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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rock sioux tribe" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Lower Brule Sioux Tribe Wind-Pump Storage Feasibility Study Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Lower Brule Sioux Tribe is a federally recognized Indian tribe organized pursuant to the 1934 Wheeler-Howard Act (Indian Reorganization Act). The Lower Brule Sioux Indian Reservation lies along the west bank of Lake Francis Case and Lake Sharpe, which were created by the Fort Randall and Big Bend dams of the Missouri River pursuant to the Pick Sloan Act. The grid accessible at the Big Bend Dam facility operated by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is less than one mile of the wind farm contemplated by the Tribe in this response. The low-head hydroelectric turbines further being studied would be placed below the dam and would be turned by the water released from the dam itself. The riverbed at this place is within the exterior boundaries of the reservation. The low-head turbines in the tailrace would be evaluated to determine if enough renewable energy could be developed to pump water to a reservoir 500 feet above the river.

Shawn A. LaRoche; Tracey LeBeau; Innovation Investments, LLC

2007-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

2

Rosebud Sioux Wind Energy Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 1998, through the vision of the late Alex Little Soldier Lunderman (1928-2000) and through the efforts of the Rosebud Sioux Tribal Utilities Commission, and with assistance from Intertribal Council on Utility Policy (COUP), and Distributed Generation, Inc (DISGEN). The Rosebud Sioux Tribe applied and was awarded in 1999 a DOE Cooperative Grant to build a commercial 750 Kw wind turbine, along with a 50/50 funding grant from the Department of Energy and a low interest loan from the Rural Utilities Service, United States Department of Agriculture, the Rosebud Sioux Tribe commissioned a single 750 kilowatt NEG Micon wind turbine in March of 2003 near the Rosebud Casino. The Rosebud Sioux Wind Energy Project (Little Soldier Akicita Cikala) Turbine stands as a testament to the vision of a man and the Sicangu Oyate.

Tony Rogers

2008-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

3

Sioux River Ethanol LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

River Ethanol LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Sioux River Ethanol LLC Place Hudson, South Dakota Zip 57034 Product Farmer owned ethanol producer, Sioux River Ethanol is...

4

Case Study - Sioux Valley Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sioux Valley Energy Sioux Valley Energy SVE's smart meters report consumption levels every 30 minutes, which enables SVE to bill customers for critical peak events that occur on particular days and during particular time periods. This detailed billing cannot be done with conventional meters. Critical Peak Pricing Lowers Peak Demands and Electric Bills in South Dakota and Minnesota Sioux Valley Energy (SVE) is an electric cooperative serving approximately 21,000 customers in seven counties in South Dakota and Minnesota. SVE's Smart Grid Investment Grant (SGIG) Advanced Metering Infrastructure Project is a customer-focused initiative to assist customers with better managing their electricity consumption and associated costs, and to help SVE realize operational efficiencies and

5

Lower Sioux Wind Feasibility & Development  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the process and findings of a Wind Energy Feasibility Study (Study) conducted by the Lower Sioux Indian Community (Community). The Community is evaluating the development of a wind energy project located on tribal land. The project scope was to analyze the critical issues in determining advantages and disadvantages of wind development within the Community. This analysis addresses both of the Community's wind energy development objectives: the single turbine project and the Commerical-scale multiple turbine project. The main tasks of the feasibility study are: land use and contraint analysis; wind resource evaluation; utility interconnection analysis; and project structure and economics.

Minkel, Darin

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

CA-TRIBE-YUROK TRIBE  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CA-TRIBE-YUROK TRIBE CA-TRIBE-YUROK TRIBE Location: Tribe CA-TRIBE-YUROK CA TRIBE American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description The Yurok Tribe of California proposes to conduct energy efficiency retrofits to the Klamath and Weitchpec Tribal Offices based on the results of the energy audits completed in 2006. The Klamath Office energy efficiency building retrofits would include repair/re-weatherstripping of exterior doors; installation of operable lovers on passive vents in the attic; replacement of double-pane windows; caulking; heating, ventilating, and air conditioning system repair and tuning; installation of check valves in hot water lines; insulation of hot water lines; timer repair; delamping; and occupancy sensors. The Weitchpec Office

7

Rosebud Sioux Wind Energy Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind Energy Project Wind Energy Project Jump to: navigation, search Name Rosebud Sioux Wind Energy Project Facility Rosebud Sioux Wind Energy Project Sector Wind energy Facility Type Community Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Rosebud Sioux Developer Rosebud Sioux Energy Purchaser Rosebud Sioux Location Rosebud Sioux Reservation SD Coordinates 43.002706°, -100.578529° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.002706,"lon":-100.578529,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

8

Sioux Valley Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Energy Place Minnesota Utility Id 17267 References Energy Information Administration.[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png No rate schedules available. Average Rates No Rates Available The following table contains monthly sales and revenue data for Sioux Valley Energy (Minnesota). Month RES REV (THOUSAND $) RES SALES (MWH) RES CONS COM REV (THOUSAND $) COM SALES (MWH) COM CONS IND_REV (THOUSAND $) IND SALES (MWH) IND CONS OTH REV (THOUSAND $) OTH SALES (MWH) OTH CONS TOT REV (THOUSAND $) TOT SALES (MWH) TOT CONS 2009-03 471.643 6,546.783 2,704 29.053 345.695 163 162.948 2,211.723 68 663.644 9,104.201 2,935

9

Sioux Valley Southwestern Electric Cooperative, Inc. Smart Grid Project |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sioux Valley Southwestern Electric Cooperative, Inc. Smart Grid Project Sioux Valley Southwestern Electric Cooperative, Inc. Smart Grid Project Jump to: navigation, search Project Lead Sioux Valley Southwestern Electric Cooperative, Inc. Country United States Headquarters Location Colman, South Dakota Additional Benefit Places Minnesota Recovery Act Funding $4,016,368.00 Total Project Value $8,032,736.00 Coverage Area Coverage Map: Sioux Valley Southwestern Electric Cooperative, Inc. Smart Grid Project Coordinates 43.9824719°, -96.8144973° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

10

WA-TRIBE-STILLAGUAMISH TRIBE OF INDIANS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WA-TRIBE-STILLAGUAMISH TRIBE OF INDIANS WA-TRIBE-STILLAGUAMISH TRIBE OF INDIANS Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program Location: Tribe WA-TRIBE- STILLAGUAMISH TRIBE OF INDIANS WA American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description The Stillaguamish Tribe proposes to expand its Stillaguamish Tribe Transit Services (STTS). For the past three years, the STTS has employed 14-passenger buses to transport clients to and from the tribal medical, dental, behavioral health and massage clinics. Often the demand-response requests that come to STTS are for one to three passengers at a time; therefore, funds are being requested to purchase a hybrid sedan to transport clients. Conditions: None Categorical Exclusion(s) Applied: A1, B1.32, B5.1 *-For the complete DOE National Environmental Policy Act regulations regarding categorical exclusions, see Subpart D of 10 CFR10 21

11

NV-TRIBE-SUMMIT LAKE PAIUTE TRIBE  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NV-TRIBE-SUMMIT LAKE PAIUTE TRIBE NV-TRIBE-SUMMIT LAKE PAIUTE TRIBE Location: Tribe NV-TRIBE-SUMMIT NV LAKE PAIUTE TRIBE American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description The Summit Lake Paiute Tribe of Nevada will conduct energy building retrofits on several tribal-owned buildings including: Maintenance Shop (insulate walls and cover insulation to keep in place); Bunkhouse (replace single-pane glass windows, and repair or replace two exit doors); Tribal Administrative Office (replace old electric water heater and three air conditioner/heaters, and replace single-pane glass windows): Community Well Shed (install walls, cover insulation, and replace single-pane glass windows); Cabin #1 and Cabin #2 (insulate and/or replace single-pane windows). Conditions: None

12

OK-TRIBE-ALABAMA QUASSARTE TRIBE  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OK-TRIBE-ALABAMA QUASSARTE TRIBE OK-TRIBE-ALABAMA QUASSARTE TRIBE Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program Location: Tribe OK-TRIBE- ALABAMA QUASSARTE TRIBE OK American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description The Alabama Quassarte Tribe of Oklahoma proposes to 1) hire a consultant to manage the overall energy efficiency and conservation block grant program, hire and monitor outreach staff, and create an energy policy upon completion of building audits; and 2) hire a part-time program coordinator to conduct public education in the current energy efficiency techniques and technologies to enable the community in implementing the correct conservation procedures and conduct seminars on energy efficiency and conservation, consumption of non-renewable items, and recycling, after the coordinator has been trained

13

City of South Sioux City, Nebraska (Utility Company) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sioux City, Nebraska (Utility Company) Sioux City, Nebraska (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name City of South Sioux City Place Nebraska Utility Id 17577 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercal- All Electric Single Phase Commercial Commercial All Electric- Three Phase Commercial Commercial and Industrial Demand- Single Phase Commercial Commercial and Industrial Demand- Three Phase Commercial Commercial and Industrial Non Demand- Single Phase Commercial Commercial and Industrial Non Demand- Three Phase Commercial

14

Sioux Students Kindle Solar Knowledge | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sioux Students Kindle Solar Knowledge Sioux Students Kindle Solar Knowledge Sioux Students Kindle Solar Knowledge July 24, 2013 - 11:30am Addthis Students and instructors at Oglala Lakota College designed, connected and built a mobile solar energy system over the course of two days. | Photo courtesy of Oglala Lakota College. Students and instructors at Oglala Lakota College designed, connected and built a mobile solar energy system over the course of two days. | Photo courtesy of Oglala Lakota College. Minh Le Minh Le Program Manager, Solar Program LEARN MORE Get details on the Solar Instructor Training Network's efforts to expand the nation's trained solar workforce. Find out about the Solar Instructor Training Network's efforts to increase the pool of qualified, well-trained solar workers among returning

15

City of Sioux Center, Iowa (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sioux Center, Iowa (Utility Company) Sioux Center, Iowa (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name City of Sioux Center Place Iowa Utility Id 17264 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial All Electric Commercial Commercial Demand Rate Commercial Commercial Rate Commercial Large Volume Industrial Rate Industrial Residential All Electric Residential Residential Rate Residential Residential Rural Rate Residential Water Heating Rate Residential Average Rates

16

ICEIWG Participating Tribes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

List of participating Tribes in the Indian Country Energy and Infrastructure Working Group (ICEIWG).

17

Sioux Valley SW Elec Coop | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SW Elec Coop SW Elec Coop Jump to: navigation, search Name Sioux Valley SW Elec Coop Place Colman, South Dakota Utility Id 17267 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] SGIC[2] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Sioux Valley Southwestern Electric Cooperative, Inc. Smart Grid Project was awarded $4,016,368 Recovery Act Funding with a total project value of $8,032,736. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png commercial electric heat rate Commercial commercial general service - single phase Commercial commercial general service - three phase Commercial

18

Sioux Falls, South Dakota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sioux Falls, SD) Sioux Falls, SD) Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 43.5499749°, -96.700327° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.5499749,"lon":-96.700327,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

19

U.S. Department of Energy NEPA Categorical Exclusion Determination Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ND-TRIBE-STANDING ROCK SIOUX TRIBE ND-TRIBE-STANDING ROCK SIOUX TRIBE Location: Tribe ND-TRIBE- STANDING ROCK SIOUX TRIBE ND American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Descriptio The Standing Rock Sioux Tribe of North Dakota proposes to install a 10 kW wind turbine that would be connected on the Sitting Bull College Finance Center on the campus of the Tribe's college in Fort Yates, North Dakota. Conditions: None Categorical Exclusion(s) Applied: B3.6, B5.1 *-For the complete DOE National Environmental Policy Act regulations regarding categorical exclusions, see Subpart D of 10 CFR10 21 This action would not: threaten a violation of applicable statutory, regulatory, or permit requirements for environment, safety, and health,

20

Sioux Valley Energy (South Dakota) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

South Dakota) South Dakota) Jump to: navigation, search Name Sioux Valley Energy Place South Dakota Utility Id 17267 References Energy Information Administration.[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png No rate schedules available. Average Rates No Rates Available The following table contains monthly sales and revenue data for Sioux Valley Energy (South Dakota). Month RES REV (THOUSAND $) RES SALES (MWH) RES CONS COM REV (THOUSAND $) COM SALES (MWH) COM CONS IND_REV (THOUSAND $) IND SALES (MWH) IND CONS OTH REV (THOUSAND $) OTH SALES (MWH) OTH CONS TOT REV (THOUSAND $) TOT SALES (MWH) TOT CONS 2009-03 1,814.612 24,648.46 16,090 274.749 2,979.244 1,776 1,113.305 16,807.692 331 3,202.666 44,435.396 18,197

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rock sioux tribe" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

City of Sioux Falls, South Dakota (Utility Company) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dakota (Utility Company) Dakota (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name City of Sioux Falls Place South Dakota Utility Id 17265 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO Activity Distribution Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Large Commercial Service Rate Industrial Large Commercial Service Rate Commercial Night Watch Flood Service Rate HPS 100W Lighting Night Watch Flood Service Rate HPS 250W Lighting Night Watch Flood Service Rate HPS 400W Lighting Residential Service Rate Residential Small Commercial Service Rate Commercial

22

Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey: Sioux Falls quadrangle, South Dakota. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Volume II contains the flight path, radiometric multi-parameter stacked profiles, magnetic and ancillary parameter stacked profiles, histograms, and anomaly maps for the Sioux Falls Quadrangle in South Dakota.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Impacts of PRB Coals on SCR Catalyst Life and Performance: Field Data from Ameren's Sioux Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The United States utility industry is making greater use of Powder River Basin (PRB) coals while at the same time moving towards selective catalytic reduction (SCR) for compliance with nitrogen oxide (NOx) regulations. Some catalyst test coupons in PRB fired boilers have reportedly experienced accelerated deactivation. This project studied the effects of PRB flue gas on catalytic samples at Ameren's Sioux Station.

2001-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

24

Public schools energy conservation measures. Report Number 8. Garfield Elementary School, Sioux Falls, South Dakota  

SciTech Connect

Energy conserving opportunities for the Garfield Elementary School, Sioux Falls, South Dakota, are identified and evaluated. The analysis is a part of the first phase of a five-part program. The report summarizes the results of the field investigations, computer simulations, and evaluations of the opportunities.

1977-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

25

Preliminary Evaluation of Geothermal Potential at the Cheyenee River Sioux Reservation, South Dakota  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A geochemical investigation of well waters from the Cheyenne River Sioux Reservation in South Dakota revealed considerable diversity in the chemistry of the fluids and indicated that waters from the Dakota Formation were the best candidates for direct-use geothermal applications. Geothermometry calculations for all wells suggest that formation temperatures are <90 C. Potential scaling problems from utilization of the waters would most likely be restricted to carbonate scale and could be offset by maintaining CO{sub 2} gas in solution.

Bergfeld, D.; Bruton, C.; Goff, F.; Counce, D.

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Three Affliated Tribes Renewable Energy Feasibility Study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Three Affliated Tribes on the Fort Berthold Reservation studied the feasibility of a commercial wind facility on land selected and owned by the Tribes and examined the potential for the development of renewable energy resources on Tribal Lands.

Belvin Pete; Kent Good; Krista Gordon; Ed McCarthy,

2006-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

27

UT-TRIBE-NORTHWESTERN BAND OF SHOSHONE  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Determination Form Program or Field Office: Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program Project Title UT-TRIBE-NORTHWESTERN BAND OF SHOSHONE Location: Tribe UT-TRIBE- NORTHWESTERN BAND OF SHOSHONE UT American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description The Northwestern Band of Shoshone Nation of Utah proposes to perform energy efficiency improvements

28

Mechanical properties of rocks at high temperatures and pressures: Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During the final year of the grant, we have investigated (1) why the strengths of rocks decrease with increasing temperature and in the presence of water through study of the fracture process in Westerly granite and Sioux quartzite specimens deformed in extension (some in true tension), (2) frictional strengths of rocks at high temperatures, (3) the stability of boreholes in fractured rock, and (4) slip in biotite single crystals (in that biotite is probably the weakest and most ductile of the common constituents of crystalline rocks.

Friedman, M.; Bauer, S.J.; Chester, F.M.; Handin, J.; Hopkins, T.W.; Johnson, B.; Kronenberg, A.K.; Mardon, D.; Russell, J.E.

1987-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

29

CA-TRIBE-SUSANVILLE INDIAN RANCHERIA, CALIFORNIA  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Determination Form Program or Field Office: Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program Project Title CA-TRIBE-SUSANVILLE INDIAN RANCHERIA, CALIFORNIA Location: Tribe CA-TRIBE- SUSANVILLE INDIAN RANCHERIA, CALIFORNIA CA American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description The Susanville Indian Racheria proposes to establish the EPA's Portfolio Manager tool to collect key

30

CA-TRIBE-BLUE LAKE RANCHERIA  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CA-TRIBE-BLUE LAKE RANCHERIA CA-TRIBE-BLUE LAKE RANCHERIA Location: Tribe CA-TRIBE-BLUE CA LAKE RANCHERIA American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description The Blue Lake Rancheria Tribe of California proposes to hire a technical consultant to gather additional information and make recommendations as to the best energy efficiency and conservation project or projects to utilize energy efficiency and conservation block grant funds. Following these recommendations, a decision will be made on building retrofits, and the specific retrofits will be identified and submitted for NEPA review. Conditions: None Categorical Exclusion(s) Applied: A9, A11 *-For the complete DOE National Environmental Policy Act regulations regarding categorical exclusions, see Subpart D of 10 CFR10 21

31

NREL: Technology Deployment - Technical Assistance for Tribes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tribes Tribes NREL provides technical assistance to help tribes build capacity to implement energy efficiency and renewable energy technology projects. We work with tribal communities across the continental United States and Alaska through two U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) programs: the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Tribal Energy Program and the Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs. Village of Venetie Village of Venetie NREL Technical Assistance Leads to Lower Electric Bills for Alaskans Forest County Potawatomi Tribe Renewable Energy Projects Help Tribe Reduce Carbon Footprint Technical Assistance and Capacity Building NREL technical assistance and capacity building on U.S. tribal lands includes: Providing unbiased technical expertise and analysis on potential

32

Workshop Helps Empower Tribes to Make Renewable Energy Project...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Workshop Helps Empower Tribes to Make Renewable Energy Project Development Decisions Workshop Helps Empower Tribes to Make Renewable Energy Project Development Decisions July 16,...

33

Key Renewable Energy Opportunities for Oklahoma Tribes | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Key Renewable Energy Opportunities for Oklahoma Tribes Key Renewable Energy Opportunities for Oklahoma Tribes August 13, 2012 Oklahoma City, Oklahoma Cox Convention Center The...

34

Renewable Energy Opportunities Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe has a vision to become self-sufficient in its energy needs and to maintain its culture and protect Mother Earth with respect and honor for the next seven generations. To achieve this vision, green energy sources such as solar, wind and biomass energy are the best energy paths to travel. In this feasibility study the Tribe has analyzed and provided data on the nature of the renewable resources available to the Tribe and the costs of implementing these technologies.

Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe Planning Department; Smiley, Steve; Bennett, Keith, DOE Project Officer

2008-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

35

AK-TRIBE-NATIVE VILLAGE OF NAPAKIAK  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

AK-TRIBE-NATIVE VILLAGE OF NAPAKIAK AK-TRIBE-NATIVE VILLAGE OF NAPAKIAK Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program Location: Tribe AK-TRIBE-NATIVE VILLAGE OF NAPAKIAK AK American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description The Native Village of Napakiak proposes to renovate/retrofit two buildings (Health Clinic and Community Center [former Transportation Building]) to become more energy efficient. Energy efficiency retrofits would include improvements to lighting systems, supplemental loads, air distribution systems, and/or heating and cooling systems, insulation, and windows/doors. Conditions: None Categorical Exclusion(s) Applied: B2.5, B5.1 *-For the complete DOE National Environmental Policy Act regulations regarding categorical exclusions, see Subpart D of 10 CFR10 21

36

Indian Tribes of the Northwest Territory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tribes of the Northwest Territory Tribes of the Northwest Territory Nature Bulletin No. 388-A September 26, 1970 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation INDIAN TRIBES OF THE NORTHWEST TERRITORY The white men found many tribes inhabiting what became the Northwest Territory in 1787, and all but one belonged to the largest and most important Indian family, the Algonquians. The powerful Shawnee occupied most of the Ohio valley and its tributaries extending south into Kentucky, West Virginia and Tennessee. Tecumseh and his brother, "The Prophet", were Shawnee. The Iliniwek, called 'Illinois" by the French, was an Algonquian confederacy which had, for a long time, occupied most of this state except the northwestern part and the Wabash valley. In addition to several small bands it included the Kaskaskia, Peoria, Cahokia, Moingewena, and the Michigamea. The latter, whom Father Marquette found living in Missouri and Arkansas, were finally forced to move back into southern Illinois.

37

Results of emissions testing while burning densified refuse derived fuel, Dordt College, Sioux Center, Iowa  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pacific Environmental Services, Inc. provided engineering and source testing services to the Council of Great Lake Governors to support their efforts in promoting the development and utilization of densified refuse derived fuels (d-RDF) and pelletized wastepaper fuels in small steam generating facilities. The emissions monitoring program was designed to provide a complete air emissions profile while burning various refuse derived fuels. The specific goal of this test program was to conduct air emissions tests at Dordt College located in Sioux Center, Iowa and to identify a relationship between fuel types and emission characteristics. The sampling protocol was carried out June 12 through June 20, 1989 on boiler {number sign}4. This unit had been previously modified to burn d-RDF. The boiler was not equipped with any type of air pollution control device so the emissions samples were collected from the boiler exhaust stack on the roof of the boilerhouse. The emissions that were sampled included: particulates; PM{sub 10} particulates; hydrochloric acid; dioxins; furans; polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB); metals and continuous monitors for CO, CO{sub 2}O{sub 2}SO{sub x}NO{sub x} and total hydrocarbons. Grab samples of the fuels were collected, composited and analyzed for heating value, moisture content, proximate and ultimate analysis, ash fusion temperature, bulk density and elemental ash analysis. Grab samples of the boiler ash were also collected and analyzed for total hydrocarbons total dioxins, total furans, total PCBs and heavy metals. 77 figs., 20 tabs.

