Big Sky region ranges from 9-15 M mt CO{sub 2} equivalent per year. Value-added benefits include enhanced yields, reduced erosion, and increased wildlife habitat. Thus the terrestrial sinks provide a viable, environmentally beneficial, and relatively low cost sink that is available to sequester C in the current time frame. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological and terrestrial sequestration re

Susan Capalbo

2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rocks supercritical carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Computational Modeling and Assessment Of Nanocoatings for Ultra Supercritical Boilers  

SciTech Connect

Forced outages and boiler unavailability in conventional coal-fired fossil power plants is most often caused by fireside corrosion of boiler waterwalls. Industry-wide, the rate of wall thickness corrosion wastage of fireside waterwalls in fossil-fired boilers has been of concern for many years. It is significant that the introduction of nitrogen oxide (NOx) emission controls with staged burners systems has increased reported waterwall wastage rates to as much as 120 mils (3 mm) per year. Moreover, the reducing environment produced by the low-NOx combustion process is the primary cause of accelerated corrosion rates of waterwall tubes made of carbon and low alloy steels. Improved coatings, such as the MCrAl nanocoatings evaluated here (where M is Fe, Ni, and Co), are needed to reduce/eliminate waterwall damage in subcritical, supercritical, and ultra-supercritical (USC) boilers. The first two tasks of this six-task project-jointly sponsored by EPRI and the U.S. Department of Energy (DE-FC26-07NT43096)-have focused on computational modeling of an advanced MCrAl nanocoating system and evaluation of two nanocrystalline (iron and nickel base) coatings, which will significantly improve the corrosion and erosion performance of tubing used in USC boilers. The computational model results showed that about 40 wt.% is required in Fe based nanocrystalline coatings for long-term durability, leading to a coating composition of Fe-25Cr-40Ni-10 wt.% Al. In addition, the long term thermal exposure test results further showed accelerated inward diffusion of Al from the nanocrystalline coatings into the substrate. In order to enhance the durability of these coatings, it is necessary to develop a diffusion barrier interlayer coating such TiN and/or AlN. The third task 'Process Advanced MCrAl Nanocoating Systems' of the six-task project jointly sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute, EPRI and the U.S. Department of Energy (DE-FC26-07NT43096)- has focused on processing of advanced nanocrystalline coating systems and development of diffusion barrier interlayer coatings. Among the diffusion interlayer coatings evaluated, the TiN interlayer coating was found to be the optimum one. This report describes the research conducted under the Task 3 workscope.

David W. Gandy; John P. Shingledecker

2011-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

162

Modeling new coal projects: supercritical or subcritical?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Decisions made on new build coal-fired plants are driven by several factors - emissions, fuel logistics and electric transmission access all provide constraints. The crucial economic decision whether to build supercritical or subcritical units often depends on assumptions concerning the reliability/availability of each technology, the cost of on-fuel operations including maintenance, the generation efficiencies and the potential for emissions credits at some future value. Modeling the influence of these key factors requires analysis and documentation to assure the assets actually meet the projected financial performance. This article addresses some of the issue related to the trade-offs that have the potential to be driven by the supercritical/subcritical decision. Solomon Associates has been collecting cost, generation and reliability data on coal-fired power generation assets for approximately 10 years using a strict methodology and taxonomy to categorize and compare actual plant operations data. This database provides validated information not only on performance, but also on alternative performance scenarios, which can provide useful insights in the pro forma financial analysis and models of new plants. 1 ref., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

Carrino, A.J.; Jones, R.B. [Solomon Associates, Dallas, TX (United States)

2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

163

Surface and Electrochemical Behavior of HSLA in Supercritical CO2-H2O Environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

General corrosion was observed on high strength low alloy carbon steel after electrochemical impedance spectroscopy experiments (EIS) performed in H{sub 2}O saturated with CO{sub 2} at 50 C and 15.2 MPa. However, general and localized were observed on the same material surfaces after the EIS experiments performed in supercritical CO{sub 2} containing approximately 6100 ppmv H{sub 2}O at 50 C and 15.2 MPa. The general corrosion areas were uniformly covered by the FeCO{sub 3}-like phase identified by X-ray diffraction (XRD). In the area of localized corrosion, XRD also revealed FeCO{sub 3}-rich islands embedded in {alpha}-iron. The energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis revealed high concentrations of iron, carbon, and oxygen in the area affected by general corrosion and in the islands formed in the area of localized corrosion. The real and imaginary impedances were lower in H{sub 2}O saturated with CO{sub 2} than those in the supercritical CO{sub 2} containing the aqueous phase indicating faster corrosion kinetics in the former.

M. Ziomek-Moroz; G. R. Holcomb; J. Tylczak; J. Beck; M. Fedkin; S. Lvov

2012-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

164

URANIUM IN ALKALINE ROCKS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

District, Teller County, Colorado," U.S. Geol. Survey Bull.Jamestown District, Colorado," Econ. Geol. , v. 68, pp 1247-Rocks at Powderhorn, Colorado; Economic Geology, Vol. 60,

Murphy, M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Supercritical Fluid Extraction Applications in the Process Industries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE), a separations technique, has recently attracted the attention of the process industries. SFE is based on the observation that a fluid exhibits enhanced solvating ability when compressed at temperatures near its critical temperature to pressures greater than its critical pressure. This extraction process can, under certain circumstances, offer economic advantages comparable to those of conventional separation techniques. Several commercial supercritical processes are currently in operation in the United States and Europe, and new industrial applications are emerging. In this paper, the current and future applications of supercritical fluid technology and the prospects for implementing an SFE operation on an industrial scale are reviewed.

Lahiere, R. J.; Fair, J. R.; Humphrey, J. L.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Design of a continuous-flow reactor for in situ x-ray absorption spectroscopy of solids in supercritical fluids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the design and performance of a novel high-temperature and high-pressure continuous-flow reactor, which allows for x-ray absorption spectroscopy or diffraction in supercritical water and other fluids under high pressure and temperature. The in situ cell consists of a tube of sintered, polycrystalline aluminum nitride, which is tolerant to corrosive chemical media, and was designed to be stable at temperatures up to 500 deg. C and pressures up to 30 MPa. The performance of the reactor is demonstrated by the measurement of extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectra of a carbon-supported ruthenium catalyst during the continuous hydrothermal gasification of ethanol in supercritical water at 400 deg. C and 24 MPa.

Dreher, M.; De Boni, E.; Nachtegaal, M.; Wambach, J.; Vogel, F. [Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

167

Rock Sampling At Socorro Mountain Area (Armstrong, Et Al., 1995) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Armstrong, Et Al., 1995) Armstrong, Et Al., 1995) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Rock Sampling At Socorro Mountain Area (Armstrong, Et Al., 1995) Exploration Activity Details Location Socorro Mountain Area Exploration Technique Rock Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Corresponding Socorro caldera Carboniferous rocks were studied in the field in 1988-1992-Renault later completed geochemistry and silica-crystallite geothermometry, Armstrong petrographic analysis and cathodoluminescence, Oscarson SEM studies, and John Repetski (USGS, Reston, Virgina) conodont stratigraphy and color and textural alteration as guides to the carbonate rocks' thermal history. The carbonate-rock classification used in this

168

Session: Hard Rock Penetration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of five presentations: ''Hard Rock Penetration - Summary'' by George P. Tennyson, Jr.; ''Overview - Hard Rock Penetration'' by James C. Dunn; ''An Overview of Acoustic Telemetry'' by Douglas S. Drumheller; ''Lost Circulation Technology Development Status'' by David A. Glowka; ''Downhole Memory-Logging Tools'' by Peter Lysne.

Tennyson, George P. Jr.; Dunn, James C.; Drumheller, Douglas S.; Glowka, David A.; Lysne, Peter

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Development of Materials for Supercritical-Water-Cooled Reactor |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Development of Materials for Supercritical-Water-Cooled Reactor Development of Materials for Supercritical-Water-Cooled Reactor Development of Materials for Supercritical-Water-Cooled Reactor Supercritical-Water-Cooled Reactor (SCWR) was selected as one of the promising candidates in Generation IV reactors for its prominent advantages; those are the high thermal efficiency, the system simplification, the R&D cost minimization and the flexibility for core design. As the demand for advanced nuclear system increases, Japanese R&D project started in 1999 aiming to provide technical information essential to demonstration of SCPR technologies through three sub-themes of 1. Plant conceptual design, 2. Thermal-hydraulics, and 3. Material. Although the material development is critical issue of SCWR development, previous studies were limited for the screening tests on commercial alloys

170

Supercritical Marine-Layer Flow along a Smoothly Varying Coastline  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A model for hydraulically supercritical atmospheric marine-layer flow along a smoothly varying coastline is formulated and solved numerically. The model is motivated by a recent comparison of CODE observations to a simple hydraulic theory, which ...

R. M. Samelson

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Dynamics of Excimer Formation and Decay in Supercritical Krypton  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dynamics of Excimer Formation and Decay in Supercritical Krypton R. A. Holroyd, A. R. Cook and J. M. Preses J. Chem. Phys. 131, 224509 (2009). Find paper at Scitation Abstract:...

172

Modeling Supercritical Systems With Tough2- The Eoslsc Equation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

| Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Modeling Supercritical Systems With Tough2- The Eoslsc Equation Of State Module And A Basin And Range...

173

Diurnal Cycle of Supercritical Along-Coast Flows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, a three-dimensional hydrostatic mesoscale model is used to address the transient behavior of supercritical along-coast flow. A control experiment and several sensitivity tests are performed in order to investigate the diurnal cycle ...

Stefan Söderberg; Michael Tjernström

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Reactor physics design of supercritical CO?-cooled fast reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas-Cooled Fast Reactors (GFRs) are among the GEN-IV designs proposed for future deployment. Driven by anticipated plant cost reduction, the use of supercritical CO? (S-CO?) as a Brayton cycle working fluid in a direct ...

Pope, Michael A. (Michael Alexander)

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

A Simple Parameterization of Turbulent Tidal Mixing near Supercritical Topography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple parameterization for tidal dissipation near supercritical topography, designed to be applied at deep midocean ridges, is presented. In this parameterization, radiation of internal tides is quantified using a linear knife-edge model. ...

Jody M. Klymak; Sonya Legg; Robert Pinkel

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

An investigation of real gas effects in supercritical CO? compressors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents a comprehensive assessment of real gas effects on the performance and matching of centrifugal compressors operating with CO2 at supercritical conditions. The analytical framework combines first principles ...

Baltadjiev, Nikola D. (Nikola Dimitrov)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Interim Guidance on Chemical Cleaning of Supercritical Units  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Waterwall tubes in some of the existing fleet of supercritical steam generators operating with oxygenated water treatment (OT) are experiencing the growth of duplex oxide scales of similar morphology to those found in the circuitry of steam-touched superheater and reheater tubing. EPRI report 1015656, Oxide Scale Growth Characteristics in Waterwall Tubes of Supercritical Steam Boilers, examined the conditions at which these oxides are formed. This report provides guidance on the proper monitoring of wate...

2010-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

178

Process for treating effluent from a supercritical water oxidation reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for treating a gaseous effluent from a supercritical water oxidation reactor containing entrained solids is provided comprising the steps of expanding the gas/solids effluent from a first to a second lower pressure at a temperature at which no liquid condenses; separating the solids from the gas effluent; neutralizing the effluent to remove any acid gases; condensing the effluent; and retaining the purified effluent to the supercritical water oxidation reactor.

Barnes, Charles M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Shapiro, Carolyn (Idaho Falls, ID)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Growth Characteristics in Waterwall Tubes of Supercritical Units  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Waterwall tubes in some of the existing fleet of U.S. supercritical steam boilers operating with oxygenated water treatment (OT) are experiencing the growth of duplex oxide scales of similar morphology to those found in the circuitry of steam-touched superheater and reheater tubing. A 2009 EPRI report, Oxide Scale Growth Characteristics in Waterwall Tubes of Supercritical Steam Boilers (1015656), examined the conditions at which these oxides are formed. This report provides information to allow the predi...

2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

180

Process for treating effluent from a supercritical water oxidation reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for treating a gaseous effluent from a supercritical water oxidation reactor containing entrained solids is provided comprising the steps of expanding the gas/solids effluent from a first to a second lower pressure at a temperature at which no liquid condenses; separating the solids from the gas effluent; neutralizing the effluent to remove any acid gases; condensing the effluent; and retaining the purified effluent to the supercritical water oxidation reactor. 6 figs.

Barnes, C.M.; Shapiro, C.

1997-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rocks supercritical carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Determination Development of Chemical Model to Predict the Interactions between Supercritical Carbon Dioxide and Reservoir Rock in Enhanced Geothermal System Reservoirs CX(s)...

182

Wyoming | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Determination Development of Chemical Model to Predict the Interactions between Supercritical Carbon Dioxide and Reservoir Rock in Enhanced Geothermal System Reservoirs CX(s)...

183

PVIC.F.F2a U.S. DEPAR.MENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Experiment-Based Model for the Chemical Interactions between Geothermal Rocks, Supercritical Carbon TITLE : Dioxide and Water Funding Opportunity Announcement Number...

184

Experiment-Based Model for the Chemical Interactions between...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Experiment-Based Model for the Chemical Interactions between Geothermal Rocks, Supercritical Carbon Dioxide and Water Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified...

185

Experimental and analytic studies to model kinetics and mass transport of carbon dioxide sequstration in depleted carbonate reservoirs  

SciTech Connect

There is undeniable evidence that concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere is rising at an increasingly rapid rate primarily as the result of burning fossil fuels. Although the debate continues, most of the scientific community believes that higher levels of atmospheric CO2 will lead to a significant warming of the Earth’s climate and that there is already evidence that this is occurring. There are two ways to ameliorate this problem. One is to significantly reduce production of CO2, which is primarily a political-economic problem, and the other is to remove CO2 from emissions and/or the atmosphere and find some way to sequester it. Several possible ways to sequester CO2 are under investigation or have been suggested. These include removal by chemical reaction, deep seabed disposal, and pumping supercritical CO2 into various subsurface environments. Sequestration of carbon dioxide in depleted gas reservoirs appears to be a viable option, with a possible economic spin-off from the recovery of significant gas reserves. At the elevated temperatures and pressures encountered in reservoirs, carbon dioxide behaves as a supercritical fluid. Under these conditions, little was known regarding the, diffusion of carbon dioxide in natural gas, and displacement of natural gas by carbon dioxide. A major objective of this research was to obtain the necessary data to model these processes. Also, the added CO2 will react with reservoir waters that are often chemically complex high ionic strength brines making them more acidic. This can result in the dissolution of calcium carbonate (calcite) that is a common host rock or sandstone cement in reservoirs and lead to potentially serious problems for CO2 injection and the integrity of the reservoir. It was consequently a second major objective of this project to determine calcite solubility and dissolution kinetics in solutions representative of subsurface brines and produce a general dissolution rate equation. Both objectives were accomplished. Reservoir simulations indicated a large amount of CO2 would be sequestered, with the amount depending on reservoir water saturation. Simulation results also indicate a significant amount of natural gas could be produced. For an 80-acre pattern, natural gas production was calculated to be 3.2 BSCF or 63% of remaining gas-in-place for 30% reservoir water saturation. Gas revenues would help defray the cost of CO2 sequestration. Therefore, CO2 sequestration in depleted gas reservoirs appears to be a win-win technology. Considerable effort went into testing and refining the ability to predict calcite solubility in brines using a Pitzer-equation based computer model, with particular difficulties being encountered in solutions with high dissolved calcium concentrations. After that was accomplished, calcite dissolution kinetics were determined a wide range of brine compositions both including and not including potential inhibitors from 25 to 83 oC and a CO2 partial pressure from 0.1 to 1 atm. The reaction was found to be first order for undersaturations of 0.2 to ~1 and was surface controlled. The rate constant was fit to a multiple regression model, thus making it possible to predict calcite dissolution rates over a wide range of solution compositions, partial pressures of CO2 and temperature. Results indicate that equilibrium is likely to be reached relatively quickly in front of an advancing supercritical CO2 fluid.

Morse, John W; Mamora, Daulat

2006-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

186

Containment system for supercritical water oxidation reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for containment of a supercritical water oxidation reactor in the event of a rupture of the reactor. The system includes a containment for housing the reaction vessel and a communicating chamber for holding a volume of coolant, such as water. The coolant is recirculated and sprayed to entrain and cool any reactants that might have escaped from the reaction vessel. Baffles at the entrance to the chamber prevent the sprayed coolant from contacting the reaction vessel. An impact-absorbing layer is positioned between the vessel and the containment to at least partially absorb momentum of any fragments propelled by the rupturing vessel. Remote, quick-disconnecting fittings exterior to the containment, in cooperation with shut-off valves, enable the vessel to be isolated and the system safely taken off-line. Normally-closed orifices throughout the containment and chamber enable decontamination of interior surfaces when necessary.

Chastagner, Philippe (3134 Natalie Cir., Augusta, GA 30909-2748)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Containment system for supercritical water oxidation reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a system for containment of a supercritical water oxidation reactor in the event of a rupture of the reactor. The system includes a containment for housing the reaction vessel and a communicating chamber for holding a volume of coolant, such as water. The coolant is recirculated and sprayed to entrain and cool any reactants that might have escaped from the reaction vessel. Baffles at the entrance to the chamber prevent the sprayed coolant from contacting the reaction vessel. An impact-absorbing layer is positioned between the vessel and the containment to at least partially absorb momentum of any fragments propelled by the rupturing vessel. Remote, quick-disconnecting fittings exterior to the containment, in cooperation with shut-off valves, enable the vessel to be isolated and the system safely taken off-line. Normally-closed orifices throughout the containment and chamber enable decontamination of interior surfaces when necessary.

Chastagner, P.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

188

Rock-ravintolatoiminta : elävää rock-musiikkia ravintolaympäristössä; Rock venue activity : live rock music in the restaurant setting.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Työn tavoitteena oli tutkia rock-ravintolatoimintaa ja elävää rock-musiikkia ravintolaympäristössä ravintolan, artistin ja asiakkaan näkökulmasta. Tutkimuksessa pyrittiin selvittämään rock-ravintolayrittämisen toimintatapoja ja kartoittamaan alan tämän hetkistä tilaa.… (more)

Väyliö, Jari

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Oldest Rock on Earth  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Canada." and "Some of the oldest surface rock can be found in the Canadian Shield, Australia, Africa and in other more specific places around the world. The ages of...

190

Synthesis of higher diamondoids by pulsed laser ablation plasmas in supercritical CO{sub 2}  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pulsed laser ablation (wavelength 532 nm; fluence 18 J/cm{sup 2}; pulse width 7 ns; repetition rate 10 Hz) of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite was conducted in adamantane-dissolved supercritical CO{sub 2} with and without cyclohexane as a cosolvent. Micro-Raman spectroscopy of the products revealed the presence of hydrocarbons possessing sp{sup 3}-hybridized carbons similar to diamond structures. The synthesis of diamantane and other possible diamondoids consisting of up to 12 cages was confirmed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Furthermore, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry measurements of samples before and after pyrolysis treatment indicate the synthesis of the most compact decamantane, namely, superadamantane. It is thought that oxidant species originating from CO{sub 2} during pulsed laser ablation might lead to the selective dissociation of C-H bonds, enabling the synthesis of low H/C ratio molecules. Therefore, laser ablation in supercritical CO{sub 2} is proposed as a practical method for synthesizing diamondoids.

Nakahara, Sho; Stauss, Sven; Kato, Toru; Terashima, Kazuo [Department of Advanced Materials Science, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, 277-8561 Chiba (Japan); Sasaki, Takehiko [Department of Complexity Science and Engineering, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, 277-8561 Chiba (Japan)

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

191

Supercritical Fluid Extraction of Plutonium and Americium from Soil using Thenoyltrifluoroacetone and Tributylphosphate Complexation  

SciTech Connect

Samples of clean soil from the source used to backfill pits at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory's Radioactive Waste Management Complex were spiked with Pu-239 and Am-241 to evaluate ligand-assistedsupercritical fluid extraction as a decontamination method. The actual soil in the pits has been subject to approximately three decades of weatheringsince it was originally contaminated. No surrogate soil can perfectly simulate the real event, but actual contaminated soil was not available for research purposes. However, fractionation of Am and Pu in the surrogate soil was found to be similar to that previously measured in the real soil using asequential aqueous extraction procedure. This suggests that Pu and Am behavior are similar in the two soils. The surrogate was subjected to supercritical carbon dioxide extraction, in the presence of the fluorinated beta diketone thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTA), and tributylphosphate (TBP). As much as 69% of the Pu and 88% of the Am were removed from the soil using 3.2mol% TTA and 2.7 mol % TBP, in a single 45 minute extraction. Extraction conditions employing a 5 mol % ethanol modifier with 0.33 mol % TTA and 0.27 mol %TBP resulted in 66% Pu and 68% Am extracted. To our knowledge, this is thefirst report of the use of supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) for the removal of actinides from soil.

Mincher, Bruce Jay; Fox, Robert Vincent; Holmes, R.; Robbins, R; Boardman, C.

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Supercritical Boiler Tube Wall Temperature Test Base on the Power Plant Control System Database  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to precisely learn the working condition of 600MW supercritical boiler, new temperature measuring points are set on the super-heater tube wall inner the flue. Since the working condition of 600MW supercritical boiler is quite severe, the temperature ... Keywords: supercritical boiler, database, temperature test, super-heater

Yu Yanzhi; Zhang Liangbo; Xu Haichuan; Chen Duogang; Dong Gongjun; Shen Bo; Liu Sheng

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Supercritical water gasification of waste residues .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A batch reactor was built in the University of Missouri Carbon Recycling Center to explore the thermo-chemical conversion of motor oil as a model compound,… (more)

Wickramathilaka, Malithi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Near Term Application of Supercritical Water Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A pressurized water reactor with a supercritical water primary loop is analyzed (PWR-SC) within this paper. It will be shown that the PWR-SC offers considerable advantages in the fields of safety, economy and efficiency compared with a conventional PWR design. A cycle analysis shows that the net plant efficiency increases by 2% compared to currently operated or built systems. In addition, the mass flow rate of the primary side is strongly decreased, which enables a reduction of the primary pump power by a factor of 4. In the secondary loop, the mass flow rate can be decreased by about 15%, which allows down-scaling of all secondary side components such as turbines, condensers and feed-water preheat systems as a consequence of the high core exit temperature. A coupled core analysis and a hot channel factor analysis are performed to demonstrate the promising safety features of the PWR-SC and to show the technical feasibility of such a system. (authors)

Vogt, Bastian [EnBW Kraftwerke AG, Lautenschlagerstr. 20 70173 Stuttgart (Germany); Starflinger, Joerg; Schulenberg, Thomas [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Density Inhomogeneities and Electron Mobility in Supercritical Xenon  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Density Inhomogeneities and Electron Mobility in Supercritical Xenon Density Inhomogeneities and Electron Mobility in Supercritical Xenon Richard A. Holroyd, Kengo Itoh, and Masaru Nishikawa J. Chem. Phys. 118, 706-710 (2003) [Find paper at Scitation] Abstract: The low-field mobility of electrons in supercritical Xe has been measured isothermally as a function of density above the critical temperature (289.7 K). At 293 K the mobility varies from a high of 890 cm2/Vs at 9.2 x 1021 atoms/cm3 to a minimum value of 4.6 cm2/Vs at a density of 3.5 x 1021 atoms/cm3, which is just below the critical density. The density dependence of the mobility is reasonably well predicted by the deformation potential model if the adiabatic compressibility is used to characterize the electron-medium interactions. Approximate agreement indicates that

196

Dehydration of acetic acid-water mixtures with near critical and supercritical fluid solvents  

SciTech Connect

Equilibrium tie lines and phase densities are presented for acetic acid-water mixtures with near critical propane at 361K and 52 bar. Experimental measurements were obtained with a static technique; the equilibrium phases were directly sampled with high-pressure liquid sample injection valves at the temperature and pressure of interest. The data obtained in this work indicate that near critical propane can be used to facilitate the production of glacial acetic acid from dilute acetic acid-water solutions. Both these experimental data and the authors earlier results for acetic acid-water mixtures with supercritical carbon dioxide have been used to test an equation of state which has recently been developed by Grenzheuser and Gmehling for systems which contain associating fluids. Results indicate that the equation's pure component parameters need to be refitted to represent the critical region more accurately.

McCully, M.A.; Mullins, J.C.; Thies, M.C.; Hartley, I.J.

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Supercritical CO2 direct cycle Gas Fast Reactor (SC-GFR) concept.  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO{sub 2}) direct cycle gas fast reactor (SC-GFR) concept. The SC-GFR reactor concept was developed to determine the feasibility of a right size reactor (RSR) type concept using S-CO{sub 2} as the working fluid in a direct cycle fast reactor. Scoping analyses were performed for a 200 to 400 MWth reactor and an S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle. Although a significant amount of work is still required, this type of reactor concept maintains some potentially significant advantages over ideal gas-cooled systems and liquid metal-cooled systems. The analyses presented in this report show that a relatively small long-life reactor core could be developed that maintains decay heat removal by natural circulation. The concept is based largely on the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) commercial power plants operated in the United Kingdom and other GFR concepts.

Wright, Steven Alan; Parma, Edward J., Jr.; Suo-Anttila, Ahti Jorma (Computational Engineering Analysis, Albuquerque, NM); Al Rashdan, Ahmad (Texas A& M University, College Station, TX); Tsvetkov, Pavel Valeryevich (Texas A& M University, College Station, TX); Vernon, Milton E.; Fleming, Darryn D.; Rochau, Gary Eugene

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Step-wise supercritical extraction of carbonaceous residua  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of fractionating a mixture containing high boiling carbonaceous material and normally solid mineral matter includes processing with a plurality of different supercritical solvents. The mixture is treated with a first solvent of high critical temperature and solvent capacity to extract a large fraction as solute. The solute is released as liquid from solvent and successively treated with other supercritical solvents of different critical values to extract fractions of differing properties. Fractionation can be supplemented by solute reflux over a temperature gradient, pressure let down in steps and extractions at varying temperature and pressure values.

Warzinski, Robert P. (Venetia, PA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Step-wise supercritical extraction of carbonaceous residua  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of fractionating a mixture containing high boiling carbonaceous material and normally solid mineral matter which includes processing with a plurality of different supercritical solvents is described. The mixture is treated with a first solvent of high critical temperature and solvent capacity to extract a large fraction as solute. The solute is released as liquid from solvent and successively treated with other supercritical solvents of different critical values to extract fractions of differing properties. Fractionation can be supplemented by solute reflux over a temperature gradient, pressure let down in steps and extractions at varying temperature and pressure values.

Warzinski, R.P.

1986-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

200

Exp6-polar thermodynamics of dense supercritical water  

SciTech Connect

We introduce a simple polar fluid model for the thermodynamics of dense supercritical water based on a Buckingham (exp-6) core and point dipole representation of the water molecule. The proposed exp6-polar thermodynamics, based on ideas originally applied to dipolar hard spheres, performs very well when tested against molecular dynamics simulations. Comparisons of the model predictions with experimental data available for supercritical water yield excellent agreement for the shock Hugoniot, isotherms and sound speeds, and are also quite good for the self-diffusion constant and relative dielectric constant. We expect the present approach to be also useful for other small polar molecules and their mixtures.

