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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rocks supercritical carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Carbonation Mechanism of Reservoir Rock by Supercritical Carbon...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the carbonation reaction mechanisms between supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) and reservoir rocks consisting of different mineralogical compositions in aqueous and...

2

Carbonation Mechanism of Reservoir Rock by Supercritical Carbon Dioxide  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Carbonation Mechanism of Reservoir Rock by Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Carbonation Mechanism of Reservoir Rock by Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Geothermal Lab Call Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Carbonation Mechanism of Reservoir Rock by Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Project Type / Topic 1 Laboratory Call for Submission of Applications for Research, Development and Analysis of Geothermal Technologies Project Type / Topic 2 Supercritical Carbon Dioxide / Reservoir Rock Chemical Interactions Project Description Supercritical CO2 is currently becoming a more common fluid for extracting volatile oil and fragrance compounds from various raw materials that are used in perfumery. Furthermore, its use as a heat transmission fluid is very attractive because of the greater uptake capability of heat from hot reservoir rock, compared with that of water. However, one concern was the reactivity of CO2 with clay and rock minerals in aqueous and non-aqueous environments. So if this reaction leads to the formation of water-soluble carbonates, such formation could be detrimental to the integrity of wellbore infrastructure.

3

Carbonation Mechanism of Reservoir Rock by Supercritical Carbon Dioxide  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Project Objectives: Elucidate comprehensively the carbonation reaction mechanisms between supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) and reservoir rocks consisting of different mineralogical compositions in aqueous and non-aqueous environments at temperatures of up to 250ºC, and to develop chemical modeling of CO2-reservior rock interactions.

4

Supercritical Carbon Dioxide / Reservoir Rock Chemical Interactions | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Supercritical Carbon Dioxide / Reservoir Rock Chemical Interactions Supercritical Carbon Dioxide / Reservoir Rock Chemical Interactions Jump to: navigation, search Geothermal Lab Call Projects for Supercritical Carbon Dioxide / Reservoir Rock Chemical Interactions Loading map... {"format":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"limit":200,"offset":0,"link":"all","sort":[""],"order":[],"headers":"show","mainlabel":"","intro":"","outro":"","searchlabel":"\u2026 further results","default":"","geoservice":"google","zoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","forceshow":true,"showtitle":true,"hidenamespace":false,"template":false,"title":"","label":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"locations":[{"text":"

5

Experiment-Based Model for the Chemical Interactions between Geothermal Rocks, Supercritical Carbon Dioxide and Water  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Experiment-Based Model for the Chemical Interactions between Geothermal Rocks, Supercritical Carbon Dioxide and Water presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado.

6

Synchrotron X-ray Studies of Super-critical Carbon Dioxide /...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Synchrotron X-ray Studies of Super-critical Carbon Dioxide Reservoir Rock Interfaces Synchrotron X-ray Studies of Super-critical Carbon Dioxide Reservoir Rock Interfaces...

7

Synchrotron X-ray Studies of Super-critical Carbon Dioxide / Reservoir Rock Interfaces  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Project obectives: Utilize synchrotron X-ray measurements, to monitor all aspects of atomic to nanoscale structural changes resulting from chemical interactions of scCO2-H2O binary fluids with rocks under environments directly relevant to EGS.

8

Recuperative supercritical carbon dioxide cycle  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A power plant includes a closed loop, supercritical carbon dioxide system (CLS-CO.sub.2 system). The CLS-CO.sub.2 system includes a turbine-generator and a high temperature recuperator (HTR) that is arranged to receive expanded carbon dioxide from the turbine-generator. The HTR includes a plurality of heat exchangers that define respective heat exchange areas. At least two of the heat exchangers have different heat exchange areas.

Sonwane, Chandrashekhar; Sprouse, Kenneth M; Subbaraman, Ganesan; O'Connor, George M; Johnson, Gregory A

2014-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

9

SunShot Initiative: 10-Megawatt Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Turbine  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

10-Megawatt Supercritical Carbon 10-Megawatt Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Turbine to someone by E-mail Share SunShot Initiative: 10-Megawatt Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Turbine on Facebook Tweet about SunShot Initiative: 10-Megawatt Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Turbine on Twitter Bookmark SunShot Initiative: 10-Megawatt Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Turbine on Google Bookmark SunShot Initiative: 10-Megawatt Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Turbine on Delicious Rank SunShot Initiative: 10-Megawatt Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Turbine on Digg Find More places to share SunShot Initiative: 10-Megawatt Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Turbine on AddThis.com... Concentrating Solar Power Systems Components Competitive Awards CSP Research & Development Thermal Storage CSP Recovery Act Baseload CSP SunShot Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative

10

Rock magnetism of remagnetized carbonate rocks: another look  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and significance of magnetism in sedimentary rocks. Journal1997. Rock Magnetism. ¨ zdemir, O Dunlop, D. J. & Oon July 30, 2013 ROCK MAGNETISM: REMAGNETIZED CARBONATES

Jackson, M.; Swanson-Hysell, N. L

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Coiled tubing drilling with supercritical carbon dioxide  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for increasing the efficiency of drilling operations by using a drilling fluid material that exists as supercritical fluid or a dense gas at temperature and pressure conditions existing at a drill site. The material can be used to reduce mechanical drilling forces, to remove cuttings, or to jet erode a substrate. In one embodiment, carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) is used as the material for drilling within wells in the earth, where the normal temperature and pressure conditions cause CO.sub.2 to exist as a supercritical fluid. Supercritical carbon dioxide (SC--CO.sub.2) is preferably used with coiled tube (CT) drilling equipment. The very low viscosity SC--CO.sub.2 provides efficient cooling of the drill head, and efficient cuttings removal. Further, the diffusivity of SC--CO.sub.2 within the pores of petroleum formations is significantly higher than that of water, making jet erosion using SC--CO.sub.2 much more effective than water jet erosion. SC--CO.sub.2 jets can be used to assist mechanical drilling, for erosion drilling, or for scale removal. A choke manifold at the well head or mud cap drilling equipment can be used to control the pressure within the borehole, to ensure that the temperature and pressure conditions necessary for CO.sub.2 to exist as either a supercritical fluid or a dense gas occur at the drill site. Spent CO.sub.2 can be vented to the atmosphere, collected for reuse, or directed into the formation to aid in the recovery of petroleum.

Kolle , Jack J. (Seattle, WA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Modeling Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Injection in Heterogeneous Porous Media  

SciTech Connect

We investigate the physical processes that occur during the sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO2) in liquid-saturated, brine-bearing geologic formations using the numerical simulator TOUGH2. CO2 is injected in a supercritical state that has a much lower density and viscosity than the liquid brine it displaces. In situ, the supercritical CO2 forms a gas-like phase, and also partially dissolves in the aqueous phase, creating a multi-phase, multi-component environment that shares many important features with the vadose zone. The flow and transport simulations employ an equation of state package that treats a two-phase (liquid, gas), three-component (water, salt, CO2) system. Chemical reactions between CO2 and rock minerals that could potentially contribute to mineral trapping of CO2 are not included. The geological setting considered is a fluvial/deltaic formation that is strongly heterogeneous, making preferential flow a significant effect, especially when coupled with the strong buoyancy forces acting on the gas-like CO2 plume. Key model development issues include vertical and lateral grid resolution, grid orientation effects, and the choice of characteristic curves.

Doughty, Christine; Pruess, Karsten

2003-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

13

Control strategies for supercritical carbon dioxide power conversion systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The supercritical carbon dioxide (S-C02) recompression cycle is a promising advanced power conversion cycle which couples well to numerous advanced nuclear reactor designs. This thesis investigates the dynamic simulation ...

Carstens, Nathan, 1978-

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Supercritical fluid carbon dioxide cleaning of plutonium parts  

SciTech Connect

Supercritical fluid carbon dioxide is under investigation in this work for use as a cleaning solvent for the final cleaning of plutonium parts. These parts must be free of organic residue to avoid corrosion in the stockpile. Initial studies on stainless steel and full-scale mock-up parts indicate that the oils of interest are easily and adequately cleaned from the metal surfaces with supercritical fluid carbon dioxide. Results from compatibility studies show that undesirable oxidation or other surface reactions are not occurring during exposure of plutonium to the supercritical fluid. Cleaning studies indicate that the oils of interest are removed from the plutonium surface under relatively mild conditions. These studies indicate that supercritical fluid carbon dioxide is a very promising cleaning medium for this application.

Hale, S.J.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

15

SunShot Initiative: Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Turbo-Expander and Heat  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Turbo-Expander and Heat Exchangers to someone by E-mail Share SunShot Initiative: Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Turbo-Expander and Heat Exchangers on Facebook Tweet about SunShot Initiative: Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Turbo-Expander and Heat Exchangers on Twitter Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Turbo-Expander and Heat Exchangers on Google Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Turbo-Expander and Heat Exchangers on Delicious Rank SunShot Initiative: Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Turbo-Expander and Heat Exchangers on Digg Find More places to share SunShot Initiative: Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Turbo-Expander and Heat Exchangers on AddThis.com... Concentrating Solar Power Systems Components

16

The Role of H2O in the Carbonation of Forsterite in Supercritical...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

H2O in the Carbonation of Forsterite in Supercritical CO2. The Role of H2O in the Carbonation of Forsterite in Supercritical CO2. Abstract: The water concentration dependence of...

17

Brucite [Mg(OH2)] Carbonation in Wet Supercritical CO2: An in...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Brucite Mg(OH2) Carbonation in Wet Supercritical CO2: An in situ High Pressure X-Ray Diffraction Study. Brucite Mg(OH2) Carbonation in Wet Supercritical CO2: An in situ High...

18

Metal Carbonation of Forsterite in Supercritical CO2 and H2O...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Metal Carbonation of Forsterite in Supercritical CO2 and H2O Using Solid State 29Si, 13C NMR Spectroscop. Metal Carbonation of Forsterite in Supercritical CO2 and H2O Using Solid...

19

Cobalt carbonyl catalyzed olefin hydroformylation in supercritical carbon dioxide  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of olefin hydroformylation is provided wherein an olefin reacts with a carbonyl catalyst and with reaction gases such as hydrogen and carbon monoxide in the presence of a supercritical reaction solvent, such as carbon dioxide. The invention provides higher yields of n-isomer product without the gas-liquid mixing rate limitation seen in conventional Oxo processes using liquid media.

Rathke, J.W.; Klingler, R.J.

1993-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

20

Supercritical carbon dioxide behavior in porous silica aerogel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Supercritical carbon dioxide within a porous silica aerogel behaves as a two-phase system formed by a film next to the silica walls and a remaining fluid phase. Small-angle neutron scattering allows one to determine the structural parameters of the involved phases.

Ciccariello, S.

2010-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rocks supercritical carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Project Profile: 10-Megawatt Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Turbine  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and its partners, under the 2012 SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) R&D funding opportunity announcement (FOA), aim to demonstrate a multi-megawatt power cycle using supercritical carbon dioxide (s-CO2) as the working fluid. The use of carbon dioxide instead of steam allows higher power-cycle efficiency and cycle components that are more compact.

22

NETL: Demonstration of a Novel Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Power Cycle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oxy-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control Oxy-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control Demonstration of a Novel Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Power Cycle Utilizing Pressurized Oxy-Combustion in Conjunction with Cryogenic Compression Project No.: DE-FE0009395 Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) is developing a novel supercritical carbon dioxide (sCO2) advanced power system utilizing pressurized oxy-combustion in conjunction with cryogenic compression. The proposed power system offers a leap in overall system efficiency while producing an output stream of sequestration ready CO2 at pipeline pressures. The system leverages developments in pressurized oxy-combustion technology and recent developments in sCO2 power cycles to achieve high net cycle efficiencies and produce CO2 at pipeline pressures without requiring additional compression of the flue gas.

23

Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Turbo-Expander and Heat Exchangers  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This fact sheet describes a supercritical carbon dioxide turbo-expander and heat exchangers project awarded under the DOE's 2012 SunShot Concentrating Solar Power R&D award program. The team, led by the Southwest Research Institute, is working to develop a megawatt-scale s-CO2 hot-gas turbo-expander optimized for the highly transient solar power plant profile. The team is also working to optimize novel printed circuit heat exchangers for s-CO2 applications to drastically reduce their manufacturing costs.

24

Project Profile: Direct Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Receiver Development  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), under the National Laboratory R&D competitive funding opportunity, is working to develop, characterize, and experimentally demonstrate a novel high-temperature receiver technology using supercritical carbon dioxide (s-CO2) directly as the heat transfer fluid (HTF). A high-temperature receiver that is compatible with s-CO2 enables a significant increase in power cycle efficiency and reduces solar-field size, thereby decreasing the installed cost of concentrating solar power (CSP) systems.

25

Theoretical and experimental analysis of supercritical carbon dioxide cooling / Paul Marius Harris.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??With on-going developments in the field of trans-critical carbon dioxide (R-744) vapour compression cycles, a need to effectively describe the heat transfer of supercritical carbon… (more)

Harris, Paul Marius

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Nimesulide adsorbed on silica aerogel using supercritical carbon dioxide  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Silica aerogel (SA) was loaded with nimesulide, a drug model compound, to demonstrate the potentiality of adsorption processes based on the usage of supercritical carbon dioxide to treat poorly water-soluble drugs, forming new kinds of drug delivery systems. Adsorption isotherms and kinetics were measured and described by models. The effect of pressure, temperature and solution concentration on loaded SA were also studied. Modelling of kinetic data showed that the sorption process was best described by a pseudo-second-order model. The adsorption isotherm data were best fitted by the Freundlich isotherm. The drug/SA composites were characterized using scanning electron microscopy, X-ray microanalysis, and FT-IR. Release kinetics of the adsorbed drug were also evaluated by in vitro dissolution tests. Results showed that nimesulide can be uniformly dispersed into the aerogel and that the release rate of nimesulide from the composite, constituted by drug and silica aerogel, is much faster than that of the crystalline drug.

Giuseppe Caputo; Mariarosa Scognamiglio; Iolanda De Marco

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Project Profile: High-Efficiency Receivers for Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Cycles  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Brayton Energy, under the 2012 SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) R&D FOA, is building and testing a new solar receiver that uses supercritical carbon dioxide (s-CO2) as the heat-transfer...

28

Experimental assessment of the internal flow behavior of supercritical carbon dioxide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents an experimental assessment of the internal flow behavior of supercritical carbon dioxide. The investigation focused mainly on assessing condensation onset during rapid expansion of CO? into the two-phase ...

Yang, David, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Power conversion system design for supercritical carbon dioxide cooled indirect cycle nuclear reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO?) cycle is a promising advanced power conversion cycle which couples nicely to many Generation IV nuclear reactors. This work investigates the power conversion system design and ...

Gibbs, Jonathan Paul

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Experimental and simulation studies of sequestration of supercritical carbon dioxide in depleted gas reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

he feasibility of sequestering supercritical CO2 in depleted gas reservoirs. The experimental runs involved the following steps. First, the 1 ft long by 1 in. diameter carbonate core is inserted into a viton Hassler sleeve and placed inside...

Seo, Jeong Gyu

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

31

POLYMER SOLUTIONS AND SOLVENT-SUPERCRITICAL CARBON DIOXIDE STUDIES APPLIYING PC-SAFT.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??ABSTRACTIn this thesis is presented the phase equilibria predictions for several polymer solutions and polymer-solvent-solvent systems with the presence of supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) applying… (more)

Catano-Barrera, Alma

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Development of Chemical Model to Predict the Interactions between Supercritical CO2and Fluid, and Rocks in EGS Reservoirs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This project will develop a chemical model, based on existing models and databases, that is capable of simulating chemical reactions between supercritical (SC) CO2 and Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) reservoir rocks of various compositions in aqueous, non-aqueous and 2-phase environments.

33

Limiting diffusion coefficients of heavy molecular weight organic contaminants in supercritical carbon dioxide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LIMITING DIFFUSION COEFFICIENTS OF HEAVY MOLECULAR WEIGHT ORGANIC CONTAMINANTS IN SUPERCRITICAL CARBON DIOXIDE A Thesis by MAURICIO OREJUELA Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1994 Major Subject: Chemical Engineering LIMITING DIFFUSION COEFFICIENTS OF HEAVY MOLECULAR WEIGHT ORGANIC CONTAMINANTS IN SUPERCRITICAL CARBON DIOXIDE A Thesis by MAURICIO OREJUELA Submitted...

Orejuela, Mauricio

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Novel Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Power Cycle Utilizing Pressured Oxy-combustion in Conjunction with Cryogenic Compression  

SciTech Connect

The team of Southwest Research Institute® (SwRI) and Thar Energy LLC (Thar) applied technology engineering and economic analysis to evaluate two advanced oxy-combustion power cycles, the Cryogenic Pressurized Oxy-combustion Cycle (CPOC), and the Supercritical Oxy-combustion Cycle. This assessment evaluated the performance and economic cost of the two proposed cycles with carbon capture, and included a technology gap analysis of the proposed technologies to determine the technology readiness level of the cycle and the cycle components. The results of the engineering and economic analysis and the technology gap analysis were used to identify the next steps along the technology development roadmap for the selected cycle. The project objectives, as outlined in the FOA, were 90% CO{sub 2} removal at no more than a 35% increase in cost of electricity (COE) as compared to a Supercritical Pulverized Coal Plant without CO{sub 2} capture. The supercritical oxy-combustion power cycle with 99% carbon capture achieves a COE of $121/MWe. This revised COE represents a 21% reduction in cost as compared to supercritical steam with 90% carbon capture ($137/MWe). However, this represents a 49% increase in the COE over supercritical steam without carbon capture ($80.95/MWe), exceeding the 35% target. The supercritical oxy-combustion cycle with 99% carbon capture achieved a 37.9% HHV plant efficiency (39.3% LHV plant efficiency), when coupling a supercritical oxy-combustion thermal loop to an indirect supercritical CO{sub 2} (sCO{sub 2}) power block. In this configuration, the power block achieved 48% thermal efficiency for turbine inlet conditions of 650°C and 290 atm. Power block efficiencies near 60% are feasible with higher turbine inlet temperatures, however a design tradeoff to limit firing temperature to 650°C was made in order to use austenitic stainless steels for the high temperature pressure vessels and piping and to minimize the need for advanced turbomachinery features such as blade cooling. The overall technical readiness of the supercritical oxy-combustion cycle is TRL 2, Technology Concept, due to the maturity level of the supercritical oxy-combustor for solid fuels, and several critical supporting components, as identified in the Technical Gap Analysis. The supercritical oxycombustor for solid fuels operating at pressures near 100 atm is a unique component of the supercritical oxy-combustion cycle. In addition to the low TRL supercritical oxy-combustor, secondary systems were identified that would require adaptation for use with the supercritical oxycombustion cycle. These secondary systems include the high pressure pulverized coal feed, high temperature cyclone, removal of post-combustion particulates from the high pressure cyclone underflow stream, and micro-channel heat exchangers tolerant of particulate loading. Bench scale testing was utilized to measure coal combustion properties at elevated pressures in a CO{sub 2} environment. This testing included coal slurry preparation, visualization of coal injection into a high pressure fluid, and modification of existing test equipment to facilitate the combustion properties testing. Additional bench scale testing evaluated the effectiveness of a rotary atomizer for injecting a coal-water slurry into a fluid with similar densities, as opposed to the typical application where the high density fluid is injected into a low density fluid. The swirl type supercritical oxy-combustor was developed from initial concept to an advanced design stage through numerical simulation using FLUENT and Chemkin to model the flow through the combustor and provide initial assessment of the coal combustion reactions in the flow path. This effort enabled the initial combustor mechanical layout, initial pressure vessel design, and the conceptual layout of a pilot scale test loop. A pilot scale demonstration of the supercritical oxy-combustion cycle is proposed as the next step in the technology development. This demonstration would advance the supercritical oxy-combustion cycle and the supercritical

Brun, Klaus; McClung, Aaron; Davis, John

2014-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

35

Rock magnetism of remagnetized carbonate rocks: another look MIKE JACKSON* & NICHOLAS L. SWANSON-HYSELL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rock magnetism of remagnetized carbonate rocks: another look MIKE JACKSON* & NICHOLAS L. SWANSON-HYSELL Institute for Rock Magnetism, Winchell School of Earth Sciences, University of Minnesota, Minnesota, US, dominantly in the super- paramagnetic and stable single-domain size range, also give rise to distinctive rock-magnetic

Swanson-Hysell, Nicholas

36

Direct formation of aerogels by sol-gel polymerizations of alkoxysilanes in supercritical carbon dioxide  

SciTech Connect

Sol-gel polymerization of alkoxysilanes in supercritical carbon dioxide (SCCD) was used to directly prepare aerogels. Polymerizations of tetramethoxysilane (TMOS) and 1,4-bis(triethoxysilyl)benzene (BESP) were performed by dissolving the monomers and formic acid in supercritical carbon dioxide (SCCD). Monolithic gels were obtained in under 12 hours. The silica and polysilsesquioxane gels were readily dried to afford aerogels by slowly venting the SCCD. The aerogels were high surface area mesoporous materials that were characterized by solid state NMR, SEM, TEM, and gas sorption porosimetry.

Loy, D.A.; Yamanaka, A.; Carpenter, J.P. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States)] [and others

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

37

Performance improvement options for the supercritical carbon dioxide brayton cycle.  

SciTech Connect

The supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO{sub 2}) Brayton cycle is under development at Argonne National Laboratory as an advanced power conversion technology for Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactors (SFRs) as well as other Generation IV advanced reactors as an alternative to the traditional Rankine steam cycle. For SFRs, the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle eliminates the need to consider sodium-water reactions in the licensing and safety evaluation, reduces the capital cost of the SFR plant, and increases the SFR plant efficiency. Even though the S-CO{sub 2} cycle has been under development for some time and optimal sets of operating parameters have been determined, those earlier development and optimization studies have largely been directed at applications to other systems such as gas-cooled reactors which have higher operating temperatures than SFRs. In addition, little analysis has been carried out to investigate cycle configurations deviating from the selected 'recompression' S-CO{sub 2} cycle configuration. In this work, several possible ways to improve S-CO{sub 2} cycle performance for SFR applications have been identified and analyzed. One set of options incorporates optimization approaches investigated previously, such as variations in the maximum and minimum cycle pressure and minimum cycle temperature, as well as a tradeoff between the component sizes and the cycle performance. In addition, the present investigation also covers options which have received little or no attention in the previous studies. Specific options include a 'multiple-recompression' cycle configuration, intercooling and reheating, as well as liquid-phase CO{sub 2} compression (pumping) either by CO{sub 2} condensation or by a direct transition from the supercritical to the liquid phase. Some of the options considered did not improve the cycle efficiency as could be anticipated beforehand. Those options include: a double recompression cycle, intercooling between the compressor stages, and reheating between the turbine stages. Analyses carried out as part of the current investigation confirm the possibilities of improving the cycle efficiency that have been identified in previous investigations. The options in this group include: increasing the heat exchanger and turbomachinery sizes, raising of the cycle high end pressure (although the improvement potential of this option is very limited), and optimization of the low end temperature and/or pressure to operate as close to the (pseudo) critical point as possible. Analyses carried out for the present investigation show that significant cycle performance improvement can sometimes be realized if the cycle operates below the critical temperature at its low end. Such operation, however, requires the availability of a heat sink with a temperature lower than 30 C for which applicability of this configuration is dependent upon the climate conditions where the plant is constructed (i.e., potential performance improvements are site specific). Overall, it is shown that the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle efficiency can potentially be increased to 45 %, if a low temperature heat sink is available and incorporation of larger components (e.g.., heat exchangers or turbomachinery) having greater component efficiencies does not significantly increase the overall plant cost.

Moisseytsev, A.; Sienicki, J. J.; Nuclear Engineering Division

2008-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

38

Study of Acid Response of Qatar Carbonate Rocks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

STUDY OF ACID RESPONSE OF QATAR CARBONATE ROCKS A Thesis by ZHAOHONG WANG Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... December 2011 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering Study of Acid Response of Qatar Carbonate Rocks Copyright 2011 Zhaohong Wang STUDY OF ACID RESPONSE OF QATAR CARBONATE ROCKS A Thesis...

Wang, Zhaohong

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

39

Project Profile: Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Turbo-Expander and Heat Exchangers  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Southwest Research Institute (SWRI) and its partners, under the 2012 Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) SunShot R&D funding opportunity announcement (FOA), are developing a supercritical carbon dioxide (s-CO2) power cycle that combines high efficiencies and low costs for modular CSP applications.

40

Properties and processing of corn oils obtained by extraction with supercritical carbon dioxide  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Crude oils were extracted from wet- and dry-milled corn germs with supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2) at 50–90 C and 8,000–12,000 psi and were characterized for color, free fatty acids, phosphorus, refining lo...

G. R. List; J. P. Friedrich…

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rocks supercritical carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Carbon-nitrogen bond-forming reactions in supercritical and expanded-liquid carbon dioxide media : green synthetic chemistry with multiscale reaction and phase behavior modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The goal of this work was to develop a detailed understanding of carbon-nitrogen (C-N) bond-forming reactions of amines carried out in supercritical and expanded-liquid carbon dioxide (CO2) media. Key motivations behind ...

Ciccolini, Rocco P

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

A comparative study of polyethylene oxide/nanoclay composite preparation via supercritical carbon dioxide and melt processing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The efficacy of supercritical carbon dioxide (ScCO2...) treatment compared with conventional melt processing methods in preparing nanoclay composites from poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO)...2 processing yielded more ho...

Gordon Armstrong; Keith Fortune

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

A Computational Study on the Thermal-Hydraulic Behavior of Supercritical Carbon Dioxide in Various Printed Circuit Heat Exchanger Designs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that will bridge the gap between energy production and consumption. To decrease the high demand alternative fuel sources are gaining in popularity. The supercritical carbon dioxide Brayton power cycle has been proposed as a possible cycle for nuclear...

Matsuo, Bryce

2013-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

44

High-Efficiency Receivers for Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Cycles  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This fact sheet describes a project awarded under the DOE's 2012 SunShot Concentrating Solar Power R&D award program. The team, led by Brayton Energy, aims to develop and demonstrate a low-cost, high-efficiency solar receiver that is compatible with s-CO2 cycles and modern thermal storage subsystems. Supercritical CO2 Brayton-cycle engines have the potential to increase conversion efficiency to more than 50%. This high conversion efficiency drives down the cost of the supporting solar field, tower, and thermal storage systems, which could significantly reduce the lifetime costs of a CSP system to achieve the SunShot goal.

45

In Situ Infrared Spectroscopic Study of Brucite Carbonation in Dry to Water-Saturated Supercritical Carbon Dioxide  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In Situ Infrared Spectroscopic Study of Brucite Carbonation in Dry to Water-Saturated Supercritical Carbon Dioxide ... In this study, we used high-pressure infrared spectroscopy to examine the carbonation of brucite (Mg(OH)2) in situ over a 24 h reaction period with scCO2 containing water concentrations between 0% and 100% saturation, at temperatures of 35, 50, and 70 °C, and at a pressure of 100 bar. ... Little or no detectable carbonation was observed when brucite was reacted with neat scCO2. ...

John S. Loring; Christopher J. Thompson; Changyong Zhang; Zheming Wang; Herbert T. Schaef; Kevin M. Rosso

2012-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

46

Deposition of Platinum Nanoparticles on Carbon Nanotubes by Supercritical Fluid Method  

SciTech Connect

Carbon nanotube-supported platinum nanoparticles with a 5-15 nm diameter size range can be synthesized by hydrogen reduction of platinum(II) acetylacetonate in methanol modified supercritical carbon dioxide. XPS and XRD spectra indicate that the carbon nanotubes contain zero-valent platinum metal and high-resolution TEM images show that the visible lattice fringes of the Pt particles are crystallites. Carbon nanotubes synthesized with 25% by weight of Pt nanoparticles exhibit a higher activity for hydrogenation of benzene compared with a commercial carbon black platinum catalyst. The carbon nanotube-supported Pt nanocatalyst can be reused at least six times for the hydrogenation reaction without losing activity. The carbon nanotube-supported Pt nanoparticles are also highly active for electrochemical oxidation of methanol and for reduction of oxygen suggesting their potential use as a new electrocatalyst for polymer electrode fuel cell applications.

Yen, Clive; Cui, Xiaoli; Pan, H. B.; Wang, S.; Lin, Yuehe; Wai, Chien M.

2005-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

47

Modeling of Seismic Signatures of Carbonate Rock Types  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbonate reservoirs of different rock types have wide ranges of porosity and permeability, creating zones with different reservoir quality and flow properties. This research addresses how seismic technology can be used to identify different...

Jan, Badr H.

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

48

Asphaltene Deposition in Carbonate Rocks: Experimental Investigation and Numerical Simulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Asphaltene Deposition in Carbonate Rocks: Experimental Investigation and Numerical Simulation ... Interfacial tension (IFT) as one of the main properties for efficient CO2 flooding planning in oil reservoirs depends strongly on pressure, temperature, and composition of the reservoir fluids. ...

Shahin Kord; Rohaldin Miri; Shahab Ayatollahi; Mehdi Escrochi

2012-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

49

Evaluation and Optimization of a Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Power Conversion Cycle for Nuclear Applications  

SciTech Connect

There have been a number of studies involving the use of gases operating in the supercritical mode for power production and process heat applications. Supercritical carbon dioxide (CO2) is particularly attractive because it is capable of achieving relatively high power conversion cycle efficiencies in the temperature range between 550°C and 750°C. Therefore, it has the potential for use with any type of high-temperature nuclear reactor concept, assuming reactor core outlet temperatures of at least 550°C. The particular power cycle investigated in this paper is a supercritical CO2 Recompression Brayton Cycle. The CO2 Recompression Brayton Cycle can be used as either a direct or indirect power conversion cycle, depending on the reactor type and reactor outlet temperature. The advantage of this cycle when compared to the helium Brayton Cycle is the lower required operating temperature; 550°C versus 850°C. However, the supercritical CO2 Recompression Brayton Cycle requires an operating pressure in the range of 20 MPa, which is considerably higher than the required helium Brayton cycle operating pressure of 8 MPa. This paper presents results of analyses performed using the UniSim process analyses software to evaluate the performance of the supercritical CO2 Brayton Recompression Cycle for different reactor outlet temperatures. The UniSim model assumed a 600 MWt reactor power source, which provides heat to the power cycle at a maximum temperature of between 550°C and 750°C. The UniSim model used realistic component parameters and operating conditions to model the complete power conversion system. CO2 properties were evaluated, and the operating range for the cycle was adjusted to take advantage of the rapidly changing conditions near the critical point. The UniSim model was then optimized to maximize the power cycle thermal efficiency at the different maximum power cycle operating temperatures. The results of the analyses showed that power cycle thermal efficiencies in the range of 40 to 50% can be achieved.

Edwin A. Harvego; Michael G. McKellar

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Supercritical CO2-Corrosion in Heat Treated Steel Pipes during Carbon Capture and Storage CCS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Heat treatment of steels used for engineering a saline aquifer Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) site may become...2...) into deep geological rock formations. 13% Chromium steel injection pipes heat treated differ...

Anja Pfennig; Phillip Zastrow…

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Solubility of Small-Chain Carboxylic Acids in Supercritical Carbon Dioxide  

SciTech Connect

The solubility of heptanoic acid and octanoic acid in supercritical carbon dioxide has been determined at temperatures of (313.15, 323.15, and 333.15) K over a pressure range of (8.5 to 30.0) MPa, depending upon the solute. The solubility of heptanoic acid ranged from a solute concentration of (0.08 ± 0.03) kg�m -3 (T = 323.15 K, p = 8.5 MPa) to (147 ± 0.2) kg�m -3 (T = 323.15 K, p = 20.0 MPa). The lowest octanoic acid solubility obtained was a solute concentration of (0.40 ± 0.1) kg�m -3 (T = 333.15 K, p = 10.0 MPa), while the highest solute concentration was (151 ± 2) kg�m -3 (T = 333.15 K, p = 26.7 MPa). Additionally, solubility experiments were performed for nonanoic acid in supercritical carbon dioxide at 323.15 K and pressures of (10.0 to 30.0) MPa to add to the solubility data previously published by the authors. In general, carboxylic acid solubility increased with increasing solvent density. The results also showed that the solubility of the solutes decreased with increasing molar mass at constant supercritical-fluid density. Additionally, the efficacy of Chrastil's equation and other density-based models was evaluated for each fatty acid.

Sparks, Darrell L.; Estevez, L. Antonio; Hernandez, Rafael; McEwen, Jason; French, Todd

2010-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

52

Carbon and oxygen isotope stratigraphy of the oxfordian carbonate rocks in Amu Darya basin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Based on the detailed research on petrologic and geochemical characteristics of deposition and diagenesis of Oxfordian carbonate rocks in Amu Darya Basin, Turkmenistan, carbon and oxygen isotopes were analyzed...

Rongcai Zheng ???; Yanghui Pan ???; Can Zhao ??; Lei Wu ??…

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Supercritical carbon dioxide cleaning market assessment and commercialization/deployment plan  

SciTech Connect

Through the US Department of Energy`s Industrial Waste Program (IWP), work is being conducted to research, develop, and commercialize supercritical fluid cleaning for its potential as a safer technology in a wide range of industrial cleaning operations. Commercialization, which has not proceeded as quickly as expected, is being aided by the Joint Association for the Advancement of Supercritical Technology (JAAST), a research consortium made up of industry, university, and National Laboratory partners. Under the IWP, JAAST is facilitating interaction and communication among those involved in the technology and addressing specific issues slowing its growth and acceptance. As part of the IWP/JAAST effort, Pacific Northwest Laboratory conducted a study to (1) identify and evaluate potential markets for supercritical fluids cleaning, (2) identify and address current perceptions that inhibit the acceptance of the technology into industrial cleaning operations, and (3) develop a plan that will lead to successful deployment and implementation in potential market areas. The approach to gathering the information needed for formulating the plan was to interview several individuals involved in developing, using, or commercializing the technology, specifically, supercritical carbon dioxide (SCCO{sub 2}), the most commonly used fluid. Several potential markets were identified, including cleaning gyroscope and filling hardware; optical components; instrument bearings; computer disk drive components; medical devices; and fabrics, cloths, and rags. In cases where there are parts with intricate geometries, where water-based cleaning may corrode parts and materials, or where significant time and energy for drying is required, SCCO{sub 2} may be an especially attractive alternative. While pursuing these applications, certain barriers still need to be overcome.

Snowden-Swan, L.J.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Supercritical carbon dioxide behavior in porous silica aerogel  

SciTech Connect

Analysis of the tails of the small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) intensities relevant to samples formed by porous silica and carbon dioxide at pressures ranging from 0 to 20 MPa and at temperatures of 308 and 353 K confirms that the CO2 fluid must be treated as a two-phase system. The first of these phases is formed by the fluid closer to the silica wall than a suitable distance [delta] and the second by the fluid external to this shell. The sample scattering-length densities and shell thicknesses are determined by the Porod invariants and the oscillations observed in the Porod plots of the SANS intensities. The resulting matter densities of the shell regions (thickness 15-35 {angstrom}) are approximately equal, while those of the outer regions increase with pressure and become equal to the bulk CO2 at the higher pressures only in the low-temperature case.

Ciccariello, Salvino [Universita di Padova; Melnichenko, Yuri B [ORNL; He, Lilin [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Supercritical Fluid Attachment of Palladium Nanoparticles on...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Attachment of Palladium Nanoparticles on Aligned Carbon Nanotubes. Supercritical Fluid Attachment of Palladium Nanoparticles on Aligned Carbon Nanotubes. Abstract: Nanocomposite...

56

Artificial Neural Network Modeling of Solubilities of 21 Commonly Used Industrial Solid Compounds in Supercritical Carbon Dioxide  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Artificial Neural Network Modeling of Solubilities of 21 Commonly Used Industrial Solid Compounds in Supercritical Carbon Dioxide ... Artificial neural networks are composed of simple elements working in a parallel computational strategy. ... These elements are inspired by biological nervous systems(36-40) and are called neurons. ...

Farhad Gharagheizi; Ali Eslamimanesh; Amir H. Mohammadi; Dominique Richon

2010-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

57

A Comparison of Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Power Cycle Configurations with an Emphasis on CSP Applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Recent research suggests that an emerging power cycle technology using supercritical carbon dioxide (s-CO2) operated in a closed-loop Brayton cycle offers the potential of equivalent or higher cycle efficiency versus supercritical or superheated steam cycles at temperatures relevant for CSP applications. Preliminary design-point modeling suggests that s-CO2 cycle configurations can be devised that have similar overall efficiency but different temperature and/or pressure characteristics. This paper employs a more detailed heat exchanger model than previous work to compare the recompression and partial cooling cycles, two cycles with high design-point efficiencies, and illustrates the potential advantages of the latter. Integration of the cycles into CSP systems is studied, with a focus on sensible heat thermal storage and direct s-CO2 receivers. Results show the partial cooling cycle may offer a larger temperature difference across the primary heat exchanger, thereby potentially reducing heat exchanger cost and improving CSP receiver efficiency.

T. Neises; C. Turchi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Corrosion of austenitic and ferritic-martensitic steels exposed to supercritical carbon dioxide  

SciTech Connect

Supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO{sub 2}) is a potential coolant for advanced nuclear reactors. The corrosion behavior of austenitic steels (alloys 800H and AL-6XN) and ferritic-martensitic (FM) steels (F91 and HCM12A) exposed to S-CO{sub 2} at 650 C and 20.7 MPa is presented in this work. Oxidation was identified as the primary corrosion phenomenon. Alloy 800H had oxidation resistance superior to AL-6XN. The FM steels were less corrosion resistant than the austenitic steels, which developed thick oxide scales that tended to exfoliate. Detailed microstructure characterization suggests the effect of alloying elements such as Al, Mo, Cr, and Ni on the oxidation of the steels.

Tan, Lizhen [ORNL; Anderson, Mark [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Taylor, D [Bechtel Marine Propulsion Corporation; Allen, Todd R. [University of Wisconsin, Madison

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Fluid substitution in carbonate rocks based on the Gassmann equation and Eshelby–Walsh theory  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Fluid substitution in carbonate rocks is more difficult than it is in clastic rocks for two reasons. Firstly, the rock physics modeling uncertainties in carbonate rocks, this is due to the difficulty of accurately acquiring the moduli of carbonate rocks' solid matrix because the experimental data on carbonate rocks have not been as thoroughly studied as silici-clastic sedimentary rocks. Secondly, due to the complex pore systems of carbonate rocks, it is very difficult to model pore geometry of carbonates, and hence hard to assess how the elastic properties change as fluid saturation changes based on the traditional Biot and Gassmann theories. In order to solve these problems, we present a new fluid substitution equation of carbonate rocks using the Gassmann equation and Eshelby–Walsh theory (GEW) in this paper. Then, the specific procedures of how to calculate the moduli of carbonate rocks' solid matrix and how to measure the effect of pore geometry in fluid substitution based on the new fluid substation equation were illustrated by experimental testing about 12 carbonate rock samples in different fluid saturation scenarios and logging data. Finally, we further compared the new fluid substitution method with the conventional Gassmann fluid substitution based on the experimental data. The results verified that the new method is more accurate and reliable in the fluid substitution of complex carbonate rocks.

Quanxiong Feng; Lian Jiang; Mingquan Liu; Huan Wan; Li Chen; Wei Xiao

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

An Experimental Study of Upward and Downward Flow of Supercritical Carbon Dioxide in a Straight Pipe Heat Exchanger with Constant Wall Heat Flux  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An experimental analysis was conducted on a single circular tube heat exchanger using supercritical carbon dioxide as the working fluid. The heat exchanger was operated in two different orientations: vertically upward and downward. The experimental...

Umrigar, Eric Dara

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rocks supercritical carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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61

Photocatalytic and chemical oxidation of organic compounds in supercritical carbon dioxide. Progress report for FY97  

SciTech Connect

'The background for the project is briefly reviewed and the work done during the nine months since funding was received is documented. Work began in January, 1997. A post doctoral fellow joined the team in April. The major activities completed this fiscal year were: staffing the project, design of the experimental system, procurement of components, assembly of the system. preparation of the Safe Operating Procedure and ES and H compliance, pressure testing, establishing data collection and storage methodology, and catalyst preparation. Objective The objective of the project is to develop new chemistry for the removal of organic contaminants from supercritical carbon dioxide. This has application in processes used for continuous cleaning and extraction of parts and waste materials. A secondary objective is to increase the fundamental understanding of photocatalytic chemistry. Cleaning and extraction using supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO{sub 2}) can be applied to the solution of a wide range of environmental and pollution prevention problems in the DOE complex. Work is being done that explores scCO{sub 2} in applications ranging from cleaning contaminated soil to cleaning components constructed from plutonium. The rationale for use of scCO{sub 2} are based on the benign nature, availability and low cost, attractive solvent properties, and energy efficient separation of the extracted solute from the solvent by moderate temperature or pressure changes. To date, R and D has focussed on the methods and applications of the extraction steps of the process. Little has been done that addresses methods to polish the scCO{sub 2} for recycle in the cleaning or extraction operations. In many applications it will be desirable to reduce the level of contamination from that which would occur at steady state operation of a process. This proposal addresses chemistry to achieve that. This would be an alternative to removing a fraction of the contaminated scCO{sub 2} for disposal and using makeup scCO{sub 2}. A chemical polishing operation can reduce the release of CO{sub 2} from the process. It can also reduce the consumption of reagents that may be used in the process to enhance extraction and cleaning. A polishing operation will also reduce or avoid formation of an additional waste stream. Photocatalytic and other photochemical oxidation chemistry have not been investigated in scCO{sub 2}. The large base of information for these reactions in water, organic solvents, or air suggest that the chemistry will work in carbon dioxide. There are compelling reasons to believe that the properties of scCO{sub 2} should increase the performance of photocatalytic chemistry over that found in more conventional fluid phases.'

Blake, D.M.; Bryant, D.L.; Reinsch, V.

1997-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

62

Brucite [Mg(OH2)] carbonation in wet supercritical CO2: An in situ high pressure X-ray diffraction study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Understanding mechanisms and kinetics of mineral carbonation reactions relevant to sequestering carbon dioxide as a supercritical fluid (scCO2) in geologic formations is crucial to accurately predicting long-term storage risks. Most attention so far has been focused on reactions occurring between silicate minerals and rocks in the aqueous dominated CO2-bearing fluid. However, water-bearing scCO2 also comprises a reactive fluid, and in this situation mineral carbonation mechanisms are poorly understood. Using in situ high-pressure X-ray diffraction, the carbonation of brucite [Mg(OH)2] in wet scCO2 was examined at pressure (82 bar) as a function of water concentration and temperature (50 and 75 °C). Exposing brucite to anhydrous scCO2 at either temperature resulted in little or no detectable reaction over three days. However, addition of trace amounts of water resulted in partial carbonation of brucite into nesquehonite [MgCO3·3H2O] within a few hours at 50 °C. By increasing water content to well above the saturation level of the scCO2, complete conversion of brucite into nesquehonite was observed. Tests conducted at 75 °C resulted in the conversion of brucite into magnesite [MgCO3] instead, apparently through an intermediate nesquehonite step. Raman spectroscopy applied to brucite reacted with 18O-labeled water in scCO2 show it was incorporated into carbonate at a relatively high concentration. This supports a carbonation mechanism with at least one step involving a direct reaction between the mineral and water molecules without mediation by a condensed aqueous layer.

H.T. Schaef; C.F. Windisch Jr.; B.P. McGrail; P.F. Martin; K.M. Rosso

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Mobilization and Transport of Organic Compounds from Reservoir Rock and Caprock in Geological Carbon Sequestration Sites  

SciTech Connect

Supercritical CO2 (scCO2) is an excellent solvent for organic compounds, including benzene, toluene, ethyl-benzene, and xylene (BTEX), phenols, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Monitoring results from geological carbon sequestration (GCS) field tests has shown that organic compounds are mobilized following CO2 injection. Such results have raised concerns regarding the potential for groundwater contamination by toxic organic compounds mobilized during GCS. Knowledge of the mobilization mechanism of organic compounds and their transport and fate in the subsurface is essential for assessing risks associated with GCS. Extraction tests using scCO2 and methylene chloride (CH2Cl2) were conducted to study the mobilization of volatile organic compounds (VOCs, including BTEX), the PAH naphthalene, and n-alkanes (n-C20 – n-C30) by scCO2 from representative reservoir rock and caprock obtained from depleted oil reservoirs and coal from an enhanced coal-bed methane recovery site. More VOCs and naphthalene were extractable by scCO2 compared to the CH2Cl2 extractions, while scCO2 extractable alkane concentrations were much lower than concentrations extractable by CH2Cl2. In addition, dry scCO2 was found to extract more VOCs than water saturated scCO2, but water saturated scCO2 mobilized more naphthalene than dry scCO2. In sand column experiments, moisture content was found to have an important influence on the transport of the organic compounds. In dry sand columns the majority of the compounds were retained in the column except benzene and toluene. In wet sand columns the mobility of the BTEX was much higher than that of naphthalene. Based upon results determined for the reservoir rock, caprock, and coal samples studied here, the risk to aquifers from contamination by organic compounds appears to be relatively low; however, further work is necessary to fully evaluate risks from depleted oil reservoirs.

Zhong, Lirong; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Mitroshkov, Alexandre V.; Shewell, Jesse L.

2014-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

64

Development of advanced off-design models for supercritical carbon dioxide power cycles  

SciTech Connect

In the search for increased efficiency of utility-scale electricity generation, Brayton cycles operating with supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO{sub 2}) have found considerable interest. There are two main advantages of a S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle compared to a Rankine cycle: 1) equal or greater thermal efficiencies can be realized using significantly smaller turbomachinery, and 2) heat rejection is not limited by the saturation temperature of the working fluid, which has the potential to reduce or completely eliminate the need for cooling water and instead allow dry cooling. While dry cooling is especially advantageous for power generation in arid climates, a reduction of water consumption in any location will be increasingly beneficial as tighter environmental regulations are enacted in the future. Because daily and seasonal weather variations may result in a plant operating away from its design point, models that are capable of predicting the off-design performance of S-CO{sub 2} power cycles are necessary for characterizing and evaluating cycle configurations and turbomachinery designs on an annual basis. To this end, an off-design model of a recuperated Brayton cycle was developed based on the radial turbomachinery currently being investigated by Sandia National Laboratory. (authors)

Dyreby, J. J.; Klein, S. A.; Nellis, G. F.; Reindl, D. T. [Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison, Solar Energy Laboratory, 1343 Engineering Research Building, 1500 Engineering Drive, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Hanford/Rocky Flats collaboration on development of supercritical carbon dioxide extraction to treat mixed waste  

SciTech Connect

Proposals for demonstration work under the Department of Energy`s Mixed Waste Focus Area, during the 1996 through 1997 fiscal years included two applications of supercritical carbon dioxide to mixed waste pretreatment. These proposals included task RF15MW58 of Rocky Flats and task RL46MW59 of Hanford. Analysis of compatibilities in wastes and work scopes yielded an expectation of substantial collaboration between sites whereby Hanford waste streams may undergo demonstration testing at Rocky Flats, thereby eliminating the need for test facilities at Hanford. This form of collaboration is premised the continued deployment at Rocky Flats and the capability for Hanford samples to be treated at Rocky Flats. The recent creation of a thermal treatment contract for a facility near Hanford may alleviate the need to conduct organic extraction upon Rocky Flats wastes by providing a cost effective thermal treatment alternative, however, some waste streams at Hanford will continue to require organic extraction. Final site waste stream treatment locations are not within the scope of this document.