Not Available

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Forest County Potawatomi Tribe Cuts Emissions, Promotes Green Growth |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Forest County Potawatomi Tribe Cuts Emissions, Promotes Green Forest County Potawatomi Tribe Cuts Emissions, Promotes Green Growth Forest County Potawatomi Tribe Cuts Emissions, Promotes Green Growth February 23, 2012 - 6:29pm Addthis The Forest County Potawatomi Tribe's solar system is providing heating, cooling, and electricity to the Tribe's administration building in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Photo from the Forest County Potawatomi Tribe. The Forest County Potawatomi Tribe's solar system is providing heating, cooling, and electricity to the Tribe's administration building in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Photo from the Forest County Potawatomi Tribe. Project Benefits Produce approximately 35,000 kilowatt-hours of clean electricity annually Reduce carbon dioxide emissions by an estimated 41 tons per year Preserve and increase local jobs for tribal members and others

39

State Government Websites With Indian Tribe Information | Department of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

State Government Websites With Indian Tribe Information State Government Websites With Indian Tribe Information State Government Websites With Indian Tribe Information This list was compiled by the federal government's Interagency Working Group on Indian Affairs (IWGIA) as an aid to federal agency consultation with federally recognized Indian tribes. It is not intended to be an exhaustive source of information about Indian tribes in each state or about which tribes must be consulted by federal agencies for a proposed action or program within a particular state. The IWGIA has not verified the accuracy of the information. It is intended only to provide possible sources to learn about which tribes may be ancestral to a particular state. If an Indian tribe is not mentioned on a state's website, it cannot be assumed that the tribe has no interest in

40

Cyclone Boiler Field Testing of Advanced Layered NOx Control Technology in Sioux Unit 1  

SciTech Connect

A four week testing program was completed during this project to assess the ability of the combination of deep staging, Rich Reagent Injection (RRI), and Selective Non-Catalytic Reduction (SNCR) to reduce NOx emissions below 0.15 lb/MBtu in a cyclone fired boiler. The host site for the tests was AmerenUE's Sioux Unit 1, a 500 MW cyclone fired boiler located near St. Louis, MO. Reaction Engineering International (REI) led the project team including AmerenUE, FuelTech Inc., and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). This layered approach to NOx reduction is termed the Advanced Layered Technology Approach (ALTA). Installed RRI and SNCR port locations were guided by computational fluid dynamics (CFD) based modeling conducted by REI. During the parametric testing, NOx emissions of 0.12 lb/MBtu were achieved consistently from overfire air (OFA)-only baseline NOx emissions of 0.25 lb/MBtu or less, when firing the typical 80/20 fuel blend of Powder River Basin (PRB) and Illinois No.6 coals. From OFA-only baseline levels of 0.20 lb/MBtu, NOx emissions of 0.12 lb/MBtu were also achieved, but at significantly reduced urea flow rates. Under the deeply staged conditions that were tested, RRI performance was observed to degrade as higher blends of Illinois No.6 were used. NOx emissions achieved with ALTA while firing a 60/40 blend were approximately 0.15 lb/MBtu. NOx emissions while firing 100% Illinois No.6 were approximately 0.165 lb/MBtu. Based on the performance results of these tests, economics analyses of the application of ALTA to a nominal 500 MW cyclone unit show that the levelized cost to achieve 0.15 lb/MBtu is well below 75% of the cost of a state of the art SCR.

Marc A. Cremer; Bradley R. Adams

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rock sioux tribe" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Case history study of total energy system at Western Mall Shopping Center, Sioux Falls, South Dakota  

SciTech Connect

Western Mall Total Energy Plant in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, serves an enclosed mall shopping center of 462,000 ft/sup 2/. The plant provides most of the mall and tenants with electricity, space-heating, and air-conditioning services from a natural gas-fueled engine-generator plant with hot water heat recovery, supplementary gas-fueled boiler, and absorption water chiller. Heating load served by the plant is calculated to be 15,000,000 Btu at -30/sup 0/F winter design condition with 70/sup 0/F space temperature. Maximum observed cooling load at 100/sup 0/F, 75/sup 0/ W.B. outdoor conditions is about 750 tons of refrigeration. Engine heat is recovered in a water system operated at 210 to 240/sup 0/F; an auxiliary scotch marine type, firetype gas-fueled boiler provides up to 14,000,000 Btu/h or supplementary heat. Energy customers have recently begun to exercise considerable control over their uses of electricity with more careful operation of lighting and appliances and with some replacement of illumination devices with more-efficient equipment. It is concluded that central heating and air-conditioning facilities provide the owner with an assured means for serving the shopping center, regardless of which energy source is most economical or least available. The hot and chilled water can be obtained from gas fuel as at present, from fuel oil, propane, all electric, or coal firing. Adapting the conversion equipment is difficult only for coal because of the space requirement for storage and handling that fuel. The power-generating capacity in place is an asset that should be used to serve the tenants because it reduces the public utility company need for expanded capacity. (MCW)

1977-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Federally-Recognized Tribes of the Columbia-Snake Basin.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is an omnibus publication about the federally-recognized Indian tribes of the Columbia-Snake river basin, as presented by themselves. It showcases several figurative and literal snapshots of each tribe, bits and pieces of each tribe`s story. Each individual tribe or tribal confederation either submitted its own section to this publication, or developed its own section with the assistance of the writer-editor. A federally-recognized tribe is an individual Indian group, or confederation of Indian groups, officially acknowledged by the US government for purposes of legislation, consultation and benefits. This publication is designed to be used both as a resource and as an introduction to the tribes. Taken together, the sections present a rich picture of regional indian culture and history, as told by the tribes.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Cultural Relations of the Gila River and Lower Colorado Tribes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OF THE GILA RIVER AND LOWER COLORADO TRIBES Included in theGila River and Lower Colorado Tribes" by Professor Leslieof the Yumans on the Lower Colorado, but that the Pima, at

Gifford, Edward Winslow

1936-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Karuk Tribe Strategic Energy Plan and Energy Options Analysis  

SciTech Connect

Energy planning document to assist the Karuk Tribe in making educated decisions about future energy priorities and implementation.

Ramona Taylor, Karuk Tribe; David Carter, Winzler and Kelly

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

45

Sault Tribe Wind Energy Feasibility Study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Sault Tribe conducted a feasibility study on tribal lands in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan to determine the technical and economic feasibility of both small and large-scale wind power development on tribal lands. The study included a wind resource assessment, transmission system analysis, engineering and regulatory analyzes and assessments.

Toni Osterhout; Global Energy Concepts

2005-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

46

Sault Tribe Building Efficiency Energy Audits  

SciTech Connect

The Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians is working to reduce energy consumption and expense in Tribally-owned governmental buildings. The Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians will conduct energy audits of nine Tribally-owned governmental buildings in three counties in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan to provide a basis for evaluating and selecting the technical and economic viability of energy efficiency improvement options. The Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians will follow established Tribal procurement policies and procedures to secure the services of a qualified provider to conduct energy audits of nine designated buildings. The contracted provider will be required to provide a progress schedule to the Tribe prior to commencing the project and submit an updated schedule with their monthly billings. Findings and analysis reports will be required for buildings as completed, and a complete Energy Audit Summary Report will be required to be submitted with the provider?s final billing. Conducting energy audits of the nine governmental buildings will disclose building inefficiencies to prioritize and address, resulting in reduced energy consumption and expense. These savings will allow Tribal resources to be reallocated to direct services, which will benefit Tribal members and families.

Holt, Jeffrey W.

2013-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

47

Community Renewable Energy Deployment: Forest County Potawatomi Tribe |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Potawatomi Tribe Potawatomi Tribe Jump to: navigation, search Name Community Renewable Energy Deployment: Forest County Potawatomi Tribe Agency/Company /Organization US Department of Energy Sector Energy Focus Area Energy Efficiency - Central Plant, Economic Development, Forestry, Greenhouse Gas, Renewable Energy, Biomass - Anaerobic Digestion, Biomass, Solar, - Solar Pv, Biomass - Waste To Energy Phase Develop Finance and Implement Projects Resource Type Case studies/examples Availability Publicly available -- Free Publication Date 11/29/2010 Website http://www1.eere.energy.gov/co Locality Forest County Potawatomi Tribe References Community Renewable Energy Deployment: Forest County Potawatomi Tribe[1] Contents 1 Overview 2 Highlights 3 Environmental Aspects 4 References

48

CA-TRIBE-TUOLUMNE BAND OF MEWUK INDIANS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TRIBE-TUOLUMNE BAND OF MEWUK INDIANS TRIBE-TUOLUMNE BAND OF MEWUK INDIANS Location: Tribe CA-TRIBE- TUOLUMNE BAND OF MEWUK INDIANS CA American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description The Tuolumne Band of MeWuk Indians proposes to reduce their fossil fuel emissions through increased energy efficiency and the implementation of renewable energy where applicable. Currently, the Tribe has contracted with the Renewable and Appropriate Energy Laboratory (RAEL) of the University of California, Berkeley, to identify the most cost-effective opportunities for increased energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies. The Tribe proposes to use a portion of the funding to allocate funds to RAEL for technical consultant services to assist the Tribe in identifying, prioritizing, and coordinating site specific

49

Council of Energy Resources Tribes 1993 summer internship report: Nez Perce Tribe  

SciTech Connect

This paper is designed to be a working part of a larger project which would deal with the topic of Tribal interests affected by the DOE Environmental Restoration and Waste Management program and the approaches by which those Tribal interests can be advanced. Topics discussed in this paper include: background history of the Nez Perce Tribe`s relations with the US government; a Nez Perce view of tribal interests affected by DOE activities at Hanford; and a Nez Perce framework for private/governmental/tribal interest.

Crow, J.S.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

CA-TRIBE-PAIUTE-SHOSHONE INDIANS OF THE LONE PINE  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Determination Form Program or Field Office: Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program Project Title CA-TRIBE-PAIUTE-SHOSHONE INDIANS OF THE LONE PINE COMMUNITY Location: Tribe CA-TRIBE-PAIUTE- SHOSHONE INDIANS OF THE LONE PINE COMMUNITY CA American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description The Paiute-Shoshone Indians of the Lone Pine Community propose to prepare a feasibility study for

51

Forest County Potawatomi Tribe Cuts Emissions, Promotes Green...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

integrated renewable energy deployment plan that includes the installation of solar, biogas, and biomass energy systems to heat, cool, and power its tribal facilities. The Tribe...

52

Oklahoma Tribe to Install Solar Roof | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oklahoma Tribe to Install Solar Roof Oklahoma Tribe to Install Solar Roof Oklahoma Tribe to Install Solar Roof March 22, 2010 - 6:10pm Addthis Stephen Graff Former Writer & editor for Energy Empowers, EERE What does this project do? The new fully functioning roof and solar energy production plant will save the tribe about $20,000 a year. The Delaware Nation, a federally-recognized tribe of about 1,400 people in Anadarko, Okla., will install solar panel roofs on two tribal government buildings as part of a larger effort to become more sustainable and bring new jobs to an area struggling with high unemployment. "It's the start of a green initiative," says Theda McPheron-Keel, president of Wind Hollow Foundation, a nonprofit organization aimed at helping American Indians improve their lives. "It provides economic

53

Workshop Helps Empower Tribes to Make Renewable Energy Project Development  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Workshop Helps Empower Tribes to Make Renewable Energy Project Workshop Helps Empower Tribes to Make Renewable Energy Project Development Decisions Workshop Helps Empower Tribes to Make Renewable Energy Project Development Decisions July 16, 2013 - 4:52pm Addthis Workshop guest speaker Bill Cornelius of Oneida Seven Generations Corporation discussed the tribal renewable energy project development and finance process in action. Photo by John De La Rosa, NREL Workshop guest speaker Bill Cornelius of Oneida Seven Generations Corporation discussed the tribal renewable energy project development and finance process in action. Photo by John De La Rosa, NREL Workshop guest speaker Rebecca Kauffman outlined the roles Tribes can play in renewable energy projects, as well as lessons learned based on her experience working on projects for the Southern Ute Tribe. Photo by Amy Glickson, NREL

54

AK-TRIBE-CENTRAL COUNCIL OF TLINGIT AND HAIDA INDIANS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

AK-TRIBE-CENTRAL COUNCIL OF TLINGIT AND HAIDA INDIANS AK-TRIBE-CENTRAL COUNCIL OF TLINGIT AND HAIDA INDIANS Location: Tribe AK-TRIBE- CENTRAL COUNCIL OF TLINGIT AND HAIDA INDIANS AK American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description The Central Council of the Tlingit and Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska propose to conduct energy audits of tribally owned facilities. Specific retrofit activities will be determined based on the results of the audits, and these retrofit activities will be submitted for appropriate NEPA review. Conditions: None Categorical Exclusion(s) Applied: A9, B5.1 *-For the complete DOE National Environmental Policy Act regulations regarding categorical exclusions, see Subpart D of 10 CFR10 21 This action would not: threaten a violation of applicable statutory, regulatory, or permit requirements for environment, safety, and health,

55

New Renewable Energy Development Resources for Tribes | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

New Renewable Energy Development Resources for Tribes New Renewable Energy Development Resources for Tribes New Renewable Energy Development Resources for Tribes June 7, 2013 - 5:16pm Addthis This map from a newly published DOE Office of Indian Energy white paper shows transmission lines highlighted in red, military bases in green, and tribal lands in purple. Of the Tribes identified in the paper as being in close proximity to military bases, 54% are located in the West, 18% in the Pacific Northwest, and 12% in New England and New York. This map from a newly published DOE Office of Indian Energy white paper shows transmission lines highlighted in red, military bases in green, and tribal lands in purple. Of the Tribes identified in the paper as being in close proximity to military bases, 54% are located in the West, 18% in the

56

Tribe's Headquarters Gets Energy Efficiency Makeover | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tribe's Headquarters Gets Energy Efficiency Makeover Tribe's Headquarters Gets Energy Efficiency Makeover Tribe's Headquarters Gets Energy Efficiency Makeover July 27, 2010 - 3:00pm Addthis Stephen Graff Former Writer & editor for Energy Empowers, EERE With 900 tribal members, a small land base for development and limited access to water, the Paiute Indian Tribe of Utah must prioritize its finances. That means some projects, like fixing the tribal headquarters, with its deteriorating stucco exterior and temperamental HVAC system, had to wait. So when Gaylord Robb, the tribe's economic development director, learned of an Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant from the U.S. Department of Energy, he jumped at the chance. "It's been an uphill battle to do economic development on that land," Robb

57

Interior Department Solicits Grant Proposals from Tribes | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Interior Department Solicits Grant Proposals from Tribes Interior Department Solicits Grant Proposals from Tribes Interior Department Solicits Grant Proposals from Tribes January 9, 2014 - 11:11am Addthis On December 23, Assistant Secretary-Indian Affairs Kevin K. Washburn announced that the U.S. Department of the Interior's (DOI's) Office of Indian Energy and Economic Development (IEED) is soliciting grant proposals from Indian Tribes and Alaska Native regional and village corporations for projects to 1) build tribal capacity for energy resource development and 2) promote the processing, use, or development of energy and mineral resources on Indian lands. Tribal Energy Development Capacity-Building Grant Proposals Applications Due: February 18, 2014 Eligible Entities: Federally recognized Tribes, including Alaska Native

58

Oklahoma Tribe to Install Solar Roof | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oklahoma Tribe to Install Solar Roof Oklahoma Tribe to Install Solar Roof Oklahoma Tribe to Install Solar Roof March 22, 2010 - 6:10pm Addthis Stephen Graff Former Writer & editor for Energy Empowers, EERE What does this project do? The new fully functioning roof and solar energy production plant will save the tribe about $20,000 a year. The Delaware Nation, a federally-recognized tribe of about 1,400 people in Anadarko, Okla., will install solar panel roofs on two tribal government buildings as part of a larger effort to become more sustainable and bring new jobs to an area struggling with high unemployment. "It's the start of a green initiative," says Theda McPheron-Keel, president of Wind Hollow Foundation, a nonprofit organization aimed at helping American Indians improve their lives. "It provides economic

59

New Renewable Energy Development Resources for Tribes | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

New Renewable Energy Development Resources for Tribes New Renewable Energy Development Resources for Tribes New Renewable Energy Development Resources for Tribes June 7, 2013 - 5:16pm Addthis This map from a newly published DOE Office of Indian Energy white paper shows transmission lines highlighted in red, military bases in green, and tribal lands in purple. Of the Tribes identified in the paper as being in close proximity to military bases, 54% are located in the West, 18% in the Pacific Northwest, and 12% in New England and New York. This map from a newly published DOE Office of Indian Energy white paper shows transmission lines highlighted in red, military bases in green, and tribal lands in purple. Of the Tribes identified in the paper as being in close proximity to military bases, 54% are located in the West, 18% in the

60

Clean Energy Projects Helping Wisconsin Tribe Achieve Sustainability Goals  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Clean Energy Projects Helping Wisconsin Tribe Achieve Clean Energy Projects Helping Wisconsin Tribe Achieve Sustainability Goals Clean Energy Projects Helping Wisconsin Tribe Achieve Sustainability Goals January 13, 2014 - 11:19am Addthis Before (left) and after photo of historic Wunder Hall, where Milwaukee's Forest County Potawatomi Community completed a major energy upgrade project. The building now serves as the tribe's economic development center. | Courtesy of Forest County Potawatomi Community Before (left) and after photo of historic Wunder Hall, where Milwaukee's Forest County Potawatomi Community completed a major energy upgrade project. The building now serves as the tribe's economic development center. | Courtesy of Forest County Potawatomi Community Lizana Pierce Project Manager, Tribal Energy Program

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rock sioux tribe" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Tribe's Headquarters Gets Energy Efficiency Makeover | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tribe's Headquarters Gets Energy Efficiency Makeover Tribe's Headquarters Gets Energy Efficiency Makeover Tribe's Headquarters Gets Energy Efficiency Makeover July 27, 2010 - 3:00pm Addthis Stephen Graff Former Writer & editor for Energy Empowers, EERE With 900 tribal members, a small land base for development and limited access to water, the Paiute Indian Tribe of Utah must prioritize its finances. That means some projects, like fixing the tribal headquarters, with its deteriorating stucco exterior and temperamental HVAC system, had to wait. So when Gaylord Robb, the tribe's economic development director, learned of an Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant from the U.S. Department of Energy, he jumped at the chance. "It's been an uphill battle to do economic development on that land," Robb

62

Key Renewable Energy Opportunities for Oklahoma Tribes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TRIBAL LEADER FORUM SERIES TRIBAL LEADER FORUM SERIES KEY RENEWABLE ENERGY OPPORTUNITIES FOR OKLAHOMA TRIBES August 13, 2012 COX CONVENTION CENTER 100 West Sheridan Avenue, Oklahoma City, OK 73102 (405) 602-8500 The fifth in a series of planned U.S. DOE Office of Indian Energy-sponsored strategic energy development & investment forums, this forum is designed to give Oklahoma tribal leaders the opportunity to receive the latest updates on DOE's energy development efforts in Indian Country. The Forum will provide a venue for tribal leaders to discuss best practices in renewable energy development, including project development and finance, issues related to Oklahoma land ownership, and energy planning and energy markets. Tribal leaders will also have the opportunity to directly converse with each other by participating in a roundtable

63

San Carlos Apache Tribe - Energy Organizational Analysis  

SciTech Connect

The San Carlos Apache Tribe (SCAT) was awarded $164,000 in late-2011 by the U.S. Department of Energy (U.S. DOE) Tribal Energy Program's "First Steps Toward Developing Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency on Tribal Lands" Grant Program. This grant funded: ? The analysis and selection of preferred form(s) of tribal energy organization (this Energy Organization Analysis, hereinafter referred to as "EOA"). ? Start-up staffing and other costs associated with the Phase 1 SCAT energy organization. ? An intern program. ? Staff training. ? Tribal outreach and workshops regarding the new organization and SCAT energy programs and projects, including two annual tribal energy summits (2011 and 2012). This report documents the analysis and selection of preferred form(s) of a tribal energy organization.

Rapp, James; Albert, Steve

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Hot rocks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Four kilometers down below the orange earth of Australias Cooper Basin lies some of the hottest nonvolcanic rock in the worldrock that the geothermal industry had never seriously considered using to make electricity. But next month Geodynamics, an ...

S. Upson

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Determination Form Project Title Program or Field Office: Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program SD-TRIBE-YANKTON SIOUX TRIBE Location: Tribe SD-TRIBE- YANKTON SIOUX TRIBE SD American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Descriptio The Yankton Sioux Tribe of South Dakota proposes to employ a Tribal Grant Coordinator to oversee the

66

Wisconsin Tribe Performing State-Wide Audits on 'Energy Wasters' |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wisconsin Tribe Performing State-Wide Audits on 'Energy Wasters' Wisconsin Tribe Performing State-Wide Audits on 'Energy Wasters' Wisconsin Tribe Performing State-Wide Audits on 'Energy Wasters' August 24, 2010 - 11:00am Addthis Ho-Chunk Nation is conducting audits throughout Wisconsin to find energy wasters such as decrepit HVAC units. | File photo Ho-Chunk Nation is conducting audits throughout Wisconsin to find energy wasters such as decrepit HVAC units. | File photo Stephen Graff Former Writer & editor for Energy Empowers, EERE What are the key facts? Ho-Chunk Nation received a $392,200 block grant under Recovery Act for energy audits. 30 tribal buildings will be audited across Nation's lands and audit recommendations could save tribes up to 30 percent on energy bills. Drive through Wisconsin, and you're bound to catch a glimpse of one of the

67

NM-TRIBE-PUEBLO OF POJOAQUE HOUSING CORPORATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NM-TRIBE-PUEBLO OF POJOAQUE HOUSING CORPORATION NM-TRIBE-PUEBLO OF POJOAQUE HOUSING CORPORATION Location: Tribe NM-TRIBE- PUEBLO OF POJOAQUE HOUSING CORPORATION NM American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description The Pueblo of Pojoaque Housing Corporation plans to improve the energy efficiency of six tribal homes located in White Sands Village by removing and replacing inefficient single-pane windows with double- pane, metal-clad wood windows. Conditions: None Categorical Exclusion(s) Applied: B2.5, B5.1 *-For the complete DOE National Environmental Policy Act regulations regarding categorical exclusions, see Subpart D of 10 CFR10 21 This action would not: threaten a violation of applicable statutory, regulatory, or permit requirements for environment, safety, and health,

68

WI-TRIBE-STOCKBRIDGE-MUNSEE BAND OF MOHICAN INDIANS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WI-TRIBE-STOCKBRIDGE-MUNSEE BAND OF MOHICAN INDIANS WI-TRIBE-STOCKBRIDGE-MUNSEE BAND OF MOHICAN INDIANS Location: Tribe WI-TRIBE- STOCKBRIDGE- MUNSEE BAND OF MOHICAN INDIANS WI American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description The Stockbridge-Munsee Band of Mohican Indians proposes to conduct energy efficient audits of residential and commerical buildings. Conditions: None Categorical Exclusion(s) Applied: A9, B5.1 *-For the complete DOE National Environmental Policy Act regulations regarding categorical exclusions, see Subpart D of 10 CFR10 21 This action would not: threaten a violation of applicable statutory, regulatory, or permit requirements for environment, safety, and health, including DOE and/or Executive Orders; require siting, construction, or major expansion of waste storage, disposal, recovery, or

69

Fuel from Waste Helps Power Two Tribes | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fuel from Waste Helps Power Two Tribes Fuel from Waste Helps Power Two Tribes Fuel from Waste Helps Power Two Tribes September 6, 2013 - 2:01pm Addthis The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians and the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians are converting waste vegetable oil and grease to biofuel in an effort to reduce the environmental impact of their energy use. The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians and the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians are converting waste vegetable oil and grease to biofuel in an effort to reduce the environmental impact of their energy use. Fuel from Waste Helps Power Two Tribes The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians and the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians are converting waste vegetable oil and grease to biofuel in an effort to reduce the environmental impact of their energy use.

70

ND-TRIBE-TURTLE MOUNTAIN BAND OF CHIPPEWA  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ND-TRIBE-TURTLE MOUNTAIN BAND OF CHIPPEWA ND-TRIBE-TURTLE MOUNTAIN BAND OF CHIPPEWA Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program Location: Tribe ND-TRIBE-TURTLE MOUNTAIN BAND OF CHIPPEWA ND American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description The Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians of North Dakota propose to 1) explore the potential for wind energy development on the Reservation by soliciting expertise from an engineering company to determine the best option for tapping wind energy on the reservation for its public buildings and seek legal expertise to study legal barriers that may exist; 2) conduct energy audits and a feasibility study to determine if several sizeable public buildings have the potential to be sites for either district heating or a

71

Upper Skagit Indian Tribe Strategic Energy Planning Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The Upper Skagit Indian Tribe was honored with a grant through the DOE's Tribal Energy Program - Golden Field Office to develop a Strategic Energy Plan for the Tribal Lands.

Lauren Rich

2008-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

72

Upper Skagit Indian Tribe Strategic Energy Planning Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The Upper Skagit Indian Tribe was honored with a grant through the DOE's Tribal Energy Program - Golden Field Office to develop a Strategic Energy Plan for the Tribal Lands.