Bastea, S; Fried, L E

2007-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rocks supercritical carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Zinc-catalyzed copolymerization of carbon dioxide and propylene oxide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The zinc-catalyzed copolymerization of carbon dioxide and propylene oxide, which is one of the promising reactions for the utilization of carbon dioxide, has been investigated from various aspects. Above all, considering that supercritical carbon dioxide has recently been paid attention in the field of extraction, separation, and reaction medium, its aptitude for both a reaction solvent and a reactant was examined in zinc glutarate-catalyzed reactions. As a result, it was proved that supercritical carbon dioxide was a suitable substitute for organic solvents in the copolymerization reactions. Great diffusivity of supercritical carbon dioxide into polymer segments was thought to promote carbon dioxide supply to the active sites of the zinc species and to afford alternating polycarbonate production. Low reaction temperature appeared to be advantageous to polycarbonate and cyclic carbonate formation. Apart from zinc glutarate catalyst whose detailed mechanistic studies were hard to perform due to its insolubility, some other zinc compounds were studied. A homogeneous catalyst, bis(ethyl fumarato)zinc, showed similar polycarbonate yield to zinc glutarate, and the method of the catalyst preparation affected its catalytic activity. Only a small amount of the catalyst was considered to be active in the copolymerization process even in the homogeneous systems. In the zinc dicarboxylate complexes, the carbon number between two carboxyl groups and the steric nature in the vicinity of the zinc atom might be important factors for the copolymerization catalysis.

Katsurao, Takumi

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Rock Harbor UNITED STATES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Passage Conglomerate Bay Five Finger Bay Lane Cove Stockly Bay Lake Ojibway Siskiwit River Creek Little River Washington Moskey M cCargoe Cove Robinson Bay Amygdaloid Channel Pickerel Cove Chippewa Harbor Crystal Cove Belle Isle Canoe Rocks Caribou Island Saginaw Point Tookers Island The Palisades Raspberry

203

The Landscape of Klamath Basin Rock Art  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Lines: Ethnographic Sources and Rock Art Interpretationwhen applying these sources toward rock art interpretation.information source for developing rock art interpretations.

David, Robert James

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Analysis of Microbial Activity Under a Supercritical CO{sub 2} Atmosphere  

SciTech Connect

Because the extent and impact of microbial activity in deep saline aquifers during geologic sequestration is unknown, the objectives of this proposal were to: (1) characterize the growth requirements and optima of a biofilm-producing supercritical CO{sub 2}-tolerant microbial consortium (labeled MIT0212) isolated from hydrocarbons recovered from the Frio Ridge, TX carbon sequestration site; (2) evaluate the ability of this consortium to grow under simulated reservoir conditions associated with supercritical CO{sub 2} injection; (3) isolate and characterize individual microbial strains from this consortium; and (4) investigate the mechanisms of supercritical CO{sub 2} tolerance in isolated strains and the consortium through genome-enabled studies. Molecular analysis of genetic diversity in the consortium MIT0212 revealed a predominance of sequences closely related to species of the spore-forming genus Bacillus. Strain MIT0214 was isolated from this consortium and characterized by physiological profiling and genomic analysis. We have shown that the strain MIT0214 is an aerobic spore-former and capable of facultative anaerobic growth under both reducing N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} atmospheres by fermentation and possibly anaerobic respiration. Strain MIT0214 is best adapted to anaerobic growth at pressures of 1 atm but is able to growth at elevated pressures After 1 week growth was observed at pressures as high as 27 atm (N{sub 2}) or 9 atm (CO{sub 2}) and after 26-30 days growth can be observed under supercritical CO{sub 2}. In addition, we have determined that spores of strain B. cereus MIT0214 are tolerant of both direct and indirect exposure to supercritical CO{sub 2}. Additional physiological characterization under aerobic conditions have revealed MIT0214 is able to grow from temperature of 21 to 45 °C and salinities 0.01 to 40 g/L NaCl with optimal growth occurring at 30°C and from 1 - 5 g NaCl/L. The genome sequence of B. cereus MIT0214 shared 89 to 91% of genes with other genome-sequenced strains with 93.3 to 97.8% nucleotide identity among shared genes. Comparison of the sequence of MIT0214 or a B. cereus strain isolated from an oil well in China to B. cereus isolates from surface environments revealed a higher proportion of genes involved in Cell wall and capsule biosynthesis and metabolism, metabolism of aromatic compounds, and stress response. Since Bacillus species, including B. cereus strains, have commonly been recovered from other “extreme” environments including the deep subsurface – the scCO{sub 2} tolerance of spores and growth under high pCO{sub 2} conditions is consistent with persistence in a subsurface environment after CO{sub 2} injection.

Thompson, Janelle

2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

205

Evaluation of Circumferential Cracking on Supercritical Boiler Waterwalls  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Circumferential cracking of the fireside surfaces of supercritical waterwalls remains a problem for many coal-fired boilers. Two parallel test programs at Pennsylvania Power and Light's (PPL) Brunner Island Unit 3 attempted to correlate operating conditions with the development and propagation of circumferential cracks.

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

206

Field-portable supercritical CO{sub 2} extractor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is an apparatus for extracting organic compounds from solid materials. A generator vessel has a removable closure for receiving a solid or liquid solvent which is heated with a resistive heating element to a gaseous or supercritical phase. The removable closure is unencumbered because the side wall is penetrated with an outlet for the gaseous or supercritical solvent. The generator vessel further has a pressure transducer that provides an electronic signal related to pressure of the gaseous or supercritical solvent. The apparatus of the present invention further includes at least one extraction cell having a top and a bottom and a wall extending there between, wherein the bottom is sealably penetrated by an inlet for gaseous or supercritical solvent received through a manifold connected to the outlet, the top having an easy-open removable closure cap, and the wall having an outlet port. Finally, a permeable sample cartridge is included for holding the solid materials and to provide radial-flow of the extraction fluid, which is placed within the extraction cell. 10 figs.

Wright, B.W.; Zemanian, T.S.; Robins, W.H.; Woodcock, L.J.

1997-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

207

Field-portable supercritical CO.sub.2 extractor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is an apparatus for extracting organic compounds from solid materials. A generator vessel has a removable closure for receiving a solid or liquid solvent which is heated with a resistive heating element to a gaseous or supercritical phase. The removable closure is unencumbered because the side wall is penetrated with an outlet for the gaseous or supercritical solvent. The generator vessel further has a pressure transducer that provides an electronic signal related to pressure of the gaseous or supercritical solvent. The apparatus of the present invention further includes at least one extraction cell having a top and a bottom and a wall extending therebetween, wherein the bottom is sealably penetrated by an inlet for gaseous or supercritical solvent received through a manifold connected to the outlet, the top having an easy-open removable closure cap, and the wall having an outlet port. Finally, a permeable sample cartridge is included for holding the solid materials and to provide radial-flow of the extraction fluid, which is placed within the extraction cell.

Wright, Bob W. (Richland, WA); Zemanian, Thomas S. (Richland, WA); Robins, William H. (Richland, WA); Woodcock, Leslie J. (Benton City, WA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Method for nucleic acid isolation using supercritical fluids  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for detecting the presence of a microorganism in an environmental sample involves contacting the sample with a supercritical fluid to isolate nucleic acid from the microorganism, then detecting the presence of a particular sequence within the isolated nucleic acid. The nucleic acid may optionally be subjected to further purification.

Nivens, David E. (11912 Kingsgate Rd., Knoxville, TN 37911); Applegate, Bruce M. (3700 Sutherland Ave. #Q2, Knoxville, TN 37911)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Repowering the 250 MW Supercritical Power Plant at Lenenergo, Russia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the repowering of a supercritical 250 MW generating unit with an ABB 52.9 MN gas turbine at the Southern Plant of the Lenenergo system in Russia. It includes a review of the performance parameters of the repowered unit and an economic analysis of the repowering project.

1999-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

210

Supercritical Burning of Liquid Oxygen (LOX) Droplet with Detailed Chemistry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Supercritical Burning of Liquid Oxygen (LOX) Droplet with Detailed Chemistry J. DAOU,* P with diameter less than I pm vaporize before burning. A quasi-steady-like diffusion flame is then established is considered; temperature and pressure in the combustion chamber have a weak influence on the burning time

Heil, Matthias

211

Method for nucleic acid isolation using supercritical fluids  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is disclosed for detecting the presence of a microorganism in an environmental sample involves contacting the sample with a supercritical fluid to isolate nucleic acid from the microorganism, then detecting the presence of a particular sequence within the isolated nucleic acid. The nucleic acid may optionally be subjected to further purification. 4 figs.

Nivens, D.E.; Applegate, B.M.

1999-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

212

Rock River Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind Farm Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Rock River Wind Farm Facility Rock River Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Shell Wind Energy Developer SeaWest Energy Purchaser PacifiCorp Location Arlington and Carbon Counties WY Coordinates 41.6996°, -107.003° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.6996,"lon":-107.003,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

213

Microwave assisted hard rock cutting  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for the sequential fracturing and cutting of subsurface volume of hard rock (102) in the strata (101) of a mining environment (100) by subjecting the volume of rock to a beam (25) of microwave energy to fracture the subsurface volume of rock by differential expansion; and , then bringing the cutting edge (52) of a piece of conventional mining machinery (50) into contact with the fractured rock (102).

Lindroth, David P. (Apple Valley, MN); Morrell, Roger J. (Bloomington, MN); Blair, James R. (Inver Grove Heights, MN)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Hydroliquefaction of Big Brown lignite in supercritical fluids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Big Brown lignite was liquefied in a fixed bed tube reactor. Three solvents were used in the liquefaction studies, toluene, cyclohexane and methanol. Two co-solvents, tetralin and water were used with toluene. The effects of the solvents and co-solvents were investigated. Supercritical fluid is the fluid at the temperature and pressure above its critical values. Toluene was the main supercritical fluid used in this study. Tetralin and water as co-solvents can contribute hydrogen to stabilize the free radicals produced during liquefaction reaction. The total conversion of Big Brown lignite and yield of liquid were increased. Water is not as good as tetralin in producing hydrogen, but it can increase the polarity of the solvent, which increases the solvency of supercritical fluids. The liquid product was found to consist primarily of saturated hydrocarbons. It illustrated that the free radicals were saturated by hydrogen during liquefaction. Alkylated aromatics and furans are also common chemical species present in the liquid products. The aromatic species were predominantly alkylated phenols, benzenes, indenes, pyridines and naphthalenes. At the supercritical conditions of this study, temperature and flowrate of the solvent were not important to the conversion of Big Brown lignite and yield of liquid, since supercritical fluids have gas-like viscosities with very high solubilities. To get more liquid products, the main point is to produce more free radicals from coal, inhibit the recombination of these radicals, and prevent the decomposition of these radicals to gas. Tetralin and water are good co-solvents for coal hydroliquefaction. Further research on the mechanism of water as a co-solvent in coal hydroliquefaction was recommended.

Chen, Hui

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Session: Hot Dry Rock  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of four presentations: ''Hot Dry Rock - Summary'' by George P. Tennyson, Jr.; ''HDR Opportunities and Challenges Beyond the Long Term Flow Test'' by David V. Duchane; ''Start-Up Operations at the Fenton Hill HDR Pilot Plant'' by Raymond F. Ponden; and ''Update on the Long-Term Flow Testing Program'' by Donald W. Brown.

Tennyson, George P. Jr.; Duchane, David V.; Ponden, Raymond F.; Brown, Donald W.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Definition: Rock Density | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

in crustal rocks. Rock density is a physical characteristic that is governed by the chemical composition (in situ minerals) and pore spaces of a specific rock or rock type.1...

217

Estimation of the annual yield of organic carbon released from carbonates and shales by chemical weathering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Estimation of the annual yield of organic carbon released from carbonates and shales by chemical matter yield induced by chemical weathering of carbonates and shales, considering their global surface carbonate rocks and shales weathering in major world watersheds, published by numerous authors. The results

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

218

Fabrication of Micro and Nanoparticles of Paclitaxel-loaded Poly L Lactide for Controlled Release using Supercritical Antisolvent Method: Effects of Thermodynamics and Hydrodynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents the fabrication of controlled release devices for anticancer drug paclitaxel using supercritical antisolvent method. The thermodynamic and hydrodynamic effects during supercritical antisolvent process ...

Lee, Lai Yeng

219

Base Technologies and Tools for Supercritical Reservoirs Geothermal Lab  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technologies and Tools for Supercritical Reservoirs Geothermal Lab Technologies and Tools for Supercritical Reservoirs Geothermal Lab Call Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Base Technologies and Tools for Supercritical Reservoirs Project Type / Topic 1 Laboratory Call for Submission of Applications for Research, Development and Analysis of Geothermal Technologies Project Type / Topic 2 High-Temperature Downhole Tools Project Description Development of downhole tools capable of reliable operation in supercritical environments is a significant challenge with a number of technical and operational hurdles related to both the hardware and electronics design. Hardware designs require the elimination of all elastomer seals and the use of advanced materials. Electronics must be hardened to the extent practicable since no electronics system can survive supercritical temperatures. To develop systems capable of logging in these environments will require a number of developments. More robust packaging of electronics is needed. Sandia will design and develop innovated, highly integrated, high-temperature (HT) data loggers. These data loggers will be designed and developed using silicon-on-insulator/silicon carbide (SOI/SiC) technologies integrated into a MultiChip Module (MCM); greatly increasing the reliability of the overall system (eliminating hundreds of board-level innerconnects) and decreasing the size of the electronics package. Tools employing these electronics will be capable of operating continuously at temperatures up to 240 °C and by using advanced Dewar flasks, will operate in a supercritical reservoir with temperatures over 450 °C and pressures above 70 MPa. Dewar flasks are needed to protect the electronic components, but those currently available are only reliable in temperature regimes in the range of 350 °C; promising advances in materials will be investigated to improve Dewar technologies. HT wireline currently used for logging operations is compromised at temperatures above 300 °C; along with exploring the development of a HT wireline for logging purposes, alternative approaches that employ HT batteries (e.g., those awarded a recent R&D 100) will also be investigated, and if available will enable deployment using slickline, which is not subject to the same temperature limitations as wireline. To demonstrate the capability provided by these improvements, tools will be developed and fielded. The developed base technologies and working tool designs will be available to industry throughout the project period. The developed techniques and subsystems will help to further the advancement of HT tools needed in the geothermal industry.

220

New Materials for 750°C Boilers in Advanced Ultra-supercritical  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, New Materials for 750°C Boilers in Advanced Ultra- supercritical (A-USC) Power Plants. Author(s), Yuefeng Gu, Z ZHONG, Y Yuan, Z Shi.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rocks supercritical carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Assessing Cast Alloys for Use in Advanced Ultra-supercritical Steam ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of these alloys were examined via SEM; phase identification and chemistry are being ... Phase Stability of Cast and Wrought IN 740 at Ultra Supercritical Boiler ...

222

Healthful LipidsChapter 6 Supercritical Fluid Processing of Nutritionally Functional Lipids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Healthful Lipids Chapter 6 Supercritical Fluid Processing of Nutritionally Functional Lipids Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry AOCS Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 6 Sup

223

Alloy Design of 9% Cr Steel for High Efficiency Ultra-Supercritical ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Alloy Design of 9% Cr Steel for High Efficiency Ultra- Supercritical Power Plants. Author(s), Fujio Abe. On-Site Speaker (Planned), Fujio Abe.

224

Process simulation, economic analysis and synthesis of biodiesel from waste vegetable oil using supercritical methanol.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Biodiesel production using supercritical methanol received attention as an alternative method to replace the conventional alkali-catalyzed method being practiced in industry. Due to its flexibility… (more)

Lee, Soo Jin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Session: Hot Dry Rock  

SciTech Connect

This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of four presentations: ''Hot Dry Rock - Summary'' by George P. Tennyson, Jr.; ''HDR Opportunities and Challenges Beyond the Long Term Flow Test'' by David V. Duchane; ''Start-Up Operations at the Fenton Hill HDR Pilot Plant'' by Raymond F. Ponden; and ''Update on the Long-Term Flow Testing Program'' by Donald W. Brown.

Tennyson, George P. Jr.; Duchane, David V.; Ponden, Raymond F.; Brown, Donald W.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Operation and analysis of a supercritical CO2 Brayton cycle.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories is investigating advanced Brayton cycles using supercritical working fluids for use with solar, nuclear or fossil heat sources. The focus of this work has been on the supercritical CO{sub 2} cycle (S-CO2) which has the potential for high efficiency in the temperature range of interest for these heat sources, and is also very compact, with the potential for lower capital costs. The first step in the development of these advanced cycles was the construction of a small scale Brayton cycle loop, funded by the Laboratory Directed Research & Development program, to study the key issue of compression near the critical point of CO{sub 2}. This document outlines the design of the small scale loop, describes the major components, presents models of system performance, including losses, leakage, windage, compressor performance, and flow map predictions, and finally describes the experimental results that have been generated.

Wright, Steven Alan; Radel, Ross F.; Vernon, Milton E.; Pickard, Paul S.; Rochau, Gary Eugene

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Method and apparatus for waste destruction using supercritical water oxidation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention relates to an improved apparatus and method for initiating and sustaining an oxidation reaction. A hazardous waste, is introduced into a reaction zone within a pressurized containment vessel. An oxidizer, preferably hydrogen peroxide, is mixed with a carrier fluid, preferably water, and the mixture is heated until the fluid achieves supercritical conditions of temperature and pressure. The heating means comprise cartridge heaters placed in closed-end tubes extending into the center region of the pressure vessel along the reactor longitudinal axis. A cooling jacket surrounds the pressure vessel to remove excess heat at the walls. Heating and cooling the fluid mixture in this manner creates a limited reaction zone near the center of the pressure vessel by establishing a steady state density gradient in the fluid mixture which gradually forces the fluid to circulate internally. This circulation allows the fluid mixture to oscillate between supercritical and subcritical states as it is heated and cooled.

Haroldsen, Brent Lowell (1251 Sprague St., Manteca, CA 95336); Wu, Benjamin Chiau-pin (2270 Goldenrod La., San Ramon, CA 94583)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Transpiring wall supercritical water oxidation test reactor design report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories is working with GenCorp, Aerojet and Foster Wheeler Development Corporation to develop a transpiring wall supercritical water oxidation reactor. The transpiring wall reactor promises to mitigate problems of salt deposition and corrosion by forming a protective boundary layer of pure supercritical water. A laboratory scale test reactor has been assembled to demonstrate the concept. A 1/4 scale transpiring wall reactor was designed and fabricated by Aerojet using their platelet technology. Sandia`s Engineering Evaluation Reactor serves as a test bed to supply, pressurize and heat the waste; collect, measure and analyze the effluent; and control operation of the system. This report describes the design, test capabilities, and operation of this versatile and unique test system with the transpiring wall reactor.

Haroldsen, B.L.; Ariizumi, D.Y.; Mills, B.E.; Brown, B.G. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). Engineering for Transportation and Environment Dept.; Rousar, D.C. [GenCorp Aerojet, Sacramento, CA (United States)

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Supercritical instability in graphene with two charged impurities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the supercritical instability in gapped graphene with two charged impurities separated by distance R using the two-dimensional Dirac equation for electron quasiparticles. Attention is paid to a situation when charges of impurities are subcritical, whereas their total charge exceeds a critical one. The critical distance R_{cr} in the system of two charged centers is defined as that at which the electron bound state with the lowest energy reaches the boundary of the lower continuum. A variational calculation of the critical distance R_{cr} separating the supercritical (RR_{cr}) regimes is carried out. It is shown that the critical distance R_{cr} increases as the quasiparticle gap decreases. The energy and width of a quasistationary state as functions of the distance between two impurities are derived in the quasiclassical approximation.

E. V. Gorbar; V. P. Gusynin; O. O. Sobol

2013-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

230

Rock Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rock Sampling Rock Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Rock Sampling Details Activities (13) Areas (13) Regions (1) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Field Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock samples are used to define lithology. Field and lab analyses can be used to measure the chemical and isotopic constituents of rock samples. Stratigraphic/Structural: Provides information about the time and environment which formed a particular geologic unit. Microscopic rock textures can be used to estimate the history of stress and strain, and/or faulting. Hydrological: Isotope geochemistry can reveal fluid circulation of a geothermal system.

231

Overview: Hard Rock Penetration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hard Rock Penetration program is developing technology to reduce the costs of drilling and completing geothermal wells. Current projects include: lost circulation control, rock penetration mechanics, instrumentation, and industry/DOE cost shared projects of the Geothermal Drilling organization. Last year, a number of accomplishments were achieved in each of these areas. A new flow meter being developed to accurately measure drilling fluid outflow was tested extensively during Long Valley drilling. Results show that this meter is rugged, reliable, and can provide useful measurements of small differences in fluid inflow and outflow rates. By providing early indications of fluid gain or loss, improved control of blow-out and lost circulation problems during geothermal drilling can be expected. In the area of downhole tools for lost circulation control, the concept of a downhole injector for injecting a two-component, fast-setting cementitious mud was developed. DOE filed a patent application for this concept during FY 91. The design criteria for a high-temperature potassium, uranium, thorium logging tool featuring a downhole data storage computer were established, and a request for proposals was submitted to tool development companies. The fundamental theory of acoustic telemetry in drill strings was significantly advanced through field experimentation and analysis. A new understanding of energy loss mechanisms was developed.

Dunn, J.C.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Overview - Hard Rock Penetration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hard Rock Penetration program is developing technology to reduce the costs of drilling and completing geothermal wells. Current projects include: lost circulation control, rock penetration mechanics, instrumentation, and industry/DOE cost shared projects of the Geothermal Drilling Organization. Last year, a number of accomplishments were achieved in each of these areas. A new flow meter being developed to accurately measure drilling fluid outflow was tested extensively during Long Valley drilling. Results show that this meter is rugged, reliable, and can provide useful measurements of small differences in fluid inflow and outflow rates. By providing early indications of fluid gain or loss, improved control of blow-out and lost circulation problems during geothermal drilling can be expected. In the area of downhole tools for lost circulation control, the concept of a downhole injector for injecting a two-component, fast-setting cementitious mud was developed. DOE filed a patent application for this concept during FY 91. The design criteria for a high-temperature potassium, uranium, thorium logging tool featuring a downhole data storage computer were established, and a request for proposals was submitted to tool development companies. The fundamental theory of acoustic telemetry in drill strings was significantly advanced through field experimentation and analysis. A new understanding of energy loss mechanisms was developed.

Dunn, James C.

1992-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

233

Overview: Hard Rock Penetration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hard Rock Penetration program is developing technology to reduce the costs of drilling and completing geothermal wells. Current projects include: lost circulation control, rock penetration mechanics, instrumentation, and industry/DOE cost shared projects of the Geothermal Drilling organization. Last year, a number of accomplishments were achieved in each of these areas. A new flow meter being developed to accurately measure drilling fluid outflow was tested extensively during Long Valley drilling. Results show that this meter is rugged, reliable, and can provide useful measurements of small differences in fluid inflow and outflow rates. By providing early indications of fluid gain or loss, improved control of blow-out and lost circulation problems during geothermal drilling can be expected. In the area of downhole tools for lost circulation control, the concept of a downhole injector for injecting a two-component, fast-setting cementitious mud was developed. DOE filed a patent application for this concept during FY 91. The design criteria for a high-temperature potassium, uranium, thorium logging tool featuring a downhole data storage computer were established, and a request for proposals was submitted to tool development companies. The fundamental theory of acoustic telemetry in drill strings was significantly advanced through field experimentation and analysis. A new understanding of energy loss mechanisms was developed.

Dunn, J.C.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Conversion of hazardous materials using supercritical water oxidation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for destruction of hazardous materials in a medium of supercritical water without the addition of an oxidant material. The hazardous material is converted to simple compounds which are relatively benign or easily treatable to yield materials which can be discharged into the environment. Treatment agents may be added to the reactants in order to bind certain materials, such as chlorine, in the form of salts or to otherwise facilitate the destruction reactions.

Rofer, C.K.; Buelow, S.J.; Dyer, R.B.; Wander, J.D.

1991-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

235

Conversion of hazardous materials using supercritical water oxidation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for destruction of hazardous materials in a medium of supercritical water without the addition of an oxidant material. The harzardous material is converted to simple compounds which are relatively benign or easily treatable to yield materials which can be discharged into the environment. Treatment agents may be added to the reactants in order to bind certain materials, such as chlorine, in the form of salts or to otherwise facilitate the destruction reactions.

Rofer, Cheryl K. (Los Alamos, NM); Buelow, Steven J. (Los Alamos, NM); Dyer, Richard B. (Los Alamos, NM); Wander, Joseph D. (Parker, FL)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Ultra-Supercritical Pressure CFB Boiler Conceptual Design Study  

SciTech Connect

Electric utility interest in supercritical pressure steam cycles has revived in the United States after waning in the 1980s. Since supercritical cycles yield higher plant efficiencies than subcritical plants along with a proportional reduction in traditional stack gas pollutants and CO{sub 2} release rates, the interest is to pursue even more advanced steam conditions. The advantages of supercritical (SC) and ultra supercritical (USC) pressure steam conditions have been demonstrated in the high gas temperature, high heat flux environment of large pulverized coal-fired (PC) boilers. Interest in circulating fluidized bed (CFB) combustion, as an alternative to PC combustion, has been steadily increasing. Although CFB boilers as large as 300 MWe are now in operation, they are drum type, subcritical pressure units. With their sizes being much smaller than and their combustion temperatures much lower than those of PC boilers (300 MWe versus 1,000 MWe and 1600 F versus 3500 F), a conceptual design study was conducted herein to investigate the technical feasibility and economics of USC CFB boilers. The conceptual study was conducted at 400 MWe and 800 MWe nominal plant sizes with high sulfur Illinois No. 6 coal used as the fuel. The USC CFB plants had higher heating value efficiencies of 40.6 and 41.3 percent respectively and their CFB boilers, which reflect conventional design practices, can be built without the need for an R&D effort. Assuming construction at a generic Ohio River Valley site with union labor, total plant costs in January 2006 dollars were estimated to be $1,551/kW and $1,244/kW with costs of electricity of $52.21/MWhr and $44.08/MWhr, respectively. Based on the above, this study has shown that large USC CFB boilers are feasible and that they can operate with performance and costs that are competitive with comparable USC PC boilers.

Zhen Fan; Steve Goidich; Archie Robertson; Song Wu

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

237

Process for treating effluent from a supercritical water oxidation reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates generally to a method for treating and recycling the effluent from a supercritical water oxidation reactor and more specifically to a method for treating and recycling the effluent by expanding the effluent without extensive cooling. Supercritical water oxidation is the oxidation of fuel, generally waste material, in a body of water under conditions above the thermodynamic critical point of water. The current state of the art in supercritical water oxidation plant effluent treatment is to cool the reactor effluent through heat exchangers or direct quench, separate the cooled liquid into a gas/vapor stream and a liquid/solid stream, expand the separated effluent, and perform additional purification on gaseous, liquid, brine and solid effluent. If acid gases are present, corrosion is likely to occur in the coolers. During expansion, part of the condensed water will revaporize. Vaporization can damage the valves due to cavitation and erosion. The present invention expands the effluent stream without condensing the stream. Radionuclides and suspended solids are more efficiently separated in the vapor phase. By preventing condensation, the acids are kept in the much less corrosive gaseous phase thereby limiting the damage to treatment equipment. The present invention also reduces the external energy consumption, by utilizing the expansion step to also cool the effluent.