Hendrickson, D.W.; Biyani, R.K. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Brown, C.M.; Teter, W.L. [Kaiser-Hill Co., Golden, CO (United States)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Supercritical-fluid carbon dioxide (SCCO{sub 2}) cleaning of nuclear weapon components  

SciTech Connect

Supercritical fluid carbon dioxide (SCCO{sub 2}) has been evaluated as a cleaning solvent for the cleaning of plutonium (Pu) metal parts. The results of the evaluation show that SCCO{sub 2} is an effective alternative to halogenated solvents that are conventionally used for removing organic and inorganic contaminants from the surface of these parts. The cleaning process was demonstrated at the laboratory scale for steel and uranium substrates and has been found to be compatible with Pu. The efficacy of this cleaning method is found to be dependent on process conditions of pressure, temperature, fluid-flow rate, as well as cleaning time. Process parameters of P > 2,500 psi, T > 40 C, and moderate fluid flow rates, produced good cleaning results in less than 10 minutes using a simple flow-through process configuration. Within the parameter range studied, cleaning efficiency generally improved with increasing process pressure and flow rate. SCCO{sub 2} cleaning is suitable for a variety of component cleaning tasks and is adaptable to precision cleaning requirements. The SCCO{sub 2} cleaning process is currently being developed for deployment for weapons production at LANL.

Taylor, C.M.V.; Sivils, L.D.; Rubin, J.B.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Extraction of lanthanides from acidic solution using tributyl phosphate modified supercritical carbon dioxide  

SciTech Connect

The feasibility of using supercritical carbon dioxide as a substitute extraction solvent in nuclear reprocessing was tested by the extraction of lanthanide ions from acidic solution. Lanthanides were extracted from 6 M HNO[sub 3]-3 M LiNO[sub 3] solutions using tributyl phosphate- (TBP-) modified CO[sub 2]. Synergistic effects were also investigated using a combination of thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTA) and TBP-modified CO[sub 2] as the extractant. It was found that near-quantitative extraction of Sm[sup 3+], Eu[sup 3+], Gd[sup 3+], and Dy[sup 3+] was achieved while the extraction efficiencies for La[sup 3+], Ce[sup 3+], Yb[sup 3+], and Lu[sup 3+] were much lower. The light lanthanides extracted as Ln(NO[sub 3])[sub 3][center dot]3TBP and the heavy lanthanides extracted as Ln(NO[sub 3])[sub 3][center dot]2TBP when TBP-modified CO[sub 2] was used as the extractant, while Ln(TTA)[sub 3][center dot] 3TBP and Ln(TTA)[sub 3][center dot]2TBP adducts were extracted when TTA was added to TBP-modified CO[sub 2]. 17 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

Laintz, K.E.; Tachikawa, E. (Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Ibaraki-Ken (Japan))

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Platinum/Carbon Nanotube Nanocomposite Synthesized in Supercritical Fluid as Electrocatalysts for Low-Temperature Fuel Cells  

SciTech Connect

Carbon nanotube (CNT)-supported Pt nanoparticles catalysts have been synthesized in supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) using platinum (II) acetylacetonate as metal precursor. The structure of the catalysts has been characterized with transmission electron micrograph (TEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). TEM images show that platinum particles size is in the range of 5-10nm. XPS analysis indicates the presence of zero-valence platinum. The Pt-CNT exhibited high catalytic activity both for methanol oxidation and oxygen reduction reaction. The higher catalytic activity has been attributed to the large surface area of carbon nanotubes and the decrease in the overpotential for methanol oxidation and oxygen reduction reaction. Cyclic voltammetric measurements at different scan rates showed that the oxygen reduction reaction at the Pt-CNT electrode is a diffusion-controlled process. Analysis of the electrode kinetics using Tafel plot suggests that Pt-CNT from scCO2 provides a strong electrocatalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction. For the methanol oxidation reaction, a high ratio of forward anodic peak current to reverse anodic peak current was observed at room temperature, which implies good oxidation of methanol to carbon dioxide on the Pt-CNT electrode. This work demonstrates that Pt-CNT nanocomposites synthesized in supercritical carbon dioxide are effective electrocatalysts for low-temperature fuel cells.

Lin, Yuehe; Cui, Xiaoli; Yen, Clive; Wai, Chien M.

2005-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

69

Influence of Rock Types on Seismic Monitoring of CO2 Sequestration in Carbonate Reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) techniques such as high pressure CO2 injection may normally be required to recover oil in place in carbonate reservoirs. This study addresses how different rock types can influence the seismic monitoring of CO2 sequestration in carbonates. This research...

Mammadova, Elnara

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

70

Development and application of a steady state code for supercritical carbon dioxide cycles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The supercritical CO2 power conversion system is of interest for advanced nuclear reactor applications because the same efficiencies are obtained as for the most developed of the closed gas-turbine cycles (helium-Brayton), ...

Legault, David M. (David Michael)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Synchrotron X-ray Studies of Super-critical Carbon Dioxide /...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Program eere.energy.gov RelevanceImpact of Research Supercritical CO 2 Water Binary Fluids Geothermal region T. Tassaing et al., proc. 14th Int'l Conf. on properties of Water...

72

NERI Quarterly Progress Report -- April 1 - June 30, 2005 -- Development of a Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Brayton Cycle: Improving PBR Efficiency and Testing Material Compatibility  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this research is to improve a helium Brayton cycle and to develop a supercritical carbon dioxide Brayton cycle for the Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR) that can also be applied to the Fast Gas-Cooled Reactor (FGR) and the Very-High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (VHTR). The proposed supercritical carbon dioxide Brayton cycle will be used to improve the PBR, FGR, and VHTR net plant efficiency. Another objective of this research is to test materials to be used in the power conversion side at supercritical carbon dioxide conditions. Generally, the optimized Brayton cycle and balance of plant (BOP) to be developed from this study can be applied to Generation-IV reactor concepts. Particularly, we are interested in VHTR because it has a good chance of being built in the near future.

Chang Oh

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Heat transfer and pressure drop of supercritical carbon dioxide flowing in several printed circuit heat exchanger channel patterns  

SciTech Connect

Closed-loop Brayton cycles using supercritical carbon dioxide (SCO{sub 2}) show potential for use in high-temperature power generation applications including High Temperature Gas Reactors (HTGR) and Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactors (SFR). Compared to Rankine cycles SCO{sub 2} Brayton cycles offer similar or improved efficiency and the potential for decreased capital costs due to a reduction in equipment size and complexity. Compact printed-circuit heat exchangers (PCHE) are being considered as part of several SCO{sub 2} Brayton designs to further reduce equipment size with increased energy density. Several designs plan to use a gas cooler operating near the pseudo-critical point of carbon dioxide to benefit from large variations in thermophysical properties, but further work is needed to validate correlations for heat transfer and pressure-drop characteristics of SCO{sub 2} flows in candidate PCHE channel designs for a variety of operating conditions. This paper presents work on experimental measurements of the heat transfer and pressure drop behavior of miniature channels using carbon dioxide at supercritical pressure. Results from several plate geometries tested in horizontal cooling-mode flow are presented, including a straight semi-circular channel, zigzag channel with a bend angle of 80 degrees, and a channel with a staggered array of extruded airfoil pillars modeled after a NACA 0020 airfoil with an 8.1 mm chord length facing into the flow. Heat transfer coefficients and bulk temperatures are calculated from measured local wall temperatures and local heat fluxes. The experimental results are compared to several methods for estimating the friction factor and Nusselt number of cooling-mode flows at supercritical pressures in millimeter-scale channels. (authors)

Carlson, M. [Univ. of Wisconsin - Madison, 839 Engineering Research Building, 1500 Engineering Drive, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Kruizenga, A. [Sandia National Laboratory (United States); Anderson, M.; Corradini, M. [Univ. of Wisconsin - Madison, 839 Engineering Research Building, 1500 Engineering Drive, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Quantification and Prediction of the 3D Pore Network Evolution in Carbonate Reservoir Rocks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quantification and Prediction of the 3D Pore Network Evolution in Carbonate Reservoir Rocks E. DeD Pore Network Evolution in Carbonate Reservoir Rocks -- This study presents an integrated approach that allows the reconstruction and prediction of 3D pore structure modifications and porosity/permeability

Boyer, Edmond

75

Extraction of Uranium from Aqueous Solutions Using Ionic Liquid and Supercritical Carbon Dioxide in Conjunction  

SciTech Connect

Uranyl ions (UO2)2+ in aqueous nitric acid solutions can be extracted into supercritical CO2 (sc-CO2) via an imidazolium-based ionic liquid using tri-n-butylphosphate (TBP) as a complexing agent. The transfer of uranium from the ionic liquid to the supercritical fluid phase was monitored by UV/Vis spectroscopy using a high-pressure fiberoptic cell. The form of the uranyl complex extracted into the supercritical CO2 phase was found to be UO2(NO3)2(TBP)2. The extraction results were confirmed by UV/Vis spectroscopy and by neutron activation analysis. This technique could potentially be used to extract other actinides for applications in the field of nuclear waste management.

Wang, Joanna S.; Sheaff, Chrystal N.; Yoon, Byunghoon; Addleman, Raymond S.; Wai, Chien M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Economic analysis of a supercritical coal-fired CHP plant integrated with an absorption carbon capture installation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Energy investments in Poland are currently focused on supercritical coal-fired unit technology. It is likely, that in the future, these units are to be integrated with carbon capture and storage (CCS) installations, which enable a significant reduction of greenhouse gas emissions into the atmosphere. A significant share of the energy market in Poland is constituted by coal-fired combined heat and power (CHP) plants. The integration of these units with CCS installation can be economically inefficient. However, the lack of such integration enhances the investment risk due to the possibility of appearing on the market in the near future high prices of emission allowances. The aforementioned factors and additional favorable conditions for the development of cogeneration can cause one to consider investing in large supercritical CHP plants. This paper presents the results of an economic analysis aimed at comparing three cases of CHP plants, one without an integrated CCS installation and two with such installations. The same steam cycle structure for all variants was adopted. The cases of integrated CHP plants differ from each other in the manner in which they recover heat. For the evaluation of the respective solutions, the break-even price of electricity and avoided emission cost were used.

?ukasz Bartela; Anna Skorek-Osikowska; Janusz Kotowicz

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Numerical Investigation of Thermal Hydraulic Behavior of Supercritical Carbon Dioxide in Compact Heat Exchangers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

desirable. Henceforth, various turbulence models were used to study their impact on the heat transfer solution for these problems. The present numerical work focuses on improving the CFD model and methodologies in order to capture... NOMENCLATURE Sc Supercritical Tcr Critical temperature Vcr Critical volume Tpc Pseudo-critical temperature Ppc Pseudo-critical pressure Pcr Critical pressure Pop Operating pressure Tw Wall temperature Tb Bulk temperature Tin Inlet...

Fatima, Roma

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

78

C/H{sub 2}O reaction under supercritical conditions and their repercussions in the preparation of activated carbon  

SciTech Connect

Two chars prepared by carbonization of oak wood and anthracite were used to perform a comparative study of the gasification with supercritical water (SCW) and with steam. This work reports the effects of the type of char, the activating agent, temperature, flow rate, and particle size employed on the kinetics, mechanism of reaction, and the characteristics of the activated carbons obtained. The results show that the reactivity of the two chars is much higher with SCW than with steam. Although this increase can be explained in terms of the greater penetration of SCW and diffusional effects in the pore structure of the chars, some aspects suggest a possible change in the mechanism of reaction favored by the formation of clusters in SCW. The evolution of porosity was also found to differ when the char was gasified with SCW and with steam, being governed strongly by the starting material. When the oak char was activated with SCW, the smallest microporosity was broadened from the very first moments due to its very open pore structure, providing carbons with larger micropores and some mesoporosity. In contrast, in the case of the anthracite char, with a narrower pore structure, the evolution of the porosity was slower and less uniform, favoring external gasification of the particle. Accordingly, the carbons had a broader distribution of micropores, and mesoporosity was scarce.

Salvador, F.; Senchez-Montero, M.J.; Izquierdo, C. [University of Salamanca, Salamanca (Spain)

2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

79

Development of a Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Brayton Cycle: Improving VHTR Efficiency and Testing Material Compatibility - Final Report  

SciTech Connect

Generation IV reactors will need to be intrinsically safe, having a proliferation-resistant fuel cycle and several advantages relative to existing light water reactor (LWR). They, however, must still overcome certain technical issues and the cost barrier before it can be built in the U.S. The establishment of a nuclear power cost goal of 3.3 cents/kWh is desirable in order to compete with fossil combined-cycle, gas turbine power generation. This goal requires approximately a 30 percent reduction in power cost for stateof-the-art nuclear plants. It has been demonstrated that this large cost differential can be overcome only by technology improvements that lead to a combination of better efficiency and more compatible reactor materials. The objectives of this research are (1) to develop a supercritical carbon dioxide Brayton cycle in the secondary power conversion side that can be applied to the Very-High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (VHTR), (2) to improve the plant net efficiency by using the carbon dioxide Brayton cycle, and (3) to test material compatibility at high temperatures and pressures. The reduced volumetric flow rate of carbon dioxide due to higher density compared to helium will reduce compression work, which eventually increase plant net efficiency.

Chang H. Oh

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

The Effect of Heterogeneity on Matrix Acidizing of Carbonate Rocks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In matrix acidizing, the goal is to dissolve minerals in the rock to increase well productivity. This is accomplished by injecting an application-specific solution of acid into the formation at a pressure between the pore pressure and fracture...

Keys, Ryan S.

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rocks supercritical carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

A high-pressure atomic force microscope for imaging in supercritical carbon dioxide  

SciTech Connect

A high-pressure atomic force microscope (AFM) that enables in situ, atomic scale measurements of topography of solid surfaces in contact with supercritical CO{sub 2} (scCO{sub 2}) fluids has been developed. This apparatus overcomes the pressure limitations of the hydrothermal AFM and is designed to handle pressures up to 100 atm at temperatures up to ?350 K. A standard optically-based cantilever deflection detection system was chosen. When imaging in compressible supercritical fluids such as scCO{sub 2} , precise control of pressure and temperature in the fluid cell is the primary technical challenge. Noise levels and imaging resolution depend on minimization of fluid density fluctuations that change the fluid refractive index and hence the laser path. We demonstrate with our apparatus in situ atomic scale imaging of a calcite (CaCO{sub 3}) mineral surface in scCO{sub 2}; both single, monatomic steps and dynamic processes occurring on the (10{overbar 1}4) surface are presented. This new AFM provides unprecedented in situ access to interfacial phenomena at solid–fluid interfaces under pressure.

Lea, A.S.; Higgins, S.R.; Knauss, K.G.; Rosso, K.M.

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

82

Microemulsions of water in supercritical carbon dioxide : an in-situ NMR investigation of micelle formation and structure.  

SciTech Connect

High-pressure NMR spectroscopy was used for the first time to investigate microemulsions of water in supercritical carbon dioxide. The emulsions were formed using a family of anionic perfluoropolyether ammonium carboxylate surfactants. This system holds promise as a reaction medium for conducting homogeneous catalytic reactions within the aqueous micellular cores while, at the same time, exploiting the facile mass transfer properties of the supercritical fluid. Ammonium hexafluorophosphate was used as a water-soluble ionic guest to investigate micelle formation and structure. Under micelle-forming conditions, the PF{sub 6}{sup -} guest, surfactant, and water were uniformly dispersed throughout the CO{sub 2} phase, as demonstrated by in situ NMR imaging. In addition, the micelles were observed to form even in the absence of mechanical stirring. This spontaneous formation of micelles demonstrates that the NMR spectral properties were obtained under conditions that result in the production of thermodynamically stable microemulsions. The nuclear overhauser effect (NOE) was used to probe the micellular structure through dipole-dipole interactions between the PF{sub 6}{sup -} anion and the fluorinated backbone of the surfactant. A strong negative homonuclear NoE was observed between the PF{sub 6}{sup -} guest and the fluorine moiety that is located directly adjacent to the surfactant's carboxylate head group. This highly specific negative NOE indicates an ordered arrangement, where the PF{sub 6}{sup -} anion and carboxylate ion are located in close proximity to one another. This close association of two negatively charged ionic groups in an aqueous environment is unusual and suggests that the PF{sub 6}{sup -} guest is concentrated within the electric double layer that forms at the micellular interface.

Fremgen, D. E.; Smotkin, E. S.; Gerald, R. E.; Klingler, R. J.; Rathke, J. W.; Chemical Engineering; IIT

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Solubility of 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural in Supercritical Carbon Dioxide with and without Ethanol as Cosolvent at (314.1 to 343.2) K  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Solubility of 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural in Supercritical Carbon Dioxide with and without Ethanol as Cosolvent at (314.1 to 343.2) K ... The solubility of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) in supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) with and without ethanol (mole fraction of ethanol x3 = 0, 0.025, and 0.050) as a cosolvent was measured by the cloud point at temperatures from (314.1 to 343.2) K and pressures from (8.54 to 19.71) MPa. ... As a versatile intermediate, 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) obtained from renewable biomass resources can be converted into 2,5-furandicarboxyl acid, 2,5-dihydroxymethylfuran, 2,5-bis(hydroxymethyl)tetrahydrofuran, dimethylfuran, and other liquid alkanes by oxidation, hydrogenation, hydrogenolysis, or aldol condensation. ...

Yan Jing; Yucui Hou; Weize Wu; Weina Liu; Baogang Zhang

2010-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

84

Method for sizing and desizing yarns with liquid and supercritical carbon dioxide solvent  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is a method of sizing and desizing yarn, or more specifically to a method of coating yarn with size and removing size from yarn with liquid carbon dioxide solvent. 3 figs.

Fulton, J.L.; Yonker, C.R.; Hallen, R.R.; Baker, E.G.; Bowman, L.E.; Silva, L.J.

1999-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

85

Performance of cholesterol oxidase sequestered within reverse micelles formed in supercritical carbon dioxide  

SciTech Connect

The authors report the first results on an enzyme-induced reaction within the water core of reverse micelles that have been formed in supercritical CO{sub 2} (scCO{sub 2}). By using a perfluoropolyether ammonium carboxylate (PFPE) surfactant, the authors form reverse micelles in scCO{sub 2} with water cores and the authors show that the oxidation of cholesterol by cholesterol oxidase (ChOx) obeys Michaelis-Menten kinetics. The results of their experiments also show that (1) the optimum ChOx activity occurs when the molar ratio of H{sub 2}O-to-PFPE (R) exceeds {approximately}12, (2) the rate constant describing the conversion of the ChOx-cholesterol complex to product ({kappa}{sub cat,app}) is similar to values reported using reverse micelle systems formed in liquid alkanes, (3) the equilibrium constant that describes the ChOx-cholesterol complex dissociation (K{sub m,app}) is optimal at high R values, (4) the best-case K{sub m,app} is {approximately}2-fold better than the value reported using reverse micelles formed in liquid alkanes, (5) there is little change in the ChOx {kappa}{sub cat,app} and K{sub m,app} as the authors adjust the CO{sub 2} pressure between 100 and 260 bar, and (6) the ChOx was active within the PFPE water pool for at least 5 h; however, after 8 or more hours within the PFPE water pool, ChOx became temporarily inactive.

Kane, M.A.; Baker, G.A.; Pandey, S.; Bright, F.V.

2000-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

86

Chapter 2 - The Application of the Concepts of Sequence Stratigraphy to Carbonate Rock Sequences  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Sequence stratigraphic principals can be applied to carbonate rock sequences. Typical tropical shallow-water carbonate shelves lead to sequence boundary exposure across carbonate platforms, and carbonate deep water deposits during highstands. Rapid carbonate sedimentation across a shelf leads to vertical accretion during the TST and progradation during the HST. Reef-bound shelf margins tend to evolve into escarpment margins with megabreccia development on the slope. Examples are the Devonian of the Canning Basin and the Cretaceous of Mexico. Carbonate ramps typically develop lowstand prograding complexes. Cool-water carbonates develop ramp morphology, independent of light with no framework reefs, and parallel the sequence stratigraphic framework of siliciclastics. The cool water sediments of the Great Australian Bight is an example Mud mound sequences as seen in Morocco are generally independent of sea-level changes, so most sequence stratigraphic concepts are not applicable. In mixed carbonate-siliciclastic situations reciprocal sedimentation results with HST carbonates dominating in the basin and LST clastics dominating in the basin. Sequence stratigraphic concepts are generally not applicable to lacustrine carbonates, but lake dessication cycles present a similar stratigraphic framework as seen in the Tertiary Green River of the Western United States.

Clyde H. Moore; William J. Wade

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Enhancing Shale Gas Recovery by High-Temperature Supercritical CO2 Flooding  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We examine a new technology for shale gas recovery: high-temperature supercritical carbon dioxide flooding ... of supercritical carbon dioxide, the characteristics of shale gas reservoirs, the adsorption/desorpti...

Feiying Ma; Yongqing Wang; Lin Wang

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Gasification of Glucose in Supercritical Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Gasification of Glucose in Supercritical Water ... Gasification of 0.6 M glucose in supercritical water was investigated at a temperature range from 480 to 750 °C and 28 MPa with a reactor residence time of 10?50 s. ... Carbon gasification efficiency reached 100% at 700 °C. ...

In-Gu Lee; Mi-Sun Kim; Son-Ki Ihm

2002-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

89

Supercritical CO2Brayton Cycle Control Strategy for Autonomous Liquid Metal-Cooled Reactors  

SciTech Connect

This presentation discusses a supercritical carbon dioxide brayton cycle control strategy for autonomous liquid metal-cooled reactors.

Moisseytsev, A.; Sienicki, J.J.

2004-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

90

Deposition of Platinum Nanoparticles on Carbon Nanotubes by Supercriti...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Deposition of Platinum Nanoparticles on Carbon Nanotubes by Supercritical Fluid Method. Deposition of Platinum Nanoparticles on Carbon Nanotubes by Supercritical Fluid Method....

91

Basic Engineering Research for D and D of R Reactor Storage Pond Sludge: Electrokinetics, Carbon Dioxide Extraction, and Supercritical Water Oxidation  

SciTech Connect

Large quantities of mixed low level waste (MLLW) that fall under the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) exist and will continue to be generated during D and D operations at DOE sites across the country. The standard process for destruction of MLLW is incineration, which has an uncertain future. The extraction and destruction of PCBs from MLLW was the subject of this research Supercritical Fluid Extraction (SFE) with carbon dioxide with 5% ethanol as cosolvent and Supercritical Waster Oxidation (SCWO) were the processes studied in depth. The solid matrix for experimental extraction studies was Toxi-dry, a commonly used absorbent made from plant material. PCB surrogates were 1.2,4-trichlorobenzene (TCB) and 2-chlorobiphenyl (2CBP). Extraction pressures of 2,000 and 4,000 psi and temperatures of 40 and 80 C were studied. Higher extraction efficiencies were observed with cosolvent and at high temperature, but pressure little effect. SCWO treatment of the treatment of the PCB surrogates resulted in their destruction below detection limits.

Michael A. Matthews; David A. Bruce,; Thomas A. Davis; Mark C. Thies; John W. Weidner; Ralph E. White

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Biomass Gasification in Supercritical Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Biomass Gasification in Supercritical Water† ... A packed bed of carbon within the reactor catalyzed the gasification of these organic vapors in the water; consequently, the water effluent of the reactor was clean. ... A method for removing plugs from the reactor was developed and employed during an 8-h gasification run involving potato wastes. ...

Michael Jerry Antal, Jr.; Stephen Glen Allen; Deborah Schulman; Xiaodong Xu; Robert J. Divilio

2000-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

93

The kerogen types and pyrolysis kinetics of several Chinese carbonate source rocks  

SciTech Connect

The kerogen types and pyrolysis kinetics of several Chinese carbonate source rocks are studied in this paper. Samples involved are from Proterozoic to Neogene, including marine and lacustrine environments. Their TOC range from 0.15% to 1.69%. The carbonate contents are more than 80% except the Paleozoic Pingliang marl, Shanganning Basin. The maturations range from immature to late stage of oil generation. The Green River calcareous shale and Ghareb marl, Jordan are included for comparison. The study of kerogen types is based on analyses of kerogens including: optical method, elemental analysis, infrared spectrum, rock eval pyrolysis, pyrolysis-gas chromatography, and C-13 Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectrometry. The results of the study shows that most of the kerogens studied belong to type 1 or sapropelic type 2 (2a), while the kerogens from Triassic Qinglong limestone (restricted by), Jiangsu and Neogene Guantao limestone (small fault lacustrine), Shandong belong to mixed type 2 (2b). The study of pyrolysis kinetics is based on standard Rock Eval information (5 C/min.), a two-stage first order reaction model and optimization method which has been confirmed to be a simple, practical and effective method by a previous study. The current study reveals that different kerogen types have their own kinetic characteristics. Generally, kinetics parameters of type 1 and type 2a kerogens are greater than those of type 2b. However, high-sulfur type 1 and type 2a kerogens, such as those from Ghareb marl, Jordan, and Proterozoic kerogen, North China have relatively low kinetics parameters. The study also shows that kerogens with similar hydrocarbon potential (HI) and elemental composition (atomic H/C, O/C) may have very different kinetic processes.

Zhang, Youcheng (Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Oceanography); Shisheng Hao (Petroleum Univ., Beijing (China). Dept. of Geosciences)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Supercritical Fluid Extraction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.5 ,~---------------~, .~ I \\ I \\ (lJ o I \\ I , "0 I \\ I S '\\ l 0.1 L-__'--__L-__'--__L-_....:'.............L.:z:----L__..J o 1.0 _2.0 3.0 Reduced Density Fi g. 1. Pressure-versus-density isotherms for pure carbon dioxide (T = 304K, P c = 7.38 MPa, 3 c p = 0..., wood [28, 29~, and oil shal e [4J although these processes are far from commercialization. The Standard Oil Co. of Indiana used supercritical water with a density above 0.2 g/cc to recovery the bitumen from tar sand, while Williams used...

Johnston, K. P.; Flarsheim, W. M.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

BASIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH FOR D&D OF R REACTOR STORAGE POND SLUDGE: ELECTROKINETICS, CARBON DIOXIDE EXTRACTION, AND SUPERCRITICAL WATER OXIDATION  

SciTech Connect

Large quantities of mixed low level waste (MLLW) that fall under the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) exist and will continue to be generated during D&D operations at DOE sites across the country. Currently, the volume of these wastes is approximately 23,500 m3, and the majority of these wastes (i.e., almost 19,000 m3) consist of PCBs and PCB-contaminated materials. Further, additional PCB-contaminated waste will be generated during D&D operations in the future. The standard process for destruction of this waste is incineration, which generates secondary waste that must be disposed, and the TSCA incinerator at Oak Ridge has an uncertain future. Beyond incineration, no proposed process for the recovery and/or destruction of these persistent pollutants has emerged as the preferred choice for DOE cleanup. The main objective of the project was to investigate and develop a deeper understanding of the thermodynamic and kinetic reactions involved in the extraction and destruction of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) from low-level mixed waste solid matrices in order to provide data that would permit the design of a combined-cycle extraction/destruction process. The specific research objectives were to investigate benign dense-fluid extraction with either carbon dioxide (USC) or hot water (CU), followed by destruction of the extracted PCBs via either electrochemical (USC) or hydrothermal (CU) oxidation. Two key advantages of the process are that it isolates and concentrates the PCBs from the solid matrices (thereby reducing waste volume greatly and removing the remaining low-level mixed waste from TSCA control), and little, if any, secondary solvent or solid wastes are generated. This project was a collaborative effort involving the University of South Carolina (USC), Clemson University (CU), and Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) (including the Savannah River Technology Center, Facilities Decommissioning Division and Regulatory Compliance). T he project was directed and coordinated by the South Carolina Universities Research and Education Foundation (SCUREF), a consortium of the four public research universities in South Carolina. The original plan was to investigate two PCB extraction processes (supercritical carbon dioxide and hot, pressurized water) and two PCB destruction processes (electrochemical oxidation and hydrothermal oxidation). However, at approximately the mid-point of the three year project, it was decided to focus on the more promising extraction process (supercritical carbon dioxide) and the more promising destruction process (supercritical water oxidation). This decision was taken because the investigation of two processes simultaneously by each university was stretching resources too thin, and because the electrochemical oxidation process needed more concentrated research before it would be ready for application to PCB destruction. The solid matrix chosen for experimental work was Toxi-dry, a commonly used adsorbent made from plant material that is used in cleanup of spills and/or liquid solvents. The Toxi-dry was supplied by the research team member from the Facilities Decommissioning Division, WSRC. This adsorbent is a major component of job control waste.

Matthews, Michael A.; Bruce,David; Davis,Thomas; Thies, Mark; Weidner, John; White, Ralph

2001-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

96

Supercritical Fluid Extraction- Process Simulation and Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SIMULATION P-1 SFE FEED PUMP SUPERCRITICAL FLUID EXTRACTOR (SFE) 2 T-1 10 7 .r D-2 SFE BOnoMS FLASH 9 222 The extract is decanted and fed to the fractionator to recover solvent carbon dioxide overhead and waterlIPA/carbon dioxide out...

Martin, C. L.; Seibert, A. F.

97

Analysis of Carbamate Pesticides by Packed Column Supercritical Fluid Chromatography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......oxamyl. 1 8 2 Figure 5. The effect of composition (% methanol in carbon dioxide) on...and R. Moulder. Trace anal ysis of agrochemicals by supercritical fluid chromatography...vented injection in the analysis of agrochemicals by capillary supercritical fluid chromatography......

Terry A. Berger; William H. Wilson; Jerome F. Deye

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Fundamental kinetics of methane oxidation in supercritical water. Summary report  

SciTech Connect

Fundamental understanding of the oxidation of compounds in supercritical water is essential for the design, development and operation of a supercritical water oxidation unit. Previous work in our group determined the oxidation kinetics of carbon monoxide and ethanol in supercritical water for temperatures ranging from 400 to 540 C. Oxidation studies of methane up to 700 C have recently been completed and are presented in this report. Theoretical studies of fundamental kinetics and mechanistic pathways for the oxidation of methane in supercritical water are discussed. Application of current gas phase elementary reaction models are briefly presented and their limitations discussed.

Webley, P.A.; Tester, J.W. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

1989-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

99

In Situ Infrared Spectroscopic Study of Brucite Carbonation in...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbonation in Dry to Water-Saturated Supercritical Carbon Dioxide. Abstract: In geologic carbon sequestration, while part of the injected carbon dioxide will dissolve into host...

100

Economic analysis of amine based carbon dioxide capture system with bi-pressure stripper in supercritical coal-fired power plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Post-combustion CO2 capture and storage is among the most mature technologies to capture, compress, transport and store CO2 from flue gas in coal-fired power plant. This paper presents the simulation of monoethanolamine (MEA) based CO2 capture and compression process integrated within a 600 MWe supercritical coal-fired power plant using chemical process simulators. Comparison between bi-pressure stripper and single-pressure stripper reveals that improved CO2 capture system with bi-pressure stripper minimizes energy penalty of CO2 capture and compression by up to 6.3% at full unit load. The study also explores optimization of some important process parameters affecting the performance of coal-fired power plant by taking into account both CO2 capture process and CO2 compression at full unit load. These parameters include operating stripper pressure, CO2 capture efficiency and steam extraction location. Results show that the optimal stripper pressure is within the range of 1.9–2.1 bar and feasible CO2 capture efficiency is between 60% and 90%. Results also show that low-pressure steam extraction reduces energy penalty. Evaluation of improved CO2 capture system is also performed at part flue gas load ranging from 40% to 90%. The study reveals that operating at part flue gas load, as compared with full load, increases energy penalty of carbon capture. Not only energy penalty but also lean solution flow rate and plant efficiency are studied at different flue load levels in this paper. In addition, results show that bi-pressure stripper configuration is also effective in reducing energy penalty at part unit load.

Haiwen Liang; Zhigao Xu; Fengqi Si

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rocks supercritical carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Selective chelation and extraction of lanthanides and actinides with supercritical fluids  

SciTech Connect

This report is made up of three independent papers: (1) Supercritical Fluid Extraction of Thorium and Uranium with Fluorinated Beta-Diketones and Tributyl Phosphate, (2) Supercritical Fluid Extraction of Lanthanides with Beta-Diketones and Mixed Ligands, and (3) A Group Contribution Method for Predicting the Solubility of Solid Organic Compounds in Supercritical Carbon Dioxide. Experimental data are presented demonstrating the successful extraction of thorium and uranium using fluorinated beta-diketones to form stable complexes that are extracted with supercritical carbon dioxide. The conditions for extracting the lanthanide ions from liquid and solid materials using supercritical carbon dioxide are presented. In addition, the Peng-Robison equation of state and thermodynamic equilibrium are used to predict the solubilities of organic solids in supercritical carbon dioxide from the sublimation pressure, critical properties, and a centric factor of the solid of interest.

Brauer, R.D.; Carleson, T.E.; Harrington, J.D.; Jean, F.; Jiang, H.; Lin, Y.; Wai, C.M.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Geochemistry of silicate-rich rocks can curtail spreading of carbon dioxide in subsurface aquifers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of carbon sequestration and dissolution rates in the subsurface, suggesting that pooled carbon dioxide may remain in the shallower regions of the formation for hundreds to thousands of years. The deeper regions of the reservoir can remain virtually carbon... interests. References 1. Marini, L. Geochemical Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide. (Elsevier 2007). 2. IPCC Special Report on Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage, edited by Metz B. et al. (Cambridge University Press, UK and New York, USA, 2005). 3. Falkowski...

Cardoso, S. S. S.; Andres, J. T. H.

2014-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

103

Rock Physics-Based Carbonate Reservoir Pore Type Evaluation by Combining Geological, Petrophysical and Seismic Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

model, similar to modern marine hydrological environments within carbonate islands. How to evaluate carbonate reservoir permeability heterogeneity from 3 D seismic data has been a dream for reservoir geoscientists, which is a key factor to optimize...

Dou, Qifeng

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

104

Evaluation of Packed Columns in Supercritical Extraction Processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

used was 1/4 inch Raschig rings with a surface area of 220 ft 2 /ft 3 . The supercritical systems studied were carbon dioxide/ethanol/water and carbon dioxide/isopropanol/water at 102 atmos pheres and 35 0 C and 102 atmospheres and 40 0 C... to the differences in performance of the two systems. Carbon dioxide is one of the most commonly used supercritical solvents because it is non-toxic and non-flammable. Carbon dioxide is inexpensive rela tive to other solvents and has a conveniently low critical...

Rathkamp, P. J.; Fair, J. R.; Humphrey, J. L.

105

The Effect of Acid Additives on Carbonate Rock Wettability and Spent Acid Recovery in Low Permeability Gas Carbonates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Spent acid retention in the near-wellbore region causes reduction of relative permeability to gas and eventually curtailed gas production. In low-permeability gas carbonate reservoirs, capillary forces are the key parameters that affect the trapping...

Saneifar, Mehrnoosh

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

106

Multiphase Sequestration Geochemistry: Model for Mineral Carbonation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for Mineral Carbonation. Abstract: Carbonation of formation minerals converts low viscosity supercritical CO2 injected into deep saline reservoirs for geologic sequestration...

107

MULTIDISCIPLINARY IMAGING OF ROCK PROPERTIES IN CARBONATE RESERVOIRS FOR FLOW-UNIT TARGETING  

SciTech Connect

Excellent progress has been made on all project objectives and goals. All tasks have been completed in the Phase 1 study area, the initial area of project focus. Primary elements of this work include the following: The stratigraphic architecture has been established through correlation of wireline logs guided by core and outcrop studies of facies and cyclicity. A porosity model has been developed that creates a basis for calculation of porosity for wells in the study area. Rock fabrics have been defined by sampling, analysis, and description of cores and used to create transforms for calculating permeability and oil saturation from porosity data. Finally, a preliminary 3-D model has been constructed that incorporates stratigraphic architecture, rock-fabric data, and petrophysical data. Reservoir volumetrics calculated from the model show that a very large fraction of the original oil in place remains.

Stephen C. Ruppel

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Thermophysical Properties of Pore-confined Supercritical CO2 by Vibrating Tube Densimetry  

SciTech Connect

Properties of fluids confined in pore systems are needed for modeling fluid flow, fluid-rock interactions, and changes in reservoir porosity. The properties of CO2-rich fluids are particularly relevant to geothermal heat mining using carbon dioxide instead of water. While manometric, volumetric, and gravimetric techniques have been used successfully to investigate adsorption of low-density subcritical vapors, the results have not been satisfactory at higher, liquid-like densities of supercritical fluids. Even if the requirements for high experimental accuracy in the neighborhood of the critical region were met, these methods are fundamentally unable to deliver the total adsorption capacity, since the properties (e.g. density) of the adsorbed phase are in general not known. In this work we utilize vibrating tube densimetry for the first time to measure the total amount of fluid contained within a mesoporous solid. The method is first demonstrated using propane at subcritical and supercritical temperatures between 35 C and 97 C confined in silica aerogel (density 0.2 g cm-3, porosity 90%) that was synthesized inside Hastelloy U-tubes. Sorption and desorption of carbon dioxide on the same solid was measured at 35 C at pressures to 120 bar (density to 0.767 g cm-3). The results show total adsorption increasing monotonically with increasing pressure, unlike excess adsorption isotherms which show a maximum close to the critical density.

Gruszkiewicz, Miroslaw {Mirek} S [ORNL; Wesolowski, David J [ORNL; Cole, David R [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Sr isotope chemostratigraphy of Upper Jurassic carbonate rocks in the Demerdzhi Plateau (Crimean Mountains)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The first Sr chemostratigraphic data are obtained for the Upper Jurassic carbonate sections in the Demerdzhi Plateau of the Crimean Mountains. The oncoid, microbial, and organogenic-detrital limestone varietie...

S. V. Rud’ko; A. B. Kuznetsov; V. K. Piskunov

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

MULTIDISCIPLINARY IMAGING OF ROCK PROPERTIES IN CARBONATE RESERVOIRS FOR FLOW-UNIT TARGETING  

SciTech Connect

Despite declining production rates, existing reservoirs in the US contain large quantities of remaining oil and gas that constitute a huge target for improved diagnosis and imaging of reservoir properties. The resource target is especially large in carbonate reservoirs, where conventional data and methodologies are normally insufficient to resolve critical scales of reservoir heterogeneity. The objectives of the research described in this report were to develop and test such methodologies for improved imaging, measurement, modeling, and prediction of reservoir properties in carbonate hydrocarbon reservoirs. The focus of the study is the Permian-age Fullerton Clear Fork reservoir of the Permian Basin of West Texas. This reservoir is an especially appropriate choice considering (a) the Permian Basin is the largest oil-bearing basin in the US, and (b) as a play, Clear Fork reservoirs have exhibited the lowest recovery efficiencies of all carbonate reservoirs in the Permian Basin.

Stephen C. Ruppel

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

A 3,800-million-year isotopic record of life from carbon in sedimentary rocks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... acid. Equilibrium fractionations that also discriminate in favour of a specific isotope are important in alternative pathways that use bicarbonate and are supposedly essential in inter- and intramolecular isotope exchange ... Once photoautotrophic organisms had learned to operate the CO2-fixing machine by means of light energy, we can assume that life processes attained partial control of the terrestrial carbon cycle. ...

Manfred Schidlowski

1988-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

112

Self-assembly of surfactants in a supercritical solvent from lattice Monte Carlo simulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Self-assembly of surfactants in a supercritical solvent from lattice Monte Carlo simulations Martin self-assembly of surfactants in a supercritical solvent by large-scale Monte Carlo simulations. CarbonCO2.3 Surfactant molecules used in scCO2 have two mutually incompatible components: a CO2-philic tail

Lisal, Martin

113

Enhanced Miscibility of Low-Molecular-Weight Polystyrene/Polyisoprene Blends in Supercritical CO2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with nitrogen decouple the plasticization efficacy of CO2 from free-volume compression due to hydrostaticEnhanced Miscibility of Low-Molecular-Weight Polystyrene/Polyisoprene Blends in Supercritical CO2 solution temperature (UCST) polymer blend in the presence of supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2

Raghavan, Srinivasa

114

Strontium Isotopic Composition of Paleozoic Carbonate Rocks in the Nevada Test Site Vicinity, Clark, Lincoln, and Nye Counties, Nevada and Inyo County, California.  

SciTech Connect

Ground water moving through permeable Paleozoic carbonate rocks represents the most likely pathway for migration of radioactive contaminants from nuclear weapons testing at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. The strontium isotopic composition (87Sr/86Sr) of ground water offers a useful means of testing hydrochemical models of regional flow involving advection and reaction. However, reaction models require knowledge of 87Sr/86Sr data for carbonate rock in the Nevada Test Site vicinity, which is scarce. To fill this data gap, samples of core or cuttings were selected from 22 boreholes at depth intervals from which water samples had been obtained previously around the Nevada Test Site at Yucca Flat, Frenchman Flat, Rainier Mesa, and Mercury Valley. Dilute acid leachates of these samples were analyzed for a suite of major- and trace-element concentrations (MgO, CaO, SiO2, Al2O3, MnO, Rb, Sr, Th, and U) as well as for 87Sr/86Sr. Also presented are unpublished analyses of 114 Paleozoic carbonate samples from outcrops, road cuts, or underground sites in the Funeral Mountains, Bare Mountain, Striped Hills, Specter Range, Spring Mountains, and ranges east of the Nevada Test Site measured in the early 1990's. These data originally were collected to evaluate the potential for economic mineral deposition at the potential high-level radioactive waste repository site at Yucca Mountain and adjacent areas (Peterman and others, 1994). Samples were analyzed for a suite of trace elements (Rb, Sr, Zr, Ba, La, and Ce) in bulk-rock powders, and 87Sr/86Sr in partial digestions of carbonate rock using dilute acid or total digestions of silicate-rich rocks. Pre-Tertiary core samples from two boreholes in the central or western part of the Nevada Test Site also were analyzed. Data are presented in tables and summarized in graphs; however, no attempt is made to interpret results with respect to ground-water flow paths in this report. Present-day 87Sr/86Sr values are compared to values for Paleozoic seawater present at the time of deposition. Many of the samples have 87Sr/86Sr compositions that remain relatively unmodified from expected seawater values. However, rocks underlying the northern Nevada Test Site as well as rocks exposed at Bare Mountain commonly have elevated 87Sr/86Sr values derived from post-depositional addition of radiogenic Sr most likely from fluids circulating through rubidium-rich Paleozoic strata or Precambrian basement rocks.

James B. Paces; Zell E. Peterman; Kiyoto Futa; Thomas A. Oliver; and Brian D. Marshall.

2007-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

115

MULTIDISCIPLINARY IMAGING OF ROCK PROPERTIES IN CARBONATE RESERVOIRS FOR FLOW-UNIT TARGETING  

SciTech Connect

Our analysis and imaging of reservoir properties at the Fullerton Clear Fork field (Figure 1) is in its final stages. Major accomplishments during the past 6 months include: (1) characterization of facies and cyclicity in cores, (2) correlation of cycles and sequences using core-calibrated wireline logs, (3) calculation and modeling of wireline porosity, (4) analysis of new cores for conventional and special core analysis data, (5) construction of full-field reservoir model, and (6) revision of 3D seismic inversion of reservoir porosity and permeability. One activity has been eliminated from the originally proposed tasks. Task 3 (Characterization and Modeling of Rock Mechanics and Fractures) has been deleted because we have determined that fractures are not significant contributing in the reservoir under study. A second project extension has been asked for to extend the project until 7/31/04. Remaining project activities are: (1) interpretation and synthesis of fieldwide data, (2) preparation of 3D virtual reality demonstrations of reservoir model and attributes, (3) transfer of working data sets to the operator for reservoir implementation and decision-making, and (4) preparation and distribution of final reports.

Stephen C. Ruppel

2004-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

116

Using supercritical fluids to refine hydrocarbons  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This is a method to reactively refine hydrocarbons, such as heavy oils with API gravities of less than 20.degree. and bitumen-like hydrocarbons with viscosities greater than 1000 cp at standard temperature and pressure using a selected fluid at supercritical conditions. The reaction portion of the method delivers lighter weight, more volatile hydrocarbons to an attached contacting device that operates in mixed subcritical or supercritical modes. This separates the reaction products into portions that are viable for use or sale without further conventional refining and hydro-processing techniques. This method produces valuable products with fewer processing steps, lower costs, increased worker safety due to less processing and handling, allow greater opportunity for new oil field development and subsequent positive economic impact, reduce related carbon dioxide, and wastes typical with conventional refineries.

Yarbro, Stephen Lee

2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

117

SUPERCRITICAL WATER PARTIAL OXIDATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of ~$3/GJ can be achieved with small-size SWPO gasifiers. · Demonstrate a 5-tpd reduced-scale gasifier and other high-value products. · Verify that high-pressure supercritical water is an ideal medium at a small municipal POTW. · Construct a 40-tpd commercial biomass gasifier at a large municipal POTW. M-246

118

Investigating Sequestration Potential of Carbonate Rocks during Tertiary Recovery from a Billion Barrel Oil Field, Weyburn, Saskatchewan: the Geoscience Framework (IEA Weyburn CO2 Monitoring Project)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sequestration Potential of Carbonate Rocks during Tertiary Sequestration Potential of Carbonate Rocks during Tertiary Recovery from a Billion Barrel Oil Field, Weyburn, Saskatchewan: the Geoscience Framework (IEA Weyburn CO 2 Monitoring and Storage Project) G. Burrowes (Geoffrey_Burrowes@pancanadian.ca; 403-290-2796) PanCanadian Resources 150 - 9 th Avenue S.W., P.O. Box 2850 Calgary, Alberta, Canada T2P 2S5 C. Gilboy (cgilboy@sem.gov.sk.ca; 306-787-2573) Petroleum Geology Branch, Saskatchewan Energy and Mines 201 Dewdney Avenue East Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada S4N 4G3 Introduction In Western Canada the application of CO 2 injection for enhanced, 'tertiary' oil recovery is a relatively recent addition to the arsenal available to reservoir engineers. The first successful application of CO 2 as a miscible fluid in Western Canada began in 1984 at Joffre Field, a

119

Novel Approaches to Conserve Energy in Textile Processing Through The Use Of Supercritical Fluids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

alternative to wet-processing is the use of supercritical fluids, such as carbon dioxide, as the carrier. This option would eliminate water discharge and convective drying and could achieve improved energy efficiency. A description of textile processing using...

Brown, M.; Sikorski, M.

120

Investigation of Mineral Transformations in Wet Supercritical...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mineral Transformations in Wet Supercritical CO2 by Electron Microscopy. Investigation of Mineral Transformations in Wet Supercritical CO2 by Electron Microscopy. Abstract: The...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rocks supercritical carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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121

Ultra Supercritical Steamside Oxidation  

SciTech Connect

Ultra supercritical (USC) power plants offer the promise of higher efficiencies and lower emissions, which are goals of the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Power Systems Initiatives. Most current coal power plants in the U.S. operate at a maximum steam temperature of 538 C. However, new supercritical plants worldwide are being brought into service with steam temperatures of up to 620 C. Current Advanced Power Systems goals include coal generation at 60% efficiency, which require steam temperatures of up to 760 C. This research examines the steamside oxidation of advanced alloys for use in USC systems, with emphasis placed on alloys for high- and intermediate-pressure turbine sections. Initial results of this research are presented.