Lauren Rich

2008-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

73

American Indian tribes and electric industry restructuring: Issues and opportunities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US electric utility industry is undergoing a period of fundamental change that has significant implications for Native American tribes. Although many details remain to be determined, the future electric power industry will be very different from that of the present. It is anticipated that the new competitive electric industry will be more efficient, which some believe will benefit all participants by lowering electricity costs. Recent developments in the industry, however, indicate that the restructuring process will likely benefit some parties at the expense of others. Given the historical experience and current situation of Native American tribes in the US, there is good reason to pay attention to electric industry changes to ensure that the situation of tribes is improved and not worsened as a result of electric restructuring. This paper provides a review of electricity restructuring in the US and identifies ways in which tribes may be affected and how tribes may seek to protect and serve their interests. Chapter 2 describes the current status of energy production and service on reservations. Chapter 3 provides an overview of the evolution of the electric industry to its present form and introduces the regulatory and structural changes presently taking place. Chapter 4 provides a more detailed discussion of changes in the US electric industry with a specific focus on the implications of these changes for tribes. Chapter 5 presents a summary of the conclusions reached in this paper.

Howarth, D. [Morse, Richard, and Weisenmiller, and Associates Inc., Oakland, CA (United States); Busch, J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Starrs, T. [Kelso, Starrs, and Associates LLC, Vashon, WA (United States)

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

A Step Towards Conservation for Interior Alaska Tribes  

SciTech Connect

This project includes a consortium of tribes. The tribes include Hughes (representing the consortium) Birch Creek, Huslia, and Allakaket. The project proposed by Interior Regional Housing Authority (IRHA) on behalf of the villages of Hughes, Birch Creek, Huslia and Allakaket is to develop an energy conservation program relevant to each specific community, educate tribe members and provide the tools to implement the conservation plan. The program seeks to achieve both energy savings and provide optimum energy requirements to support each tribe's mission. The energy management program will be a comprehensive program that considers all avenues for achieving energy savings, from replacing obsolete equipment, to the design and construction of energy conservation measures, the implementation of energy saving operation and maintenance procedures, the utilization of a community-wide building energy management system, and a commitment to educating the tribes on how to decrease energy consumption. With the implementation of this program and the development of an Energy Management Plan, these communities can then work to reduce the high cost of living in rural Alaska.

Kimberly Carlo

2012-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

75

A Step Towards Conservation for Interior Alaska Tribes  

SciTech Connect

This project includes a consortium of tribes. The tribes include Hughes (representing the consortium) Birch Creek, Huslia, and Allakaket. The project proposed by Interior Regional Housing Authority (IRHA) on behalf of the villages of Hughes, Birch Creek, Huslia and Allakaket is to develop an energy conservation program relevant to each specific community, educate tribe members and provide the tools to implement the conservation plan. The program seeks to achieve both energy savings and provide optimum energy requirements to support each tribe's mission. The energy management program will be a comprehensive program that considers all avenues for achieving energy savings, from replacing obsolete equipment, to the design and construction of energy conservation measures, the implementation of energy saving operation and maintenance procedures, the utilization of a community-wide building energy management system, and a commitment to educating the tribes on how to decrease energy consumption. With the implementation of this program and the development of an Energy Management Plan, these communities can then work to reduce the high cost of living in rural Alaska.

Kimberly Carlo

2012-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

76

More Weatherized Homes for Minnesota Tribe | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

More Weatherized Homes for Minnesota Tribe More Weatherized Homes for Minnesota Tribe More Weatherized Homes for Minnesota Tribe April 22, 2010 - 4:51pm Addthis Stephen Graff Former Writer & editor for Energy Empowers, EERE Randy and Dorothy Pittman are cozy now, but for the first few winters in their new home at the Fond du Lac Reservation this was not the case. At first, the couple, who moved from muggy Alabama, thought they needed time to acclimate to the Minnesota cold. It turned out it was the two-story house they constructed that needed adjusting. "I had not built a house in the North," says Dorothy, a tribal member of the Fond du Lac Band of Lake Superior Chippewa, who takes partial blame for a drafty downstairs. "It's a whole different climate here." Everything changed last fall after a weatherization crew from Arrowhead

77

AK-TRIBE-ASSOCIATION OF VILLAGE COUNCIL PRESIDENTS, INC  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Determination Form Program or Field Office: Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program Project Title AK-TRIBE-ASSOCIATION OF VILLAGE COUNCIL PRESIDENTS, INC Location: Tribe AK-TRIBE- ASSOCIATION OF VILLAGE COUNCIL PRESIDENTS, INC AK American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description: The Association of Village Council Presidents, Inc., (AVCP) proposes to renovate a steel-constructed building, built circa 1990 (First Avenue Building, US Survey 1002 Parcel 1, Lot 1), located in Bethel, Alaska, to an office building. Proposed building retrofits would include installation of an (EPA certified) wood-fired central boiler, a conventional (household size) energy efficient oil-fired boiler, a heat distribution

78

How Power Marketing Administrations Market Power and Work with Tribes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

How Power Marketing Administrations Market Power and Work with How Power Marketing Administrations Market Power and Work with Tribes Webinar How Power Marketing Administrations Market Power and Work with Tribes Webinar April 24, 2013 11:00AM MDT Webinar The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Tribal Energy Program, and Western Area Power Administration (WAPA) are pleased to continue their sponsorship of the Tribal Renewable Energy Webinar Series. The country's federal Power Marketing Administrations (PMAs) have valuable generation and transmission assets and have the potential to promote renewable energy development within their respective footprints. Get information on PMA assets and operations, examples of past cooperation with Tribes, and how to work with PMAs to promote future economic growth

79

More Weatherized Homes for Minnesota Tribe | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

More Weatherized Homes for Minnesota Tribe More Weatherized Homes for Minnesota Tribe More Weatherized Homes for Minnesota Tribe April 22, 2010 - 4:51pm Addthis Stephen Graff Former Writer & editor for Energy Empowers, EERE Randy and Dorothy Pittman are cozy now, but for the first few winters in their new home at the Fond du Lac Reservation this was not the case. At first, the couple, who moved from muggy Alabama, thought they needed time to acclimate to the Minnesota cold. It turned out it was the two-story house they constructed that needed adjusting. "I had not built a house in the North," says Dorothy, a tribal member of the Fond du Lac Band of Lake Superior Chippewa, who takes partial blame for a drafty downstairs. "It's a whole different climate here." Everything changed last fall after a weatherization crew from Arrowhead

80

EM's Top Official Underscores Commitment to Meet with Tribes | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Top Official Underscores Commitment to Meet with Tribes Top Official Underscores Commitment to Meet with Tribes EM's Top Official Underscores Commitment to Meet with Tribes November 29, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Senior Advisor for Environmental Management David Huizenga, center, speaks with Pilar Thomas, deputy director of the Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs, left, and John Moon, acting principal deputy director of the Office of Economic Impact and Diversity, at DOE's event this week recognizing contributions of Native Americans. Senior Advisor for Environmental Management David Huizenga, center, speaks with Pilar Thomas, deputy director of the Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs, left, and John Moon, acting principal deputy director of the Office of Economic Impact and Diversity, at DOE's event this week

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rock sioux tribe" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Nez Perce Tribe Energy Efficient Facilities Installation Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although Idaho's electrical rates are among the lowest in the country, the Nez Perce Tribe's electrical bills take a large bite out of the operating budget every year. Tribal programs are located in forty some buildings, in six counties, in two states. Ninety-five percent, or more, are heated electrically. The age of the Tribal office buildings located in Lapwai, Idaho vary from forty to over a hundred years old. Only sporadic updates, in the buildings themselves, have been made over the years. Working with the Tribe's electrical provider (Avista Corporation), it was determine that a minimum financial commitment could reap large rewards in the form of lower operating costs.

Terry Kinder

2012-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

82

MI-TRIBE-LAC VIEUX DESERT BAND OF LAKE SUPERIOR CHIPPEWA  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MI-TRIBE-LAC VIEUX DESERT BAND OF LAKE SUPERIOR CHIPPEWA MI-TRIBE-LAC VIEUX DESERT BAND OF LAKE SUPERIOR CHIPPEWA INDIANS Location: Tribe MI-TRIBE-LAC VIEUX DESERT BAND OF LAKE SUPERIOR CHIPPEWA INDIANS MI American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description The Lac Vieux Desert Tribe proposes to use funding to help with a current effort that is a collaboration of the Tribe with the Conservation Fund of Michigan, an effort that is funded by the W.K. Kellogg Foundation. The project will be conducting a feasibility study to determine the viability of using wood products from resources found on tribal lands. The study is dedicating a part of the effort to see the feasibility of providing a renewable energy source to the Tribe in the form of wood products and biomass fuels. NEPA

83

MHK Projects/Passamaquoddy Tribe Hydrokinetic Project | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Passamaquoddy Tribe Hydrokinetic Project Passamaquoddy Tribe Hydrokinetic Project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.0234,"lon":-67.0672,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

84

U.S. DEPARTlVIENT OF ENERGY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

M . .I\NAGEMENT CENTER M . .I\NAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETERlV.IINATION Page 1 of3 RECIPU:NT:Standing Rock Sioux Tribe STATE: SD PROJECT TITLE : Feasibility Study Supporting Wind Development on the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe Indian Reservation Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number CID Number DE-FOA-000424 DE-EE0005630 GF0-0005630-001 Based on my review of the information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 451.IA), I have made the following determination: CX, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: A9 Information gathering, analysis, and dissemination 83.1 Site characterization and environmental monitoring Information gathering (including, but not limited to, literature surveys, inventories, site VISits, and audits),

85

Eleven Tribes Jump START Clean Energy Projects, Summer 2012 (Newsletter)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This newsletter describes key activities of the DOE Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs for Summer 2012. The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs (DOE-IE) has selected 11 Tribes - five in Alaska and six in the contiguous United States - to receive on-the-ground technical support for community-based energy efficiency and renewable energy projects as part of DOE-IE's Strategic Technical Assistance Response Team (START) Program. START finalists were selected based on the clarity of their requests for technical assistance and the ability of START to successfully work with their projects or community. Technical experts from DOE and its National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) will work directly with community-based project teams to analyze local energy issues and assist the Tribes in moving their projects forward. In Alaska, the effort will be bolstered by DOE-IE's partnership with the Denali Commission, which will provide additional assistance and expertise, as well as funding to fuel the Alaska START initiative.

Not Available

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Umatilla Tribes to Grow Native Plants for Hanford | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Umatilla Tribes to Grow Native Plants for Hanford Umatilla Tribes to Grow Native Plants for Hanford Umatilla Tribes to Grow Native Plants for Hanford January 2, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation’s field station, located in Mission, Ore., will be home to one-of-a-kind research and development for revegetation efforts. The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation's field station, located in Mission, Ore., will be home to one-of-a-kind research and development for revegetation efforts. Tribal construction workers stand in front of the hexagonal greenhouse dome structure that will house the seeds for revegetation efforts. Tribal construction workers stand in front of the hexagonal greenhouse dome structure that will house the seeds for revegetation efforts.

87

Installation restoration program. Site investigation report for IRP site No. 12 and 13, South Dakota Air National Guard, 114th Fighter Wing, Joe Foss Field, Sioux Falls, South Dakota - Volume 1. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Site Investigation Report for IRP Site No 12 and 13, South Dakota Air National Guard, 114th Fighter Wing, Joe Foss Field, Sioux Falls, South Dakota, Volume I. This is the first volume of a two volume site investigation report. Two sites (Site 12 - Ramp area and Site 13 - Motor Vehicle Maintenance Facility) was investigated under the Installation Restoration Program. Soil and groundwater samples were collected and analyzed. No further action was recommended on site 13 and quarterly sampling was recommended for site 12. South Dakota Regulators have agreed to both recommendations. Decision documents will be prepared for each site.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

DOE Categorical Exclusion Determination Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Determination Form Program or Field Office: TRIBAL ENERGY PROGRAM Project Title SD-TEP-ROSEBUD SIOUX TRIBE Location: Tribal ROSEBUD SIOUX TRIBE SD American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description The Rosebud Sioux Tribe (RST) and Citizens Wind propose to complete the required pre-construction activities necessary to secure funding for the proposed 190 MW North Antelope Highlands wind farm,

89

Exploration 3-D Seismic Field Test/Native Tribes Initiative  

SciTech Connect

To determine current acquisition procedures and costs and to further the goals of the President's Initiative for Native Tribes, a seismic-survey project is to be conducted on Osage tribal lands. The goals of the program are to demonstrate the capabilities, costs, and effectiveness of 3-D seismic work in a small-operator setting and to determine the economics of such a survey. For these purposes, typical small-scale independent-operator practices are being followed and a shallow target chose in an area with a high concentration of independent operators. The results will be analyzed in detail to determine if there are improvements and/or innovations which can be easily introduced in field-acquisition procedures, in processing, or in data manipulation and interpretation to further reduce operating costs and to make the system still more active to the small-scale operator.

Carroll, Herbert B.; Chen, K.C.; Guo, Genliang; Johnson, W.I.; Reeves,T.K.; Sharma,Bijon

1999-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

90

Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SD-TRIBE-OGLALA SIOUX TRIBE OF THE PINE RIDGE SD-TRIBE-OGLALA SIOUX TRIBE OF THE PINE RIDGE RESERVATION, SOUTH DAKOTA Location: Tribe SD-TRIBE-OGLALA SIOUX TRIBE OF THE PINE RIDGE RESERVATION, SOUTH DAKOTA SD American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description The Oglala Sioux Tribe of South Dakota proposes to sponsor an outreach initiative to address the need to increase the rate and total number of low-income residential energy retrofits. The Tribe proposes to target mobile homes manufactured prior to 1976. The Tribe would assist Tribal members with acquisition, preparation, and submission of South Dakota Weatherization Assistance Program enrollment applications, provide an energy efficiency and conservation coordinator for the nine districts that make up the

91

Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description The Lower Brule Sioux Tribe of South Dakota proposes to 1) retain technical consultant services to assist in development...

92

ASSEMBLAGES ON WASTE ROCK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Natural regeneration on waste rock was investigated at the old Wangaloa coal mine, south-east Otago. A 450-m long waste rock stack had been created 4050 years ago, and has had little anthropogenic intervention since. The stack is made up of a gradient of three main waste rock types, defined as silt-rich, mixed, and quartz-rich, which reflect different proportions of loess siltstone and quartz gravel conglomerate. Plant species assemblages were quantified in four 5-m 2 quadrats in each waste rock type. Invertebrates were heat extracted from substrate cores (7 cm diameter; depth 5 cm) collected from quadrats over an eight-week period in spring 2003. Ordination analysis showed statistically distinct plant and invertebrate assemblages had arisen on each waste rock type. Revegetation patterns were dominated by native, woody individuals on all waste rock types, particularly manuka (Leptospermum scoparium) and kanuka (Kunzea ericoides). Plant cover on silt-rich waste rock was four-fold that on quartz-rich waste rock. Total numbers of invertebrates were highest on quartz-rich waste rock, but richness greatest on silt-rich waste rock. Collembola dominated the fauna but their numbers were proportionally greatest in poorly vegetated areas. Further work is required to explain the absence of plants and invertebrates from local areas of waste rock. ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

C. G. Rufaut; S. Hammit; D. Craw; S. G. Clearwater

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Energy Department Makes $2.5 Million Available for Native American Tribes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Makes $2.5 Million Available for Native American Makes $2.5 Million Available for Native American Tribes to Develop Renewable Energy Resources Energy Department Makes $2.5 Million Available for Native American Tribes to Develop Renewable Energy Resources June 14, 2005 - 4:54pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced today that it is making nearly $2.5 million available to 18 Native American tribes to advance the use of renewable energy and energy efficient technologies on tribal lands. "DOE is committed to helping Native American tribes develop their energy resources," said Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman. "Renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies can play a significant role in encouraging tribal self-sufficiency, creating jobs and improving

94

Energy Department Makes $2.5 Million Available for Native American Tribes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Makes $2.5 Million Available for Native American Makes $2.5 Million Available for Native American Tribes to Develop Renewable Energy Resources Energy Department Makes $2.5 Million Available for Native American Tribes to Develop Renewable Energy Resources June 14, 2005 - 4:54pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced today that it is making nearly $2.5 million available to 18 Native American tribes to advance the use of renewable energy and energy efficient technologies on tribal lands. "DOE is committed to helping Native American tribes develop their energy resources," said Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman. "Renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies can play a significant role in encouraging tribal self-sufficiency, creating jobs and improving

95

Webinar for Tribes: Overview of U.S. Department of Energy Power Marketing  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Webinar for Tribes: Overview of U.S. Department of Energy Power Webinar for Tribes: Overview of U.S. Department of Energy Power Marketing Administrations Webinar for Tribes: Overview of U.S. Department of Energy Power Marketing Administrations November 18, 2011 - 2:45pm Addthis The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs, the DOE Tribal Energy Program, and the Western Area Power Administration (Western) are conducting a webinar to provide tribes with an overview of power marketing administrations (PMAs), including their service territories, their power resources, their role in delivering federal power to customers, and the methods of determining power rates. The webinar will also include a discussion of preference customer qualifications. More Addthis Related Articles April 24 Webinar to Explore How Power Marketing Administrations Work with

96

DOE-Supported Education and Training Programs Help Crow Tribe Promote  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE-Supported Education and Training Programs Help Crow Tribe DOE-Supported Education and Training Programs Help Crow Tribe Promote Energy Independence and Education DOE-Supported Education and Training Programs Help Crow Tribe Promote Energy Independence and Education July 30, 2012 - 4:02pm Addthis Two Department of Energy-supported programs are helping the Crow Tribe in Montana produce energy with minimal environmental impact, educate future generations and prepare its community for future jobs in energy fields. At the heart of the Work Readiness Program and the Cultivation and Characterization of Oil Producing Algae Internship are 6-week intensive courses of study that teach real-world skills and provide opportunities for academic and industrial advancement in science, math and energy. The programs are supported in part by the National Energy Technology

97

DOE-Supported Education and Training Programs Help Crow Tribe Promote  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Education and Training Programs Help Crow Tribe Education and Training Programs Help Crow Tribe Promote Energy Independence and Education DOE-Supported Education and Training Programs Help Crow Tribe Promote Energy Independence and Education May 23, 2012 - 1:00pm Addthis Amanda Not Afraid (front) and another student in the DOE-sponsored algae internship program work on cultivating and characterizing oil-producing algae. Amanda Not Afraid (front) and another student in the DOE-sponsored algae internship program work on cultivating and characterizing oil-producing algae. Washington, DC -Two Department of Energy (DOE)-supported programs are helping the Crow Tribe in Montana produce energy with minimal environmental impact, educate future generations, and prepare its community for future jobs in energy fields.

98

DOE-Supported Education and Training Programs Help Crow Tribe Promote  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE-Supported Education and Training Programs Help Crow Tribe DOE-Supported Education and Training Programs Help Crow Tribe Promote Energy Independence and Education DOE-Supported Education and Training Programs Help Crow Tribe Promote Energy Independence and Education May 23, 2012 - 1:00pm Addthis Amanda Not Afraid (front) and another student in the DOE-sponsored algae internship program work on cultivating and characterizing oil-producing algae. Amanda Not Afraid (front) and another student in the DOE-sponsored algae internship program work on cultivating and characterizing oil-producing algae. Washington, DC -Two Department of Energy (DOE)-supported programs are helping the Crow Tribe in Montana produce energy with minimal environmental impact, educate future generations, and prepare its community for future jobs in energy fields.

99

Colville Confederated Tribes' Performance Project Wildlife Mitigation Acquisitions, Annual Report 2006.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Colville Confederated Tribes Wildlife Mitigation Project is protecting lands as partial mitigation for hydropower's share of the wildlife losses resulting from Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams. The Mitigation Project protects and manages 54,606 acres for the biological requirements of managed wildlife species that are important to the Colville Tribes. With the inclusion of 2006 acquisitions, the Colville Tribes have acquired approximately 32,018 habitat units (HUs) towards a total 35,819 HUs lost from original inundation due to hydropower development. This annual report for 2006 briefly describes that four priority land acquisitions that were considered for enrollment into the Colville Tribes Mitigation Project during the 2006 contract period.

Whitney, Richard; Berger, Matthew; Tonasket, Patrick

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

URANIUM IN ALKALINE ROCKS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

District, Teller County, Colorado," U.S. Geol. Survey Bull.Jamestown District, Colorado," Econ. Geol. , v. 68, pp 1247-Rocks at Powderhorn, Colorado; Economic Geology, Vol. 60,

Murphy, M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rock sioux tribe" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Renewable Energy Development in Indian Country: A Handbook for Tribes  

SciTech Connect

This handbook is designed to be an accessible reference for those who are new to tribal energy project development or seek a refresher on key development issues as they navigate the project development process. It builds upon the wealth of feedback and experiences shared by tribal and other participants in the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's tribal energy training sessions to provide tribal leaders, tribal economic and energy enterprises, and those supporting them with a general overview of the renewable energy project development process as well as detailed guidance on the following: how to structure a renewable energy project transaction to protect tribal interests, with an emphasis on joint project development efforts undertaken with nontribal parties; key energy development agreements, including power sale agreements, transmission and interconnection agreements, and land leases; and ways tribes can finance renewable energy projects, including the sources of funding or financing that may be available, the types of investors that may be available, and federal tax incentives for renewable energy projects.

MacCourt, D. C.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

EM's New Project of the Month Focuses on Tribes' Work with Native  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

New Project of the Month Focuses on Tribes' Work with New Project of the Month Focuses on Tribes' Work with Native Plants for Hanford Site EM's New Project of the Month Focuses on Tribes' Work with Native Plants for Hanford Site January 17, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - EM is highlighting important work by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation in a new Project of the Month on EM's public Web site, www.em.doe.gov. With the help of EM funding, the Umatilla Tribes have been building a tribal field station and two greenhouses for researching and reproducing native plants to revegetate the Hanford site. Habitat at the site has been disturbed by EM's Cold War cleanup and subsequent restoration, as well as natural forces such as wildfires. Addthis Related Articles The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation's field station, located in Mission, Ore., will be home to one-of-a-kind research and development for revegetation efforts.

103

Session: Hard Rock Penetration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of five presentations: ''Hard Rock Penetration - Summary'' by George P. Tennyson, Jr.; ''Overview - Hard Rock Penetration'' by James C. Dunn; ''An Overview of Acoustic Telemetry'' by Douglas S. Drumheller; ''Lost Circulation Technology Development Status'' by David A. Glowka; ''Downhole Memory-Logging Tools'' by Peter Lysne.

Tennyson, George P. Jr.; Dunn, James C.; Drumheller, Douglas S.; Glowka, David A.; Lysne, Peter

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Case Study - Sioux Valley Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SVE reports that the new web portal has been a particularly effective customer education tool. One SVE customer noted, "The information has been very helpful to me, as I am a very...

105

Rock-ravintolatoiminta : elv rock-musiikkia ravintolaympristss; Rock venue activity : live rock music in the restaurant setting.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Tyn tavoitteena oli tutkia rock-ravintolatoimintaa ja elv rock-musiikkia ravintolaympristss ravintolan, artistin ja asiakkaan nkkulmasta. Tutkimuksessa pyrittiin selvittmn rock-ravintolayrittmisen toimintatapoja ja kartoittamaan alan tmn hetkist tilaa. (more)

Vyli, Jari

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Determination Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SD-TRIBE-ROSEBUD SIOUX TRIBE SD-TRIBE-ROSEBUD SIOUX TRIBE Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program Location: Tribe SD-TRIBE- ROSEBUD SIOUX TRIBE SD American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description The Rosebud Sioux Tribe of South Dakota proposes to establish a tribal weatherization program within an existing tribal organization and provide training and weatherization skills development to tribal members. The design and implementation of a weatherization program is to ensure that every house weatherized will receive cost-effective measures. Energy weatherization, such as weather-stripping of doors and windows and caulking and sealing cracks and holes in a living structure, would be conducted to help low-income families become more self sufficient.