Barnes, C.M.; Shapiro, C.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

238

Rock Art in the Public Trust: Managing Prehistoric Rock Art on Federal Land  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Archaic North America. ? In Handbook of Rock Art Research,Rock Art Analysis. ? In Handbook of Archaeological Methods,Rock Art Analysis,? in Handbook of Archaeological Methods,

Hale, John Patrick

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Energy from hot dry rock  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Program is described. The system, operation, results, development program, environmental implications, resource, economics, and future plans are discussed. (MHR)

Hendron, R.H.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Oxidation of phenolics in supercritical water. Quarterly technical progress report, 1 December 1993--28 February 1994  

SciTech Connect

An environmental hazard associated with coal liquefaction and gasification is the generation of aqueous waste streams containing phenolics and carcinogenic organics such as polynuclear aromatics. Oxidation in supercritical water (SCW) is an emerging technology for the ultimate destruction of phenolics and other organics in waste water streams. SCW oxidation involves the oxidation of organics in an aqueous medium at temperatures between 400--650 C and pressures around 250 atm. These conditions exceed the thermodynamic critical point of water, hence the water is said to be supercritical. Wastes can be converted by SCWO to benign products: carbon is converted to CO{sub 2}, hydrogen to H{sub 2}O, and nitrogen to N{sub 2} or N{sub 2}O (but not NO{sub x}). The objective of this project is to oxidize selected phenolics in SCW and then determine the reaction kinetics (rate constants, reaction orders, activation energies) and the reaction pathways. These reaction fundamentals can then be used to evaluate, design, optimize, and control coal-conversion waste water treatment processes based on SCWO.

Not Available

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rocks supercritical carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Fischer-Tropsch synthesis in supercritical fluids. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1, 1996--June 30, 1996  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

For the task on diffusion coefficients of F-T products in supercritical fluids, we attempted to find a model for the {beta} parameter to predict the molecular diffusion coefficients to a high degree of accuracy so we may be able to predict both the molecular diffusion coefficient and thus the effective diffusivity a priori. The dependency of solvent/solute interactions on the {beta} parameter was analyzed and a correlation developed to predict the functionality. This allowed us to develop an empirical formula to correlate the molecular diffusion coefficient to ratios of mass, size, and density. Thus finally allowing for supercritical fluid diffusion predictions a priori. Figure 6 shows our predictions of the data available on the self diffusion coefficient of carbon dioxide (Chen, 1983; Takahashi and Iwasaki, 1966) ethylene (Arends et al., 1981; Baker et al., 1984), toluene (Baker et al., 1985) and chlorotrifuoromethane (Harris, 1978). The predictions, with no parameters adjusted from the data, are excellent with an average absolute error of 3.64%.

Akgerman, A.; Bukur, D.B. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

242

Control system options and strategies for supercritical CO2 cycles.  

SciTech Connect

The Supercritical Carbon Dioxide (S-CO{sub 2}) Brayton Cycle is a promising alternative to Rankine steam cycle and recuperated gas Brayton cycle energy converters for use with Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactors (SFRs), Lead-Cooled Fast Reactors (LFRs), as well as other advanced reactor concepts. The S-CO{sub 2} Brayton Cycle offers higher plant efficiencies than Rankine or recuperated gas Brayton cycles operating at the same liquid metal reactor core outlet temperatures as well as reduced costs or size of key components especially the turbomachinery. A new Plant Dynamics Computer Code has been developed at Argonne National Laboratory for simulation of a S-CO{sub 2} Brayton Cycle energy converter coupled to an autonomous load following liquid metal-cooled fast reactor. The Plant Dynamics code has been applied to investigate the effectiveness of a control strategy for the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton Cycle for the STAR-LM 181 MWe (400 MWt) Lead-Cooled Fast Reactor. The strategy, which involves a combination of control mechanisms, is found to be effective for controlling the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton Cycle over the complete operating range from 0 to 100 % load for a representative set of transient load changes. While the system dynamic analysis of control strategy performance for STARLM is carried out for a S-CO{sub 2} Brayton Cycle energy converter incorporating an axial flow turbine and compressors, investigations of the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton Cycle have identified benefits from the use of centrifugal compressors which offer a wider operating range, greater stability near the critical point, and potentially further cost reductions due to fewer stages than axial flow compressors. Models have been developed at Argonne for the conceptual design and performance analysis of centrifugal compressors for use in the SCO{sub 2} Brayton Cycle. Steady state calculations demonstrate the wider operating range of centrifugal compressors versus axial compressors installed in a S-CO{sub 2} Brayton Cycle as well as the benefits in expanding the range over which individual control mechanisms are effective for cycle control. However, a combination of mechanisms is still required for control of the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton Cycle between 0 and 100 % load. An effort is underway to partially validate the Argonne models and codes by means of comparison with data from tests carried out using the small-scale Sandia Brayton Loop (SBL) recuperated gas closed Brayton cycle facility. The centrifugal compressor model has been compared with data from the SBL operating with nitrogen gas and good agreement is obtained between calculations and the measured data for the compressor outlet pressure versus flow rate, although it is necessary to assume values for certain model parameters which require information about the configuration or dimensions of the compressor components that is unavailable. Unfortunately, the compressor efficiency cannot be compared with experiment data due to the lack of outlet temperature data. A radial inflow turbine model has been developed to enable further comparison of calculations with data from the SBL which incorporates both a radial inflow turbine as well as a radial compressor. Preliminary calculations of pressure ratio and efficiency versus flow rate have been carried out using the radial inflow turbine model.

Moisseytsev, A.; Kulesza, K. P.; Sienicki, J. J.; Nuclear Engineering Division; Oregon State Univ.

2009-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

243

Carbon Dioxide-Water Emulsions for Enhanced Oil Recovery and Permanent Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project involves the use of an innovative new invention ? Particle Stabilized Emulsions (PSEs) of Carbon Dioxide-in-Water and Water-in-Carbon Dioxide for Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) and Permanent Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide. The EOR emulsion would be injected into a semi-depleted oil reservoir such as Dover 33 in Otsego County, Michigan. It is expected that the emulsion would dislocate the stranded heavy crude oil from the rock granule surfaces, reduce its viscosity, and increase its mobility. The advancing emulsion front should provide viscosity control which drives the reduced-viscosity oil toward the production wells. The make-up of the emulsion would be subsequently changed so it interacts with the surrounding rock minerals in order to enhance mineralization, thereby providing permanent sequestration of the injected CO{sub 2}. In Phase 1 of the project, the following tasks were accomplished: 1. Perform laboratory scale (mL/min) refinements on existing procedures for producing liquid carbon dioxide-in-water (C/W) and water-in-liquid carbon dioxide (W/C) emulsion stabilized by hydrophilic and hydrophobic fine particles, respectively, using a Kenics-type static mixer. 2. Design and cost evaluate scaled up (gal/min) C/W and W/C emulsification systems to be deployed in Phase 2 at the Otsego County semi-depleted oil field. 3. Design the modifications necessary to the present CO{sub 2} flooding system at Otsego County for emulsion injection. 4. Design monitoring and verification systems to be deployed in Phase 2 for measuring potential leakage of CO{sub 2} after emulsion injection. 5. Design production protocol to assess enhanced oil recovery with emulsion injection compared to present recovery with neat CO{sub 2} flooding. 6. Obtain Federal and State permits for emulsion injection. Initial research focused on creating particle stabilized emulsions with the smallest possible globule size so that the emulsion can penetrate even low-permeability crude oilcontaining formations or saline aquifers. The term ?globule? refers to the water or liquid carbon dioxide droplets sheathed with ultrafine particles dispersed in the continuous external medium, liquid CO{sub 2} or H{sub 2}O, respectively. The key to obtaining very small globules is the shear force acting on the two intermixing fluids, and the use of ultrafine stabilizing particles or nanoparticles. We found that using Kenics-type static mixers with a shear rate in the range of 2700 to 9800 s{sup -1} and nanoparticles between 100-300 nm produced globule sizes in the 10 to 20 ?m range. Particle stabilized emulsions with that kind of globule size should easily penetrate oil-bearing formations or saline aquifers where the pore and throat size can be on the order of 50 ?m or larger. Subsequent research focused on creating particle stabilized emulsions that are deemed particularly suitable for Permanent Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide. Based on a survey of the literature an emulsion consisting of 70% by volume of water, 30% by volume of liquid or supercritical carbon dioxide, and 2% by weight of finely pulverized limestone (CaCO{sub 3}) was selected as the most promising agent for permanent sequestration of CO{sub 2}. In order to assure penetration of the emulsion into tight formations of sandstone or other silicate rocks and carbonate or dolomite rock, it is necessary to use an emulsion consisting of the smallest possible globule size. In previous reports we described a high shear static mixer that can create such small globules. In addition to the high shear mixer, it is also necessary that the emulsion stabilizing particles be in the submicron size, preferably in the range of 0.1 to 0.2 ?m (100 to 200 nm) size. We found a commercial source of such pulverized limestone particles, in addition we purchased under this DOE Project a particle grinding apparatus that can provide particles in the desired size range. Additional work focused on attempts to generate particle stabilized emulsions with a flow through, static mixer based apparatus under a variety

Ryan, David; Golomb, Dan; Shi, Guang; Shih, Cherry; Lewczuk, Rob; Miksch, Joshua; Manmode, Rahul; Mulagapati, Srihariraju; Malepati, Chetankurmar

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

244

Workshop on hydrology of crystalline basement rocks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This workshop covered the following subjects: measurements in relatively shallow boreholes; measurement and interpretation of data from deep boreholes; hydrologic properties of crystalline rocks as interpreted by geophysics and field geology; rock mechanics related to hydrology of crystalline rocks; the possible contributions of modeling to the understanding of the hydrology of crystalline rocks; and geochemical interpretations of the hydrology of crystalline rocks. (MHR)

Davis, S.N. (comp.)

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Corrosion of ferriticmartensitic steels in steam and supercritical water Jeremy Bischoff a,b  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of their resistance to radiation degradation and stress corrosion cracking, ferritic­martensitic steels such as HCM12ACorrosion of ferritic­martensitic steels in steam and supercritical water Jeremy Bischoff a: Available online xxxx a b s t r a c t Corrosion tests were performed in steam and supercritical water at 500

Motta, Arthur T.

246

Study on Pyrolysis of Used Tyre in Subcritical and Supercritical Water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pyrolysis efficiency of used tyres and effect of temperature and pressure in subcritical/supercritical water were studied. Products were analyzed by GS-Mass, FTIR and elementary analyzer. Process of pyrolysis in supercritical /subcritical water was described ... Keywords: pyrogenation-SCW, subcritical, waste rubber

Bao-kui Yi; Chun-yuan Ma; Gui-fang Chen; Shou-yan Chen

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Energy-Saving Analysis on Thermal System in 600MW Supercritical Coal-Fired Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-efficiency, energy-saving and environmentally friendly supercritical thermal power units are gradually becoming main stream in China. In this paper, an advanced energy system analysis method, specific consumption analysis, is used to examine the ... Keywords: supercritical, energy-saving, specific consumption analysis, feed-water heating system, environmentally friendly

Yongping Yang; Yu Wu; Zhiping Yang; Ningling Wang; Gang Xu

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Pollution prevention opportunity assessment for the supercritical water oxidation flow reactor  

SciTech Connect

This pollution prevention opportunity assessment was conducted to evaluate the operation of the supercritical water oxidation flow reactor, which is located in Building 906, Room 107. This assessment documents the processes, identifies the hazardous chemical waste streams generated by these processes, recommends possible ways to minimize waste, and serves as a reference for future assessments of the supercritical water oxidation reactor process.

Phillips, N.M.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

MOLECULAR DESIGN OF COLLOIDS IN SUPERCRITICAL FLUIDS  

SciTech Connect

The environmentally benign, non-toxic, non-flammable fluids water and carbon dioxide (CO2) are the two most abundant and inexpensive solvents on earth. Emulsions of these fluids are of interest in many industrial processes, as well as CO2 sequestration and enhanced oil recovery. Until recently, formation of these emulsions required stabilization with fluorinated surfactants, which are expensive and often not environmentally friendly. In this work we overcame this severe limitation by developing a fundamental understanding of the properties of surfactants the CO2-water interface and using this knowledge to design and characterize emulsions stabilized with either hydrocarbon-based surfactants or nanoparticle stabilizers. We also discovered a new concept of electrostatic stabilization for CO2-based emulsions and colloids. Finally, we were able to translate our earlier work on the synthesis of silicon and germanium nanocrystals and nanowires from high temperatures and pressures to lower temperatures and ambient pressure to make the chemistry much more accessible.

Keith P. Johnston

2009-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

250

Fischer Tropsch synthesis in supercritical fluids. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1, 1995--June 30, 1995  

SciTech Connect

Our objective for this quarter was to study the effect of co-feeding a 1-olefin on the Ruhrchemie catalyst activity and selectivity, during-both conventional Fisher-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) and FTS under supercritical conditions. We used propane as the supercritical fluid and 1-dodecene (1-C{sub 12}H{sub 24}) in this test. Motivation for this study was the work of Fujimoto and co-workers who reported that suppression of methane and enhancement of high molecular weight hydrocarbons selectivities occurs with co-feeding of 1-olefins (1-heptene, 1-tetradecene, or 1-hexadecene) during FTS under supercritical conditions, but not during the conventional FTS (Co-La catalyst supported on silica in supercritical n-pentane).The diffusion coefficients of products in supercritical fluids is discussed.

Akgerman, A.; Bukur, D.B.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Experimental study of crossover from capillary to viscous fingering for supercritical CO2 - water displacement in a homogeneous pore network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carbon sequestration in saline aquifers involves displacing resident brine from the pore space by supercritical CO2 (scCO2). The displacement process is considered unstable due to the unfavorable viscosity ratio (logM = -5.21), respectively. Crossover from capillary to viscous fingering was observed for logCa = -5.91~-5.21, resulting in a large decrease in scCO2 saturation. The discontinuous-rate experimental results confirmed the decrease in nonwetting fluid saturation during crossover from capillary to viscous fingering predicted by numerical simulations by Lenormand et al. (1988).1 Capillary fingering was the only mechanism that dominates all injection rates in the continuous-rate experiment, and resulted in monotonic increase in scCO2 saturation.

Wang, Ying; Zhang, Changyong; Wei, Ning; Oostrom, Martinus; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Li, Xiaochun; Bonneville, Alain HR

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Gas permeability of carbon aerogels  

SciTech Connect

Carbon aerogels are synthesized via the aqueous polycondensation of resorcinol with formaldehyde, followed by supercritical drying and subsequent pyrolysis at 1050 [degree]C. As a result of their interconnected porosity, ultrafine cell/pore size, and high surface area, carbon aerogels have many potential applications such as supercapacitors, battery electrodes, catalyst supports, and gas filters. The performance of carbon aerogels in the latter two applications depends on the permeability or gas flow conductance in these materials. By measuring the pressure differential across a thin specimen and the nitrogen gas flow rate in the viscous regime, the permeability of carbon aerogels was calculated from equations based upon Darcy's law. Our measurements show that carbon aerogels have permeabilities on the order of 10[sup [minus]12] to 10[sup [minus]10] cm[sup 2] over the density range from 0.05--0.44 g/cm[sup 3]. Like many other aerogel properties, the permeability of carbon aerogels follows a power law relationship with density, reflecting differences in the average mesopore size. Comparing the results from this study with the permeability of silica aerogels reported by other workers, we found that the permeability of aerogels is governed by a simple universal flow equation. This paper discusses the relationship between permeability, pore size, and density in carbon aerogels.

Kong, F.; LeMay, J.D.; Hulsey, S.S.; Alviso, C.T.; Pekala, R.W. (Chemistry and Materials Science Department, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States))

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Shotgun cartridge rock breaker  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A rock breaker uses shotgun cartridges or other firearm ammunition as the explosive charge at the bottom of a drilled borehole. The breaker includes a heavy steel rod or bar, a gun with a firing chamber for the ammunition which screws onto the rod, a long firing pin running through a central passage in the rod, and a firing trigger mechanism at the external end of the bar which strikes the firing pin to fire the cartridge within the borehole. A tubular sleeve surround the main body of the rod and includes slits the end to allow it to expand. The rod has a conical taper at the internal end against which the end of the sleeve expands when the sleeve is forced along the rod toward the taper by a nut threaded onto the external end of the rod. As the sleeve end expands, it pushes against the borehole and holds the explosive gasses within, and also prevents the breaker from flying out of the borehole. The trigger mechanism includes a hammer with a slot and a hole for accepting a drawbar or drawpin which, when pulled by a long cord, allows the cartridge to be fired from a remote location.

Ruzzi, Peter L. (Eagan, NM); Morrell, Roger J. (Bloomington, MN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Chemical Functionalization of Nanostructured Materials Using Supercritical Reaction Media  

SciTech Connect

There exists a need for durable and thin functional coatings to utilize the afforded surface area of highly porous ceramic materials. Deposition of silane-based Self Assembled Monolayers (SAMs) has thus far been limited to maximum coverages of 4-5 molecules/nm2 and long processing times (up to 2 weeks), due to the restricted internal geometry of the substrates. Results are presented for SAMs deposited on high surface area silica from supercritical fluids (SCFs). The SAMs so produced display unprecedented coverages, high monolayer integrity, and extremely low surface defect density. Moreover, the depositions and subsequent removal of reaction byproducts are complete in a matter of minutes rather than days. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectra of the surface modified silica are presented, demonstrating the SAM integrity and evolution over time. Sorption of aqueous metal ions is demonstrated, and results are given demonstrating the broad pH stability of the deposited SAMs. A chemical explanation for the enhanced deposition is posited, and the kinetics of mass transport into and out of the nanostructured spaces are discussed.Related experiments using zeolite substrates show deposition of thiol-terminated silanes to internal surfaces of 6? microporous material. After oxidation of the thiol functional group size selective chemistry was demonstrated using the produced catalyst, proving the efficacy of the supercritical reaction medium for installing functional coatings inside pores of similar diameters to the chain length of the deposited molecule[]. Comparisons are made between the response of the different substrates to the supercritical fluid-based processing, and remarks on the utility of SCF based processing of nanostructured materials are presented.

Zemanian, Thomas S.; Fryxell, Glen E.; Liu, Jun; Mattigod, Shas V.; Shin, Yongsoon; Franz, James A.; Ustyugov, Oleksiy A.; Nie, Zimin

2001-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

255

Carbonate Mineralization of Volcanic Province Basalts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flood basalts are receiving increasing attention as possible host formations for geologic sequestration of anthropogenic CO2, with studies underway in the United States, India, Iceland, and Canada. As an extension of our previous experiments with Columbia River basalt, basalts from the eastern United States, India, and South Africa were reacted with aqueous dissolved CO2 and aqueous dissolved CO2-H2S mixtures under supercritical CO2 (scCO2) conditions to study the geochemical reactions resulting from injection of CO2 in such formations. The results of these studies are consistent with cation release behavior measured in our previous experiments (in press) for basalt samples tested in single pass flow through dissolution experiments under dilute solution and mildly acidic conditions. Despite the basalt samples having similar bulk chemistry, mineralogy and apparent dissolution kinetics, long-term static experiments show significant differences in rates of mineralization as well as compositions and morphologies of precipitates that form when the basalts are reacted with CO2-saturated water. For example, basalt from the Newark Basin in the United States was by far the most reactive of any basalt tested to date. Carbonate reaction products for the Newark Basin basalt were globular in form and contained significantly more Fe than the secondary carbonates that precipitated on the other basalt samples. In comparison, the post-reacted samples associated with the Columbia River basalts from the United States contained calcite grains with classic dogtooth spar morphology and trace cation substitution (Mg and Mn). Carbonation of the other basalts produced precipitates with compositions that varied chemically throughout the entire testing period. Examination of polished cross sections of the reacted grains by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy show precipitate overgrowths with varying chemical compositions. Compositional differences in the precipitates suggest changes in fluid chemistry unique to the dissolution behavior of each basalt sample reacted with CO2-saturated water. The Karoo basalt from South Africa appeared the least reactive, with very limited mineralization occurring during the testing with CO2-saturated water. The relative reactivity of different basalt samples were unexpectedly different in the experiments conducted using aqueous dissolved CO2-H2S mixtures versus those reacted with aqueous dissolved CO2 mixtures. For example, the Karoo basalt was highly reactive in the presence of aqueous dissolved CO2-H2S, as evident by small nodules of carbonate coating the basalt grains after 181 days of testing. However the most reactive basalt in CO2-H2O, Newark Basin, formed limited amounts of carbonate precipitates in the presence of aqueous dissolved CO2-H2S mixture. Basalt reactivity in CO2-H2O mixtures appears to be controlled by the composition of the glassy mesostasis, which is the most reactive component in the basalt rock. With the addition of H2S to the CO2-H2O system, basalt reactivity appears to be controlled by precipitation of coatings of insoluble Fe sulfides.

Schaef, Herbert T.; McGrail, B. Peter; Owen, Antionette T.

2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

256

Kinetics of electron transfer reactions in hydrothermal and supercritical water.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The rates of several radiation-induced reactions are assessed via pulse radiolysis in order to extend a model for nuclear reactor coolant radiolysis to supercritical conditions. They find changes in radiolysis yields and significant deviations from Arrhenius behavior at 250 bar as the temperature approaches and exceeds the critical temperature of pure water. At 380 C they also observe a strong pressure dependence of the reaction rates of ions and hydrophobic species. Using a homogeneous chemistry model, they find by 350 C that the relatively mild changes in these reaction rates increase the predicted critical hydrogen concentration relative to 325 C.

Cline, J. A.; Takahashi, K.; Marin, T. W.; Jonah, C. D.; Bartels, D. M.

2001-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

257

Modeling and experimental results for condensing supercritical CO2 power cycles.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Sandia supported research project evaluated the potential improvement that 'condensing' supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO{sub 2}) power cycles can have on the efficiency of Light Water Reactors (LWR). The analytical portion of research project identified that a S-CO{sub 2} 'condensing' re-compression power cycle with multiple stages of reheat can increase LWR power conversion efficiency from 33-34% to 37-39%. The experimental portion of the project used Sandia's S-CO{sub 2} research loop to show that the as designed radial compressor could 'pump' liquid CO{sub 2} and that the gas-cooler's could 'condense' CO{sub 2} even though both of these S-CO{sub 2} components were designed to operate on vapor phase S-CO{sub 2} near the critical point. There is potentially very high value to this research as it opens the possibility of increasing LWR power cycle efficiency, above the 33-34% range, while lowering the capital cost of the power plant because of the small size of the S-CO{sub 2} power system. In addition it provides a way to incrementally build advanced LWRs that are optimally designed to couple to S-CO{sub 2} power conversion systems to increase the power cycle efficiency to near 40%.

Wright, Steven Alan; Conboy, Thomas M.; Radel, Ross F.; Rochau, Gary Eugene

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Rock Density | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Rock Density Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Rock Density Details Activities (2) Areas (2) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Lab Analysis Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Rock Lab Analysis Parent Exploration Technique: Rock Lab Analysis Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Density of different lithologic units. Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Thermal: Cost Information Low-End Estimate (USD): 10.001,000 centUSD 0.01 kUSD 1.0e-5 MUSD 1.0e-8 TUSD / sample

259

Post Rock | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rock Rock Jump to: navigation, search Name Post Rock Facility Post Rock Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Wind Capital Group Developer Wind Capital Group Energy Purchaser Westar Energy Location Ellsworth KS Coordinates 38.87269233°, -98.33059788° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.87269233,"lon":-98.33059788,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

260

SUPERCRITICAL WATER PARTIAL OXIDATION PHASE I - PILOT-SCALE TESTING / FEASIBILITY STUDIES FINAL REPORT  

SciTech Connect

Under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC36-00GO10529 for the Department of Energy, General Atomics (GA) is developing Supercritical Water Partial Oxidation (SWPO) as a means of producing hydrogen from low-grade biomass and other waste feeds. The Phase I Pilot-scale Testing/Feasibility Studies have been successfully completed and the results of that effort are described in this report. The Key potential advantages of the SWPO process is the use of partial oxidation in-situ to rapidly heat the gasification medium, resulting in less char formation and improved hydrogen yield. Another major advantage is that the high-pressure, high-density aqueous environment is ideal for reaching and gasifying organics of all types. The high water content of the medium encourages formation of hydrogen and hydrogen-rich products and is especially compatible with high water content feeds such as biomass materials. The high water content of the medium is also effective for gasification of hydrogen-poor materials such as coal. A versatile pilot plant for exploring gasification in supercritical water has been established at GA's facilities in San Diego. The Phase I testing of the SWPO process with wood and ethanol mixtures demonstrated gasification efficiencies of about 90%, comparable to those found in prior laboratory-scale SCW gasification work carreid out at the University of Hawaii at Manoa (UHM) as well as other biomass gasification experience with conventional gasifiers. As in the prior work at UHM, a significant amount of the hydrogen found in the gas phase products is derived from the water/steam matrix. The studies at UHM utilized an indirectly heated gasifier with an acitvated carbon catalyst. In contrast, the GA studies utilized a directly heated gasifier without catalyst, plus a surrogate waste fuel. Attainment of comparable gasification efficiencies without catalysis is an important advancement for the GA process, and opens the way for efficient hydrogen production from low-value, dirty feed materials. The Phase I results indicate that a practical means to overcome limitations on biomass slurry feed concentration and preheat temperatuare is to coprocess an auxiliary high heating value material. SWPO coprocessing of tow hgih-water content wastes, partially dewatered sewage sludge and trap grease, yields a scenario for the production of hydrogen at highly competitive prices. It is estimated that there are hundreds if not thousands of potential sites for this technology across the US and worldwide.

SPRITZER,M; HONG,G

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rocks supercritical carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Transpiring wall supercritical water oxidation reactor salt deposition studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories has teamed with Foster Wheeler Development Corp. and GenCorp, Aerojet to develop and evaluate a new supercritical water oxidation reactor design using a transpiring wall liner. In the design, pure water is injected through small pores in the liner wall to form a protective boundary layer that inhibits salt deposition and corrosion, effects that interfere with system performance. The concept was tested at Sandia on a laboratory-scale transpiring wall reactor that is a 1/4 scale model of a prototype plant being designed for the Army to destroy colored smoke and dye at Pine Bluff Arsenal in Arkansas. During the tests, a single-phase pressurized solution of sodium sulfate (Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) was heated to supercritical conditions, causing the salt to precipitate out as a fine solid. On-line diagnostics and post-test observation allowed us to characterize reactor performance at different flow and temperature conditions. Tests with and without the protective boundary layer demonstrated that wall transpiration provides significant protection against salt deposition. Confirmation tests were run with one of the dyes that will be processed in the Pine Bluff facility. The experimental techniques, results, and conclusions are discussed.