Holcomb, Gordon R.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Ziomek-Moroz, Malgorzata

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

AVESTAR® - Supercritical Once-Through (SCOT) Pulverized Coal Dynamic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Supercritical Once-Through (SCOT) Pulverized Coal Dynamic Simulator Supercritical Once-Through (SCOT) Pulverized Coal Dynamic Simulator A new U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) cooperative research and development agreement to develop, test, and deploy a dynamic simulator and operator training system (OTS) could eventually help commercialize important carbon capture technologies at the nation's power plants. The high-fidelity, real-time OTS for a generic supercritical once-through (SCOT) pulverized-coal power plant will be installed at the National Energy Technology Laboratory's (NETL's) Advanced Virtual Energy Simulation Training and Research (AVESTAR) Center in Morgantown, W.Va. It will be used for collaborative research, industry workforce training, and engineering education on SCOT plant operations and control under the agreement signed with Invensys Operations Management.

123

Silica microparticles precipitation by two processes using supercritical fluids  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Silica microspheres are of great interest for several applications in areas such as medicine, biochemistry, colloidal chemistry and aerosol research. In this work, the sol–gel method was used to obtain such microparticles in two different ways. One of the methods applied was supercritical reaction; a high temperature process using ethanol as a supercritical fluid (SCF reaction). Another approach to obtaining silica microparticles was Supercritical AntiSolvent (SAS) process, as a low temperature process, using supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2). A tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) and water solution (1:4 molar ratio) was dissolved in ethanol and then pumped into an autoclave at 100 bar and 523 K for the SCF reaction process, and at 120 bar and 313 K in the case of the SAS process. All the experiments led to a successful precipitation of silica microparticles, in the micrometer range. In all cases spherical morphology and no agglomeration was found. Furthermore, the main textural characteristics of such powders were obtained by nitrogen physisorption experiments. Results reveal spherical microparticles with nanopores smaller than 1 nm in size when using supercritical ethanol, and bulky microparticles with smooth surfaces when using scCO2.

A. Montes; M.D. Gordillo; C. Pereyra; N. de la Rosa-Fox; E.J. Martínez de la Ossa

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Properties of CO2-Rich Pore Fluids and Their Effect on Porosity Evolution in EGS Rocks  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Project objective: Quantify key parameters critically needed for developing and validating numerical modeling of chemical interactions between EGS reservoir rocks and supercritical CO2and CO2-rich aqueous fluids.

125

Authigenic Carbonate and the History of the Global Carbon Cycle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Earth's surface reservoirs ({delta} 13 C...of carbonate rocks. In either case, this...history when the porosity and permeability of...track the bulk rock {delta} 13...of carbonate rocks...sedimentary reservoirs does...

Daniel P. Schrag; John. A. Higgins; Francis A. Macdonald; David T. Johnston

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Basic Engineering Research for D&D of R. Reactor Storage Pond Sludge: Electrokinetics, Carbon Dioxide Extraction, and Supercritical Water Oxidation  

SciTech Connect

Collaborating researchers at the University of South Carolina (USC), Clemson University (CU), and the Savannah River Site (SRS) are investigating the fundamentals of a combined extraction and destruction process for the decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of PCB-contaminated materials as found at DOE sites. Currently, the volume of PCBs and PCB contaminated wastes at DOE sites nationwide is approximately 19,000 m3. While there are a number of existing and proposed processes for the recovery and/or destruction of these persistent 4 pollutants, none has emerged as the preferred choice. Therefore, this research focuses on combining novel processes to solve the problem. The research objectives are to investigate benign dense-fluid extraction with either carbon dioxide (USC) or hot water (CU), followed by destruction of the extracted PCBs via either electrochemical (USC) or hydrothermal (CU) oxidation. Based on the results of these investigations, a combined extraction and destruction process that incorporates the most successful elements of the various processes will be recommended for application to contaminated DOE sites.

Hamilton, Edward A.; Bruce, David A.; Oji, Lawrence; White, Ralph E.; Matthews, Michael A.; Thies, Mark C.

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Supercritical Fluid Extraction of Plutonium and Americium from Soil  

SciTech Connect

Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) of plutonium and americium from soil was successfully demonstrated using supercritical fluid carbon dioxide solvent augmented with organophosphorus and beta-diketone complexants. Spiked Idaho soils were chemically and radiologically characterized, then extracted with supercritical fluid carbon dioxide at 2,900 psi and 65 C containing varying concentrations of tributyl phosphate (TBP) and thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTA). A single 45 minute SFE with 2.7 mol% TBP and 3.2 mol% TTA provided as much as 88% {+-} 6.0 extraction of americium and 69% {+-} 5.0 extraction of plutonium. Use of 5.3 mol% TBP with 6.8 mol% of the more acidic beta-diketone hexafluoroacetylacetone (HFA) provided 95% {+-} 3.0 extraction of americium and 83% {+-} 5.0 extraction of plutonium in a single 45 minute SFE at 3,750 psi and 95 C. Sequential chemical extraction techniques were used to chemically characterize soil partitioning of plutonium and americium in pre-SFE soil samples. Sequential chemical extraction techniques demonstrated that spiked plutonium resides primarily (76.6%) in the sesquioxide fraction with minor amounts being absorbed by the oxidizable fraction (10.6%) and residual fractions (12.8%). Post-SFE soils subjected to sequential chemical extraction characterization demonstrated that 97% of the oxidizable, 78% of the sesquioxide and 80% of the residual plutonium could be removed using SFE. These preliminary results show that SFE may be an effective solvent extraction technique for removal of actinide contaminants from soil.

Fox, R.V.; Mincher, B.J.

2002-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

128

Supercritical Fluid Extraction of Plutonium and Americium from Soil  

SciTech Connect

Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) of plutonium and americium from soil was successfully demonstrated using supercritical fluid carbon dioxide solvent augmented with organophosphorus and beta-diketone complexants. Spiked Idaho soils were chemically and radiologically characterized, then extracted with supercritical fluid carbon dioxide at 2,900 psi and 65°C containing varying concentrations of tributyl phosphate (TBP) and thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTA). A single 45 minute SFE with 2.7 mol% TBP and 3.2 mol% TTA provided as much as 88% ± 6.0 extraction of americium and 69% ± 5.0 extraction of plutonium. Use of 5.3 mol% TBP with 6.8 mol% of the more acidic beta-diketone hexafluoroacetylacetone (HFA) provided 95% ± 3.0 extraction of americium and 83% ± 5.0 extraction of plutonium in a single 45 minute SFE at 3,750 psi and 95°C. Sequential chemical extraction techniques were used to chemically characterize soil partitioning of plutonium and americium in pre-SFE soil samples. Sequential chemical extraction techniques demonstrated that spiked plutonium resides primarily (76.6%) in the sesquioxide fraction with minor amounts being absorbed by the oxidizable fraction (10.6%) and residual fractions (12.8%). Post-SFE soils subjected to sequential chemical extraction characterization demonstrated that 97% of the oxidizable, 78% of the sesquioxide and 80% of the residual plutonium could be removed using SFE. These preliminary results show that SFE may be an effective solvent extraction technique for removal of actinide contaminants from soil.

Fox, Robert Vincent; Mincher, Bruce Jay

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Extension of the supercritical carbon dioxide brayton cycle to low reactor power operation: investigations using the coupled anl plant dynamics code-SAS4A/SASSYS-1 liquid metal reactor code system.  

SciTech Connect

Significant progress has been made on the development of a control strategy for the supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO{sub 2}) Brayton cycle enabling removal of power from an autonomous load following Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor (SFR) down to decay heat levels such that the S-CO{sub 2} cycle can be used to cool the reactor until decay heat can be removed by the normal shutdown heat removal system or a passive decay heat removal system such as Direct Reactor Auxiliary Cooling System (DRACS) loops with DRACS in-vessel heat exchangers. This capability of the new control strategy eliminates the need for use of a separate shutdown heat removal system which might also use supercritical CO{sub 2}. It has been found that this capability can be achieved by introducing a new control mechanism involving shaft speed control for the common shaft joining the turbine and two compressors following reduction of the load demand from the electrical grid to zero. Following disconnection of the generator from the electrical grid, heat is removed from the intermediate sodium circuit through the sodium-to-CO{sub 2} heat exchanger, the turbine solely drives the two compressors, and heat is rejected from the cycle through the CO{sub 2}-to-water cooler. To investigate the effectiveness of shaft speed control, calculations are carried out using the coupled Plant Dynamics Code-SAS4A/SASSYS-1 code for a linear load reduction transient for a 1000 MWt metallic-fueled SFR with autonomous load following. No deliberate motion of control rods or adjustment of sodium pump speeds is assumed to take place. It is assumed that the S-CO{sub 2} turbomachinery shaft speed linearly decreases from 100 to 20% nominal following reduction of grid load to zero. The reactor power is calculated to autonomously decrease down to 3% nominal providing a lengthy window in time for the switchover to the normal shutdown heat removal system or for a passive decay heat removal system to become effective. However, the calculations reveal that the compressor conditions are calculated to approach surge such that the need for a surge control system for each compressor is identified. Thus, it is demonstrated that the S-CO{sub 2} cycle can operate in the initial decay heat removal mode even with autonomous reactor control. Because external power is not needed to drive the compressors, the results show that the S-CO{sub 2} cycle can be used for initial decay heat removal for a lengthy interval in time in the absence of any off-site electrical power. The turbine provides sufficient power to drive the compressors. Combined with autonomous reactor control, this represents a significant safety advantage of the S-CO{sub 2} cycle by maintaining removal of the reactor power until the core decay heat falls to levels well below those for which the passive decay heat removal system is designed. The new control strategy is an alternative to a split-shaft layout involving separate power and compressor turbines which had previously been identified as a promising approach enabling heat removal from a SFR at low power levels. The current results indicate that the split-shaft configuration does not provide any significant benefits for the S-CO{sub 2} cycle over the current single-shaft layout with shaft speed control. It has been demonstrated that when connected to the grid the single-shaft cycle can effectively follow the load over the entire range. No compressor speed variation is needed while power is delivered to the grid. When the system is disconnected from the grid, the shaft speed can be changed as effectively as it would be with the split-shaft arrangement. In the split-shaft configuration, zero generator power means disconnection of the power turbine, such that the resulting system will be almost identical to the single-shaft arrangement. Without this advantage of the split-shaft configuration, the economic benefits of the single-shaft arrangement, provided by just one turbine and lower losses at the design point, are more important to the overall cycle performance. Therefore, the single-shaft

Moisseytsev, A.; Sienicki, J. J. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

2012-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

130

Genetic adaptation to elevated carbon dioxide atmospheres by Pseudomonas-like bacteria isolated from rock cod (Sebastes spp. )  

SciTech Connect

The microorganisms on rock cod fillets stored in a modified atmosphere (MA; 80% CO/sub 2/ - 20% air) at 4/sup 0/C for 21 days were isolated. Only Lactobacillus sp. (71 to 87%) and tan-colored Pseudomonas sp.-like isolates (TAN isolates) were found. The TAN isolates grew more slowly in MA than in air at 8/sup 0/C. When TAN isolates were grown in air at 8/sup 0/C, there was an initial decline in viable counts for 10 to 30 h followed by exponential growth. During this exponential growth phase in MA, the growth rates of the TAN isolates from MA-stored fish were significantly greater than those of the TAN isolates from fresh fish. When a TAN isolate from fresh fish was grown under MA for 21 days, it then grew as rapidly under MA as isolates from MA-stored fish. These results suggest that the TAN isolates genetically adapt to high levels of CO/sub 2/. 17 references, 3 figures, 1 table.

Johnson, A.R.; Ogrydziak, D.M.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Evaluation of Biodiesel Fuels from Supercritical Fluid Processing...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Biodiesel Fuels from Supercritical Fluid Processing with the Advanced Distillation Curve Method Evaluation of Biodiesel Fuels from Supercritical Fluid Processing with the Advanced...

132

Reaction of Water-Saturated Supercritical CO2 with Forsterite...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water-Saturated Supercritical CO2 with Forsterite: Evidence for Magnesite Formation at Low Temperatures. Reaction of Water-Saturated Supercritical CO2 with Forsterite: Evidence for...

133

CO2 displacement mechanisms: phase equilibria effects and carbon dioxide sequestration studies.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Supercritical carbon dioxide is injected into underground formations to enhance oil recovery and for subsurface sequestration to minimize the impact of CO2 emissions due to… (more)

Pasala, Sangeetha M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Supercritical/Solid Catalyst (SSC)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

INL's patented, continuous-flow Supercritical/Solid Catalyst (SSC) produces the highest ASTM-quality B-100 biodiesel from waste fats, oils, and greases at the site of waste generation. SSC delivers low-cost transportation fuel, avoids significant landfill costs for municipalities, and reduces potent methane and other emissions produced in landfills from these wastes. You can learn more about INL's energy research programs at http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

None

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

135

Supercritical Fluid Extraction of Wood Pulps  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......capillary column inlet system which was main tained...great concern in this study because (a) their relative...McNally and J.R. Wheeler. J. Chromatogr. 447...Chaplin, and N.R. Foster. J. Supercrit. Fluids...Wells, and N.R. Foster. J. Supercrit. Fluids......

A.J. Sequeira; L.T. Taylor

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

White Rock  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Furnished house for rent in rural White Rock Bright and sunny Ideal for a young family Safe neighborhood 10 min drive to LANL 1300 per month, basic utilities included 1180 sq ft....

137

Rock magnetism  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The past three decades have witnessed a new paradigm, the plate tectonics paradigm, in Earth sciences. The record of the Earth's magnetic field stored in rocks played a major role in the establishment of this par...

Ronald T. Merrill

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Method and apparatus for dissociating metals from metal compounds extracted into supercritical fluids  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for dissociating metal-ligand complexes in a supercritical fluid by treating the metal-ligand complex with heat and/or reducing or oxidizing agents is described. Once the metal-ligand complex is dissociated, the resulting metal and/or metal oxide form fine particles of substantially uniform size. In preferred embodiments, the solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the ligand is a .beta.-diketone such as hexafluoroacetylacetone or dibutyldiacetate. In other preferred embodiments, the metals in the metal-ligand complex are copper, silver, gold, tungsten, titanium, tantalum, tin, or mixtures thereof. In preferred embodiments, the reducing agent is hydrogen. The method provides an efficient process for dissociating metal-ligand complexes and produces easily-collected metal particles free from hydrocarbon solvent impurities. The ligand and the supercritical fluid can be regenerated to provide an economic, efficient process.

Wai, Chien M. (Moscow, ID); Hunt, Fred H. (Moscow, ID); Smart, Neil G. (Workington, GB); Lin, Yuehe (Richland, WA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Modeling supercritical CO2 injection in heterogeneous porous media  

SciTech Connect

We investigate the physical processes that occur during the sequestration of CO{sub 2} in brine-bearing geologic formations using TOUGH2. An equation of state package that treats a two-phase (liquid, gas), three-component (water, salt, and CO{sub 2}) system is employed. CO{sub 2} is injected in a supercritical state that has a much lower density and viscosity than the liquid brine it displaces. In situ, the supercritical CO{sub 2} forms a gas-like phase, and also partially dissolves in the aqueous phase. Chemical reactions between CO{sub 2} and rock minerals that could potentially contribute to mineral trapping of CO{sub 2} are not included. The geological setting considered is a fluvial/deltaic formation that is strongly heterogeneous, making preferential flow a significant effect, especially when coupled with the strong buoyancy forces acting on the gas-like CO{sub 2} plume. Key model development concerns include vertical and lateral grid resolution, grid orientation effects, and the choice of characteristic curves.

Doughty, Christine; Pruess, Karsten

2003-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

140

10 MW Supercritical CO2 Turbine Test  

SciTech Connect

The Supercritical CO2 Turbine Test project was to demonstrate the inherent efficiencies of a supercritical carbon dioxide (s-CO2) power turbine and associated turbomachinery under conditions and at a scale relevant to commercial concentrating solar power (CSP) projects, thereby accelerating the commercial deployment of this new power generation technology. The project involved eight partnering organizations: NREL, Sandia National Laboratories, Echogen Power Systems, Abengoa Solar, University of Wisconsin at Madison, Electric Power Research Institute, Barber-Nichols, and the CSP Program of the U.S. Department of Energy. The multi-year project planned to design, fabricate, and validate an s-CO2 power turbine of nominally 10 MWe that is capable of operation at up to 700°C and operates in a dry-cooled test loop. The project plan consisted of three phases: (1) system design and modeling, (2) fabrication, and (3) testing. The major accomplishments of Phase 1 included: Design of a multistage, axial-flow, s-CO2 power turbine; Design modifications to an existing turbocompressor to provide s-CO2 flow for the test system; Updated equipment and installation costs for the turbomachinery and associated support infrastructure; Development of simulation tools for the test loop itself and for more efficient cycle designs that are of greater commercial interest; Simulation of s-CO2 power cycle integration into molten-nitrate-salt CSP systems indicating a cost benefit of up to 8% in levelized cost of energy; Identification of recuperator cost as a key economic parameter; Corrosion data for multiple alloys at temperatures up to 650ºC in high-pressure CO2 and recommendations for materials-of-construction; and Revised test plan and preliminary operating conditions based on the ongoing tests of related equipment. Phase 1 established that the cost of the facility needed to test the power turbine at its full power and temperature would exceed the planned funding for Phases 2 and 3. Late in Phase 1 an opportunity arose to collaborate with another turbine-development team to construct a shared s-CO2 test facility. The synergy of the combined effort would result in greater facility capabilities than either separate project could produce and would allow for testing of both turbine designs within the combined budgets of the two projects. The project team requested a no-cost extension to Phase 1 to modify the subsequent work based on this collaborative approach. DOE authorized a brief extension, but ultimately opted not to pursue the collaborative facility and terminated the project.

Turchi, Craig

2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rocks supercritical carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

ULTRA-SUPERCRITICAL STEAM CORROSION  

SciTech Connect

Efficiency increases in fossil energy boilers and steam turbines are being achieved by increasing the temperature and pressure at the turbine inlets well beyond the critical point of water. To allow these increases, advanced materials are needed that are able to withstand the higher temperatures and pressures in terms of strength, creep, and oxidation resistance. As part of a larger collaborative effort, the Albany Research Center (ARC) is examining the steam-side oxidation behavior for ultrasupercritical (USC) steam turbine applications. Initial tests are being done on six alloys identified as candidates for USC steam boiler applications: ferritic alloy SAVE12, austenitic alloy Super 304H, the high Cr-high Ni alloy HR6W, and the nickel-base superalloys Inconel 617, Haynes 230, and Inconel 740. Each of these alloys has very high strength for its alloy type. Three types of experiments are planned: cyclic oxidation in air plus steam at atmospheric pressure, thermogravimetric ana lysis (TGA) in steam at atmospheric pressure, and exposure tests in supercritical steam up to 650 C (1202 F) and 34.5 MPa (5000 psi). The atmospheric pressure tests, combined with supercritical exposures at 13.8, 20.7, 24.6, and 34.5 MPa (2000, 3000, 4000, and 5000 psi) should allow the determination of the effect of pressure on the oxidation process.

Holcomb, G.R.; Alman, D.E.; Bullard, S.B.; Covino, B.S., Jr.; Cramer, S.D.; Ziomek-Moroz, M.

2003-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

142

On blowup in supercritical wave equations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the blowup behaviour for the focusing energy-supercritical semilinear wave equation in 3 space dimensions without symmetry assumptions on the data. We prove the stability of the ODE blowup profile.

Roland Donninger; Birgit Schörkhuber

2014-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

143

Hydrothermal combustion of biofuels in supercritical water  

SciTech Connect

Supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) has long been recognized as a safe, clean and energy efficient method for destroying a wide range of organic materials and hazardous wastes. As SCWO systems operate at elevated pressure, all effluent streams are fully contained allowing efficient recovery of thermal energy using compact heat exchangers. Water vapor produced by the combustion efficiency, especially for fuels with increasing moisture content such as biomass. This paper compares the performance of a simple Rankine vapor power cycle which derives it`s heat input from (1) a hydrothermal combustion system, and (2) a conventionally-fired steam boiler. The study is based on a hypothetical cellulose-based organic fuel with a higher heating value of 7,000 BT/1bm (dry). For a constant organic feedrate of 100 tons/day (bone dry) mixed in 20:80 fuel/water ratio with water, the calculated net electric power output from the 31.93%. Whereas, for an organic feedrate of 100 tons/day (bone dry) with zero of 5,382 kW, at an overall thermal efficiency of 31.48%. The hydrothermal combustion power cycle is unaffected by free moisture in the fuel, and thereby uniquely well-suited for use in biomass power generation applications. The hydrothermal combustion process is exceptionally clean burning, and allows full control over carbon dioxide and SOx emissions. NOx levels are inherently ultra-low due to lower combustion temperatures. Hydrothermal combustion technology is ready for pilot-scale engineering development and demonstration.

McGuinness, T.G. [Summit Research Corporation, Sante Fe, NM (United States); Marentis, R. [Summit Research Corporation, Allentown, PA (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

144

Near-Infrared Spectroscopic Investigation of Water in Supercritical...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Infrared Spectroscopic Investigation of Water in Supercritical CO2 and the Effect of CaCl2. Near-Infrared Spectroscopic Investigation of Water in Supercritical CO2 and the Effect...

145

Separation of Polyhydroxylflavonoids by Packed-Column Supercritical Fluid Chromatography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......isorhamnetin, kampcetin, quercetin, and fisetin are efficiently separated using supercritical...isorhamnetin, kampcetin, quercetin, and fisetin are efficiently separated using supercritical...v) Isorhamnetin Kampcetin Quercetin Fisetin 0.025 6.98 10.20 11.09 -- 0......

Zhimin Liu; Suoqi Zhao; Ren'an Wang; Guanghua Yang

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Separation of Phenylurea Herbicides by Packed Column Supercritical Fluid Chromatography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......effects of pressure, mobile phase composition, temperature, and flow rate were...and R. Moulder. Trace analysis of agrochemicals by supercritical fluid chromatography...vented injection in the analysis of agrochemicals by capillary supercritical fluid chromatography......

Terry A. Berger

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Pilot Plant for Soil Remediation with Supercritical CO2 under Quasi-Isobaric Conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Soil remediation using CO2 in a supercritical extraction process is one innovative technique currently available. ... It was based on a first pressurized vessel acting as an extractor (where the soil to be remediated was located), a second pressurized vessel acting as an adsorber (where activated carbon was placed), a pump for solvent supply, and auxiliary equipment such as heat exchangers, pressure, temperature, and flow meters. ...

M. J. Cocero; E. Alonso; S. Lucas

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Supercritical extraction of organic mixtures from soil-water slurries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for hazardous waste remediation. One such innovative technology that has been shown to be an efflcient means by which to remove high molecular weight organics &om soil is supercritical fluid extraction (SCFE). A supercritical fluid (SCF) exists in the region... for hazardous waste remediation. One such innovative technology that has been shown to be an efflcient means by which to remove high molecular weight organics &om soil is supercritical fluid extraction (SCFE). A supercritical fluid (SCF) exists in the region...

Green, Lynda Ann

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

149

Topping PCFB combustion plant with supercritical steam pressure  

SciTech Connect

Research is being conducted to develop a new type of coal fired plant for electric power generation. This new type of plant, called a second generation or topping pressurized circulating fluidized bed combustion (topping PCFB) plant, offers the promise of efficiencies greater than 46 percent (HHV), with both emissions and a cost of electricity that are significantly lower than conventional pulverized coal fired plants with scrubbers. The topping PCFB plant incorporates the partial gasification of coal in a carbonizer, the combustion of carbonizer char in a pressurized circulating fluidized bed combustor (PCFB), and the combustion of carbonizer fuel gas in a topping combustor to achieve gas turbine inlet temperatures of 2,300 F and higher. After completing pilot plant tests of a carbonizer, a PCFB, and a gas turbine topping combustor, all being developed for this new plant, the authors calculated a higher heating value efficiency of 46.2 percent for the plant. In that analysis, the plant operated with a conventional 2,400 psig steam cycle with 1,000 F superheat and reheat steam and a 2.5 inch mercury condenser back pressure. This paper identifies the efficiency gains that this plant will achieve by using supercritical pressure steam conditions.

Robertson, A. [Foster Wheeler Development Corp., Livingston, NJ (United States); White, J. [Parsons Power Group Inc., Reading, PA (United States)

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Surface Studies of HSLA Steel after Electrochemical Corrosion in Supercritical CO2-H2O Environment  

SciTech Connect

In aqueous phase saturated with CO2, X-65 sample underwent general corrosion with formation of FeCO3. In supercritical CO2 containing water phase, two major regions are present on the sample surface after the EIS experiment. One region covered with corrosion products identified as FeCO3 and the other containing Fe, oxygen, and carbon-rich islands embedded in metal matrix identified as {alpha}-Fe. Precipitation of FeCO3 from Fe2+ and CO3 2- is responsible for formation of passive layer in oxygen-deficient, CO2 rich aqueous environment. Mechanisms of corrosion degradation occurring in supercritical CO2 as a function. Transport of supercritical CO{sub 2} is a critical element for carbon capture from fossil fuel power plants and underground sequestration. Although acceptable levels of water in supercritical CO{sub 2} (up to {approx} 5 x 10{sup -4}g/dm{sup 3}) have been established, their effects on the corrosion resistance of pipeline steels are not fully known. Moreover, the presence of SO{sub 2}, O{sub 2} impurities in addition to the water can make the fluid more corrosive and, therefore, more detrimental to service materials. Also, in this case, limited data are available on materials performance of carbon steels. to advance this knowledge, other service alloys are being investigated in the high pressure high temperature cell containing impure CO{sub 2} fluids using reliable non-destructive in-situ electrochemical methods. The electrochemical results are being augmented by a number of surface analyses of the corroded surfaces.

Ziomek-Moroz, M. Holcomb, G. Tylczak, J Beck, J Fedkin, M. Lvov, S.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Catalytic gasification of glucose to H2 in supercritical water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Gasification of glucose in supercritical water with and without catalysts (NaOH and Ni based) was investigated at 400 °C and 500 °C with a residence time of 30 min. The products from glucose gasification without catalyst consist of ~ 8–17 wt.% gas, 21–24 wt.% solid, 9–16 wt.% acetone phase and 8–10 wt.% water phase. As expected, all the gas product yields increased by an increase in process temperature and higher water to biomass ratio benefits the yields of gas phase and water phase. For the experimental runs with catalysts, NaOH had the best activity for improving H2 formation, the H2 yield increased by 135% with NaOH compared to that for run without catalyst at 500 °C with water to biomass ratio of 3. At the same operating conditions, the presence of Ni/activated carbon (AC) contributed to 81% increase in H2 yield, followed by 62% with Ni/MgO, 60% with Ni/CeO2/Al2O3 and 52% with Ni/Al2O3. The net effect of Ni was studied by using activated carbon and Ni/AC at 500 °C with water to biomass ratio of 7 for 30 min. The results showed that the hydrogen production was further increased by 6.9% with activated carbon and 36.9% with Ni/AC.

Ning Ding; Ramin Azargohar; Ajay K. Dalai; Janusz A. Kozinski

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Chemical deposition methods using supercritical fluid solutions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for depositing a film of a desired material on a substrate comprises dissolving at least one reagent in a supercritical fluid comprising at least one solvent. Either the reagent is capable of reacting with or is a precursor of a compound capable of reacting with the solvent to form the desired product, or at least one additional reagent is included in the supercritical solution and is capable of reacting with or is a precursor of a compound capable of reacting with the first reagent or with a compound derived from the first reagent to form the desired material. The supercritical solution is expanded to produce a vapor or aerosol and a chemical reaction is induced in the vapor or aerosol so that a film of the desired material resulting from the chemical reaction is deposited on the substrate surface. In an alternate embodiment, the supercritical solution containing at least one reagent is expanded to produce a vapor or aerosol which is then mixed with a gas containing at least one additional reagent. A chemical reaction is induced in the resulting mixture so that a film of the desired material is deposited.

Sievers, Robert E. (Boulder, CO); Hansen, Brian N. (Boulder, CO)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

An integrated experimental and numerical study: Developing a reaction transport model that couples chemical reactions of mineral dissolution/precipitation with spatial and temporal flow variations in CO2/brine/rock systems  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Project objectives: Generate and characterize mineral dissolution/precipitation reactions in supercritical CO2/brine/rock systems under pressure-temperature-chemistry conditions resembling CO2injection into EGS. Characterize three-dimensional spatial and temporal distributions of rock structures subject to mineral dissolution/precipitation processes by X-ray tomography, SEM imaging, and Microprobe analysis.

154

Evaluation of Five Sedimentary Rocks Other Than Salt for Geologic Repository Siting Purposes  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE), in order to increase the diversity of rock types under consideration by the geologic disposal program, initiated the Sedimary ROck Program (SERP), whose immediate objectiv eis to evaluate five types of secimdnary rock - sandstone, chalk, carbonate rocks (limestone and dolostone), anhydrock, and shale - to determine the potential for siting a geologic repository. The evaluation of these five rock types, together with the ongoing salt studies, effectively results in the consideration of all types of relatively impermeable sedimentary rock for repository purposes. The results of this evaluation are expressed in terms of a ranking of the five rock types with respect to their potential to serve as a geologic repository host rock. This comparative evaluation was conducted on a non-site-specific basis, by use of generic information together with rock evaluation criteria (RECs) derived from the DOE siting guidelines for geologic repositories (CFR 1984). An information base relevant to rock evaluation using these RECs was developed in hydrology, geochemistry, rock characteristics (rock occurrences, thermal response, rock mechanics), natural resources, and rock dissolution. Evaluation against postclosure and preclosure RECs yielded a ranking of the five subject rocks with respect to their potential as repository host rocks. Shale was determined to be the most preferred of the five rock types, with sandstone a distant second, the carbonate rocks and anhydrock a more distant third, and chalk a relatively close fourth.

Croff, A.G.; Lomenick, T.F.; Lowrie, R.S.; Stow, S.H.

2003-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

155

Materials for Ultra-Supercritical Steam Power Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for Advanced Ultra-Supercritical for Advanced Ultra-Supercritical Steam Power Plants Background The first ultra-supercritical (USC) steam plants in the U.S. were designed, constructed, and operated in the late 1950s. The higher operating temperatures and pressures in USC plants were designed to increase the efficiency of steam plants. However, materials performance problems forced the reduction of steam temperatures in these plants, and discouraged further developmental efforts on low heat-rate units.

156

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced supercritical light Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

liquid-like densities of supercritical fluids. Even... demonstrated using propane at subcritical and supercritical temperatures between 35 C and 97 C ... Source: Stanford...

157

Supercritical methanol for polyethylene terephthalate depolymerization: Observation using simulator  

SciTech Connect

To apply PET depolymerization in supercritical methanol to commercial recycling, the benefits of supercritical methanol usage in PET depolymerization was investigated from the viewpoint of the reaction rate and energy demands. PET was depolymerized in a batch reactor at 573 K in supercritical methanol under 14.7 MPa and in vapor methanol under 0.98 MPa in our previous work. The main products of both reactions were the PET monomers of dimethyl terephthalate (DMT) and ethylene glycol (EG). The rate of PET depolymerization in supercritical methanol was faster than that of PET depolymerization in vapor methanol. This indicates supercritical fluid is beneficial in reducing reaction time without the use of a catalyst. We depicted the simple process flow of PET depolymerization in supercritical methanol and in vapor methanol, and by simulation evaluated the total heat demand of each process. In this simulation, bis-hydroxyethyl terephthalate (BHET) was used as a model component of PET. The total heat demand of PET depolymerization in supercritical methanol was 2.35 x 10{sup 6} kJ/kmol Produced-DMT. That of PET depolymerization in vapor methanol was 2.84 x 10{sup 6} kJ/kmol Produced-DMT. The smaller total heat demand of PET depolymerization in supercritical methanol clearly reveals the advantage of using supercritical fluid in terms of energy savings.

Genta, Minoru; Iwaya, Tomoko; Sasaki, Mitsuru [Department of Applied Chemistry and Biochemistry, Kumamoto University, 2-39-1 Kurokami, Kumamoto 865-8555 (Japan); Goto, Motonobu [Department of Applied Chemistry and Biochemistry, Kumamoto University, 2-39-1 Kurokami, Kumamoto 865-8555 (Japan)], E-mail: mgoto@kumamoto-u.ac.jp

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Advanced Materials for Ultra Supercritical Boiler Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Road Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 304-285-4721 robert.romanosky@netl.doe.gov Patricia a. Rawls Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 412-386-5882 patricia.rawls@netl.doe.gov Robert M. Purgert Prime Contractor and Administrator Energy Industries of Ohio 6100 Oak Tree Boulevard, Suite 200 Independence, OH 44131-6914 216-643-2952 purgert@msn.com AdvAnced MAteriAls for UltrA sUpercriticAl Boiler systeMs Description A consortium led by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy (FE) has conducted the first phase of a multiyear program to develop materials technology for use in advanced ultra supercritical (USC) coal-fired power plants. The advanced materials developed in this project are essential for construction of

159

Supercriticality to subcriticality in dynamo transitions  

SciTech Connect

Evidence from numerical simulations suggests that the nature of dynamo transition changes from supercritical to subcritical as the magnetic Prandtl number is decreased. To explore this interesting crossover, we first use direct numerical simulations to investigate the hysteresis zone of a subcritical Taylor-Green dynamo. We establish that a well defined boundary exists in this hysteresis region which separates dynamo states from the purely hydrodynamic solution. We then propose simple dynamo models which show similar crossover from supercritical to subcritical dynamo transition as a function of the magnetic Prandtl number. Our models show that the change in the nature of dynamo transition is connected to the stabilizing or de-stabilizing influence of governing non-linearities.

Verma, Mahendra K. [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur 208016 (India)] [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur 208016 (India); Yadav, Rakesh K. [Max-Planck-Institut für Sonnensystemforschung, Max Planck Strasse 2, 37191 Katlenburg-Lindau (Germany)] [Max-Planck-Institut für Sonnensystemforschung, Max Planck Strasse 2, 37191 Katlenburg-Lindau (Germany)

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

160

SUPERCRITICAL STEAM CYCLE FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANT  

SciTech Connect

Revolutionary improvement of the nuclear plant safety and economy with light water reactors can be reached with the application of micro-fuel elements (MFE) directly cooled by a supercritical pressure light-water coolant-moderator. There are considerable advantages of the MFE as compared with the traditional fuel rods, such as: Using supercritical and superheated steam considerably increases the thermal efficiency of the Rankine cycle up to 44-45%. Strong negative coolant and void reactivity coefficients with a very short thermal delay time allow the reactor to shutdown quickly in the event of a reactivity or power excursion. Core melting and the creation of corium during severe accidents are impossible. The heat transfer surface area is larger by several orders of magnitude due to the small spherical dimensions of the MFE. The larger heat exchange surface significantly simplifies residual heat removal by natural convection and radiation from the core to a subsequent passive system of heat removal.

Tsiklauri, Georgi V.; Talbert, Robert J.; Schmitt, Bruce E.; Filippov, Gennady A.; Bogojavlensky, Roald G.; Grishanin, Evgeny I.

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rocks supercritical carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Ultra supercritical turbines--steam oxidation  

SciTech Connect

Ultra supercritical (USC) power plants offer the promise of higher efficiencies and lower emissions, which are goals of the U.S. Department of Energy?s Advanced Power Systems Initiatives. Most current coal power plants in the U.S. operate at a maximum steam temperature of 538?C. However, new supercritical plants worldwide are being brought into service with steam temperatures of up to 620?C. Current Advanced Power Systems goals include coal generation at 60% efficiency, which would require steam temperatures of up to 760?C. This research examines the steamside oxidation of advanced alloys for use in USC systems, with emphasis placed on alloys for high- and intermediate-pressure turbine sections. Initial results of this research are presented.

Holcomb, Gordon R.; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Ziomek-Moroz, Margaret; Alman, David E.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Supercritical Stability, Transitions, and (Pseudo)tachyons  

SciTech Connect

Highly supercritical strings (c >> 15) with a time-like linear dilaton provide a large class of solutions to string theory, in which closed string tachyon condensation is under control (and follows the worldsheet renormalization group flow). In this note we analyze the late-time stability of such backgrounds, including transitions between them. The large friction introduced by the rolling dilaton and the rapid decrease of the string coupling suppress the back-reaction of naive instabilities. In particular, although the graviton, dilaton, and other light fields have negative effective mass squared in the linear dilaton background, the decaying string coupling ensures that their condensation does not cause large back-reaction. Similarly, the copious particles produced in transitions between highly supercritical theories do not back-react significantly on the solution. We discuss these features also in a somewhat more general class of time-dependent backgrounds with stable late-time asymptotics.

Aharony, Ofer; Silverstein, Eva

2007-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

163

Supercritical fluid reactions for coal processing. Quarterly progress report, July 1, 1995--September 30, 1995  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this work is to design benign solvent/cosolvent systems for reactions which will achieve optimum desulfurization and/or denitrogenation in the pre-treatment of coal or coal liquids. Supercritical fluids present excellent opportunities for the pretreatment of coal, hence we shall utilize supercritical fluids as a reaction medium. A number of possible Diels-Alder reactive systems involving anthracene (diene) in supercritical solvent were proposed at the outset of research. Scouting experiments designed to select out the optimum reactive system from among the candidate dienophiles and solvents have been completed. The nitrogen bearing compound 4-phenyl-1,2,4-triazoline-3,5-dione (PTAD) has demonstrated superior reactivity and sensitivity to cosolvent additions and has been selected as dienophile. A convenient half-life of reaction between PTAD and anthracene is obtained at temperatures in the neighborhood of 50{degree}C. Carbon dioxide has been selected as the solvent because of its convenient critical properties, and also to optimize the safety of the experiments. In the process of completing these scouting experiments, the experimental apparatus that will be used to obtain kinetic data for calculation of partial molar volumes of the reaction transition state has also been optimized.

Eckert, C.A

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

164

Advanced Thermal Storage for Central Receivers with Supercritical Coolants  

SciTech Connect

The principal objective of the study is to determine if supercritical heat transport fluids in a central receiver power plant, in combination with ceramic thermocline storage systems, offer a reduction in levelized energy cost over a baseline nitrate salt concept. The baseline concept uses a nitrate salt receiver, two-tank (hot and cold) nitrate salt thermal storage, and a subcritical Rankine cycle. A total of 6 plant designs were analyzed, as follows: Plant Designation Receiver Fluid Thermal Storage Rankine Cycle Subcritical nitrate salt Nitrate salt Two tank nitrate salt Subcritical Supercritical nitrate salt Nitrate salt Two tank nitrate salt Supercritical Low temperature H2O Supercritical H2O Two tank nitrate salt Supercritical High temperature H2O Supercritical H2O Packed bed thermocline Supercritical Low temperature CO2 Supercritical CO2 Two tank nitrate salt Supercritical High temperature CO2 Supercritical CO2 Packed bed thermocline Supercritical Several conclusions have been drawn from the results of the study, as follows: 1) The use of supercritical H2O as the heat transport fluid in a packed bed thermocline is likely not a practical approach. The specific heat of the fluid is a strong function of the temperatures at values near 400 °C, and the temperature profile in the bed during a charging cycle is markedly different than the profile during a discharging cycle. 2) The use of supercritical CO2 as the heat transport fluid in a packed bed thermocline is judged to be technically feasible. Nonetheless, the high operating pressures for the supercritical fluid require the use of pressure vessels to contain the storage inventory. The unit cost of the two-tank nitrate salt system is approximately $24/kWht, while the unit cost of the high pressure thermocline system is nominally 10 times as high. 3) For the supercritical fluids, the outer crown temperatures of the receiver tubes are in the range of 700 to 800 °C. At temperatures of 700 °C and above, intermetallic compounds can precipitate between, and within, the grains of nickel alloys. The precipitation leads to an increase in tensile strength, and a decrease in ductility. Whether the proposed tube materials can provide the required low cycle fatigue life for the supercritical H2O and CO2 receivers is an open question. 4) A ranking of the plants, in descending order of technical and economic feasibility, is as follows: i) Supercritical nitrate salt and baseline nitrate salt: equal ratings ii) Low temperature supercritical H2O iii) Low temperature supercritical CO2 iv) High temperature supercritical CO2 v) High temperature supercritical H2O 5) The two-tank nitrate salt thermal storage systems are strongly preferred over the thermocline systems using supercritical heat transport fluids.

Kelly, Bruce D.

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

165

Supercritical Fluid Extraction-Supercritical Fluid Chromatography with Fraction Collection for Sensitive Analytes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Temelli, C.S. Chen, and R.J. Braddock. Supercritical...6:14550 (1988). 5. R.M. Campbell and M.L...1985). 7. M.E.P. McNally and J.R. Wheeler. Increasing extraction...9. R.J. Skelton, Jr., C.C. Johnson, and......

Qian L. Xie; Karin E. Markides; Milton L. Lee

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Materials development for ultra-supercritical boilers  

SciTech Connect

Progress is reported on a US Department of Energy project to develop high temperature, corrosion resistant alloys for use in ultra-supercritical steam cycles. The aim is to achieve boiler operation at 1,400{sup o}F/5,000 psi steam conditions with 47% net cycle efficiency. Most ferritic steel tested such as T92 and Save 12 showed severe corrosion. Nickel-based alloys, especially IN 740 and CCA 617, showed greatest resistance to oxidation with no evidence of exfoliation. Laboratory and in-plant tests have begun. 2 figs.

NONE

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

167

Treatment of pulp mill sludges by supercritical water oxidation  

SciTech Connect

Supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) is new process that can oxidize organics very effectively at moderate temperatures (400 to 650{degree}C) and high pressure (3700 psi). It is an environmentally acceptable alternative for sludge treatment. In bench scale tests, total organic carbon (TOC) and total organic halide (TOX) reductions of 99 to 99.9% were obtained; dioxin reductions were 95 to 99.9%. A conceptual design for commercial systems has been completed and preliminary economics have been estimated. Comparisons confirm that SCWO is less costly than dewatering plus incineration for treating pulp mill sludges. SCWO can also compete effectively with dewatering plus landfilling where tipping fees exceed $35/yd{sup 3}. In some regions of the US, tipping fees are now $75/yd{sup 3} and rising steadily. In the 1995 to 2000 time frame, SCWO has a good chance of becoming the method of choice. MODEC's objective is to bring the technology to commercial availability by 1993. 10 refs., 6 figs., 19 tabs.

Modell, M.

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Supercritical Fluid Extraction and Separation of Uranium from Other Actinides  

SciTech Connect

This paper investigates the feasibility of separating uranium from other actinides by using supercritical fluid carbon dioxide (sc-CO2) as a solvent modified with tri-n-butylphosphate (TBP) for the development of an extraction and counter current stripping technique, which would be a more efficient and environmentally benign technology for used nuclear fuel reprocessing compared to traditional solvent extraction. Several actinides (U(VI), Np(VI), Pu(IV), and Am(III)) were extracted in sc-CO2 modified with TBP over a range of nitric acid concentrations and then the actinides were exposed to reducing and complexing agents to suppress their extractability. According to this study, the separation of uranium from plutonium in sc-CO2 modified with TBP was successful at nitric acid concentrations of less than 3 M in the presence of acetohydroxamic acid or oxalic acid, and the separation of uranium from neptunium was successful at nitric acid concentrations of less than 1 M in the presence of acetohydroxamic acid, oxalic acid, or sodium nitrite.

Donna L. Quach; Bruce J. Mincher; Chien M. Wai

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership  

SciTech Connect

The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership in Phase I are organized into four areas: (1) Evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks that will be used to determine the location of pilot demonstrations in Phase II; (2) Development of GIS-based reporting framework that links with national networks; (3) Design of an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies, market-based opportunities for carbon management, and an economic/risk assessment framework; (referred to below as the Advanced Concepts component of the Phase I efforts) and (4) Initiation of a comprehensive education and outreach program. As a result of the Phase I activities, the groundwork is in place to provide an assessment of storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that complements the ongoing DOE research agenda in Carbon Sequestration. The geology of the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership Region is favorable for the potential sequestration of enormous volume of CO{sub 2}. The United States Geological Survey (USGS 1995) identified 10 geologic provinces and 111 plays in the region. These provinces and plays include both sedimentary rock types characteristic of oil, gas, and coal productions as well as large areas of mafic volcanic rocks. Of the 10 provinces and 111 plays, 1 province and 4 plays are located within Idaho. The remaining 9 provinces and 107 plays are dominated by sedimentary rocks and located in the states of Montana and Wyoming. The potential sequestration capacity of the 9 sedimentary provinces within the region ranges from 25,000 to almost 900,000 million metric tons of CO{sub 2}. Overall every sedimentary formation investigated has significant potential to sequester large amounts of CO{sub 2}. Simulations conducted to evaluate mineral trapping potential of mafic volcanic rock formations located in the Idaho province suggest that supercritical CO{sub 2} is converted to solid carbonate mineral within a few hundred years and permanently entombs the carbon. Although MMV for this rock type may be challenging, a carefully chosen combination of geophysical and geochemical techniques should allow assessment of the fate of CO{sub 2} in deep basalt hosted aquifers. Terrestrial carbon sequestration relies on land management practices and technologies to remove atmospheric CO{sub 2} where it is stored in trees, plants, and soil. This indirect sequestration can be implemented today and is on the front line of voluntary, market-based approaches to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions. Initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil Carbon (C) on rangelands, and forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Rangelands can store up to an additional 0.05 mt C/ha/yr, while the croplands are on average four times that amount. Estimates of technical potential for soil sequestration within the region in cropland are in the range of 2.0 M mt C/yr over 20 year time horizon. This is equivalent to approximately 7.0 M mt CO{sub 2}e/yr. The forestry sinks are well documented, and the potential in the Big Sky region ranges from 9-15 M mt CO{sub 2} equivalent per year. Value-added benefits include enhanced yields, reduced erosion, and increased wildlife habitat. Thus the terrestrial sinks provide a viable, environmentally beneficial, and relatively low cost sink that is available to sequester C in the current time frame. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological and terrestrial sequestration re

Susan Capalbo

2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

170

On the correlation of buoyancy-influenced turbulent convective heat transfer to fluids at supercritical pressure  

SciTech Connect

This paper is concerned with buoyancy-influenced turbulent convective heat transfer in vertical tubes for conditions where the physical properties vary strongly with temperature as in fluids at supercritical pressure in the pseudocritical temperature region. An extended physically-based, semi-empirical model is described which has been developed to account for the extreme non-uniformity of properties which can be present in such fluids and lead to strong influences of buoyancy which cause the mean flow and turbulence fields to be modified in such a manner that has a very profound effect on heat transfer. Data for both upward and downward flow from experiments using carbon dioxide at supercritical pressure (8.80, MPa, p/pc=1.19) in a uniformly heated tube of internal diameter 2 mm and length 290 mm, obtained under conditions of strong non-uniformity of fluid properties, are being correlated and fitted using an approach based on the model. It provides a framework for describing the complex heat transfer behaviour which can be encountered in such experiments by means of an equation of simple form. Buoyancy-induced impairment and enhancement of heat transfer is successfully reproduced by the model. Similar studies are in progress using experimental data for both carbon dioxide and water from other sources. The aim is to obtain an in-depth understanding of the mechanisms by which deterioration of heat transfer might arise in sensitive applications involving supercritical pressure fluids, such as high pressure, water-cooled reactors operating above the critical pressure. (authors)

Jackson, J. D. [Univ. of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom); Jiang, P. X.; Liu, B. [Tsinghua Univ., Thermal Engineering Dept., Beijing (China)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

10-Megawatt Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Turbine- FY13 Q2  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This document summarizes the progress of this National Renewable Energy Laboratory project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013.