107

Oldest Rock on Earth  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Canada." and "Some of the oldest surface rock can be found in the Canadian Shield, Australia, Africa and in other more specific places around the world. The ages of...

108

Human Capacity Building in Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy System Maintenance for the Yurok Tribe  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

From July 2005 to July 2007, the Schatz Energy Research Center (SERC) assisted the Yurok Tribe in the implementation of a program designed to build the Tribes own capacity to improve energy efficiency and maintain and repair renewable energy systems in Tribal homes on the Yurok Reservation. Funding for this effort was provided by the U.S. Department of Energys Tribal Program under First Steps grant award #DE-FG36-05GO15166. The programs centerpiece was a house-by-house needs assessment, in which Tribal staff visited and conducted energy audits at over fifty homes. The visits included assessment of household energy efficiency and condition of existing renewable energy systems. Staff also provided energy education to residents, evaluated potential sites for new household renewable energy systems, and performed minor repairs as needed on renewable energy systems.

Engel, R. A.' Zoellick, J J.

2007-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

109

Comprehensive Renewable Energy Feasibility Study for the Makah Indian Tribe  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this project was to determine the technical feasibility, economic viability, and potential impacts of installing and operating a wind power station and/or small hydroelectric generation plants on the Makah reservation. The long-term objective is to supply all or a portion of Tribe's electricity from local, renewable energy sources in order to reduce costs, provide local employment, and reduce power outages. An additional objective was for the Tribe to gain an understanding of the requirements, costs, and benefits of developing and operating such plants on the reservation. The Makah Indian Reservation, with a total land area of forty-seven square miles, is located on the northwestern tip of the Olympic Peninsula in Washington State. Four major watersheds drain the main Reservation areas and the average rainfall is over one hundred inches per year. The reservation's west side borders the Pacific Ocean, but mostly consists of rugged mountainous terrain between 500 and 1,900 feet in elevation. Approximately 1,200 tribal members live on the Reservation and there is an additional non-Indian residential population of about 300. Electric power is provided by the Clallam County PUD. The annual usage on the reservation is approximately 16,700 mWh. Project Work Wind Energy--Two anemometer suites of equipment were installed on the reservation and operated for a more than a year. An off-site reference station was identified and used to project long-term wind resource characteristics at the two stations. Transmission resources were identified and analyzed. A preliminary financial analysis of a hypothetical wind power station was prepared and used to gauge the economic viability of installation of a multi-megawatt wind power station. Small Hydroelectric--Two potential sites for micro/small-hydro were identified by analysis of previous water resource studies, topographical maps, and conversations with knowledgeable Makah personnel. Field trips were conducted to collect preliminary site data. A report was prepared by Alaska Power & Telephone (Larry Coupe) including preliminary layouts, capacities, potential environmental issues, and projected costs. Findings and Conclusions Wind Energy The average wind resources measured at both sites were marginal, with annual average wind speeds of 13.6-14.0 mph at a 65-meter hub height, and wind shears of 0.08-0.13. Using GE 1.5 MW wind turbines with a hub height of 65 meters, yields a net capacity factor of approximately 0.19. The cost-of-energy for a commercial project is estimated at approximately 9.6 cents per kWh using current costs for capital and equipment prices. Economic viability for a commercial wind power station would require a subsidy of 40-50% of the project capital cost, loans provided at approximately 2% rate of interest, or a combination of grants and loans at substantially below market rates. Recommendations: Because the cost-of-energy from wind power is decreasing, and because there may be small pockets of higher winds on the reservation, our recommendation is to: (1) Leave one of the two anemometer towers, preferably the 50-meter southern unit MCC, in place and continue to collect data from this site. This site would serve as an excellent reference anemometer for the Olympic Peninsula, and, (2) If funds permit, relocate the northern tower (MCB) to a promising small site closer to the transmission line with the hope of finding a more energetic site that is easier to develop. Small Hydroelectric There are a very limited number of sites on the reservation that have potential for economical hydroelectric development, even in conjunction with water supply development. Two sites emerged as the most promising and were evaluated: (1) One utilizing four creeks draining the north side of the Cape Flattery peninsula (Cape Creeks), and (2) One on the Waatch River to the south of Neah Bay. The Cape Creeks site would be a combination water supply and 512 kW power generation facility and would cost a approximately $11,100,000. Annual power generation would be approximately 1,300,0

RobertLynette; John Wade; Larry Coupe

2005-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

110

The 1997 Water Rights Settlement between the State of Montana and the Chippewa Cree Tribe of the Rocky Boy's Reservation: The Role of Community and of the Trustee  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ct. Mont. ), asserting the claims of the Blackfeet Tribeof the Blackfeet Reservation, the Chippewa Cree Tribe of theAsserting the claims of the Blackfeet Tribe of the Black-

Cosens, Barbara A.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Developing Clean Energy Projects on Tribal Lands: Data and Resources for Tribes (Book)  

SciTech Connect

This is a outreach brochure (booklet) for the DOE Office of Indian Energy summarizing the renewable energy technology potential on tribal lands. The booklet features tech potential maps for various technologies, information about the activities of DOE-IE, and resources for Tribes.

Not Available

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Tribal Energy Program, Assisting Tribes to Realize Their Energy Visions (Brochure), Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)  

SciTech Connect

This 12-page brochure provides an overview of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's Tribal Energy Program and describes the financial, technical, and educational assistance it provides to help tribes develop their renewable energy resources and reduce their energy consumption.

Not Available

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Tribal Energy Program, Assisting Tribes to Realize Their Energy Visions (Brochure), Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)  

SciTech Connect

This 12-page brochure provides an overview of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's Tribal Energy Program and describes the financial, technical, and educational assistance it provides to help tribes develop their renewable energy resources and reduce their energy consumption.

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

FY 2007 Progress Report for Upper Columbia United Tribes' Regional Coordination.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is a summary of activities conducted over the fiscal year 2007 contract period to fulfill requirements to coordinate Upper Columbia United Tribes (UCUT) interests within the Columbia River Basin. This coordination was specific to the implementation of portions of the Integrated Fish and Wildlife Program within the purview of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council and Bonneville Power Administration.

Michel, D.R.

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

115

The Landscape of Klamath Basin Rock Art  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Lines: Ethnographic Sources and Rock Art Interpretationwhen applying these sources toward rock art interpretation.information source for developing rock art interpretations.

David, Robert James

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Rock Harbor UNITED STATES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Passage Conglomerate Bay Five Finger Bay Lane Cove Stockly Bay Lake Ojibway Siskiwit River Creek Little River Washington Moskey M cCargoe Cove Robinson Bay Amygdaloid Channel Pickerel Cove Chippewa Harbor Crystal Cove Belle Isle Canoe Rocks Caribou Island Saginaw Point Tookers Island The Palisades Raspberry

117

Microwave assisted hard rock cutting  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for the sequential fracturing and cutting of subsurface volume of hard rock (102) in the strata (101) of a mining environment (100) by subjecting the volume of rock to a beam (25) of microwave energy to fracture the subsurface volume of rock by differential expansion; and , then bringing the cutting edge (52) of a piece of conventional mining machinery (50) into contact with the fractured rock (102).

Lindroth, David P. (Apple Valley, MN); Morrell, Roger J. (Bloomington, MN); Blair, James R. (Inver Grove Heights, MN)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Definition: Rock Density | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

in crustal rocks. Rock density is a physical characteristic that is governed by the chemical composition (in situ minerals) and pore spaces of a specific rock or rock type.1...

119

Session: Hot Dry Rock  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of four presentations: ''Hot Dry Rock - Summary'' by George P. Tennyson, Jr.; ''HDR Opportunities and Challenges Beyond the Long Term Flow Test'' by David V. Duchane; ''Start-Up Operations at the Fenton Hill HDR Pilot Plant'' by Raymond F. Ponden; and ''Update on the Long-Term Flow Testing Program'' by Donald W. Brown.

Tennyson, George P. Jr.; Duchane, David V.; Ponden, Raymond F.; Brown, Donald W.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Kalispel Tribe of Indians Wildlife Mitigation and Restoration for Albeni Falls Dam: Flying Goose Ranch Phase I.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is a recommendation from the Kalispel Tribe to the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) for wildlife habitat mitigation for the extensive habitat losses caused by Albeni Falls Dam on and near the Kalispel Indian Reservation.

Merker, Christopher

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rock sioux tribe" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Workshop Provides Hands-On Project Development Training for 26 Tribes |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Workshop Provides Hands-On Project Development Training for 26 Workshop Provides Hands-On Project Development Training for 26 Tribes Workshop Provides Hands-On Project Development Training for 26 Tribes September 30, 2013 - 6:25pm Addthis The Office of Indian Energy's Community- and Facility-Scale Tribal Renewable Energy Project Development and Finance workshop was held September 18-20 at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, Colorado. Photo by John De La Rosa, NREL The Office of Indian Energy's Community- and Facility-Scale Tribal Renewable Energy Project Development and Finance workshop was held September 18-20 at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, Colorado. Photo by John De La Rosa, NREL Workshop attendees reviewed renewable energy resource maps to identify the best sites for potential projects based on available resources. Photo by John De La Rosa, NREL

122

MHK Projects/Colorado River Indian Tribes IRR DI | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Colorado River Indian Tribes IRR DI Colorado River Indian Tribes IRR DI < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.9825,"lon":-113.394,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

123

Workshop Provides Hands-On Project Development Training for 26 Tribes |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Workshop Provides Hands-On Project Development Training for 26 Workshop Provides Hands-On Project Development Training for 26 Tribes Workshop Provides Hands-On Project Development Training for 26 Tribes September 30, 2013 - 6:25pm Addthis The Office of Indian Energy's Community- and Facility-Scale Tribal Renewable Energy Project Development and Finance workshop was held September 18-20 at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, Colorado. Photo by John De La Rosa, NREL The Office of Indian Energy's Community- and Facility-Scale Tribal Renewable Energy Project Development and Finance workshop was held September 18-20 at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, Colorado. Photo by John De La Rosa, NREL Workshop attendees reviewed renewable energy resource maps to identify the best sites for potential projects based on available resources. Photo by John De La Rosa, NREL

124

Clearwater Focus Watershed; Nez Perce Tribe, 2003-2004 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Watershed Division, approaches watershed restoration with a goal to protect, restore, and enhance a connected network of functioning habitat types capable of supporting all fish life stages. Its goal is also to re-establish normal patterns of production, dispersal, and exchange of genetic information within the 1855 Treaty Area. The Nez Perce Tribe began watershed restoration projects within the Clearwater River Subbasin in 1996. Progress has been made in restoring the sub-basin by excluding cattle from critical riparian areas through fencing, stabilizing stream banks, decommissioning roads, and upgrading culverts. Coordination of these projects is critical to the success of the restoration of the sub-basin. Coordination activities also includes: inter and intra-department coordination, sub-basin assessment and planning, involving government and private organizations, and treaty area coordination.

Jones, Ira (Nez Perce Tribe, Lapwai, ID)

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Clearwater Focus Watershed; Nez Perce Tribe, 2002-2003 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Watershed Division, approaches watershed restoration with a goal to protect, restore, and enhance a connected network of functioning habitat types capable of supporting all fish life stages. Its goal is also to re-establish normal patters of production, dispersal, and exchange of genetic information within the 1855 Treaty Area. The Nez Perce Tribe began watershed restoration projects within the Clearwater River Subbasin in 1996. Progress has been made in restoring the sub-basin by excluding cattle from critical riparian areas through fencing, stabilizing streambanks, decommissioning roads, and upgrading culverts. Coordination of these projects is critical to the success of the restoration of the sub-basin. Coordination includes: within department coordination, sub-basin assessment and planning, and treaty area coordination.

Jones, Ira (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Lapwai, ID)

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Clearwater Focus Watershed; Nez Perce Tribe, 2005-2006 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Watershed Division, approaches watershed restoration with a goal to protect, restore, and enhance a connected network of functioning habitat types capable of supporting all fish life stages. The key objective of the Nez Perce Tribe Focus Coordinator position is to overcome fragmentation within the basin by managing communications with the subbasin, providing an overall framework and process for coordinated fisheries restoration and managing the planning, assessment, implementation, and monitoring and evaluation process. The Nez Perce Tribe began watershed restoration projects within the Clearwater River Subbasin in 1996. Progress has been made in restoring the sub-basin by excluding cattle from critical riparian areas through fencing, stabilizing stream banks, decommissioning roads, restoring fish passage, as well as other watershed restoration projects. Coordination of these projects is critical to the success of the restoration of the sub-basin. Coordination activities also includes: inter and intra-department coordination, sub-basin assessment and planning, involving government and private organizations, and treaty area coordination.

Jones, Ira; McRoberts, Heidi (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Lapwai, ID)

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Clearwater Focus Watershed; Nez Perce Tribe, 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Watershed Division, approaches watershed restoration with a goal to protect, restore, and enhance a connected network of functioning habitat types capable of supporting all fish life stages. The key objective of the Nez Perce Tribe Focus Coordinator position is to overcome fragmentation within the basin by managing communications with the subbasin, providing an overall framework and process for coordinated fisheries restoration and managing the planning, assessment, implementation, and monitoring and evaluation process. The Nez Perce Tribe began watershed restoration projects within the Clearwater River Subbasin in 1996. Progress has been made in restoring the sub-basin by excluding cattle from critical riparian areas through fencing, stabilizing stream banks, decommissioning roads, restoring fish passage, as well as other watershed restoration projects. Coordination of these projects is critical to the success of the restoration of the sub-basin. Coordination activities also includes: inter and intra-department coordination, sub-basin assessment and planning, involving government and private organizations, and treaty area coordination.

Jones, Ira (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Lapwai, ID)

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Session: Hot Dry Rock  

SciTech Connect

This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of four presentations: ''Hot Dry Rock - Summary'' by George P. Tennyson, Jr.; ''HDR Opportunities and Challenges Beyond the Long Term Flow Test'' by David V. Duchane; ''Start-Up Operations at the Fenton Hill HDR Pilot Plant'' by Raymond F. Ponden; and ''Update on the Long-Term Flow Testing Program'' by Donald W. Brown.

Tennyson, George P. Jr.; Duchane, David V.; Ponden, Raymond F.; Brown, Donald W.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Rock Art in the Public Trust: Managing Prehistoric Rock Art on Federal Land  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Archaic North America. ? In Handbook of Rock Art Research,Rock Art Analysis. ? In Handbook of Archaeological Methods,Rock Art Analysis,? in Handbook of Archaeological Methods,

Hale, John Patrick

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Rock Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rock Sampling Rock Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Rock Sampling Details Activities (13) Areas (13) Regions (1) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Field Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock samples are used to define lithology. Field and lab analyses can be used to measure the chemical and isotopic constituents of rock samples. Stratigraphic/Structural: Provides information about the time and environment which formed a particular geologic unit. Microscopic rock textures can be used to estimate the history of stress and strain, and/or faulting. Hydrological: Isotope geochemistry can reveal fluid circulation of a geothermal system.

131

Applicant Location Requested DOE Funds Project Summary Feasibility Studies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Requested Requested DOE Funds Project Summary Feasibility Studies Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes Pablo, MT $850,000 This project will evaluate the technical and economic viability of a co-generation biomass fuel power plant. The plant would use fuels from tribal forest management activities to provide between 2.5 to 20 megawatts (MW) of electricity to heat tribal buildings or sell on the wholesale market. Standing Rock Sioux Tribe Fort Yates, ND $430,982 This project will perform a feasibility study over the course of two years on three tribal sites to support the future development of 50 to 100 MW of wind power. Navajo Hopi Land Commission (NHLCO), Navajo Nation Window Rock, AZ $347,090 This project will conduct a feasibility study to explore potential

132

Energy from hot dry rock  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Program is described. The system, operation, results, development program, environmental implications, resource, economics, and future plans are discussed. (MHR)

Hendron, R.H.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Overview: Hard Rock Penetration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hard Rock Penetration program is developing technology to reduce the costs of drilling and completing geothermal wells. Current projects include: lost circulation control, rock penetration mechanics, instrumentation, and industry/DOE cost shared projects of the Geothermal Drilling organization. Last year, a number of accomplishments were achieved in each of these areas. A new flow meter being developed to accurately measure drilling fluid outflow was tested extensively during Long Valley drilling. Results show that this meter is rugged, reliable, and can provide useful measurements of small differences in fluid inflow and outflow rates. By providing early indications of fluid gain or loss, improved control of blow-out and lost circulation problems during geothermal drilling can be expected. In the area of downhole tools for lost circulation control, the concept of a downhole injector for injecting a two-component, fast-setting cementitious mud was developed. DOE filed a patent application for this concept during FY 91. The design criteria for a high-temperature potassium, uranium, thorium logging tool featuring a downhole data storage computer were established, and a request for proposals was submitted to tool development companies. The fundamental theory of acoustic telemetry in drill strings was significantly advanced through field experimentation and analysis. A new understanding of energy loss mechanisms was developed.

Dunn, J.C.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Overview - Hard Rock Penetration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hard Rock Penetration program is developing technology to reduce the costs of drilling and completing geothermal wells. Current projects include: lost circulation control, rock penetration mechanics, instrumentation, and industry/DOE cost shared projects of the Geothermal Drilling Organization. Last year, a number of accomplishments were achieved in each of these areas. A new flow meter being developed to accurately measure drilling fluid outflow was tested extensively during Long Valley drilling. Results show that this meter is rugged, reliable, and can provide useful measurements of small differences in fluid inflow and outflow rates. By providing early indications of fluid gain or loss, improved control of blow-out and lost circulation problems during geothermal drilling can be expected. In the area of downhole tools for lost circulation control, the concept of a downhole injector for injecting a two-component, fast-setting cementitious mud was developed. DOE filed a patent application for this concept during FY 91. The design criteria for a high-temperature potassium, uranium, thorium logging tool featuring a downhole data storage computer were established, and a request for proposals was submitted to tool development companies. The fundamental theory of acoustic telemetry in drill strings was significantly advanced through field experimentation and analysis. A new understanding of energy loss mechanisms was developed.

Dunn, James C.

1992-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

135

Overview: Hard Rock Penetration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hard Rock Penetration program is developing technology to reduce the costs of drilling and completing geothermal wells. Current projects include: lost circulation control, rock penetration mechanics, instrumentation, and industry/DOE cost shared projects of the Geothermal Drilling organization. Last year, a number of accomplishments were achieved in each of these areas. A new flow meter being developed to accurately measure drilling fluid outflow was tested extensively during Long Valley drilling. Results show that this meter is rugged, reliable, and can provide useful measurements of small differences in fluid inflow and outflow rates. By providing early indications of fluid gain or loss, improved control of blow-out and lost circulation problems during geothermal drilling can be expected. In the area of downhole tools for lost circulation control, the concept of a downhole injector for injecting a two-component, fast-setting cementitious mud was developed. DOE filed a patent application for this concept during FY 91. The design criteria for a high-temperature potassium, uranium, thorium logging tool featuring a downhole data storage computer were established, and a request for proposals was submitted to tool development companies. The fundamental theory of acoustic telemetry in drill strings was significantly advanced through field experimentation and analysis. A new understanding of energy loss mechanisms was developed.

Dunn, J.C.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Carbon deposition during brittle rock deformation: Changes in electrical properties of fault zones and potential geoelectric phenomena during earthquakes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To investigate potential mechanisms for geoelectric phenomena accompanying earthquakes, we have deformed hollow cylinders of Sioux quartzite to failure in the presence of carbonaceous pore fluids and investigated the resulting changes in electrical conductivity and carbon distribution. Samples were loaded at room temperature or 400 C by a hydrostatic pressure at their outer diameter, increasing pressure at a constant rate to {approx}290 MPa. Pore fluids consisted of pure CO, CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4} and a 1:1 mixture of CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4}, each with pore pressures of 2.0 to 4.1 MPa. Failure occurred by the formation of mode II shear fractures transecting the hollow cylinder walls. Radial resistivities of the cylinders fell to 2.9 to 3.1 M{Omega}-m for CO tests and 15.2 to 16.5 M{Omega}-m for CO{sub 2}:CH{sub 4} tests, compared with >23 M{Omega}-m for dry, undeformed cylinders. Carbonaceous fluids had no discernable influence on rock strength. Based on mapping using electron microprobe techniques, carbon occurs preferentially as quasi-continuous films on newly-formed fracture surfaces, but these films are absent from pre-existing surfaces in those same experiments. The observations support the hypothesis that electrical conductivity of rocks is enhanced by the deposition of carbon on fracture surfaces and imply that electrical properties may change in direct response to brittle deformation. They also suggest that the carbon films formed nearly instantaneously as the cracks formed. Carbon film deposition may accompany the development of microfracture arrays prior to and during fault rupture and thus may be capable of explaining precursory and coseismic geoelectric phenomena.

Mathez, E A; Roberts, J J; Duba, A G; Kronenberg, A K; Karner, S L

2008-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

137

Workshop on hydrology of crystalline basement rocks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This workshop covered the following subjects: measurements in relatively shallow boreholes; measurement and interpretation of data from deep boreholes; hydrologic properties of crystalline rocks as interpreted by geophysics and field geology; rock mechanics related to hydrology of crystalline rocks; the possible contributions of modeling to the understanding of the hydrology of crystalline rocks; and geochemical interpretations of the hydrology of crystalline rocks. (MHR)

Davis, S.N. (comp.)

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Wind Generation Feasibility Study for Sac & Fox Tribe of the Mississippi in Iowa (Meskwaki Nation)  

SciTech Connect

1.2 Overview The Meskwaki Nation will obtain an anemometer tower. Install the tower at the site that has been pre-qualified as the site most likely to produce maximum electric power from the wind. It will collect meteorological data from the towerâ??s sensors for a one year period, as required for due diligence to identify the site as appropriate for the installation of a wind turbine to provide electric power for the community. Have the collected data analyzed by a meteorologist and a professionally certified wind engineer to produce the reports of expected power generation at the site, for the specific wind turbine(s) under consideration for installation. 1.2.1 Goals of the Tribe The feasibility study reports, including technical and business analyses will be used to obtain contracts and financing required to develop and implement a wind turbine project on the Meskwaki Settlement. Our goal is to produce two (2) mega watts of power and to reduce the cost for electricity currently being paid by the Meskwaki Casino. 1.2.2 Project Objectives Meet the energy needs of the community with clean energy. Bring renewable energy to the settlement in a responsible, affordable manner. Maximize both the economic and the spiritual benefits to the tribe from energy independence. Integrate the Tribeâ??s energy policies with its economic development goals. Contribute to achieving the Tribeâ??s long-term goals of self-determination and sovereignty. 1.2.3 Project Location The precise location proposed for the tower is at the following coordinates: 92 Degrees, 38 Minutes, 46.008 Seconds West Longitude 41 Degrees, 59 Minutes, 45.311 Seconds North Latitude. A circle of radius 50.64 meters, enclosing and area of 1.98 acres in PLSS Township T83N, Range R15W, in Iowa. In relative directions, the site is 1,650 feet due west of the intersection of Highway 30 and 305th Street in Tama, Iowa, as approached from the direction of Toledo, Iowa. It is bounded on the north by Highway 30 and on the south by 305th Street, a street which runs along a meandering west-south-west heading from this intersection with Highway 30. In relation to Settlement landmarks, it is 300 meters west of the Meskwaki water tower found in front of the Meskwaki Public Works Department, and is due north of the athletic playing fields of the Meskwaki Settlement School. The accompanying maps (in the Site Resource Maps File) use a red pushpin marker to indicate the exact location, both in the overview frames and in the close-up frame. 1.2.4 Long Term Energy Vision The Meskwaki Tribe is committed to becoming energy self-sufficient, improving the economic condition of the tribe, and maintaining Tribal Values of closeness with Grandmother Earth. The details of the Tribeâ??s long-term vision continues to evolve. A long term vision exists of: 1) a successful assessment program; 2) a successful first wind turbine project reducing the Tribeâ??s cost of electricity; 3) creation of a Meskwaki Tribal Power Utility/Coop under the auspices of the new tribal Corporation, as we implement a master plan for economic and business development; 4), and opening the doors for additional wind turbines/renewable energy sources on the community. The additional turbines could lead directly to energy self-sufficiency, or might be the one leg of a multi-leg approach using multiple forms of renewable energy to achieve self-sufficiency. We envision current and future assessment projects providing the data needed to qualify enough renewable energy projects to provide complete coverage for the entire Meskwaki Settlement, including meeting future economic development projectsâ?? energy needs. While choosing not to engage in excessive optimism, we can imagine that in the future the Iowa rate-setting bodies will mandate that grid operators pay fair rates (tariffs) to renewable suppliers. We will be ready to expand renewable production of electricity for export, when that time comes. The final report includes the Wind

Lasley, Larry C. [Sac & Fox Tribe of the Mississippi in Iowa

2013-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

139

Shotgun cartridge rock breaker  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A rock breaker uses shotgun cartridges or other firearm ammunition as the explosive charge at the bottom of a drilled borehole. The breaker includes a heavy steel rod or bar, a gun with a firing chamber for the ammunition which screws onto the rod, a long firing pin running through a central passage in the rod, and a firing trigger mechanism at the external end of the bar which strikes the firing pin to fire the cartridge within the borehole. A tubular sleeve surround the main body of the rod and includes slits the end to allow it to expand. The rod has a conical taper at the internal end against which the end of the sleeve expands when the sleeve is forced along the rod toward the taper by a nut threaded onto the external end of the rod. As the sleeve end expands, it pushes against the borehole and holds the explosive gasses within, and also prevents the breaker from flying out of the borehole. The trigger mechanism includes a hammer with a slot and a hole for accepting a drawbar or drawpin which, when pulled by a long cord, allows the cartridge to be fired from a remote location.