Haroldsen, B.L.; Mills, B.E.; Ariizumi, D.Y.; Brown, B.G. [and others

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Coal conversion wastewater treatment by catalytic oxidation in supercritical water  

SciTech Connect

Wastewaters from coal-conversion processes contain phenolic compounds in appreciable concentrations. These compounds need to be removed so that the water can be discharged or re-used. Catalytic oxidation in supercritical water is one potential means of treating coal-conversion wastewaters, and this project examined the reactions of phenol over different heterogeneous oxidation catalysts in supercritical water. More specifically, the authors examined the oxidation of phenol over a commercial catalyst and over bulk MnO{sub 2}, bulk TiO{sub 2}, and CuO supported on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. They used phenol as the model pollutant because it is ubiquitous in coal-conversion wastewaters and there is a large database for non-catalytic supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) with which they can contrast results from catalytic SCWO. The overall objective of this research project is to obtain the reaction engineering information required to evaluate the utility of catalytic supercritical water oxidation for treating wastes arising from coal conversion processes. All four materials were active for catalytic supercritical water oxidation. Indeed, all four materials produced phenol conversions and CO{sub 2} yields in excess of those obtained from purely homogeneous, uncatalyzed oxidation reactions. The commercial catalyst was so active that the authors could not reliably measure reaction rates that were not limited by pore diffusion. Therefore, they performed experiments with bulk transition metal oxides. The bulk MnO{sub 2} and TiO{sub 2} catalysts enhance both the phenol disappearance and CO{sub 2} formation rates during SCWO. MnO{sub 2} does not affect the selectivity to CO{sub 2}, or to the phenol dimers at a given phenol conversion. However, the selectivities to CO{sub 2} are increased and the selectivities to phenol dimers are decreased in the presence of TiO{sub 2}, which are desirable trends for a catalytic SCWO process. The role of the catalyst appears to be accelerating the rate of formation of phenoxy radicals, which then react in the fluid phase by the same mechanism operative for non-catalytic SCWO of phenol. The rates of phenol disappearance and CO{sub 2} formation are sensitive to the phenol and O{sub 2} concentrations, but independent of the water density. Power-law rate expressions were developed to correlate the catalytic kinetics. The catalytic kinetics were also consistent with a Langmuir-Hinshelwood rate law derived from a dual-site mechanism comprising the following steps: reversible adsorption of phenol on one type of catalytic site, reversible dissociative adsorption of oxygen on a different type of site, and irreversible, rate-determining surface reaction between adsorbed phenol and adsorbed oxygen.

Phillip E. Savage

1999-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

263

COAL CONVERSION WASTEWATER TREATMENT BY CATALYTIC OXIDATION IN SUPERCRITICAL WATER  

SciTech Connect

Wastewaters from coal-conversion processes contain phenolic compounds in appreciable concentrations. These compounds need to be removed so that the water can be discharged or re-used. Catalytic oxidation in supercritical water is one potential means of treating coal-conversion wastewaters, and this project examined the reactions of phenol over different heterogeneous oxidation catalysts in supercritical water. More specifically, we examined the oxidation of phenol over a commercial catalyst and over bulk MnO{sub 2}, bulk TiO{sub 2}, and CuO supported on Al{sub 2} O{sub 3}. We used phenol as the model pollutant because it is ubiquitous in coal-conversion wastewaters and there is a large database for non-catalytic supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) with which we can contrast results from catalytic SCWO. The overall objective of this research project is to obtain the reaction engineering information required to evaluate the utility of catalytic supercritical water oxidation for treating wastes arising from coal conversion processes. All four materials were active for catalytic supercritical water oxidation. Indeed, all four materials produced phenol conversions and CO{sub 2} yields in excess of those obtained from purely homogeneous, uncatalyzed oxidation reactions. The commercial catalyst was so active that we could not reliably measure reaction rates that were not limited by pore diffusion. Therefore, we performed experiments with bulk transition metal oxides. The bulk MnO{sub 2} and TiO{sub 2} catalysts enhance both the phenol disappearance and CO{sub 2} formation rates during SCWO. MnO{sub 2} does not affect the selectivity to CO{sub 2}, or to the phenol dimers at a given phenol conversion. However, the selectivities to CO{sub 2} are increased and the selectivities to phenol dimers are decreased in the presence of TiO{sub 2} , which are desirable trends for a catalytic SCWO process. The role of the catalyst appears to be accelerating the rate of formation of phenoxy radicals, which then react in the fluid phase by the same mechanism operative for non-catalytic SCWO of phenol. The rates of phenol disappearance and CO{sub 2} formation are sensitive to the phenol and O{sub 2} concentrations, but independent of the water density. Power-law rate expressions were developed to correlate the catalytic kinetics. The catalytic kinetics were also consistent with a Langmuir-Hinshelwood rate law derived from a dual-site mechanism comprising the following steps: reversible adsorption of phenol on one type of catalytic site, reversible dissociative adsorption of oxygen on a different type of site, and irreversible, rate-determining surface reaction between adsorbed phenol and adsorbed oxygen.

Phillip E. Savage

1999-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

264

Rock physics at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Rock physics refers to the study of static and dynamic chemical and physical properties of rocks and to phenomenological investigations of rocks reacting to man-made forces such as stress waves and fluid injection. A bibliography of rock physics references written by LASL staff members is given. Listing is by surname of first author. (RWR)

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Isotopic Analysis- Rock | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis- Rock Isotopic Analysis- Rock Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Isotopic Analysis- Rock Details Activities (13) Areas (11) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Lab Analysis Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Rock Lab Analysis Parent Exploration Technique: Rock Lab Analysis Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Water rock interaction Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Thermal: Dictionary.png Isotopic Analysis- Rock: Isotopes are atoms of the same element that have different numbers of neutrons. An isotopic analysis looks at a particular isotopic element(s) in a given system, while the conditions which increase/decrease the number of neutrons are well understood and measurable.

266

Stable-Isotope Studies Of Rocks And Secondary Minerals In A Vapor-Dominated  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Stable-Isotope Studies Of Rocks And Secondary Minerals In A Vapor-Dominated Stable-Isotope Studies Of Rocks And Secondary Minerals In A Vapor-Dominated Hydrothermal System At The Geysers, Sonoma County, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Stable-Isotope Studies Of Rocks And Secondary Minerals In A Vapor-Dominated Hydrothermal System At The Geysers, Sonoma County, California Details Activities (5) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Geysers, a vapor-dominated hydrothermal system, is developed in host rock of the Franciscan Formation, which contains veins of quartz and calcite whose Δ18O values record the temperatures and isotopic compositions of fluids prevailing during at least two different episodes of rock-fluid interaction. The first episode took place at about 200°C, during which marine silica and carbonate apparently interacted with ocean

267

NETL: Gasifipedia - Carbon Sequestration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coal: SNG from Coal: Process & Commercialization: Carbon Sequestration Coal: SNG from Coal: Process & Commercialization: Carbon Sequestration Carbon sequestration, also termed carbon storage, is the permanent storage of CO2, usually in deep geologic formations. Industrially-generated CO2 -- resulting from fossil fuel combustion, gasification, and other industrial processes -- is injected as a supercritical fluid into geologic reservoirs, where it is held in place by natural traps and seals. Carbon storage is one approach to minimizing atmospheric emissions of man-made CO2. As discussed above, the main purpose of CO2 EOR such as the Weyburn Project is tertiary recovery of crude oil, but in effect substantial CO2 remains sequestered/stored as a result. Current Status of CO2 Storage CO2 storage is currently underway in the United States and around the world. Large, commercial-scale projects, like the Sleipner CO2 Storage Site in Norway and the Weyburn-Midale CO2 Project in Canada, have been injecting CO2 into geologic storage formations more than a decade. Each of these projects stores more than 1 million tons of CO2 per year. Large-scale efforts are currently underway in Africa, China, Australia, and Europe, as well. These commercial-scale projects are demonstrating that large volumes of CO2 can be safely and permanently stored. In addition, a number of smaller pilot projects are underway in different parts of the world to determine suitable locations and technologies for future long-term CO2 storage. To date, more than 200 small-scale CO2 storage projects have been carried out worldwide. A demonstration project that captures CO2 from a pulverized coal power plant and pipes it to a geologic formation for storage recently came online in Alabama.

268

Oil from rock  

SciTech Connect

The article discusses first the Green River Formation oil shale projects in the western United States from which conservative estimates have suggested an output of 400,000 to 600,000 bbl/day of crude shale oil by 1990. The western reserves recoverable with present technology are said to exceed 600 billion (10/sup 9/) bbl. Three major considerations could limit the large-scale development of shale oil: availability of water, environmental factors, and socio-economic considerations. Water is used to obtain and process the crude shale oil, and additional water is needed to cool the spent shale and to establish new vegetation on top of it. Nitrogenous compounds and arsenic in crude shale oil are among potential pollutants. Spent shale contains salts that are potentially leachable, as well as organic pyrolytic products. Retorting oil shales may release more CO/sub 2/ through decomposition of carbonate minerals that will subsequently be generated by burning the oil produced. Topographic effects of oil shale mining may raise socio-economic problems. Next the article discusses the conversion of coal to liquid by pyrolysis or hydrogenation, including the Gulf solvent refined coal (SRC) and the Exxon (EDS) liquefaction processes. Also described in the South African SASOL process for producing synthetic fuel from coal. A parallel account is included on the estimated complete cycle of United States and of worldwide crude oil production, forecasting depletion within less than a century. 11 refs.

Walters, S.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Nano-scale magnetic film formation by decompression of supercritical CO?/ferric acetylacetonate solutions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GROWTH OF NANO-SCALE MAGNETIC FILMS USING CO 2 RESS EX-113 GROWTH OF NANO-SCALE MAGNETIC FILMS USING A SUPERCRIT-of EDX analysis on nano-scale ?lms. . . . . . . . . . . 109

De Dea, Silvia

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Oxidation kinetics of methylphosphonic acid in supercritical water : experimental measurements and model development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(cont.) at well-defined operating conditions and to develop. both microscopic and macroscopic models, ranging from regressed global models to an elementary reaction mechanism, to quantify MPA oxidation kinetics in supercritical ...

Sullivan, Patricia A. (Patricia Ann), 1978-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Supercritical Flow Interaction within the Cape Blanco–Cape Mendocino Orographic Complex  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Supercritical flow interaction occurring in the marine boundary layer between closely spaced coastal capes is investigated with a mesoscale numerical prediction model. As an extension of previous work, the U.S. Navy’s Coupled Ocean/Atmosphere ...

Tracy Haack; Stephen D. Burk; Clive Dorman; David Rogers

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Fischer Tropsch synthesis in supercritical fluids. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1, 1995--September 30, 1995  

SciTech Connect

Our objective for this quarter was to compare performance of the Ruhrchemie catalyst in different modes of operation: fixed bed reactor (conventional and supercritical mode of operation), and stirred tank slurry reactor. Diffusion coefficients are discussed.

Akgerman, A.; Bukur, D.B.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Modelling of a solar-powered supercritical water biomass gasifier Laurance A Watson1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modelling of a solar-powered supercritical water biomass gasifier Laurance A Watson1 , John D Pye2 to efficiently gasify biomass would offer one potential source of sustainable hydrocarbons and deliver desirable

274

The deterioration in heat transfer to fluids at supercritical pressure and high heat fluxes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

At slightly supercritical pressure and in the neighborhood of the pseudo-critical temperature (defined as the temperature corresponding to the peak in specific heat at the operating pressure), the heat transfer coefficient ...

Shiralkar, B. S.

1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Investigations of a printed circuit heat exchanger for supercritical CO2 and water.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In the STAR-LM (Secure Transportable Autonomous Reactor-Liquid Metal) reactor concept developed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), a supercritical CO2 (S-CO2) Brayton cycle is used as… (more)

Song, Hoseok

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Co-oxidation in supercritical water : methylphosphonic acid-ethanol and ammonia-ethanol model systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Supercritical water (SCW) is an effective solvent for the destruction of organic compounds by oxidation. Because both organics and oxygen have high solubility in water above its critical point (To = 374 °C (647 K), Pc = ...

Ploeger, Jason M

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Simulations of Supercritical Flow around Points and Capes in a Coastal Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fully 3D nonlinear model simulations for supercritical flow along locations at the California coast, at Cape Mendocino, and Point Sur, are presented. The model results are objectively and subjectively verified against measurements from the ...

Michael Tjernström; Branko Grisogono

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

T2Well/ECO2N Version 1.0: Multiphase and Non-Isothermal Model for Coupled Wellbore-Reservoir Flow of Carbon Dioxide and Variable Salinity Water  

SciTech Connect

At its most basic level, the injection of CO{sub 2} into geologic CO{sub 2} storage sites involves a system comprising the wellbore and the target reservoir. The wellbore is the only conduit available to emplace CO{sub 2} into reservoirs for long-term storage. At the same time, wellbores in general have been identified as the most likely conduit for CO{sub 2} and brine leakage from geologic carbon sequestration (GCS) sites, especially those in sedimentary basins with historical hydrocarbon production. We have developed a coupled wellbore and reservoir model for simulating the dynamics of CO{sub 2} injection and leakage through wellbores. The model describes the following processes: (1) upward or downward wellbore flow of CO{sub 2} and variable salinity water with transition from supercritical to gaseous CO{sub 2} including Joule-Thomson cooling, (2) exsolution of CO{sub 2} from the aqueous phase as pressure drops, and (3) cross flow into or interaction with layers of surrounding rock (reservoirs). We use the Drift-Flux Model and related conservation equations for describing transient two-phase non-isothermal wellbore flow of CO{sub 2}-water mixtures under different flow regimes and interacting with surrounding rock. The mass and thermal energy balance equations are solved numerically by a finite difference scheme with wellbore heat transmission to the surrounding rock handled either semi-analytically or numerically. The momentum balance equation for the flow in the wellbore is solved numerically with a semi-explicit scheme. This manual provides instructions for compilation and use of the new model, and presents some example problems to demonstrate its use.

Pan, L.; Oldenburg, C.M.; Wu, Y.-S.; Pruess, K.

2011-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

279

Computational Modeling and Assessment of Nanocoatings for Ultra-Supercritical Boilers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Forced outages and boiler unavailability of coal-fired fossil plants is most often caused by fire-side corrosion of boiler water walls and tubing. Reliable coatings are required for ultra-supercritical application to mitigate corrosion because these boilers will operate at much higher temperatures and pressures than in supercritical boilers.Computational modeling efforts have been undertaken to design and assess potentialFe-Cr-Ni-Al systems to produce stable nanocrystalline ...

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

280

Survey of Ultra-Supercritical Pulverized Coal Power Plants in Japan and China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Within the United States, there is interest in pulverized coal (PC) units operating at ultra-supercritical (USC) conditions, arbitrarily defined as having main steam temperatures of 1100186F (595186C) and above. Such units have higher efficiency than conventional supercritical (SC) PC units with corresponding reductions in emissions8212on a lb/MWh basis8212for CO2, criteria pollutants, and mercury. Some power producers also consider the improved efficiency a hedge against future coal price increases. To ...

2009-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rocks supercritical carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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281

Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field Investigations Of In Situ...

282

Rock Lab Analysis | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rock Lab Analysis Rock Lab Analysis Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Rock Lab Analysis Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Lab Analysis Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Rock Lab Analysis Parent Exploration Technique: Lab Analysis Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Core and cuttings analysis is done to define lithology. Water rock interaction. Can determine detailed information about rock composition and morphology. Density of different lithologic units. Rapid and unambiguous identification of unknown minerals.[1] Stratigraphic/Structural: Core analysis can locate faults or fracture networks. Oriented core can give additional important information on anisotropy. Historic structure and deformation of land.

283

Development of Modeling Capabilities for the Analysis of Supercritical Water-Cooled Reactor Thermal-Hydraulics and Dynamics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Develop an experimental and theoretical data base for heat transfer in tubes and channels cooled by water and CO2 at supercritical pressures.

Dr. Michael Z. Podowski

2009-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

284

New oil source rocks cut in Greek Ionian basin  

SciTech Connect

The Ionian zone of Northwest Greece (Epirus region) constitutes part of the most external zones of the Hellenides (Paxos zone, Ionian zone, Gavrovo Tripolitza zone). The rocks of the Ionian zone range from Triassic evaporites and associated breccias through a varied series of Jurassic through Upper Eocene carbonates and lesser cherts and shales followed by Oligocene flysch. The surface occurrences of petroleum in the Ionian zone are mainly attributed to Toarcian Lower Posidonia beds source rocks and lesser to late Callovian-Tithonian Upper Posidonia beds and to the Albian-Cenomanian Upper Siliceous zone or Vigla shales of the Vigla limestones. Oil that could not be attributed to the above source rocks is believed to have an origin from Triassic formations that contain potential source rocks in Albania and Italy. However, several samples of the shales of Triassic breccias from outcrops and drillholes were analyzed in the past, but the analytical results were not so promising since their hydrocarbon potential was low. In this article, the authors will present their analytical results of the Ioannina-1 well, where for the first time they identified some very rich source beds in the Triassic breccias formation of Northwest Greece.

Karakitsios, V. [Univ. of Athens (Greece); Rigakis, N. [Public Petroleum Corp., Athens (Greece)

1996-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

285

Polymers for metal extractions in carbon dioxide  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A composition useful for the extraction of metals and metalloids comprises (a) carbon dioxide fluid (preferably liquid or supercritical carbon dioxide); and (b) a polymer in the carbon dioxide, the polymer having bound thereto a ligand that binds the metal or metalloid; with the ligand bound to the polymer at a plurality of locations along the chain length thereof (i.e., a plurality of ligands are bound at a plurality of locations along the chain length of the polymer). The polymer is preferably a copolymer, and the polymer is preferably a fluoropolymer such as a fluoroacrylate polymer. The extraction method comprises the steps of contacting a first composition containing a metal or metalloid to be extracted with a second composition, the second composition being as described above; and then extracting the metal or metalloid from the first composition into the second composition.

DeSimone, Joseph M. (7315 Crescent Ridge Dr., Chapel Hill, NC 27516); Tumas, William (1130 Big Rock Loop, Los Alamos, NM 87544); Powell, Kimberly R. (103 Timber Hollow Ct. Apartment 323, Chapel Hill, NC 27514); McCleskey, T. Mark (1930 Camino Mora, Los Alamos, NM 87544); Romack, Timothy J. (5810 Forest Ridge Dr., Durham, NC 27713); McClain, James B. (8530 Sommersweet La., Raleigh, NC 27612); Birnbaum, Eva R. (1930 Camino Mora, Los Alamos, NM 87544)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Preliminary assessment of high-resistivity cap-rock shale in the Frio Formation of the Texas Gulf Coast. Annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Mapping of high resistivity cap rock shales in the Frio Formation of the Texas Gulf Coast shows that few areas of thin cap rock occur in the upper Texas Gulf Coast, and more extensive, thicker cap rock occurs in the lower Texas Gulf Coast. Increases in (1) maximum shale resistivity, (2) unstable minerals (volcanic rock fragments, detrital carbonate grains), and (3) authigenic cementation parallel the increase in cap rock from the upper to the lower Gulf Coast. Similarity in cap rock distribution in two major Frio deltaic depocenters is not evident. Facies analysis of regional cross sections in the lower Texas Gulf Coast and of cross sections in Sarita East field, Kenedy County, shows preferential development of cap rock in the delta-front/slope facies of the Norias delta system. Sand content of the cap rock interval varies from 23 to 41 percent in part of Sarita East field, suggesting that if cap rock is due to authigenic cementation, such sands may act as fluid conduits during mineralization. Cap rock is rarely developed in the shale-rich prodelta and distal delta-front facies. High resistivity cap rock shales have been considered a result of authigenic calcite cementation, but definite evidence for this origin is lacking. Preliminary mineralogic analyses of well cuttings have not yielded satisfactory results. Analysis of core through cap rock and non-cap rock intervals will be required to determine the mineralogic variability within each interval and to accurately assess any mineralogic control of the high resistivity log response.

Finley, R.J.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Laser Rock Perforation Demo - The NE Multimedia Collection  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

rock perforation demo High power laser beam can be used in oil well completion application for perforating oil reservoir rock and increasing rock's permeability for high oil...

288

PARKER-HEADGATE ROCK & PARKER-GILA  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PARKER-HEADGATE ROCK & PARKER-GILA 161-kV TRANSMISSION LINE Cross Arm Repair and Helicopter Staging Areas Figure 1. Project Location Project Location j PARKER-HEADGATE ROCK &...

289

Rock River LLC Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

River LLC Wind Farm River LLC Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search The Rock River LLC Wind Farm is in Carbon County, Wyoming. It consists of 50 turbines and has a total capacity of 50 MW. It is owned by Shell Wind Energy.[1] Based on assertions that the site is near Arlington, its approximate coordinates are 41.5946899°, -106.2083459°.[2] References ↑ http://www.wsgs.uwyo.edu/Topics/EnergyResources/wind.aspx ↑ http://www.thefreelibrary.com/Shell+WindEnergy+Acquires+Second+Wind+Farm+in+the+U.S.,+in+an...-a082345438 Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Rock_River_LLC_Wind_Farm&oldid=132230" Category: Wind Farms What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load)

290

Separation of Fischer-Tropsch wax from catalyst using supercritical fluid extraction. Quarterly technical progress report, 1 January 1996--31 March 1996  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this research project is to evaluate the potential of supercritical fluid extraction for separating the catalyst slurry of a Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) slurry bubble column (SBC) reactor into two fractions: (1) a catalyst-free wax containing less than 10 ppm particulate matter and (2) a concentrated catalyst slurry that is ready for recycle or regeneration. The wax will be extracted with a hydrocarbon solvent that has a critical temperature near the operating temperature of the SBC reactor, i.e., 200--300 {degrees}C. Initial work is being performed using n-hexane as the solvent. The success of the project depends on two major factors. First, the supercritical solvent must be able to dissolve the F-T wax; furthermore, this must be accomplished without entraining the solid catalyst. Second, the extraction must be controlled so as not to favor the removal of the low molecular weight wax compounds, i.e., a constant carbon-number distribution of the alkanes in the wax slurry must be maintained at steady-state column operation. During this quarter work focused on task 1b, experimental measurement of selected model systems. Vapor-liquid equilibrium experiments for the n- hexane/squalane system, which we initiated in the previous quarter, were continued and results are discussed in this report.

Joyce, P.C.; Thies, M.C.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Self-diffusion measurements of methanol and 1-decanol in supercritical CO{sub 2} by {sup 13}C pulsed field gradient NMR  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A small amount of a highly polar compound, such as methanol, is frequently added to supercritical fluid (SCF) carbon dioxide to enhance its ability to dissolve polar molecules in SCF separation technology. Few diffusion coefficients in SCF mixtures have been reported in the literature. The pulsed field gradient spin-echo technique (PGSE) has been used extensively to measure self-diffusion in neat monohydric alcohols under pressure. Hurle et al. and Luedemann et al. showed that the experimental diffusion coefficients of methanol may be explained by a rough hard-sphere model (RHS) with a roughness parameter, A. In this paper, diffusion measurements are reported for CO{sub 2}-methanol and CO{sub 2}-decanol mixtures in supercritical fluids. Since methanol in CO{sub 2} is primarily monomeric at low concentration, the RHS model, that is accurate for most simple, non-associated liquids, should apply. Previous nuclear spin-lattice relaxation studies in SCF CO{sub 2} suggest a large local solvent density enhancement, or solvent clustering, near a alcohol solute molecule under SCF conditions. If solvent clustering occurs in the vicinity of alcohol solute molecules, it should affect the diffusion coefficients. The authors have made the requisite measurements and found that they corroborate their previous spin-relaxation data.

Bai, S.; Mayne, C.L.; Grant, D.M. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Taylor, C.M.V. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Organic Analytical Chemistry Group

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Incorporating supercritical steam turbines into molten-salt power tower plants : feasibility and performance.  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories and Siemens Energy, Inc., examined 14 different subcritical and supercritical steam cycles to determine if it is feasible to configure a molten-salt supercritical steam plant that has a capacity in the range of 150 to 200 MWe. The effects of main steam pressure and temperature, final feedwater temperature, and hot salt and cold salt return temperatures were determined on gross and half-net efficiencies. The main steam pressures ranged from 120 bar-a (subcritical) to 260 bar-a (supercritical). Hot salt temperatures of 566 and 600%C2%B0C were evaluated, which resulted in main steam temperatures of 553 and 580%C2%B0C, respectively. Also, the effects of final feedwater temperature (between 260 and 320%C2%B0C) were evaluated, which impacted the cold salt return temperature. The annual energy production and levelized cost of energy (LCOE) were calculated using the System Advisory Model on 165 MWe subcritical plants (baseline and advanced) and the most promising supercritical plants. It was concluded that the supercritical steam plants produced more annual energy than the baseline subcritical steam plant for the same-size heliostat field, receiver, and thermal storage system. Two supercritical steam plants had the highest annual performance and had nearly the same LCOE. Both operated at 230 bar-a main steam pressure. One was designed for a hot salt temperature of 600%C2%B0C and the other 565%C2%B0C. The LCOEs for these plants were about 10% lower than the baseline subcritical plant operating at 120 bar-a main steam pressure and a hot salt temperature of 565%C2%B0C. Based on the results of this study, it appears economically and technically feasible to incorporate supercritical steam turbines in molten-salt power tower plants.

Pacheco, James Edward; Wolf, Thorsten [Siemens Energy, Inc., Orlando, FL; Muley, Nishant [Siemens Energy, Inc., Orlando, FL

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Electrochemical behavior of carbon aerogels derived from different precursors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The ability to tailor the structure and properties of porous carbons has led to their increased use as electrodes in energy storage devices. Our research focuses on the synthesis and characterization of carbon aerogels for use in electrochemical double layer capacitors. Carbon aerogels are formed from the sol-gel polymerization of (1) resorcinol-formaldehyde or (2) phenolic-furfural, followed by supercritical drying from carbon dioxide, and subsequent pyrolysis in an inert atmosphere. These materials can be produced as monoliths, composites, thin films, powders, or microspheres. In all cases, the areogels have an open-cell structure with an ultrafine pore size (<100 nm), high surface area (400-1 100 m{sup 2}/g), and a solid matrix composed of interconnected particles, fibers, or platelets with characteristic dimensions of 10 nm. This paper examines the effects of the carbon precursor and processing conditions on electrochemical performance in aqueous and organic electrolytes.

Pekala, R.W.; Alviso, C.T.; Nielson, J.K.; Tran, T.D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Reynolds, G.M.; Dresshaus, M.S. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Physics

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Hot dry rock energy project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A proof-of-concept experimental project by the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory endeavors to establish the feasibility of exploitation of the thermal energy contained in the earth's crust where such energy and a transporting fluid have not been juxtaposed in nature. A region of high heat flow and apparently unfaulted basement rock formation was selected. Two boreholes, drilled to a total depth of about 3 km (10,000 ft) and penetrating about 2.5 km (7500 ft) into the Precambrian formation, to a rock temperature of 200/sup 0/C, have been connected at depth by a hydraulically fractured zone to form the heat extraction surface. Energy was extracted at a rate of 3.2 MW(t) with water temperature of 132/sup 0/C during a 96-h preliminary circulating test run performed late in September 1977. This paper traces the progress of the project, summarizes procedures and salient events, and references detailed reports and specialized topics.