172

Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Turbo-Expander- FY12 Q4  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This document summarizes the progress of this SWRI project, funded by SunShot, for the fourth quarter of fiscal year 2012.

173

Carbon-Catalyzed Gasification of Organic Feedstocks in Supercritical Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Feedstocks studied in this paper include glycerol, glucose, cellobiose, whole biomass feedstocks (depithed bagasse liquid extract and sewage sludge), and representative Department of Defense (DoD) wastes (methanol, methyl ethyl ketone, ethylene glycol, acetic acid, and phenol). ...

Xiaodong Xu; Yukihiko Matsumura; Jonny Stenberg; Michael Jerry Antal, Jr.

1996-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

174

Platinum/Carbon Nanotube Nanocomposite Synthesized in Supercritical...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

electrode is a diffusion-controlled process. Analysis of the electrode kinetics using Tafel plot suggests that Pt-CNT from scCO2 provides a strong electrocatalytic activity for...

175

Experimental study of heat transfer in a 7-element bundle cooled with supercritical Freon-12  

SciTech Connect

Experimental data on Supercritical-Water (SCW) cooled bundles are very limited. Major problems with performing such experiments are technical difficulties in testing and experimental costs at high pressures, temperatures and heat fluxes. Also, there are only a few SCW experimental setups currently in the world capable of providing data. Supercritical Water-cooled nuclear Reactors (SCWRs), as one of the six concepts of Generation IV reactors, cannot be designed without such data. Therefore, a preliminary approach uses modeling fluids such as carbon dioxide and refrigerants instead of water is practical. In particularly, experiments in supercritical refrigerant-cooled bundles can be used. One of the SC modeling fluids typically used is Freon-12 (R-12) with the critical pressure of 4.136 MPa and the critical temperature of 111.97 deg. C. These conditions correspond to the critical pressure of 22.064 MPa and critical temperature of 373.95 deg. C in water. A set of experimental data obtained at the Inst. of Physics and Power Engineering (IPPE, Obninsk, Russia) in a vertically-oriented bundle cooled with supercritical R-12 was analyzed. This dataset consisted of 20 runs. The test section was 7-element bundle installed in a hexagonal flow channel with 3 grid spacers. Data was collected at pressures of approximately 4.65 MPa for several different combinations of wall and bulk-fluid temperatures that were below, at, or above the pseudo-critical temperature. The values of mass flux were ranged from 400 to 1320 kg/m{sup 2}s and inlet temperatures ranged from 72 to 120 deg. C. The test section consisted of fuel-element simulators that were 9.5 mm in OD with the total heated length of about 1 m. Bulk-fluid and wall temperature profiles were recorded using a combination of 8 different thermocouples. Analysis of the data has confirmed that there are three distinct heat-transfer regimes for forced convention in supercritical fluids: 1) Normal heat transfer; 2) Deteriorated heat transfer characterized with higher than expected wall temperatures; and 3) Enhanced heat transfer characterized with lower than expected wall temperatures. It was also confirmed that the effects of spacers are evident which was previously observed in sub-critical experimental data. (authors)

Richards, G. [Univ. of Ontario Inst. of Technology, Ontario, Canada, Faculty of Energy Systems and Nuclear Science, 2000 Simcoe Street North, Oshawa, ON, L1H 7K4 (Canada); Shelegov, A. S.; Kirillov, P. L. [Inst. of Physics and Power Engineering, Obninsk (Russian Federation); Pioro, I. L.; Harvel, G. [Univ. of Ontario Inst. of Technology, Ontario, Canada, Faculty of Energy Systems and Nuclear Science, 2000 Simcoe Street North, Oshawa, ON, L1H 7K4 (Canada)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Chapter 7 - Hydrolysis in Near- and Supercritical Water for Biomass Conversion and Material Recycling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Supercritical water (SCW) has been investigated for about 20 years for chemical reactions and processes. Water above its critical point (Tc = 374 °C, pc = 22.1 MPa, ?c = 0.322 g/cm3) has remarkable tunable properties and has been at the origin of a number of major developments especially due to its environmental innocuousness. SCW has been extensively used in the last 15 years to perform hydrolysis reactions. We propose to discuss in this book chapter the main fields of the application of the SCW hydrolysis reactions: (1) biomass liquefaction toward biofuels and platform molecules and (2) material recycling. SCW has been identified as an efficient medium in the transformation of biomass. Actually, Supercritical Biomass Valorization is a new generation of SCW-based technology, following the R&D development performed in SCW Oxidation. Two main routes can be investigated: the SuperCritical Biomass Gasification process and the SuperCritical Biomass Liquefaction process. Moreover, at present, the increase in the plant sourcing in the chemical industry is inescapable because of the social request for low environmental impact products and the high prices of products from fossil resources. In this context, biomass is particularly interesting because it is abundant and can be easily mobilized. Since lignocellulosic materials constitute approximately 95% of the total plant biomass, the discovery and the investigation of novel and effective pathways for their conversion are very important. In this chapter, we will present the direct SCW liquefaction of this new resource of carbon in order to produce two types of “biobased” products: 2G biofuels and platform molecules. In the context of a sustainable society, material recycling has an important role to play. Nowadays, the industry cannot produce consumer goods or industrial products without thinking about the future of each product in an environment and energetic point of view. Therefore in the field of environmentally friendly processes, a major challenge is the recycling of man-made materials. SCW has also been identified as an interesting medium for this aim. In this chapter, we will present two major aspects of material recycling using SCW: recycling of plastics and composite materials. We will see that hydrolysis reactions can be completed with alcoholysis reactions using near- and supercritical alcohols.

Anne Loppinet-Serani; Cyril Aymonier

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Materials, Turbomachinery and Heat Exchangers for Supercritical CO2 Systems  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to produce the necessary data to evaluate the performance of the supercritical carbon dioxide cycle. The activities include a study of materials compatibility of various alloys at high temperatures, the heat transfer and pressure drop in compact heat exchanger units, and turbomachinery issues, primarily leakage rates through dynamic seals. This experimental work will serve as a test bed for model development and design calculations, and will help define further tests necessary to develop high-efficiency power conversion cycles for use on a variety of reactor designs, including the sodium fast reactor (SFR) and very high-temperature gas reactor (VHTR). The research will be broken into three separate tasks. The first task deals with the analysis of materials related to the high-temperature S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle. The most taxing materials issues with regard to the cycle are associated with the high temperatures in the reactor side heat exchanger and in the high-temperature turbine. The system could experience pressures as high as 20MPa and temperatures as high as 650°C. The second task deals with optimization of the heat exchangers required by the S-CO{sub 2} cycle; the S-CO{sub 2} flow passages in these heat exchangers are required whether the cycle is coupled with a VHTR or an SFR. At least three heat exchangers will be required: the pre-cooler before compression, the recuperator, and the heat exchanger that interfaces with the reactor coolant. Each of these heat exchangers is unique and must be optimized separately. The most challenging heat exchanger is likely the pre-cooler, as there is only about a 40°C temperature change but it operates close to the CO{sub 2} critical point, therefore inducing substantial changes in properties. The proposed research will focus on this most challenging component. The third task examines seal leakage through various dynamic seal designs under the conditions expected in the S-CO{sub 2} cycle, including supercritical, choked, and two-phase flow conditions.

Mark Anderson; Greg Nellis; Michael Corradini

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

178

Surface and Electrochemical Behavior of HSLA in Supercritical CO2-H2O Environment  

SciTech Connect

General corrosion was observed on high strength low alloy carbon steel after electrochemical impedance spectroscopy experiments (EIS) performed in H{sub 2}O saturated with CO{sub 2} at 50 C and 15.2 MPa. However, general and localized were observed on the same material surfaces after the EIS experiments performed in supercritical CO{sub 2} containing approximately 6100 ppmv H{sub 2}O at 50 C and 15.2 MPa. The general corrosion areas were uniformly covered by the FeCO{sub 3}-like phase identified by X-ray diffraction (XRD). In the area of localized corrosion, XRD also revealed FeCO{sub 3}-rich islands embedded in {alpha}-iron. The energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis revealed high concentrations of iron, carbon, and oxygen in the area affected by general corrosion and in the islands formed in the area of localized corrosion. The real and imaginary impedances were lower in H{sub 2}O saturated with CO{sub 2} than those in the supercritical CO{sub 2} containing the aqueous phase indicating faster corrosion kinetics in the former.

M. Ziomek-Moroz; G. R. Holcomb; J. Tylczak; J. Beck; M. Fedkin; S. Lvov

2012-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

179

Design of a continuous-flow reactor for in situ x-ray absorption spectroscopy of solids in supercritical fluids  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the design and performance of a novel high-temperature and high-pressure continuous-flow reactor, which allows for x-ray absorption spectroscopy or diffraction in supercritical water and other fluids under high pressure and temperature. The in situ cell consists of a tube of sintered, polycrystalline aluminum nitride, which is tolerant to corrosive chemical media, and was designed to be stable at temperatures up to 500 deg. C and pressures up to 30 MPa. The performance of the reactor is demonstrated by the measurement of extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectra of a carbon-supported ruthenium catalyst during the continuous hydrothermal gasification of ethanol in supercritical water at 400 deg. C and 24 MPa.

Dreher, M.; De Boni, E.; Nachtegaal, M.; Wambach, J.; Vogel, F. [Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

180

9 - An economic and engineering analysis of a 700 °C advanced ultra-supercritical pulverized coal power plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract: EPRI has completed an engineering and economic evaluation of advanced ultra-supercritical pulverized coal (A-USC PC) technology to determine its generating efficiency and cost effectiveness. For a location in the United States, absent any cost imposed for CO2 emissions, the cost of electricity from the A-USC PC design is slightly higher than that from a conventional supercritical PC design. However, as the CO2/MWh emitted by the A-USC PC plant is lower, imposing a relatively modest cost of $25 per tonne of CO2 shifts the economics in its favor. The lower CO2 emissions also lower the cost of carbon capture and storage once integrated with the A-USC PC power plant.

J.M. Wheeldon; J.N. Phillips

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rocks supercritical carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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181

Rock Sampling At Socorro Mountain Area (Armstrong, Et Al., 1995) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Armstrong, Et Al., 1995) Armstrong, Et Al., 1995) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Rock Sampling At Socorro Mountain Area (Armstrong, Et Al., 1995) Exploration Activity Details Location Socorro Mountain Area Exploration Technique Rock Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Corresponding Socorro caldera Carboniferous rocks were studied in the field in 1988-1992-Renault later completed geochemistry and silica-crystallite geothermometry, Armstrong petrographic analysis and cathodoluminescence, Oscarson SEM studies, and John Repetski (USGS, Reston, Virgina) conodont stratigraphy and color and textural alteration as guides to the carbonate rocks' thermal history. The carbonate-rock classification used in this

182

Quantitation of Organics in Supercritical Fluid Aging Experiments Using FTIR Spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect

Aging is a natural process in which hydrophobic organic contaminants slowly accumulate in the mineral pores and organic matter of soils and sediments. Contaminants in aged soils exhibit decreased bioavailability and slow release to the environment. Therefore, aging may have a significant influence on the applicability and effectiveness of remediation strategies (e.g., bioremediation and natural attenuation) and the accuracy of numerical transport models. Previous research in our laboratory has demonstrated that circulating supercritical carbon dioxide can be used to rapidly prepare artificially aged materials for studying slow-release behavior. In this investigation, FTIR spectroscopy was evaluated as a means of monitoring the progress of the aging process in real time. Solvent interferences, measurement sensitivity for selected halocarbons and the influence of temperature and pressure on the FTIR spectra were assessed. Application of this methodology to monitoring the incorporation of carbon tetrachloride into natural soils will be discussed.

Thompson, Christopher J.; Riley, Robert G.; Amonette, James E.; Gassman, Paul L.

2004-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

183

Development of Materials for Supercritical-Water-Cooled Reactor |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Development of Materials for Supercritical-Water-Cooled Reactor Development of Materials for Supercritical-Water-Cooled Reactor Development of Materials for Supercritical-Water-Cooled Reactor Supercritical-Water-Cooled Reactor (SCWR) was selected as one of the promising candidates in Generation IV reactors for its prominent advantages; those are the high thermal efficiency, the system simplification, the R&D cost minimization and the flexibility for core design. As the demand for advanced nuclear system increases, Japanese R&D project started in 1999 aiming to provide technical information essential to demonstration of SCPR technologies through three sub-themes of 1. Plant conceptual design, 2. Thermal-hydraulics, and 3. Material. Although the material development is critical issue of SCWR development, previous studies were limited for the screening tests on commercial alloys

184

An investigation of real gas effects in supercritical CO? compressors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents a comprehensive assessment of real gas effects on the performance and matching of centrifugal compressors operating with CO2 at supercritical conditions. The analytical framework combines first principles ...

Baltadjiev, Nikola D. (Nikola Dimitrov)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

The explosive oxidation of hydrocarbons in a supercritical water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The kinetics of oxidation of naphthalene and a heavy oil residue (upon vacuum distillation) by oxygen dissolved in supercritical water is studied in a wide range of temperatures (663 K?T?1075 K) and pressures (31...

A. A. Vostrikov; S. A. Psarov

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Process for treating effluent from a supercritical water oxidation reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for treating a gaseous effluent from a supercritical water oxidation reactor containing entrained solids is provided comprising the steps of expanding the gas/solids effluent from a first to a second lower pressure at a temperature at which no liquid condenses; separating the solids from the gas effluent; neutralizing the effluent to remove any acid gases; condensing the effluent; and retaining the purified effluent to the supercritical water oxidation reactor. 6 figs.

Barnes, C.M.; Shapiro, C.

1997-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

187

Rock Magnetism To-Day  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... ROCK magnetism is that branch of geophysics that deals with the origin of magnetization in rocks and ... that deals with the origin of magnetization in rocks and its stability. Workers in rock magnetism are also interested in the phenomenon of self-reversal, that is, a rock acquiring ...

SUBIR K. BANERJEE

1966-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

188

Containment system for supercritical water oxidation reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system is described for containment of a supercritical water oxidation reactor in the event of a rupture of the reactor. The system includes a containment for housing the reaction vessel and a communicating chamber for holding a volume of coolant, such as water. The coolant is recirculated and sprayed to entrain and cool any reactants that might have escaped from the reaction vessel. Baffles at the entrance to the chamber prevent the sprayed coolant from contacting the reaction vessel. An impact-absorbing layer is positioned between the vessel and the containment to at least partially absorb momentum of any fragments propelled by the rupturing vessel. Remote, quick-disconnecting fittings exterior to the containment, in cooperation with shut-off valves, enable the vessel to be isolated and the system safely taken off-line. Normally-closed orifices throughout the containment and chamber enable decontamination of interior surfaces when necessary. 2 figures.

Chastagner, P.

1994-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

189

Session: Hard Rock Penetration  

SciTech Connect

This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of five presentations: ''Hard Rock Penetration - Summary'' by George P. Tennyson, Jr.; ''Overview - Hard Rock Penetration'' by James C. Dunn; ''An Overview of Acoustic Telemetry'' by Douglas S. Drumheller; ''Lost Circulation Technology Development Status'' by David A. Glowka; ''Downhole Memory-Logging Tools'' by Peter Lysne.

Tennyson, George P. Jr.; Dunn, James C.; Drumheller, Douglas S.; Glowka, David A.; Lysne, Peter

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Coping with carbon: a near-term strategy to limit carbon dioxide emissions from power stations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of 3500C, far too high for the best of modern...results in the most efficient power plant? Table...represents the most efficient plant type. This reflects the higher efficiency of this...ultra-supercritical boiler. (c) Carbon sequestration...

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Fluid-to-fluid scaling for convective heat transfer in tubes at supercritical and high subcritical pressures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Following a review of two recent sets of fluid-to-fluid scaling laws for supercritical heat transfer and a discussion of their possible limitations, we have proposed two additional sets of scaling laws, which take into account empirically adjustable versions of the Dittus–Boelter correlation and which are applicable to both the supercritical and the high subcritical flow regions. We have compiled a database of heat transfer measurements in carbon dioxide flowing upwards in vertical heated tubes that are free of deterioration or enhancement. We then applied the four sets of scaling laws to these data to compute values of the water-equivalent heat transfer coefficient and compared these values to predictions of a transcritical look-up table, which was earlier shown to represent well a large compilation of measurements in water at supercritical and high subcritical pressures. It was shown that the two earlier methods systematically overestimated the heat transfer coefficient in water and also introduced significant imprecision. In contrast, the two proposed methods of scaling introduce no bias and have lower precision uncertainties than those of the previous scaling methods.

H. Zahlan; D.C. Groeneveld; S. Tavoularis

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Supercritical fluid extraction of lanthanides with fluorinated [beta]diketones and tributyl phosphate  

SciTech Connect

Trivalent lanthanide ions (La[sup 3+], Eu[sup 3+], and Lu[sup 3+]) in solid materials can be effectively extracted by methanol-modified carbon dioxide containing a suitable fluorinated [beta]-diketone (such as HFA, TTA, or FOD) at 60[degree]C and 150 atm. Addition of a small amount of water to the solid samples can significantly increase the extraction efficiency. Tributyl phosphate (TBP) shows a strong positive synergistic effect with the fluorinated [beta]-diketones for the extraction of the lanthanides in supercritical CO[sub 2] without methanol modifier. Quantitative extraction of the lanthanides (92-98%) from sand or a cellulose-based solid material can be achieved using a mixture of TBP and one of the fluorinated [beta]-diketones in neat CO[sub 2] at 60[degree]C and 150 atm. The synergistic effect depends on the structure and fluorine substitution in the [beta]-diketone. In soil matrix, TBP+HFA are more effective than TBP+TTA or TBP+FOD for lanthanide extraction in supercritical CO[sub 2]. Without fluorine substitution, as in the case of acetylacetone, the positive synergistic extraction of lanthanides with TBP is negligible. With the mixed-ligand approach, high efficiencies of lanthanide extraction from aqueous solutions by neat CO[sub 2] can also be accomplished. 14 refs., 4 tabs.

Lin, Y.; Wai, C.M. (Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID (United States))

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Research on the Hydraulic Characteristics of a 600MW Supercritical Pressure CFB Boiler  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Water wall design is a key technology of supercritical pressure CFB boiler. On account of the low heat ... be applied in the water wall of supercritical CFB boilers. An experimental research on the flow ... Harbi...

D. Yang; J. Pan; Q. C. Bi; Y. J. Zhang…

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Slag-washing water of blast furnace power station with supercritical organic Rankine cycle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Organic Rankine cycle (ORC) power plant operating with supercritical ... of a supercritical power plant. Two typical organic fluids with sufficiently low critical parameters were ... study the efficiency of the s...

Song Xiao ??; Shu-ying Wu ???; Dong-sheng Zheng ???

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Hydrogen Production by Noncatalytic Autothermal Reformation of Aviation Fuel Using Supercritical Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hydrogen Production by Noncatalytic Autothermal Reformation of Aviation Fuel Using Supercritical Water ... Energy Fuels, 2009, 23 (12), ...

Jason W. Picou; Jonathan E. Wenzel; H. Brian Lanterman; Sunggyu Lee

2009-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

196

Evaluation of Biodiesel Fuels from Supercritical Fluid Processing with the Advanced Distillation Curve Method  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Supercritical transesterification processing permits efficient fuel system and combustion chamber designs to optimize fuel utilization in diesel engines.,

197

Experimental study of elliptical jet from sub to supercritical conditions  

SciTech Connect

The jet mixing at supercritical conditions involves fluid dynamics as well as thermodynamic phenomena. All the jet mixing studies at critical conditions to the present date have focused only on axisymmetric jets. When the liquid jet is injected into supercritical environment, the thermodynamic transition could be well understood by considering one of the important fluid properties such as surface tension since it decides the existence of distinct boundary between the liquid and gaseous phase. It is well known that an elliptical liquid jet undergoes axis-switching phenomena under atmospheric conditions due to the presence of surface tension. The experimental investigations were carried out with low speed elliptical jet under supercritical condition. Investigation of the binary component system with fluoroketone jet and N{sub 2} gas as environment shows that the surface tension force dominates for a large downstream distance, indicating delayed thermodynamic transition. The increase in pressure to critical state at supercritical temperature is found to expedite the thermodynamic transition. The ligament like structures has been observed rather than droplets for supercritical pressures. However, for the single component system with fluoroketone jet and fluoroketone environment shows that the jet disintegrates into droplets as it is subjected to the chamber conditions even for the subcritical pressures and no axis switching phenomenon is observed. For a single component system, as the pressure is increased to critical state, the liquid jet exhibits gas-gas like mixing behavior and that too without exhibiting axis-switching behavior.

Muthukumaran, C. K.; Vaidyanathan, Aravind, E-mail: aravind7@iist.ac.in [Department of Aerospace Engineering, Indian Institute of Space Science and Technology, Trivandrum, Kerala 695547 (India)] [Department of Aerospace Engineering, Indian Institute of Space Science and Technology, Trivandrum, Kerala 695547 (India)

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

198

Interactions of Supercritical CO2 with Coal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide (CO2) mainly emitted from fossil fuel combustion causes global warming. ... (23) CO2 and methane might penetrate the coal matrix and cause coals to expand to some extent. ... Four coals ranging in carbon content from 77 to 84% C were warmed in the weak swelling solvent chlorobenzene at 132°C for 2 wk, and samples were withdrawn at intervals. ...

Dengfeng Zhang; Lili Gu; Songgeng Li; Peichao Lian; Jun Tao

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

199

Density Inhomogeneities and Electron Mobility in Supercritical Xenon  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Density Inhomogeneities and Electron Mobility in Supercritical Xenon Density Inhomogeneities and Electron Mobility in Supercritical Xenon Richard A. Holroyd, Kengo Itoh, and Masaru Nishikawa J. Chem. Phys. 118, 706-710 (2003) [Find paper at Scitation] Abstract: The low-field mobility of electrons in supercritical Xe has been measured isothermally as a function of density above the critical temperature (289.7 K). At 293 K the mobility varies from a high of 890 cm2/Vs at 9.2 x 1021 atoms/cm3 to a minimum value of 4.6 cm2/Vs at a density of 3.5 x 1021 atoms/cm3, which is just below the critical density. The density dependence of the mobility is reasonably well predicted by the deformation potential model if the adiabatic compressibility is used to characterize the electron-medium interactions. Approximate agreement indicates that

200

Heat transfer research on supercritical water flow upward in tube  

SciTech Connect

The experimental research of heat transfer on supercritical water has been carried out on the supercritical water multipurpose test loop with a 7.6 mm upright tube. The experimental data of heat transfer is obtained. The experimental results of thermal-hydraulic parameters on flow and heat transfer of supercritical water show that: Heat transfer enhancement occurs when the fluid temperature reaches pseudo-critical point with low mass flow velocity, and peters out when the mass flow velocity increases. The heat transfer coefficient and Nusselt number decrease with the heat flux or system pressure increases, and increase with the increasing of mass flow velocity. The wall temperature increases when the mass flow velocity decreases or the system pressure increases. (authors)

Li, H. B.; Yang, J. [China Nuclear Power Technology Research Inst., Shenzhen, Guangdong (China); Gu, H. Y.; Zhao, M. [Shanghai Jiao Tong Univ., Shanghai (China); Lu, D. H.; Zhang, J. M.; Wang, F.; Zhang, Y. [China Nuclear Power Technology Research Inst., Shenzhen, Guangdong (China)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rocks supercritical carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Diagenesis in halite-cemented source rocks, Middle Devonian, Saskatchewan  

SciTech Connect

Porosity in Dawson Bay carbonates is halite plugged and the formation is sandwiched between thick units of bedded halite. The presence of displacive halite crystals within fine-grained carbonates (implying sediment plasticity during halite emplacement) and uncompacted organic-rich, carbonate-poor stromatolites indicate halite cementation occurred at an early stage. Also, halite cementation must have been completed prior to porosity loss in overlying bedded halites. By comparison with Holocene/Pleistocene bedded halites, this cementation occurred with only tens of meters of overburden. Early complete halite cementation should have converted Dawson Bay carbonates into virtually a closed system and greatly curtailed or inhibited organic-matter maturation within them Organic-rich carbonates occur immediately below Dawson Bay evaporites as rocks containing an anomalously abundant benthos (stromatoporoids, brachiopods) or as a more restricted facies, lacking megafossils or containing gastropods. Some restricted carbonates contain more than 2% extractable organic carbon. The n-alkane, pentacyclic triterpane, nonrearranged sterane and disterane distributions suggest two distinct populations of samples are present. Biomarker distributions are difficult to interpret in terms of estimating organic maturity because of source rock environmental factors (hypersalinity), but appear to be inconsistent with the geological prognosis that these source rocks would have been isolated early in their diagenesis. The problem of how kerogens can be altered in an apparently closed system has yet to be resolved.

Kendall, A.C. (Univ. of East Anglia, Norwich (England)); Abbott, G.D.; D'Elia, V.A.A. (Univ. of Newcastle upon Tyne (England))

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Supercritical water oxidation data acquisition testing. Final report, Volume I  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses the phase one testing of a data acquisition system for a supercritical water waste oxidation system. The system is designed to destroy a wide range of organic materials in mixed wastes. The design and testing of the MODAR Oxidizer is discussed. An analysis of the optimized runs is included.

NONE

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Field-portable supercritical CO{sub 2} extractor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is an apparatus for extracting organic compounds from solid materials. A generator vessel has a removable closure for receiving a solid or liquid solvent which is heated with a resistive heating element to a gaseous or supercritical phase. The removable closure is unencumbered because the side wall is penetrated with an outlet for the gaseous or supercritical solvent. The generator vessel further has a pressure transducer that provides an electronic signal related to pressure of the gaseous or supercritical solvent. The apparatus of the present invention further includes at least one extraction cell having a top and a bottom and a wall extending there between, wherein the bottom is sealably penetrated by an inlet for gaseous or supercritical solvent received through a manifold connected to the outlet, the top having an easy-open removable closure cap, and the wall having an outlet port. Finally, a permeable sample cartridge is included for holding the solid materials and to provide radial-flow of the extraction fluid, which is placed within the extraction cell. 10 figs.

Wright, B.W.; Zemanian, T.S.; Robins, W.H.; Woodcock, L.J.

1997-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

204

Field-portable supercritical CO.sub.2 extractor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is an apparatus for extracting organic compounds from solid materials. A generator vessel has a removable closure for receiving a solid or liquid solvent which is heated with a resistive heating element to a gaseous or supercritical phase. The removable closure is unencumbered because the side wall is penetrated with an outlet for the gaseous or supercritical solvent. The generator vessel further has a pressure transducer that provides an electronic signal related to pressure of the gaseous or supercritical solvent. The apparatus of the present invention further includes at least one extraction cell having a top and a bottom and a wall extending therebetween, wherein the bottom is sealably penetrated by an inlet for gaseous or supercritical solvent received through a manifold connected to the outlet, the top having an easy-open removable closure cap, and the wall having an outlet port. Finally, a permeable sample cartridge is included for holding the solid materials and to provide radial-flow of the extraction fluid, which is placed within the extraction cell.

Wright, Bob W. (Richland, WA); Zemanian, Thomas S. (Richland, WA); Robins, William H. (Richland, WA); Woodcock, Leslie J. (Benton City, WA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Rock River Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind Farm Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Rock River Wind Farm Facility Rock River Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Shell Wind Energy Developer SeaWest Energy Purchaser PacifiCorp Location Arlington and Carbon Counties WY Coordinates 41.6996°, -107.003° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.6996,"lon":-107.003,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

206

Microwave assisted hard rock cutting  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for the sequential fracturing and cutting of subsurface volume of hard rock (102) in the strata (101) of a mining environment (100) by subjecting the volume of rock to a beam (25) of microwave energy to fracture the subsurface volume of rock by differential expansion; and , then bringing the cutting edge (52) of a piece of conventional mining machinery (50) into contact with the fractured rock (102).

Lindroth, David P. (Apple Valley, MN); Morrell, Roger J. (Bloomington, MN); Blair, James R. (Inver Grove Heights, MN)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Can Rock-Eval pyrolysis assess the biogeochemical composition of organic matter during peatification?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as a screening tool to investigate soil organic matter (SOM) chemistry and vulnerability. In order to test the validity of Rock-Eval as an indicator of SOM chemistry and of OM transformations, we compared classical Rock-Eval-derived parameters (Total Organic Carbon - TOC, Hydrogen Index - HI and Oxygen Index - OI

Boyer, Edmond

208

Supercritical Water Reactor Cycle for Medium Power Applications  

SciTech Connect

Scoping studies for a power conversion system based on a direct-cycle supercritical water reactor have been conducted. The electric power range of interest is 5-30 MWe with a design point of 20 MWe. The overall design objective is to develop a system that has minimized physical size and performs satisfactorily over a broad range of operating conditions. The design constraints are as follows: Net cycle thermal efficiency {ge}20%; Steam turbine outlet quality {ge}90%; and Pumping power {le}2500 kW (at nominal conditions). Three basic cycle configurations were analyzed. Listed in order of increased plant complexity, they are: (1) Simple supercritical Rankine cycle; (2) All-supercritical Brayton cycle; and (3) Supercritical Rankine cycle with feedwater preheating. The sensitivity of these three configurations to various parameters, such as reactor exit temperature, reactor pressure, condenser pressure, etc., was assessed. The Thermoflex software package was used for this task. The results are as follows: (a) The simple supercritical Rankine cycle offers the greatest hardware simplification, but its high reactor temperature rise and reactor outlet temperature may pose serious problems from the viewpoint of thermal stresses, stability and materials in the core. (b) The all-supercritical Brayton cycle is not a contender, due to its poor thermal efficiency. (c) The supercritical Rankine cycle with feedwater preheating affords acceptable thermal efficiency with lower reactor temperature rise and outlet temperature. (d) The use of a moisture separator improves the performance of the supercritical Rankine cycle with feedwater preheating and allows for a further reduction of the reactor outlet temperature, thus it was selected for the next step. Preliminary engineering design of the supercritical Rankine cycle with feedwater preheating and moisture separation was performed. All major components including the turbine, feedwater heater, feedwater pump, condenser, condenser pump and pipes were modeled with realistic assumptions using the PEACE module of Thermoflex. A three-dimensional layout of the plant was also generated with the SolidEdge software. The results of the engineering design are as follows: (i) The cycle achieves a net thermal efficiency of 24.13% with 350/460 C reactor inlet/outlet temperatures, {approx}250 bar reactor pressure and 0.75 bar condenser pressure. The steam quality at the turbine outlet is 90% and the total electric consumption of the pumps is about 2500 kWe at nominal conditions. (ii) The overall size of the plant is attractively compact and can be further reduced if a printed-circuit-heat-exchanger (vs shell-and-tube) design is used for the feedwater heater, which is currently the largest component by far. Finally, an analysis of the plant performance at off-nominal conditions has revealed good robustness of the design in handling large changes of thermal power and seawater temperature.

BD Middleton; J Buongiorno

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

209

GPC behavior of metalloporphyrins from rock extract  

SciTech Connect

Nickel and vanadyl porphyrins present in rock extract from the vicinity of petroleum deposit in the Persian Gulf area were isolated by the combination of adsurption chromatography on silica gel and GPC on styrene-divinylbenzene copolymer. In order to study the GPC behavior of these metalloporphyrins, chromatographic fractions were collected and analyzed by UV/VIS absorption spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. The number of carbon atoms present in the porphine substituents and the different geometry of nickel and vanadyl ions in the molecule of metalloporphyrins were found to be the main factors influencing the GPC separation of these complexes. This chromatographic technique provided an effective separation of nickel from vanadylporphyrins.

Sebor, G.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Carbon Sequestration Kinetic and Storage Capacity of Ultramafic Mining Waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Mineral carbonation of ultramafic rocks provides an environmentally safe and permanent solution for CO2 sequestration. In order to assess the carbonation potential of ultramafic waste material produced by industrial processing, we designed a laboratory-...

Julie Pronost; Georges Beaudoin; Joniel Tremblay; Faïçal Larachi; Josée Duchesne; Réjean Hébert; Marc Constantin

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

211

Base Technologies and Tools for Supercritical Reservoirs Geothermal Lab  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technologies and Tools for Supercritical Reservoirs Geothermal Lab Technologies and Tools for Supercritical Reservoirs Geothermal Lab Call Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Base Technologies and Tools for Supercritical Reservoirs Project Type / Topic 1 Laboratory Call for Submission of Applications for Research, Development and Analysis of Geothermal Technologies Project Type / Topic 2 High-Temperature Downhole Tools Project Description Development of downhole tools capable of reliable operation in supercritical environments is a significant challenge with a number of technical and operational hurdles related to both the hardware and electronics design. Hardware designs require the elimination of all elastomer seals and the use of advanced materials. Electronics must be hardened to the extent practicable since no electronics system can survive supercritical temperatures. To develop systems capable of logging in these environments will require a number of developments. More robust packaging of electronics is needed. Sandia will design and develop innovated, highly integrated, high-temperature (HT) data loggers. These data loggers will be designed and developed using silicon-on-insulator/silicon carbide (SOI/SiC) technologies integrated into a MultiChip Module (MCM); greatly increasing the reliability of the overall system (eliminating hundreds of board-level innerconnects) and decreasing the size of the electronics package. Tools employing these electronics will be capable of operating continuously at temperatures up to 240 °C and by using advanced Dewar flasks, will operate in a supercritical reservoir with temperatures over 450 °C and pressures above 70 MPa. Dewar flasks are needed to protect the electronic components, but those currently available are only reliable in temperature regimes in the range of 350 °C; promising advances in materials will be investigated to improve Dewar technologies. HT wireline currently used for logging operations is compromised at temperatures above 300 °C; along with exploring the development of a HT wireline for logging purposes, alternative approaches that employ HT batteries (e.g., those awarded a recent R&D 100) will also be investigated, and if available will enable deployment using slickline, which is not subject to the same temperature limitations as wireline. To demonstrate the capability provided by these improvements, tools will be developed and fielded. The developed base technologies and working tool designs will be available to industry throughout the project period. The developed techniques and subsystems will help to further the advancement of HT tools needed in the geothermal industry.

212

Experimental Study of Carbon Sequestration Reactions Controlled  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Experimental Study of Carbon Sequestration Reactions Controlled by the Percolation of CO2-Rich. Carbonation of ultramafic rocks in geological reservoirs is, in theory, the most efficient way to trap CO2 irreversibly; however, possible feedback effects between carbonation reactions and changes in the reservoir

Demouchy, Sylvie

213

Solvent-vented injection in the analysis of agrochemicals by capillary supercritical fluid chromatography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Capillary supercritical fluid chromatography was performed with solvent-vented injection. Dilute samples of agrochemical mixtures were chromatographed and a study of detector response vs. quantity injected made.

S. Ashraf; K. D. Bartle; A. A. Clifford; I. L. Davies; R. Moulder

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Volatility of Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Blends for Supercritical Fuel Injection  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Supercritical dieseline could be used in diesel engines having efficient fuel systems and combustion chamber designs that decrease fuel consumption and mitigate emissions.

215

2018 MAX-C/EXOMARS MISSION: THE ORLEANS MARS-ANALOGUE ROCK COLLECTION FOR INSTRUMENT TESTING. N. Bost1,2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Svalbard (Norway) with carbonate concretions in vesi- cules, and hydrothermal calcareous exhalite crusts) Hydrothermal carbonate (exhalite on the Svalbard basalt). Methods : Textural and compositional information nontronite. Some of the rocks have been subjected to hydrothermal alteration (silicifica- tion) and some

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

216

Method and apparatus for waste destruction using supercritical water oxidation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention relates to an improved apparatus and method for initiating and sustaining an oxidation reaction. A hazardous waste, is introduced into a reaction zone within a pressurized containment vessel. An oxidizer, preferably hydrogen peroxide, is mixed with a carrier fluid, preferably water, and the mixture is heated until the fluid achieves supercritical conditions of temperature and pressure. The heating means comprise cartridge heaters placed in closed-end tubes extending into the center region of the pressure vessel along the reactor longitudinal axis. A cooling jacket surrounds the pressure vessel to remove excess heat at the walls. Heating and cooling the fluid mixture in this manner creates a limited reaction zone near the center of the pressure vessel by establishing a steady state density gradient in the fluid mixture which gradually forces the fluid to circulate internally. This circulation allows the fluid mixture to oscillate between supercritical and subcritical states as it is heated and cooled.

Haroldsen, Brent Lowell (1251 Sprague St., Manteca, CA 95336); Wu, Benjamin Chiau-pin (2270 Goldenrod La., San Ramon, CA 94583)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Chapter 13 - Energy Conversion of Biomass and Recycling of Waste Plastics Using Supercritical Fluid, Subcritical Fluid and High-Pressure Superheated Steam  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Utilization of unused or waste biomass as fuels is receiving much attention owing to the reduction of CO2 emission and the development of alternative energy to expensive fossil fuels. On the other hand, the recycling of waste plastics is important for the prevention of the exhaustion of fossil resources. In this chapter, typical several examples of the energy conversion of biomass and the recycling of waste plastics using supercritical fluid, subcritical fluid, and high-pressure superheated steam were introduced: (1) bioethanol production from paper sludge with subcritical water, (2) hydrogen production from various biomass with high-pressure superheated steam, (3) production of composite solid fuel from waste biomass and plastics with subcritical water, (4) waste treatment and recovery of thermal energy with high-pressure superheated steam oxidation, (5) recycling of carbon fiber-reinforced plastic with high-pressure superheated steam and supercritical alcohol, (6) recycling of laminate film with subcritical water, and (7) recycling of cross-linked polyethylene with supercritical methanol.

Idzumi Okajima; Takeshi Sako

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Ultra-Supercritical Pressure CFB Boiler Conceptual Design Study  

SciTech Connect

Electric utility interest in supercritical pressure steam cycles has revived in the United States after waning in the 1980s. Since supercritical cycles yield higher plant efficiencies than subcritical plants along with a proportional reduction in traditional stack gas pollutants and CO{sub 2} release rates, the interest is to pursue even more advanced steam conditions. The advantages of supercritical (SC) and ultra supercritical (USC) pressure steam conditions have been demonstrated in the high gas temperature, high heat flux environment of large pulverized coal-fired (PC) boilers. Interest in circulating fluidized bed (CFB) combustion, as an alternative to PC combustion, has been steadily increasing. Although CFB boilers as large as 300 MWe are now in operation, they are drum type, subcritical pressure units. With their sizes being much smaller than and their combustion temperatures much lower than those of PC boilers (300 MWe versus 1,000 MWe and 1600 F versus 3500 F), a conceptual design study was conducted herein to investigate the technical feasibility and economics of USC CFB boilers. The conceptual study was conducted at 400 MWe and 800 MWe nominal plant sizes with high sulfur Illinois No. 6 coal used as the fuel. The USC CFB plants had higher heating value efficiencies of 40.6 and 41.3 percent respectively and their CFB boilers, which reflect conventional design practices, can be built without the need for an R&D effort. Assuming construction at a generic Ohio River Valley site with union labor, total plant costs in January 2006 dollars were estimated to be $1,551/kW and $1,244/kW with costs of electricity of $52.21/MWhr and $44.08/MWhr, respectively. Based on the above, this study has shown that large USC CFB boilers are feasible and that they can operate with performance and costs that are competitive with comparable USC PC boilers.

Zhen Fan; Steve Goidich; Archie Robertson; Song Wu

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

219

Rock Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rock Sampling Rock Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Rock Sampling Details Activities (13) Areas (13) Regions (1) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Field Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock samples are used to define lithology. Field and lab analyses can be used to measure the chemical and isotopic constituents of rock samples. Stratigraphic/Structural: Provides information about the time and environment which formed a particular geologic unit. Microscopic rock textures can be used to estimate the history of stress and strain, and/or faulting. Hydrological: Isotope geochemistry can reveal fluid circulation of a geothermal system.

220

Aspects of rock physics in 4-D seismology  

SciTech Connect

In recent years, time-lapse 3-13 or 4-D seismology has been used to identify bypassed oil, to monitor steam and CO[sub 2] injection processes, and even to track the movement of the injected water. However, the feasibility of applying seismic technology to monitoring oil recovery processes and the ability to interpret the seismic results depend to a large extent on the understanding of the physics or seismic properties of the reservoir rocks and fluids. We have carried out several laboratory rock physics investigations on seismic properties of reservoir rocks in relation to oil recovery processes. Particularly, we found that seismic properties were dramatically affected by he injected steam in heavy oil sands, by the injected CO[sub 2] in carbonate rocks, and in some cases, by the injected water in light oil reservoir sands. In this paper, we present laboratory results of seismic properties of oil lands from several places in the world, including Indonesia, Canada, and of West Texas carbonates undergoing CO[sub 2] injection. We discuss the effects of reservoir geology, fluid properties, and recovery process on the seismic properties and how the laboratory results can be used in the feasibility studies and seismic interpretations. We also show examples of 4-D and cross-well seismic results from the Duri field, Indonesia, and from a West Texas carbonate field undergoing CO[sub 2] flooding.

Wang, Zhijing; Langan, R. (Chevron Petroleum Technology Co., La Habra, CA (United States)); Jenkins, S.; Bee, M.; Waite, M. (Caltex Pacific Indonesia, Rumbai (Indonesia))

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rocks supercritical carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Aspects of rock physics in 4-D seismology  

SciTech Connect

In recent years, time-lapse 3-13 or 4-D seismology has been used to identify bypassed oil, to monitor steam and CO{sub 2} injection processes, and even to track the movement of the injected water. However, the feasibility of applying seismic technology to monitoring oil recovery processes and the ability to interpret the seismic results depend to a large extent on the understanding of the physics or seismic properties of the reservoir rocks and fluids. We have carried out several laboratory rock physics investigations on seismic properties of reservoir rocks in relation to oil recovery processes. Particularly, we found that seismic properties were dramatically affected by he injected steam in heavy oil sands, by the injected CO{sub 2} in carbonate rocks, and in some cases, by the injected water in light oil reservoir sands. In this paper, we present laboratory results of seismic properties of oil lands from several places in the world, including Indonesia, Canada, and of West Texas carbonates undergoing CO{sub 2} injection. We discuss the effects of reservoir geology, fluid properties, and recovery process on the seismic properties and how the laboratory results can be used in the feasibility studies and seismic interpretations. We also show examples of 4-D and cross-well seismic results from the Duri field, Indonesia, and from a West Texas carbonate field undergoing CO{sub 2} flooding.

Wang, Zhijing; Langan, R. [Chevron Petroleum Technology Co., La Habra, CA (United States); Jenkins, S.; Bee, M.; Waite, M. [Caltex Pacific Indonesia, Rumbai (Indonesia)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

222

Overview - Hard Rock Penetration  

SciTech Connect

The Hard Rock Penetration program is developing technology to reduce the costs of drilling and completing geothermal wells. Current projects include: lost circulation control, rock penetration mechanics, instrumentation, and industry/DOE cost shared projects of the Geothermal Drilling Organization. Last year, a number of accomplishments were achieved in each of these areas. A new flow meter being developed to accurately measure drilling fluid outflow was tested extensively during Long Valley drilling. Results show that this meter is rugged, reliable, and can provide useful measurements of small differences in fluid inflow and outflow rates. By providing early indications of fluid gain or loss, improved control of blow-out and lost circulation problems during geothermal drilling can be expected. In the area of downhole tools for lost circulation control, the concept of a downhole injector for injecting a two-component, fast-setting cementitious mud was developed. DOE filed a patent application for this concept during FY 91. The design criteria for a high-temperature potassium, uranium, thorium logging tool featuring a downhole data storage computer were established, and a request for proposals was submitted to tool development companies. The fundamental theory of acoustic telemetry in drill strings was significantly advanced through field experimentation and analysis. A new understanding of energy loss mechanisms was developed.

Dunn, James C.

1992-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

223

Overview: Hard Rock Penetration  

SciTech Connect

The Hard Rock Penetration program is developing technology to reduce the costs of drilling and completing geothermal wells. Current projects include: lost circulation control, rock penetration mechanics, instrumentation, and industry/DOE cost shared projects of the Geothermal Drilling organization. Last year, a number of accomplishments were achieved in each of these areas. A new flow meter being developed to accurately measure drilling fluid outflow was tested extensively during Long Valley drilling. Results show that this meter is rugged, reliable, and can provide useful measurements of small differences in fluid inflow and outflow rates. By providing early indications of fluid gain or loss, improved control of blow-out and lost circulation problems during geothermal drilling can be expected. In the area of downhole tools for lost circulation control, the concept of a downhole injector for injecting a two-component, fast-setting cementitious mud was developed. DOE filed a patent application for this concept during FY 91. The design criteria for a high-temperature potassium, uranium, thorium logging tool featuring a downhole data storage computer were established, and a request for proposals was submitted to tool development companies. The fundamental theory of acoustic telemetry in drill strings was significantly advanced through field experimentation and analysis. A new understanding of energy loss mechanisms was developed.

Dunn, J.C.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Rock Properties Model  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this model report is to document the Rock Properties Model version 3.1 with regard to input data, model methods, assumptions, uncertainties and limitations of model results, and qualification status of the model. The report also documents the differences between the current and previous versions and validation of the model. The rock properties model provides mean matrix and lithophysae porosity, and the cross-correlated mean bulk density as direct input to the ''Saturated Zone Flow and Transport Model Abstraction'', MDL-NBS-HS-000021, REV 02 (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170042]). The constraints, caveats, and limitations associated with this model are discussed in Section 6.6 and 8.2. Model validation accomplished by corroboration with data not cited as direct input is discussed in Section 7. The revision of this model report was performed as part of activities being conducted under the ''Technical Work Plan for: The Integrated Site Model, Revision 05'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169635]). The purpose of this revision is to bring the report up to current procedural requirements and address the Regulatory Integration Team evaluation comments. The work plan describes the scope, objectives, tasks, methodology, and procedures for this process.

C. Lum

2004-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

225

MOLECULAR DESIGN OF COLLOIDS IN SUPERCRITICAL FLUIDS  

SciTech Connect

The environmentally benign, non-toxic, non-flammable fluids water and carbon dioxide (CO2) are the two most abundant and inexpensive solvents on earth. Emulsions of these fluids are of interest in many industrial processes, as well as CO2 sequestration and enhanced oil recovery. Until recently, formation of these emulsions required stabilization with fluorinated surfactants, which are expensive and often not environmentally friendly. In this work we overcame this severe limitation by developing a fundamental understanding of the properties of surfactants the CO2-water interface and using this knowledge to design and characterize emulsions stabilized with either hydrocarbon-based surfactants or nanoparticle stabilizers. We also discovered a new concept of electrostatic stabilization for CO2-based emulsions and colloids. Finally, we were able to translate our earlier work on the synthesis of silicon and germanium nanocrystals and nanowires from high temperatures and pressures to lower temperatures and ambient pressure to make the chemistry much more accessible.