Ruzzi, Peter L. (Eagan, NM); Morrell, Roger J. (Bloomington, MN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Rock Density | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Rock Density Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Rock Density Details Activities (2) Areas (2) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Lab Analysis Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Rock Lab Analysis Parent Exploration Technique: Rock Lab Analysis Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Density of different lithologic units. Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Thermal: Cost Information Low-End Estimate (USD): 10.001,000 centUSD 0.01 kUSD 1.0e-5 MUSD 1.0e-8 TUSD / sample

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rock sioux tribe" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Post Rock | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rock Rock Jump to: navigation, search Name Post Rock Facility Post Rock Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Wind Capital Group Developer Wind Capital Group Energy Purchaser Westar Energy Location Ellsworth KS Coordinates 38.87269233°, -98.33059788° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.87269233,"lon":-98.33059788,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

142

Rock physics at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Rock physics refers to the study of static and dynamic chemical and physical properties of rocks and to phenomenological investigations of rocks reacting to man-made forces such as stress waves and fluid injection. A bibliography of rock physics references written by LASL staff members is given. Listing is by surname of first author. (RWR)

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Isotopic Analysis- Rock | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis- Rock Isotopic Analysis- Rock Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Isotopic Analysis- Rock Details Activities (13) Areas (11) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Lab Analysis Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Rock Lab Analysis Parent Exploration Technique: Rock Lab Analysis Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Water rock interaction Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Thermal: Dictionary.png Isotopic Analysis- Rock: Isotopes are atoms of the same element that have different numbers of neutrons. An isotopic analysis looks at a particular isotopic element(s) in a given system, while the conditions which increase/decrease the number of neutrons are well understood and measurable.

144

Texas Originals Introduction: We are not the first people to Walk Across Texas. Many of the nomadic tribes of Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Texas Originals Introduction: We are not the first people to Walk Across Texas. Many of the nomadic tribes of Texas were doing this long before we got here. Before Europeans introduced horses to the Native Level and Subject: Seventh Grade Texas History TEKS: TH 2a, 9b, 9c, 10a, 11a, 20a, 21a, 22a, 22b, 22c

Wilkins, Neal

145

Sharp-tailed Grouse Restoration; Colville Tribes Restore Habitat for Sharp-tailed Grouse, Annual Report 2002-2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Columbian Sharp-Tailed Grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus columbianus) (CSTG) are an important traditional and cultural species to the Colville Confederated Tribes (CCT), Spokane Tribe of Indians (STOI), and other Tribes in the Region. They were once the most abundant upland bird in the Region. Currently, the largest remaining population in Washington State occurs on the CCT Reservation in Okanogan County. Increasing agricultural practices and other land uses has contributed to the decline of sharp-tail habitat and populations putting this species at risk. The decline of this species is not new (Yokum, 1952, Buss and Dziedzic, 1955, Zeigler, 1979, Meints 1991, and Crawford and Snyder 1994). The Tribes (CCT and STOI) are determined to protect, enhance and restore habitat for this species continued existence. When Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Hydro-projects were constructed, inundated habitat used by this species was lost forever adding to overall decline. To compensate and prevent further habitat loss, the CCT proposed a project with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funding to address this species and their habitat requirements. The projects main focus is to address habitat utilized by the current CSTG population and determine ways to protect, restore, and enhance habitats for the conservation of this species over time. The project went through the NPPC Review Process and was funded through FY03 by BPA. This report addresses part of the current CCT effort to address the conservation of this species on the Colville Reservation.

Whitney, Richard

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Hot Dry Rock - Summary  

SciTech Connect

Hot Dry Rock adds a new flexibility to the utilization of geothermal energy. Almost always the approach has been to limit that utilization to places where there is a natural source of water associated with a source of heat. Actually, the result was that steam was mined. Clearly there are much larger heat resources available which lack natural water to transport that energy to the surface. Also, as is found in hydrothermal fields being mined for steam, the water supply finally gets used up. There is a strong motive in the existing capital investment to revitalize those resources. Techniques for introducing, recovering and utilizing the water necessary to recover the heat from below the surface of the earth is the subject of this session. Implicit in that utilization is the ability to forecast with reasonable accuracy the busbar cost of that energy to the utility industry. The added element of supplying the water introduces costs which must be recovered while still supplying energy which is competitive. Hot Dry Rock technology can supply energy. That has been proved long since. The basic barrier to its use by the utility industry has been and remains proof to the financial interests that the long term cost is competitive enough to warrant investment in a technology that is new to utility on-grid operations. As the opening speaker for this session states, the test that is underway will ''simulate the operations of a commercial facility in some ways, but it will not show that energy from HDR can be produced at a variety of locations with different geological settings''. Further, the Fenton Hill system is a research facility not designed for commercial production purposes, but it can give indications of how the system must be changed to provide economic HDR operations. And so it is that we must look beyond the long term flow test, at the opportunities and challenges. Proving that the huge HDR resources can be accessed on a worldwide scale must involve the construction of additional sites, preferably to the specifications of the now Federal geothermal community. These facilities will have to be engineered to produce and market energy at competitive prices. At the same time, we must not rest on our technological laurels, though they be many. Design and operational techniques have been conceived which could lead to improved economics and operations for HDR. These must be pursued and where merit is found, vigorously pursued. Accelerated research and development ought to include revolutionary drilling techniques, reservoir interrogation, and system modeling to assure the competitiveness and geographical diversity of applications of HDR. Much of this work will be applicable to the geothermal industry in general. More advanced research ought to include such innovations as the utilization of other operating fluids. Supercritical carbon dioxide and the ammonia/water (Kalina) cycle have been mentioned. But even as the near and more distant outlook is examined, today's work was reported in the HDR session. The start-up operations for the current test series at the Fenton Hill HDR Pilot Plant were described. The surface plant is complete and initial operations have begun. While some minor modifications to the system have been required, nothing of consequence has been found to impede operations. Reliability, together with the flexibility and control required for a research system were shown in the system design, and demonstrated by the preliminary results of the plant operations and equipment performance. Fundamental to the overall success of the HDR energy resource utilization is the ability to optimize the pressure/flow impedance/time relationships as the reservoir is worked. Significant new insights are still being developed out of the data which will substantially affect the operational techniques applied to new systems. However, again, these will have to be proved to be general and not solely specific to the Fenton Hill site. Nevertheless, high efficiency use of the reservoir without unintended reservoir grow

Tennyson, George P. Jr.

1992-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

147

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Office of Energy Efficiency and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

24, 2011 24, 2011 CX-006570: Categorical Exclusion Determination North Dakota-Tribe-Standing Rock Sioux Tribe CX(s) Applied: B3.6, B5.1 Date: 08/24/2011 Location(s): Fort Yates, North Dakota Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy August 24, 2011 CX-006569: Categorical Exclusion Determination Michigan-County-Macomb CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B5.1 Date: 08/24/2011 Location(s): Macomb County, Michigan Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy August 24, 2011 CX-006567: Categorical Exclusion Determination Recovery Act: A 3D-3C Reflection Seismic Survey and Data Integration to Identify the Seismic Response of Fractures and Permeable Zones Over a Known Geothermal Resource: Soda Lake, Churchill County, Nevada CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1, B3.7 Date: 08/24/2011 Location(s): Churchill County, Nevada

148

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: American Recovery and Reinvestment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

August 25, 2011 August 25, 2011 CX-006516: Categorical Exclusion Determination Carolina Blue Skies Initiative CX(s) Applied: A1, B5.1 Date: 08/25/2011 Location(s): Durham, North Carolina Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory August 25, 2011 CX-006515: Categorical Exclusion Determination Midwest Region Alternative Fuels Project CX(s) Applied: A7 Date: 08/25/2011 Location(s): Lincoln, Nebraska Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory August 24, 2011 CX-006570: Categorical Exclusion Determination North Dakota-Tribe-Standing Rock Sioux Tribe CX(s) Applied: B3.6, B5.1 Date: 08/24/2011 Location(s): Fort Yates, North Dakota Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy August 24, 2011 CX-006569: Categorical Exclusion Determination

149

U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy NEPA Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MN-TRIBE-SHAKOPEE MDEWAKANTON SIOUX COMMUNITY OF MN-TRIBE-SHAKOPEE MDEWAKANTON SIOUX COMMUNITY OF MINNESOTA Location: Tribe MN-TRIBE- SHAKOPEE MDEWAKANTON SIOUX COMMUNITY OF MINNESOTA MN American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description The Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community of Minnesota proposes to retrofit streetlights on the Dakota Parkway with energy efficient light-emitting diode lighting fixtures. Conditions: None Categorical Exclusion(s) Applied: B1.32, B5.1 *-For the complete DOE National Environmental Policy Act regulations regarding categorical exclusions, see Subpart D of 10 CFR10 21 This action would not: threaten a violation of applicable statutory, regulatory, or permit requirements for environment, safety, and health, including DOE and/or Executive Orders; require siting, construction, or major expansion of waste storage, disposal, recovery, or

150

Strategic Energy Planning (Area 1) Consultants Reports to Citizen Potawatomi Nation Federally Recognized Indian Tribe  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The assets that Citizen Potawatomi Nation holds were evaluated to help define the strengths and weaknesses to be used in pursuing economic prosperity. With this baseline assessment, a Planning Team will create a vision for the tribe to integrate into long-term energy and business strategies. Identification of energy efficiency devices, systems and technologies was made, and an estimation of cost benefits of the more promising ideas is submitted for possible inclusion into the final energy plan. Multiple energy resources and sources were identified and their attributes were assessed to determine the appropriateness of each. Methods of saving energy were evaluated and reported on and potential revenue-generating sources that specifically fit the tribe were identified and reported. A primary goal is to create long-term energy strategies to explore development of tribal utility options and analyze renewable energy and energy efficiency options. Associated goals are to consider exploring energy efficiency and renewable economic development projects involving the following topics: (1) Home-scale projects may include construction of a home with energy efficiency or renewable energy features and retrofitting an existing home to add energy efficiency or renewable energy features. (2) Community-scale projects may include medium to large scale energy efficiency building construction, retrofit project, or installation of community renewable energy systems. (3) Small business development may include the creation of a tribal enterprise that would manufacture and distribute solar and wind powered equipment for ranches and farms or create a contracting business to include energy efficiency and renewable retrofits such as geothermal heat pumps. (4) Commercial-scale energy projects may include at a larger scale, the formation of a tribal utility formed to sell power to the commercial grid, or to transmit and distribute power throughout the tribal community, or hydrogen production, and propane and natural-gas distribution systems.

Smith, Marvin; Bose, James; Beier, Richard; Chang, Young Bae

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field Investigations Of In Situ...

152

Rock Lab Analysis | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rock Lab Analysis Rock Lab Analysis Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Rock Lab Analysis Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Lab Analysis Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Rock Lab Analysis Parent Exploration Technique: Lab Analysis Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Core and cuttings analysis is done to define lithology. Water rock interaction. Can determine detailed information about rock composition and morphology. Density of different lithologic units. Rapid and unambiguous identification of unknown minerals.[1] Stratigraphic/Structural: Core analysis can locate faults or fracture networks. Oriented core can give additional important information on anisotropy. Historic structure and deformation of land.

153

Laser Rock Perforation Demo - The NE Multimedia Collection  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

rock perforation demo High power laser beam can be used in oil well completion application for perforating oil reservoir rock and increasing rock's permeability for high oil...

154

PARKER-HEADGATE ROCK & PARKER-GILA  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PARKER-HEADGATE ROCK & PARKER-GILA 161-kV TRANSMISSION LINE Cross Arm Repair and Helicopter Staging Areas Figure 1. Project Location Project Location j PARKER-HEADGATE ROCK &...

155

NAWIG News: The Quarterly Newsletter of the Native American Wind Interest Group; Winter 2003  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Rosebud Sioux: First Tribe in the Nation to Sell Rosebud Sioux: First Tribe in the Nation to Sell Wind Power Alex "Little Soldier" Lunderman had a vision. The former Rosebud Sioux tribal chairman saw a long line of people behind him walking toward a traditional tipi. In the tipi, he saw computers and other kinds of technologies that his people could use to protect their Mother Earth, and he knew that generating clean electricity from the Four Winds could help his people. The Rosebud Sioux Wind Project proves that he was right. Lunderman passed into the Spirit World in 2000, but his legacy lives on. In February 2003, the first utility-scale tribally owned wind turbine, a 750-kilowatt NEG Micon named after Lunderman, was installed on the Rosebud Sioux Indian Reservation, marking the end of eight years

156

The Asacarsarmiut Tribe proposes to conduct energy efficient building retrofits to tribal homes which  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NATIVE VILLAGE OF CHENEGA BAY NATIVE VILLAGE OF CHENEGA BAY Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program Location: Tribe AK-TRIBE-NATIVE VILLAGE OF CHENEGA BAY AK American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description The Native Village of Chenega Bay of Alaska proposes to purchase and install materials and equipment needed to replace three electrical transformers, including pedestals and pads, which are part of the power system which provides electricity to residential properties in the Native Village of Chenega Bay, Alaska. These transformer upgrades will provide uninterrupted electrical power to twenty-three existing residential structures. Conditions: None Categorical Exclusion(s) Applied: B2.5, B5.1 *-For the complete DOE National Environmental Policy Act regulations regarding categorical exclusions, see Subpart D of 10 CFR10 21

157

FEASIBILITY STUDY FOR A PETROLEUM REFINERY FOR THE JICARILLA APACHE TRIBE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A feasibility study for a proposed petroleum refinery for the Jicarilla Apache Indian Reservation was performed. The available crude oil production was identified and characterized. There is 6,000 barrels per day of crude oil production available for processing in the proposed refinery. The proposed refinery will utilize a lower temperature, smaller crude fractionation unit. It will have a Naphtha Hydrodesulfurizer and Reformer to produce high octane gasoline. The surplus hydrogen from the reformer will be used in a specialized hydrocracker to convert the heavier crude oil fractions to ultra low sulfur gasoline and diesel fuel products. The proposed refinery will produce gasoline, jet fuel, diesel fuel, and a minimal amount of lube oil. The refinery will require about $86,700,000 to construct. It will have net annual pre-tax profit of about $17,000,000. The estimated return on investment is 20%. The feasibility is positive subject to confirmation of long term crude supply. The study also identified procedures for evaluating processing options as a means for American Indian Tribes and Native American Corporations to maximize the value of their crude oil production.

John D. Jones

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Dispersivity as an oil reservoir rock characteristic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main objective of this research project is to establish dispersivity, {alpha}{sub d}, as an oil reservoir rock characteristic and to use this reservoir rock property to enhance crude oil recovery. A second objective is to compare the dispersion coefficient and the dispersivity of various reservoir rocks with other rock characteristics such as: porosity, permeability, capillary pressure, and relative permeability. The dispersivity of a rock was identified by measuring the physical mixing of two miscible fluids, one displacing the other in a porous medium. 119 refs., 27 figs., 12 tabs.

Menzie, D.E.; Dutta, S.

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Hot dry rock energy project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A proof-of-concept experimental project by the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory endeavors to establish the feasibility of exploitation of the thermal energy contained in the earth's crust where such energy and a transporting fluid have not been juxtaposed in nature. A region of high heat flow and apparently unfaulted basement rock formation was selected. Two boreholes, drilled to a total depth of about 3 km (10,000 ft) and penetrating about 2.5 km (7500 ft) into the Precambrian formation, to a rock temperature of 200/sup 0/C, have been connected at depth by a hydraulically fractured zone to form the heat extraction surface. Energy was extracted at a rate of 3.2 MW(t) with water temperature of 132/sup 0/C during a 96-h preliminary circulating test run performed late in September 1977. This paper traces the progress of the project, summarizes procedures and salient events, and references detailed reports and specialized topics.

Hendron, R.H.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Relative Permeability of Fractured Rock  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Contemporary understanding of multiphase flow through fractures is limited. Different studies using synthetic fractures and various fluids have yielded different relative permeability-saturation relations. This study aimed to extend the understanding of multiphase flow by conducting nitrogen-water relative permeability experiments on a naturally-fractured rock from The Geysers geothermal field. The steady-state approach was used. However, steady state was achieved only at the endpoint saturations. Several difficulties were encountered that are attributed to phase interference and changes in fracture aperture and surface roughness, along with fracture propagation/initiation. Absolute permeabilities were determined using nitrogen and water. The permeability values obtained change with the number of load cycles. Determining the absolute permeability of a core is especially important in a fractured rock. The rock may change as asperities are destroyed and fractures propagate or st rain harden as the net stresses vary. Pressure spikes occurred in water a solute permeability experiments. Conceptual models of an elastic fracture network can explain the pressure spike behavior. At the endpoint saturations the water relative permeabilities obtained are much less than the nitrogen gas relative permeabilities. Saturations were determined by weighing and by resistivity calculations. The resistivity-saturation relationship developed for the core gave saturation values that differ by 5% from the value determined by weighing. Further work is required to complete the relative permeability curve. The steady-state experimental approach encountered difficulties due to phase interference and fracture change. Steady state may not be reached until an impractical length of time. Thus, unsteady-state methods should be pursued. In unsteady-state experiments the challenge will be in quantifying rock fracture change in addition to fluid flow changes.

Mark D. Habana

2002-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rock sioux tribe" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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161

CX-005522: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

522: Categorical Exclusion Determination 522: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-005522: Categorical Exclusion Determination South Dakota-Tribe-Yankton Sioux Tribe CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 03/30/2011 Location(s): South Dakota Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant. The Yankton Sioux Tribe of South Dakota proposes to employ a Tribal Grant Coordinator to oversee the Yankton Sioux Tribe?s Solar Energy Project and to utilize funds to pay for training costs/stipends to trainees attending a training course on assembling solar air heating systems. The trainees would install solar collector panels (approximately 10-15 solar heating panels per building) on approximately 3 to 6 tribal buildings. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-005522.pdf More Documents & Publications

162

Hot Dry Rock; Geothermal Energy  

SciTech Connect

The commercial utilization of geothermal energy forms the basis of the largest renewable energy industry in the world. More than 5000 Mw of electrical power are currently in production from approximately 210 plants and 10 000 Mw thermal are used in direct use processes. The majority of these systems are located in the well defined geothermal generally associated with crustal plate boundaries or hot spots. The essential requirements of high subsurface temperature with huge volumes of exploitable fluids, coupled to environmental and market factors, limit the choice of suitable sites significantly. The Hot Dry Rock (HDR) concept at any depth originally offered a dream of unlimited expansion for the geothermal industry by relaxing the location constraints by drilling deep enough to reach adequate temperatures. Now, after 20 years intensive work by international teams and expenditures of more than $250 million, it is vital to review the position of HDR in relation to the established geothermal industry. The HDR resource is merely a body of rock at elevated temperatures with insufficient fluids in place to enable the heat to be extracted without the need for injection wells. All of the major field experiments in HDR have shown that the natural fracture systems form the heat transfer surfaces and that it is these fractures that must be for geothermal systems producing from naturally fractured formations provide a basis for directing the forthcoming but, equally, they require accepting significant location constraints on HDR for the time being. This paper presents a model HDR system designed for commercial operations in the UK and uses production data from hydrothermal systems in Japan and the USA to demonstrate the reservoir performance requirements for viable operations. It is shown that these characteristics are not likely to be achieved in host rocks without stimulation processes. However, the long term goal of artificial geothermal systems developed by systematic engineering procedures at depth may still be attained if high temperature sites with extensive fracturing are developed or exploited. [DJE -2005

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Definition: Rock Lab Analysis | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

to core recovered from boreholes. They typically involve measuring the physical and chemical properties of the rock. Physical properties include density, elastic modulus, seismic...

164

Rock Energy Cooperative (Illinois) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cooperative (Illinois) Jump to: navigation, search Name Rock Energy Cooperative Place Illinois Utility Id 16196 References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File220101...

165

DOE hot dry rock program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydraulic fracturing has been used to create and subsequently to enlarge the first hot dry rock heat-extraction loop at Fenton Hill, New Mexico. Encouraging results prompted the DOE to expand this project into a program of national scope. The elements of that Program and their present status are discussed. Emphasis is given the ongoing Fenton Hill Project where techniques and information developed in the existing research system will soon be used to produce a multiply-fractured engineering system in hotter rock at the same site. Recent results from research loop operation and progress in constructing the engineering system are reported. Although acoustic mapping and system geometry indicate that the primary hydraulic fractures are essentially vertical, relatively low fracturing pressure and absence of a sharp breakdown suggest that at Fenton Hill fracture initiation occurs by reopening of old natural fractures rather than by initiation of new ones. Flow patterns and temperature behavior suggest opening of additional old fractures as the loop is operated. Except where the hot fluid leaves the crack system to enter the production well, flow impedances are very low without either artificial propping or inflation by pressurization.

Nunz, G.J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Schmid et al. Inclusion Behavior in Deforming Rocks Inclusion Behavior in Deforming Rocks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Schmid et al. Inclusion Behavior in Deforming Rocks Inclusion Behavior in Deforming Rocks Dani Podladchikov, PGP, University of Oslo, Norway Intro 1 #12;Schmid et al. Inclusion Behavior in Deforming Rocks Motivation 2 The single most useful thing to understand! #12;Schmid et al. Inclusion Behavior in Deforming

Cesare, Bernardo

167

The hot dry rock geothermal energy program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The paper presents a simplified description of the Department of Energy's Hot-Dry-Rock program conducted at Fenton Hill, New Mexico. What a hot-dry-rock resource is and what the magnitude of the resource is are also described.