Hendron, R.H.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Relative Permeability of Fractured Rock  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Contemporary understanding of multiphase flow through fractures is limited. Different studies using synthetic fractures and various fluids have yielded different relative permeability-saturation relations. This study aimed to extend the understanding of multiphase flow by conducting nitrogen-water relative permeability experiments on a naturally-fractured rock from The Geysers geothermal field. The steady-state approach was used. However, steady state was achieved only at the endpoint saturations. Several difficulties were encountered that are attributed to phase interference and changes in fracture aperture and surface roughness, along with fracture propagation/initiation. Absolute permeabilities were determined using nitrogen and water. The permeability values obtained change with the number of load cycles. Determining the absolute permeability of a core is especially important in a fractured rock. The rock may change as asperities are destroyed and fractures propagate or st rain harden as the net stresses vary. Pressure spikes occurred in water a solute permeability experiments. Conceptual models of an elastic fracture network can explain the pressure spike behavior. At the endpoint saturations the water relative permeabilities obtained are much less than the nitrogen gas relative permeabilities. Saturations were determined by weighing and by resistivity calculations. The resistivity-saturation relationship developed for the core gave saturation values that differ by 5% from the value determined by weighing. Further work is required to complete the relative permeability curve. The steady-state experimental approach encountered difficulties due to phase interference and fracture change. Steady state may not be reached until an impractical length of time. Thus, unsteady-state methods should be pursued. In unsteady-state experiments the challenge will be in quantifying rock fracture change in addition to fluid flow changes.

Mark D. Habana

2002-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

296

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Act: Experiment-Based Model for the Chemical Interactions between Geothermal Rocks, Supercritical Carbon Dioxide and Water CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 08052010 Location(s):...

297

Dispersivity as an oil reservoir rock characteristic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main objective of this research project is to establish dispersivity, {alpha}{sub d}, as an oil reservoir rock characteristic and to use this reservoir rock property to enhance crude oil recovery. A second objective is to compare the dispersion coefficient and the dispersivity of various reservoir rocks with other rock characteristics such as: porosity, permeability, capillary pressure, and relative permeability. The dispersivity of a rock was identified by measuring the physical mixing of two miscible fluids, one displacing the other in a porous medium. 119 refs., 27 figs., 12 tabs.

Menzie, D.E.; Dutta, S.

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Quasi-three dimensional ground-water modeling of the hydrologic influence of paleozoic rocks on the ground-water table at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The proposed high-level radioactive waste repository site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, has created a need to understand the, ground-water system at the site. One of the important hydrologic characteristics is a steep gradient on the ground-water table north of the repository site. This study investigates the cause of the steep gradient, based on the possible influence by Paleozoic rocks under the Yucca Mountain area. A quasi-three dimensional, steady-state, finite-difference model of the groundwater flow system of the Yucca Mountain Site and vicinity, was developed using a manual trial-and-error calibration technique to model the ground-water table. The ground-water system in the model was divided into a two layers, which consist of Cenozoic volcanic rocks and Paleozoic carbonate rocks. The carbonate rocks were defined to be a confined aquifer. The model simulates vertical flow from the volcanic rocks to the underlying carbonate rocks in an area where the Eleana Formation, a Paleozoic clastic aquitard, is absent. The model requires a vertical hydrologic connection in a particular region and a large difference in hydraulic heads between the volcanic rocks and the carbonates to create the steep gradient north of the repository site. The regions of different hydraulic gradient on the water-table surface could be simulated by spatial variations of the horizontal hydraulic conductivity in the volcanic rocks.

Lee, Si-Yong

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

A Simple Hydromechanical Modeling of Carbon Sequestration in Sedimentary Rocks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this study, over different scenarios we will simulate a week coupling of hydromechanical loads in a long term CO2 injection with a hypothetical reservoir while the effect of pore water pressure and then multi-phase flow procedure has been ignored. In the first basic case the homogenous case has been considered when the theory of poroelasticity was employed. Second case covers the effects of directional heterogeneity, constructed by random faults, on the flow paths of gas and other attributes of the system. Also, in the latter case the impact of stress state as an active loads (body loads) has been regarded. Thanks to multiple directional heterogeneity, which induces only one heterogenic parameter (intrinsic permeability), distinguishable flow paths can be recognized. In another process, the failure ability of system regard to Mohr-Columb criterion is measured as well as options that, presumably, the system has continuum faults (zero cohesion). The results over different cases shows absedince of ground surf...

Ghaffari, Hamed O

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Supercritical fluid molecular spray film deposition and powder formation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Solid films are deposited, or fine powders formed, by dissolving a solid material into a supercritical fluid solution at an elevated pressure and then rapidly expanding the solution through a short orifice into a region of relatively low pressure. This produces a molecular spray which is directed against a substrate to deposit a solid thin film thereon, or discharged into a collection chamber to collect a fine powder. Upon expansion and supersonic interaction with background gases in the low pressure region, any clusters of solvent are broken up and the solvent is vaporized and pumped away. Solute concentration in the solution is varied primarily by varying solution pressure to determine, together with flow rate, the rate of deposition and to control in part whether a film or powder is produced and the granularity of each. Solvent clustering and solute nucleation are controlled by manipulating the rate of expansion of the solution and the pressure of the lower pressure region. Solution and low pressure region temperatures are also controlled.

Smith, Richard D. (Richland, WA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rocks supercritical carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Ion dynamics at supercritical quasi-parallel shocks: Hybrid simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

By separating the incident ions into directly transmitted, downstream thermalized, and diffuse ions, we perform one-dimensional (1D) hybrid simulations to investigate ion dynamics at a supercritical quasi-parallel shock. In the simulations, the angle between the upstream magnetic field and shock nominal direction is {theta}{sub Bn}=30 Degree-Sign , and the Alfven Mach number is M{sub A}{approx}5.5. The shock exhibits a periodic reformation process. The ion reflection occurs at the beginning of the reformation cycle. Part of the reflected ions is trapped between the old and new shock fronts for an extended time period. These particles eventually form superthermal diffuse ions after they escape to the upstream of the new shock front at the end of the reformation cycle. The other reflected ions may return to the shock immediately or be trapped between the old and new shock fronts for a short time period. When the amplitude of the new shock front exceeds that of the old shock front and the reformation cycle is finished, these ions become thermalized ions in the downstream. No noticeable heating can be found in the directly transmitted ions. The relevance of our simulations to the satellite observations is also discussed in the paper.

Su Yanqing; Lu Quanming; Gao Xinliang; Huang Can; Wang Shui [CAS Key Laboratory of Basic Plasma Physics, Department of Geophysics and Planetary Science, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

302

Supercritical fluid molecular spray thin films and fine powders  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Solid films are deposited, or fine powders formed, by dissolving a solid material into a supercritical fluid solution at an elevated pressure and then rapidly expanding the solution through a short orifice into a region of relatively low pressure. This produces a molecular spray which is directed against a substrate to deposit a solid thin film thereon, or discharged into a collection chamber to collect a fine powder. The solvent is vaporized and pumped away. Solution pressure is varied to determine, together with flow rate, the rate of deposition and to control in part whether a film or powder is produced and the granularity of each. Solution temperature is varied in relation to formation of a two-phase system during expansion to control porosity of the film or powder. A wide variety of film textures and powder shapes are produced of both organic and inorganic compounds. Films are produced with regular textural feature dimensions of 1.0-2.0 .mu.m down to a range of 0.01 to 0.1 .mu.m. Powders are formed in very narrow size distributions, with average sizes in the range of 0.02 to 5 .mu.m.

Smith, Richard D. (Richland, WA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Anatomy of the giant component: The strictly supercritical regime  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In a recent work of the authors and Kim, we derived a complete description of the largest component of the Erd\\H{o}s-R\\'enyi random graph $G(n,p)$ as it emerges from the critical window, i.e. for $p = (1+\\epsilon)/n$ where $\\epsilon^3 n \\to\\infty$ and $\\epsilon=o(1)$, in terms of a tractable contiguous model. Here we provide the analogous description for the supercritical giant component, i.e., the largest component of $G(n,p)$ for $p = \\lambda/n$ where $\\lambda>1$ is fixed. The contiguous model is roughly as follows: Take a random degree sequence and sample a random multigraph with these degrees to arrive at the kernel; Replace the edges by paths whose lengths are i.i.d. geometric variables to arrive at the 2-core; Attach i.i.d. Poisson Galton-Watson trees to the vertices for the final giant component. As in the case of the emerging giant, we obtain this result via a sequence of contiguity arguments at the heart of which are Kim's Poisson-cloning method and the Pittel-Wormald local limit theorems.

Ding, Jian; Peres, Yuval

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Cast Alloys for Advanced Ultra Supercritical Steam Turbines  

SciTech Connect

The proposed steam inlet temperature in the Advanced Ultra Supercritical (A-USC) steam turbine is high enough (760 °C) that traditional turbine casing and valve body materials such as ferritic/martensitic steels will not suffice due to temperature limitations of this class of materials. Cast versions of several traditionally wrought Ni-based superalloys were evaluated for use as casing or valve components for the next generation of industrial steam turbines. The full size castings are substantial: 2-5,000 kg each half and on the order of 100 cm thick. Experimental castings were quite a bit smaller, but section size was retained and cooling rate controlled to produce equivalent microstructures. A multi-step homogenization heat treatment was developed to better deploy the alloy constituents. The most successful of these cast alloys in terms of creep strength (Haynes 263, Haynes 282, and Nimonic 105) were subsequently evaluated by characterizing their microstructure as well as their steam oxidation resistance (at 760 and 800 °C).

G. R. Holcomb, P. Wang, P. D. Jablonski, and J. A. Hawk,

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

SUPERCRITICAL WATER PARTIAL OXIDATION PHASE I - PILOT-SCALE TESTING/FEASIBILTY SUDIES FINAL REPORT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

General Atomics (GA) is developing Supercritical Water Partial Oxidation (SWPO) as a means of producing hydrogen from low-grade biomass and other waste feeds. The Phase I Pilot-scale Testing/Feasibility Studies have been successfully completed and the results of that effort are described in this report. The key potential advantage of the SWPO process is the use of partial oxidation in-situ to rapidly heat the gasification medium, resulting in less char formation and improved hydrogen yield. Another major advantage is that the high-pressure, high-density aqueous environment is ideal for reacting and gasifying organics of all types. The high water content of the medium encourages formation of hydrogen and hydrogen-rich products and is especially compatible with high water content feeds such as biomass materials. The high water content of the medium is also effective for gasification of hydrogen-poor materials such as coal. A versatile pilot plant for exploring gasification in supercritical water has been established at GA's facilities in San Diego. The Phase I testing of the SWPO process with wood and ethanol mixtures demonstrated gasification efficiencies of about 90%, comparable to those found in prior laboratory-scale SCW gasification work carried out at the University of Hawaii at Manoa (UHM), as well as other biomass gasification experience with conventional gasifiers. As in the prior work at UHM, a significant amount of the hydrogen found in the gas phase products is derived from the water/steam matrix. The studies at UHM utilized an indirectly heated gasifier with an activated carbon catalyst. In contrast, the GA studies utilized a directly heated gasifier without catalyst, plus a surrogate waste fuel. Attainment of comparable gasification efficiencies without catalysis is an important advancement for the GA process, and opens the way for efficient hydrogen production from low-value, dirty feed materials. The Phase I results indicate that a practical means to overcome limitations on biomass slurry feed concentration and preheat temperature is to coprocess an auxiliary high heating value material. SWPO coprocessing of two high-water content wastes, partially dewatered sewage sludge and trap grease, yields a scenario for the production of hydrogen at highly competitive prices. It is estimated that there are hundreds if not thousands of potential sites for this technology across the US and worldwide. The economics for plants processing 40 tpd sewage sludge solids augmented with grease trap waste are favorable over a significant range of cost parameters such as sludge disposal credit and capital financing. Hydrogen production costs for SWPO plants of this size are projected to be about $3/GJ or less. Economics may be further improved by future developments such as pumping of higher solids content sludges and improved gasifier nozzle designs to reduce char and improve hydrogen yields. The easiest market entry for SWPO is expected to be direct sales to municipal wastewater treatment plants for use with sewage sludge in conjunction with trap grease, as both of these wastes are ubiquitous and have reasonably well-defined negative value (i.e., the process can take credit for reduction of well-defined disposal costs for these streams). Additionally, waste grease is frequently recovered at municipal wastewater treatment plants where it is already contaminated with sewage. SWPO should also be favorable to other market applications in which low or negative value, high water content biomass is available in conjunction with a low or negative value fuel material. For biomass slurries primary candidates are sewage sludge, manure sludge, and shredded and/or composted organic municipal solid waste (MSW) slurries. For the high heating value stream primary candidates are trap grease, waste plastic or rubber slurries, and coal or coke slurries. Phase II of the SWPO program will be focused on verifying process improvements identified during Phase I, and then performing extended duration testing with the GA pilot plant. Tests of at least 1

SPRITZER.M; HONG,G

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Process design and solvent recycle for the supercritical Fischer-Tropsch synthesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A recycle reactor system for supercritical Fischer-Tropsch synthesis was successfully designed and tested. The new reactor system has these characteristics: (1) integration of supercritical Fischer-Tropsch reactions, natural separation of produced wax from liquid phase, and recycle of the solvent and (2) natural recycle of solvent driven by self-gravity. A 20% Co/SiO{sub 2} catalyst and n-hexane were used as a catalyst and supercritical fluid, respectively. The results show that the average CO conversion at the steady state was 45% with recycle and 58% without recycle. The lumped hydrocarbon products distribution did not have any obvious difference between with and without recycle operation; however, {alpha}-olefin content of products with recycle was lower than that without recycle. The XRD result indicates that most of the reduced cobalt remains in the metallic state during the Fischer-Tropsch reactions for both cases. 22 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

Wensheng Linghu; Xiaohong Li; Kenji Asami; Kaoru Fujimoto [University of Kitakyushu, Fukuoka (Japan). Department of Chemical Processes and Environments, Faculty of Environmental Engineering

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Scaling considerations for a multi-megawatt class supercritical CO2 brayton cycle and commercialization.  

SciTech Connect

Small-scale supercritical CO2 demonstration loops are successful at identifying the important technical issues that one must face in order to scale up to larger power levels. The Sandia National Laboratories supercritical CO2 Brayton cycle test loops are identifying technical needs to scale the technology to commercial power levels such as 10 MWe. The small size of the Sandia 1 MWth loop has demonstration of the split flow loop efficiency and effectiveness of the Printed Circuit Heat Exchangers (PCHXs) leading to the design of a fully recuperated, split flow, supercritical CO2 Brayton cycle demonstration system. However, there were many problems that were encountered, such as high rotational speeds in the units. Additionally, the turbomachinery in the test loops need to identify issues concerning the bearings, seals, thermal boundaries, and motor controller problems in order to be proved a reliable power source in the 300 kWe range. Although these issues were anticipated in smaller demonstration units, commercially scaled hardware would eliminate these problems caused by high rotational speeds at small scale. The economic viability and development of the future scalable 10 MWe solely depends on the interest of DOE and private industry. The Intellectual Property collected by Sandia proves that the ~10 MWe supercritical CO2 power conversion loop to be very beneficial when coupled to a 20 MWth heat source (either solar, geothermal, fossil, or nuclear). This paper will identify a commercialization plan, as well as, a roadmap from the simple 1 MWth supercritical CO2 development loop to a power producing 10 MWe supercritical CO2 Brayton loop.

Fleming, Darryn D.; Holschuh, Thomas Vernon,; Conboy, Thomas M.; Pasch, James Jay; Wright, Steven Alan; Rochau, Gary Eugene; Fuller, Robert Lynn [Barber-Nichols, Inc., Arvada, CO] [Barber-Nichols, Inc., Arvada, CO

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Hot Dry Rock; Geothermal Energy  

SciTech Connect

The commercial utilization of geothermal energy forms the basis of the largest renewable energy industry in the world. More than 5000 Mw of electrical power are currently in production from approximately 210 plants and 10 000 Mw thermal are used in direct use processes. The majority of these systems are located in the well defined geothermal generally associated with crustal plate boundaries or hot spots. The essential requirements of high subsurface temperature with huge volumes of exploitable fluids, coupled to environmental and market factors, limit the choice of suitable sites significantly. The Hot Dry Rock (HDR) concept at any depth originally offered a dream of unlimited expansion for the geothermal industry by relaxing the location constraints by drilling deep enough to reach adequate temperatures. Now, after 20 years intensive work by international teams and expenditures of more than $250 million, it is vital to review the position of HDR in relation to the established geothermal industry. The HDR resource is merely a body of rock at elevated temperatures with insufficient fluids in place to enable the heat to be extracted without the need for injection wells. All of the major field experiments in HDR have shown that the natural fracture systems form the heat transfer surfaces and that it is these fractures that must be for geothermal systems producing from naturally fractured formations provide a basis for directing the forthcoming but, equally, they require accepting significant location constraints on HDR for the time being. This paper presents a model HDR system designed for commercial operations in the UK and uses production data from hydrothermal systems in Japan and the USA to demonstrate the reservoir performance requirements for viable operations. It is shown that these characteristics are not likely to be achieved in host rocks without stimulation processes. However, the long term goal of artificial geothermal systems developed by systematic engineering procedures at depth may still be attained if high temperature sites with extensive fracturing are developed or exploited. [DJE -2005

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Investigations of supercritical CO2 Rankine cycles for geothermal power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Supercritical CO2 Rankine cycles are investigated for geothermal power plants. The system of equations that describe the thermodynamic cycle is solved using a Newton-Rhapson method. This approach allows a high computational efficiency of the model when thermophysical properties of the working fluid depend strongly on the temperature and pressure. Numerical simulation results are presented for different cycle configurations in order to assess the influences of heat source temperature, waste heat rejection temperatures and internal heat exchanger design on cycle efficiency. The results show that thermodynamic cycle efficiencies above 10% can be attained with the supercritical brayton cycle while lower efficiencies can be attained with the transcritical CO2 Rankine cycle.

Sabau, Adrian S [ORNL; Yin, Hebi [ORNL; Qualls, A L [ORNL; McFarlane, Joanna [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Ligands for Extracting Actinide Metal Ions from Porous Solids  

SciTech Connect

Numerous types of actinide-bearing waste materials are found throughout the DOE complex. Most of these wastes consist of large volumes of non-hazardous materials contaminated with relatively small quantities of actinide elements. Separation of these wastes into their inert and radioactive components would dramatically reduce the costs of stabilization and disposal. For example, the DOE is responsible for decontaminating concrete within 7000 surplus contaminated buildings. The best technology now available for removing surface contamination from concrete involves removing the surface layer by grit blasting, which produces a large volume of blasting residue containing a small amount of radioactive material. Disposal of this residue is expensive because of its large volume and fine particulate nature. Considerable cost savings would result from separation of the radioactive constituents and stabilization of the concrete dust. Similarly, gas diffusion plants for uranium enrichment contain valuable high-purity nickel in the form of diffusion barriers. Decontamination is complicated by the extremely fine pores in these barriers, which are not readily accessible by most cleaning techniques. A cost-effective method for the removal of radioactive contaminants would release this valuable material for salvage.

Albert W. Herlinger; Dr. Mark L. Dietz

2003-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

311

Supercritical Carbon Dioxide-Soluble Ligands for Extracting Actinide Metal Ions from Porous Solids  

SciTech Connect

Numerous types of actinide-bearing waste materials are found throughout the DOE complex. Most of these wastes consist of large volumes of non-hazardous materials contaminated with relatively small quantities of actinide elements. Separation of these wastes into their inert and radioactive components would dramatically reduce the costs of stabilization and disposal. For example, the DOE is responsible for decontaminating concrete within 7000 surplus contaminated buildings. The best technology now available for removing surface contamination from concrete involves removing the surface layer by grit blasting, which produces a large volume of blasting residue containing a small amount of radioactive material. Disposal of this residue is expensive because of its large volume and fine particulate nature. Considerable cost savings would result from separation of the radioactive constituents and stabilization of the concrete dust. Similarly, gas diffusion plants for uranium enrichment contain valuable high-purity nickel in the form of diffusion barriers. Decontamination is complicated by the extremely fine pores in these barriers, which are not readily accessible by most cleaning techniques. A cost-effect method for the removal of radioactive contaminants would release this valuable material for salvage.

Joan Brennecke; Mark Dietz; Richard Barrans; Alabert Herlinger

2003-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

312

Pressure buildup during supercritical carbon dioxide injection from a partially penetrating borehole into gas reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the vicinity of the injection well. While a large injectionby pumping it down into an injection well. While the actuala small part of the injection well (typically, a few meters

Mukhopadhyay, S.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Advanced Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Power Cycle Configurations for Use in Concentrating Solar Power Systems: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The research will characterize and evaluate advanced S-CO2 Brayton cycle power generation with a modular power tower CSP system.

Ma, Z.; Turchi, C. S.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Optimized core design of a supercritical carbon dioxide-cooled fast reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Spurred by the renewed interest in nuclear power, Gas-cooled Fast Reactors (GFRs) have received increasing attention in the past decade. Motivated by the goals of the Generation-IV International Forum (GIF), a GFR cooled ...

Handwerk, Christopher S. (Christopher Stanley), 1974-

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Turbo-Expander and Heat Exchangers (Fact Sheet)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Southwest Research Institute is one of the 2012 SunShot CSP R&D awardees for their advanced power cycles. This fact sheet explains the motivation, description, and impact of the project.

Not Available

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

High-Efficiency Receivers for Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Cycles, Concentrating Solar Power (Fact Sheet)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Brayton Energy is one of the 2012 SunShot CSP R&D awardees for their advanced receivers. This fact sheet explains the motivation, description, and impact of the project.

Not Available

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

An experimental investigation of convection heat transfer to supercritical carbon dioxide in miniature tubes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-year research program in heat transfer and viscoelastic fluid flows, after working for some time in industry of All Sciences), Fluid Mechanics, Heat Transfer and related fluid-thermal-energy sciences; with emphases Press series Advances in Heat Transfer, Volume 19, and "Viscosity" in CRC Press' Measurement

Zhao, Tianshou

318

A high-pressure atomic force microscope for imaging in supercritical carbon dioxide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

National Laboratory (PNNL). The research was performed usingResearch and located at PNNL. 1 R. S. Arvidson, M. Collier,

Lea, A.S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Extraction of hydrogenous material from cemented wasteforms by supercritical fluid carbonation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We are conducting experiments on an innovative transformation concept, using a traditional immobilization technique, that may significantly reduce the volume of hazardous and/or radioactive waste requiring transport and long-term storage. The standard practice at LANL for the stabilization of radioactive salts and residues is to mix them with portland cement, which may include additives to enhance immobilization. Many of these wasteforms do not qualify for transportation or underground disposition, however, because they do not meet Department of Energy regulations for free liquids, decay heat, and/or head-space gases. The present treatment method alters the bulk properties of a cemented wasteform by greatly accelerating the natural cement-aging reactions, producing a chemically stable form having reduced levels of free liquids and organic compounds, as well as reduced porosity, permeability and pH. These structural and chemical changes should allow for greater actinide loading, as well as reduced mobility of the anions, cations, and radionuclides in aboveground and underground repositories.

Rubin, J.B.; Carey, J.W.; Taylor, C.M.V.

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

A MEMS Thin Film AlN Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Valve  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

When a piezoelectric material converts mechanical energy tothis, for piezoelectric actuators, an electrical energy willthe piezoelectric material to generate a mechanical energy

Chen, Ya-Mei

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rocks supercritical carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Shale caprock integrity under carbon sequestration conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carbon sequestration technology requires injection and storage of large volumes of carbon dioxide ( CO 2 ) in subsurface geological formations. Shale caprock which constitutes more than 60% of effective seals for geologic hydrocarbon bearing formations are therefore of considerable interest in underground CO 2 storage into depleted oil and gas formations. This study investigated experimentally shale caprock’s geophysical and geochemical behavior when in contact with aqueous CO 2 over a long period of time. The primary concern is a potential increase in hydraulic conductivity of clay-rich rocks as a result of acidic brine-rock minerals geochemical interactions. Both

Abiola Olabode; Lauren Bentley; Mileva Radonjic

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

NETL: Carbon Storage - Geologic Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geologic Storage Geologic Storage Carbon Storage Geologic Storage Focus Area Geologiccarbon dioxide (CO2) storage involves the injection of supercritical CO2 into deep geologic formations (injection zones) overlain by competent sealing formations and geologic traps that will prevent the CO2 from escaping. Current research and field studies are focused on developing better understanding 11 major types of geologic storage reservoir classes, each having their own unique opportunities and challenges. Understanding these different storage classes provides insight into how the systems influence fluids flow within these systems today, and how CO2 in geologic storage would be anticipated to flow in the future. The different storage formation classes include: deltaic, coal/shale, fluvial, alluvial, strandplain, turbidite, eolian, lacustrine, clastic shelf, carbonate shallow shelf, and reef. Basaltic interflow zones are also being considered as potential reservoirs. These storage reservoirs contain fluids that may include natural gas, oil, or saline water; any of which may impact CO2 storage differently. The following summarizes the potential for storage and the challenges related to CO2 storage capability for fluids that may be present in more conventional clastic and carbonate reservoirs (saline water, and oil and gas), as well as unconventional reservoirs (unmineable coal seams, organic-rich shales, and basalts):

323

DOE hot dry rock program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydraulic fracturing has been used to create and subsequently to enlarge the first hot dry rock heat-extraction loop at Fenton Hill, New Mexico. Encouraging results prompted the DOE to expand this project into a program of national scope. The elements of that Program and their present status are discussed. Emphasis is given the ongoing Fenton Hill Project where techniques and information developed in the existing research system will soon be used to produce a multiply-fractured engineering system in hotter rock at the same site. Recent results from research loop operation and progress in constructing the engineering system are reported. Although acoustic mapping and system geometry indicate that the primary hydraulic fractures are essentially vertical, relatively low fracturing pressure and absence of a sharp breakdown suggest that at Fenton Hill fracture initiation occurs by reopening of old natural fractures rather than by initiation of new ones. Flow patterns and temperature behavior suggest opening of additional old fractures as the loop is operated. Except where the hot fluid leaves the crack system to enter the production well, flow impedances are very low without either artificial propping or inflation by pressurization.