Keith P. Johnston

2009-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

226

Heat transfer and hydraulic resistance of supercritical pressure coolants. Part III: Generalized description of SCP fluids normal heat transfer, empirical calculating correlations, integral method of theoretical calculations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The problems of generalized description of the supercritical-pressure fluids “normal” heat transfer are analyzed. The known empirical correlations are considered and their efficiency is assessed in view of using the refined International Standards on water and carbon dioxide thermophysical properties. The efficient methods of renovating the old correlations, as well as new correlations for calculating normal heat transfer are proposed. The modified integral method for theoretical calculating normal heat transfer is given, which makes it possible obtaining the data on the SCP flow structure.

V.A. Kurganov; Yu.A. Zeigarnik; I.V. Maslakova

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership--Phase I  

SciTech Connect

The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership in Phase I are organized into four areas: (1) Evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks that will be used to determine the location of pilot demonstrations in Phase II; (2) Development of GIS-based reporting framework that links with national networks; (3) Design of an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies, market-based opportunities for carbon management, and an economic/risk assessment framework (referred to below as the Advanced Concepts component of the Phase I efforts); and (4) Initiation of a comprehensive education and outreach program. As a result of the Phase I activities, the groundwork is in place to provide an assessment of storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that complements the ongoing DOE research agenda in Carbon Sequestration. The geology of the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership Region is favorable for the potential sequestration of enormous volume of CO{sub 2}. The United States Geological Survey (USGS 1995) identified 10 geologic provinces and 111 plays in the region. These provinces and plays include both sedimentary rock types characteristic of oil, gas, and coal productions as well as large areas of mafic volcanic rocks. Of the 10 provinces and 111 plays, 1 province and 4 plays are located within Idaho. The remaining 9 provinces and 107 plays are dominated by sedimentary rocks and located in the states of Montana and Wyoming. The potential sequestration capacity of the 9 sedimentary provinces within the region ranges from 25,000 to almost 900,000 million metric tons of CO{sub 2}. Overall every sedimentary formation investigated has significant potential to sequester large amounts of CO{sub 2}. Simulations conducted to evaluate mineral trapping potential of mafic volcanic rock formations located in the Idaho province suggest that supercritical CO{sub 2} is converted to solid carbonate mineral within a few hundred years and permanently entombs the carbon. Although MMV for this rock type may be challenging, a carefully chosen combination of geophysical and geochemical techniques should allow assessment of the fate of CO{sub 2} in deep basalt hosted aquifers. Terrestrial carbon sequestration relies on land management practices and technologies to remove atmospheric CO{sub 2} where it is stored in trees, plants, and soil. This indirect sequestration can be implemented today and is on the front line of voluntary, market-based approaches to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions. Initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil Carbon (C) on rangelands, and forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Rangelands can store up to an additional 0.05 mt C/ha/yr, while the croplands are on average four times that amount. Estimates of technical potential for soil sequestration within the region in cropland are in the range of 2.0 M mt C/yr over 20 year time horizon. This is equivalent to approximately 7.0 M mt CO{sub 2}e/yr. The forestry sinks are well documented, and the potential in the Big Sky region ranges from 9-15 M mt CO{sub 2} equivalent per year. Value-added benefits include enhanced yields, reduced erosion, and increased wildlife habitat. Thus the terrestrial sinks provide a viable, environmentally beneficial, and relatively low cost sink that is available to sequester C in the current time frame. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological and terrestrial sequestration re

Susan M. Capalbo

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership--Phase I  

SciTech Connect

The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership in Phase I are organized into four areas: (1) Evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks that will be used to determine the location of pilot demonstrations in Phase II; (2) Development of GIS-based reporting framework that links with national networks; (3) Design of an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies, market-based opportunities for carbon management, and an economic/risk assessment framework (referred to below as the Advanced Concepts component of the Phase I efforts); and (4) Initiation of a comprehensive education and outreach program. As a result of the Phase I activities, the groundwork is in place to provide an assessment of storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that complements the ongoing DOE research agenda in Carbon Sequestration. The geology of the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership Region is favorable for the potential sequestration of enormous volume of CO{sub 2}. The United States Geological Survey (USGS 1995) identified 10 geologic provinces and 111 plays in the region. These provinces and plays include both sedimentary rock types characteristic of oil, gas, and coal productions as well as large areas of mafic volcanic rocks. Of the 10 provinces and 111 plays, 1 province and 4 plays are located within Idaho. The remaining 9 provinces and 107 plays are dominated by sedimentary rocks and located in the states of Montana and Wyoming. The potential sequestration capacity of the 9 sedimentary provinces within the region ranges from 25,000 to almost 900,000 million metric tons of CO{sub 2}. Overall every sedimentary formation investigated has significant potential to sequester large amounts of CO{sub 2}. Simulations conducted to evaluate mineral trapping potential of mafic volcanic rock formations located in the Idaho province suggest that supercritical CO{sub 2} is converted to solid carbonate mineral within a few hundred years and permanently entombs the carbon. Although MMV for this rock type may be challenging, a carefully chosen combination of geophysical and geochemical techniques should allow assessment of the fate of CO{sub 2} in deep basalt hosted aquifers. Terrestrial carbon sequestration relies on land management practices and technologies to remove atmospheric CO{sub 2} where it is stored in trees, plants, and soil. This indirect sequestration can be implemented today and is on the front line of voluntary, market-based approaches to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions. Initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil Carbon (C) on rangelands, and forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Rangelands can store up to an additional 0.05 mt C/ha/yr, while the croplands are on average four times that amount. Estimates of technical potential for soil sequestration within the region in cropland are in the range of 2.0 M mt C/yr over 20 year time horizon. This is equivalent to approximately 7.0 M mt CO{sub 2}e/yr. The forestry sinks are well documented, and the potential in the Big Sky region ranges from 9-15 M mt CO{sub 2} equivalent per year. Value-added benefits include enhanced yields, reduced erosion, and increased wildlife habitat. Thus the terrestrial sinks provide a viable, environmentally beneficial, and relatively low cost sink that is available to sequester C in the current time frame. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological and terrestrial sequestration re

Susan M. Capalbo

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Gassmann's fluid substitution paradox on carbonates: seismic and ultrasonic frequencies Ludmila Adam 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

response of carbonate rocks to porosity, permeability, texture, fluids and pressure. Velocities, in general of carbonate plugs of different porosity, permeability, mineralogy and texture are measured at seismic data on carbonate reservoir rocks have not been as thoroughly studied as clastic sedimentary reservoir

230

Convective heat transfer characteristics of China RP-3 aviation kerosene at supercritical pressure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Convective heat transfer characteristics of China RP-3 aviation kerosene at supercritical pressure Keywords: Supercritical pressure Aviation kerosene Convective heat transfer Numerical study a b s t r a c convective in kerosene pipe flow is complicated. Here the convective heat transfer characteristics of China

Guo, Zhixiong "James"

231

Quantitative study on removal of SU-8 photoresist patterns by supercritical CO2 emulsion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Supercritical CO"2 emulsion (SCE) was found to be effective in removal of epoxy-type SU-8 photoresist. The ability to remove SU-8 was compared between a commercially available Remover PG (RPG) solution and SCE. Both RPG and SCE were effective in removing ... Keywords: Lithography, SU-8 removal, Supercritical CO2 emulsion

Tso-Fu Mark Chang; Chiemi Ishiyama; Tatsuo Sato; Masato Sone

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Monolithic Composites of Silica Aerogels by Reactive Supercritical Deposition of Hydroxy-Terminated Poly(Dimethylsiloxane)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The method involves dissolution of PDMS(OH) in supercritical CO2 (scCO2) and then exposure of the aerogel samples to this single phase mixture of PDMS(OH)-CO2. ... Upon supercritical deposition, the polymer molecules were discovered to react with the hydroxyl groups on the silica aerogel surface and form a conformal coating on the surface. ...

D. Sanli; C. Erkey

2013-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

233

Source rock screening studies of Ordovician Maquoketa shale in western Illinois  

SciTech Connect

Rock-Eval (pyrolysis) studies of Ordovician Maquoketa Shale samples (cuttings and cores) from the shallow subsurface (500-800 ft deep) in western Illinois indicate that facies within the Maquoketa have potential as hydrocarbon source rocks. Dark, presumably organic-rich zones within the Maquoketa Shale were selected and analyzed for total organic carbon (TOC), Rock-Eval (pyrolysis), and bulk and clay mineralogy using x-ray diffraction. Preliminary results from six samples from Schuyler, McDonough, and Fulton Counties show TOC values ranging from 4.70% to as high as 12.90%. Rock-Eval parameters, measured by heating organic matter in an inert atmosphere, indicate source rock maturity and petroleum-generative potential. Screening studies, using the Rock-Eval process, describe very good source rock potential in facies of the Maquoketa Shale. Further studies at the Illinois State Geological Survey will expand on these preliminary results. This study complements a proposed exploration model in western Illinois and further suggests the possibility of source rocks on the flanks of the Illinois basin. Long-distance migration from more deeply buried effective source rocks in southern Illinois has been the traditional mechanism proposed for petroleum in basin-flank reservoirs. Localized source rocks can be an alternative to long-distance migration, and can expand the possibilities of basin-flank reservoirs, encouraging further exploration in these areas.

Autrey, A.; Crockett, J.E.; Dickerson, D.R.; Oltz, D.F.; Seyler, B.J.; Warren, R.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

1. BACKGROUND & OBJECTIVES For geological carbon sequestration, it is essential to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1. BACKGROUND & OBJECTIVES · For geological carbon sequestration, it is essential to understand Material Characterization for Intermediate-scale Testing to Develop Strategies for Geologic Sequestration to generate comprehensive data sets. Due to the nature of the CO2 geological sequestration where supercritical

235

Supercritical Helium Cooling of the LHC Beam Screens  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The cold mass of the LHC superconducting magnets, operating in pressurised superfluid helium at 1.9 K, must be shielded from the dynamic heat loads induced by the circulating particle beams, by means of beam screens maintained at higher temperature. The beam screens are cooled between 5 and 20 K by forced flow of weakly supercritical helium, a solution which avoids two-phase flow in the long, narr ow cooling channels, but still presents a potential risk of thermohydraulic instabilities. This problem has been studied by theoretical modelling and experiments performed on a full-scale dedicated te st loop.

Hatchadourian, E; Tavian, L

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Separation of Fischer-Tropsch from Catalyst by Supercritical Extraction.  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this research project is to evaluate the potential of supercritical fluid (SCF) extraction for the recovery and fractionation of the wax product from the slurry bubble column (SBC) reactor of the Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) process. The wax, comprised mostly of branched and linear alkanes with a broad molecular weight distribution up to C{sub 100}, will be extracted with a hydrocarbon solvent that has a critical temperature near the operating temperature of the SBC reactor, i.e., 200-300{degrees}C. Initial work is being performed using n-hexane as the solvent.

Joyce, P.C.; Thies, M.C.

1997-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

237

Supercritical Fluid Extraction of Radionuclides - A Green Technology for Nuclear Waste Management  

SciTech Connect

Supercritical fluid carbon dioxide (SF-CO2) is capable of extracting radionuclides including cesium, strontium, uranium, plutonium and lanthanides directly from liquid and solid samples with proper complexing agents. Of particular interest is the ability of SF-CO2 to dissolve uranium dioxide directly using a CO2-soluble tri-nbutylphosphate- nitric acid (TBP-HNO3) extractant to form a highly soluble UO2(NO3)2(TBP)2 complex that can be transported and separated from Cs, Sr, and other transition metals. This method can also dissolve plutonium dioxide in SF-CO2. The SF-CO2 extraction technology offers several advantages over conventional solvent-based methods including ability to extract radionuclides directly from solids, easy separation of solutes from CO2, and minimization of liquid waste generation. Potential applications of the SF-CO2 extraction technology for nuclear waste treatment and for reprocessing of spent nuclear fuels will be discussed. Information on current demonstrations of the SF-CO2 technology by nuclear companies and research organizations in different countries will be reviewed.

Wai, Chien M.

2003-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

238

EUROCK 2006 Multiphysics Coupling and Long Term Behaviour in Rock Mechanics Van Cotthem, Charlier, Thimus & Tshibangu (eds)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

observations of stress-aligned shear- wave splitting (seismic birefringence) in hydro-carbon reservoirs-WAVE SPLITTING The key phenomenon for observing the internal micro- cracked structure of rocks is stress

239

Life Under Rocks Grade Level: First  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Procedure: Find a small and large rock (rock should be on a solid surface and not sunk in sand or muck

240

Shotgun cartridge rock breaker  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A rock breaker uses shotgun cartridges or other firearm ammunition as the explosive charge at the bottom of a drilled borehole. The breaker includes a heavy steel rod or bar, a gun with a firing chamber for the ammunition which screws onto the rod, a long firing pin running through a central passage in the rod, and a firing trigger mechanism at the external end of the bar which strikes the firing pin to fire the cartridge within the borehole. A tubular sleeve surround the main body of the rod and includes slits the end to allow it to expand. The rod has a conical taper at the internal end against which the end of the sleeve expands when the sleeve is forced along the rod toward the taper by a nut threaded onto the external end of the rod. As the sleeve end expands, it pushes against the borehole and holds the explosive gasses within, and also prevents the breaker from flying out of the borehole. The trigger mechanism includes a hammer with a slot and a hole for accepting a drawbar or drawpin which, when pulled by a long cord, allows the cartridge to be fired from a remote location.

Ruzzi, Peter L. (Eagan, NM); Morrell, Roger J. (Bloomington, MN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rocks supercritical carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Transpiring wall supercritical water oxidation reactor salt deposition studies  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories has teamed with Foster Wheeler Development Corp. and GenCorp, Aerojet to develop and evaluate a new supercritical water oxidation reactor design using a transpiring wall liner. In the design, pure water is injected through small pores in the liner wall to form a protective boundary layer that inhibits salt deposition and corrosion, effects that interfere with system performance. The concept was tested at Sandia on a laboratory-scale transpiring wall reactor that is a 1/4 scale model of a prototype plant being designed for the Army to destroy colored smoke and dye at Pine Bluff Arsenal in Arkansas. During the tests, a single-phase pressurized solution of sodium sulfate (Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) was heated to supercritical conditions, causing the salt to precipitate out as a fine solid. On-line diagnostics and post-test observation allowed us to characterize reactor performance at different flow and temperature conditions. Tests with and without the protective boundary layer demonstrated that wall transpiration provides significant protection against salt deposition. Confirmation tests were run with one of the dyes that will be processed in the Pine Bluff facility. The experimental techniques, results, and conclusions are discussed.

Haroldsen, B.L.; Mills, B.E.; Ariizumi, D.Y.; Brown, B.G. [and others

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Post Rock | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rock Rock Jump to: navigation, search Name Post Rock Facility Post Rock Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Wind Capital Group Developer Wind Capital Group Energy Purchaser Westar Energy Location Ellsworth KS Coordinates 38.87269233°, -98.33059788° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.87269233,"lon":-98.33059788,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

243

Rock Density | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Rock Density Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Rock Density Details Activities (2) Areas (2) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Lab Analysis Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Rock Lab Analysis Parent Exploration Technique: Rock Lab Analysis Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Density of different lithologic units. Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Thermal: Cost Information Low-End Estimate (USD): 10.001,000 centUSD 0.01 kUSD 1.0e-5 MUSD 1.0e-8 TUSD / sample

244

NETL: Gasifipedia - Carbon Sequestration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coal: SNG from Coal: Process & Commercialization: Carbon Sequestration Coal: SNG from Coal: Process & Commercialization: Carbon Sequestration Carbon sequestration, also termed carbon storage, is the permanent storage of CO2, usually in deep geologic formations. Industrially-generated CO2 -- resulting from fossil fuel combustion, gasification, and other industrial processes -- is injected as a supercritical fluid into geologic reservoirs, where it is held in place by natural traps and seals. Carbon storage is one approach to minimizing atmospheric emissions of man-made CO2. As discussed above, the main purpose of CO2 EOR such as the Weyburn Project is tertiary recovery of crude oil, but in effect substantial CO2 remains sequestered/stored as a result. Current Status of CO2 Storage CO2 storage is currently underway in the United States and around the world. Large, commercial-scale projects, like the Sleipner CO2 Storage Site in Norway and the Weyburn-Midale CO2 Project in Canada, have been injecting CO2 into geologic storage formations more than a decade. Each of these projects stores more than 1 million tons of CO2 per year. Large-scale efforts are currently underway in Africa, China, Australia, and Europe, as well. These commercial-scale projects are demonstrating that large volumes of CO2 can be safely and permanently stored. In addition, a number of smaller pilot projects are underway in different parts of the world to determine suitable locations and technologies for future long-term CO2 storage. To date, more than 200 small-scale CO2 storage projects have been carried out worldwide. A demonstration project that captures CO2 from a pulverized coal power plant and pipes it to a geologic formation for storage recently came online in Alabama.

245

GEOL 103 Writing Assignment 3. Sedimentary Rocks Name _______________________  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.g., kaolinite), halite (rock salt), gypsum, occasionally micas (muscovite, biotite). Sed rocks can also contain

Kirby, Carl S.

246

Stable-Isotope Studies Of Rocks And Secondary Minerals In A Vapor-Dominated  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Stable-Isotope Studies Of Rocks And Secondary Minerals In A Vapor-Dominated Stable-Isotope Studies Of Rocks And Secondary Minerals In A Vapor-Dominated Hydrothermal System At The Geysers, Sonoma County, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Stable-Isotope Studies Of Rocks And Secondary Minerals In A Vapor-Dominated Hydrothermal System At The Geysers, Sonoma County, California Details Activities (5) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Geysers, a vapor-dominated hydrothermal system, is developed in host rock of the Franciscan Formation, which contains veins of quartz and calcite whose Δ18O values record the temperatures and isotopic compositions of fluids prevailing during at least two different episodes of rock-fluid interaction. The first episode took place at about 200°C, during which marine silica and carbonate apparently interacted with ocean

247

Isotopic Analysis- Rock | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis- Rock Isotopic Analysis- Rock Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Isotopic Analysis- Rock Details Activities (13) Areas (11) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Lab Analysis Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Rock Lab Analysis Parent Exploration Technique: Rock Lab Analysis Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Water rock interaction Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Thermal: Dictionary.png Isotopic Analysis- Rock: Isotopes are atoms of the same element that have different numbers of neutrons. An isotopic analysis looks at a particular isotopic element(s) in a given system, while the conditions which increase/decrease the number of neutrons are well understood and measurable.

248

Synthesis of nanostructured materials in supercritical ammonia: nitrides, metals and oxides Desmoulins-Krawiec S., Aymonier C., Loppinet-Serani A., Weill F., Grosse S., Etourneau J., Cansell F.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to copper particle synthesis in a supercritical mixture CO2­ethanol demonstrated that this process allows in supercritical ethanol.12 In addition, synthesis of metal particles by supercritical fluid processing has been

Boyer, Edmond

249

Carnets de Gologie / Notebooks on Geology -Article 2003/04 (CG2003_A04_BG) A new approach in rock-typing, documented by a case study of layer-cake  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

; chalk; rock-typing; porosity; permeability; rock-type; Abu Dhabi Citation: GRANIER B. (2003).- A new in rock-typing, documented by a case study of layer-cake reservoirs in field "A", offshore Abu Dhabi (U.A.E.) Bruno GRANIER 1 Abstract: In carbonate reservoirs, the relationship between porosity Ã?, a measure

Brest, Université de

250

High-Efficiency Low-Cost Solar Receiver for Use in a Supercritical...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Low-Cost Solar Receiver for Use in a Supercritical CO 2 Recompression Cycle Brayton Energy, LLC Award Number: DE-EE0005799 | November 30, 2012 | Sullivan * Numerical Modeling is...

251

Supercritical Fluid Extraction as a Cleanup Technique for Gas Chromatographic Analysis of Pesticides in Wool Wax  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Supercritical Fluid Extraction as a Cleanup Technique for Gas Chromatographic Analysis of Pesticides in Wool Wax ... Wool wax is the lipid secreted by the sebaceous glands of sheep and is recovered during the scouring of raw wool. ...

F. William Jones

1997-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

252

Supercritical fluid extraction of Chinese Maoming oil shale with water and toluene  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Chinese Maoming (Guangdong Province) oil shale was subjected to supercritical fluid extraction with ... water, although the weight losses of the oil shale with toluene and water were almost the...n-alkanes were a...

T Funazukuri; N Wakao

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Heat-transfer mechanism in turbulent flow of fluid at supercritical pressures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A hypothetical physical model of the heat-transfer process accompanying a forced flow of liquid at supercritical pressures is proposed. This model accounts for the anomalous improvements and deteriorations in ...

Sh. G. Kaplan

1971-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

The deterioration in heat transfer to fluids at supercritical pressure and high heat fluxes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

At slightly supercritical pressure and in the neighborhood of the pseudo-critical temperature (defined as the temperature corresponding to the peak in specific heat at the operating pressure), the heat transfer coefficient ...

Shiralkar, B. S.

1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Nano-scale magnetic film formation by decompression of supercritical CO?/ferric acetylacetonate solutions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GROWTH OF NANO-SCALE MAGNETIC FILMS USING CO 2 RESS EX-113 GROWTH OF NANO-SCALE MAGNETIC FILMS USING A SUPERCRIT-of EDX analysis on nano-scale ?lms. . . . . . . . . . . 109

De Dea, Silvia

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

PHYSICAL REVIEW E 88, 042152 (2013) Unstable supercritical discontinuous percolation transitions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, such as displaying a "Devil's staircase" of discrete jumps in the supercritical regime. Here we investigate whether where the order parameter exhibits a staircase, the largest discontinuity generically does not coincide

D'Souza, Raissa

257

Smoothly evolving supercritical-string dark energy relaxes supersymmetric-dark-matter constraints  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We show that Supercritical-String-Cosmology (SSC) off-equilibrium and time-dependent-dilaton effects lead to a smoothly evolving dark energy for the last 10 billion years in concordance with all presently available astrophysical data. Such effects dilute by a factor O ( 10 ) the supersymmetric dark matter density (neutralinos), relaxing severe WMAP 1, 3 constraints on the SUSY parameter space. Thus, LHC anticipated searches/discoveries may discriminate between conventional and supercritical-string cosmology.

A.B. Lahanas; N.E. Mavromatos; D.V. Nanopoulos

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Supercritical CO2 extraction of organic compounds from soil-water slurries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SUPERCRITICAL COi EXTRACTION OF ORGANIC COMPOUNDS FROM SOIL-WATER SLURRIES A Thesis by BRIAN DEAN CARTER Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE August 1993 Major Subject: Chemical Engineering SUPERCRITICAL COz FXTRACTION OF ORGANIC COMPOUNDS FROM SOIL-WATER SLURRIES A Thesis by BRIAN DEAN CARTER Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements...

Carter, Brian Dean

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

259

Vibrational lifetimes and vibrational line positions in polyatomic supercritical fluids near the critical point  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the asymmetric (T1u) CO stretching mode of W CO 6 in supercritical CO2, C2H6, and CHF3 as a function of solvent spectra of W CO 6 and Rh CO 2acac in supercritical CO2, C2H6, and CHF3 acquired for the same isotherms scattering of light. The transition from a dilute gas to a compressed liquid is accomplished by distinct

Fayer, Michael D.

260

Optically Thick Outflows of Supercritical Accretion Discs: Radiative Diffusion Approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Highly supercritical accretion discs are probable sources of dense optically thick axisymmetric winds. We introduce a new approach based on diffusion approximation radiative transfer in a funnel geometry and obtain an analytical solution for the energy density distribution inside the wind assuming that all the mass, momentum and energy are injected well inside the spherization radius. This allows to derive the spectrum of emergent emission for various inclination angles. We show that self-irradiation effects play an important role altering the temperature of the outcoming radiation by about 20% and the apparent X-ray luminosity by a factor of 2-3. The model has been successfully applied to two ULXs. The basic properties of the high ionization HII-regions found around some ULXs are also easily reproduced in our assumptions.

P. Abolmasov; S. Karpov; Taro Kotani

2008-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rocks supercritical carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

CARBON-CARBON COMPOSITE ALLCOMP Carbon-Carbon Composite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CARBON-CARBON COMPOSITE ALLCOMP Carbon-Carbon Composite · C-C supplied in two forms · T300: C-C composite containing continuous PAN T300 fibers · SWB: Chopped Fiber Composite containing SWB fibers Crush strength 4340 steel, carbon-carbon composite, and Carbon-Silicon Carbide composite were tested to examine

Rollins, Andrew M.

262

Rock Lab Analysis | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rock Lab Analysis Rock Lab Analysis Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Rock Lab Analysis Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Lab Analysis Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Rock Lab Analysis Parent Exploration Technique: Lab Analysis Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Core and cuttings analysis is done to define lithology. Water rock interaction. Can determine detailed information about rock composition and morphology. Density of different lithologic units. Rapid and unambiguous identification of unknown minerals.[1] Stratigraphic/Structural: Core analysis can locate faults or fracture networks. Oriented core can give additional important information on anisotropy. Historic structure and deformation of land.

263

Ordovician petroleum source rocks and aspects of hydrocarbon generation in Canadian portion of Williston basin  

SciTech Connect

Accumulation of rich petroleum source rocks - starved bituminous mudrocks in both the Winnipeg Formation (Middle Ordovician) and Bighorn Group (Upper Ordovician) - is controlled by cyclical deepening events with a frequency of approximately 2 m.y. Tectonics control both this frequency and the location of starved subbasins of source rock accumulation. Deepening cycles initiated starvation of offshore portions of the inner detrital and medial carbonate facies belts. Persistence of starved offshore settings was aided by marginal onlap and strandline migration in the inner detrital facies belt, and by low carbonate productivity in the medial carbonate facies belt. Low carbonate productivity was accompanied by high rates of planktonic productivity. Periodic anoxia, as a consequence of high rates of planktonic organic productivity accompanying wind-driven equatorial upwellings, is the preferred mechanism for suppressing carbonate productivity within the epeiric sea. The planktonic, although problematic, form Gloecapsamorpha prisca Zalesskey 1917 is the main contributing organism to source rock alginites. A long-ranging alga (Cambrian to Silurian), it forms kukersites in Middle and Upper Ordovician rocks of the Williston basin as a consequence of environmental controls - starvation and periodic anoxia. Source rocks composed of this organic matter type generate oils of distinctive composition at relatively high levels of thermal maturity (transformation ratio = 10% at 0.78% R/sub o/). In the Canadian portion of the Williston basin, such levels of thermal maturity occur at present depths greater than 2950 m within a region of geothermal gradient anomalies associated with the Nesson anticline. Approximately 193 million bbl (30.7 x 10/sup 6/ m/sup 3/) of oil has been expelled into secondary migration pathways from thermally mature source rocks in the Canadian portion of the basin.

Osadetz, K.G.; Snowdon, L.R.

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Seismic wave attenuation in carbonates L. Adam,1,2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and permeability between 0.03 and 58.1 mdarcy. Contrary to most observations in sandstones, bulk compressibility waves is common practice in reservoir rock physics. Variations in reservoir seismic properties can more than half of the current major oil and gas reservoirs in the world are in carbonates, these rocks

Boise State University

265

Separation of Fischer-Tropsch wax from catalyst using supercritical fluid extraction. Quarterly technical progress report, 1 January 1996--31 March 1996  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this research project is to evaluate the potential of supercritical fluid extraction for separating the catalyst slurry of a Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) slurry bubble column (SBC) reactor into two fractions: (1) a catalyst-free wax containing less than 10 ppm particulate matter and (2) a concentrated catalyst slurry that is ready for recycle or regeneration. The wax will be extracted with a hydrocarbon solvent that has a critical temperature near the operating temperature of the SBC reactor, i.e., 200--300 {degrees}C. Initial work is being performed using n-hexane as the solvent. The success of the project depends on two major factors. First, the supercritical solvent must be able to dissolve the F-T wax; furthermore, this must be accomplished without entraining the solid catalyst. Second, the extraction must be controlled so as not to favor the removal of the low molecular weight wax compounds, i.e., a constant carbon-number distribution of the alkanes in the wax slurry must be maintained at steady-state column operation. During this quarter work focused on task 1b, experimental measurement of selected model systems. Vapor-liquid equilibrium experiments for the n- hexane/squalane system, which we initiated in the previous quarter, were continued and results are discussed in this report.

Joyce, P.C.; Thies, M.C.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Fundamental controls on flow in carbonates: an introduction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...and associated distributions of environment-of-deposition (EOD) belts. Although these architectures may be substantially modified...plausible stratigraphic architectures and rock properties at EOD-belt scale for carbonate ramps. They then use these models...

Susan M. Agar; Gary J. Hampson

267

Rock River LLC Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

River LLC Wind Farm River LLC Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search The Rock River LLC Wind Farm is in Carbon County, Wyoming. It consists of 50 turbines and has a total capacity of 50 MW. It is owned by Shell Wind Energy.[1] Based on assertions that the site is near Arlington, its approximate coordinates are 41.5946899°, -106.2083459°.[2] References ↑ http://www.wsgs.uwyo.edu/Topics/EnergyResources/wind.aspx ↑ http://www.thefreelibrary.com/Shell+WindEnergy+Acquires+Second+Wind+Farm+in+the+U.S.,+in+an...-a082345438 Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Rock_River_LLC_Wind_Farm&oldid=132230" Category: Wind Farms What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load)

268

Incorporating supercritical steam turbines into molten-salt power tower plants : feasibility and performance.  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories and Siemens Energy, Inc., examined 14 different subcritical and supercritical steam cycles to determine if it is feasible to configure a molten-salt supercritical steam plant that has a capacity in the range of 150 to 200 MWe. The effects of main steam pressure and temperature, final feedwater temperature, and hot salt and cold salt return temperatures were determined on gross and half-net efficiencies. The main steam pressures ranged from 120 bar-a (subcritical) to 260 bar-a (supercritical). Hot salt temperatures of 566 and 600%C2%B0C were evaluated, which resulted in main steam temperatures of 553 and 580%C2%B0C, respectively. Also, the effects of final feedwater temperature (between 260 and 320%C2%B0C) were evaluated, which impacted the cold salt return temperature. The annual energy production and levelized cost of energy (LCOE) were calculated using the System Advisory Model on 165 MWe subcritical plants (baseline and advanced) and the most promising supercritical plants. It was concluded that the supercritical steam plants produced more annual energy than the baseline subcritical steam plant for the same-size heliostat field, receiver, and thermal storage system. Two supercritical steam plants had the highest annual performance and had nearly the same LCOE. Both operated at 230 bar-a main steam pressure. One was designed for a hot salt temperature of 600%C2%B0C and the other 565%C2%B0C. The LCOEs for these plants were about 10% lower than the baseline subcritical plant operating at 120 bar-a main steam pressure and a hot salt temperature of 565%C2%B0C. Based on the results of this study, it appears economically and technically feasible to incorporate supercritical steam turbines in molten-salt power tower plants.

Pacheco, James Edward; Wolf, Thorsten [Siemens Energy, Inc., Orlando, FL; Muley, Nishant [Siemens Energy, Inc., Orlando, FL

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

PARKER-HEADGATE ROCK & PARKER-GILA  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PARKER-HEADGATE ROCK & PARKER-GILA 161-kV TRANSMISSION LINE Cross Arm Repair and Helicopter Staging Areas Figure 1. Project Location Project Location j PARKER-HEADGATE ROCK &...

270

LUCI: A facility at DUSEL for large-scale experimental study of geologic carbon sequestration  

SciTech Connect

LUCI, the Laboratory for Underground CO{sub 2} Investigations, is an experimental facility being planned for the DUSEL underground laboratory in South Dakota, USA. It is designed to study vertical flow of CO{sub 2} in porous media over length scales representative of leakage scenarios in geologic carbon sequestration. The plan for LUCI is a set of three vertical column pressure vessels, each of which is {approx}500 m long and {approx}1 m in diameter. The vessels will be filled with brine and sand or sedimentary rock. Each vessel will have an inner column to simulate a well for deployment of down-hole logging tools. The experiments are configured to simulate CO{sub 2} leakage by releasing CO{sub 2} into the bottoms of the columns. The scale of the LUCI facility will permit measurements to study CO{sub 2} flow over pressure and temperature variations that span supercritical to subcritical gas conditions. It will enable observation or inference of a variety of relevant processes such as buoyancy-driven flow in porous media, Joule-Thomson cooling, thermal exchange, viscous fingering, residual trapping, and CO{sub 2} dissolution. Experiments are also planned for reactive flow of CO{sub 2} and acidified brines in caprock sediments and well cements, and for CO{sub 2}-enhanced methanogenesis in organic-rich shales. A comprehensive suite of geophysical logging instruments will be deployed to monitor experimental conditions as well as provide data to quantify vertical resolution of sensor technologies. The experimental observations from LUCI will generate fundamental new understanding of the processes governing CO{sub 2} trapping and vertical migration, and will provide valuable data to calibrate and validate large-scale model simulations.

Peters, C. A.; Dobson, P.F.; Oldenburg, C.M.; Wang, J. S. Y.; Onstott, T.C.; Scherer, G.W.; Freifeld, B.M.; Ramakrishnan, T.S.; Stabinski, E.L.; Liang, K.; Verma, S.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Hybridisation of solar and geothermal energy in both subcritical and supercritical Organic Rankine Cycles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A supercritical Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) is renowned for higher conversion efficiency than the conventional ORC due to a better thermal match (i.e. reduced irreversibility) presented in the heat exchanger unit. This improved thermal match is a result of the obscured liquid-to-vapor boundary of the organic working fluid at supercritical states. Stand-alone solar thermal power generation and stand-alone geothermal power generation using a supercritical ORC have been widely investigated. However, the power generation capability of a single supercritical ORC using combined solar and geothermal energy has not been examined. This paper thus investigates the hybridisation of solar and geothermal energy in a supercritical ORC to explore the benefit from the potential synergies of such a hybrid platform. Its performances were also compared with those of a subcritical hybrid plant, stand-alone solar and geothermal plants. All simulations and modelling of the power cycles were carried out using process simulation package Aspen HYSYS. The performances of the hybrid plant were then assessed using technical analysis, economic analysis, and the figure of merit analysis. The results of the technical analysis show that thermodynamically, the hybrid plant using a supercritical ORC outperforms the hybrid plant using a subcritical ORC if at least 66% of its exergy input is met by solar energy (i.e. a solar exergy fraction of >66%), namely producing 4–17% more electricity using the same energy resources. Exergy analysis shows that with a solar exergy fraction of more than 66% the exergetic efficiency of the hybrid plant is about 27–34% for the supercritical hybrid plant and 23–32% for the subcritical hybrid plant. The figure of merit analysis indicates that the hybrid plant produces a maximum of 15% (using a subcritical ORC) and 19% (using a supercritical ORC) more annual electricity than the two stand-alone plants. Economically, the hybrid plant using the supercritical ORC has a solar-to-electricity cost of approximately 1.5–3.3% less than those of the subcritical scenario.

Cheng Zhou

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Temperature–pressure conditions in coalbed methane reservoirs of the Black Warrior basin: implications for carbon sequestration and enhanced coalbed methane recovery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Sorption of gas onto coal is sensitive to pressure and temperature, and carbon dioxide can be a potentially volatile supercritical fluid in coalbed methane reservoirs. More than 5000 wells have been drilled in the coalbed methane fields of the Black Warrior basin in west-central Alabama, and the hydrologic and geothermic information from geophysical well logs provides a robust database that can be used to assess the potential for carbon sequestration in coal-bearing strata. Reservoir temperature within the coalbed methane target zone generally ranges from 80 to 125 °F (27–52 °C), and geothermal gradient ranges from 6.0 to 19.9 °F/1000 ft (10.9–36.2 °C/km). Geothermal gradient data have a strong central tendency about a mean of 9.0 °F/1000 ft (16.4 °C/km). Hydrostatic pressure gradients in the coalbed methane fields range from normal (0.43 psi/ft) to extremely underpressured (wells have pressure gradients greater than 0.30 psi/ft, and 20% have pressure gradients lower than 0.10 psi/ft. Pockets of underpressure are developed around deep longwall coal mines and in areas distal to the main hydrologic recharge zone, which is developed in structurally upturned strata along the southeastern margin of the basin. Geothermal gradients within the coalbed methane fields are high enough that reservoirs never cross the gas–liquid condensation line for carbon dioxide. However, reservoirs have potential for supercritical fluid conditions beyond a depth of 2480 ft (756 m) under normally pressured conditions. All target coal beds are subcritically pressured in the northeastern half of the coalbed methane exploration fairway, whereas those same beds were in the supercritical phase window prior to gas production in the southwestern half of the fairway. Although mature reservoirs are dewatered and thus are in the carbon dioxide gas window, supercritical conditions may develop as reservoirs equilibrate toward a normal hydrostatic pressure gradient after abandonment. Coal can hold large quantities of carbon dioxide under supercritical conditions, and supercritical isotherms indicate non-Langmiur conditions under which some carbon dioxide may remain mobile in coal or may react with formation fluids or minerals. Hence, carbon sequestration and enhanced coalbed methane recovery show great promise in subcritical reservoirs, and additional research is required to assess the behavior of carbon dioxide in coal under supercritical conditions where additional sequestration capacity may exist.

Jack C Pashin; Marcella R McIntyre

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Application of High-Temperature Simulated Distillation to the Residuum Oil Supercritical Extraction Process in Petroleum Refining  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......fractions from the residual oil supercritical...JOURNAL ARTICLE The gas chromatographic method...presented for refinery residual feed, deasphalted...fractions from the residual oil supercritical...fuels, gasoline, turbine (jet) fuels, diesel...high-value deasphalted gas oil (DAO) from......

Joe C. Raia; Dan C. Villalanti; Murugesan Subramanian; Bruce Williams

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

An Experimental Design Approach to the Optimization of Supercritical Fluid Extraction for the Determination of Oil and Grease in Soil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Smith, B.W. Wright, and C.R. Yonker. Supercritical fluid...1323A-36A(1988). 9. J.R. Wheeler and M.E. McNally. Supercritical fluid extraction...11. F.H. Walters, L.R. Parker, Jr., S.L. Morgan, and S.N......

M.K.L. Bicking; T.G. Hayes; J.C. Kiley; S.N. Deming

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Methodology for Predicting Water Content in Supercritical Gas Vapor and Gas Solubility in Aqueous Phase for Natural Gas Process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The streams in the natural gas process contain light hydrocarbons, mainly methane and ethane, associated with non-hydrocarbon supercritical gases (nitrogen, hydrogen, argon, etc.). ... For system that contains supercritical gases, the gas solubility in water can be related to the Henry's law constant. ...

Chorng H. Twu; Suphat Watanasiri; Vince Tassone

2007-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

276

Cast Alloys for Advanced Ultra Supercritical Steam Turbines  

SciTech Connect

The proposed steam inlet temperature in the Advanced Ultra Supercritical (A-USC) steam turbine is high enough (760 °C) that traditional turbine casing and valve body materials such as ferritic/martensitic steels will not suffice due to temperature limitations of this class of materials. Cast versions of several traditionally wrought Ni-based superalloys were evaluated for use as casing or valve components for the next generation of industrial steam turbines. The full size castings are substantial: 2-5,000 kg each half and on the order of 100 cm thick. Experimental castings were quite a bit smaller, but section size was retained and cooling rate controlled to produce equivalent microstructures. A multi-step homogenization heat treatment was developed to better deploy the alloy constituents. The most successful of these cast alloys in terms of creep strength (Haynes 263, Haynes 282, and Nimonic 105) were subsequently evaluated by characterizing their microstructure as well as their steam oxidation resistance (at 760 and 800 °C).

G. R. Holcomb, P. Wang, P. D. Jablonski, and J. A. Hawk,

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Dispersivity as an oil reservoir rock characteristic  

SciTech Connect

The main objective of this research project is to establish dispersivity, {alpha}{sub d}, as an oil reservoir rock characteristic and to use this reservoir rock property to enhance crude oil recovery. A second objective is to compare the dispersion coefficient and the dispersivity of various reservoir rocks with other rock characteristics such as: porosity, permeability, capillary pressure, and relative permeability. The dispersivity of a rock was identified by measuring the physical mixing of two miscible fluids, one displacing the other in a porous medium. 119 refs., 27 figs., 12 tabs.

Menzie, D.E.; Dutta, S.

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Fischer Tropsch synthesis in supercritical fluids. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1, 1993--December 31, 1993  

SciTech Connect

Objectives for the first quarter for Task A, Diffusion Coefficients of F-T Products in Supercritical Fluids, were to measure diffusion coefficients of 1-tetradecene in subcritical propane and the diffusion coefficients of 1-octene and 1-tetradecene in subcritical propane and the diffusion coefficients of 1-octene and 1-tetradecene in subcritical and supercritical ethane. We planned to use ethane as a solvent because its lower critical temperature enabled measurements without modification of the existing unit. Our objective was to investigate the behavior of the diffusion coefficients in crossing from subcritical to supercritical conditions. Objectives for Task B, Fischer Tropsch reaction related studies, were: (1) to install and test the temperature probe and the flammable gas detector: (2) to conduct Fischer-Tropsch experiments at baseline conditions and at a high pressure in order to test the newly constructed fixed bed reactor assembly. Accomplishments and problems, are presented.

Akgerman, A.; Bukur, D.B.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

279

Supercritical Fluid Immersion Deposition: A New Process for Selective Deposition of Metal Films on Silicon Substrates  

SciTech Connect

Supercritical CO2 is used as a new solvent for immersion deposition, a galvanic displacement process traditionally carried out in aqueous HF solutions containing metal ions, to selectively develop metal films on featured or non-featured silicon substrates. Components of supercritical fluid immersion deposition (SFID) solutions for fabricating Cu and Pd films on silicon substrates are described along with the corresponding experimental setup and procedure. Only silicon substrates exposed and reactive to SFID solutions can be coated. The highly pressurized and gas-like supercritical CO2, combined with the galvanic displacement property of immersion deposition, enables the SFID technique to selectively deposit metal films in small features. SFID may also provide a new method to fabricate palladium silicide in small features or to metallize porous silicon.

Ye, Xiangrong; Wai, Chien M.; Lin, Yuehe; Young, James S.; Engelhard, Mark H.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Changes of petrophysical properties of sandstones due to interaction with supercritical carbon dioxide – a laboratory study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...inductively-coupled plasma optical-emission-spectroscopy...CO2) emissions to the atmosphere is the underground storage...the frequency range 1 mHz to 1 MHz. Measurements...reaction time in argon atmosphere, the permeability increased...inductively-coupled plasma optical-emission-spectroscopy...

Georg Nover; Jutta von der Gönna; Stephanie Heikamp; Jens Köster

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rocks supercritical carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Changes of petrophysical properties of sandstones due to interaction with supercritical carbon dioxide – a laboratory study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...inductively-coupled plasma optical-emission-spectroscopy...pore-surface area. The uniaxial...emissions to the atmosphere is the underground...imply that a large number of...frequency range 1 mHz to 1 MHz...time in argon atmosphere, the permeability...same sample area before and...inductively-coupled plasma optical-emission-spectroscopy...pore-surface area. The uniaxial...

Georg Nover; Jutta von der Gönna; Stephanie Heikamp; Jens Köster

282

High-Efficiency Receivers for Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Cycles- FY12 Q4  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This document summarizes the progress of this Brayton Energy project, funded by SunShot, for the fourth quarter of fiscal year 2012.

283

Optimized core design of a supercritical carbon dioxide-cooled fast reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Spurred by the renewed interest in nuclear power, Gas-cooled Fast Reactors (GFRs) have received increasing attention in the past decade. Motivated by the goals of the Generation-IV International Forum (GIF), a GFR cooled ...

Handwerk, Christopher S. (Christopher Stanley), 1974-

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

A Computational Study on the Leakage of Supercritical Carbon Dioxide through Labyrinth Seals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of turbomachinery equipment it is important to reduce internal leakage through seals. A computational study was performed to understand the leakage through seals subject to large pressure differential using Open source CFD software OpenFOAM. FIT (Fluid Property...

Pidaparti, Sandeep R

2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

285

Changes of petrophysical properties of sandstones due to interaction with supercritical carbon dioxide – a laboratory study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...inductively-coupled plasma optical-emission-spectroscopy...emissions to the atmosphere is the underground...frequency range 1 mHz to 1 MHz. Measurements...low-frequency region to ~1 kHz, whereas the maximum...reaction time in argon atmosphere, the permeability...inductively-coupled plasma optical-emission-spectroscopy...

Georg Nover; Jutta von der Gönna; Stephanie Heikamp; Jens Köster

286

The Effect of Dissolved Helium on the Density and Solvation Power of Supercritical Carbon Dioxide  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Lincoln, NE) using nitrogen and water, respectively. After...the known densities of nitrogen and water at selected temperatures...used for making the solubility measurements is illustrated...Figure 1. Here, the gas booster pump and syringe......

Zhouyao Zhang; Jerry W. King

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Supercritical carbon dioxide-processed resorbable polymer nanocomposites for bone graft substitute applications.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Numerous clinical situations necessitate the use of bone graft materials to enhance bone formation. While autologous and allogenic materials are considered the gold standards… (more)

Baker, Kevin

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

High-Efficiency Receivers for Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Cycles, Concentrating Solar Power (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Brayton Energy is one of the 2012 SunShot CSP R&D awardees for their advanced receivers. This fact sheet explains the motivation, description, and impact of the project.

Not Available

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Limestone-Particle-Stabilized Macroemulsion of Liquid and Supercritical Carbon Dioxide in Water for Ocean Sequestration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In relation to ocean disposal of CO2 from power plants, a comprehensive plume model was developed to simulate the dynamic, near-field behavior of CO2 released in the water column as either a buoyant liq. ... from flue gases and injected into the oceans. ...

D. Golomb; E. Barry; D. Ryan; C. Lawton; P. Swett

2004-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

290

High-Efficiency Receivers for Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Cycles- FY13 Q3  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This document summarizes the progress of this Brayton Energy project, funded by SunShot, for the third quarter of fiscal year 2013.

291

A MEMS Thin Film AlN Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Valve  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

d Frequency shift due to Doppler effect V object Velocity ofa frequency shift due to Doppler effect [125]. The frequencyshift due to the Doppler effect, V object is the velocity of

Chen, Ya-Mei

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Anomalous Properties of Poly(methyl methacrylate) Thin Films in Supercritical Carbon Dioxide  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The PMMA swelling isotherms are insensitive to changing the substrate from silicon to gallium arsenide. ... The wafers were then rinsed with voluminous amounts of deionized water (NANOpureII, Barnstead) and then dried with nitrogen gas (Matheson Gas Products, >99.999%). ... The solubility of CO2 in the polymer film may be expected to decrease as the compressibility increases. ...

S. M. Sirard; K. J. Ziegler; I. C. Sanchez; P. F. Green; K. P. Johnston

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

An experimental investigation of convection heat transfer to supercritical carbon dioxide in miniature tubes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as an onboard coolant. Highly charged machine elements such as gas turbine blades, supercomputer elements of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong, China Received 22 December 2001; received on the experimental data, correlations were developed for the axially-averaged Nusselt number of convection heat

Zhao, Tianshou

294

A MEMS Thin Film AlN Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Valve  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

block actuator arrays”, Smart Materials and Structures, Vol.Pokines and E. Garcia, “A smart material microamplificationfabricated using LIGA”, Smart Materials and Structures, Vol.