Smith, M.C.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Proceedings of hot dry rock geothermal workshop  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Abstracts of 38 papers are included on the following subjects: rock mechanics, part 1: hydraulic fracturing; fracture imaging and borehole surveying; fluid flow-pressure analyses; rock mechanics, part 2: hydraulic fracturing and thermal cracking; geochemistry; heat extraction modeling; and economics and energy conversion. (MHR)

Elsner, D.B. (comp.)

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Journeys within the Leucophoropterini: Revision of the Tribe, Genera and Species, and Description of New Genera and Species from Australia and the Indo-Pacific  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The tribe Leucophoropterini (Miridae: Phylinae) is a diverse assemblage of primarily Indo-Pacific and Australian bugs which are united by simple, small genitalia and a trend towards ant-mimetic body forms. Previous to this work, the relationship of the Leucophoropterini to the other tribes of Phylinae, as well as the generic relationships within the lineage, was unresolved. Further, the characters initially proposed to unite the tribe are brought into question with the addition of several recently discovered taxa from Australia. The Leucophoropterini is first re-evaluated within a phylogenetic analysis of the subfamily Phylinae, using a combined molecular and morphological dataset to test the monophyly of the lineage, re-test the character synapomorphies supporting it, and to determine the closest relatives to the tribe. The molecular dataset includes 4 genes (COII, 16S, 28S, and 18S), and 123 morphological characters for 104 taxa, which is analyzed in a parsimony analysis using Tree analysis using New Technology [TNT], a model-based analysis in RAxML, and a Bayesian analysis in Mr. Bayes. All three methods resulted in phylogenetic trees with nearly identical generic and tribal groupings, and a lineage containing Pseudophylus Yasunaga, Decomia Poppius and Tuxedo Schuh being sister-group to the Leucophoropterini. With the closest relatives to the Leucophoropterini determined for outgroup selection, a generic revision of the tribe including both Australian and Indo-Pacific taxa is accomplished using 137 morphological characters and is analyzed in an un-weighted and implied weighted parsimony analysis using TNT for 86 leucophoropterine taxa. The Indo-Pacific taxa of Leucophoropterini are found to be related to the Australian Leucophoropterini, and at least two genera within the tribe (Sejanus Distant, Leucophoroptera Poppius) were found to be paraphyletic. Lastly, taxa are revised within the context of the generic-level phylogenetic analysis, with new genera and species from Australia and the Indo-Pacific being described.

Menard, Katrina Louise

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Eagle Rock Geothermal Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Eagle Rock Geothermal Facility Eagle Rock Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Eagle Rock Geothermal Facility General Information Name Eagle Rock Geothermal Facility Facility Eagle Rock Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Location The Geysers, California Coordinates 38.826770222484°, -122.80002593994° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.826770222484,"lon":-122.80002593994,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

171

Definition: Rock Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sampling Sampling Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Rock Sampling Systematic rock sampling can be used to characterize a geothermal reservoir. The physical and chemical properties of rock samples provide important information for determining whether a power generation or heat utilization facility can be developed. Some general rock properties can be measured by visual inspection, but detailed properties require laboratory techniques. View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition A core sample is a cylindrical section of (usually) a naturally occurring substance. Most core samples are obtained by drilling with special drills into the substance, for example sediment or rock, with a hollow steel tube called a core drill. The hole made for the core sample is called the "core hole". A variety of core samplers exist to sample

172

FRACTURE DETECTION IN CRYSTALLINE ROCK USING ULTRASONIC SHEAR WAVES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the piezoelectric source plate and the rock surface. With aThe S^j sources were bonded to the rock surface with a fast-^ source plate was epoxied in position on the rock specimen.

Waters, K.H.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Some approaches to rock mass hydrofracture theory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new engineering method has been developed at the Leningrad Mining Institute for defining hot dry rock hydrofracturing parameters. It reflects the structural features of a real jointed rock mass, its gravity-tectonic components of the stress tensor and volume character of deformations, taking into account the inertial effects of hydrodynamics in the non-Darcy zone of radial fluid flow near the injection well, and conversion of the heat energy extracted from hot rock by circulating water partly into filtration-flow additional pressure. Results of calculations are compared to field experiments at Fenton Hill, NM, and are used for the first HDR circulation systems in the USSR.

Dyadkin, Yuri, D.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field Investigations Of In Situ Geochemical Behavior Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field Investigations Of In Situ Geochemical Behavior Details Activities (5) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: Two hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal energy reservoirs have been created by hydraulic fracturing of Precambrian granitic rock between two wells on the west flank of the Valles Caldera in the Jemez Mountains of northern New Mexico. Heat is extracted by injecting water into one well,

175

Rock of Ages | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of Ages of Ages Jump to: navigation, search Name Rock of Ages Facility Rock of Ages Sector Wind energy Facility Type Small Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Rock of Ages Energy Purchaser Rock of Ages Location Graniteville VT Coordinates 44.14668574°, -72.48180896° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.14668574,"lon":-72.48180896,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

176

Definition: Isotopic Analysis- Rock | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis- Rock Isotopic Analysis- Rock Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Isotopic Analysis- Rock Isotopes are atoms of the same element that have different numbers of neutrons. An isotopic analysis looks at a particular isotopic element(s) in a given system, while the conditions which increase/decrease the number of neutrons are well understood and measurable.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition References ↑ http://wwwrcamnl.wr.usgs.gov/isoig/isopubs/itchch2.html Ret LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. rieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Isotopic_Analysis-_Rock&oldid=687702" Category: Definitions What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties

177

Rock bed heat accumulators. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The principal objectives of the research program on rock bed heat accumulators (or RBHA) are: (1) to investigate the technical and economic feasibility of storing large amounts of thermal energy (in the tens of MWt range) at high temperature (up to 500/sup 0/C) over extended periods of time (up to 6 months) using native earth or rock materials; (2) to conduct studies to establish the performance characteristics of large rock bed heat accumulators at various power and temperature levels compatible with thermal conversion systems; and (3) to assess the materials and environmental problems associated with the operation of such large heat accumulators. Results of the study indicate that rock bed heat accumulators for seasonal storage are both technically and economically feasible, and hence could be exploited in various applications in which storage plays an essential role such as solar power and total energy systems, district and cogeneration heating systems.

Riaz, M.

1977-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Microsoft Word - ProvisionsFundsColvilleConfederatedTribesPurchaseLoupLoupCreekAeneasCreekProperties_CX.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7, 2011 7, 2011 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Dave Roberts Project Manager - KEWU-4 Proposed Action: Provisions of funds to the Colville Confederated Tribes for purchase of the Loup Loup Creek and Aeneas Creek properties. Fish and Wildlife Project No.: 2008-104-00 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.25 Transfer, lease, disposition or acquisition of interests in uncontaminated land for habitat preservation or wildlife management, and only associated buildings that support these purposes. Uncontaminated means that there would be no potential for release of substances at a level, or in a form, that would pose a threat to public health or the environment.

179

Waginogans and Other Indian Homes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Waginogans and Other Indian Homes Waginogans and Other Indian Homes Nature Bulletin No. 578 October 31, 1959 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Daniel Ryan, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor Richard Becker, Naturalist WAGINOGANS AND OTHER INDIAN HOMES The American Indians built homes of many types that varied according to the materials available and the customs and culture of each tribe or nation. Sioux and other plains Indians who followed the buffalo lived in teepees. The "longhouse" of the Iroquois, built of poles covered with bark and surrounded by a palisade, was a large permanent structure housing several families. So, too, were the fort-like pueblos and cliff dwellings built of rocks and adobe clay by some of the southwestern "agricultural" Indians.

180

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

21 - 19230 of 26,764 results. 21 - 19230 of 26,764 results. Download CX-000123: Categorical Exclusion Determination Standing Rock Sioux Tribe Wind Energy Project CX(s) Applied: B3.6, B5.1 Date: 12/09/2009 Location(s): North Dakota Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-000123-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-000121: Categorical Exclusion Determination Fort Belknap Indian Community of the Fort Belknap Reservation Energy Efficiency and Conservation Strategy CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11 Date: 12/08/2009 Location(s): Montana Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-000121-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-000107: Categorical Exclusion Determination Beavercreek's Energy Conservation Audit for City Hall and Police Building

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rock sioux tribe" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B3.6 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9, 2009 9, 2009 CX-000123: Categorical Exclusion Determination Standing Rock Sioux Tribe Wind Energy Project CX(s) Applied: B3.6, B5.1 Date: 12/09/2009 Location(s): North Dakota Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy December 8, 2009 CX-000819: Categorical Exclusion Determination Thin-Film Development Laboratory CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 12/08/2009 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office December 8, 2009 CX-000820: Categorical Exclusion Determination Vacuum Induction Melting of Metals CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 12/08/2009 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office December 8, 2009 CX-000818: Categorical Exclusion Determination Scanned Probe Microscopy Surface Analysis and Sample Preparation

182

Deep drilling technology for hot crystalline rock  

SciTech Connect

The development of Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal systems at the Fenton Hill, New Mexico site has required the drilling of four deep boreholes into hot, Precambrian granitic and metamorphic rocks. Thermal gradient holes, four observation wells 200 m (600 ft) deep, and an exploration core hole 800 m (2400 ft) deep guided the siting of the four deep boreholes. Results derived from the exploration core hole, GT-1 (Granite Test No. 1), were especially important in providing core from the granitic rock, and establishing the conductive thermal gradient and heat flow for the granitic basement rocks. Essential stratigraphic data and lost drilling-fluid zones were identified for the volcanic and sedimentary rocks above the contact with the crystalline basement. Using this information drilling strategies and well designs were then devised for the planning of the deeper wells. The four deep wells were drilled in pairs, the shallowest were planned and drilled to depths of 3 km in 1975 at a bottom-hole temperature of nearly 200/sup 0/C. These boreholes were followed by a pair of wells, completed in 1981, the deepest of which penetrated the Precambrian basement to a vertical depth of 4.39 km at a temperature of 320/sup 0/C.

Rowley, J.C.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Category:Little Rock, AR | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AR AR Jump to: navigation, search Go Back to PV Economics By Location Media in category "Little Rock, AR" The following 16 files are in this category, out of 16 total. SVFullServiceRestaurant Little Rock AR Entergy Arkansas Inc.png SVFullServiceRestauran... 71 KB SVHospital Little Rock AR Entergy Arkansas Inc.png SVHospital Little Rock... 69 KB SVLargeHotel Little Rock AR Entergy Arkansas Inc.png SVLargeHotel Little Ro... 70 KB SVLargeOffice Little Rock AR Entergy Arkansas Inc.png SVLargeOffice Little R... 71 KB SVMediumOffice Little Rock AR Entergy Arkansas Inc.png SVMediumOffice Little ... 68 KB SVMidriseApartment Little Rock AR Entergy Arkansas Inc.png SVMidriseApartment Lit... 70 KB SVOutPatient Little Rock AR Entergy Arkansas Inc.png SVOutPatient Little Ro...

184

Rock-brine chemical interactions. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of experimental interaction of powdered volcanic rock with aqueous solutions are presented at temperatures from 200 to 400/sup 0/C, 500 to 1000 bars fluid pressure, with reaction durations of approximately 30 days under controlled laboratory conditions. The aim of this research is to develop data on the kinetics and equilibria of rock solution interactions that will provide insight into the complex geochemical processes attending geothermal reservoir development, stimulation, and reinjection. The research was done in the Stanford Hydrothermal Lab using gold cell equipment of the Dickson design. This equipment inverts the solution rock mixture several times a minute to ensure thorough mixing. Solution samples were periodically withdrawn without interruption of the experimental conditions. The data from these experiments suggests a path dependent series of reactions by which geothermal fluids might evolve from meteoric or magmatic sources.

Not Available

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Rock melting tool with annealer section  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A rock melting penetrator is provided with an afterbody that rapidly cools a molten geological structure formed around the melting tip of the penetrator to the glass transition temperature for the surrounding molten glass-like material. An annealing afterbody then cools the glass slowly from the glass transition temperature through the annealing temperature range to form a solid self-supporting glass casing. This allows thermally induced strains to relax by viscous deformations as the molten glass cools and prevents fracturing of the resulting glass liner. The quality of the glass lining is improved, along with its ability to provide a rigid impermeable casing in unstable rock formations.

Bussod, Gilles Y. (Santa Fe, NM); Dick, Aaron J. (Oakland, CA); Cort, George E. (Montrose, CO)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Financial assistance to states and tribes to support emergency preparedness and response and the safe transportation of hazardous shipments: 1996 Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report revises and updates the 1995 report Financial Assistance to States and Tribes to Support Emergency Preparedness and Response and the Safe Transportation of Hazardous Shipments, PNL-10260 (UC-620). The presentation of data and some of the data reported have been changed; these data supersede those presented in the earlier publication. All data have been updated to fiscal year 1995, with the exception of FEMA data that are updated to fiscal year 1994 only. The report identifies and summarizes existing sources of financial assistance to States and Tribes in preparing and responding to transportation emergencies and ensuring the safe transportation of hazardous shipments through their jurisdictions. It is intended for use as an information resource for the U.S. Department of Energy`s Office of Environmental Management (EM), Office of Transportation, Emergency Management, and Analytical Services (EM-76).

Bradbury, J.A.; Leyson, J.; Lester, M.K.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Indian Relics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Relics Relics Nature Bulletin No. 210-A December 11, 1965 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation INDIAN RELICS The American Indians, before the coming of the white man, were Stone Age people. Theirs was a hand culture, employing tools of stone, bone, shell and wood. Certain tribes used copper found near Lake Superior and elsewhere, but no Indian had learned to use metals like bronze and iron. Others had learned to weave and made baskets or clothing out of plant materials. Most tribes made pottery: molding and baking vessels of clay tempered with sand, powdered rock or shell; some crude; some very good. They had learned to farm and had domesticated many useful plants such as corn, beans, squash and tobacco, but they had not discovered the wheel, nor the plow, and the dog was their only domestic animal. Some tribes, like the Sioux of the great plains, were wandering hunters depending upon the buffalo for food and clothing.

188

U.S. Department of Energy NEPA Categorical Exclusion Determination Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MT-TEP-FORT PECK ASSINIBOINE & SIOUX TRIBES MT-TEP-FORT PECK ASSINIBOINE & SIOUX TRIBES Location: Tribal FORT PECK ASSINIBOINE & SIOUX TRIBES MT American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description 1) Complete feasibility study: Evaluation of existing geological, geophysical, and geochemical criteria to identify keys parameters for the geothermal resource within the Polar Dome oil field on the Fort Peck Indian Reservation (compilation) and determine how to expand the geothermal reservoir and how to explore for additional geothermal targets (exploration/reassessment)--includes limited geologic survey and site assessment Conditions: None Categorical Exclusion(s) Applied: A9, A11 *-For the complete DOE National Environmental Policy Act regulations regarding categorical exclusions, see Subpart D of 10 CFR10 21

189

EIS-0312: Record of Decision for the 2008 Columbia Basin Fish Accord MOA with the Shoshone-Banock Tribes (11/06/08)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MOA WITH THE SHOSHONE-BANNOCK TRIBES November 6, 2008 i TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 INTRODUCTION...................................................................................................... 1 2.0 BACKGROUND ........................................................................................................ 2 2.1 Litigation Leads to Collaborative Remand ....................................................... 2 2.2 Collaboration Leads to Negotiations ................................................................ 2 3.0 MUTUAL COMMITMENTS OF THE SHO-BAN MOA..................................... 4 3.1 Purpose and Principles..................................................................................... 4 3.2 Hydro Commitments.........................................................................................

190

Esimation of field-scale thermal conductivities of unsaturated rocks from in-situ temperature data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

vicinity of the heat source, and rock temperature exceededand the dry rock near the heat source. The other differencesources, heat transfer takes place through the wet rock (see

Mukhopadhyay, Sumit; Tsang, Yvonne W.; Birkholzer, Jens T.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

SEARCH FOR UNDERGROUND OPENINGS FOR IN SITU TEST FACILITIES IN CRYSTALLINE ROCK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Index Appendix 1. Sources of Information Rock properties -various sources, and list of mines in crystalline rock whichoz SOURCE EOLOGY INFORMATION MINERALOGY OF HOST ROCKS GULF

Wallenberg, H.A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Proceedings of the Second International Symposium on Dynamics of Fluids in Fractured Rock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

toward the heat source, or into the rock underlying the heatcharacterizing DNAPL source zones in fractured rock at theby a point source injection in fractured rock with multiple

Faybishenko, Boris; Witherspoon, Paul A.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Seismic and Acoustic Investigations of Rock Fall Initiation, Processes, and Mechanics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

systems and rock fall source and impact areas, it possible to a rock fall source area in the possible to a rock fall source area. There are

Zimmer, Valerie Louise

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Rim Rock Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rim Rock Wind Farm Rim Rock Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Rim Rock Wind Farm Facility Rim Rock Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NaturEner Developer NaturEner Energy Purchaser San Diego Gas & Electric Location Glacier and Toole Counties MT Coordinates 48.779564°, -112.061291° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":48.779564,"lon":-112.061291,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

195

Storage capacity in hot dry rock reservoirs  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for extracting thermal energy, in a cyclic manner, from geologic strata which may be termed hot dry rock. A reservoir comprised of hot fractured rock is established and water or other liquid is passed through the reservoir. The water is heated by the hot rock, recovered from the reservoir, cooled by extraction of heat by means of heat exchange apparatus on the surface, and then re-injected into the reservoir to be heated again. Water is added to the reservoir by means of an injection well and recovered from the reservoir by means of a production well. Water is continuously provided to the reservoir and continuously withdrawn from the reservoir at two different flow rates, a base rate and a peak rate. Increasing water flow from the base rate to the peak rate is accomplished by rapidly decreasing backpressure at the outlet of the production well in order to meet periodic needs for amounts of thermal energy greater than a baseload amount, such as to generate additional electric power to meet peak demands. The rate of flow of water provided to the hot dry rock reservoir is maintained at a value effective to prevent depletion of the liquid inventory of the reservoir. 4 figs.

Brown, D.W.

1997-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

196

Transfer of hot dry rock technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development Program has focused worldwide attention on the facts that natural heat in the upper part of the earth's crust is an essentially inexhaustible energy resource which is accessible almost everywhere, and that practical means now exist to extract useful heat from the hot rock and bring it to the earth's surface for beneficial use. The Hot Dry Rock Program has successfully constructed and operated a prototype hot, dry rock energy system that produced heat at the temperatures and rates required for large-scale space heating and many other direct uses of heat. The Program is now in the final stages of constructing a larger, hotter system potentially capable of satisfying the energy requirements of a small, commercial, electrical-generating power plant. To create and understand the behavior of such system, it has been necessary to develop or support the development of a wide variety of equipment, instruments, techniques, and analyses. Much of this innovative technology has already been transferred to the private sector and to other research and development programs, and more is continuously being made available as its usefulness is demonstrated. This report describes some of these developments and indicates where this new technology is being used or can be useful to industry, engineering, and science.

Smith, M.C.

1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Hot-dry-rock geothermal resource 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The work performed on hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal resource evaluation, site characterization, and geophysical exploration techniques is summarized. The work was done by region (Far West, Pacific Northwest, Southwest, Rocky Mountain States, Midcontinent, and Eastern) and limited to the conterminous US.

Heiken, G.; Goff, F.; Cremer, G. (ed.)

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Segmentation of cracks in shale rock  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper the use of morphological connected filters are studied for segmenting sheet- and thread-like cracks in images of shale rock. A volume formed from a stack of 2-D X-ray images is processed using 3-D attributes. The shape-preserving property ...

Erik R. Urbach; Marina Pervukhina; Leanne Bischof

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

STANFORD ROCK PHYSICS BOREHOLE GEOPHYSICS PROJECT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TABLE OF CONTENTS A: Rock Physics and Geology. Pressure-solution models and the velocity......................................................... A3 Pressure trends of compressional-and shear-wave velocities measured measured in sands to 20 MPA.....................................................C3 Properties of pore fluids at very high pressures from equations of state. Walls & Dvorkin

Nur, Amos

200

Storage capacity in hot dry rock reservoirs  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of extracting thermal energy, in a cyclic manner, from geologic strata which may be termed hot dry rock. A reservoir comprised of hot fractured rock is established and water or other liquid is passed through the reservoir. The water is heated by the hot rock, recovered from the reservoir, cooled by extraction of heat by means of heat exchange apparatus on the surface, and then re-injected into the reservoir to be heated again. Water is added to the reservoir by means of an injection well and recovered from the reservoir by means of a production well. Water is continuously provided to the reservoir and continuously withdrawn from the reservoir at two different flow rates, a base rate and a peak rate. Increasing water flow from the base rate to the peak rate is accomplished by rapidly decreasing backpressure at the outlet of the production well in order to meet periodic needs for amounts of thermal energy greater than a baseload amount, such as to generate additional electric power to meet peak demands. The rate of flow of water provided to the hot dry rock reservoir is maintained at a value effective to prevent depletion of the liquid

Brown, Donald W. (Los Alamos, NM)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rock sioux tribe" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Little Rock, Arkansas Small Business IT Security Workshop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Twitter, Facebook & Blogs Free Workshop helps Small Business Owners Reduce Cyber Threats LITTLE ROCK--The US ...

2013-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

202

CRC handbook of physical properties of rocks. Volume III  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This book presents topics on: Density of rocks and minerals, includes histograms of density ranges; elastic constants of minerals, elastic moduli, thermal properties; inelastic properties, strength and rheology for rocks and minerals, rock mechanics and friction, and stress-strain relations; radioactivity, decay constants and heat production of isotope systems in geology; seismic attenuation, in rocks, minerals, and the earth, with application to oil exploration and terrestrial studies; and index.

Carmichael, R.S.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

CX-003269: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9: Categorical Exclusion Determination 9: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-003269: Categorical Exclusion Determination South Dakota-Tribe-Oglala Sioux Tribe of the Pine Ridge Reservation, South Dakota CX(s) Applied: A9, B5.1 Date: 07/26/2010 Location(s): South Dakota Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program. The Oglala Sioux Tribe of South Dakota proposes to sponsor an outreach initiative to address the need to increase the rate and total number of low-income residential energy retrofits. The Tribe proposes to target mobile homes manufactured prior to 1976. The Tribe would assist Tribal members with acquisition, preparation, and submission of South Dakota Weatherization Assistance Program enrollment applications, provide an energy efficiency and

204

A digital rock density map of New Zealand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Digital geological maps of New Zealand (QMAP) are combined with 9256 samples with rock density measurements from the national rock catalogue PETLAB and supplementary geological sources to generate a first digital density model of New Zealand. This digital ... Keywords: Crust, Database, Density, Geological mapping, Gravimetry, Rock types

Robert Tenzer; Pascal Sirguey; Mark Rattenbury; Julia Nicolson

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Rock River Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind Farm Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Rock River Wind Farm Facility Rock River Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Shell Wind Energy Developer SeaWest Energy Purchaser PacifiCorp Location Arlington and Carbon Counties WY Coordinates 41.6996°, -107.003° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.6996,"lon":-107.003,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

206

A Phased Array Approach to Rock Blasting  

SciTech Connect

A series of laboratory-scale simultaneous two-hole shots was performed in a rock simulant (mortar) to record the shock wave interference patterns produced in the material. The purpose of the project as a whole was to evaluate the usefulness of phased array techniques of blast design, using new high-precision delay technology. Despite high-speed photography, however, we were unable to detect the passage of the shock waves through the samples to determine how well they matched the expected interaction geometry. The follow-up mine-scale tests were therefore not conducted. Nevertheless, pattern analysis of the vectors that would be formed by positive interference of the shockwaves from multiple charges in an ideal continuous, homogeneous, isotropic medium indicate the potential for powerful control of blast design, given precise characterization of the target rock mass.