Nunz, G.J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Superalloys for ultra supercritical steam turbines--oxidation behavior  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Goals of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Power Systems Initiatives include power generation from coal at 60% efficiency, which requires steam conditions of up to 760 °C and 340 atm, so called ultra-supercritical (USC) steam conditions. One of the important materials performance considerations is steam-side oxidation resistance. Evaporation of protective chromia scales is expected to be a primary corrosion mechanism under USC conditions. A methodology to calculate Cr evaporation rates from chromia scales with cylindrical geometries was developed that allows for the effects of CrO2(OH)2 saturation within the gas phase. This approach was combined with Cr diffusion calculations within the alloy (with a constant flux of Cr leaving the alloy from evaporation) to predict Cr concentration profiles as a function of exposure time and to predict the time until the alloy surface concentration of Cr reaches zero. This time is a rough prediction of the time until breakaway oxidation. A hypothetical superheater tube, steam pipe, and high pressure turbine steam path was examined. At the highest temperatures and pressures, the time until breakaway oxidation was predicted to be quite short for the turbine blade, and of concern within the steam pipe and the higher temperature portions of the superheater tube. The predicted time until breakaway oxidation increases dramatically with decreases in temperature and total pressure. Possible mitigation techniques were discussed, including those used in solid oxide fuel cell metallic interconnects (lowering the activity of Cr in the oxide scale by adding Mn to the alloy), and thermal barrier coating use on high pressure turbine blades for both erosion and chromia evaporation protection.

Holcomb, G.R.

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Geothermal heat cycle research: Supercritical cycle with horizontal counterflow condenser  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Heat Cycle Research Program, which is being conducted for the Department of Energy, has as its objective the development of the technology for effecting the improved utilization of moderate temperature geothermal resources. To meet this objective, the program has as one of its goals to improve the performance of geothermal binary cycles to levels approaching the practicable thermodynamic maximum. In pursuit of this goal, tests are being conducted at the Heat Cycle Research Facility located at the DOE Geothermal Test Facility, East Mesa, California. The current testing involves the investigation of binary power cycle performance utilizing mixtures of non-adjacent hydrocarbons as the working fluids, with supercritical vaporization and in-tube condensation of the working fluid. In addition to the present test program, preparations are being made to investigate the binary cycle performance improvements which can be achieved by allowing supersaturated vapor expansions in the turbine. These efforts are anticipated to verify that through the utilization of these advanced power cycle concepts and allowing the supersaturated turbine expansions, improvements of up to 28% in the net geofluid effectiveness (net watt hours plant output per pound of geofluid) over conventional binary power plants can be achieved. Results are presented for the recent testing including those tests examining the performance of the countercurrent condenser at different tube inclinations. Performance of the heaters and the condenser in a vertical orientation can be predicted well with existing methods and data. The condenser in its near horizontal orientation performs slightly worse than in its vertical orientation. Some problems have been encountered in predicting the performance in the horizontal orientation. There is no evidence of departure from integral condensation in either orientation.

Mines, G.L.; Swank, W.D.; Bliem, C.J.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Design requirements for the supercritical water oxidation test bed  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the design requirements for the supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) test bed that will be located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The test bed will process a maximum of 50 gph of waste plus the required volume of cooling water. The test bed will evaluate the performance of a number of SCWO reactor designs. The goal of the project is to select a reactor that can be scaled up for use in a full-size waste treatment facility to process US Department of Energy mixed wastes. EG&G Idaho, Inc. will design and construct the SCWO test bed at the Water Reactor Research Test Facility (WRRTF), located in the northern region of the INEL. Private industry partners will develop and provide SCWO reactors to interface with the test bed. A number of reactor designs will be tested, including a transpiring wall, tube, and vessel-type reactor. The initial SCWO reactor evaluated will be a transpiring wall design. This design requirements report identifies parameters needed to proceed with preliminary and final design work for the SCWO test bed. A flow sheet and Process and Instrumentation Diagrams define the overall process and conditions of service and delineate equipment, piping, and instrumentation sizes and configuration Codes and standards that govern the safe engineering and design of systems and guidance that locates and interfaces test bed hardware are provided. Detailed technical requirements are addressed for design of piping, valves, instrumentation and control, vessels, tanks, pumps, electrical systems, and structural steel. The approach for conducting the preliminary and final designs and environmental and quality issues influencing the design are provided.

Svoboda, J.M.; Valentich, D.J.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Definition: Rock Lab Analysis | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

to core recovered from boreholes. They typically involve measuring the physical and chemical properties of the rock. Physical properties include density, elastic modulus, seismic...

328

Rock Energy Cooperative (Illinois) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cooperative (Illinois) Jump to: navigation, search Name Rock Energy Cooperative Place Illinois Utility Id 16196 References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File220101...

329

Ionic Liquid and Supercritical Fluid Hyphenated Techniques for Dissolution and Separation of Lanthanides, Actinides, and Fission Products  

SciTech Connect

This project is investigating techniques involving ionic liquids (IL) and supercritical (SC) fluids for dissolution and separation of lanthanides, actinides, and fission products. The research project consists of the following tasks: Study direct dissolution of lanthanide oxides, uranium dioxide and other actinide oxides in [bmin][Tf{sub 2}N] with TBP(HNO{sub 3}){sub 1.8}(H{sub 2}O){sub 0.6} and similar types of Lewis acid-Lewis base complexing agents; Measure distributions of dissolved metal species between the IL and the sc-CO{sub 2} phases under various temperature and pressure conditions; Investigate the chemistry of the dissolved metal species in both IL and sc-CO{sub 2} phases using spectroscopic and chemical methods; Evaluate potential applications of the new extraction techniques for nuclear waste management and for other projects. Supercritical carbon dioxide (sc-CO{sub 2}) and ionic liquids are considered green solvents for chemical reactions and separations. Above the critical point, CO{sub 2} has both gas- and liquid-like properties, making it capable of penetrating small pores of solids and dissolving organic compounds in the solid matrix. One application of sc-CO{sub 2} extraction technology is nuclear waste management. Ionic liquids are low-melting salts composed of an organic cation and an anion of various forms, with unique properties making them attractive replacements for the volatile organic solvents traditionally used in liquid-liquid extraction processes. One type of room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) based on the 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium cation [bmin] with bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide anion [Tf{sub 2}N] is of particular interest for extraction of metal ions due to its water stability, relative low viscosity, high conductivity, and good electrochemical and thermal stability. Recent studies indicate that a coupled IL sc-CO{sub 2} extraction system can effectively transfer trivalent lanthanide and uranyl ions from nitric acid solutions. Advantages of this technique include operation at ambient temperature and pressure, selective extraction due to tunable sc-CO{sub 2} solvation strength, no IL loss during back-extraction, and no organic solvent introduced into the IL phase.

Wai, Chien M. [Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID (United States); Bruce Mincher

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Investigation of Mineral Transformations in Wet Supercritical CO2 by Electron Microscopy  

SciTech Connect

The capture and storage of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases in deep geologic formations represents one of the most promising options for mitigating the impacts of greenhouse gases on global warming. In this regard, mineral-fluid interactions are of prime importance since such reactions can result in the long term sequestration of CO2 by trapping in mineral phases. Recently it has been recognized that interactions with neat to water-saturated non-aqueous fluids are of prime importance in understanding mineralization reactions since the introduced CO2 is likely to contain water initially or soon after injection and the supercritical CO2 (scCO2) is less dense than the aqueous phase which can result in a buoyant scCO2 plume contacting the isolating caprock. As a result, unraveling the molecular/microscopic mechanisms of mineral transformation in neat to water saturated scCO2 has taken on an added important. In this study, we are examining the interfacial reactions of the olivine mineral forsterite (Mg2SiO4) over a range of water contents up to and including complete water saturation in scCO2. The surface precipitates that form on the reacted forsterite grains are extremely fragile and difficult to experimentally characterize. In order to address this issue we have developed experimental protocols for preparing and imaging electron-transparent samples from fragile structures. These electron-transparent samples are then examined using a combination of STEM/EDX, FIB-TEM, and helium ion microscope (HIM) imaging (Figures 1-3). This combination of capabilities has provided unique insight into the geochemical processes that occur on scCO2 reacted mineral surfaces. The experimental procedures and protocols that have been developed also have useful applications for examining fragile structures on a wide variety of materials. This research was performed using EMSL, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

Arey, Bruce W.; Kovarik, Libor; Wang, Zheming; Felmy, Andrew R.

2011-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

331

SUPERCRITICAL WATER PARTIAL OXIDATION PHASE I - PILOT-SCALE TESTING / FEASIBILITY STUDIES FINAL REPORT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Key potential advantages of the SWPO process is the use of partial oxidation in-situ to rapidly heat the gasification medium, resulting in less char formation and improved hydrogen yield. Another major advantage is that the high-pressure, high-density aqueous environment is ideal for reaching and gasifying organics of all types. The high water content of the medium encourages formation of hydrogen and hydrogen-rich products and is especially compatible with high water content feeds such as biomass materials. The high water content of the medium is also effective for gasification of hydrogen-poor materials such as coal. A versatile pilot plant for exploring gasification in supercritical water has been established at GA's facilities in San Diego. The Phase I testing of the SWPO process with wood and ethanol mixtures demonstrated gasification efficiencies of about 90%, comparable to those found in prior laboratory-scale SCW gasification work carreid out at the University of Hawaii at Manoa (UHM) as well as other biomass gasification experience with conventional gasifiers. As in the prior work at UHM, a significant amount of the hydrogen found in the gas phase products is derived from the water/steam matrix. The studies at UHM utilized an indirectly heated gasifier with an acitvated carbon catalyst. In contrast, the GA studies utilized a directly heated gasifier without catalyst, plus a surrogate waste fuel. Attainment of comparable gasification efficiencies without catalysis is an important advancement for the GA process, and opens the way for efficient hydrogen production from low-value, dirty feed materials. The Phase I results indicate that a practical means to overcome limitations on biomass slurry feed concentration and preheat temperatuare is to coprocess an auxiliary high heating value material. SWPO coprocessing of tow hgih-water content wastes, partially dewatered sewage sludge and trap grease, yields a scenario for the production of hydrogen at highly competitive prices. It is estimated that there are hundreds if not thousands of potential sites for this technology across the US and worldwide.

SPRITZER,M; HONG,G

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Reaction of Water-Saturated Supercritical CO2 with Forsterite: Evidence for Magnesite Formation at Low Temperatures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The nature of the reaction products that form on the surfaces of nanometer-sized forsterite particles during reaction with H2O saturated supercritical CO2 (scCO2) at 35 C and 50 C were examined under in situ conditions and ex situ following reaction. The in situ analysis was conducted by X-ray diffraction (XRD). Ex situ analysis consisted of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) examination of the surface phases and chemical characterization of precipitates using a combination of confocal Raman spectroscopy, 13C and 29Si NMR spectroscopy, and energy-dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS). The results show that the forsterite surface is highly reactive with the primary reaction products being a mixture of nesquehonite (MgCO3.3H2O) and magnesite (MgCO3) at short reaction times ({approx}3-4 days) and then magnesite (MgCO3) and a highly porous amorphous silica phase at longer reaction times (14 days). After 14 days of reaction most of the original forsterite transformed to reaction products. Importantly, the formation of magnesite was observed at temperatures much lower (35 C) than previously thought needed to overcome its well known sluggish precipitation kinetics. The conversion of nesquehonite to magnesite liberates H2O which can potentially facilitate further metal carbonation, as postulated by previous investigators, based upon studies at higher temperature (80 C). The observation that magnesite can form at lower temperatures implies that water recycling may also be important in determining the rate and extent of mineral carbonation in a wide range of potential CO2 storage reservoirs.

Felmy, Andrew R.; Qafoku, Odeta; Arey, Bruce W.; Hu, Jian Z.; Hu, Mary Y.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Ilton, Eugene S.; Hess, Nancy J.; Pearce, Carolyn I.; Feng, Ju; Rosso, Kevin M.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Schmid et al. Inclusion Behavior in Deforming Rocks Inclusion Behavior in Deforming Rocks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Schmid et al. Inclusion Behavior in Deforming Rocks Inclusion Behavior in Deforming Rocks Dani Podladchikov, PGP, University of Oslo, Norway Intro 1 #12;Schmid et al. Inclusion Behavior in Deforming Rocks Motivation 2 The single most useful thing to understand! #12;Schmid et al. Inclusion Behavior in Deforming

Cesare, Bernardo

334

Spectroscopy, modeling and computation of metal chelate solubility in supercritical CO{sub 2}  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall objectives of this project were to gain a fundamental understanding of the solubility and phase behavior of metal chelates in supercritical CO{sub 2}. Extraction with CO{sub 2} is an excellent way to remove organic compounds from soils, sludges and aqueous solutions, and recent research has demonstrated that, together with chelating agents, it is a viable way to remove metals, as well. In this project the authors sought to gain fundamental knowledge that is vital to computing phase behavior, and modeling and designing processes using CO{sub 2} to separate organics and metal compounds from DOE mixed wastes. The overall program was a comprehensive one to measure, model and compute the solubility of metal chelate complexes in supercritical CO{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}/cosolvent mixtures. Through a combination of phase behavior measurements, spectroscopy and the development of a new computational technique, the authors have achieved a completely reliable way to model metal chelate solubility in supercritical CO{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}/co-contaminant mixtures. Thus, they can now design and optimize processes to extract metals from solid matrices using supercritical CO{sub 2}, as an alternative to hazardous organic solvents that create their own environmental problems, even while helping in metals decontamination.

J. F. Brennecke; M. A. Stadtherr

1999-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

335

Separation of saturated hydrocarbons from coal by treatment with water at supercritical parameters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The treatment of coals of various degrees of metamorphism in supercritical water (SCW) over the temperature region 380-800{sup o}C was studied. The yields and compositions of liquid products obtained by treatment in SCW were determined. These data were compared with the results of the semicoking of the above coals.

M.R. Predtechenskiy; M.V. Pukhovoy [Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk (Russia). Kutateladze Institute of Thermophysics

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

336

Advanced Computational Thermal Studies and their Assessment for Supercritical-Pressure Reactors (SCRs)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of this laboratory / university collaboration of coupled computational and experimental studies is the improvement of predictive methods for supercritical-pressure reactors. The general objective is to develop supporting knowledge needed of advanced computational techniques for the technology development of the concepts and their safety systems.

D. M. McEligot; J. Y. Yoo; J. S. Lee; S. T. Ro; E. Lurien; S. O. Park; R. H. Pletcher; B. L. Smith; P. Vukoslavcevic; J. M. Wallace

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Pressure Sensitive Paint Evaluation on a Supercritical Wing at Cruise Speed  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A comparative wind tunnel test of various Pressure Sensitive Paint (PSP) formulations has been performed at the Institute for Aerospace Research (IAR) 1.5 m × 1.5 m Trisonic Blowdown Wind Tunnel. The model under study is a prototype supercritical ... Keywords: pressure sensitive paint, wind tunnel testing

Y. Mébarki; Y. Le Sant

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

The destruction of hazardous chemical waste by oxidation in supercritical water  

SciTech Connect

The chemistry of oxidation in supercritical water is being investigated for development into a practical destruction process for hazardous chemical waste. In principle, a wide variety of waste streams might be treated by this technology, including those that are unsuitable for incineration because of high water content. To establish a basis for extrapolation of kinetic measurements to a variety of compounds, a mechanism is being developed for oxidation in supercritical water on the basis of conventional free-radical reactions, with modifications for high pressures and high concentrations of water. Global rate expressions for oxidation of methane and methanol in supercritical water have been determined. A base mechanism and modifications to the mechanism to account for the roles of hydrogen bonding and water dimer formation have been investigated for CO. On this limited basis, reasonable agreement between model and experimental results has been obtained. Further verification of the model with experimental results will provide insight into the roles of hydrogen bonding and water dimer formation in oxidation in supercritical water. 30 refs., 3 tabs.

Rofer, C.K.; Streit, G.E.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

CARBON-CARBON COMPOSITE ALLCOMP Carbon-Carbon Composite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

strength 4340 steel, carbon-carbon composite, and Carbon-Silicon Carbide composite were tested to examine-C composite containing continuous PAN T300 fibers · SWB: Chopped Fiber Composite containing SWB fibers Crush

Rollins, Andrew M.

340

Tertiary carbonate reservoirs in Indonesia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydrocarbon production from Tertiary carbonate reservoirs accounted for ca. 10% of daily Indonesian production at the beginning of 1978. Environmentally, the reservoirs appear as parts of reef complexes and high-energy carbonate deposits within basinal areas situated mainly in the back arc of the archipelago. Good porosities of the reservoirs are represented by vugular/moldic and intergranular porosity types. The reservoirs are capable of producing prolific amounts of hydrocarbons: production tests in Salawati-Irian Jaya reaches maximum values of 32,000 bpd, and in Arun-North Sumatra tests recorded 200 MMCF gas/day. Significant hydrocarbon accumulations are related to good reservoir rocks in carbonates deposited as patch reefs, pinnacle reefs, and platform complexes. Exploration efforts expand continuously within carbonate formations which are extensive horizontally as well as vertically in the Tertiary stratigraphic column.

Nayoan, G.A.S.; Arpandi; Siregar, M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rocks supercritical carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

The hot dry rock geothermal energy program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The paper presents a simplified description of the Department of Energy's Hot-Dry-Rock program conducted at Fenton Hill, New Mexico. What a hot-dry-rock resource is and what the magnitude of the resource is are also described.

Smith, M.C.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Proceedings of hot dry rock geothermal workshop  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Abstracts of 38 papers are included on the following subjects: rock mechanics, part 1: hydraulic fracturing; fracture imaging and borehole surveying; fluid flow-pressure analyses; rock mechanics, part 2: hydraulic fracturing and thermal cracking; geochemistry; heat extraction modeling; and economics and energy conversion. (MHR)

Elsner, D.B. (comp.)

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Eagle Rock Geothermal Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Eagle Rock Geothermal Facility Eagle Rock Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Eagle Rock Geothermal Facility General Information Name Eagle Rock Geothermal Facility Facility Eagle Rock Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Location The Geysers, California Coordinates 38.826770222484°, -122.80002593994° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.826770222484,"lon":-122.80002593994,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

344

Definition: Rock Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sampling Sampling Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Rock Sampling Systematic rock sampling can be used to characterize a geothermal reservoir. The physical and chemical properties of rock samples provide important information for determining whether a power generation or heat utilization facility can be developed. Some general rock properties can be measured by visual inspection, but detailed properties require laboratory techniques. View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition A core sample is a cylindrical section of (usually) a naturally occurring substance. Most core samples are obtained by drilling with special drills into the substance, for example sediment or rock, with a hollow steel tube called a core drill. The hole made for the core sample is called the "core hole". A variety of core samplers exist to sample

345

Parameterizing Surface and Internal Tide Scattering and Breaking on Supercritical Topography: The One- and Two-Ridge Cases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A parameterization is presented for turbulence dissipation due to internal tides generated at and impinging upon topography steep enough to be “supercritical” with respect to the tide. The parameterization requires knowledge of the topography, ...

Jody M. Klymak; Maarten Buijsman; Sonya Legg; Robert Pinkel

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Nutritionally Enhanced Edible Oil and Oilseed ProcessingChapter 6 Utilization of Supercritical Fluid Technology for Oil And Oilseed Processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nutritionally Enhanced Edible Oil and Oilseed Processing Chapter 6 Utilization of Supercritical Fluid Technology for Oil And Oilseed Processing Processing eChapters Processing Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 6 U

347

Lipid Analysis and Lipidomics: New Techniques & ApplicationChapter 10 Lipid Separations Using Packed-Column Supercritical Fluid Chromatography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lipid Analysis and Lipidomics: New Techniques & Application Chapter 10 Lipid Separations Using Packed-Column Supercritical Fluid Chromatography Methods and Analyses eChapters Methods - Analyses Books AOCS Press Downloadabl

348

The Numerical Simulation of Drainage Winds in a Small Urban Valley under Conditions with Supercritical Richardson Numbers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A two-dimensional numerical model is used to simulate nocturnal drainage flow in a small urban valley with light prevailing winds and conditions of supercritical Richardson numbers (Ri). The model uses a hydrostatic and Boussinesq system of ...

Raymond K. W. Wong; Keith D. Hage; Leslie D. Phillips

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Conceptual design for a re-entrant type fuel channel for supercritical water-cooled nuclear reactors.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Current CANDU-type nuclear reactors use a once-through fuel-channel with an annulus gas insulating it from the moderator. The current reference design for a CANDU-type SuperCritical… (more)

Samuel, Jeffrey

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

FRACTURE DETECTION IN CRYSTALLINE ROCK USING ULTRASONIC SHEAR WAVES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the piezoelectric source plate and the rock surface. With aThe S^j sources were bonded to the rock surface with a fast-^ source plate was epoxied in position on the rock specimen.

Waters, K.H.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Solvent Effects on Metal Complexation with Crown Ethers from Liquid to Supercritical Fluids (DE-FG07-98ER 149 13)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this project is to study the salvation effects of metal-crown ether complexation in different solvents. It has been suggested in the literature that supercritical fluid carbon dioxide (SF-CO2) is a tunable solvent because its salvation environment can be varied with the fluid density. In this project, spectroscopic techniques including nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) were used to evaluate salvation effects of metal crown complexation in organic solvents and in SF-CO2. In most solvent extraction systems, water is often involved in the extraction processes. We have carried out extensive studies of water-crown ether interactions in different solvents and in SF-CO2 using NMR and FTIR techniques. Water molecules can be attached to crown ethers through hydrogen bonding of H-0-H to the oxygen atoms of crown ether cavities. This type of interaction is like a Lewis acid-Lewis base complexation. During the course of this project, we noticed that some CO2 soluble Lewis base such as tri-n-butyl-phosphate (TBP) can also form such Lewis acid-Lewis base complexes with water and other inorganic acids including nitric acid and hydrochloric acid. Inorganic acids (e.g. nitric acid) are normally not soluble in SF-CO2. However, because TBP is highly soluble in SF-CO2, an inorganic acid bound to TBP via hydrogen bonding becomes CO2 soluble. This Lewis acid-Lewis base complex approach provides a method of introducing inorganic acids into supercritical fluid CO2 for chemical reactions.

Wai, C.M.

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

CARBON TETRACHLORIDE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This fact sheet answers the most frequently asked health questions (FAQs) about carbon tetrachloride.

unknown authors

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

FY12 ARRA-NRAP Report – Studies to Support Risk Assessment of Geologic Carbon Sequestration  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes results of research conducted during FY2012 to support the assessment of environmental risks associated with geologic carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration and storage. Several research focus areas are ongoing as part of this project. This includes the quantification of the leachability of metals and organic compounds from representative CO2 storage reservoir and caprock materials, the fate of metals and organic compounds after release, and the development of a method to measure pH in situ under supercritical CO2 (scCO2) conditions. Metal leachability experiments were completed on 6 different rock samples in brine in equilibrium with scCO2 at representative geologic reservoir conditions. In general, the leaching of RCRA metals and other metals of concern was found to be limited and not likely to be a significant issue (at least, for the rocks tested). Metals leaching experiments were also completed on 1 rock sample with scCO2 containing oxygen at concentrations of 0, 1, 5, and 10% to simulate injection of CO2 originating from the oxy-fuel combustion process. Significant differences in the leaching behavior of certain metals were observed when oxygen is present in the CO2. These differences resulted from oxidation of sulfides, release of sulfate, ferric iron and other metals, and subsequent precipitation of iron oxides and some sulfates such as barite. Experiments to evaluate the potential for mobilization of organic compounds from representative reservoir materials and cap rock and their fate in porous media (quartz sand) have been conducted. Results with Fruitland coal and Gothic shale indicate that lighter organic compounds were more susceptible to mobilization by scCO2 compared to heavier compounds. Alkanes demonstrated very low extractability by scCO2. No significant differences were observed between the extractability of organic compounds by dry or water saturated scCO2. Reaction equilibrium appears to have been reached by 96 hours. When the scCO2 was released from the reactor, less than 60% of the injected lighter compounds (benzene, toluene) were transported through dry sand column by the CO2, while more than 90% of the heavier organics were trapped in the sand column. For wet sand columns, most (80% to 100%) of the organic compounds injected into the sand column passed through, except for naphthalene which was substantial removed from the CO2 within the column. A spectrophotometric method was developed to measure pH in brines in contact with scCO2. This method provides an alternative to fragile glass pH electrodes and thermodynamic modeling approaches for estimating pH. The method was tested in simulated reservoir fluids (CO2–NaCl–H2O) at different temperatures, pressures, and ionic strength, and the results were compared with other experimental studies and geochemical models. Measured pH values were generally in agreement with the models, but inconsistencies were present between some of the models.

Cantrell, Kirk J.; Shao, Hongbo; Thompson, C. J.; Zhong, Lirong; Jung, Hun Bok; Um, Wooyong

2011-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

354

NETL: Carbon Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Sequestration Partnerships Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (RCSP) Programmatic Points of Contact Carbon Storage Program Infrastructure Coordinator Carbon Storage...

355

Rapid Field Measurement of Dissolved Inorganic Carbon Based on CO{sub 2} Analysis  

SciTech Connect

Dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) is commonly measured in water and is an important parameter for understanding carbonate equilibrium, carbon cycling, and water-rock interaction. While accurate measurements can be made in the analytical laboratory, we have developed a rapid, portable technique that can be used to obtain accurate and precise data in the field as well.

VESPER, DJ, Edenborn, Harry

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Parallel, high-resolution carbon and sulfur isotope records of the evolving Paleozoic marine sulfur reservoir  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Carbonate rocks record the inorganic carbon isotope composition of the oceanic reservoir through geologicalParallel, high-resolution carbon and sulfur isotope records of the evolving Paleozoic marine sulfur, University of California-Riverside, Riverside California 92521-0423, USA b Department of Geological Sciences

Saltzman, Matthew R.

357

Some approaches to rock mass hydrofracture theory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new engineering method has been developed at the Leningrad Mining Institute for defining hot dry rock hydrofracturing parameters. It reflects the structural features of a real jointed rock mass, its gravity-tectonic components of the stress tensor and volume character of deformations, taking into account the inertial effects of hydrodynamics in the non-Darcy zone of radial fluid flow near the injection well, and conversion of the heat energy extracted from hot rock by circulating water partly into filtration-flow additional pressure. Results of calculations are compared to field experiments at Fenton Hill, NM, and are used for the first HDR circulation systems in the USSR.