Chen, Ya-Mei

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

NETL: Carbon Storage - Geologic Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geologic Storage Geologic Storage Carbon Storage Geologic Storage Focus Area Geologiccarbon dioxide (CO2) storage involves the injection of supercritical CO2 into deep geologic formations (injection zones) overlain by competent sealing formations and geologic traps that will prevent the CO2 from escaping. Current research and field studies are focused on developing better understanding 11 major types of geologic storage reservoir classes, each having their own unique opportunities and challenges. Understanding these different storage classes provides insight into how the systems influence fluids flow within these systems today, and how CO2 in geologic storage would be anticipated to flow in the future. The different storage formation classes include: deltaic, coal/shale, fluvial, alluvial, strandplain, turbidite, eolian, lacustrine, clastic shelf, carbonate shallow shelf, and reef. Basaltic interflow zones are also being considered as potential reservoirs. These storage reservoirs contain fluids that may include natural gas, oil, or saline water; any of which may impact CO2 storage differently. The following summarizes the potential for storage and the challenges related to CO2 storage capability for fluids that may be present in more conventional clastic and carbonate reservoirs (saline water, and oil and gas), as well as unconventional reservoirs (unmineable coal seams, organic-rich shales, and basalts):

296

General features of direct-cycle, supercritical-pressure, light-water-cooled reactors  

SciTech Connect

The concept of direct-cycle, supercritical-pressure, light-water-cooled reactors is developed. Breeding is possible in the tight lattice core. The power output can be maximized in the fast converter reactor. The gross thermal efficiency of the high temperature reactor adopting Inconel as fuel cladding is expected to be 44.8%. The plant system is similar to the supercritical-fossil-fired power plant which adopts once-through type coolant circulation system. The volume and height of the containment are approximately half of the BWR. The basic safety principles follows those of LWRs. The reactor will solve the economic problems of LWR and LMFBR.

Oka, Y.; Koshizuka, S. [Univ. of Tokyo (Japan). Nuclear Engineering Research Lab.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Investigations of supercritical CO2 Rankine cycles for geothermal power plants  

SciTech Connect

Supercritical CO2 Rankine cycles are investigated for geothermal power plants. The system of equations that describe the thermodynamic cycle is solved using a Newton-Rhapson method. This approach allows a high computational efficiency of the model when thermophysical properties of the working fluid depend strongly on the temperature and pressure. Numerical simulation results are presented for different cycle configurations in order to assess the influences of heat source temperature, waste heat rejection temperatures and internal heat exchanger design on cycle efficiency. The results show that thermodynamic cycle efficiencies above 10% can be attained with the supercritical brayton cycle while lower efficiencies can be attained with the transcritical CO2 Rankine cycle.

Sabau, Adrian S [ORNL; Yin, Hebi [ORNL; Qualls, A L [ORNL; McFarlane, Joanna [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

International contributions to IAEA-NEA heat transfer databases for supercritical fluids  

SciTech Connect

An IAEA Coordinated Research Project on 'Heat Transfer Behaviour and Thermohydraulics Code Testing for SCWRs' is being conducted to facilitate collaboration and interaction among participants from 15 organizations. While the project covers several key technology areas relevant to the development of SCWR concepts, it focuses mainly on the heat transfer aspect, which has been identified as the most challenging. Through the collaborating effort, large heat-transfer databases have been compiled for supercritical water and surrogate fluids in tubes, annuli, and bundle subassemblies of various orientations over a wide range of flow conditions. Assessments of several supercritical heat-transfer correlations were performed using the complied databases. The assessment results are presented. (authors)

Leung, L. K. H. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, ON K0J 1J0 (Canada); Yamada, K. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna International Centre, P.O. Box 100, 1400 Vienna (Austria)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Modeling heat transfer in supercritical fluid using the lattice Boltzmann method  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A lattice Boltzmann model has been developed to simulate heat transfer in supercritical fluids. A supercritical viscous fluid layer between two plates heated from the bottom has been studied. It is demonstrated that the model can be used to study heat transfer near the critical point where the so-called piston effect speeds up the transfer of heat and results in homogeneous heating in the bulk of the layer. We have also studied the onset of convection in a Rayleigh-Bénard configuration. It is shown that our model can well predict qualitatively the onset of convection near the critical point, where there is a crossover between the Rayleigh and Schwarzschild criteria.

Gábor Házi and Attila Márkus

2008-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

300

Representation of the Solubility of Solids in Supercritical Fluids Using the SAFT Equation of State  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Representation of the Solubility of Solids in Supercritical Fluids Using the SAFT Equation of State ... A SAFT equation of state (EOS) combined with eight mixing rules was used to evaluate the capability of the SAFT approach for modeling the solubility of solids in supercritical fluids (SCFs). ... The results show that the SAFT approach gives good correlative accuracy in general, and the results are satisfactory when the three-parameter mixing rules are used, where the average absolute deviation of solid solubility in the SCF phase is normally smaller than 10%. ...

Chongli Zhong; Hongyu Yang

2002-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rocks supercritical carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Influence of rock mass fracturing on the net penetration rates of hard rock \\{TBMs\\}  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Penetration rates during excavation using hard rock tunnel boring machines (TBMs) are significantly influenced by the degree of fracturing of the rock mass. In the NTNU prediction model for hard rock TBM performance and costs, the rock mass fracturing factor (ks) is used to include the influence of rock mass fractures. The rock mass fracturing factor depends on the degree of fracturing, fracture type, fracture spacing, and the angle between fracture systems and the tunnel axis. In order to validate the relationship between the degree of fracturing and the net penetration rate of hard rock TBMs, field work has been carried out, consisting of geological back-mapping and analysis of performance data from a TBM tunnel. The rock mass influence on hard rock TBM performance prediction is taken into account in the NTNU model. Different correlations between net penetration rate and the fracturing factor (ks) have been identified for a variety of ks values.

F.J. Macias; P.D. Jakobsen; Y. Seo; A. Bruland

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Separation of Fischer-Tropsch wax from catalyst by supercritical extraction. Quarterly report, July 1, 1996 - September 30, 1996  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this research projects is to evaluate the potential of SCF extraction for separating the catalyst slurry of a Fischer- Tropsch (F-T) slurry bubble column (SBC) reactor into two fractions: (1) a catalyst-free wax containing less than 10 ppm particulate matter and (2) a concentrated catalyst slurry that is ready for recycle or regeneration. The wax will be extracted with a hydrocarbon solvent that has a critical temperature near the operating temperature of the SBC reactor, i.e. 200-300{degrees}C. Initial work is being performed using n-hexane as the solvent. The success of the projects depends on two major factors. First, the supercritical solvent must be able to dissolve the F-T wax; furthermore, the must be accomplished without entraining the solid catalyst. Second, the extraction must be controlled so as not to favor the removal of the low molecular weight wax compounds, i.e., a constant carbon-number distribution of the alkanes in the wax slurry must be maintained at steady-state column operation. The project includes three tasks (1) equilibrium solubility measurements, (2) thermodynamic modeling, and (3) process design studies.

Joyce, P.C.; Thies, M.C. [USDOE Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, PA (United States); Sherrard, D.; Biales, J.; Kilpatrick, P.; Roberts, G. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

303

Evaporative Light Scattering Detection for Supercritical Fluid Chromatography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......nitrogen makeup gas flow rate, carbon...determined. As the nitrogen gas flow rate increases...increasing the solubility of the analyte...w), a makeup gas was necessary...could form ice (water) from nondried nitrogen and increase the......

J. Thompson B. Strode; III; Larry T. Taylor

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Summary on the depressurization from supercritical pressure conditions  

SciTech Connect

When a fluid discharges from a high pressure and temperature system, a 'choking' or critical condition occurs, and the flow rate becomes independent of the downstream pressure. During a postulated loss of coolant accident (LOCA) of a water reactor the break flow will be subject to this condition. An accurate estimation of the critical flow rate is important for the evaluation of the reactor safety, because this flow rate controls the loss of coolant inventory and energy from the system, and thus has a significant effect on the accident consequences[1]. In the design of safety systems for a super critical water reactor (SCWR), postulated LOCA transients are particularly important due to the lower coolant inventory compared to a typical PWR for the same power output. This lower coolant inventory would result in a faster transient response of the SCWR, and hence accurate prediction of the critical discharge is mandatory. Under potential two-phase conditions critical flow is dominated by the vapor content or quality of the vapor, which is closely related with the onset of vaporization and the interfacial interaction between phases [2]. This presents a major challenge for the estimation of the flow rate due to the lack of the knowledge of those processes, especially under the conditions of interest for the SCWR. According to the limited data of supercritical fluids, the critical flows at conditions above the pseudo-critical point seem to be fairly stable and consistent with the subcritical homogeneous equilibrium model (HEM) model predictions, while having a lower flow rate than those in the two-phase region. Thus the major difficulty in the prediction of the depressurization flow rates remains in the region where two phases co-exist at the top of the vapor dome. In this region, the flow rate is strongly affected by the nozzle geometry and tends to be unstable. Various models for this region have been developed with different assumptions, e.g. the HEM and Moody model [3], and the Henry-Fauske non-equilibrium model [4], and are currently used in subcritical pressure reactor safety design[5]. It appears that some of these models could be reasonably extended to above the thermodynamic pseudo-critical point. The more stable and lower discharge flow rates observed in conditions above the pseudo-critical point suggests that even though SCWR's have a smaller coolant inventory, the safety implications of a LOCA and the subsequent depressurization may not be as severe as expected, this however needs to be confirmed by a rigorous evaluation of the particular event and further evaluation of the critical flow rate. This paper will summarize activities on critical flow models, experimental data and numerical modeling during blowdown from supercritical pressure conditions under the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on 'Heat Transfer Behaviour and Thermo-hydraulics Code testing for SCWRs'. (authors)

Anderson, M. [Univ. of Wisconsin Madison, 1500 Engineering Dr., Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Chen, Y. [Dept. of Reactor Engineering, Research and Design, Reactor Thermal-Hydraulic Lab., China Inst. of Atomic Energy, P.O.Box 275 59, 102413 Beijing (China); Ammirable, L. [JRC/Inst. for Energy and Transport (Netherlands); Novog, D. [Dept. of Engineering Physics, McMaster Univ., 1280 Main Street, ON (Canada); Yamada, K. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna International Centre, P.O. Box 100, 1400 Vienna (Austria)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Superalloys for ultra supercritical steam turbines--oxidation behavior  

SciTech Connect

Goals of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Power Systems Initiatives include power generation from coal at 60% efficiency, which requires steam conditions of up to 760 °C and 340 atm, so called ultra-supercritical (USC) steam conditions. One of the important materials performance considerations is steam-side oxidation resistance. Evaporation of protective chromia scales is expected to be a primary corrosion mechanism under USC conditions. A methodology to calculate Cr evaporation rates from chromia scales with cylindrical geometries was developed that allows for the effects of CrO2(OH)2 saturation within the gas phase. This approach was combined with Cr diffusion calculations within the alloy (with a constant flux of Cr leaving the alloy from evaporation) to predict Cr concentration profiles as a function of exposure time and to predict the time until the alloy surface concentration of Cr reaches zero. This time is a rough prediction of the time until breakaway oxidation. A hypothetical superheater tube, steam pipe, and high pressure turbine steam path was examined. At the highest temperatures and pressures, the time until breakaway oxidation was predicted to be quite short for the turbine blade, and of concern within the steam pipe and the higher temperature portions of the superheater tube. The predicted time until breakaway oxidation increases dramatically with decreases in temperature and total pressure. Possible mitigation techniques were discussed, including those used in solid oxide fuel cell metallic interconnects (lowering the activity of Cr in the oxide scale by adding Mn to the alloy), and thermal barrier coating use on high pressure turbine blades for both erosion and chromia evaporation protection.

Holcomb, G.R.

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Big Bang Day : Physics Rocks  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Is particle physics the new rock 'n' roll? The fundamental questions about the nature of the universe that particle physics hopes to answer have attracted the attention of some very high profile and unusual fans. Alan Alda, Ben Miller, Eddie Izzard, Dara O'Briain and John Barrowman all have interests in this branch of physics. Brian Cox - CERN physicist, and former member of 90's band D:Ream, tracks down some very well known celebrity enthusiasts and takes a light-hearted look at why this subject can appeal to all of us.

None

2011-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

307

Carbon sequestration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Leaver and Howard Dalton Carbon sequestration Rattan Lal * * ( lal.1...and biotic technologies. Carbon sequestration implies transfer of atmospheric...and biomass burning. 3. Carbon sequestration Emission rates from fossil...

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Carbon Sequestration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Carbon sequestration” refers to a portfolio of activities for ... capture, separation and storage or reuse of carbon or CO2. Carbon sequestration technologies encompass both the prevention of CO2 emissions into ...

Robert L. Kane MS; Daniel E. Klein MBA

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Rock Energy Cooperative (Illinois) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Cooperative (Illinois) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Rock Energy Cooperative Place: Illinois References: EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File220101 EIA...

310

Spectroscopy, modeling and computation of metal chelate solubility in supercritical CO{sub 2}  

SciTech Connect

The overall objectives of this project were to gain a fundamental understanding of the solubility and phase behavior of metal chelates in supercritical CO{sub 2}. Extraction with CO{sub 2} is an excellent way to remove organic compounds from soils, sludges and aqueous solutions, and recent research has demonstrated that, together with chelating agents, it is a viable way to remove metals, as well. In this project the authors sought to gain fundamental knowledge that is vital to computing phase behavior, and modeling and designing processes using CO{sub 2} to separate organics and metal compounds from DOE mixed wastes. The overall program was a comprehensive one to measure, model and compute the solubility of metal chelate complexes in supercritical CO{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}/cosolvent mixtures. Through a combination of phase behavior measurements, spectroscopy and the development of a new computational technique, the authors have achieved a completely reliable way to model metal chelate solubility in supercritical CO{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}/co-contaminant mixtures. Thus, they can now design and optimize processes to extract metals from solid matrices using supercritical CO{sub 2}, as an alternative to hazardous organic solvents that create their own environmental problems, even while helping in metals decontamination.

J. F. Brennecke; M. A. Stadtherr

1999-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

311

Modelling of a solar-powered supercritical water biomass gasifier Laurance A Watson1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is incorporated that recovers the waste heat proceeding biomass gasification. Under the ideal assumptions applied exercise to design a solar supercritical water gasification (SCWG) reactor. A formative reactor concept the waste heat (steam) of a downstream Fischer- Tropsch process. An intermediate heat exchange unit

312

THE 2D EULER-BOUSSINESQ EQUATIONS WITH A LOGARITHMICALLY SUPERCRITICAL VELOCITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE 2D EULER-BOUSSINESQ EQUATIONS WITH A LOGARITHMICALLY SUPERCRITICAL VELOCITY DURGA KC, DIPENDRA of solutions to a generalized 2D Euler-Boussinesq systems of equations with a logarithmically super- critical Euler- Boussinesq system of equations with a singular velocity t + u · = x1 , t + u · + = 0, u

Wu, Jiahong

313

Subcritical and supercritical Klein-Gordon-Maxwell equations without Ambrosetti-Rabinowitz condition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this article we present some results on the existence of positive and ground state solutions for the nonlinear Klein-Gordon-Maxwell equations. We introduce a general nonlinearity with subcritical and supercritical growth which does not require the usual Ambrosetti-Rabinowitz condition. The proof is based on variational methods and perturbation arguments.

Cunha, Patricia L

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Transition from Townsend to glow discharge: Subcritical, mixed, or supercritical characteristics Danijela D. Sijacic1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transition from Townsend to glow discharge: Subcritical, mixed, or supercritical characteristics, the transition from Townsend to glow discharge can show the textbook subcritical behavior, but for smaller values long discharges that have a clearly pronounced subcritical characteristics, i.e., for fixed large pd

Ebert, Ute

315

SOME RESULTS ON SCATTERING FOR LOG-SUBCRITICAL AND LOG-SUPERCRITICAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SOME RESULTS ON SCATTERING FOR LOG-SUBCRITICAL AND LOG-SUPERCRITICAL NONLINEAR WAVE EQUATIONS HSI equations. First, we consider the H1 x Ã? L2 x scattering theory for the energy log- subcritical wave regularity) Sobolev space. We include also some observation about scattering in the energy subcritical case

Weinberger, Hans

316

Long time mass fraction statistics in stationary compressible isotropic turbulence at supercritical pressure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

turbulent binary nitrogen­hydrocarbon mixtures under supercritical pressure conditions. The governing equation, and generalized heat and mass diffusion derived from nonequilibrium thermodynamics. A highly of Physics. S1070-6631 00 00608-5 I. INTRODUCTION A variety of modern air­fuel mixing and combustion devices

Miller, Richard S.

317

Numerical and experimental validation of transient modelling for Scramjet active cooling with supercritical  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Numerical and experimental validation of transient modelling for Scramjet active cooling of the engine. In order to simulate the behaviour of a complete actively cooled scramjet, a one for supercritical fuel under pyrolysis. This model is called RESPIRE (French acronym for Scramjet Cooling

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

318

Numerical simulations of the thermal impact of supercritical CO2 injection on chemical  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

technology must make it possible to inject CO2 into deep saline aquifers or oil- and gas-depleted reservoirs by massive CO2 injection. If laboratory or field experiments can bring many details about gas behaviourNumerical simulations of the thermal impact of supercritical CO2 injection on chemical reactivity

Boyer, Edmond

319

Stability of Supported Ruthenium Catalysts for Lignin Gasification in Supercritical Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

However, low-temperature methods for lignin gasification are desirable, because waste heat available from high-temperature processes in industry can be utilized for energy generation.1 ... The gasification of lignin proceeded in supercritical water, and all lignin was gasified completely over Ru/TiO2 after 180 min during the first use. ... water for gasification technique of wastes. ...

Mitsumasa Osada; Osamu Sato; Kunio Arai; Masayuki Shirai

2006-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

320

Oxidation behavior of ferriticmartensitic and ODS steels in supercritical water Jeremy Bischoff  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Arthur T. Motta Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, 227 The Supercritical Water Reactor is one of the six Generation IV nuclear power plant designs and was envisioned dispersion of yttrium­titanium-rich oxide nano- particles inside their matrix. The ODS alloys were developed

Motta, Arthur T.

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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Prediction of heat transfer for a supercritical water test with a four pin fuel bundle  

SciTech Connect

As a next step to validate prediction methods for core design of a Supercritical Water Cooled Reactor, a small, electrically heated fuel bundle with 4 pins is planned to be tested. This paper summarizes first heat transfer predictions for such a test, which were performed based on supercritical and subcritical sub-channel analyses. For heat transfer under supercritical pressure conditions, the sub-channel code STAFAS has been applied, which had been tested successfully already for a supercritical water reactor design. Design studies with different assembly box sizes at a given pin diameter and pitch have been performed to optimize the coolant temperature distribution. With a fuel pin outer diameter of 10 mm and a pitch to diameter ratio of 1.15, an optimum inner width of the assembly box was determined to be 24 mm. Coolant and cladding surface temperatures to be expected at subcritical pressure conditions have been predicted with the sub-channel code MATRA. As, different from typical PWR or BWR conditions, a dryout has been foreseen for the tests, this code had to be extended to include suitable dryout criteria as well as post dryout heat transfer correlations at higher enthalpies and pressures. Different from PWR or BWR design, the cladding surface temperature of fuel pins in supercritical water reactors can vary significantly around the circumference of each pin, causing bending towards its hotter side which, in turn, can cause additional sub-channel heat-up and thus additional thermal bending of the pin. To avoid a thermal instability by this effect, a sensitivity study with respect to thermal bending of fuel pins has been performed, which determines the minimum number of grid spacers needed for this test. (authors)

Behnke, L. [RWE Power AG, Essen (Germany); Himmel, S.; Waata, C.; Schulenberg, T. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH, Institute for Nuclear and Energy Technologies, PO Box 3640, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Laurien, E. [University of Stuttgart (Germany)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Turbulent mixing of a slightly supercritical van der Waals fluid at low-Mach number  

SciTech Connect

Supercritical fluids near the critical point are characterized by liquid-like densities and gas-like transport properties. These features are purposely exploited in different contexts ranging from natural products extraction/fractionation to aerospace propulsion. Large part of studies concerns this last context, focusing on the dynamics of supercritical fluids at high Mach number where compressibility and thermodynamics strictly interact. Despite the widespread use also at low Mach number, the turbulent mixing properties of slightly supercritical fluids have still not investigated in detail in this regime. This topic is addressed here by dealing with Direct Numerical Simulations of a coaxial jet of a slightly supercritical van der Waals fluid. Since acoustic effects are irrelevant in the low Mach number conditions found in many industrial applications, the numerical model is based on a suitable low-Mach number expansion of the governing equation. According to experimental observations, the weakly supercritical regime is characterized by the formation of finger-like structures – the so-called ligaments – in the shear layers separating the two streams. The mechanism of ligament formation at vanishing Mach number is extracted from the simulations and a detailed statistical characterization is provided. Ligaments always form whenever a high density contrast occurs, independently of real or perfect gas behaviors. The difference between real and perfect gas conditions is found in the ligament small-scale structure. More intense density gradients and thinner interfaces characterize the near critical fluid in comparison with the smoother behavior of the perfect gas. A phenomenological interpretation is here provided on the basis of the real gas thermodynamics properties.

Battista, F.; Casciola, C. M. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Sapienza University, via Eudossiana 18, 00184 Rome (Italy); Picano, F. [Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Padova, via Venezia 1, 35131 Padova (Italy)

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

323

Carbon Smackdown: Carbon Capture  

SciTech Connect

In this July 9, 2010 Berkeley Lab summer lecture, Lab scientists Jeff Long of the Materials Sciences and Nancy Brown of the Environmental Energy Technologies Division discuss their efforts to fight climate change by capturing carbon from the flue gas of power plants, as well as directly from the air

Jeffrey Long

2010-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

324

Eagle Rock Geothermal Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Eagle Rock Geothermal Facility Eagle Rock Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Eagle Rock Geothermal Facility General Information Name Eagle Rock Geothermal Facility Facility Eagle Rock Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Location The Geysers, California Coordinates 38.826770222484°, -122.80002593994° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.826770222484,"lon":-122.80002593994,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

325

Definition: Rock Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sampling Sampling Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Rock Sampling Systematic rock sampling can be used to characterize a geothermal reservoir. The physical and chemical properties of rock samples provide important information for determining whether a power generation or heat utilization facility can be developed. Some general rock properties can be measured by visual inspection, but detailed properties require laboratory techniques. View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition A core sample is a cylindrical section of (usually) a naturally occurring substance. Most core samples are obtained by drilling with special drills into the substance, for example sediment or rock, with a hollow steel tube called a core drill. The hole made for the core sample is called the "core hole". A variety of core samplers exist to sample

326

Non-supercritically dried silica–silica composite aerogel and its possible application for confining simulated nuclear wastes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The simpler non-supercritical drying approach has been used for the first time for the preparation of silica–silica composite aerogels (CA) and the efficiency of the process being demonstrated by testing the u...

P. R. Aravind; P. Shajesh; P. Mukundan…

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Solvent Effects on Metal Complexation with Crown Ethers from Liquid to Supercritical Fluids (DE-FG07-98ER 149 13)  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this project is to study the salvation effects of metal-crown ether complexation in different solvents. It has been suggested in the literature that supercritical fluid carbon dioxide (SF-CO2) is a tunable solvent because its salvation environment can be varied with the fluid density. In this project, spectroscopic techniques including nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) were used to evaluate salvation effects of metal crown complexation in organic solvents and in SF-CO2. In most solvent extraction systems, water is often involved in the extraction processes. We have carried out extensive studies of water-crown ether interactions in different solvents and in SF-CO2 using NMR and FTIR techniques. Water molecules can be attached to crown ethers through hydrogen bonding of H-0-H to the oxygen atoms of crown ether cavities. This type of interaction is like a Lewis acid-Lewis base complexation. During the course of this project, we noticed that some CO2 soluble Lewis base such as tri-n-butyl-phosphate (TBP) can also form such Lewis acid-Lewis base complexes with water and other inorganic acids including nitric acid and hydrochloric acid. Inorganic acids (e.g. nitric acid) are normally not soluble in SF-CO2. However, because TBP is highly soluble in SF-CO2, an inorganic acid bound to TBP via hydrogen bonding becomes CO2 soluble. This Lewis acid-Lewis base complex approach provides a method of introducing inorganic acids into supercritical fluid CO2 for chemical reactions.

Wai, C.M.

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Separation of Fischer-Tropsch wax from catalyst using supercritical fluid extraction. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1, 1995--September 31, 1995  

SciTech Connect

Programming and testing of the highly complex Statistical Associating Fluid Theory (or SAFT) equation of state is essentially complete. As an accuracy check, results from our program were compared and found to be in excellent agreement with those of two other research groups (one in the US and two in Europe) for both a nonassociating (methane-hexadecane) and an associating (carbon dioxide-methanol) system. This equation is being used to model the solubility our model Fischer-Tropsch compounds in supercritical solvents such as hexane. SAFT has been chosen for this work because of its fundamental rigor. Therefore, extension of our model compound results to the poorly defined Fischer-Tropsch waxes should be more successful compared to more empirical equations such as Peng-Robinson. Computer-controlled automation of one of our dynamic supercritical fluid (SCF) extraction apparatus is complete. The apparatus collects samples automatically, dramatically reducing operator manpower and fatigue, and is also capable of controlling the operating pressure more precisely (i.e., within {plus_minus}2 psi). This apparatus (SFE I) will be used for future experiments with actual Fischer-Tropsch waxes. Modification/construction of another apparatus (SCF II) that will be used for our model component-SCF phase equilibria/solubility studies is nearly complete; it is currently being leak-tested. This apparatus was built to handle the low mass flow rates that will be required when measuring solubility data for the more expensive model compounds, such as n-C40. Anticipated results for the next quarter include VLE measurements for hexane-squalane at temperatures to 573 K.

Thies, M.C.; Joyce, P.C.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Organic geochemistry and correlation of Paleozoic source rocks and Trenton crude oils, Indiana  

SciTech Connect

Shale samples from four cores of the New Albany and Antrim Shales (Devonian) and from six cores of the Maquoketa Group (Ordovician), representing a broad geographic area of Indiana, have been analyzed for total organic carbon, total sulfur, pyrolysis yield (Rock-Eval), bitumen content, and illite crystallinity data. These data indicate that the New Albany, Antrim, and Maquoketa shales contain a sufficient quantity and quality of organic matter to be good petroleum source rocks. Bitumen ratios, Rock-Eval yields, gas chromatography of saturated hydrocarbons, and illite crystallinity data show that the Maquoketa shales have reached a higher level of thermal maturity than the New Albany and Antrim shales. The level of thermal maturity of the Maquoketa shales suggested a maximum burial depth considerably greater than the present depth.

Guthrie, J. (Indiana Geological Survey, Bloomington (USA))

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Petroleum potential of lower and middle Paleozoic rocks in Nebraska portion of Mid-Continent  

SciTech Connect

Central North America during the Paleozoic was characterized by northern (Williston) and southern (Anadarko) depositional regimes separated by a stable Transcontinental arch. Nebraska lies on the southern flank of this arch and contains the northern zero edges of the lower and middle Paleozoic rocks of the southern regime. Most of these rocks are secondary dolomites with zones of excellent intercrystalline porosity. The Reagan-LaMotte Sandstones and the overlying Arbuckle dolomites are overlapped by Middle Ordovician rocks toward the Transcontinental arch. Rocks equivalent to the Simpson consist of a basal sand (St. Peter) and overlying interbedded gray-green shales and dolomitic limestones. An uppermost shale facies is present in the Upper Ordovician (Viola-Maquoketa) eastward and southward across Nebraska. The dolomite facies extends northward into the Williston basin. The Silurian dolomites, originally more widely deposited, are overlapped by Devonian dolomites in southeastern Nebraska. Upper Devonian rocks exhibit a regional facies change from carbonate to green-gray shale to black shale southeastward across the Mid-Continent. Mississippian carbonates overlap the Devonian westward and northward across the Transcontinental arch. Pennsylvanian uplift and erosion were widespread, producing numerous stratigraphic traps. Sands related to the basal Pennsylvanian unconformity produce along the Cambridge arch. Arbuckle, Simpson, Viola, and Hunton production is present in the Forest City basin and along the Central Kansas uplift. Although source rocks are scarce and the maturation is marginal, current theories of long-distance oil migration encourage exploration in the extensive lower and middle Paleozoic reservoirs in this portion of the Mid-Continent.

Carlson, M.P. (Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln (USA))

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Research and Development of High Temperature Light Water Cooled Reactor Operating at Supercritical-Pressure in Japan  

SciTech Connect

This paper summarizes the status and future plans of research and development of the high temperature light water cooled reactor operating at supercritical-pressure in Japan. It includes; the concept development; material for the fuel cladding; water chemistry under supercritical pressure; thermal hydraulics of supercritical fluid; and the conceptual design of core and plant system. Elements of concept development of the once-through coolant cycle reactor are described, which consists of fuel, core, reactor and plant system, stability and safety. Material studies include corrosion tests with supercritical water loops and simulated irradiation tests using a high-energy transmission electron microscope. Possibilities of oxide dispersion strengthening steels for the cladding material are studied. The water chemistry research includes radiolysis and kinetics of supercritical pressure water, influence of radiolysis and radiation damage on corrosion and behavior on the interface between water and material. The thermal hydraulic research includes heat transfer tests of single tube, single rod and three-rod bundles with a supercritical Freon loop and numerical simulations. The conceptual designs include core design with a three-dimensional core simulator and sub-channel analysis, and balance of plant. (authors)

Yoshiaki Oka [Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 112-0006 (Japan); Katsumi Yamada [Isogo Nuclear Engineering Center, Toshiba Corporation, 8, Shinsugita-cho, Isogo-ku, Yokohama, 235-8523 (Japan)

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

A Methodology for Measuring the Rate of Reaction of CO2 with Brine-Rock Mixtures  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Methodology for Measuring the Rate of Reaction of CO Methodology for Measuring the Rate of Reaction of CO 2 with Brine-Rock Mixtures Nicholas B. Janda (nbj2@po.cwru.edu; 216-368-2648) Philip W. Morrison, Jr. (pwm5@po.cwru.edu; 216-368-4238) Department of Chemical Engineering Case Western Reserve University 10900 Euclid Avenue Cleveland, OH 44106-7217 Beverly Z. Saylor (bzs@po.cwru.edu; 216-368-3763) Gerald Matisoff (gxm4@po.cwru.edu; 216-368-3677) Department of Geological Sciences Case Western Reserve University 10900 Euclid Avenue Cleveland, OH 44106-7216 Introduction Storage of carbon dioxide in deep, porous, and permeable reservoir rocks is one of the most promising technologies for reducing emissions of greenhouse gases to the atmosphere. Although oil and gas reservoirs are a sensible first step for sequestration of carbon dioxide in geologic

333

Slick Rock Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Soil & Groundwater Master Reports Slick Rock - Old North Continent Slick Rock - Union Carbide More Documents & Publications South Valley Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports...

334

Water-in-carbon dioxide microemulsions: An environment for hydrophiles including proteins  

SciTech Connect

Carbon dioxide in the liquid and supercritical fluid states is useful as a replacement for toxic organic solvents. However, nonvolatile hydrophilic substances such as proteins, ions, and most catalysts are insoluble. This limitation was overcome by the formation of aqueous microemulsion droplets in a carbon dioxide-continuous phase with a nontoxic ammonium carboxylate perfluoropolyether surfactant. Several spectroscopic techniques consistently indicated that the properties of the droplets approach those of bulk water. The protein bovine serum albumin (BSA) with a molecular weight of 67,000 is soluble in this microemulsion and experiences an environment similar to that of native BSA in buffer. 23 refs., 4 figs.

Johnston, K.P.; Harrison, K.L. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Clarke, M.J. [Univ. of Nottingham (United Kingdom)] [and others

1996-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

335

Surfactant Screening to Alter the Wettability and Aid in Acidizing Carbonate Formations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Surfactant flooding in carbonate matrix acidizing treatment has been widely used for changing the wettability of the rock and to achieve low IFT values. Optimizing the type of surfactant and concentration for the specific oil field is very important...

Yadhalli Shivaprasad, Arun Kumar

2013-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

336

Carbon Conference  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Carbon Conference ... The Fourth Hienninl Conference on Carbon will be held at the University of Buffalo, June 15 to 19. ... The Pittsburgh Section's coal technology group will meet in the conference room at Mellon Institute, Pittsburgh, June ... ...

1959-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Effects of carbon dioxide injection on the displacement of methane and carbonate dissolution in sandstone cores  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Previous coreflood experiments show that CO2 sequestration in carbonate rocks is a win-win technology. Injecting CO2 into a depleted gas reservoir for storage also produces hitherto unrecoverable gas. This in turn helps to defray the cost of CO2...

Maduakor, Ekene Obioma

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

338

Spectra of random Hermitian matrices with a small-rank external source: supercritical and subcritical regimes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Random Hermitian matrices with a source term arise, for instance, in the study of non-intersecting Brownian walkers \\cite{Adler:2009a, Daems:2007} and sample covariance matrices \\cite{Baik:2005}. We consider the case when the $n\\times n$ external source matrix has two distinct real eigenvalues: $a$ with multiplicity $r$ and zero with multiplicity $n-r$. The source is small in the sense that $r$ is finite or $r=\\mathcal O(n^\\gamma)$, for $0subcritical regime) the external source has no leading-order effect on the eigenvalues, while for $|a|$ sufficiently large (the supercritical regime) $r$ eigenvalues exit the bulk of the spectrum and behave as the eigenvalues of $r\\times r$ Gaussian unitary ensemble (GUE). We establish the universality of these results for a general class of analytic potentials in the supercritical and subcritical regimes.

Marco Bertola; Robert Buckingham; Seung-Yeop Lee; Virgil U. Pierce

2010-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

339

Evolution of the core physics concept for the Canadian supercritical water reactor  

SciTech Connect

The supercritical water cooled reactor (SCWR) is one of the advanced reactor concepts chosen by the GEN-IV International Forum (GIF) for research and development efforts. Canada's contribution is the Canadian SCWR, a heavy water moderated, pressure tube supercritical light water cooled reactor. Recent developments in the SCWR lattice and core concepts, primarily the introduction of a large central flow tube filled with coolant combined with a two-ring fuel assembly, have enabled significant improvements compared to earlier concepts. These improvements include a reduction in coolant void reactivity (CVR) by more than 10 mk, and an almost 40% increase in fuel exit burnup, which is achieved via balanced power distribution between the fuel pins in the fuel assembly. In this paper the evolution of the physics concept is reviewed, and the present lattice and core physics concepts are presented.

Pencer, J.; Colton, A.; Wang, X.; Gaudet, M.; Hamilton, H.; Yetisir, M. [Atomic Energy of Canada, Ltd., Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, ON (Canada)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

A manual for evaluation and exploitation of carbonate reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

different stages of exploration/exploitation: before drilling, during drilling, and after drilling. The selection of the appropriate carbonate reservoir model should be made first considering information obtained before and during drilling. Rocks.... . . . . . . 53 . . . 56 . . . . . 57 . . . . 60 LIST OF FIGURES (Continued) Page Fig. 24, Three different rock types, their hydrocarbon distribution, and their capillary pressure curve types. . Fig. 25. a Effect of pore-to-throat size on recovery...

Cordova, Pedro Luis

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rocks supercritical carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Growing TiO2 nanowires on the surface of graphene sheets in supercritical CO2: characterization and photoefficiency  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Tremendous interest exists towards synthesizing nanoassemblies for dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) using earth-abundant and -friendly materials with green synthetic approaches. In this work, high surface area TiO2 nanowire arrays were grown on the surface of functionalized graphene sheets (FGSs) containing ?COOH functionalities acting as a template by using a sol–gel method in the green solvent, supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2). The effect of scCO2 pressure (1500, 3000 and 5000 psi), temperature (40, 60 and 80?°C), acetic acid/titanium isopropoxide monomer ratios (HAc/TIP = 2, 4 and 6), functionalized graphene sheets (FGSs)/TIP weight ratios (1:20, 1:40 and 1:60 w/w) and solvents (EtOH, hexane) were investigated. Increasing the HAc/TIPweight ratio from 4 to 6 in scCO2 resulted in increasing the TiO2 nanowire diameter from 10 to 40 nm. Raman and high resolution XPS showed the interaction of TiO2 with the ?COOH groups on the surface of the graphene sheets, indicating that graphene acted as a template for polycondensation growth. UV–vis diffuse reflectance and photoluminescence spectroscopy showed a reduction in titania's bandgap and also a significant reduction in electron–hole recombination compared to bare TiO2 nanowires. Photocurrent measurements showed that the TiO2nanowire/graphene composites prepared in scCO2 gave a 5? enhancement in photoefficiency compared to bare TiO2 nanowires.

Nasrin Farhangi; Yaocihuatl Medina-Gonzalez; Rajib Roy Chowdhury; Paul A Charpentier

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Comparison of subcritical and supercritical Rankine cycles for application to the geopressured geothermal resource  

SciTech Connect

There are several features unique to the geopressure geothermal resource which narrow the range of power cycle alternatives. The thermodynamic and operating restrictions which appear to favor the application of a supercritical Rankine power cycle utilizing propane for the recovery of thermal energy from the geopressure geothermal resource are described. This power cycle can be integrated into a natural gas recovery scheme that conserves reservoir pressure for brine disposal and produces gas at pipeline pressure.

Goldsberry, F.L.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Supercritical Water Biomass Gasification Process As a Successful Solution to Valorize Wine Distillery Wastewaters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

There are many gasification technologies that could potentially be part of the future energy industry. ... scale continuous-flow system with 2 different industrial wastewaters that contain a high concn. of orgs., with both wastes having a high energy potential: cutting oil wastes, oleaginous wastewater from metalworking industries, and vinasses, alc. ... Biomass feedstocks, including lignocellulosic materials (cotton stalk and corncob) and the tannery waste, were gasified in supercrit. ...

Anne Loppinet-Serani; Cédric Reverte; François Cansell; Cyril Aymonier

2012-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

344

Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field Investigations Of In Situ Geochemical Behavior Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field Investigations Of In Situ Geochemical Behavior Details Activities (5) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: Two hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal energy reservoirs have been created by hydraulic fracturing of Precambrian granitic rock between two wells on the west flank of the Valles Caldera in the Jemez Mountains of northern New Mexico. Heat is extracted by injecting water into one well,

345

NETL: News Release - Critical Carbon Sequestration Assessment Begins:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

September 12, 2006 September 12, 2006 Critical Carbon Sequestration Assessment Begins: Midwest Partnership Looks at Appalachian Basin for Safe Storage Sites Seismic Surveys to Determine Viability of Rock Formations for CO2 Storage WASHINGTON, DC - Tapping into rock formations at sites thousands of feet deep, a government-industry team is using seismic testing to help determine whether those sites can serve as reservoirs to safely store carbon dioxide (CO2), a major greenhouse gas. MORE INFO WATCH: NETL Project Manager Charlie Byrer discuss this important project Learn more about DOE's Carbon Sequestration Regional Partnerships Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership web site The U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory is sponsoring the tests in a program to develop carbon sequestration

346

Rock of Ages | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of Ages of Ages Jump to: navigation, search Name Rock of Ages Facility Rock of Ages Sector Wind energy Facility Type Small Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Rock of Ages Energy Purchaser Rock of Ages Location Graniteville VT Coordinates 44.14668574°, -72.48180896° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.14668574,"lon":-72.48180896,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

347

Definition: Isotopic Analysis- Rock | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis- Rock Isotopic Analysis- Rock Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Isotopic Analysis- Rock Isotopes are atoms of the same element that have different numbers of neutrons. An isotopic analysis looks at a particular isotopic element(s) in a given system, while the conditions which increase/decrease the number of neutrons are well understood and measurable.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition References ↑ http://wwwrcamnl.wr.usgs.gov/isoig/isopubs/itchch2.html Ret LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. rieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Isotopic_Analysis-_Rock&oldid=687702" Category: Definitions What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties

348

Thermophysical properties of the Po Basin rocks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......7 per cent. 4.2.2 Anisotropic rocks Anisotropy of shales, silty shales and siltstones...dolomites). Horizons of shales, silty shales and siltstones are present...the presence of thermally anisotropic sheet silicates, note that......

V. Pasquale; G. Gola; P. Chiozzi; M. Verdoya

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Winner: Hot Rocks | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers (EERE)

a catch. Only a couple of EGS projects have ever produced power, and those are in Germany and France, where the rock is considerably more pliant than Australia's granite...

350

High-pressure cell for neutron reflectometry of supercritical and subcritical fluids at solid interfaces  

SciTech Connect

A new high-pressure cell design for use in neutron reflectometry (NR) for pressures up to 50 MPa and a temperature range of 300 473 K is described. The cell design guides the neutron beam through the working crystal without passing through additional windows or the bulk fluid, which provides for a high neutron transmission, low scattering background, and low beam distortion. The o-ring seal is suitable for a wide range of subcritical and supercritical fluids and ensures high chemical and pressure stability. Wafers with a diameter of 5.08 cm (2 in.) and 5 mm or 10 mm thickness can be used with the cells, depending on the required pressure and momentum transfer range. The fluid volume in the sample cell is very small at about 0.1 ml, which minimizes scattering background and stored energy. The cell design and pressure setup for measurements with supercritical fluids are described. NR data are shown for silicon/silicon oxide and quartz wafers measured against air and subsequently within the high-pressure cell to demonstrate the neutron characteristics of the high-pressure cell. Neutron reflectivity data for supercritical CO2 in contact with quartz and Si/SiO2 wafers are also shown.

Carmichael, Justin R [ORNL; Rother, Gernot [ORNL; Browning, Jim [ORNL; Ankner, John Francis [ORNL; Banuelos, Jose Leo [ORNL; Anovitz, Lawrence {Larry} M [ORNL; Wesolowski, David J [ORNL; Cole, David [Ohio State University

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Direct conversion of wet algae to crude biodiesel under supercritical ethanol conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper presents a single-step, environmentally friendly approach for the direct conversion of wet algae to crude biodiesel under supercritical ethanol conditions. Ethanol was used for the simultaneous extraction and transesterification of lipids in algae to produce fatty acid ethyl esters at supercritical conditions. In this work the effects of process parameters dry algae to ethanol (wt./vol.) ratio (1:6–1:15), reaction temperature (245–270 °C), and reaction time (2–30 min.) on the yield of fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEE) were studied. 67% conversion was achieved at 265 °C and 20 min of reaction time. The calorific value of a purified biodiesel sample produced at optimum conditions was measured to be 43 MJ/kg, which is higher than that of fatty acid methyl esters produced from the same biomass. The purified fatty acid ethyl esters were analyzed using GC–MS and FTIR. TGA analysis of algal biomass and purified FAEE was presented along with TEM images of the biomass captured before and after supercritical ethanol transesterification. This green conversion process has the potential to provide an energy-efficient and economical route for the production of renewable biodiesel production.

Harvind K. Reddy; Tapaswy Muppaneni; Prafulla D. Patil; Sundaravadivelnathan Ponnusamy; Peter Cooke; Tanner Schaub; Shuguang Deng

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Kinetics of glucose epimerization and decomposition in subcritical and supercritical water  

SciTech Connect

Glucose decomposition kinetics in subcritical and supercritical water were studied for the temperatures 573, 623, and 673 K, pressures between 25 and 40 MPa, and residence times between 0.02 and 2 s. Glucose decomposition products were fructose, saccharinic acids, erythrose, glyceraldehyde, 1,6-anhydroglucose, dihydroxyacetone, pyruvaldehyde, and small amounts of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural. Fructose was also studied and found to decompose to products similar to those of glucose, except that its epimerization to glucose was negligibly low and no formation of 1,6-anhydroglucose was detected. The authors concluded that only the forward epimerization of glucose to fructose was important. The glucose decomposition pathway could be described in terms of a forward epimerization rate, r{sub gf}, a fructose to decomposition products rate, r{sub f}, and a glucose to decomposition products rate, r{sub g}. A kinetic model based on this pathway gave good correlation of the experimental data. In the subcritical region, r{sub g}, r{sub f}, and r{sub gf} showed only small changes with pressure at a given temperature. In the supercritical region, the rate of glucose decomposition decreased with pressure at a given temperature. The reason for this decrease was mainly due to the decrease in r{sub gf}. The pressure effect in the supercritical region shows that there is a shift among the kinetic rates, which can lead to higher selectivity for glucose when decomposing cellulosic materials.

Kabyemela, B.M.; Adschiri, Tadafumi; Malaluan, R.M.; Arai, Kunio [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Dept. of Chemical Engineering] [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Supercritical thermodynamics of sulfur and nitrogen species. Final technical report, October 1, 1991--September 30, 1994  

SciTech Connect

Significant opportunity exists for the application of supercritical fluid (SCF) technology to coal processing, both for pretreatment of high sulfur coals, as well as liquefaction and treatment of coal liquids. Supercritical fluids are attractive solvents for a variety of coal processing applications because of their unusual solvating and mass transfer properties. Solubility studies have been carried out for a number of model coal and coal-liquid compounds, primarily in pure supercritical fluids. We have extended this database of model coal compound equilibria using modern techniques that have the advantage of being much more rapid than traditional techniques. Cosolvent effects on solubility have also been investigated over a variety of solvent properties. In addition, specific molecular interactions have been investigated through spectroscopic techniques. The resulting data has been used to develop a physical-chemical equation of state (EOS) model of SCF solutions with meaningful parameters. This equation of state model has been used to predict solubility behavior, which will permit the design and tailoring of SCF cosolvent systems for specific coal processing applications.