Leslie Gertsch; Jason Baird

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Low Pore Connectivity in Natural Rock  

SciTech Connect

As repositories for CO? and radioactive waste, as oil and gas reservoirs, and as contaminated sites needing remediation, rock formations play a central role in energy and environmental management. The connectivity of the rock's porespace strongly affects fluid flow and solute transport. This work examines pore connectivity and its implications for fluid flow and chemical transport. Three experimental approaches (imbibition, tracer concentration profiles, and imaging) were used in combination with network modeling. In the imbibition results, three types of imbibition slope [log (cumulative imbibition) vs. log (imbibition time)] were found: the classical 0.5, plus 0.26, and 0.26 transitioning to 0.5. The imbibition slope of 0.26 seen in Indiana sandstone, metagraywacke, and Barnett shale indicates low pore connectivity, in contrast to the slope of 0.5 seen in the well-connected Berea sandstone. In the tracer profile work, rocks exhibited different distances to the plateau porosity, consistent with the pore connectivity from the imbibition tests. Injection of a molten metal into connected pore spaces, followed by 2-D imaging of the solidified alloy in polished thin sections, allowed direct assessment of pore structure and lateral connection in the rock samples. Pore-scale network modeling gave results consistent with measurements, confirming pore connectivity as the underlying cause of both anomalous behaviors: imbibition slope not having the classical value of 0.5, and accessible porosity being a function of distance from the edge. A poorly connected porespace will exhibit anomalous behavior in fluid flow and chemical transport, such as a lower imbibition slope (in airwater system) and diffusion rate than expected from classical behavior.

Hu, Qinhong; Ewing, Robert P.; Dultz, Stefan

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

208

Organic matter characteristics of CenomanianTuronian source rocks: implications for petroleum and gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and shale source rocks . In: Petroleum Geochemistry and Source Rock Potential of Carbonate Rocks (Ed. by G of petroleum . In: Petroleum Geochemistry and Source Rock Potential of Carbonate Rocks (Ed. by G. Palacas of petroleum in Mesozoic reservoirs to carbonate source rocks of Jurassic Smackover Formation, southwestern

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

209

Dynamic rock fragmentation: oil shale applications  

SciTech Connect

Explosive rock fragmentation techniques used in many resource recovery operations have in the past relied heavily upon traditions of field experience for their design. As these resources, notably energy resources, become less accessible, it becomes increasingly important that fragmentation techniques be optimized and that methods be developed to effectively evaluate new or modified explosive deployment schemes. Computational procedures have significant potential in these areas, but practical applications must be preceded by a thorough understanding of the rock fracture phenomenon and the development of physically sound computational models. This paper presents some of the important features of a rock fragmentation model that was developed as part of a program directed at the preparation of subterranean beds for in situ processing of oil shale. The model, which has been implemented in a two-dimensional Lagrangian wavecode, employs a continuum damage concept to quantify the degree of fracturing and takes into account experimental observations that fracture strength and fragment dimensions depend on tensile strain rates. The basic premises of the model are considered in the paper as well as some comparisons between calculated results and observations from blasting experiments.

Boade, R. R.; Grady, D. E.; Kipp, M. E.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Gage for measuring displacements in rock samples  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gage for measuring diametral displacement within a rock sample for use in a rock mechanics laboratory and in the field, comprises a support ring housing a linear variable differential transformer, a mounting screw, and a leaf spring. The mounting screw is adjustable and defines a first point of contact with the rock sample. The leaf spring has opposite ends fixed to the inner periphery of the mounting ring. An intermediate portion of the leaf spring projecting radially inward from the ring is formed with a dimple defining a second point of contact with the sample. The first and second points of contact are diametrically opposed to each other. The LVDT is mounted in the ring with its axis parallel to the line of measurement and its core rod received in the dimple of the leaf spring. Any change in the length of the line between the first and second support points is directly communicated to the LVDT. The leaf spring is rigid to completely support lateral forces so that the LVDT is free of all load for improved precision.

Holcomb, David J. (Albuquerque, NM); McNamee, Michael J. (Albuquerque, NM)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Los Alamos hot dry rock geothermal project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The greatest potential for geothermal energy is the almost unlimited energy contained in the vast regions of hot, but essentially impermeable, rock within the first six or seven km of the Earth's crust. For the past five years, the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory has been investigating and developing a practical, economical and environmentally acceptable method of extracting this energy. By early 1978, a 10 MW (thermal) heat extraction experiment will be in operation. In the Los Alamos concept, a man-made geothermal reservoir is formed by drilling into a region of suitably hot rock, and then creating within the rock a very large surface for heat transfer by large-scale hydraulic-fracturing techniques. After a circulation loop is formed by drilling a second hole to intersect the fractured region, the heat contained in this reservoir is brought to the surface by the buoyant closed-loop circulation of water. The water is kept liquid throughout the loop by pressurization, thereby increasing the rate of heat transport up the withdrawal hole compared to that possible with steam.

Brown, D.W.; Pettitt, R.A.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Artificial geothermal reservoirs in hot volcanic rock  

SciTech Connect

S>Some recent results from the Los Alamos program in which hydraulic fracturing is used for the recovery of geothermal energy are discussed. The location is about 4 kilometers west and south of the ring fault of the enormous Jemez Caldera in the northcentral part of New Mexico. It is shown that geothermal energy may be extracted from hot rock that does not contain circulating hot water or steam and is relatively impermeable. A fluid is pumped at high pressure into an isolated section of a wellbore. If the well is cased the pipe in this pressurized region is perforated as it is in the petroleum industry, so that the pressure may be applied to the rock, cracking it. A second well is drilled a few hundred feet away from the first. Cold water is injected through the first pipe, circulates through the crack, and hot water returns to the surface through the second pipe. Results are described and circumstances are discussed under which artiflcial geothermal reservoirs might be created in the basaltic rock of Hawaii. (MCW)

Aamodt, R.L.

1974-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

213

Gage for measuring displacements in rock samples  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gage for measuring diametral displacement within a rock sample for use in a rock mechanics laboratory and in the field, comprises a support ring housing a linear variable differential transformer (LVDT), a mounting screw, and a leaf spring. The mounting screw is adjustable and defines a first point of contact with the rock sample. The leaf spring has opposite ends fixed to the inner periphery of the mounting ring. An intermediate portion of the leaf spring projecting radially inward from the ring is formed with a dimple defining a second point of contact with the sample. The first and second points of contact are diametrically opposed to each other. The LVDT is mounted in the ring with its axis parallel to the line of measurement and its core rod received in the dimple of the leaf spring. Any change in the length of the line between the first and second support points is directly communicated to the LVDT. The leaf spring is rigid to completely support lateral forces so that the LVDT is free of all load for improved precision.

Holcomb, D.J.; McNamee, M.J.

1985-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

214

Calculation of explosive rock breakage: oil shale  

SciTech Connect

Improved efficiency in explosive rock breakage becomes increasingly important as mining costs and the need to tap underground resources continue to grow. Industry has recognized this need for many years and has done a great deal in developing new products and new blasting techniques, generally by purely empirical means. One particular application that has received added attention within the past several years, and one that lends itself to a more objective theoretical study, is explosive fracture of oil shale for conventional and in situ fossil energy recovery. Numerical calculation of oil shale fracturization with commercial explosives has the potential to add to an objective understanding of the breakage process. Often, in such numerical studies, only one or two parts of the total problem are addressed with any degree of sophistication or completeness. Here an attempt is made to treat the entire problem, i.e., explosive characterization, constitutive behavior of intact rock, and a mathematical description of rock fracture. The final results are two-dimensional calculations of explosively induced fracture damage in oil shale.

Johnson, J.N.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During Fiscal Year 1987, emphasis in the Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development Program was on preparations for a Long-Term Flow Test'' of the Phase II'' or Engineering'' hot dry rock energy system at Fenton Hill, New Mexico. A successful 30-day flow test of the system during FY86 indicated that such a system would produce heat at a temperature and rate that could support operation of a commercial electrical power plant. However, it did not answer certain questions basic to the economics of long-term operation, including the rate of depletion of the thermal reservoir, the rate of water loss from the system, and the possibility of operating problems during extended continuous operation. Preparations for a one-year flow test of the system to answer these and more fundamental questions concerning hot dry rock systems were made in FY87: design of the required surface facilities; procurement and installation of some of their components; development and testing of slimline logging tools for use through small-diameter production tubing; research on temperature-sensitive reactive chemical tracers to monitor thermal depletion of the reservoir; and computer simulations of the 30-day test, extended to modeling the planned Long-Term Flow Test. 45 refs., 34 figs., 5 tabs.

Smith, M.C.; Hendron, R.H.; Murphy, H.D.; Wilson, M.G.

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Development of hot dry rock resources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The LASL Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Project is the only U.S. field test of this geothermal resource. In the LASL concept, a man-made geothermal reservoir would be formed by drilling a deep hole into relatively impermeable hot rock, creating a large surface area for heat transfer by fracturing the rock hydraulically, then drilling a second hole to intersect the fracture to complete the circulation loop. In 1974, the first hole was drilled to a depth of 2929 m (9610 ft) and a hydraulic fracture was produced near the bottom. In 1975, a second hole was directionally drilled to intersect the fracture. Although the desired intersection was not achieved, a connection was made through which water was circulated. After a year's study of the fracture system, drilling began again in April 1977 and an improved connection was achieved. In September of 1977 a 5 MW (thermal) heat extraction and circulation experiment was conducted for 100 h as a preliminary test of the concept. An 1800-h circulation experiment was concluded on April 13, 1978 to determine temperature-drawdown, permeation water loss and flow characteristics of the pressurized reservoir, to examine chemistry changes in the circulating fluid, and to monitor for induced seismic effects.

Pettitt, R.A.; Tester, J.W.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Category:Rock Lab Analysis | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Category Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Category:Rock Lab Analysis Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Rock Lab Analysis page? For detailed information on exploration techniques, click here. Category:Rock Lab Analysis Add.png Add a new Rock Lab Analysis Technique Pages in category "Rock Lab Analysis" The following 9 pages are in this category, out of 9 total. C Core Analysis Cuttings Analysis I Isotopic Analysis- Rock O Over Core Stress P Paleomagnetic Measurements Petrography Analysis R Rock Density X X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF)

218

TWO-DIMENSIONAL MODELING OF LASER SPALLATION DRILLING OF ROCKS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DIMENSIONAL MODELING OF LASER SPALLATION DRILLING OF ROCKS DIMENSIONAL MODELING OF LASER SPALLATION DRILLING OF ROCKS P532 Zhiyue Xu, Yuichiro Yamashita 1 , and Claude B. Reed Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439, USA 1 Now with Kyushu University, Japan Abstract High power lasers can weaken, spall, melt and vaporize natural earth materials with thermal spallation being the most energy efficient rock removal mechanism. Laser rock spallation is a very complex phenomenon that depends on many factors. Computer numerical modeling would provides great tool to understand the fundamental of this complex phenomenon, which is crucial to the success of its applications. Complexity of modeling laser rock spallation is due to: 1) rock is a porous media, to which traditional theories of heat transfer and rock mechanics can not be directly

219

Goa, India Permeability of Charnokite Rock at High Temperatures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ABSTRACT: Permeability at high temperature is a very important parameter to be considered for designing underground high level nuclear waste repository (HLW) in rock mass. The surrounding rock mass is exposed to heat radiated by HLW when it is buried underground and development or extension of micro-cracks takes place in the host rock due to rise in temperature. Keeping this in view, the permeability study was conducted for Charnokite rock at high temperatures in the range from room temperature, 30 to 200 o C. The cylindrical rock samples of 36mm diameter and 150mm in length were used as per the required size for the equipment permeameter, TEMCO, USA. Total thirty rock samples were tested at various temperatures using nitrogen gas as fluid. The permeability tests were conducted at confining pressure of around 4MPa in order to simulate the horizontal in situ stress conditions in Charnokite rock at the depth of 400m for construction of HLW repository. 1

R. D. Dwivedi; R. K. Goel; A. Swarup; V. V. R. Prasad; R. K. Bajpai; P. K. Narayan; V. Arumugam

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Mechanical and acoustic properties of weakly cemented granular rocks  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the results of laboratory measurements on the mechanical and acoustic properties of weakly cemented granular rock. Artificial rock samples were fabricated by cementing sand and glass beads with sodium silicate binder. During uniaxial compression tests, the rock samples showed stress-strain behavior which was more similar to that of soils than competent rocks, exhibiting large permanent deformations with frictional slip. The mechanical behavior of the samples approached that of competent rocks as the amount of binder was increased. For very weak samples, acoustic waves propagating in these rocks showed very low velocities of less than 1000 m/sec for compressional waves. A borehole made within this weakly cemented rock exhibited a unique mode of failure that is called ''anti-KI mode fracture'' in this paper. The effect of cementation, grain type, and boundary conditions on this mode of failure was also examined experimentally.

Nakagawa, S.; Myer, L.R.

2001-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rock sioux tribe" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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221

Experimentally determined rock-fluid interactions applicable to a natural hot-dry-rock geothermal system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The field program cnsists of experiments in which hot rock of low permeability is hydraulically fractured between two wellbores. Water is circulated from one well to the other through the fractured hot rock. Our field experiments are designed to test reservoir engineering parameters such as heat-extraction rates, water-loss rates, flow characteristics including impedance and buoyancy, seismic activity, and fluid chemistry. Laboratory experiments were designed to provide information on the mineral-water reactivity encountered during the field program. Two experimental circulation systems tested the rates of dissolution and alteration during dynamic flow. Solubility of rock in agitated systems was studied. Moreover, pure minerals, samples of the granodiorite from the actual reservoir, and Tijeras Canyon granite have been reacted with distilled water and various solutions of NaCl, NaOH, and Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/. The results of these experimental systems are compared to the observations made in field experiments done within the hot dry rock reservoir at a depth of approximately 3 km where the initial rock temperature was 150 to 200/sup 0/C.

Charles, R.W.; Grigsby, C.O.; Holley, C.E. Jr.; Tester, J.W.; Blatz, L.A.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

ROCK PROPERTIES MODEL ANALYSIS MODEL REPORT  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Analysis and Model Report (AMR) is to document Rock Properties Model (RPM) 3.1 with regard to input data, model methods, assumptions, uncertainties and limitations of model results, and qualification status of the model. The report also documents the differences between the current and previous versions and validation of the model. The rock properties models are intended principally for use as input to numerical physical-process modeling, such as of ground-water flow and/or radionuclide transport. The constraints, caveats, and limitations associated with this model are discussed in the appropriate text sections that follow. This work was conducted in accordance with the following planning documents: WA-0344, ''3-D Rock Properties Modeling for FY 1998'' (SNL 1997, WA-0358), ''3-D Rock Properties Modeling for FY 1999'' (SNL 1999), and the technical development plan, Rock Properties Model Version 3.1, (CRWMS M&O 1999c). The Interim Change Notice (ICNs), ICN 02 and ICN 03, of this AMR were prepared as part of activities being conducted under the Technical Work Plan, TWP-NBS-GS-000003, ''Technical Work Plan for the Integrated Site Model, Process Model Report, Revision 01'' (CRWMS M&O 2000b). The purpose of ICN 03 is to record changes in data input status due to data qualification and verification activities. These work plans describe the scope, objectives, tasks, methodology, and implementing procedures for model construction. The constraints, caveats, and limitations associated with this model are discussed in the appropriate text sections that follow. The work scope for this activity consists of the following: (1) Conversion of the input data (laboratory measured porosity data, x-ray diffraction mineralogy, petrophysical calculations of bound water, and petrophysical calculations of porosity) for each borehole into stratigraphic coordinates; (2) Re-sampling and merging of data sets; (3) Development of geostatistical simulations of porosity; (4) Generation of derivative property models via linear coregionalization with porosity; (5) Post-processing of the simulated models to impart desired secondary geologic attributes and to create summary and uncertainty models; and (6) Conversion of the models into real-world coordinates. The conversion to real world coordinates is performed as part of the integration of the RPM into the Integrated Site Model (ISM) 3.1; this activity is not part of the current analysis. The ISM provides a consistent volumetric portrayal of the rock layers, rock properties, and mineralogy of the Yucca Mountain site and consists of three components: (1) Geologic Framework Model (GFM); (2) RPM, which is the subject of this AMR; and (3) Mineralogic Model. The interrelationship of the three components of the ISM and their interface with downstream uses are illustrated in Figure 1. Figure 2 shows the geographic boundaries of the RPM and other component models of the ISM.

Clinton Lum

2002-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

223

Sioux County, Iowa: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

869936°, -96.1526985° 869936°, -96.1526985° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.0869936,"lon":-96.1526985,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

224

Sioux Center, Iowa: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

72441°, -96.177681° 72441°, -96.177681° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.072441,"lon":-96.177681,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

225

Sioux Rapids, Iowa: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2.8933093°, -95.1511051° 2.8933093°, -95.1511051° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.8933093,"lon":-95.1511051,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

226

Sioux Falls, South Dakota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

5499749°, -96.700327° 5499749°, -96.700327° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.5499749,"lon":-96.700327,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

227

Sioux County, Nebraska: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

3.7289167° 3.7289167° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.5012873,"lon":-103.7289167,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

228

Sioux County, North Dakota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

101.1175392° 101.1175392° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":46.0512004,"lon":-101.1175392,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

229

Adsorption of water vapor on reservoir rocks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress is reported on: adsorption of water vapor on reservoir rocks; theoretical investigation of adsorption; estimation of adsorption parameters from transient experiments; transient adsorption experiment -- salinity and noncondensible gas effects; the physics of injection of water into, transport and storage of fluids within, and production of vapor from geothermal reservoirs; injection optimization at the Geysers Geothermal Field; a model to test multiwell data interpretation for heterogeneous reservoirs; earth tide effects on downhole pressure measurements; and a finite-difference model for free surface gravity drainage well test analysis.

Not Available

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Hot dry rock venture risks investigation:  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study assesses a promising resource in central Utah as the potential site of a future commerical hot dry rock (HDR) facility for generating electricity. The results indicate that, if the HDR reservoir productivity equals expectations based on preliminary results from research projects to date, a 50 MWe HDR power facility at Roosevelt Hot Springs could generate power at cost competitive with coal-fired plants. However, it is imperative that the assumed productivity be demonstrated before funds are committed for a commercial facility. 72 refs., 39 figs., 38 tabs.

Not Available

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Paradox Basin source rock, southeastern Utah : organic geochemical characterization of Gothic and Chimney Rock units, Ismay and Desert Creek zones, within a sequence stratigraphic framework.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Chimney Rock and Gothic units of the Pennsylvanian Paradox Formation have long been considered source rocks for the rich hydrocarbon fields of southeastern Utah. (more)

Tischler, Keith Louris

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Seepage into drifts in unsaturated fractured rock at Yucca Mountain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fractured Rock at Yucca Mountain Jens Birkholzer, Guomin Lrepository site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as it is locatedclimate conditions at Yucca Mountain. The numerical study is

Birkholzer, Jens; Li, Guomin; Tsang, Chin-Fu; Tsang, Yvonne

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Carbonation Mechanism of Reservoir Rock by Supercritical Carbon...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technologies Project Type Topic 2 Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Reservoir Rock Chemical Interactions Project Description Supercritical CO2 is currently becoming a more...

234

Rock Sampling At Yellowstone Region (Hellman & Ramsey, 2004)...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hot Springs And Associated Deposits In Yellowstone National Park Using Aster And Aviris Remote Sensing Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleRockSamplingAtYel...

235

Rock Sampling At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the target area, obtained rock samples for age dating and mineral chemistry, performed gravity and magnetic surveys, and integrated these results to identify potential drilling...

236

ROCK INSTRUMENTATION PROBLEMS EXPERIENCED DURING IN-SITU HEATER TESTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and R. Haught, Instrumentation evaluation, calibration, and27 - 30,1979. ROCK INSTRUMENTATION PROBLEMS EXPERIENCEDdiscussed here,l INSTRUMENTATION AND DATA ACQUISITION SYSTEM

Binnall, E.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Jazz and Blues Legends Rock the Northeast, Help Save Louisiana ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Jazz and Blues Legends Rock the Northeast, Help Save Louisiana's Coastal Wetlands. 6.8.2006 Neville Brothers, Dr. John and Mavis Staples Highlight the ...

238

Using Ornamental Rock Waste in the Manufacture of Pressed Brick ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... is a major producer of rock trimmest, with its production destined largely for export. ... Application of Electrospun Gas Diffusion Nanofibre-membranes in the...

239

ROCK MASS CHARACTERIZATION FOR STORAGE OF NUCLEAR WASTE IN GRANITE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

effect of pressure on electrical resistivity of rocks. J..exceptionally high electrical resistivity and low waterwater content is the electrical resistivity which in igneous

Witherspoon, P.A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Long Valley Caldera Area (Smith &...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Long Valley Caldera Area (Smith & Suemnicht, 1991) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis-...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rock sioux tribe" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Rock mechanics contributions from defense programs  

SciTech Connect

An attempt is made at illustrating the many contributions to rock mechanics from US defense programs, over the past 30-plus years. Large advances have been achieved in the technology-base area covering instrumentation, material properties, physical modeling, constitutive relations and numerical simulations. In the applications field, much progress has been made in understanding and being able to predict rock mass behavior related to underground explosions, cratering, projectile penetration, and defense nuclear waste storage. All these activities stand on their own merit as benefits to national security. But their impact is even broader, because they have found widespread applications in the non-defense sector; to name a few: the prediction of the response of underground structures to major earthquakes, the physics of the earth`s interior at great depths, instrumentation for monitoring mine blasting, thermo-mechanical instrumentation useful for civilian nuclear waste repositories, dynamic properties of earthquake faults, and transient large-strain numerical modeling of geological processes, such as diapirism. There is not pretense that this summary is exhaustive. It is meant to highlight success stories representative of DOE and DOD geotechnical activities, and to point to remaining challenges.

Heuze, F.E.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Hot dry rock geothermal heat extraction  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A man-made geothermal reservoir has been created at a depth of 2.7 km in hot, dry granite by hydraulic fracturing. The system was completed by directionally drilling a second well in close proximity with the top of the vertical fracture. In early 1978 heat was extracted from this reservoir for a period of 75 days. During this period thermal power was produced at an average rate of 4 MW(t). Theoretical analysis of th measured drawdown suggests a total fracture heat transfer area of 16,000 m/sup 2/. Viscous impedance to through-flow declined continuously so that at the end of the experiment this impedance was only one-fifth its initial value. Water losses to the surrounding rock formation also decreased continuously, and eventually this loss rate was less than 1% of the circulated flow rate. Geochemical analyses suggest that, with scale up of the heat transfer area and deeper, hotter reservoirs, hot dry rock reservoirs can ultimately produce levels of power on a commercial scale.

Murphy, H.D.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Hot Dry Rock at Fenton Hill, USA  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Project began in the early 1970's with the objective of developing a technology to make economically available the large ubiquitous thermal energy of the upper earth crust. The program, operated by the Los Alamos National Laboratory, has been funded by the Department of Energy (and its predecessors) and for a few years with participation by West Germany and Japan. An energy reservoir was accessed by drilling and hydraulically fracturing in the Precambrian basement rock at Fenton Hill, outside the Valles Caldera of north-central New Mexico. Water was circulated through the reservoir (Phase 1, 1978--1980) producing up to 5 MWt at 132/degree/C. A second (Phase 2) reservoir has been established with a deeper pair of holes and an initial flow test completed producing about 10 MWt at 190/degree/C. These accomplishments have been supported and paralleled by developments in drilling, well completion and instrumentation hardware. Acoustic or microseismic fracture mapping and geochemistry studies in addition to hydraulic and thermal data contribute to reservoir analyses. Studies of some of the estimated 430,000 quads of HDR resources in the United States have been made with special attention focused on sites most advantageous for early development. 17 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

Hendron, R.H.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

The US Hot Dry Rock project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hot Dry Rock geothermal energy project began in the early 1970's with the objective of developing a technology to make economically available the large ubiquitous thermal energy of the upper earth crust. The program has been funded by the Department of Energy (and its predecessors) and for a few years with participation by West Germany and Japan. An energy reservoir was accessed by drilling and hydraulically fracturing in the precambrian basement rock outside the Valles Caldera of north-central New Mexico. Water was circulated through the reservoir (Phase I, 1978-1980) producing up to 5 MWt at 132/sup 0/C. A second (Phase II) reservoir has been established with a deeper pair of holes and an initial flow test completed producing about 10 MWt at 190/sup 0/C. These accomplishments have been supported and paralleled by developments in drilling, well completion and instrumentation hardware. Acoustic or microseismic fracture mapping and geochemistry studies in addition to hydraulic and thermal data contribute to reservoir analyses. Studies of some of the estimated 430,000 quads of HDR resources in the United States have been made with special attention focused on sites most advantageous for early development.