Dyadkin, Yuri, D.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Computation Modeling and Assessment of Nanocoatings for Ultra Supercritical Boilers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Forced outages and boiler unavailability of coal-fired fossil plants is most often caused by fire-side corrosion of boiler waterwalls and tubing. Reliable coatings are required for Ultrasupercritical (USC) application to mitigate corrosion since these boilers will operate at a much higher temperatures and pressures than in supercritical (565 C {at} 24 MPa) boilers. Computational modeling efforts have been undertaken to design and assess potential Fe-Cr-Ni-Al systems to produce stable nanocrystalline coatings that form a protective, continuous scale of either Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} or Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The computational modeling results identified a new series of Fe-25Cr-40Ni with or without 10 wt.% Al nanocrystalline coatings that maintain long-term stability by forming a diffusion barrier layer at the coating/substrate interface. The computational modeling predictions of microstructure, formation of continuous Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} scale, inward Al diffusion, grain growth, and sintering behavior were validated with experimental results. Advanced coatings, such as MCrAl (where M is Fe, Ni, or Co) nanocrystalline coatings, have been processed using different magnetron sputtering deposition techniques. Several coating trials were performed and among the processing methods evaluated, the DC pulsed magnetron sputtering technique produced the best quality coating with a minimum number of shallow defects and the results of multiple deposition trials showed that the process is repeatable. scale, inward Al diffusion, grain growth, and sintering behavior were validated with experimental results. The cyclic oxidation test results revealed that the nanocrystalline coatings offer better oxidation resistance, in terms of weight loss, localized oxidation, and formation of mixed oxides in the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} scale, than widely used MCrAlY coatings. However, the ultra-fine grain structure in these coatings, consistent with the computational model predictions, resulted in accelerated Al diffusion from the coating into the substrate. An effective diffusion barrier interlayer coating was developed to prevent inward Al diffusion. The fire-side corrosion test results showed that the nanocrystalline coatings with a minimum number of defects have a great potential in providing corrosion protection. The coating tested in the most aggressive environment showed no evidence of coating spallation and/or corrosion attack after 1050 hours exposure. In contrast, evidence of coating spallation in isolated areas and corrosion attack of the base metal in the spalled areas were observed after 500 hours. These contrasting results after 500 and 1050 hours exposure suggest that the premature coating spallation in isolated areas may be related to the variation of defects in the coating between the samples. It is suspected that the cauliflower-type defects in the coating were presumably responsible for coating spallation in isolated areas. Thus, a defect free good quality coating is the key for the long-term durability of nanocrystalline coatings in corrosive environments. Thus, additional process optimization work is required to produce defect-free coatings prior to development of a coating application method for production parts.

J. Shingledecker; D. Gandy; N. Cheruvu; R. Wei; K. Chan

2011-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

359

A Methodology for Measuring the Rate of Reaction of CO2 with Brine-Rock Mixtures  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Methodology for Measuring the Rate of Reaction of CO Methodology for Measuring the Rate of Reaction of CO 2 with Brine-Rock Mixtures Nicholas B. Janda (nbj2@po.cwru.edu; 216-368-2648) Philip W. Morrison, Jr. (pwm5@po.cwru.edu; 216-368-4238) Department of Chemical Engineering Case Western Reserve University 10900 Euclid Avenue Cleveland, OH 44106-7217 Beverly Z. Saylor (bzs@po.cwru.edu; 216-368-3763) Gerald Matisoff (gxm4@po.cwru.edu; 216-368-3677) Department of Geological Sciences Case Western Reserve University 10900 Euclid Avenue Cleveland, OH 44106-7216 Introduction Storage of carbon dioxide in deep, porous, and permeable reservoir rocks is one of the most promising technologies for reducing emissions of greenhouse gases to the atmosphere. Although oil and gas reservoirs are a sensible first step for sequestration of carbon dioxide in geologic

360

Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field Investigations Of In Situ Geochemical Behavior Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field Investigations Of In Situ Geochemical Behavior Details Activities (5) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: Two hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal energy reservoirs have been created by hydraulic fracturing of Precambrian granitic rock between two wells on the west flank of the Valles Caldera in the Jemez Mountains of northern New Mexico. Heat is extracted by injecting water into one well,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rocks supercritical carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Rock of Ages | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of Ages of Ages Jump to: navigation, search Name Rock of Ages Facility Rock of Ages Sector Wind energy Facility Type Small Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Rock of Ages Energy Purchaser Rock of Ages Location Graniteville VT Coordinates 44.14668574°, -72.48180896° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.14668574,"lon":-72.48180896,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

362

Definition: Isotopic Analysis- Rock | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis- Rock Isotopic Analysis- Rock Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Isotopic Analysis- Rock Isotopes are atoms of the same element that have different numbers of neutrons. An isotopic analysis looks at a particular isotopic element(s) in a given system, while the conditions which increase/decrease the number of neutrons are well understood and measurable.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition References ↑ http://wwwrcamnl.wr.usgs.gov/isoig/isopubs/itchch2.html Ret LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. rieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Isotopic_Analysis-_Rock&oldid=687702" Category: Definitions What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties

363

Rock bed heat accumulators. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The principal objectives of the research program on rock bed heat accumulators (or RBHA) are: (1) to investigate the technical and economic feasibility of storing large amounts of thermal energy (in the tens of MWt range) at high temperature (up to 500/sup 0/C) over extended periods of time (up to 6 months) using native earth or rock materials; (2) to conduct studies to establish the performance characteristics of large rock bed heat accumulators at various power and temperature levels compatible with thermal conversion systems; and (3) to assess the materials and environmental problems associated with the operation of such large heat accumulators. Results of the study indicate that rock bed heat accumulators for seasonal storage are both technically and economically feasible, and hence could be exploited in various applications in which storage plays an essential role such as solar power and total energy systems, district and cogeneration heating systems.

Riaz, M.

1977-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Initial results for supercritical cycle experiments using pure and mixed-hydrocarbon working fluids  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Heat Cycle Research Program, which is being conducted for the Department of Energy, has as its objective the development of the technology for effecting improved utilization of moderate temperature geothermal resources. Testing at the Heat Cycle Research Facility (HCRF) located at the DOE Geothermal Test Facility (GTF), East Mesa, California, is presently being conducted to meet this objective. Current testing involves a supercritical vaporization and countercurrent in-tube condensing system. The paper presents a brief description of the test facility and a discussion of the test program. Preliminary results on the performance of the supercritical heaters, countercurrent in-tube condenser, and turbine are given for both pure and mixed-hydrocarbon working fluids.

Bliem, C.J.; Mines, G.L.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Solvated electron yields in liquid and supercritical ammonia-A statistical mechanical treatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Earlier the geminate recombination of ions and solvated electrons, produced by ionizing radiation or laser light, was theoretically treated by a model which consisted of a Rydberg atom interacting with the thermodynamic fluctuations of the medium [R. Schiller, J. Chem. Phys. 92, 5527 (1990)]. The theory was applied to liquid-to-supercritical water [R. Schiller and A. Horvath, J. Chem. Phys. 135, 084510 (2011)]. Now it is compared with recent experiments performed on liquid-to-supercritical ammonia [J. Urbanek, A. Dahmen, J. Torres-Alacan, P. Koenigshoven, J. Lindner, and P. Voehringer, J. Phys. Chem. B 116, 2223 (2012)]. The agreement between theory and experiment seems to be reasonable. The treatment is critically assessed.

Schiller, Robert; Horvath, Akos [Centre for Energy Research, P.O.B. 49, Budapest H-1525 (Hungary)

2012-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

366

Fischer Tropsch synthesis in supercritical fluids. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1--December 31, 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Objectives for this quarter were to attempt to develop a model to predict the molecular diffusion coefficients to a high degree of accuracy so the authors may be able to predict both the molecular diffusion coefficient and thus the effective diffusivity a priori. They are working on a semi-empirical equation based on the rough hard sphere theory to predict diffusion coefficients in supercritical fluids. In addition, they planned to take additional data in order to extend the database available for development of the predictive equation. The paper discusses accomplishments and problems related to the diffusion coefficients of F-T products in supercritical fluids. Data are presented on the diffusion coefficients of 1-octene in ethane, propane, and hexane.

Akgerman, A.; Bukur, D.B. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Chemical Engineering Dept.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Hydrogen bonding and coordination in normal and supercritical water from X-ray inelastic scattering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A direct measure of hydrogen bonding in water under conditions ranging from the normal state to the supercritical regime is derived from the Compton scattering of inelastically-scattered X-rays. First, we show that a measure of the number of electrons $n_e$ involved in hydrogen bonding at varying thermodynamic conditions can be directly obtained from Compton profile differences. Then, we use first-principles simulations to provide a connection between $n_e$ and the number of hydrogen bonds $n_{HB}$. Our study shows that over the broad range studied the relationship between $n_e$ and $n_{HB}$ is linear, allowing for a direct experimental measure of bonding and coordination in water. In particular, the transition to supercritical state is characterized by a sharp increase in the number of water monomers, but also displays a significant number of residual dimers and trimers.

Patrick H. -L. Sit; Christophe Bellin; Bernardo Barbiellini; D. Testemale; J. -L. Hazemann; T. Buslaps; Nicola Marzari; Abhay Shukla

2007-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

368

Root Causes of Circumferential Cracking in Waterwalls of Supercritical Units: State-of-Knowledge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Circumferential cracking on the waterwalls has again become a significant problem for many supercritical units, especially with the implementation of low-NOx systems. Damage typically consists of multiple, parallel cracks perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the tube and to the direction of maximum tensile stress. There can be numerous potential causes, and the choice of the appropriate control strategy will depend on identifying the underlying cause(s) for a particular outbreak of damage. This repo...

2008-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

369

Feasibility Study of Supercritical Light Water Cooled Reactors for Electric Power Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The supercritical water reactor (SCWR) has been the object of interest throughout the nuclear Generation IV community because of its high potential: a simple, direct cycle, compact configuration; elimination of many traditional LWR components, operation at coolant temperatures much higher than traditional LWRs and thus high thermal efficiency. It could be said that the SWR was viewed as the water counterpart to the high temperature gas reactor.

Philip MacDonald; Jacopo Buongiorno; James Sterbentz; Cliff Davis; Robert Witt; Gary Was; J. McKinley; S. Teysseyre; Luca Oriani; Vefa Kucukboyaci; Lawrence Conway; N. Jonsson: Bin Liu

2005-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

370

The Applicability of Supercritical Topping Cycles for Repowering Subcritical Steam-Electric Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Steam cycle efficiency of existing plants is limited by the steam temperatures and pressures to which the plant has been designed. Capacity and efficiency might be increased at subcritical steam-electric plants by adding a supercritical topping cycle that exhausts at the inlet steam conditions of the existing steam turbine. Implementation of such a topping cycle will require a new steam generator that might be a low-cost solution if the existing steam generator and its associated air quality control syst...

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

371

Technical design issues for a field-portable supercritical fluid extractor  

SciTech Connect

Supercritical fluid extraction is gaining acceptance as an alternative sample preparation method for trace organic analysis. The development of SFE instrumentation optimized for field use requires taking several technical design issues including size and weight requirements, user-friendly operation, and technical performance capabilities into consideration. Parameters associated with a prototype SFE instrument under development for potential use in conducting on-site inspections of the Chemical Weapons Convention and its preliminary technical and operational performance are described.

Wright, B.W.; Zemanian, T.S.; Robins, W.H.; Wright, C.W.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Carbon nanomaterials in silica aerogel matrices  

SciTech Connect

Silica aerogels are ultra low-density, high surface area materials that are extremely good thermal insulators and have numerous technical applications. However, their mechanical properties are not ideal, as they are brittle and prone to shattering. Conversely, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and graphene-based materials, such as graphene oxide, have extremely high tensile strength and possess novel electronic properties. By introducing SWCNTs or graphene-based materials into aerogel matrices, it is possible to produce composites with the desirable properties of both constituents. We have successfully dispersed SWCNTs and graphene-based materials into silica gels. Subsequent supercritical drying results in monolithic low-density composites having improved mechanical properties. These nanocomposite aerogels have great potential for use in a wide range of applications.

Hamilton, Christopher E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chavez, Manuel E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Duque, Juan G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gupta, Gautam [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Doorn, Stephen K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dattelbaum, Andrew M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Obrey, Kimberly A D [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Resorcinol-formaldehyde and carbon aerogel microspheres  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aerogels are a unique class of materials possessing an open-cell structure with ultrafine cells/pores (aerogels are ideal candidates for many applications (e.g. transparent window insulation), current processing methods have limited their introduction into the commercial marketplace. Our research focuses on the formation of resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) aerogel microspheres which offer an attractive alternative to monolith production. An inverse emulsion polymerization is used to produce these spherical gel particles which undergo solvent exchange followed by supercritical drying with carbon dioxide. This process yields aerogel microspheres (10--80{mu} diameter) which can be used as loosely packed powders, compression molded into near-net shapes using a polymer binder, or used as additives in conventional foaming operations to produce new aerogel composites with superior thermal properties. The emulsification procedure, thermal characterization, mechanical properties, and potential applications of RF aerogel microspheres will be discussed.

Alviso, C.T.; Pekela, R.W.; Gross, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Lu, X.; Caps, R.; Fricke, J [Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany). Physikalisches Inst.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Safety and Techno-Economic Analysis of Solvent Selection for Supercritical Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis Reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fisher-Tropsch Synthesis is a primary pathway for gas-to-liquid technology. In order to overcome commercial problems associated with reaction and transport phenomena, the use of supercritical solvents has been proposed to increase chemical conversion and improve temperature control. One of the major challenges in designing the supercritical FTS systems is the solvent selection. Numerous alternatives exist and should be screened based on relevant criteria. The main aim of the thesis was to develop a safety metric that can be incorporated in the selection of an optimal supercritical solvent or a mixture of solvents. The objective was to minimize the cost while satisfying safety constraints or to establish tradeoffs between cost and safety. Hydrocarbons from C3 to C9 were identified as feasible solvents for FTS purposes. The choice of these solvents is dependent on their mixture critical temperature and pressure requirements that need to be satisfied upon entry into the FTS reactor. A safety metric system was developed in order to compare the risk issues associated with using the aforementioned solvents. In addition, an economic analysis of using the different solvents was performed. Finally, a case study was solved to illustrate the use of the proposed metrics and the selection of solvents based on safety and techno-economic criteria.

Hamad, Natalie

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

High-pressure cell for neutron reflectometry of supercritical and subcritical fluids at solid interfaces  

SciTech Connect

A new high-pressure cell design for use in neutron reflectometry (NR) for pressures up to 50 MPa and a temperature range of 300 473 K is described. The cell design guides the neutron beam through the working crystal without passing through additional windows or the bulk fluid, which provides for a high neutron transmission, low scattering background, and low beam distortion. The o-ring seal is suitable for a wide range of subcritical and supercritical fluids and ensures high chemical and pressure stability. Wafers with a diameter of 5.08 cm (2 in.) and 5 mm or 10 mm thickness can be used with the cells, depending on the required pressure and momentum transfer range. The fluid volume in the sample cell is very small at about 0.1 ml, which minimizes scattering background and stored energy. The cell design and pressure setup for measurements with supercritical fluids are described. NR data are shown for silicon/silicon oxide and quartz wafers measured against air and subsequently within the high-pressure cell to demonstrate the neutron characteristics of the high-pressure cell. Neutron reflectivity data for supercritical CO2 in contact with quartz and Si/SiO2 wafers are also shown.

Carmichael, Justin R [ORNL; Rother, Gernot [ORNL; Browning, Jim [ORNL; Ankner, John Francis [ORNL; Banuelos, Jose Leo [ORNL; Anovitz, Lawrence {Larry} M [ORNL; Wesolowski, David J [ORNL; Cole, David [Ohio State University

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

NETL: News Release - Critical Carbon Sequestration Assessment Begins:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

September 12, 2006 September 12, 2006 Critical Carbon Sequestration Assessment Begins: Midwest Partnership Looks at Appalachian Basin for Safe Storage Sites Seismic Surveys to Determine Viability of Rock Formations for CO2 Storage WASHINGTON, DC - Tapping into rock formations at sites thousands of feet deep, a government-industry team is using seismic testing to help determine whether those sites can serve as reservoirs to safely store carbon dioxide (CO2), a major greenhouse gas. MORE INFO WATCH: NETL Project Manager Charlie Byrer discuss this important project Learn more about DOE's Carbon Sequestration Regional Partnerships Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership web site The U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory is sponsoring the tests in a program to develop carbon sequestration

377

Iron-Doped Carbon Aerogels: Novel Porous Substrates for Direct Growth of Carbon Nanotubes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present the synthesis and characterization of Fe-doped carbon aerogels (CAs) and demonstrate the ability to grow carbon nanotubes directly on monoliths of these materials to afford novel carbon aerogel-carbon nanotube composites. Preparation of the Fe-doped CAs begins with the sol-gel polymerization of the potassium salt of 2,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid with formaldehyde, affording K{sup +}-doped gels that can then be converted to Fe{sup 2+}- or Fe{sup 3+}-doped gels through an ion exchange process, dried with supercritical CO{sub 2} and subsequently carbonized under an inert atmosphere. Analysis of the Fe-doped CAs by TEM, XRD and XPS revealed that the doped iron species are reduced during carbonization to form metallic iron and iron carbide nanoparticles. The sizes and chemical composition of the reduced Fe species were related to pyrolysis temperature as well as the type of iron salt used in the ion exchange process. Raman spectroscopy and XRD analysis further reveal that, despite the presence of the Fe species, the CA framework is not significantly graphitized during pyrolysis. The Fe-doped CAs were subsequently placed in a thermal CVD reactor and exposed to a mixture of CH{sub 4} (1000 sccm), H{sub 2} (500 sccm), and C{sub 2}H{sub 4} (20 sccm) at temperatures ranging from 600 to 800 C for 10 minutes, resulting in direct growth of carbon nanotubes on the aerogel monoliths. Carbon nanotubes grown by this method appear to be multiwalled ({approx}25 nm in diameter and up to 4 mm long) and grow through a tip-growth mechanism that pushes catalytic iron particles out of the aerogel framework. The highest yield of CNTs were grown on Fe-doped CAs pyrolyzed at 800 C treated at CVD temperatures of 700 C.

Steiner, S A; Baumann, T F; Kong, J; Satcher, J H; Dresselhaus, M S

2007-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

378

Iron-Doped Carbon Aerogels: Novel Porous Substrates for Direct Growth of Carbon Nanotubes  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

We present the synthesis and characterization of Fe-doped carbon aerogels (CAs) and demonstrate the ability to grow carbon nanotubes directly on monoliths of these materials to afford novel carbon aerogel-carbon nanotube composites. Preparation of the Fe-doped CAs begins with the sol-gel polymerization of the potassium salt of 2,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid with formaldehyde, affording K{sup +}-doped gels that can then be converted to Fe{sup 2+}- or Fe{sup 3+}-doped gels through an ion exchange process, dried with supercritical CO{sub 2} and subsequently carbonized under an inert atmosphere. Analysis of the Fe-doped CAs by TEM, XRD and XPS revealed that the doped iron species are reduced during carbonization to form metallic iron and iron carbide nanoparticles. The sizes and chemical composition of the reduced Fe species were related to pyrolysis temperature as well as the type of iron salt used in the ion exchange process. Raman spectroscopy and XRD analysis further reveal that, despite the presence of the Fe species, the CA framework is not significantly graphitized during pyrolysis. The Fe-doped CAs were subsequently placed in a thermal CVD reactor and exposed to a mixture of CH{sub 4} (1000 sccm), H{sub 2} (500 sccm), and C{sub 2}H{sub 4} (20 sccm) at temperatures ranging from 600 to 800 C for 10 minutes, resulting in direct growth of carbon nanotubes on the aerogel monoliths. Carbon nanotubes grown by this method appear to be multiwalled ({approx}25 nm in diameter and up to 4 mm long) and grow through a tip-growth mechanism that pushes catalytic iron particles out of the aerogel framework. The highest yield of CNTs were grown on Fe-doped CAs pyrolyzed at 800 C treated at CVD temperatures of 700 C.

Steiner, S. A.; Baumann, T. F.; Kong, J.; Satcher, J. H.; Dresselhaus, M. S.

2007-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

379

Deep drilling technology for hot crystalline rock  

SciTech Connect

The development of Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal systems at the Fenton Hill, New Mexico site has required the drilling of four deep boreholes into hot, Precambrian granitic and metamorphic rocks. Thermal gradient holes, four observation wells 200 m (600 ft) deep, and an exploration core hole 800 m (2400 ft) deep guided the siting of the four deep boreholes. Results derived from the exploration core hole, GT-1 (Granite Test No. 1), were especially important in providing core from the granitic rock, and establishing the conductive thermal gradient and heat flow for the granitic basement rocks. Essential stratigraphic data and lost drilling-fluid zones were identified for the volcanic and sedimentary rocks above the contact with the crystalline basement. Using this information drilling strategies and well designs were then devised for the planning of the deeper wells. The four deep wells were drilled in pairs, the shallowest were planned and drilled to depths of 3 km in 1975 at a bottom-hole temperature of nearly 200/sup 0/C. These boreholes were followed by a pair of wells, completed in 1981, the deepest of which penetrated the Precambrian basement to a vertical depth of 4.39 km at a temperature of 320/sup 0/C.

Rowley, J.C.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Carbon Cycle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Cycle Carbon Cycle Latest Global Carbon Budget Estimates Including CDIAC Estimates Terrestrial Carbon Management Data Sets and Analyses Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Fossil-Fuel Consumption and Cement Manufacture, (2011) Annual Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions: Mass of Emissions Gridded by One Degree Latitude by One Degree Longitude (2012) Monthly Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions: Mass of Emissions Gridded by One Degree Latitude by One Degree Longitude (2012) Annual Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions: Global Stable Carbon Isotopic Signature (2012) Monthly Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions: Isomass (δ 13C) of Emissions Gridded by One Degree Latitude by One Degree Longitude (2012) AmeriFlux - Terrestrial Carbon Dioxide, Water Vapor, and Energy Balance Measurements Estimates of Monthly CO2 Emissions and Associated 13C/12C Values

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rocks supercritical carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Carbon Isotopes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Trace Gases » Carbon Isotopes Atmospheric Trace Gases » Carbon Isotopes Carbon Isotopes Gateway Pages to Isotopes Data Modern Records of Carbon and Oxygen Isotopes in Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide and Carbon-13 in Methane 800,000 Deuterium Record and Shorter Records of Various Isotopic Species from Ice Cores Carbon-13 13C in CO Measurements from Niwot Ridge, Colorado and Montana de Oro, California (Tyler) 13C in CO2 NOAA/CMDL Flask Network (White and Vaughn) CSIRO GASLAB Flask Network (Allison, Francey, and Krummel) CSIRO in situ measurements at Cape Grim, Tasmania (Francey and Allison) Scripps Institution of Oceanography (Keeling et al.) 13C in CH4 NOAA/CMDL Flask Network (Miller and White) Northern & Southern Hemisphere Sites (Quay and Stutsman) Northern & Southern Hemisphere Sites (Stevens)

382

Corrosion of Ferritic-Martensitic Steels in Steam and Supercritical Water Jeremy Bischoffa, Arthur T. Mottaa, Chad Eichfeldb, Robert J. Comstockc, Guoping Caod, Todd  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Corrosion of Ferritic-Martensitic Steels in Steam and Supercritical Water Jeremy Bischoffa, Arthur Corrosion tests were performed in steam and supercritical water at 500°C for two ferritic- martensitic in steam. Examinations of the oxide layers using scanning electron microscopy and microbeam synchrotron

Motta, Arthur T.

383

Carbon Sequestration Monitoring Activities  

SciTech Connect

In its 'Carbon Sequestration Technology Roadmap and Program Plan 2007' the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)'s Office of Fossil Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) identified as a major objective extended field tests to fully characterize potential carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) storage sites and to demonstrate the long-term storage of sequestered carbon (p. 5). Among the challenges in this area are 'improved understanding of CO{sub 2} flow and trapping within the reservoir and the development and deployment of technologies such as simulation models and monitoring systems' (p. 20). The University of Wyoming (UW), following consultations with the NETL, the Wyoming State Geological Survey, and the Governor's office, identified potential for geologic sequestration of impure carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) in deep reservoirs of the Moxa Arch. The Moxa Arch is a 120-mile long north-south trending anticline plunging beneath the Wyoming Thrust Belt on the north and bounded on the south by the Uinta Mountains. Several oil and gas fields along the Moxa Arch contain accumulations of natural CO{sub 2}. The largest of these is the La Barge Platform, which encompasses approximately 800 square miles. Several formations may be suitable for storage of impure CO{sub 2} gas, foremost among them the Madison Limestone, Bighorn Dolomite, and Nugget Sandstone. This project responded to the challenges described above by preparing a geological site characterization study on the Moxa Arch. The project included four priority research areas: (A) geological characterization of geologic structure of the Arch, the fault, and fracture patterns of the target formations and caprocks, (B) experimental characterization of carbon dioxide-brine-rock reactions that may occur, (C) optimization of geophysical and numerical models necessary for measurement, monitoring and verification (MMV), and (D) a preliminary performance assessment. Research work to accomplish these goals was coordinated by one administrative task under the direction of Dr. Carol Frost, Professor of Geology and Geophysics (Task 1.0), and one task devoted to designing and creating an interdisciplinary, project-specific carbon cyberinfrastructure to support collaborative carbon dioxide sequestration research among University of Wyoming scientists and their collaborators, performed by Jeff Hammerlinck, Director of the Wyoming Geographic Information Science Center at the University of Wyoming (Task 1.5). The results of these tasks are presented in the Introduction and in Chapter 1, respectively.

Carol Frost

2010-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

384

Rock-brine chemical interactions. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of experimental interaction of powdered volcanic rock with aqueous solutions are presented at temperatures from 200 to 400/sup 0/C, 500 to 1000 bars fluid pressure, with reaction durations of approximately 30 days under controlled laboratory conditions. The aim of this research is to develop data on the kinetics and equilibria of rock solution interactions that will provide insight into the complex geochemical processes attending geothermal reservoir development, stimulation, and reinjection. The research was done in the Stanford Hydrothermal Lab using gold cell equipment of the Dickson design. This equipment inverts the solution rock mixture several times a minute to ensure thorough mixing. Solution samples were periodically withdrawn without interruption of the experimental conditions. The data from these experiments suggests a path dependent series of reactions by which geothermal fluids might evolve from meteoric or magmatic sources.

Not Available

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Rock melting tool with annealer section  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A rock melting penetrator is provided with an afterbody that rapidly cools a molten geological structure formed around the melting tip of the penetrator to the glass transition temperature for the surrounding molten glass-like material. An annealing afterbody then cools the glass slowly from the glass transition temperature through the annealing temperature range to form a solid self-supporting glass casing. This allows thermally induced strains to relax by viscous deformations as the molten glass cools and prevents fracturing of the resulting glass liner. The quality of the glass lining is improved, along with its ability to provide a rigid impermeable casing in unstable rock formations.

Bussod, Gilles Y. (Santa Fe, NM); Dick, Aaron J. (Oakland, CA); Cort, George E. (Montrose, CO)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

New Species of Cyanobacteria Forms Intracellular Carbonates  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Species of Cyanobacteria Forms Intracellular Carbonates Print New Species of Cyanobacteria Forms Intracellular Carbonates Print A new species of cyanobacteria-photosynthetic bacteria that occupy a wide array of habitats-was discovered in the Mexican Lake of Alchichica where massive carbonate rocks form. Cyanobacteria have been impacting the global carbon cycle of the Earth for more than 2.3 billion years by assimilating CO2 into organic compounds and triggering calcium carbonate (CaCO3) precipitation. Despite the importance of this cyanobacteria-mediated CaCO3 biomineralization, the mechanistic details of this process are still poorly understood. Scientists agree that calcification in cyanobacteria is an extracellular process: Photosynthesizing cells commonly export the photosynthesis byproduct CO32- outside their cells where it bonds with an alkaline earth metal like Ca2+. The cyanobacteria recently found in Lake Alchichica, however, forms amorphous Ca-, Mg-, Sr- and Ba-rich carbonates intracellularly. This discovery significantly modifies the traditional view of how bacteria induce CaCO3 precipitation and may improve understanding of the fossil record by hinting at ancient traces of life in rocks, or designing new routes for sequestering CO2 or 90Sr in minerals.