Eckert, C.A.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

354

Carbon Cycle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Cycle Carbon Cycle Latest Global Carbon Budget Estimates Including CDIAC Estimates Terrestrial Carbon Management Data Sets and Analyses Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Fossil-Fuel Consumption and Cement Manufacture, (2011) Annual Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions: Mass of Emissions Gridded by One Degree Latitude by One Degree Longitude (2012) Monthly Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions: Mass of Emissions Gridded by One Degree Latitude by One Degree Longitude (2012) Annual Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions: Global Stable Carbon Isotopic Signature (2012) Monthly Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions: Isomass (δ 13C) of Emissions Gridded by One Degree Latitude by One Degree Longitude (2012) AmeriFlux - Terrestrial Carbon Dioxide, Water Vapor, and Energy Balance Measurements Estimates of Monthly CO2 Emissions and Associated 13C/12C Values

355

Carbon Isotopes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Trace Gases » Carbon Isotopes Atmospheric Trace Gases » Carbon Isotopes Carbon Isotopes Gateway Pages to Isotopes Data Modern Records of Carbon and Oxygen Isotopes in Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide and Carbon-13 in Methane 800,000 Deuterium Record and Shorter Records of Various Isotopic Species from Ice Cores Carbon-13 13C in CO Measurements from Niwot Ridge, Colorado and Montana de Oro, California (Tyler) 13C in CO2 NOAA/CMDL Flask Network (White and Vaughn) CSIRO GASLAB Flask Network (Allison, Francey, and Krummel) CSIRO in situ measurements at Cape Grim, Tasmania (Francey and Allison) Scripps Institution of Oceanography (Keeling et al.) 13C in CH4 NOAA/CMDL Flask Network (Miller and White) Northern & Southern Hemisphere Sites (Quay and Stutsman) Northern & Southern Hemisphere Sites (Stevens)

356

Bio-Oil Separation and Stabilization by Supercritical Fluid Fractionation – 2014 Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to use supercritical fluids to separate and fractionate algal-based bio-oils into stable products that can be subsequently upgraded to produce drop-in renewable fuels. To accomplish this objective, algae was grown and thermochemically converted to bio-oils using hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL), pyrolysis, and catalytic pyrolysis. The bio-oils were separated into an extract and a raffinate using near-critical propane or carbon dioxide. The fractions were then subjected to thermal aging studies to determine if the extraction process had stabilized the products. It was found that the propane extract fraction was twice as stable as the parent catalytic pyrolysis bio-oils as measured by the change in viscosity after two weeks of accelerated aging at 80°C. Further, in-situ NMR aging studies found that the propane extract was chemically more stable than the parent bio-oil. Thus the milestone of stabilizing the product was met. A preliminary design of the extraction plant was prepared. The design was based on a depot scale plant processing 20,000,000 gallons per year of bio-oil. It was estimated that the capital costs for such a plant would be $8,700,000 with an operating cost of $3,500,000 per year. On a per gallon of product cost and a 10% annual rate of return, capital costs would represent $0.06 per gallon and operating costs would amount to $0.20 per gallon. Further, it was found that the energy required to run the process represented 6.2% of the energy available in the bio-oil, meeting the milestone of less than 20%. Life cycle analysis and greenhouse gas (GHG) emission analysis found that the energy for running the critical fluid separation process and the GHG emissions were minor compared to all the inputs to the overall well to pump system. For the well to pump system boundary, energetics in biofuel conversion are typically dominated by energy demands in the growth, dewater, and thermochemical process. Bio-oil stabilization by near critical propane extraction had minimal impact in the overall energetics of the process with NER contributions of 0.03. Based on the LCA, the overall conversion pathways were found to be energy intensive with a NER of about 2.3 and 1.2 for catalytic pyrolysis and HTL, respectively. GHG emissions for the catalytic pyrolysis process were greater than that of petroleum diesel at 210 g CO2 eq compared to 18.9 g CO2 eq. Microalgae bio-oil based diesel with thermochemical conversion through HTL meets renewable fuel standards with favorable emission reductions of -10.8 g CO2 eq. The importance of the outcomes is that the critical fluid extraction and stabilization process improved product stability and did so with minimal energy inputs and processing costs. The LCA and GHG emission calculations point toward the HTL pathway as the more favorable thermochemical route towards upgrading algae to bio-fuels. Since the quality of the HTL oil was significantly lower than that of the catalytic pyrolysis bio-oil, the next steps point toward improving the quality of the HTL oils from algae biomass and focusing the critical fluid stabilization on that bio-oil product.

Foster Agblevor; Lucia Petkovic; Edward Bennion; Jason Quinn; John Moses; Deborah Newby; Daniel Ginosar

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Preparation of carbon aerogel microspheres by a simple-injection emulsification method  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Carbon aerogel microspheres were successfully prepared using a simple-injection emulsification method, employing sol–gel polycondensation of a resorcinol–formaldehyde solution containing sodium carbonate as a catalyst. This process was followed by solvent exchange using acetone, supercritical drying with carbon dioxide and carbonization in a nitrogen atmosphere. The effect of curing time before starting injection, injection rate and agitation rate of continuous phase on the particle size and the porous properties of the carbon aerogel microspheres was investigated. Adsorption of phenol by using the prepared carbon aerogel microspheres was also examined. The diameter of carbon aerogel microspheres was controlled in the range of 20–55 ?m by varying injection rate and agitation rate. The mean diameter of carbon aerogel microspheres decreased with increasing the injection rate and the agitation rate, whereas their mean diameter was independent of the curing time. The BET surface area and total pore volume of carbon aerogel microspheres increased with increasing the curing time. In contrast, their BET surface area and total pore volume decreased with increasing the injection rate and the agitation rate. The BET surface area, total pore volume, mesopore volume and micropore volume of the carbon aerogel microspheres with a mean diameter of 45 ?m were 903 m2/g, 0.60 cm3/g, 0.31 cm3/g and 0.27 cm3/g, respectively. The phenol-adsorption capacity of these carbon aerogel microspheres was 29.3 mg phenol/g adsorbent.

Jintawat Chaichanawong; Koranit Kongcharoen; Surat Areerat

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

New Species of Cyanobacteria Forms Intracellular Carbonates  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Species of Cyanobacteria New Species of Cyanobacteria Forms Intracellular Carbonates New Species of Cyanobacteria Forms Intracellular Carbonates Print Wednesday, 30 January 2013 00:00 A new species of cyanobacteria-photosynthetic bacteria that occupy a wide array of habitats-was discovered in the Mexican Lake of Alchichica where massive carbonate rocks form. Cyanobacteria have been impacting the global carbon cycle of the Earth for more than 2.3 billion years by assimilating CO2 into organic compounds and triggering calcium carbonate (CaCO3) precipitation. Despite the importance of this cyanobacteria-mediated CaCO3 biomineralization, the mechanistic details of this process are still poorly understood. Scientists agree that calcification in cyanobacteria is an extracellular process: Photosynthesizing cells commonly export the photosynthesis byproduct CO32- outside their cells where it bonds with an alkaline earth metal like Ca2+. The cyanobacteria recently found in Lake Alchichica, however, forms amorphous Ca-, Mg-, Sr- and Ba-rich carbonates intracellularly. This discovery significantly modifies the traditional view of how bacteria induce CaCO3 precipitation and may improve understanding of the fossil record by hinting at ancient traces of life in rocks, or designing new routes for sequestering CO2 or 90Sr in minerals.

359

New Species of Cyanobacteria Forms Intracellular Carbonates  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Species of Cyanobacteria Forms Intracellular Carbonates Print New Species of Cyanobacteria Forms Intracellular Carbonates Print A new species of cyanobacteria-photosynthetic bacteria that occupy a wide array of habitats-was discovered in the Mexican Lake of Alchichica where massive carbonate rocks form. Cyanobacteria have been impacting the global carbon cycle of the Earth for more than 2.3 billion years by assimilating CO2 into organic compounds and triggering calcium carbonate (CaCO3) precipitation. Despite the importance of this cyanobacteria-mediated CaCO3 biomineralization, the mechanistic details of this process are still poorly understood. Scientists agree that calcification in cyanobacteria is an extracellular process: Photosynthesizing cells commonly export the photosynthesis byproduct CO32- outside their cells where it bonds with an alkaline earth metal like Ca2+. The cyanobacteria recently found in Lake Alchichica, however, forms amorphous Ca-, Mg-, Sr- and Ba-rich carbonates intracellularly. This discovery significantly modifies the traditional view of how bacteria induce CaCO3 precipitation and may improve understanding of the fossil record by hinting at ancient traces of life in rocks, or designing new routes for sequestering CO2 or 90Sr in minerals.

360

New Species of Cyanobacteria Forms Intracellular Carbonates  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Species of Cyanobacteria Forms Intracellular Carbonates Print New Species of Cyanobacteria Forms Intracellular Carbonates Print A new species of cyanobacteria-photosynthetic bacteria that occupy a wide array of habitats-was discovered in the Mexican Lake of Alchichica where massive carbonate rocks form. Cyanobacteria have been impacting the global carbon cycle of the Earth for more than 2.3 billion years by assimilating CO2 into organic compounds and triggering calcium carbonate (CaCO3) precipitation. Despite the importance of this cyanobacteria-mediated CaCO3 biomineralization, the mechanistic details of this process are still poorly understood. Scientists agree that calcification in cyanobacteria is an extracellular process: Photosynthesizing cells commonly export the photosynthesis byproduct CO32- outside their cells where it bonds with an alkaline earth metal like Ca2+. The cyanobacteria recently found in Lake Alchichica, however, forms amorphous Ca-, Mg-, Sr- and Ba-rich carbonates intracellularly. This discovery significantly modifies the traditional view of how bacteria induce CaCO3 precipitation and may improve understanding of the fossil record by hinting at ancient traces of life in rocks, or designing new routes for sequestering CO2 or 90Sr in minerals.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rocks supercritical carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

New Species of Cyanobacteria Forms Intracellular Carbonates  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Species of Cyanobacteria Forms Intracellular Carbonates Print New Species of Cyanobacteria Forms Intracellular Carbonates Print A new species of cyanobacteria-photosynthetic bacteria that occupy a wide array of habitats-was discovered in the Mexican Lake of Alchichica where massive carbonate rocks form. Cyanobacteria have been impacting the global carbon cycle of the Earth for more than 2.3 billion years by assimilating CO2 into organic compounds and triggering calcium carbonate (CaCO3) precipitation. Despite the importance of this cyanobacteria-mediated CaCO3 biomineralization, the mechanistic details of this process are still poorly understood. Scientists agree that calcification in cyanobacteria is an extracellular process: Photosynthesizing cells commonly export the photosynthesis byproduct CO32- outside their cells where it bonds with an alkaline earth metal like Ca2+. The cyanobacteria recently found in Lake Alchichica, however, forms amorphous Ca-, Mg-, Sr- and Ba-rich carbonates intracellularly. This discovery significantly modifies the traditional view of how bacteria induce CaCO3 precipitation and may improve understanding of the fossil record by hinting at ancient traces of life in rocks, or designing new routes for sequestering CO2 or 90Sr in minerals.

362

Abstract 5554: PBI-05204, a supercritical CO2 extract of Nerium oleander, inhibits the growth of human pancreatic cancer in a Panc-1 orthotopic model by down-regulation of PI3k/mTOR pathways.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Abstract 5554: PBI-05204, a supercritical CO2 extract of Nerium oleander, inhibits the...botanical drug PBI-05204, a supercritical CO2 extract of Nerium oleander, was examined...Peiying Yang. PBI-05204, a supercritical CO2 extract of Nerium oleander, inhibits the...

Yong Pan; Sun-Jin Kim; Patrea Rhea; Carrie Cartwright; Ho Jeong Lee; Crandell Addington; Mihai Gagea; Robert A. Newman; Peiying Yang

2013-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

363

Determination of Total Biodiesel Fatty Acid Methyl, Ethyl Esters, and Hydrocarbon Types in Diesel Fuels by Supercritical Fluid Chromatography-Flame Ionization Detection  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Research and Engineering, Paulsboro...determining total biodiesel methyl and...in diesel fuels by supercritical...mixture. Introduction The proposed use of biodiesel esters derived...as diesel fuel blending...of Total Biodiesel Fatty Acid...in Diesel Fuels by Supercritical...Research and Engineering, Paulsboro......

John W. Diehl; Frank P. DiSanzo

364

Carbon Nanotubes.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Carbon nanotubes have extraordinary mechanical, electrical, thermal andoptical properties. They are harder than diamond yet exible, have betterelectrical conductor than copper, but can also… (more)

Fredriksson, Tore

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Experiment-Based Model for the Chemical Interactions between Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Experiment-Based Model for the Chemical Interactions between Geothermal Experiment-Based Model for the Chemical Interactions between Geothermal Rocks, Supercritical Carbon Dioxide and Water Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Experiment-Based Model for the Chemical Interactions between Geothermal Rocks, Supercritical Carbon Dioxide and Water Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Enhanced Geothermal Systems Component Research and Development/Analysis Project Type / Topic 2 Supercritical Carbon Dioxide / Reservoir Rock Chemical Interactions Project Description The geochemical model will be developed on a foundation of both theory and measurements of chemical and physical interactions between minerals, rocks, scCO2 and water. An experimentally validated reservoir modeling capability is critically important for the evaluation of the scCO2-EGS concept, the adoption of which could significantly enhance energy production in the USA.

366

Capturing carbon | EMSL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capturing carbon Capturing carbon New technology enables molecular-level insight into carbon sequestration Carbon sequestration is a potential solution for reducing greenhouse...

367

Vacuum polarization of graphene with a supercritical Coulomb impurity: Low-energy universality and discrete scale invariance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study massless Dirac fermions in a supercritical Coulomb potential with the emphasis on that its low-energy physics is universal and parametrized by a single quantity per supercritical angular momentum channel. This low-energy parameter with the dimension of length is defined only up to multiplicative factors and thus each supercritical channel exhibits the discrete scale invariance. In particular, we show that the induced vacuum polarization has a power-law tail whose coefficient is a sum of log-periodic functions with respect to the distance from the potential center. This coefficient can also be expressed in terms of the energy and width of so-called atomic collapse resonances. Our universal predictions on the vacuum polarization and its relationship to atomic collapse resonances shed new light on the longstanding fundamental problem of quantum electrodynamics and can in principle be tested by graphene experiments with charged impurities.

Nishida, Yusuke

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Vacuum polarization of graphene with a supercritical Coulomb impurity: Low-energy universality and discrete scale invariance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study massless Dirac fermions in a supercritical Coulomb potential with the emphasis on that its low-energy physics is universal and parametrized by a single quantity per supercritical angular momentum channel. This low-energy parameter with the dimension of length is defined only up to multiplicative factors and thus each supercritical channel exhibits the discrete scale invariance. In particular, we show that the induced vacuum polarization has a power-law tail whose coefficient is a sum of log-periodic functions with respect to the distance from the potential center. This coefficient can also be expressed in terms of the energy and width of so-called atomic collapse resonances. Our universal predictions on the vacuum polarization and its relationship to atomic collapse resonances shed new light on the longstanding fundamental problem of quantum electrodynamics and can in principle be tested by graphene experiments with charged impurities.

Yusuke Nishida

2014-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

369

Rock-brine chemical interactions. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The results of experimental interaction of powdered volcanic rock with aqueous solutions are presented at temperatures from 200 to 400/sup 0/C, 500 to 1000 bars fluid pressure, with reaction durations of approximately 30 days under controlled laboratory conditions. The aim of this research is to develop data on the kinetics and equilibria of rock solution interactions that will provide insight into the complex geochemical processes attending geothermal reservoir development, stimulation, and reinjection. The research was done in the Stanford Hydrothermal Lab using gold cell equipment of the Dickson design. This equipment inverts the solution rock mixture several times a minute to ensure thorough mixing. Solution samples were periodically withdrawn without interruption of the experimental conditions. The data from these experiments suggests a path dependent series of reactions by which geothermal fluids might evolve from meteoric or magmatic sources.

Not Available

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Geochemistry of Magnesium Silicate Carbonation in an Aqueous Medium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geochemistry of Magnesium Silicate Geochemistry of Magnesium Silicate Carbonation in an Aqueous Medium (Carbon Mineralization) Jon Benner, Deb Bergfeld, Dave Bish, Darrin Byler, Bill Carey, Steve Chipera, George Guthrie, Klaus Lackner, Hans Ziock Hydrology, Geochemistry, Geology Group Los Alamos National Laboratory LA-UR-01-4206 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited George Guthrie gguthrie@lanl.gov 505-665-6340 Mineral Carbonation: Conversion of CO 2 into Carbonates * alkali carbonates too soluble * alkaline earth carbonates ideal sources: Ca-silicates (feldspar) Mg-silicates (olivine, serpentine, clays) Mg 2+ + CO 3 2- => MgCO 3 Mg 2 SiO 4 + 4H + => 2Mg 2+ + SiO 2(aq) Ultramafic rocks are an abundant Mg source (~0.2 km) 3 serpentine / GW-yr Challenges for Mineral-Carbonation

371

Category:Little Rock, AR | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AR AR Jump to: navigation, search Go Back to PV Economics By Location Media in category "Little Rock, AR" The following 16 files are in this category, out of 16 total. SVFullServiceRestaurant Little Rock AR Entergy Arkansas Inc.png SVFullServiceRestauran... 71 KB SVHospital Little Rock AR Entergy Arkansas Inc.png SVHospital Little Rock... 69 KB SVLargeHotel Little Rock AR Entergy Arkansas Inc.png SVLargeHotel Little Ro... 70 KB SVLargeOffice Little Rock AR Entergy Arkansas Inc.png SVLargeOffice Little R... 71 KB SVMediumOffice Little Rock AR Entergy Arkansas Inc.png SVMediumOffice Little ... 68 KB SVMidriseApartment Little Rock AR Entergy Arkansas Inc.png SVMidriseApartment Lit... 70 KB SVOutPatient Little Rock AR Entergy Arkansas Inc.png SVOutPatient Little Ro...

372

Molecular interactions of SO2 with carbonate minerals under co-sequestration conditions: a combined experimental and theoretical study  

SciTech Connect

We present a combined experimental and theoretical study investigating the reactivity between selected and morphologically important surfaces of carbonate minerals with supercritical CO2 with co-existing H2O and SO2. Trace amounts of SO2 cause formation of CaSO3 in the form of hannebachite in the initial stages of SO2 adsorption and transformation. Atomistic simulations of these initial steps indicate a somewhat catalytic activity of water, which is enhanced by the presence of Magnesium atoms in the mineral surface. Under co-sequestration conditions, traces of water are not likely to cause carbonate dissolution, however the presence of SO2 greatly stabilizes the sulfite product.

Glezakou, Vassiliki Alexandra; McGrail, B. Peter; Schaef, Herbert T.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Carbon Sequestration Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Science Science July 2001 Focus Area Overview Presentation Mission and Scope Program Relationships Scientific Challenges Research Plans Facility Plans Princeton.ppt 7/16/01 Carbon Sequestration Science Focus Area New Projects Contribute to Sequestration Science Systems Integration Virtual Simulation of CO 2 Capture Technologies Cleanup Stream Gas Gasification Gasification MEA CO 2 Capture Facility Oxygen Membrane 3 km 2 inch tube 800m - 20 °C, 20 atm Liquid CO 2 , 100 tons ~1 kg CO 2 / s = 5 MW ^ CO 2 Coal Other Fuels Coal Other Fuels CO 2 Sequestration Aquifer H 2 O Flue gas H 2 O CH 4 CH 4 CO 2 Oil field Oil well Power plant CH 4 Coal - bed Aquiclude H 2 O CO 2 /N 2 CO 2 N 2 CO 2 CO 2 CO 2 CO 2 CO 2 Water Rock , 2 Coal Other Fuels Coal Other Fuels Combustor Oxygen Membrane Princeton.ppt 7/16/01 Carbon Sequestration Science Focus Area

374

Comparison Of Hydrothermal Alteration Of Carboniferous Carbonate And  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydrothermal Alteration Of Carboniferous Carbonate And Hydrothermal Alteration Of Carboniferous Carbonate And Siliclastic Rocks In The Valles Caldera With Outcrops From The Socorro Caldera, New Mexico Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Comparison Of Hydrothermal Alteration Of Carboniferous Carbonate And Siliclastic Rocks In The Valles Caldera With Outcrops From The Socorro Caldera, New Mexico Details Activities (3) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: Continental Scientific Drilling Program (CSDP) drill hole VC-2B (total depth 1761.7 m (5780 ft); maximum temperature 295°C) was continuously cored through the Sulphur Springs hydrothermal system in the western ring-fracture zone of the 1.14 Ma Valles caldera. Among other units, the hole penetrated 760.2 m (2494.1 ft) of Paleozoic carbonate and

375

Innovative biomass to power conversion systems based on cascaded supercritical CO2 Brayton cycles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In the small to medium power range the main technologies for the conversion of biomass sources into electricity are based either on reciprocating internal combustion or organic Rankine cycle engines. Relatively low energy conversion efficiencies are obtained in both systems due to the thermodynamic losses in the conversion of biomass into syngas in the former, and to the high temperature difference in the heat transfer between combustion gases and working fluid in the latter. The aim of this paper is to demonstrate that higher efficiencies in the conversion of biomass sources into electricity can be obtained using systems based on the supercritical closed CO2 Brayton cycles (s-CO2). The s-CO2 system analysed here includes two cascaded supercritical CO2 cycles which enable to overcome the intrinsic limitation of the single cycle in the effective utilization of the whole heat available from flue gases. Both part-flow and simple supercritical CO2 cycle configurations are considered and four boiler arrangements are investigated to explore the thermodynamic performance of such systems. These power plant configurations, which were never explored in the literature for biomass conversion into electricity, are demonstrated here to be viable options to increase the energy conversion efficiency of small-to-medium biomass fired power plants. Results of the optimization procedure show that a maximum biomass to electricity conversion efficiency of 36% can be achieved using the cascaded configuration including a part flow topping cycle, which is approximately 10%-points higher than that of the existing biomass power plants in the small to medium power range.

Giovanni Manente; Andrea Lazzaretto

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

MIDWEST REGIONAL CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP THE UNITED  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MIDWEST REGIONAL CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP THE UNITED S T A T E S 2012 ATLAS CARBON UTILIZATION AND STORAGE Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership The Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP) region consists of nine neighboring states: Indiana, Kentucky, Maryland, Michigan, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia. Battelle Memorial Institute leads MRCSP, which includes nearly 40 organizations from the research community, energy industry, universities, non-government, and government organizations. The region has a diverse range of CO 2 sources and many opportunities for reducing CO 2 emissions through geologic storage and/or EOR. Potential locations for geologic storage in the MRCSP states extend from the deep rock formations in the broad

377

Superior Corrosion Resistance Properties of TiN-Based Coatings on Zircaloy Tubes in Supercritical Water  

SciTech Connect

Thin films of TiN and Ti0.35Al0.65N nanocomposite were deposited on polished Zircaloy-4 tubes. After exposure to supercritical water for 48 h, the coated tubes are remarkably intact, while the bare uncoated tube shows severe oxidation and breakaway corrosion. X-ray diffraction patterns, secondary electron images, backscattered electron images, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy data from the tube surfaces and cross-sections show that a protective oxide, formed on the film surface, effectively prevents further oxidation and corrosion to the Zircaloy-4 tubes. This result demonstrates the effectiveness of thin film ceramics as protective coatings under extreme environments.

Fauzia Khatkhatay; Liang Jiao; Jie Jian; Zhijie Jiao; Hongbin Zhang; Jian Gan; Haiyan Wang; Wenrui Zhang; Xinghang Zhang

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Chapter 3 - Environmentally Benign Transformations of Monoterpenes and Monoterpenoids in Supercritical Fluids  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The use of supercritical fluids (SCFs) to perform transformations of monoterpenes and their oxygen-containing derivatives enables one to obtain a broad range of valuable products using renewable raw materials under green conditions. The advantages of \\{SCFs\\} are most vividly manifested when they are used in combination with heterogeneous catalysts and/or flow-type reactors. The review covers all types of transformations of monoterpenes and monoterpenoids in \\{SCFs\\} published in literature up to early 2012, including the results obtained by the authors and literature data.

Konstantin P. Volcho; Vladimir I. Anikeev

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Advanced Computational Thermal Fluid Physics (CTFP) and Its Assessment for Light Water Reactors and Supercritical Reactors  

SciTech Connect

Background: The ultimate goal of the study is the improvement of predictive methods for safety analyses and design of Generation IV reactor systems such as supercritical water reactors (SCWR) for higher efficiency, improved performance and operation, design simplification, enhanced safety and reduced waste and cost. The objective of this Korean / US / laboratory / university collaboration of coupled fundamental computational and experimental studies is to develop the supporting knowledge needed for improved predictive techniques for use in the technology development of Generation IV reactor concepts and their passive safety systems. The present study emphasizes SCWR concepts in the Generation IV program.

D.M. McEligot; K. G. Condie; G. E. McCreery; H. M. McIlroy; R. J. Pink; L.E. Hochreiter; J.D. Jackson; R.H. Pletcher; B.L. Smith; P. Vukoslavcevic; J.M. Wallace; J.Y. Yoo; J.S. Lee; S.T. Ro; S.O. Park

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Model-free adaptive control of supercritical circulating fluidized-bed boilers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A novel 3-Input-3-Output (3.times.3) Fuel-Air Ratio Model-Free Adaptive (MFA) controller is introduced, which can effectively control key process variables including Bed Temperature, Excess O2, and Furnace Negative Pressure of combustion processes of advanced boilers. A novel 7-input-7-output (7.times.7) MFA control system is also described for controlling a combined 3-Input-3-Output (3.times.3) process of Boiler-Turbine-Generator (BTG) units and a 5.times.5 CFB combustion process of advanced boilers. Those boilers include Circulating Fluidized-Bed (CFB) Boilers and Once-Through Supercritical Circulating Fluidized-Bed (OTSC CFB) Boilers.

Cheng, George Shu-Xing; Mulkey, Steven L

2014-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rocks supercritical carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Reaction Pathway for Catalytic Gasification of Lignin in Presence of Sulfur in Supercritical Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Generally, very high temperatures of over 1073 K are needed for steam reformation of the lignin in the gasification process.1 Hence, low-temperature methods for lignin gasification are the most desirable, so that the waste heat from high-temperature processes in industry can be utilized for energy generation. ... While in the presence of the Ru/TiO2 catalyst, formaldehyde was completely gasified in supercritical water, similar to the gasification of lignin and 4-propylphenol. ... water for gasification technique of wastes. ...

Mitsumasa Osada; Norihito Hiyoshi; Osamu Sato; Kunio Arai; Masayuki Shirai

2007-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

382

Van-der-Waals supercritical fluid: Exact formulas for special lines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the framework of the van-der-Waals model, analytical expressions for the locus of extrema (ridges) for heat capacity, thermal expansion coefficient, compressibility, density fluctuation, and sound velocity in the supercritical region have been obtained. It was found that the ridges for different thermodynamic values virtually merge into single Widom line only at $Tlines and the pseudo-Gruneisen parameter $\\gamma$ of a van-der-Waals fluid were analyzed. In the critical point, the van-der-Waals fluid has $\\gamma=8/3$, corresponding to a soft sphere particle system with exponent $n=14$.

V. V. Brazhkin; V. N. Ryzhov

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

383

The Effect of Supercritical String Cosmology on the Relic Density of Dark Matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. 3 As various type Ia supernovae projects [4,5] and the WMAP data [1,2] have continually confirmed the existence of dark energy, the cause of universe expansion, Supercritical String Cosmology (SSC) [6,7] arises as a model attempting to formulate... imply that exotic matter has negative pressure, acting like a dark energy term. Also, notice that the factor R increases as ?? decreases. When ?? = 0, ???? = 3.8 ? 1014. Such high enhancement factor is obviously ruled out by observational data, so...

Truong, Phuongmai N

2009-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

384

Separation of Fischer-Tropsch wax from catalyst using supercritical fluid extraction. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1, 1996--June 30, 1996  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this research project is to evaluate the potential of SCF extraction for separating the catalyst slurry of a Fischer- Tropsch (F-T) slurry bubble column (SBC) reactor into two fractions: (1) a catalyst-free wax containing less than 10 ppm particulate matter and (2) a concentrated catalyst slurry that is ready for recycle or regeneration. The wax will be extracted with a hydrocarbon solvent that has a critical temperature near the operating temperature of the SBC reactor, i.e., 200-300{degrees}C. Initial work is being performed using n-hexane as the solvent. The success of the project depends on two major factors. First, the supercritical solvent must be able to dissolve the F-T wax; furthermore, this must be accomplished without entraining the solid catalyst. Second, the extraction must be controlled so as not to favor the removal of the low molecular weight wax compounds, i.e., a constant carbon-number distribution of the alkanes in the wax slurry must be maintained at steady-state column operation. To implement our objectives, the following task structure is being implemented: Task 1 equilibrium solubility measurements; Task 2 thermodynamic modeling; and Task 3 process design studies. Progress reports are presented for each task.

Joyce, P.C.; Thies, M.C.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Final_Tech_Session_Schedule_and_Location.xls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

In Carbonate Aquifers: Rock and Brine Alterations during Super-Critical CO In Carbonate Aquifers: Rock and Brine Alterations during Super-Critical CO 2 Injection in San Andres Formation, West Texas Gloria S. Garcia-Orrego,KinderMorgan CO 2 Company LP. Waylon House,Texas Tech University;Necip Guven, Texas Tech University, LorneA. Davis, texas Lutheran Univesity Abstract The injection of CO 2 into a formation changes the physics and chemistry of both the solid matrix and the fluids contained in the formation. The laboratory study reported here investigated how the chemical composition of the natural formation brine and different minerals present in the carbonate formations altered upon CO 2 injection under supercritical conditions. The study focused on the alteration of the petrophysical properties of the carbonate reservoir rocks resulting from this interaction

386

Hydromechanical interactions in a fractured carbonate reservoir inferred from hydraulic and mechanical measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydromechanical interactions in a fractured carbonate reservoir inferred from hydraulic, France Abstract Hydromechanical coupled processes in a shallow fractured carbonate reservoir rock were of hydraulic loading/unloading of a water reservoir in which fluid flow occurs mainly inside a heterogeneous

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

387

Carbon geochemistry of serpentinites in the Lost City Hydrothermal System (30N, MAR)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon geochemistry of serpentinites in the Lost City Hydrothermal System (30°N, MAR) Ade May 2008 Abstract The carbon geochemistry of serpentinized peridotites and gabbroic rocks recovered at the Lost City Hydrothermal Field (LCHF) and drilled at IODP Hole 1309D at the central dome of the Atlantis

Gilli, Adrian

388

Effective Permeability Change in Wellbore Cement with Carbon Dioxide Reaction  

SciTech Connect

Portland cement, a common sealing material for wellbores for geological carbon sequestration was reacted with CO{sub 2} in supercritical, gaseous, and aqueous phases at various pressure and temperature conditions to simulate cement-CO{sub 2} reaction along the wellbore from carbon injection depth to the near-surface. Hydrated Portland cement columns (14 mm diameter x 90 mm length; water-to-cement ratio = 0.33) including additives such as steel coupons and Wallula basalt fragments were reacted with CO{sub 2} in the wet supercritical (the top half) and dissolved (the bottom half) phases under carbon sequestration condition with high pressure (10 MPa) and temperature (50 C) for 5 months, while small-sized hydrated Portland cement columns (7 mm diameter x 20 mm length; water-to-cement ratio = 0.38) were reacted with CO{sub 2} in dissolved phase at high pressure (10 MPa) and temperature (50 C) for 1 month or with wet CO{sub 2} in gaseous phase at low pressure (0.2 MPa) and temperature (20 C) for 3 months. XMT images reveal that the cement reacted with CO{sub 2} saturated groundwater had degradation depth of {approx}1 mm for 1 month and {approx}3.5 mm for 5 month, whereas the degradation was minor with cement exposure to supercritical CO{sub 2}. SEM-EDS analysis showed that the carbonated cement was comprised of three distinct zones; the innermost less degraded zone with Ca atom % > C atom %, the inner degraded zone with Ca atom % {approx} C atom % due to precipitation of calcite, the outer degraded zone with C atom % > Ca atom % due to dissolution of calcite and C-S-H, as well as adsorption of carbon to cement matrix. The outer degraded zone of carbonated cement was porous and fractured because of dissolution-dominated reaction by carbonic acid exposure, which resulted in the increase in BJH pore volume and BET surface area. In contrast, cement-wet CO{sub 2}(g) reaction at low P (0.2 MPa)-T (20 C) conditions for 1 to 3 months was dominated by precipitation of micron-sized calcite on the outside surface of cement, which resulted in the decrease in BJH pore volume and BET surface area. Cement carbonation and pore structure change are significantly dependent on pressure and temperature conditions as well as the phase of CO{sub 2}, which controls the balance between precipitation and dissolution in cement matrix. Geochemical modeling result suggests that ratio of solid (cement)-to-solution (carbonated water) has a significant effect on cement carbonation, thus the cement-CO{sub 2} reaction experiment needs to be conducted under realistic conditions representing the in-situ wellbore environment of carbon sequestration field site. Total porosity and air permeability for a duplicate cement column with water-to-cement ratio of 0.38 measured after oven-drying by Core Laboratories using Boyle's Law technique and steady-state method were 31% and 0.576 mD. A novel method to measure the effective liquid permeability of a cement column using X-ray micro-tomography images after injection of pressurized KI (potassium iodide) is under development by PNNL. Preliminary results indicate the permeability of a cement column with water-to-cement ratio of 0.38 is 4-8 mD. PNNL will apply the method to understand the effective permeability change of Portland cement by CO{sub 2}(g) reaction under a variety of pressure and temperature conditions to develop a more reliable well-bore leakage risk model.

Um, Wooyong; Jung, Hun Bok; Martin, Paul F.; McGrail, B. Peter

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Rim Rock Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rim Rock Wind Farm Rim Rock Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Rim Rock Wind Farm Facility Rim Rock Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NaturEner Developer NaturEner Energy Purchaser San Diego Gas & Electric Location Glacier and Toole Counties MT Coordinates 48.779564°, -112.061291° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":48.779564,"lon":-112.061291,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

390

Storage capacity in hot dry rock reservoirs  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of extracting thermal energy, in a cyclic manner, from geologic strata which may be termed hot dry rock. A reservoir comprised of hot fractured rock is established and water or other liquid is passed through the reservoir. The water is heated by the hot rock, recovered from the reservoir, cooled by extraction of heat by means of heat exchange apparatus on the surface, and then re-injected into the reservoir to be heated again. Water is added to the reservoir by means of an injection well and recovered from the reservoir by means of a production well. Water is continuously provided to the reservoir and continuously withdrawn from the reservoir at two different flow rates, a base rate and a peak rate. Increasing water flow from the base rate to the peak rate is accomplished by rapidly decreasing backpressure at the outlet of the production well in order to meet periodic needs for amounts of thermal energy greater than a baseload amount, such as to generate additional electric power to meet peak demands. The rate of flow of water provided to the hot dry rock reservoir is maintained at a value effective to prevent depletion of the liquid

Brown, Donald W. (Los Alamos, NM)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Thermophysical properties of the Po Basin rocks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......W.E., AAPG, Memoir 1. Hadgu T. , Clinton C.L., Bean J.E., 2007. Determination of heat capacity of Yucca Mountain stratigraphic layer, Int. J. Rock Mech. Min. Sci., 44, 1022-1034. Hamilton E. , 1976. Variations of density......

V. Pasquale; G. Gola; P. Chiozzi; M. Verdoya

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Hot-dry-rock geothermal resource 1980  

SciTech Connect

The work performed on hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal resource evaluation, site characterization, and geophysical exploration techniques is summarized. The work was done by region (Far West, Pacific Northwest, Southwest, Rocky Mountain States, Midcontinent, and Eastern) and limited to the conterminous US.

Heiken, G.; Goff, F.; Cremer, G. (ed.)

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

E-Print Network 3.0 - archean metavolcanic rocks Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(Krner, 1985). However, the tectonic setting and age of metavolcanic rocks in Egypt are poorly... metavolcanic rocks. Metavolcanic rocks in Egypt were described by...

394

An Evaluation of the Carbon Sequestration Potential of the Cambro-Ordovician Strata of the Illinois and Michigan Basins: Part 1: Evaluation of Phase 2 CO{sub 2} Injection Testing in the Deep Saline Gunter Sandstone Reservoir (Cambro-Ordovician Knox Group), Marvin Blan No. 1 Hancock County, Kentucky Part 2: Time-lapse Three-Dimensional Vertical Seismic Profile (3D-VSP) of Sequestration Target Interval with Injected Fluids  

SciTech Connect

Part 1 of this report focuses on results of the western Kentucky carbon storage test, and provides a basis for evaluating injection and storage of supercritical CO{sub 2} in Cambro-Ordovician carbonate reservoirs throughout the U.S. Midcontinent. This test demonstrated that the Cambro- Ordovician Knox Group, including the Beekmantown Dolomite, Gunter Sandstone, and Copper Ridge Dolomite in stratigraphic succession from shallowest to deepest, had reservoir properties suitable for supercritical CO{sub 2} storage in a deep saline reservoir hosted in carbonate rocks, and that strata with properties sufficient for long-term confinement of supercritical CO{sub 2} were present in the deep subsurface. Injection testing with brine and CO{sub 2} was completed in two phases. The first phase, a joint project by the Kentucky Geological Survey and the Western Kentucky Carbon Storage Foundation, drilled the Marvin Blan No. 1 carbon storage research well and tested the entire Knox Group section in the open borehole � including the Beekmantown Dolomite, Gunter Sandstone, and Copper Ridge Dolomite � at 1152�2255 m, below casing cemented at 1116 m. During Phase 1 injection testing, most of the 297 tonnes of supercritical CO{sub 2} was displaced into porous and permeable sections of the lowermost Beekmantown below 1463 m and Gunter. The wellbore was then temporarily abandoned with a retrievable bridge plug in casing at 1105 m and two downhole pressure-temperature monitoring gauges below the bridge plug pending subsequent testing. Pressure and temperature data were recorded every minute for slightly more than a year, providing a unique record of subsurface reservoir conditions in the Knox. In contrast, Phase 2 testing, this study, tested a mechanically-isolated dolomitic-sandstone interval in the Gunter. Operations in the Phase 2 testing program commenced with retrieval of the bridge plug and long-term pressure gauges, followed by mechanical isolation of the Gunter by plugging the wellbore with cement below the injection zone at 1605.7 m, then cementing a section of a 14-cm casing at 1470.4�1535.6. The resultant 70.1-m test interval at 1535.6�1605.7 m included nearly all of the Gunter sandstone facies. During the Phase 2 injection, 333 tonnes of CO{sub 2} were injected into the thick, lower sand section in the sandy member of the Gunter. Following the completion of testing, the injection zone below casing at 1116 m in the Marvin Blan No. 1 well, and wellbore below 305 m was permanently abandoned with cement plugs and the wellsite reclaimed. The range of most-likely storage capacities found in the Knox in the Marvin Blan No. 1 is 1000 tonnes per surface hectare in the Phase 2 Gunter interval to 8685 tonnes per surface hectare if the entire Knox section were available including the fractured interval near the base of the Copper Ridge. By itself the Gunter lacks sufficient reservoir volume to be considered for CO{sub 2} storage, although it may provide up to 18% of the reservoir volume available in the Knox. Regional extrapolation of CO{sub 2} storage potential based on the results of a single well test can be problematic, although indirect evidence of porosity and permeability can be demonstrated in the form of active saltwater-disposal wells injecting into the Knox. The western Kentucky region suitable for CO{sub 2} storage in the Knox is limited updip, to the east and south, by the depth at which the base of the Maquoketa shale lies above the depth required to ensure storage of CO{sub 2} in its supercritical state and the deepest a commercial well might be drilled for CO{sub 2} storage. The resulting prospective region has an area of approximately 15,600 km{sup 2}, beyond which it is unlikely that suitable Knox reservoirs may be developed. Faults in the subsurface, which serve as conduits for CO{sub 2} migration and compromise sealing strata, may mitigate the area with Knox reservoirs suitable for CO{sub 2} storage. The results of the injection tes

Richard Bowersox; John Hickman; Hannes Leetaru

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Rock Sampling At The Needles Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2005) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

The Needles Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2005) The Needles Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Rock Sampling At The Needles Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location The Needles Area Exploration Technique Rock Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Over 2000 km2 of 5-m resolution Hymap hyperspectral data was acquired in 2004. Subsequent image processing and data analysis has identified reflectance spectra for alunite, kaolinite/halloysite, illite, gypsum, vegetation, and carbonate. A portable spectrometer is being used for in situ validation, along with laboratory measurements and x-ray diffraction analyses of samples collected in teh field. We are in the process of producing and validating mineral maps that will be used to narrow the scope

396

Does roughening of rock-fluid-rock interfaces emerge from a stress-induced instability?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Non-planar solid-fluid-solid interfaces under stress are very common in many industrial and natural materials. For example, in the Earth’s crust, many rough and wavy interfaces can be observed in rocks in a wi...

E. Bonnetier; C. Misbah; F. Renard; R. Toussaint…

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Exploring an Unstructured Lattice Representation for Carbonate Reservoir Characterization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

carbonates via a lattice-network of pore-volumes connected in space in directions and connectivity properties driven by the rock fabric, as opposed to being limited by the rigid geometry of grid-blocks. With this goal in mind, some aspects related to a...

Pasumarti, Lakshmi

2014-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

398

Modeling of crack initiation, propagation and coalescence in rocks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural or artificial fracturing of rock plays a very important role in geologic processes and for engineered structures in and on rock. Fracturing is associated with crack initiation, propagation and coalescence, which ...

Gonçalves da Silva, Bruno Miguel

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Carbon Sequestration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

David a. Lang David a. Lang Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236 412-386-4881 david.lang@netl.doe.gov andrew chizmeshya Arizona State University Center for Solid State Science Tempe, AZ 85287-1704 480-965-6072 chizmesh@asu.edu A Novel ApproAch to MiNerAl cArboNAtioN: eNhANciNg cArboNAtioN While AvoidiNg MiNerAl pretreAtMeNt process cost Background Carbonation of the widely occurring minerals of the olivine group, such as forsterite (Mg 2 SiO 4 ), is a potential large-scale sequestration process that converts CO 2 into the environmentally benign mineral magnesite (MgCO 3 ). Because the process is exothermic, it inherently offers low-cost potential. Enhancing carbonation reactivity is the key to economic viability. Previous

400

Carbon Nanotubes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A broad review of the structure and properties of carbon nanotubes is presented. Particular emphasis is given to ... dimensional density of states predicted for single-wall nanotubes of small diameter. The eviden...

M. S. Dresselhaus; G. Dresselhaus…

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rocks supercritical carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Carbon Fiber  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Lee McGetrick leads ORNL's effort to produce light, durable carbon fiber at lower cost -- a key to improvements in manufacturing that will produce more fuel-efficient vehicles and other advances.

McGetrick, Lee

2014-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

402

Carbon Fiber  

SciTech Connect

Lee McGetrick leads ORNL's effort to produce light, durable carbon fiber at lower cost -- a key to improvements in manufacturing that will produce more fuel-efficient vehicles and other advances.

McGetrick, Lee

2014-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

403

Production of silica aerogel microparticles loaded with ammonia borane by batch and semicontinuous supercritical drying techniques  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Silica aerogel microparticles were prepared by supercritical drying and used as support for hydrogen-storing ammonia borane (AB). The formation of aerogel microparticles was done using two different processes: batch supercritical fluid extraction and a semicontinuous drying process. Silica aerogel microparticles with a surface area ranging from 400 to 800 m2/g, a volume of pores of 1 cm3/g, and a mean particle diameter ranging from 12 to 27 ?m were produced using the two drying techniques. The particle size distribution (PSD) of the microparticles was influenced by shear rate, amount of catalyst, hydrophilic–hydrophobic solvent ratio and hydrophobic surface modification. In particular, irregular aerogel particles were obtained from hydrophilic gels, while regular, spherical particles with smooth surfaces were obtained from hydrophobic gels. AB was loaded into silica aerogel microparticles in concentrations ranging from 1% till 5% wt. Hydrogen release kinetics from the hydride-loaded aerogel was analyzed with a volumetric cell at 80 °C. By stabilization of AB into the silica aerogel microparticles, an improvement of the release rate of hydrogen from AB was observed.

Miriam Rueda; Luis Miguel Sanz-Moral; Antonio Nieto-Márquez; Pablo Longone; Facundo Mattea; Ángel Martín

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Numerical simulation of supercritical heat transfer under severe axial density gradient in a narrow vertical tube  

SciTech Connect

A number of computational works have been performed so far for the simulation of heat transfer in a supercritical fluid. The simulations, however, faced a lot of difficulties when heat transfer deteriorates due either to buoyancy or by acceleration. When the bulk temperature approaches the pseudo-critical temperature the fluid experiences a severe axial density gradient on top of a severe radial one. Earlier numerical calculations showed, without exception, unrealistic over-predictions, as soon as the bulk temperature exceeded the pseudo-critical temperature. The over-predictions might have been resulted from an inapplicability of widely-used turbulence models. One of the major causes for the difficulties may probably be an assumption of a constant turbulent Prandtl number. Recent research, both numerical and experimental, indicates that the turbulent Prandtl number is never a constant when the gradient of physical properties is significant. This paper describes the applicability of a variable turbulent Prandtl number to the numerical simulation of heat transfer in supercritical fluids flowing in narrow vertical tubes. (authors)

Bae, Y. Y.; Hong, S. D.; Kim, Y. W. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst., 1045 Daedeokdaero, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Experimental study on heat transfer to supercritical water flowing through tubes  

SciTech Connect

A test facility named SWAMUP (Supercritical Water Multi-Purpose Loop) has been constructed in Shanghai Jiao Tong Univ. to investigate heat transfer and pressure drop through tubes and rod bundles. SWAMUP is a closed loop with operating pressure up to 30 MPa, outlet-water temperature up to 550 deg. C, and mass flow rate up to 5 t/h. In this paper, experimental study has been carried out on heat transfer of supercritical water flowing vertically through tubes (ID=7.6 and 10 mm). A large number of test points in tubes has been obtained with a wide range of heat flux (200-1500 kw/m{sup 2}) and mass flux (450-2000 kg/m{sup 2}s). Test results showed that heat transfer deterioration (HTD) caused by buoyancy effect only appears in upward flow and HTD caused by acceleration effect appears both in upward flow and downward flow. The heat transfer coefficients (HTC) produced in tube tests were compared with existing heat transfer correlations. (authors)

Zhao, M.; Gu, H.; Cheng, X. [School of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong Univ. SJTU, 800 Dongchuan Road, Shanghai (China)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Feasibility Study of Supercritical Light Water Cooled Fast Reactors for Actinide Burning and Electric Power Production  

SciTech Connect

The use of supercritical temperature and pressure light water as the coolant in a direct-cycle nuclear reactor offers potential for considerable plant simplification and consequent capital and O&M cost reduction compared with current light water reactor (LWR) designs. Also, given the thermodynamic conditions of the coolant at the core outlet (i.e. temperature and pressure beyond the water critical point), very high thermal efficiencies of the power conversion cycle are possible (i.e. up to 46%). Because no change of phase occurs in the core, the need for steam separators and dryers as well as for BWR-type recirculation pumps is eliminated, which, for a given reactor power, results in a substantially shorter reactor vessel than the current BWRs. Furthermore, in a direct cycle the steam generators are not needed. If a tight fuel rod lattice is adopted, it is possible to significantly reduce the neutron moderation and attain fast neutron energy spectrum conditions. In this project a supercritical water reactor concept with a simple, blanket-free, pancake-shaped core will be developed. This type of core can make use of either fertile or fertile-free fuel and retain the hard spectrum to effectively burn plutonium and minor actinides from LWR spent fuel while efficiently generating electricity.

Mac Donald, Philip Elsworth; Buongiorno, Jacopo; Davis, Cliff Bybee; Weaver, Kevan Dean

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

IAEA coordinated research project on thermal-hydraulics of Supercritical Water-Cooled Reactors (SCWRs)  

SciTech Connect

The Supercritical Water-Cooled Reactor (SCWR) is an innovative water-cooled reactor concept, which uses supercritical pressure water as reactor coolant. It has been attracting interest of many researchers in various countries mainly due to its benefits of high thermal efficiency and simple primary systems, resulting in low capital cost. The IAEA started in 2008 a Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on Thermal-Hydraulics of SCWRs as a forum to foster the exchange of technical information and international collaboration in research and development. This paper summarizes the activities and current status of the CRP, as well as major progress achieved to date. At present, 15 institutions closely collaborate in several tasks. Some organizations have been conducting thermal-hydraulics experiments and analysing the data, and others have been participating in code-to-test and/or code-to-code benchmark exercises. The expected outputs of the CRP are also discussed. Finally, the paper introduces several IAEA activities relating to or arising from the CRP. (authors)

Yamada, K. [Vienna International Centre, P.O. Box 100, 1400 Vienna (Austria); Aksan, S. N. [International Atomic Energy Agency, 1400 Vienna (Austria)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Supercritical Hadley circulation within a layer of fluid saturated porous medium: Bifurcation to traveling wave  

SciTech Connect

Hadley circulation induced by horizontal and vertical temperature gradients imposed on a fluid saturated porous medium layer is simulated numerically. The flow is assumed to be longitudinal, that is the secondary flow is composed of cells with axes transverse to the direction of the Hadley circulation. Critical (bifurcation) states predicted theoretically via linear stability analysis are verified by the numerical results giving confidence on the accuracy of the method. Several values of horizontal Rayleigh number, Ra{sub h}, and vertical Rayleigh number, Ra{sub v}, are studied. Results indicate that beyond a threshold horizontal Rayleigh number value the flow and temperature fields evolve from subcritical Hadley circulation to a supercritical time periodic flow. The secondary flow emerges in the form of a traveling wave aligned with the main (Hadley) flow direction. This traveling wave is characterized, at supercritical low vertical Rayleigh numbers, by the continuous drifting of two horizontal layers of flow cells that move in opposite directions. As the vertical Rayleigh number increases, the traveling wave becomes characterized by a unique layer of cells drifting in the direction opposite to the applied horizontal temperature gradient. Numerical animation unravels the main features of the transport process. This simplified model is of fundamental and practical importance, for instance, to the study of geothermal activities, underground transport of pollutants, paper processing, crystal growth, building insulation, and gas reservoirs.