387

New Species of Cyanobacteria Forms Intracellular Carbonates  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Species of Cyanobacteria New Species of Cyanobacteria Forms Intracellular Carbonates New Species of Cyanobacteria Forms Intracellular Carbonates Print Wednesday, 30 January 2013 00:00 A new species of cyanobacteria-photosynthetic bacteria that occupy a wide array of habitats-was discovered in the Mexican Lake of Alchichica where massive carbonate rocks form. Cyanobacteria have been impacting the global carbon cycle of the Earth for more than 2.3 billion years by assimilating CO2 into organic compounds and triggering calcium carbonate (CaCO3) precipitation. Despite the importance of this cyanobacteria-mediated CaCO3 biomineralization, the mechanistic details of this process are still poorly understood. Scientists agree that calcification in cyanobacteria is an extracellular process: Photosynthesizing cells commonly export the photosynthesis byproduct CO32- outside their cells where it bonds with an alkaline earth metal like Ca2+. The cyanobacteria recently found in Lake Alchichica, however, forms amorphous Ca-, Mg-, Sr- and Ba-rich carbonates intracellularly. This discovery significantly modifies the traditional view of how bacteria induce CaCO3 precipitation and may improve understanding of the fossil record by hinting at ancient traces of life in rocks, or designing new routes for sequestering CO2 or 90Sr in minerals.

388

New Species of Cyanobacteria Forms Intracellular Carbonates  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Species of Cyanobacteria Forms Intracellular Carbonates Print New Species of Cyanobacteria Forms Intracellular Carbonates Print A new species of cyanobacteria-photosynthetic bacteria that occupy a wide array of habitats-was discovered in the Mexican Lake of Alchichica where massive carbonate rocks form. Cyanobacteria have been impacting the global carbon cycle of the Earth for more than 2.3 billion years by assimilating CO2 into organic compounds and triggering calcium carbonate (CaCO3) precipitation. Despite the importance of this cyanobacteria-mediated CaCO3 biomineralization, the mechanistic details of this process are still poorly understood. Scientists agree that calcification in cyanobacteria is an extracellular process: Photosynthesizing cells commonly export the photosynthesis byproduct CO32- outside their cells where it bonds with an alkaline earth metal like Ca2+. The cyanobacteria recently found in Lake Alchichica, however, forms amorphous Ca-, Mg-, Sr- and Ba-rich carbonates intracellularly. This discovery significantly modifies the traditional view of how bacteria induce CaCO3 precipitation and may improve understanding of the fossil record by hinting at ancient traces of life in rocks, or designing new routes for sequestering CO2 or 90Sr in minerals.

389

New Species of Cyanobacteria Forms Intracellular Carbonates  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Species of Cyanobacteria Forms Intracellular Carbonates Print New Species of Cyanobacteria Forms Intracellular Carbonates Print A new species of cyanobacteria-photosynthetic bacteria that occupy a wide array of habitats-was discovered in the Mexican Lake of Alchichica where massive carbonate rocks form. Cyanobacteria have been impacting the global carbon cycle of the Earth for more than 2.3 billion years by assimilating CO2 into organic compounds and triggering calcium carbonate (CaCO3) precipitation. Despite the importance of this cyanobacteria-mediated CaCO3 biomineralization, the mechanistic details of this process are still poorly understood. Scientists agree that calcification in cyanobacteria is an extracellular process: Photosynthesizing cells commonly export the photosynthesis byproduct CO32- outside their cells where it bonds with an alkaline earth metal like Ca2+. The cyanobacteria recently found in Lake Alchichica, however, forms amorphous Ca-, Mg-, Sr- and Ba-rich carbonates intracellularly. This discovery significantly modifies the traditional view of how bacteria induce CaCO3 precipitation and may improve understanding of the fossil record by hinting at ancient traces of life in rocks, or designing new routes for sequestering CO2 or 90Sr in minerals.

390

Category:Little Rock, AR | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AR AR Jump to: navigation, search Go Back to PV Economics By Location Media in category "Little Rock, AR" The following 16 files are in this category, out of 16 total. SVFullServiceRestaurant Little Rock AR Entergy Arkansas Inc.png SVFullServiceRestauran... 71 KB SVHospital Little Rock AR Entergy Arkansas Inc.png SVHospital Little Rock... 69 KB SVLargeHotel Little Rock AR Entergy Arkansas Inc.png SVLargeHotel Little Ro... 70 KB SVLargeOffice Little Rock AR Entergy Arkansas Inc.png SVLargeOffice Little R... 71 KB SVMediumOffice Little Rock AR Entergy Arkansas Inc.png SVMediumOffice Little ... 68 KB SVMidriseApartment Little Rock AR Entergy Arkansas Inc.png SVMidriseApartment Lit... 70 KB SVOutPatient Little Rock AR Entergy Arkansas Inc.png SVOutPatient Little Ro...

391

Experiment-Based Model for the Chemical Interactions between Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Experiment-Based Model for the Chemical Interactions between Geothermal Experiment-Based Model for the Chemical Interactions between Geothermal Rocks, Supercritical Carbon Dioxide and Water Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Experiment-Based Model for the Chemical Interactions between Geothermal Rocks, Supercritical Carbon Dioxide and Water Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Enhanced Geothermal Systems Component Research and Development/Analysis Project Type / Topic 2 Supercritical Carbon Dioxide / Reservoir Rock Chemical Interactions Project Description The geochemical model will be developed on a foundation of both theory and measurements of chemical and physical interactions between minerals, rocks, scCO2 and water. An experimentally validated reservoir modeling capability is critically important for the evaluation of the scCO2-EGS concept, the adoption of which could significantly enhance energy production in the USA.

392

Carbon Nanotubes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carbon Nanotubes. Sponsored by: TMS Electronic, Magnetic and Photonic Materials Division Date and Time: Sunday, February 13, 2005 ~ 8:30 am-5:00 pm

393

Carbon Nanomaterials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 12, 2012 ... The graphene film was spin-coated using carbon nanotubes to form the cathode of the field emission device. A phosphor coated graphene-PET ...

394

Generation of laser-induced plasma in supercritical water and vibrational spectroscopic study of accompanying stimulated Raman scattering  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have formed a laser-induced plasma (LIP) in supercritical water (SCW) and studied associated molecular vibrations using spectroscopic methods. The accompanying forward and backward stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) of water molecules showed anisotropic behavior at supercritical conditions (>647 K and >22.1 MPa). The Raman shift of the backward SRS indicated that attractive interactions between water molecules and excess electrons generated by the LIP were dominant in the SCW. The backward SRS spectrum provided a microscopic view of the hydration environment around an excess electron, which is useful for controlling electron-driven chemical reactions and materials processing in SCW.

Yui, Hiroharu [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Tokyo University of Science, Kagurazaka 1-3, Shinjyuku-ku, Tokyo 162-8601 (Japan); PRESTO-JST, Sanbancho 5, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-0075 (Japan); Tomai, Takaaki; Sawada, Masayoshi; Terashima, Kazuo [Department of Advanced Materials Science, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa-shi, Chiba 277-8561 (Japan)

2011-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

395

Rim Rock Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rim Rock Wind Farm Rim Rock Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Rim Rock Wind Farm Facility Rim Rock Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NaturEner Developer NaturEner Energy Purchaser San Diego Gas & Electric Location Glacier and Toole Counties MT Coordinates 48.779564°, -112.061291° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":48.779564,"lon":-112.061291,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

396

Storage capacity in hot dry rock reservoirs  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for extracting thermal energy, in a cyclic manner, from geologic strata which may be termed hot dry rock. A reservoir comprised of hot fractured rock is established and water or other liquid is passed through the reservoir. The water is heated by the hot rock, recovered from the reservoir, cooled by extraction of heat by means of heat exchange apparatus on the surface, and then re-injected into the reservoir to be heated again. Water is added to the reservoir by means of an injection well and recovered from the reservoir by means of a production well. Water is continuously provided to the reservoir and continuously withdrawn from the reservoir at two different flow rates, a base rate and a peak rate. Increasing water flow from the base rate to the peak rate is accomplished by rapidly decreasing backpressure at the outlet of the production well in order to meet periodic needs for amounts of thermal energy greater than a baseload amount, such as to generate additional electric power to meet peak demands. The rate of flow of water provided to the hot dry rock reservoir is maintained at a value effective to prevent depletion of the liquid inventory of the reservoir. 4 figs.

Brown, D.W.

1997-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

397

Transfer of hot dry rock technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development Program has focused worldwide attention on the facts that natural heat in the upper part of the earth's crust is an essentially inexhaustible energy resource which is accessible almost everywhere, and that practical means now exist to extract useful heat from the hot rock and bring it to the earth's surface for beneficial use. The Hot Dry Rock Program has successfully constructed and operated a prototype hot, dry rock energy system that produced heat at the temperatures and rates required for large-scale space heating and many other direct uses of heat. The Program is now in the final stages of constructing a larger, hotter system potentially capable of satisfying the energy requirements of a small, commercial, electrical-generating power plant. To create and understand the behavior of such system, it has been necessary to develop or support the development of a wide variety of equipment, instruments, techniques, and analyses. Much of this innovative technology has already been transferred to the private sector and to other research and development programs, and more is continuously being made available as its usefulness is demonstrated. This report describes some of these developments and indicates where this new technology is being used or can be useful to industry, engineering, and science.

Smith, M.C.

1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Hot-dry-rock geothermal resource 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The work performed on hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal resource evaluation, site characterization, and geophysical exploration techniques is summarized. The work was done by region (Far West, Pacific Northwest, Southwest, Rocky Mountain States, Midcontinent, and Eastern) and limited to the conterminous US.

Heiken, G.; Goff, F.; Cremer, G. (ed.)

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Segmentation of cracks in shale rock  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper the use of morphological connected filters are studied for segmenting sheet- and thread-like cracks in images of shale rock. A volume formed from a stack of 2-D X-ray images is processed using 3-D attributes. The shape-preserving property ...

Erik R. Urbach; Marina Pervukhina; Leanne Bischof

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

STANFORD ROCK PHYSICS BOREHOLE GEOPHYSICS PROJECT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TABLE OF CONTENTS A: Rock Physics and Geology. Pressure-solution models and the velocity......................................................... A3 Pressure trends of compressional-and shear-wave velocities measured measured in sands to 20 MPA.....................................................C3 Properties of pore fluids at very high pressures from equations of state. Walls & Dvorkin

Nur, Amos

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rocks supercritical carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Storage capacity in hot dry rock reservoirs  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of extracting thermal energy, in a cyclic manner, from geologic strata which may be termed hot dry rock. A reservoir comprised of hot fractured rock is established and water or other liquid is passed through the reservoir. The water is heated by the hot rock, recovered from the reservoir, cooled by extraction of heat by means of heat exchange apparatus on the surface, and then re-injected into the reservoir to be heated again. Water is added to the reservoir by means of an injection well and recovered from the reservoir by means of a production well. Water is continuously provided to the reservoir and continuously withdrawn from the reservoir at two different flow rates, a base rate and a peak rate. Increasing water flow from the base rate to the peak rate is accomplished by rapidly decreasing backpressure at the outlet of the production well in order to meet periodic needs for amounts of thermal energy greater than a baseload amount, such as to generate additional electric power to meet peak demands. The rate of flow of water provided to the hot dry rock reservoir is maintained at a value effective to prevent depletion of the liquid

Brown, Donald W. (Los Alamos, NM)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Temperature Evolution and Oxide Growth in Waterwall Tubes of Supercritical Units  

SciTech Connect

In order to understand the failures in some waterwall tubes of supercritical steam boilers, an analysis is required to estimate the temperature of the waterwall tubes and the oxide growth in these tubes. A review on the thermophysical properties of oxide grown in waterwall tubes was conducted. Specimens of waterwall tubes associated with thermal fatigue cracking were obtained and microstructural analyses, using metallographic and electron-optical techniques such as SEM and electron-probe microanalysis, were performed. A computer model is being developed to estimate the maximum temperature in waterwall tubes by considering several phenomena that take place in supercritical units. The comprehensive model includes the following boiler operation features and phenomena: oxide growth, distribution of the heat flux on the waterwall tube as a function of height distance, variation of steam flow rate due to load variation, variation of heat flux due to load variation, and variation of the heat transfer coefficient with steam conditions and furnace heat flux. The model will handle the transition subcritical-to-supercritical and will account for the heat transfer deterioration phenomena in tubes. The tube regions with deteriorated heat transfer regimes will be identified. The temperatures of steam, metal, and oxide will be obtained as a function of the height distance in the boiler. The mixing effects of the steam from different waterwall tubes and subsequent fluid dynamics effects on the heat transfer will be considered. The new model will enable the prediction of the maximum metal temperature for realistic boiler operation schedule, which include transitions from full-to-low loads. Based on the estimated data for the steam temperature, metal temperature, and oxide thickness, regions of the waterwall tubes that are exposed to the most severe conditions will be identified.

Sabau, Adrian S [ORNL; Wright, Ian G [ORNL; Zhang, Wei [ORNL; Pint, Bruce A [ORNL; Unocic, Kinga A [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Test Plan for Heat Cycle Research Program, Phase I Supercritical Cycle Tests  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The 60 kW Heat Cycle Research Facility (HCRF) provides a means of examining different concepts and components associated with the generation of electrical power from a geothermal resource using a binary power cycle. In this power cycle the heat or energy in a hot geothermal fluid is transferred to a secondary working fluid. This working fluid is vaporized in the heat exchange process and the vapor is in turn expanded through a turbine which drives a generator producing electrical power. the heat or energy in the vapor leaving the turbine is transferred to a circulating cooling water in the condenser where the working fluid is condensed to a liquid which can be pumped back to the heaters, completing the cycle. This waste heat load in the condenser is in turn transferred from the cooling water to the atmosphere in a cooling tower. The HCRF allows the different components described in the cycle above to be tested as well as the basic cycle itself. This cycle may vary in that the heaters, condenser, cooling system, pumps, etc. may differ in number and type, however the basic cycle does not change significantly. During this sequence of tests, the HCRF is operated using a supercritical vapor generator and a vertical condenser where the condensation occurs inside of the tubes as opposed to the shell side more commonly used in these applications. In addition to providing the data to be used to evaluate the design of these heat exchangers, these supercritical tests provide cycle and component performance data with both single component working fluids and working fluids comprised of different mixtures of hydrocarbons. The use of these mixtures promises to improve cycle performance, in terms of watt-hours per pound of geothermal fluid, provided the countercurrent flow paths can be maintained between the fluids in both the condenser and the heaters. The supercritical heaters and the condenser to be used in this series of tests were designed to provide the desired countercurrent flow paths.

Mines, Greg L.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

RELAP5-3D Code for Supercritical-Pressure Light-Water-Cooled Reactors  

SciTech Connect

The RELAP5-3D computer program has been improved for analysis of supercritical-pressure, light-water-cooled reactors. Several code modifications were implemented to correct code execution failures. Changes were made to the steam table generation, steam table interpolation, metastable states, interfacial heat transfer coefficients, and transport properties (viscosity and thermal conductivity). The code modifications now allow the code to run slow transients above the critical pressure as well as blowdown transients (modified Edwards pipe and modified existing pressurized water reactor model) that pass near the critical point.

Riemke, Richard Allan; Davis, Cliff Bybee; Schultz, Richard Raphael

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Circumferential Cracking Investigation on a Supercritical Boiler — Martin Lake Unit 3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Luminants Martin Lake unit 3 is one of three supercritical boilers at the site. Lignite from nearby mines is the principal source of fuel, which is mixed with 10-20% Powder River Basin or western coal to assist combustion. The boiler was originally designed to generate around 750 MW, although it is now generating up to 850 MW. In 2000, water cannons were installed in the walls as a replacement for the wall blowers. At about the same time, after 21 years of operation without signs of cracking, the unit wa...

2010-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

406

Forced flow supercritical helium in a closed heat transfer loop subjected to pulsed heat loads  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The superconducting magnets of the tokamak JT-60SA are cooled by means of forced flows of supercritical helium at 4.4 K and 0.5 MPa. The closed loops transfer heat from the magnets to the refrigerator through heat exchangers immersed into a saturated liquid helium bath. An experimental loop was designed to represent a 1/20 scaled down mock-up of JT-60SA central solenoid cooling circuits. This design for keeping the same transit times in the helium circuits

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Demonstration Development Project: Readiness of Advanced Ultra-Supercritical Pulverized Coal Technology for Demonstration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advanced ultra-supercritical (A-USC) pulverized coal technology operates with main steam temperatures in the range of 700°C to 760°C (1290°F to 1400°F) and has the potential to raise net generating efficiency by up to 50% (HHV). Economic analysis indicates that, by lowering CO2/MWh, A-USC technology lowers the cost of CO2 capture and storage when it is integrated with the power plant. To achieve these higher operating temperatures, nickel alloys and associated fabrication procedures are b...

2011-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

408

Oxidation reactions of solid carbonaceous and resinous substances in supercritical water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent kinetic studies, particularly those by means of shadowgraphy and X-ray radiography, for supercritical water oxidation of solid carbonaceous and resinous substances have revealed the importance of the O{sub 2} mass transfer process over the intrinsic surface reaction at higher temperatures. The mass transfer processes, internal and external one, should be incorporated in designing SCWO processes for solid substances and related processes such as catalytic SCWO. Some model calculation efforts of late are briefly described. Finally, fundamental information required for future development is itemed.

Koda, S. [Sophia University, Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Material and Life Science

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

409

Final report on the oxidation of energetic materials in supercritical water. Final Air Force report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to determine the suitability of oxidation in supercritical fluids (SCO), particularly water (SCWO), for disposal of propellants, explosives, and pyrotechnics (PEPs). The SCO studies of PEPs addressed the following issues: The efficiency of destruction of the substrate. The products of destruction contained in the effluents. Whether the process can be conducted safely on a large scale. Whether energy recovery from the process is economically practicable. The information essential for process development and equipment design was also investigated, including issues such as practical throughput of explosives through a SCWO reactor, reactor materials and corrosion, and models for process design and optimization.

Buelow, S.J.; Allen, D.; Anderson, G.K. [and others

1995-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

410

Advanced Computational Thermal Fluid Physics (CTFP) and Its Assessment for Light Water Reactors and Supercritical Reactors  

SciTech Connect

Background: The ultimate goal of the study is the improvement of predictive methods for safety analyses and design of Generation IV reactor systems such as supercritical water reactors (SCWR) for higher efficiency, improved performance and operation, design simplification, enhanced safety and reduced waste and cost. The objective of this Korean / US / laboratory / university collaboration of coupled fundamental computational and experimental studies is to develop the supporting knowledge needed for improved predictive techniques for use in the technology development of Generation IV reactor concepts and their passive safety systems. The present study emphasizes SCWR concepts in the Generation IV program.

D.M. McEligot; K. G. Condie; G. E. McCreery; H. M. McIlroy; R. J. Pink; L.E. Hochreiter; J.D. Jackson; R.H. Pletcher; B.L. Smith; P. Vukoslavcevic; J.M. Wallace; J.Y. Yoo; J.S. Lee; S.T. Ro; S.O. Park

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Separation of Fischer-Tropsch wax from catalyst using supercritical fluid extraction. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1, 1996--June 30, 1996  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this research project is to evaluate the potential of SCF extraction for separating the catalyst slurry of a Fischer- Tropsch (F-T) slurry bubble column (SBC) reactor into two fractions: (1) a catalyst-free wax containing less than 10 ppm particulate matter and (2) a concentrated catalyst slurry that is ready for recycle or regeneration. The wax will be extracted with a hydrocarbon solvent that has a critical temperature near the operating temperature of the SBC reactor, i.e., 200-300{degrees}C. Initial work is being performed using n-hexane as the solvent. The success of the project depends on two major factors. First, the supercritical solvent must be able to dissolve the F-T wax; furthermore, this must be accomplished without entraining the solid catalyst. Second, the extraction must be controlled so as not to favor the removal of the low molecular weight wax compounds, i.e., a constant carbon-number distribution of the alkanes in the wax slurry must be maintained at steady-state column operation. To implement our objectives, the following task structure is being implemented: Task 1 equilibrium solubility measurements; Task 2 thermodynamic modeling; and Task 3 process design studies. Progress reports are presented for each task.

Joyce, P.C.; Thies, M.C.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

NETL: Carbon Storage - Carbon Sequestration Leadership Forum  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CSLF Carbon Storage Carbon Sequestration Leadership Forum CSLF Logo The Carbon Sequestration Leadership Forum (CSLF) is a voluntary climate initiative of industrially developed and...

413

Carbon Sequestration Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Science Science July 2001 Focus Area Overview Presentation Mission and Scope Program Relationships Scientific Challenges Research Plans Facility Plans Princeton.ppt 7/16/01 Carbon Sequestration Science Focus Area New Projects Contribute to Sequestration Science Systems Integration Virtual Simulation of CO 2 Capture Technologies Cleanup Stream Gas Gasification Gasification MEA CO 2 Capture Facility Oxygen Membrane 3 km 2 inch tube 800m - 20 °C, 20 atm Liquid CO 2 , 100 tons ~1 kg CO 2 / s = 5 MW ^ CO 2 Coal Other Fuels Coal Other Fuels CO 2 Sequestration Aquifer H 2 O Flue gas H 2 O CH 4 CH 4 CO 2 Oil field Oil well Power plant CH 4 Coal - bed Aquiclude H 2 O CO 2 /N 2 CO 2 N 2 CO 2 CO 2 CO 2 CO 2 CO 2 Water Rock , 2 Coal Other Fuels Coal Other Fuels Combustor Oxygen Membrane Princeton.ppt 7/16/01 Carbon Sequestration Science Focus Area

414

Final_Tech_Session_Schedule_and_Location.xls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

In Carbonate Aquifers: Rock and Brine Alterations during Super-Critical CO In Carbonate Aquifers: Rock and Brine Alterations during Super-Critical CO 2 Injection in San Andres Formation, West Texas Gloria S. Garcia-Orrego,KinderMorgan CO 2 Company LP. Waylon House,Texas Tech University;Necip Guven, Texas Tech University, LorneA. Davis, texas Lutheran Univesity Abstract The injection of CO 2 into a formation changes the physics and chemistry of both the solid matrix and the fluids contained in the formation. The laboratory study reported here investigated how the chemical composition of the natural formation brine and different minerals present in the carbonate formations altered upon CO 2 injection under supercritical conditions. The study focused on the alteration of the petrophysical properties of the carbonate reservoir rocks resulting from this interaction

415

Esimation of field-scale thermal conductivities of unsaturated rocks from in-situ temperature data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

vicinity of the heat source, and rock temperature exceededand the dry rock near the heat source. The other differencesources, heat transfer takes place through the wet rock (see

Mukhopadhyay, Sumit; Tsang, Yvonne W.; Birkholzer, Jens T.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

SEARCH FOR UNDERGROUND OPENINGS FOR IN SITU TEST FACILITIES IN CRYSTALLINE ROCK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Index Appendix 1. Sources of Information Rock properties -various sources, and list of mines in crystalline rock whichoz SOURCE EOLOGY INFORMATION MINERALOGY OF HOST ROCKS GULF

Wallenberg, H.A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Proceedings of the Second International Symposium on Dynamics of Fluids in Fractured Rock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

toward the heat source, or into the rock underlying the heatcharacterizing DNAPL source zones in fractured rock at theby a point source injection in fractured rock with multiple

Faybishenko, Boris; Witherspoon, Paul A.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Seismic and Acoustic Investigations of Rock Fall Initiation, Processes, and Mechanics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

systems  and  rock  fall  source  and  impact  areas,  it  possible  to  a   rock   fall   source   area   in   the  possible  to  a  rock   fall  source  area.    There  are  

Zimmer, Valerie Louise

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Fluid ?Rock Characterization and Interactions in  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

on dead oils. Mixing rules are developed for gaseous mixtures of methane, ethane, propane, carbon dioxide, and nitrogen. The coupling between the relaxation time distribution...

420

Geochemistry of Magnesium Silicate Carbonation in an Aqueous Medium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geochemistry of Magnesium Silicate Geochemistry of Magnesium Silicate Carbonation in an Aqueous Medium (Carbon Mineralization) Jon Benner, Deb Bergfeld, Dave Bish, Darrin Byler, Bill Carey, Steve Chipera, George Guthrie, Klaus Lackner, Hans Ziock Hydrology, Geochemistry, Geology Group Los Alamos National Laboratory LA-UR-01-4206 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited George Guthrie gguthrie@lanl.gov 505-665-6340 Mineral Carbonation: Conversion of CO 2 into Carbonates * alkali carbonates too soluble * alkaline earth carbonates ideal sources: Ca-silicates (feldspar) Mg-silicates (olivine, serpentine, clays) Mg 2+ + CO 3 2- => MgCO 3 Mg 2 SiO 4 + 4H + => 2Mg 2+ + SiO 2(aq) Ultramafic rocks are an abundant Mg source (~0.2 km) 3 serpentine / GW-yr Challenges for Mineral-Carbonation

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rocks supercritical carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Comparison Of Hydrothermal Alteration Of Carboniferous Carbonate And  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydrothermal Alteration Of Carboniferous Carbonate And Hydrothermal Alteration Of Carboniferous Carbonate And Siliclastic Rocks In The Valles Caldera With Outcrops From The Socorro Caldera, New Mexico Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Comparison Of Hydrothermal Alteration Of Carboniferous Carbonate And Siliclastic Rocks In The Valles Caldera With Outcrops From The Socorro Caldera, New Mexico Details Activities (3) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: Continental Scientific Drilling Program (CSDP) drill hole VC-2B (total depth 1761.7 m (5780 ft); maximum temperature 295°C) was continuously cored through the Sulphur Springs hydrothermal system in the western ring-fracture zone of the 1.14 Ma Valles caldera. Among other units, the hole penetrated 760.2 m (2494.1 ft) of Paleozoic carbonate and

422

Rock Sampling At The Needles Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2005) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

The Needles Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2005) The Needles Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Rock Sampling At The Needles Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location The Needles Area Exploration Technique Rock Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Over 2000 km2 of 5-m resolution Hymap hyperspectral data was acquired in 2004. Subsequent image processing and data analysis has identified reflectance spectra for alunite, kaolinite/halloysite, illite, gypsum, vegetation, and carbonate. A portable spectrometer is being used for in situ validation, along with laboratory measurements and x-ray diffraction analyses of samples collected in teh field. We are in the process of producing and validating mineral maps that will be used to narrow the scope

423

Little Rock, Arkansas Small Business IT Security Workshop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Twitter, Facebook & Blogs Free Workshop helps Small Business Owners Reduce Cyber Threats LITTLE ROCK--The US ...

2013-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

424

CRC handbook of physical properties of rocks. Volume III  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This book presents topics on: Density of rocks and minerals, includes histograms of density ranges; elastic constants of minerals, elastic moduli, thermal properties; inelastic properties, strength and rheology for rocks and minerals, rock mechanics and friction, and stress-strain relations; radioactivity, decay constants and heat production of isotope systems in geology; seismic attenuation, in rocks, minerals, and the earth, with application to oil exploration and terrestrial studies; and index.

Carmichael, R.S.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425