Manole, D.M. [MCD Inc., Anniston, AL (United States); Lage, J.L.; Antohe, B.V. [Southern Methodist Univ., Dallas, TX (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

409

Techno-economic analysis of biodiesel production from Jatropha curcas via a supercritical methanol process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper presents the conceptual design and economic evaluation of a production of methyl esters (biodiesel) from Jatropha curcas oil (JCO) via a supercritical methanol process with glycerol as a by-product. The process consists of four major units: transesterification (PFR), methanol recovery (FT) and (DC1), recovery of glycerol (DEC), and biodiesel purification (DC2). The material and heat balance are also presented here. A biodiesel production of 40,000 tonnes-yr?1 is taken as case study. Biodiesel obtained from supercritical transesterification with Jatropha curcas oil as feedstock resulting in high purity methyl esters (99.96%) with almost pure glycerol (96.49%) obtained as by-product. The biodiesel can be sold at USD 0.78 kg?1, while the manufacturing and capital investment costs are in the range of USD 25.39 million-year?1 and USD 9.41 million year?1, respectively. This study proved that biodiesel from JCO is the least expensive with purities comparable to those found in other studies.

N.N.A.N. Yusuf; S.K. Kamarudin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

VancouverParksville White RockNew Westminster  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Courtenay VancouverParksville Abbotsford White RockNew Westminster Squamish Chilliwack Port McNeill Powell

411

Submitted to the Journal of Fluid Mechanics, January, 2005 Conditions under which a supercritical turbidity current traverses an abrupt  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

slope can be expected to be subcritical. The transition from supercritical to subcritical flow a hydraulic jump to subcritical flow near the canyon-fan break, and then b) accelerate again to critical flow water across the Gibraltar Sill from the Mediterranean Sea into the Atlantic (e.g. Armi & Farmer, 1988

Parker, Gary

412

Rock mechanics activities at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect

The application of rock mechanics at nuclear waste repositories is a true multidisciplinary effort. A description and historical summary of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is presented. Rock mechanics programs at the WIPP are outlined, and the current rock mechanics modeling philosophy of the Westinghouse Waste Isolation Division is discussed.

Francke, C. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Carlsbad, NM (United States); Saeb, S. [International Technology Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

413

Understanding Through-Composition in Post-Rock, Math-Metal, and other Post-Millennial Rock Genres  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since the dawn of experimental rock’s second coming in the new millennium, experimental artists have begun distancing themselves from Top-40 artists through formal structures that eschew recapitulatory verse/chorus ...

Osborn, Brad

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

A Phased Array Approach to Rock Blasting  

SciTech Connect

A series of laboratory-scale simultaneous two-hole shots was performed in a rock simulant (mortar) to record the shock wave interference patterns produced in the material. The purpose of the project as a whole was to evaluate the usefulness of phased array techniques of blast design, using new high-precision delay technology. Despite high-speed photography, however, we were unable to detect the passage of the shock waves through the samples to determine how well they matched the expected interaction geometry. The follow-up mine-scale tests were therefore not conducted. Nevertheless, pattern analysis of the vectors that would be formed by positive interference of the shockwaves from multiple charges in an ideal continuous, homogeneous, isotropic medium indicate the potential for powerful control of blast design, given precise characterization of the target rock mass.

Leslie Gertsch; Jason Baird

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Uranium mineralization in fluorine-enriched volcanic rocks  

SciTech Connect

Several uranium and other lithophile element deposits are located within or adjacent to small middle to late Cenozoic, fluorine-rich rhyolitic dome complexes. Examples studied include Spor Mountain, Utah (Be-U-F), the Honeycomb Hills, Utah (Be-U), the Wah Wah Mountains, Utah (U-F), and the Black Range-Sierra Cuchillo, New Mexico (Sn-Be-W-F). The formation of these and similar deposits begins with the emplacement of a rhyolitic magma, enriched in lithophile metals and complexing fluorine, that rises to a shallow crustal level, where its roof zone may become further enriched in volatiles and the ore elements. During initial explosive volcanic activity, aprons of lithicrich tuffs are erupted around the vents. These early pyroclastic deposits commonly host the mineralization, due to their initial enrichment in the lithophile elements, their permeability, and the reactivity of their foreign lithic inclusions (particularly carbonate rocks). The pyroclastics are capped and preserved by thick topaz rhyolite domes and flows that can serve as a source of heat and of additional quantities of ore elements. Devitrification, vapor-phase crystallization, or fumarolic alteration may free the ore elements from the glassy matrix and place them in a form readily leached by percolating meteoric waters. Heat from the rhyolitic sheets drives such waters through the system, generally into and up the vents and out through the early tuffs. Secondary alteration zones (K-feldspar, sericite, silica, clays, fluorite, carbonate, and zeolites) and economic mineral concentrations may form in response to this low temperature (less than 200 C) circulation. After cooling, meteoric water continues to migrate through the system, modifying the distribution and concentration of the ore elements (especially uranium).

Burt, D.M.; Sheridan, M.F.; Bikun, J.; Christiansen, E.; Correa, B.; Murphy, B.; Self, S.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Water Challenges for Geologic Carbon Capture and Sequestration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

subcritical and supercritical con?gurations, respectively Environmental Management (2010) 45:651–661 Fig. 5 Water

Newmark, Robin L.; Friedmann, Samuel J.; Carroll, Susan A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Multiscale heterogeneity characterization of tidal channel, tidal delta and foreshore facies, Almond Formation outcrops, Rock Springs uplift, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

In order to accurately predict fluid flow within a reservoir, variability in the rock properties at all scales relevant to the specific depositional environment needs to be taken into account. The present work describes rock variability at scales from hundreds of meters (facies level) to millimeters (laminae) based on outcrop studies of the Almond Formation. Tidal channel, tidal delta and foreshore facies were sampled on the eastern flank of the Rock Springs uplift, southeast of Rock Springs, Wyoming. The Almond Fm. was deposited as part of a mesotidal Upper Cretaceous transgressive systems tract within the greater Green River Basin. Bedding style, lithology, lateral extent of beds of bedsets, bed thickness, amount and distribution of depositional clay matrix, bioturbation and grain sorting provide controls on sandstone properties that may vary more than an order of magnitude within and between depositional facies in outcrops of the Almond Formation. These features can be mapped on the scale of an outcrop. The products of diagenesis such as the relative timing of carbonate cement, scale of cemented zones, continuity of cemented zones, selectively leached framework grains, lateral variability of compaction of sedimentary rock fragments, and the resultant pore structure play an equally important, although less predictable role in determining rock property heterogeneity. A knowledge of the spatial distribution of the products of diagenesis such as calcite cement or compaction is critical to modeling variation even within a single facies in the Almond Fin. because diagenesis can enhance or reduce primary (depositional) rock property heterogeneity. Application of outcrop heterogeneity models to the subsurface is greatly hindered by differences in diagenesis between the two settings. The measurements upon which this study is based were performed both on drilled outcrop plugs and on blocks.

Schatzinger, R.A.; Tomutsa, L. [BDM Petroleum Technologies, Bartlesville, OK (United States)

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Gage for measuring displacements in rock samples  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gage for measuring diametral displacement within a rock sample for use in a rock mechanics laboratory and in the field, comprises a support ring housing a linear variable differential transformer, a mounting screw, and a leaf spring. The mounting screw is adjustable and defines a first point of contact with the rock sample. The leaf spring has opposite ends fixed to the inner periphery of the mounting ring. An intermediate portion of the leaf spring projecting radially inward from the ring is formed with a dimple defining a second point of contact with the sample. The first and second points of contact are diametrically opposed to each other. The LVDT is mounted in the ring with its axis parallel to the line of measurement and its core rod received in the dimple of the leaf spring. Any change in the length of the line between the first and second support points is directly communicated to the LVDT. The leaf spring is rigid to completely support lateral forces so that the LVDT is free of all load for improved precision.

Holcomb, David J. (Albuquerque, NM); McNamee, Michael J. (Albuquerque, NM)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Hydrothermal formation of Clay-Carbonate alteration assemblages in the Nili Fossae region of Mars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) has returned observations of the Nili Fossae region indicating the presence of Mg- carbonate in small (carbonate-bearing units. We applied absorption band mapping techniques to investigate a range of possible phyllosilicate and carbonate minerals that could be present in the Nili Fossae region. We also describe a clay-carbonate hydrothermal alteration mineral assemblage in the Archean Warrawoona Group of Western Australia that is a potential Earth analog to the Nili Fossae carbonate-bearing rock units. We discuss the geological and biological implications for hydrothermal processes on Noachian Mars.

Brown, Adrian J; Baldridge, Alice M; Crowley, James K; Bridges, Nathan T; Thomson, Bradley J; Marion, Giles M; Filho, Carlos R de Souza; Bishop, Janice L

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Category:Rock Lab Analysis | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Category Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Category:Rock Lab Analysis Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Rock Lab Analysis page? For detailed information on exploration techniques, click here. Category:Rock Lab Analysis Add.png Add a new Rock Lab Analysis Technique Pages in category "Rock Lab Analysis" The following 9 pages are in this category, out of 9 total. C Core Analysis Cuttings Analysis I Isotopic Analysis- Rock O Over Core Stress P Paleomagnetic Measurements Petrography Analysis R Rock Density X X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rocks supercritical carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

TWO-DIMENSIONAL MODELING OF LASER SPALLATION DRILLING OF ROCKS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DIMENSIONAL MODELING OF LASER SPALLATION DRILLING OF ROCKS DIMENSIONAL MODELING OF LASER SPALLATION DRILLING OF ROCKS P532 Zhiyue Xu, Yuichiro Yamashita 1 , and Claude B. Reed Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439, USA 1 Now with Kyushu University, Japan Abstract High power lasers can weaken, spall, melt and vaporize natural earth materials with thermal spallation being the most energy efficient rock removal mechanism. Laser rock spallation is a very complex phenomenon that depends on many factors. Computer numerical modeling would provides great tool to understand the fundamental of this complex phenomenon, which is crucial to the success of its applications. Complexity of modeling laser rock spallation is due to: 1) rock is a porous media, to which traditional theories of heat transfer and rock mechanics can not be directly

422

Low Carbon Fuel Standards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gas, or even coal with carbon capture and sequestration. Afuels that facilitate carbon capture and sequestration. Forenergy and could capture and sequester carbon emissions.

Sperling, Dan; Yeh, Sonia

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Exergetic analysis and evaluation of coal-fired supercritical thermal power plant and natural gas-fired combined cycle power plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The present work has been undertaken for energetic and exergetic analysis of coal-fired supercritical thermal power plant and natural gas-fired combined cycle power plant. Comparative analysis has been conducted ...

V. Siva Reddy; S. C. Kaushik; S. K. Tyagi

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

ROCK PROPERTIES MODEL ANALYSIS MODEL REPORT  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Analysis and Model Report (AMR) is to document Rock Properties Model (RPM) 3.1 with regard to input data, model methods, assumptions, uncertainties and limitations of model results, and qualification status of the model. The report also documents the differences between the current and previous versions and validation of the model. The rock properties models are intended principally for use as input to numerical physical-process modeling, such as of ground-water flow and/or radionuclide transport. The constraints, caveats, and limitations associated with this model are discussed in the appropriate text sections that follow. This work was conducted in accordance with the following planning documents: WA-0344, ''3-D Rock Properties Modeling for FY 1998'' (SNL 1997, WA-0358), ''3-D Rock Properties Modeling for FY 1999'' (SNL 1999), and the technical development plan, Rock Properties Model Version 3.1, (CRWMS M&O 1999c). The Interim Change Notice (ICNs), ICN 02 and ICN 03, of this AMR were prepared as part of activities being conducted under the Technical Work Plan, TWP-NBS-GS-000003, ''Technical Work Plan for the Integrated Site Model, Process Model Report, Revision 01'' (CRWMS M&O 2000b). The purpose of ICN 03 is to record changes in data input status due to data qualification and verification activities. These work plans describe the scope, objectives, tasks, methodology, and implementing procedures for model construction. The constraints, caveats, and limitations associated with this model are discussed in the appropriate text sections that follow. The work scope for this activity consists of the following: (1) Conversion of the input data (laboratory measured porosity data, x-ray diffraction mineralogy, petrophysical calculations of bound water, and petrophysical calculations of porosity) for each borehole into stratigraphic coordinates; (2) Re-sampling and merging of data sets; (3) Development of geostatistical simulations of porosity; (4) Generation of derivative property models via linear coregionalization with porosity; (5) Post-processing of the simulated models to impart desired secondary geologic attributes and to create summary and uncertainty models; and (6) Conversion of the models into real-world coordinates. The conversion to real world coordinates is performed as part of the integration of the RPM into the Integrated Site Model (ISM) 3.1; this activity is not part of the current analysis. The ISM provides a consistent volumetric portrayal of the rock layers, rock properties, and mineralogy of the Yucca Mountain site and consists of three components: (1) Geologic Framework Model (GFM); (2) RPM, which is the subject of this AMR; and (3) Mineralogic Model. The interrelationship of the three components of the ISM and their interface with downstream uses are illustrated in Figure 1. Figure 2 shows the geographic boundaries of the RPM and other component models of the ISM.

Clinton Lum

2002-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

425

Low Temperature Deposition of Metal Oxide Thin Films in Supercritical Carbon Dioxide using Metal-organic Precursors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and are driven by the energy provided by a heated substrate. Both these vacuum-based techniques require in the precursor adsorption, oxidation and by-product desorption. [5] Use of solvation energy may provide a viable. Pressurized CO2 was delivered using an ISCO 260D syringe pump through a high- pressure manifold. Resistive

Gougousi, Theodosia

426

Experimental investigation and thermodynamic modeling of extraction of heavy metal ions from aqueous solutions by chelation in supercritical carbon dioxide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

disadvantages. First, the solvent/metal solution must be subsequently purified. Second, since the solvent may be miscible in the aqueous phase, the residual solvent must be removed from the water stream. These disadvantages can be eliminated by substituting...

Uyansoy, Hakki

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

427

Hydraulic interactions between fractures and bedding planes in a carbonate aquifer studied by means of experimentally induced water-table fluctuations (Coaraze  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Hydraulic interactions between fractures and bedding planes in a carbonate aquifer studied. Keywords: Karst, hydrogeochemistry, fractured rocks, hydraulic properties, France insu-00376151,version1 high and low permeability regions are controlled by the hydraulic head gradient. Past studies have

Boyer, Edmond

428

Delayed carbon sequestration and rising carbon prices  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We set out a dynamic model to investigate optimal time paths of emissions, carbon stocks and carbon sequestration by land conversion, allowing for non-instantaneous carbon sequestration. Previous research in a dy...

Alejandro Caparrós

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Extraction and direct detection of metals in contaminated soils using supercritical fluid extraction - atomic emission spectrometry  

SciTech Connect

This presentation describes the determination of metal complexes that are directly extracted from sedimentary material using Supercritical Fluid Extraction (SFE) coupled with a microwave induced plasma (MIP) for direct elemental determination. The metal complexes studied are: tris (1,1,1 triofluoro 2,4-pentanediono) Iron (III), Cobalt (II) Acetylacetonate, Copper (II) Acetylacetonate, Zinc (II) Acetylacetonate, and Ni (II) Acetylacetonate. These complexes were spiked directly onto cleaned sea sand. Static extractions were performed using SO-CO{sub 2} modified with 5% methanol. The SFE was interfaced to the MIP by integrating the restrictor into the plasma torch assembly. A 100 W Ar plasma was sustained in a highly efficient TM{sub 010} cavity with the atomic emission signal being viewed in an axial manner. Results of these direct determinations herald the possibility of the extraction and determination of surface bound contaminants in one unified procedure, thereby reducing the risk of sample loss, sample contamination, and sample analysis time.

Lancaster, E.D.; Long, G.L.; Ducatte, G.R. [Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

430

Steam Oxidation and Chromia Evaporation in Ultra-Supercritical Steam Boilers and Turbines  

SciTech Connect

U.S. Department of Energy’s goals include power generation from coal at 60% efficiency, which requires steam conditions of up to 760 °C and 340 atm, so-called ultra-supercritical (USC) conditions. Evaporation of protective chromia scales is expected to be a primary corrosion mechanism. A methodology to calculate Cr evaporation rates from chromia scales was developed and combined with Cr diffusion calculations within the alloy (with a constant flux of Cr leaving the alloy from evaporation) to predict Cr concentration profiles and to predict the time until breakaway oxidation. At the highest temperatures and pressures, the time until breakaway oxidation was predicted to be quite short for the turbine blade, and of concern within the steam pipe and the higher temperature portions of the superheater tube. Alloy additions such as Ti may allow for a reduction in evaporation rate with time, mitigating the deleterious effects of chromia evaporation.

Gordon H. Holcomb

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Transition from Townsend to glow discharge: Subcritical, mixed, or supercritical characteristics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The transition from Townsend to glow discharge is investigated numerically in one space dimension in full parameter space within the classical model: with electrons and positive ions drifting in the local electric field, impact ionization by electrons (? process), secondary electron emission from the cathode (? process) and space charge effects. We also perform a systematic analytical small current expansion about the Townsend limit up to third order in the current that fits our numerical data very well. Depending on the two determining parameters ? and system size pd, the transition from Townsend to glow discharge can show the textbook subcritical behavior, but for smaller values of pd, we also find supercritical or some unexpected intermediate “mixed” behavior. Our work shows the same qualitative dependence of U=U(I,pd) for fixed ? as the old experiments by Pokrovskaya-Soboleva and Klyarfeld. Furthermore, the analysis lays the basis for understanding the complex spatiotemporal patterns in short planar barrier discharge systems.

Danijela D. Šija?i? and Ute Ebert

2002-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

432

Separation of Fischer-Tropsch Wax from Catalyst by Supercritical Extraction  

SciTech Connect

The proposed process of using supercritical fluid extraction in conjunction with the Fischer-Tropsch slurry bubble column reactor has been examined using the ASPEN Plus simulator by the research group at North Carolina State University. Qualitative results have been obtained for varying the following process parameters: solvent-to-wax ratio, solvent type (pentane or hexane), extraction temperature and pressure, and recovery unit temperature and pressure. The region of retrograde behavior was determined for pentane and hexane. Initial results show hexane to be the superior solvent; compared to pentane, hexane requires lower quantities of solvent makeup (the amount of solvent which needs to be added to account for solvent that cannot be recycled), and also results in a lower average molecular weight of slurry in the reactor. Studies indicate that increasing the extraction temperature, extraction pressure, recovery temperature, or solvent to wax ratio decreases the amount solvent makeup required. Decreasing the recovery pressure was found to decrease the makeup flowrate.

Joyce, P.C.; Thies, M.C.

1997-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

433

Fragmentation of Magnetically Subcritical Clouds into Multiple Supercritical Cores and the Formation of Small Stellar Groups  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Isolated low-mass stars are formed in dense cores of molecular clouds. In the standard picture, the cores are envisioned to condense out of strongly magnetized clouds through ambipolar diffusion. Most previous calculations based on this scenario are limited to axisymmetric cloud evolution leading to a single core, which collapses to form an isolated star or stellar system at the center. These calculations are here extended to the nonaxisymmetric case under thin-disk approximation, which allows for a detailed investigation into the process of fragmentation, fundamental to binary, multiple system, and cluster formation. We have shown previously that initially axisymmetric, magnetically subcritical clouds with an $m=2$ density perturbation of modest fractional amplitude ($\\sim 5%$) can develop highly elongated bars, which facilitate binary and multiple system formation. In this paper, we show that in the presence of higher order ($m\\ge 3$) perturbations of similar amplitude such clouds are capable of breaking up into a set of discrete dense cores. These multiple cores are magnetically supercritical. They are expected to collapse into single stars or stellar systems individually and, collectively, to form a small stellar group. Our calculations demonstrate that the standard scenario for single star formation involving magnetically subcritical clouds and ambipolar diffusion can readily produce more than one star, provided that the cloud mass is well above the Jeans limit and relatively uniformly distributed. The fragments develop in the central part of the cloud, after the region has become magnetically supercritical but before rapid collapse sets in. It is enhanced by the flattening of mass distribution along the field lines and by the magnetic tension force.

Zhi-Yun Li; Fumitaka Nakamura

2002-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

434

Rock-derived Micronutrient Transport in the Tropics: Molybdenum Cycling in Deeply-weathered Panama Soils  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The rock-derived micronutrient Molybdenum (Mo) is important in both terrestrial and ocean ecosystems as an essential cofactor in nitrogenase, the enzyme used by microorganisms to fix atmospheric nitrogen. As global nitrogen fixation rates respond to increasing atmospheric pCO2, the weathering, transport, and availability of this micronutrient becomes essential, because Mo limitation on nitrogen fixation has been documented in diverse ecosystems, including tropical soils in Panama. Therefore, a thorough understanding of the carbon and nitrogen cycles may depend more on the availability of trace metals such as Mo than previously realized, but the weathering and cycling of these elements as they pass across ecosystem boundaries remains poorly understood. This work explores the sources and sinks of Mo in small (36-176 ha) single land cover catchments in tropical Panama. Water samples were collected from precipitation, canopy throughfall, soil water, groundwater, soil seeps, and first- order through higher-order streams. Though Mo is considered a “rock-derived” micronutrient, concentrations were higher in precipitation and shallow soil water than in the groundwater and stream waters in contact with underlying rocks and weathered saprolite. Event-based mass balance suggests that Mo is being retained within the catchment ecosystem. The source of Mo in tropical forests may have important implications as the amount of nitrogen fixation changes during tropical forest recovery from a previous land use.

Christopher B. Gardner; W. Berry Lyons; Guy Litt; Fred L. Ogden

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Water-in-carbon dioxide emulsions: Formation and stability  

SciTech Connect

Stable water-in-carbon dioxide (W/C) emulsions, for either liquid or supercritical CO{sub 2} containing up to 70 vol % water, are formed with various molecular weight perfluoropolyether ammonium caroxylate surfactants. Water droplet sizes ranging from 3 to 10 {micro}m were determined by optical microscopy. From conductivity measurements, an inversion to C/W emulsions results from a decrease in CO{sub 2} density or salinity at constant pressure, a decrease in surfactant molecular weight, or an increase in temperature. Emulsions become more stable with a change in any of these formulation variables away from the balanced state, which increases interfacial tensions and interfacial tension gradient enhancing Marangoni-Gibbs stabilization. This type of stability is enhanced with an increase in the molecular weight of the surfactant tails, which increases the thickness of the stabilizing films between droplets. W/C emulsions formed with the 7,500 molecular weight surfactant were stable for several days.

Lee, C.T. Jr.; Psathas, P.A.; Johnston, K.P.; Grazia, J. de; Randolph, T.W.

1999-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

436

Size distribution functions for rock fragments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The capacity of 17 functions to represent the size distribution of fragmented rock is assessed on 1234 data sets of screened fragments from blasted and crushed rock of different origins, of sizes ranging from 0.002 to 2000 mm. The functions evaluated are Weibull, Grady, log-normal, log-logistic and Gilvarry, in their plain, re-scaled and bi-component forms, and also the Swebrec distribution and its bi-component extension. In terms of determination coefficient, the Weibull is the best two-parameter function for describing rock fragments, with a median R2 of 0.9886. Among re-scaled, three-parameter distributions, Swebrec and Weibull lead with median R2 values of 0.9976 and 0.9975, respectively. Weibull and Swebrec distributions tie again as best bi-component, with median R2 of 0.9993. Re-scaling generally reduces the unexplained variance by a factor of about four with respect to the plain function; bi-components further reduce this unexplained variance by a factor of about two to three. Size-prediction errors are calculated in four zones: coarse, central, fines and very fines. Expected and maximum errors in the different ranges are discussed. The extended Swebrec is the best fitting function across the whole passing range for most types of data. Bimodal Weibull and Grady distributions follow, except for the coarse range, where re-scaled forms are preferable. Considering the extra difficulty in fitting a five-parameter function with respect to a three-parameter one, re-scaled functions are the best choice if data do not extend far below 20% passing. If the focus is on the fine range, some re-scaled distributions may still do (Weibull, Swebrec and Grady, with maximum errors of 15–20% at 8% passing), but serious consideration should be given to bi-component distributions, especially extended Swebrec, bimodal Weibull and bimodal Grady.

José A. Sanchidrián; Finn Ouchterlony; Pablo Segarra; Peter Moser

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Carbon Additionality: Discussion Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ahead, and identifying the carbon pools and other green house gas emissions sources and savings coveredCarbon Additionality: A review Discussion Paper Gregory Valatin November 2009 Forest Research. Voluntary Carbon Standards American Carbon Registry Forest Carbon Project Standard (ACRFCPS) 27 Carbon

438

Autothermal Reforming of Glycerol with Supercritical Water for Maximum Power through a Turbine Plus a Fuel Cell  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An autothermal reforming of glycerol process using supercritical water was proposed to produce maximum power by means of a turbine, from the huge pressure energy of product gas just at the outlet of the reformer, and a proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell, which is fed by a hydrogen-rich stream. ... Supercritical water (SCW) has many advantageous properties and is extremely reactive,(5-8) and it may allow for the performance of a catalyst-free process, because of its relevant thermophysical properties, such as a high capability to solubilize gaseous organic molecules and high reactivity, among others. ... This research is supported by the Science and Technology Ministry of Spain under Research Project ENE2009-13755, as a Project of Fundamental Research inside the framework of the National Plan of Scientific Research, Development and Technological Innovation 2008–2011. ...

F. J. Gutiérrez Ortiz; P. Ollero; A. Serrera; S. Galera

2012-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

439

Shallow Carbon Sequestration Demonstration Project  

SciTech Connect

The potential for carbon sequestration at relatively shallow depths was investigated at four power plant sites in Missouri. Exploratory boreholes were cored through the Davis Shale confining layer into the St. Francois aquifer (Lamotte Sandstone and Bonneterre Formation). Precambrian basement contact ranged from 654.4 meters at the John Twitty Energy Center in Southwest Missouri to over 1100 meters near the Sioux Power Plant in St. Charles County. Investigations at the John Twitty Energy Center included 3D seismic reflection surveys, downhole geophysical logging and pressure testing, and laboratory analysis of rock core and water samples. Plans to perform injectivity tests at the John Twitty Energy Center, using food grade CO{sub 2}, had to be abandoned when the isolated aquifer was found to have very low dissolved solids content. Investigations at the Sioux Plant and Thomas Hill Energy Center in Randolph County found suitably saline conditions in the St. Francois. A fourth borehole in Platte County was discontinued before reaching the aquifer. Laboratory analyses of rock core and water samples indicate that the St. Charles and Randolph County sites could have storage potentials worthy of further study. The report suggests additional Missouri areas for further investigation as well.

Pendergrass, Gary; Fraley, David; Alter, William; Bodenhamer, Steven

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

440

Simulating Geologic Co-sequestration of Carbon Dioxide and Hydrogen Sulfide in a Basalt Formation  

SciTech Connect

Co-sequestered CO2 with H2S impurities could affect geologic storage, causing changes in pH and oxidation state that affect mineral dissolution and precipitation reactions and the mobility of metals present in the reservoir rocks. We have developed a variable component, non-isothermal simulator, STOMP-COMP (Water, Multiple Components, Salt and Energy), which simulates multiphase flow gas mixtures in deep saline reservoirs, and the resulting reactions with reservoir minerals. We use this simulator to model the co-injection of CO2 and H2S into brecciated basalt flow top. A 1000 metric ton injection of these supercritical fluids, with 99% CO2 and 1% H2S, is sequestered rapidly by solubility and mineral trapping. CO2 is trapped mainly as calcite within a few decades and H2S is trapped as pyrite within several years.

Bacon, Diana H.; Ramanathan, Ramya; Schaef, Herbert T.; McGrail, B. Peter

2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rocks supercritical carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Carbon Sequestration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technology Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 412-386-4966 jose.figueroa@netl.doe.gov Kevin o'Brien Principal Investigator SRI International Materials Research Laboratory 333 Ravenswood Avenue Menlo Park, AK 94025 650-859-3528 kevin.obrien@sri.com Fabrication and Scale-Up oF polybenzimidazole - baSed membrane SyStem For pre - combUStion captUre oF carbon dioxide Background In order to effectively sequester carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) from a gasification plant, there must be an economically viable method for removing the CO 2 from other gases. While CO 2 separation technologies currently exist, their effectiveness is limited. Amine-based separation technologies work only at low temperatures, while pressure-swing absorption and cryogenic distillation consume significantly

442

Carbon Sequestration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

andrea Mcnemar andrea Mcnemar National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 304-285-2024 andrea.mcnemar@netl.doe.gov Gregory J. Elbring Principal Investigator Sandia National Laboratory P.O. Box 5800 Albuquerque, NM 87185 505-844-4904 gjelbri@sandia.gov GeoloGic SequeStration of carbon DioxiDe in a DepleteD oil reServoir: a comprehenSive moDelinG anD Site monitorinG project Background The use of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) to enhance oil recovery (EOR) is a familiar and frequently used technique in the United States. The oil and gas industry has significant experience with well drilling and injecting CO 2 into oil-bearing formations to enhance production. While using similar techniques as in oil production, this sequestration field

443

United States National Waste Terminal Storage argillaceous rock studies  

SciTech Connect

The past and present argillaceous rock studies for the US National Waste Terminal Storage Program consist of: (1) evaluation of the geological characteristics of several widespread argillaceous formations in the United States; (2) laboratory studies of the physical and chemical properties of selected argillaceous rock samples; and (3) two full-scale in situ surface heater experiments that simulate the emplacement of heat-generating radioactive waste in argillaceous rock.

Brunton, G.D.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

On leakage and seepage from geological carbon sequestration sites  

SciTech Connect

Geologic carbon sequestration is one strategy for reducing the rate of increase of global atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2} ) concentrations (IEA, 1997; Reichle, 2000). As used here, the term geologic carbon sequestration refers to the direct injection of supercritical CO{sub 2} deep into subsurface target formations. These target formations will typically be either depleted oil and gas reservoirs, or brine-filled permeable formations referred to here as brine formations. Injected CO{sub 2} will tend to be trapped by one or more of the following mechanisms: (1) permeability trapping, for example when buoyant supercritical CO{sub 2} rises until trapped by a confining caprock; (2) solubility trapping, for example when CO{sub 2} dissolves into the aqueous phase in water-saturated formations, or (3) mineralogic trapping, such as occurs when CO{sub 2} reacts to produce stable carbonate minerals. When CO{sub 2} is trapped in the subsurface by any of these mechanisms, it is effectively sequestered away from the atmosphere where it would otherwise act as a greenhouse gas. The purpose of this report is to summarize our work aimed at quantifying potential CO{sub 2} seepage due to leakage from geologic carbon sequestration sites. The approach we take is to present first the relevant properties of CO{sub 2} over the range of conditions from the deep subsurface to the vadose zone (Section 2), and then discuss conceptual models for how leakage might occur (Section 3). The discussion includes consideration of gas reservoir and natural gas storage analogs, along with some simple estimates of seepage based on assumed leakage rates. The conceptual model discussion provides the background for the modeling approach wherein we focus on simulating transport in the vadose zone, the last potential barrier to CO{sub 2} seepage (Section 4). Because of the potentially wide range of possible properties of actual future geologic sequestration sites, we carry out sensitivity analyses by means of numerical simulation and derive the trends in seepage flux and near-surface CO{sub 2} concentrations that will arise from variations in fundamental hydrogeological properties.

Oldenburg, C.M.; Unger, A.J.A.; Hepple, R.P.; Jordan, P.D.

2002-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

445

Rock mechanics contributions from defense programs  

SciTech Connect

An attempt is made at illustrating the many contributions to rock mechanics from US defense programs, over the past 30-plus years. Large advances have been achieved in the technology-base area covering instrumentation, material properties, physical modeling, constitutive relations and numerical simulations. In the applications field, much progress has been made in understanding and being able to predict rock mass behavior related to underground explosions, cratering, projectile penetration, and defense nuclear waste storage. All these activities stand on their own merit as benefits to national security. But their impact is even broader, because they have found widespread applications in the non-defense sector; to name a few: the prediction of the response of underground structures to major earthquakes, the physics of the earth`s interior at great depths, instrumentation for monitoring mine blasting, thermo-mechanical instrumentation useful for civilian nuclear waste repositories, dynamic properties of earthquake faults, and transient large-strain numerical modeling of geological processes, such as diapirism. There is not pretense that this summary is exhaustive. It is meant to highlight success stories representative of DOE and DOD geotechnical activities, and to point to remaining challenges.

Heuze, F.E.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Rock types, pore types, and hydrocarbon exploration  

SciTech Connect

A proposed exploration-oriented method of classifying porosity in sedimentary rocks is based on microscopic examination cores or cuttings. Factors include geometry, size, abundance, and connectivity of the pores. The porosity classification is predictive of key petrophysical characteristics: porosity-permeability relationships, capillary pressures, and (less certainly) relative permeabilities. For instance, intercrystalline macroporosity typically is associated with high permeability for a given porosity, low capillarity, and favorable relative permeabilities. This is found to be true whether this porosity type occurs in a sucrosic dolomite or in a sandstone with pervasive quartz overgrowths. This predictive method was applied in three Rocky Mountain oil plays. Subtle pore throat traps could be recognized in the J sandstone (Cretaceous) in the Denver basin of Colorado by means of porosity permeability plotting. Variations in hydrocarbon productivity from a Teapot Formation (Cretaceous) field in the Powder River basin of Wyoming were related to porosity types and microfacies; the relationships were applied to exploration. Rock and porosity typing in the Red River Formation (Ordovician) reconciled apparent inconsistencies between drill-stem test, log, and mud-log data from a Williston basin wildcat. The well was reevaluated and completed successfully, resulting in a new field discovery. In each of these three examples, petrophysics was fundamental for proper evaluation of wildcat wells and exploration plays.

Coalson, E.B.; Hartmann, D.J.; Thomas, J.B.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Effect of main process parameters on extraction of pine kernel lipid using supercritical green solvents: Solubility models and lipid profiles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Supercritical fluid extraction of pine kernel lipids from Pinus pinea L. using green solvents (only CO2 or mixed with ethanol) was performed in a laboratory scale extraction system. For the first time in this study the effect of main operating parameters [i.e. pressure (20–50 MPa), temperature (40–60 °C), CO2 flow rate (0.061–0.259 kg h?1), entrainer concentration (2.5 and 5 vol.%) and average particle size (362.5 and 725 ?m)] on extraction yield, initial extraction rate and the solved contents of pine kernel lipid in CO2 or its solubility was investigated systematically. Experimental results showed that extraction yields (from 0.477 to 0.488 g PKL g?1 dry PK) obtained from supercritical CO2 extraction over 30 MPa of operating pressure was better than extraction yield (0.472 g PKL g?1 dry PK) obtained from organic solvent extraction. It should be noted that the extraction yield obtained using 5 vol.% of ethanol reached to 0.487 g PKL g?1 dry PK in 90 min under a suitable operating condition such as 30 MPa, 40 °C and 0.194 kg h?1 of green solvent flow rate. The crossover effect of pine kernel lipid was determined approximately at 23 MPa of operating pressure. The experimental solubility data, determined by the dynamic method, of pine kernel oil in supercritical CO2 were correlated by some empirical models such as Chrastil, del Valle–Aguilera, Adachi–Lu, and Sparks models. Adachi–Lu and Sparks models made a lower error in the prediction of solubility. Lipids extracted by supercritical green solvents extraction contain more unsaturated fatty acids than those extracted by Soxhlet with in the n-hexane extracts.

U?ur Salg?n; Sema Salg?n

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Separation of Fischer-Tropsch wax from catalyst by supercritical fluid extraction. Technical progress report, October--December 1994  

SciTech Connect

Goal is to evaluate the potential of supercritical fluid extraction for separating the catalyst slurry of a Fischer-Tropsch slurry bubble column reactor into two fractions: a catalyst-free wax containing <10 ppM solids and a concentrated catalyst slurry ready for recycle/regeneration. Efforts focused on programming and testing of the SAFT equation and automation of the continuous-flow apparatus.

Thies, M.C.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

449

Seepage into drifts in unsaturated fractured rock at Yucca Mountain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fractured Rock at Yucca Mountain Jens Birkholzer, Guomin Lrepository site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as it is locatedclimate conditions at Yucca Mountain. The numerical study is

Birkholzer, Jens; Li, Guomin; Tsang, Chin-Fu; Tsang, Yvonne

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Active control of underground stresses through rock pressurization  

SciTech Connect

To significantly increase the stability of underground excavations while exploiting the full advantages of confined rock strength, methods must be developed to actively control the distribution of stresses near the excavation. This US Bureau of Mines study examines theoretical and practical aspects of rock pressurization, an active stress control concept that induces compressive stress in the wall rock through repeated hydraulic fracturing with a settable fluid. Numerical analyses performed by incorporating the rock pressurization concept into a variety of boundary-element models indicate that rock pressurization has the potential to improve underground excavation stability in three ways: (1) by relocating stress concentrations away from the weak opening surface to stronger, confined wall rock; (2) by inducing additional stresses in a biaxial stress field to reduce the difference between the principal stress components near the surface of the opening, and (3) by counteracting the tensile stresses induced in the rock around internally loaded openings. Practical aspects of the rock pressurization concept were investigated through a series of hydraulic fracturing experiments. The use of sulfur as a settable fluid for hydraulic fracturing was demonstrated, although problems related to sulfur viscosity suggest that other molten materials, such as wax, may be better suited to practical field application of the rock pressurization concept.

Vandergrift, T.L.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Scientists Pass Solid Particles Through Rock in DOE-Sponsored...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

rock fractures in the laboratory. This technology has the potential for mapping fracture systems in detail and aid in determining reservoir characteristics. This research was...

452

Reconstruction of Sedimentary Rock Based on Mechanical Properties  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Diagenesis transforms an unconsolidated loose sed- imentOur emphasis is on unconsolidated sand and sandstone. Thesedi- mentary rock: unconsolidated sand and sandstone. The

Jin, Guodong; Patzek, Tad W.; Silin, Dmitry B.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Rock Sampling At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

geologically mapped the target area, obtained rock samples for age dating and mineral chemistry, performed gravity and magnetic surveys, and integrated these results to identify...

454

Evaluation Of Used Fuel Disposition In Clay-Bearing Rock  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Radioactive waste disposal in shale/argillite rock formations has been widely considered given its desirable isolation properties, e.g., low permeability, potential geochemically reduced conditions...

455

Carbon Trading, Carbon Taxes and Social Discounting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon Trading, Carbon Taxes and Social Discounting Elisa Belfiori belf0018@umn.edu University of Minnesota Abstract This paper considers the optimal design of policies to carbon emissions in an economy, such as price or quantity controls on the net emissions of carbon, are insufficient to achieve the social

Weiblen, George D

456

Use of supercritical fluid technology for the production of tailor-made aerogel particles for delivery systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Supercritical and compressed fluid technology provides a powerful tool for particle design and engineering. On the other hand, aerogels are nanoporous materials holding many world-class properties. However, the morphology of the end product can be the limiting factor for aerogels in some applications. The integration of different technologies for the production of particles can lead to a breakthrough in aerogel production. In this work, the combination of the emulsion–gelation process with supercritical fluid extraction was tested as a versatile technology for the production of microspherical aerogel particles. Novel natural product-based nanoporous materials (aerogels) based on starch were obtained using this method and were specifically targeted to chemical carriers for life science applications (e.g. pharmaceutics, tissue engineering, cosmetics, food, biotechnology, and agriculture). Aerogels in the form of cylinders and microspheres (400–800 ?m) with the intrinsic outstanding textural aerogel properties (high surface area – Sa = 100–240 m2/g, low density – ? = 0.10–0.25 g/cm3, large porosity – ? = 85–90%) were produced. The effect of micronization on the kinetics of the supercritical drying of the wet gel (in ethanol) was also studied. Thus the obtained aerogels were then tested for their use as active agent carriers regarding loading capacity using ketoprofen as model compound as well as the release behavior of the loaded active compound in aqueous media simulating physiological pHs.

C.A. García-González; I. Smirnova

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Experimental investigation on heat transfer and frictional characteristics of vertical upward rifled tube in supercritical CFB boiler  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Water wall design is a key issue for supercritical Circulating Fluidized Bed (CFB) boiler. On account of the good heat transfer performance, rifled tube is applied in the water wall design of a 600 MW supercritical CFB boiler in China. In order to investigate the heat transfer and frictional characteristics of the rifled tube with vertical upward flow, an in-depth experiment was conducted in the range of pressure from 12 to 30 MPa, mass flux from 230 to 1200 kg/(m2 s), and inner wall heat flux from 130 to 720 kW/m2. The wall temperature distribution and pressure drop in the rifled tube were obtained in the experiment. The normal, enhanced and deteriorated heat transfer characteristics were also captured. In this paper, the effects of pressure, inner wall heat flux and mass flux on heat transfer characteristics are analyzed, the heat transfer mechanism and the frictional resistance performance are discussed, and the corresponding empirical correlations are presented. The experimental results show that the rifled tube can effectively prevent the occurrence of Departure from Nucleate Boiling (DNB) and keep the tube wall temperature in a permissible range under the operating condition of supercritical CFB boiler.

Dong Yang; Jie Pan; Chenn Q. Zhou; Xiaojing Zhu; Qincheng Bi; Tingkuan Chen

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Fabrication of integrally skinned asymmetric membranes based on nanocomposite polyethersulfone by supercritical CO2 for gas separation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Integrally skinned asymmetric membranes based on nanocomposite polyethersulfone were prepared by the phase separation process using the supercritical CO2 as a nonsolvent for the polymer solution. All the membranes have been prepared from originally dense nanocomposite films inducing asymmetry by the formation of the porous layer adding N,N-dimethylacetamide as solvent and supercritical CO2 (SC-CO2) to one side of the dense films, and then allowing the supercritical CO2 expansion to occur. The effect of pressure, temperature and nanoparticles on the permeability of CH4 and CO2 and also selectivity performance of membranes has been investigated. The results showed that the membranes formation pressures which varied from 100 to 120 bar have significant effect on the pore sizes and thickness of obtained dense and porous layers. Also, the effect of the temperature which varied from 45 to 55 °C has been evaluated and it was concluded that by changing the temperature, it is possible to induce a very-controlled asymmetry in a dense film and pore sizes and thus increasing in CO2 permeability and selectivity performance of membranes. Finally, the permeability of CH4 and CO2 measured at the constant temperatures of 30, 40 and 50 °C and at the pressures of 8, 10 and 12 bar and the effects of temperature and nanoparticle on selectivity performance and permeability of gases has been investigated.

Hooman Adib; Shadi Hassanajili; Dariush Mowla; Feridun Esmaeilzadeh

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Optimization of water use and cost of electricity for an MEA carbon capture process, January 26, 2012  

SciTech Connect

DOE goals are: 90% CO{sub 2} capture, Less than 30% increase in COE, and to reduce water use by 70% at 50% cost of dry cooling. Objectives are: (1) Develop detailed models of supercritical power plant, MEA carbon capture process, CO{sub 2} compression; and (2) Optimize process for conflicting goals of minimizing water use and COE CO{sub 2} capture greatly increases COE and water use, power gen. 1/3 of fresh water use, and water scarcity is increasing.

Eslick, J.; Miller, D.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Development of Chemical Model to Predict the Interactions between  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Model to Predict the Interactions between Model to Predict the Interactions between Supercritical CO2 and Fluid, Rocks in EGS Reservoirs Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Development of Chemical Model to Predict the Interactions between Supercritical CO2 and Fluid, Rocks in EGS Reservoirs Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Enhanced Geothermal Systems Component Research and Development/Analysis Project Type / Topic 2 Supercritical Carbon Dioxide / Reservoir Rock Chemical Interactions Project Description In order to develop this model, databases will be assembled and/or updated for thermodynamic and kinetic rate laws for water/brine/rock/CO2 interactions at the pressures and temperatures common to EGS systems. In addition to a literature search, extrapolation of existing data and experimental laboratory work will be conducted to calibrate and verify the datasets.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rocks supercritical carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

NERSC Visualization and Analysis for Nanoscale Control of Geologic Carbon  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nanocontrol of CO2 Nanocontrol of CO2 Visualization and Analysis for Nanoscale Control of Geologic Carbon Dioxide Goals * Collect experimental 2D-3D imaging data in order to investigate fluid-fluid and fluid-rock interactions; * Provide algorithms for better understanding of processes governing fluid-fluid and fluid-rock systems, related to geologic sequestration of CO2; * Develop image processing methods for analyzing experimental data and comparing it to simulations; * Detect/reconstruct material interfaces, quantify contact angles, derive contact angle distribution, etc. Impact * Unveil knowledge required for developing technology to store CO2 safely in deep surface rock formations, thus reducing amount of CO2 in atmosphere; More Personnel * CRD: Wes Bethel, Dani Ushizima, Gunther Weber (SciDAC-e award)

462

Synthesis, characterization, and modeling of hydrogen storage in carbon aerogels  

SciTech Connect

Carbon aerogels are a special class of open-cell foams with an ultrafine cell/pore size (<50 nm), high surface area (600-800 m{sup 2}/g), and a solid matrix composed of interconnected colloidal-like particles or fibers with characteristic diameters of 10 nm. These materials are usually synthesized from the sol-gel polymerization of resorcinol-formaldehyde or phenolic-furfural, followed by supercritical extraction of the solvent and pyrolysis in an inert atmosphere. The resultant aerogel has a nanocrystalline structure with micropores (<2 nm diameter) located within the solid matrix. Carbon aerogel monoliths can be prepared at densities ranging from 0.05-1.0 g/cm{sup 3}, leading to volumetric surface areas (> 500 m{sup 2}/cm{sup 3}) that are much larger than commercially available materials. This research program is directed at optimization of the aerogel structure for maximum hydrogen adsorption over a wide range of temperatures and pressures. Computer modeling of hydrogen adsorption at carbon surfaces was also examined.

Pekala, R.W.; Coronado, P.R.; Calef, D.F.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Rock Rapids Municipal Utility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rapids Municipal Utility Rapids Municipal Utility Jump to: navigation, search Name Rock Rapids Municipal Utility Place Iowa Utility Id 16206 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial Power (Single-Phase) Commercial Commercial Power (Three-Phase) Commercial Residential Power Residential Average Rates Residential: $0.0807/kWh Commercial: $0.0633/kWh Industrial: $0.0899/kWh