Hendron, R.H.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Thermal conductivity of rocks associated with energy extraction from hot dry rock geothermal systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results of thermal conductivity measurements are given for 14 drill core rock samples taken from two exploratory HDR geothermal wellbores (maximum depth of 2929 m (9608 ft) drilled into Precambrian granitic rock in the Jemez Mountains of northern New Mexico. These samples have been petrographically characterized and in general represent fresh competent Precambrian material of deep origin. Thermal conductivities, modal analyses, and densities are given for all core samples studied under dry and water-saturated conditions. Additional measurements are reported for several sedimentary rocks encountered in the upper 760 m (2500 ft) of that same region. A cut-bar thermal conductivity comparator and a transient needle probe were used for the determinations with fused quartz and Pyroceram 9606 as the standards. The maximum temperature range of the measurements was from the ice point to 250/sup 0/C. The measurements on wet, water-saturated rock were limited to the temperature range below room temperature. Conductivity values of the dense core rock samples were generally within the range from 2 to 2.9 W/mK at 200/sup 0/C. Excellent agreement was achieved between these laboratory measurements of thermal conductivity and those obtained by in situ measurements used in the HDR wellbores. By using samples of sufficient thickness to provide a statistically representative heat flow path, no difference between conductivity values and their temperature coefficients for orthogonal directions (heat flow parallel or perpendicular to core axis) was observed. This isotropic behavior was even found for highly foliated gneissic specimens. Estimates of thermal conductivity based on a composite dispersion analysis utilizing pure minerallic phase conductivities and detailed modal analyses usually agreed to within 9 percent of the experimental values.

Sibbitt, W.L.; Dodson, J.G.; Tester, J.W.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

INDIAN COUNTRY ENERGY AND INFRASTRUCTURE WORKING GROUP ICEIWG  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

March 21, 2012 NEW ORLEANS, LOUISIANA Wyndham Garden Hotel-Baronne Plaza 201 Baronne Street New Orleans, LA 70112 (504) 522-0083 AGENDA MEETING ROOM - MAGNOLIA ROOM WEDNESDAY, MARCH 21, 2012 4:30pm - 6:30pm INTERNAL WORKING GROUP SESSION FOR ICEIWG MEMBERS ICEIWG Members and Alternates  Rodney Bordeaux, Chairman, Rosebud Sioux Tribe  Barney Enos, Jr., District 4 Community Council, Gila River Indian Community  Jim Manion, Warm Springs Power, Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon  Will Micklin, CEO, Ewiiaapaayp Band of Kumeyaay Indians  Mato Standing High, Attorney General, Rosebud Sioux Tribe  Ronald Suppah, Vice Chairman Tribal Council, Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon

247

Implementation of Fisheries Enhancement Opportunities on the Coeur d'Alene Reservation; Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fish, Water, and Wildlife Program, REVISED 2002 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Historically, the Coeur d'Alene Indian Tribe depended on runs of anadromous salmon and steelhead along the Spokane River and Hangman Creek, as well as resident and adfluvial forms of trout and char in Coeur d'Alene Lake, for survival. Dams constructed in the early 1900s on the Spokane River in the City of Spokane and at Little Falls (further downstream) were the first dams that initially cut-off the anadromous fish runs from the Coeur d'Alene Tribe. These fisheries were further removed by the construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams on the Columbia River. Together, these actions forced the Tribe to rely solely on the resident fish resources of Coeur d'Alene Lake (Staff Communication). The Coeur d'Alene Tribe is estimated to have historically harvested around 42,000 westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki) per year (Scholz et al. 1985). In 1967, Mallet (1969) reported that 3,329 cutthroat were harvested from the St. Joe River, and a catch of 887 was reported from Coeur d'Alene Lake. This catch is far less than the 42,000 fish per year the tribe harvested historically. Today, only limited opportunities exist to harvest cutthroat trout in the Coeur d'Alene Basin. The declines in native salmonid fish populations, particularly cutthroat and bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus), in the Coeur d'Alene basin have been the focus of study by the Coeur d' Alene Tribe's Fisheries and Water Resources programs since 1990. It appears that there are a number of factors contributing to the decline of resident salmonid stocks within Coeur d'Alene Lake and its tributaries (Ellis 1932; Oien 1957; Mallet 1969; Scholz et. al. 1985, Lillengreen et. al. 1993). These factors include: construction of Post Falls Dam in 1906; major changes in land cover types, agricultural activities and introduction of exotic fish species. Over 100 years of mining activities in the Coeur d'Alene River drainage have had devastating effects on the quality of the water in the Coeur d'Alene River and Coeur d'Alene Lake. Effluents from tailings and mining waste have contributed vast quantities of trace heavy metals to the system. Poor agricultural and forest practices have also contributed to the degradation of water quality and habitat suitability for resident salmonids. Increased sediment loads from agricultural runoff and recent and recovering clearcuts, and increases in water temperature due to riparian canopy removal may be two of the most important problems currently affecting westslope cutthroat trout. Increases in water temperature have reduced the range of resident salmonids to a fraction of its historic extent. Within this new range, sediment has reduced the quality of both spawning and rearing habitats. Historically, municipal waste contributed large quantities of phosphates and nitrogen that accelerated the eutrophication process in Coeur d'Alene Lake. However, over the last 25 years work has been completed to reduce the annual load of these materials. Wastewater treatment facilities have been established near all major municipalities in and around the basin. Species interactions with introduced exotics as well as native species are also acting to limit cutthroat trout populations. Two mechanisms are at work: interspecific competition, and species replacement. Competition occurs when two species utilize common resources, the supply of which is short; or if the resources are not in short supply, they harm each other in the process of seeking these resources. Replacement occurs when some environmental or anthropogenic change (e.g., habitat degradation, fishing pressure, etc.) causes the decline or elimination of one species and another species, either native or introduced, fills the void left by the other. In 1994, the Northwest Power Planning Council adopted the recommendations set forth by the Coeur d'Alene Tribe to improve the Reservation fishery. These recommended actions included: (1) Implement habitat restoration and enhancement measures in Alder, Benewah, Evans, and Lake Creeks; (2) Purchase critical watershed areas for protection of fis

Vitale, Angelo; Lamb, Dave; Scott, Jason

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Rock Rapids Municipal Utility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rapids Municipal Utility Rapids Municipal Utility Jump to: navigation, search Name Rock Rapids Municipal Utility Place Iowa Utility Id 16206 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial Power (Single-Phase) Commercial Commercial Power (Three-Phase) Commercial Residential Power Residential Average Rates Residential: $0.0807/kWh Commercial: $0.0633/kWh Industrial: $0.0899/kWh

249

Hot dry rock Phase II reservoir engineering  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Early attempts to hydraulically fracture and connect two wells drilled at the Hot Dry Rock site at Fenton Hill in New Mexico failed. Microearthquakes triggered by hydraulic fracturing indicated that the fracture zones grew in unexpected directions. Consequently one of the wells was sidetracked at a depth of 2.9 km; was redrilled into the zones of most intense microseismic activity; and a flow connection was achieved. Hydraulic communication was improved by supplemental fracturing using recently developed high temperature and high pressure open hole packers. Preliminary testing indicates a reservoir with stimulated joint volume which already surpasses that attained in the earlier phase I reservoir after several years of development. 12 refs., 6 figs.

Murphy, H.D.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Hot Dry Rock Overview at Los Alamos  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal energy program is a renewable energy program that can contribute significantly to the nation's balanced and diversified energy mix. Having extracted energy from the first Fenton Hill HDR reservoir for about 400 days, and from the second reservoir for 30 days in a preliminary test, Los Alamos is focusing on the Long Term Flow Test and reservoir studies. Current budget limitations have slowed preparations thus delaying the start date of that test. The test is planned to gather data for more definitive reservoir modeling with energy availability or reservoir lifetime of primary interest. Other salient information will address geochemistry and tracer studies, microseismic response, water requirements and flow impedance which relates directly to pumping power requirements. During this year of ''preparation'' we have made progress in modeling studies, in chemically reactive tracer techniques, in improvements in acoustic or microseismic event analysis.

Berger, Michael; Hendron, Robert H.

1989-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

251

High-Velocity Rocks Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of our research was to develop and demonstrate seismic data-acquisition and data-processing technologies that allow geothermal prospects below high-velocity rock outcrops to be evaluated. To do this, we acquired a 3-component seismic test line across an area of exposed high-velocity rocks in Brewster County, Texas, where there is high heat flow and surface conditions mimic those found at numerous geothermal prospects. Seismic contractors have not succeeded in creating good-quality seismic data in this area for companies who have acquired data for oil and gas exploitation purposes. Our test profile traversed an area where high-velocity rocks and low-velocity sediment were exposed on the surface in alternating patterns that repeated along the test line. We verified that these surface conditions cause non-ending reverberations of Love waves, Rayleigh waves, and shallow critical refractions to travel across the earth surface between the boundaries of the fast-velocity and slow-velocity material exposed on the surface. These reverberating surface waves form the high level of noise in this area that does not allow reflections from deep interfaces to be seen and utilized. Our data-acquisition method of deploying a box array of closely spaced geophones allowed us to recognize and evaluate these surface-wave noise modes regardless of the azimuth direction to the surface anomaly that backscattered the waves and caused them to return to the test-line profile. With this knowledge of the surface-wave noise, we were able to process these test-line data to create P-P and SH-SH images that were superior to those produced by a skilled seismic data-processing contractor. Compared to the P-P data acquired along the test line, the SH-SH data provided a better detection of faults and could be used to trace these faults upward to the boundaries of exposed surface rocks. We expanded our comparison of the relative value of S-wave and P-wave seismic data for geothermal applications by inserting into this report a small part of the interpretation we have done with 3C3D data across Wister geothermal field in the Imperial Valley of California. This interpretation shows that P-SV data reveal faults (and by inference, also fractures) that cannot be easily, or confidently, seen with P-P data, and that the combination of P-P and P-SV data allows VP/VS velocity ratios to be estimated across a targeted reservoir interval to show where an interval has more sandstone (the preferred reservoir facies). The conclusion reached from this investigation is that S-wave seismic technology can be invaluable to geothermal operators. Thus we developed a strong interest in understanding the direct-S modes produced by vertical-force sources, particularly vertical vibrators, because if it can be demonstrated that direct-S modes produced by vertical-force sources can be used as effectively as the direct-S modes produced by horizontal-force sources, geothermal operators can acquire direct-S data across many more prospect areas than can be done with horizontal-force sources, which presently are limited to horizontal vibrators. We include some of our preliminary work in evaluating direct-S modes produced by vertical-force sources.

Hardage, Bob A; DeAngelo, Michael V; Ermolaeva, Elena; Hardage, Bob A; Remington, Randy; Sava, Diana; Wagner, Donald; Wei, Shuijion

2013-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

252

Determining inert content in coal dust/rock dust mixture  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for determining the inert content of a coal dust and rock dust mixture uses a transparent window pressed against the mixture. An infrared light beam is directed through the window such that a portion of the infrared light beam is reflected from the mixture. The concentration of the reflected light is detected and a signal indicative of the reflected light is generated. A normalized value for the generated signal is determined according to the relationship .phi.=(log i.sub.c `log i.sub.co) / (log i.sub.c100 -log i.sub.co) where i.sub.co =measured signal at 0% rock dust i.sub.c100 =measured signal at 100% rock dust i.sub.c =measured signal of the mixture. This normalized value is then correlated to a predetermined relationship of .phi. to rock dust percentage to determine the rock dust content of the mixture. The rock dust content is displayed where the percentage is between 30 and 100%, and an indication of out-of-range is displayed where the rock dust percent is less than 30%. Preferably, the rock dust percentage (RD%) is calculated from the predetermined relationship RD%=100+30 log .phi.. where the dust mixture initially includes moisture, the dust mixture is dried before measuring by use of 8 to 12 mesh molecular-sieves which are shaken with the dust mixture and subsequently screened from the dust mixture.

Sapko, Michael J. (Finleyville, PA); Ward, Jr., Jack A. (Oakmont, PA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Property:CapRockLithology | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CapRockLithology CapRockLithology Jump to: navigation, search Property Name CapRockLithology Property Type String Description Condensed description of the lithology of the cap rock. Subproperties This property has the following 6 subproperties: B Beowawe Hot Springs Geothermal Area Brady Hot Springs Geothermal Area D Desert Peak Geothermal Area E East Mesa Geothermal Area H Heber Geothermal Area S Salton Sea Geothermal Area Pages using the property "CapRockLithology" Showing 6 pages using this property. A Amedee Geothermal Area + volcanic; lacustrine sediments + B Blue Mountain Geothermal Area + Hydrothermal alteration layer + G Geysers Geothermal Area + Hydrothermal alteration layer + K Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area + Overlapping a'a' and pahoehoe flows + L Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area + Metasedimentary Landslide Block; Hydrothermal Alteration Layer +

254

Rock Hill Utilities - Water Heater and Heat Pump Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rock Hill Utilities - Water Heater and Heat Pump Rebate Program Rock Hill Utilities - Water Heater and Heat Pump Rebate Program Rock Hill Utilities - Water Heater and Heat Pump Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Program Info State South Carolina Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Water Heater: up to $275 Heat Pump Replacement: $400 Provider Rock Hill Utilities Through the SmartChoice program, Rock Hill Utilities offers rebates for water heater and heat pump replacements. Information on financing for heat pumps can also be found on the web site listed above. If both the water heater and heat pump are purchased then the customer may qualify for the Great Rate program. The Great Rate program will add a 25% discount to a

255

Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Coso Geothermal Area (1984) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Analysis- Rock At Coso Geothermal Area (1984) Analysis- Rock At Coso Geothermal Area (1984) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Coso Geothermal Area (1984) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Rock Activity Date 1984 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis To analyze evidence for crustal interaction and compositional zonation in the source regions of Pleistocene basaltic and rhyolitic magmas of the Coso volcanic field Notes The isotopic compositions of Pb and Sr in Pleistocene basalt, high-silica rhyolite, and andesitic inclusions in rhyolite of the Coso volcanic field indicate that these rocks were derived from different levels of compositionally zoned magmatic systems. The two earliest rhyolites probably

256

Property:HostRockLithology | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

HostRockLithology HostRockLithology Jump to: navigation, search Property Name HostRockLithology Property Type String Description Condensed description of the lithology of the reservoir rock. This is a property of type Page. Subproperties This property has the following 14 subproperties: B Beowawe Hot Springs Geothermal Area Brady Hot Springs Geothermal Area C Chena Geothermal Area D Desert Peak Geothermal Area G Geysers Geothermal Area H Heber Geothermal Area L Lightning Dock Geothermal Area R Raft River Geothermal Area Roosevelt Hot Springs Geothermal Area S Salton Sea Geothermal Area Steamboat Springs Geothermal Area S cont. Stillwater Geothermal Area V Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal Area W Wabuska Hot Springs Geothermal Area Pages using the property "HostRockLithology"

257

Drilling Large Diameter Holes in Rocks Using Multiple Laser Beams  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Drilling Large Diameter Holes in Rocks Using Multiple Laser Beams (504) Drilling Large Diameter Holes in Rocks Using Multiple Laser Beams (504) Richard Parker,. Parker Geoscience Consulting, LLC, Arvada, Colorado, USA; Zhiyue Xu and Claude Reed, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois, USA; Ramona Graves, Department of Petroleum Engineering, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Colorado, USA; Brian Gahan and Samih Batarseh, Gas Technology Institute, Des Plaines, Illinois, USA ABSTRACT Studies on drilling petroleum reservoir rocks with lasers show that modern infrared lasers have the capability to spall (thermally fragment), melt and vaporize natural earth materials with the thermal spallation being the most efficient rock removal mechanism. Although laser irradiance as low as 1000 W/cm 2 is sufficient to spall rock, firing the

258

Property:HostRockAge | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

HostRockAge HostRockAge Jump to: navigation, search Property Name HostRockAge Property Type String Description Describes the age of the reservoir rock by epoch, era, or period per available data. This is a property of type Page. Subproperties This property has the following 10 subproperties: B Beowawe Hot Springs Geothermal Area Brady Hot Springs Geothermal Area C Chena Geothermal Area D Desert Peak Geothermal Area G Geysers Geothermal Area R Raft River Geothermal Area Roosevelt Hot Springs Geothermal Area S Salton Sea Geothermal Area Steamboat Springs Geothermal Area W Wabuska Hot Springs Geothermal Area Pages using the property "HostRockAge" Showing 11 pages using this property. A Amedee Geothermal Area + Mesozoic + B Blue Mountain Geothermal Area + Triassic + C Coso Geothermal Area + Mesozoic +

259

Electrical Conductivity of Soils and Rocks | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Electrical Conductivity of Soils and Rocks Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Electrical Conductivity of Soils and Rocks Author J.D. McNeill Organization Geonics Limited Published Geonics Limited, 1980 Report Number TN-5 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Electrical Conductivity of Soils and Rocks Citation J.D. McNeill (Geonics Limited). 1980. Electrical Conductivity of Soils and Rocks. TN-5 Edition. ?: Geonics Limited. Report No.: TN-5. Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Electrical_Conductivity_of_Soils_and_Rocks&oldid=695344"

260

Rock Density At Alum Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rock Density At Alum Area (DOE GTP) Rock Density At Alum Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Rock Density At Alum Geothermal Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Alum Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Rock Density Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References (1 January 2011) GTP ARRA Spreadsheet Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Rock_Density_At_Alum_Area_(DOE_GTP)&oldid=402985" Categories: Exploration Activities DOE Funded Activities ARRA Funded Activities What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties About us Disclaimers Energy blogs Linked Data Developer services OpenEI partners with a broad range of international organizations to grow

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261

Rock Sampling At Coso Geothermal Area (1995) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Rock Sampling At Coso Geothermal Area (1995) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Rock Sampling At Coso Geothermal Area (1995) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Rock Sampling Activity Date 1995 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geologic controls on the geometry of the upwelling plume were investigated using petrographic and analytical analyses of reservoir rock and vein material. References Lutz, S.J.; Moore, J.N. ; Copp, J.F. (1 June 1995) Lithology and alteration mineralogy of reservoir rocks at Coso Geothermal Area,

262

The Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation of Oregon John Day Basin Office : Watershed Restoration Projects : 2002 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The John Day is the nation's second longest free-flowing river in the contiguous United States and the longest containing entirely unsupplemented runs of anadromous fish. Located in eastern Oregon, the basin drains over 8,000 square miles, Oregon's fourth largest drainage basin, and incorporates portions of eleven counties. Originating in the Strawberry Mountains near Prairie City, the John Day River flows 284 miles in a northwesterly direction, entering the Columbia River approximately four miles upstream of the John Day dam. With wild runs of spring Chinook salmon and summer steelhead, westslope cutthroat, and redband and bull trout, the John Day system is truly a basin with national significance. The majority of the John Day basin was ceded to the Federal government in 1855 by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes). In 1997, the Tribes established an office in the basin to coordinate restoration projects, monitoring, planning and other watershed activities on private and public lands. Once established, the John Day Basin Office (JDBO) formed a partnership with the Grant Soil and Water Conservation District (GSWCD), also located in the town of John Day, who contracts the majority of the construction implementation activities for these projects from the JDBO. The GSWCD completes the landowner contact, preliminary planning, engineering design, permitting, construction contracting, and construction implementation phases of most projects. The JDBO completes the planning, grant solicitation/defense, environmental compliance, administrative contracting, monitoring, and reporting portion of the program. Most phases of project planning, implementation, and monitoring are coordinated with the private landowners and basin agencies, such as the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and Oregon Water Resources Department. In 2002, the JDBO and GSWCD proposed continuation of their successful partnership between the two agencies and basin landowners to implement an additional twelve (12) watershed conservation projects. The types of projects include off channel water developments, riparian fencing, juniper control, permanent diversions, pump stations, infiltration galleries and return-flow cooling systems. Project costs in 2002 totaled $423,198.00 with a total amount of $345,752.00 (81%) provided by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the remainder coming from other sources such as the Bureau of Reclamation (BOR), Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board, the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Partners in Wildlife Program and individual landowners.

Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon. John Day Basin Office.

2003-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

263

The Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation of Oregon John Day Basin Office : Watershed Restoration Projects : 2003 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The John Day is the nation's second longest free-flowing river in the contiguous United States and the longest containing entirely unsupplemented runs of anadromous fish. Located in eastern Oregon, the basin drains over 8,000 square miles, Oregon's fourth largest drainage basin, and incorporates portions of eleven counties. Originating in the Strawberry Mountains near Prairie City, the John Day River flows 284 miles in a northwesterly direction, entering the Columbia River approximately four miles upstream of the John Day dam. With wild runs of spring Chinook salmon and summer steelhead, westslope cutthroat, and redband and bull trout, the John Day system is truly a basin with national significance. The majority of the John Day basin was ceded to the Federal government in 1855 by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes). In 1997, the Tribes established an office in the basin to coordinate restoration projects, monitoring, planning and other watershed activities on private and public lands. Once established, the John Day Basin Office (JDBO) formed a partnership with the Grant Soil and Water Conservation District (GSWCD), which contracts the majority of the construction implementation activities for these projects from the JDBO. The GSWCD completes the landowner contact, preliminary planning, engineering design, permitting, construction contracting, and construction implementation phases of most projects. The JDBO completes the planning, grant solicitation/defense, environmental compliance, administrative contracting, monitoring, and reporting portion of the program. Most phases of project planning, implementation, and monitoring are coordinated with the private landowners and basin agencies, such as the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and Oregon Water Resources Department. In 2003, the JDBO and GSWCD proposed continuation of their successful partnership between the two agencies and basin landowners to implement an additional twelve (12) watershed conservation projects. The types of projects include off channel water developments, juniper control, permanent diversions, pump stations, and return-flow cooling systems. Due to funding issues and delays, permitting delays, fire closures and landowner contracting problems, 2 projects were canceled and 7 projects were rescheduled to the 2004 construction season. Project costs in 2003 totaled $115,554.00 with a total amount of $64,981.00 (56%) provided by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the remainder coming from other sources such as the Bureau of Reclamation (BOR), Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board, the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Partners in Wildlife Program and individual landowners.

Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon. John Day Basin Office.

2004-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

264

The Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation of Oregon John Day Basin Office : Watershed Restoration Projects : Annual Report, 2000.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The John Day is the second longest free-flowing river in the contiguous United States and the longest containing entirely unsupplemented runs of anadromous fish. Located in eastern Oregon, the basin drains over 8,000 square miles--Oregon's third largest drainage basin--and incorporates portions of eleven counties. Originating in the Strawberry Mountains near Prairie City, the John Day River flows 284 miles in a northwesterly direction, entering the Columbia River approximately four miles upstream of the John Day dam. With wild runs of spring Chinook salmon and summer steelhead, red band, westslope cutthroat, and redband trout, the John Day system is truly a basin with national significance. Most all of the entire John Day basin was ceded to the Federal government in 1855 by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes). In 1997, the Tribes established an office in the Basin to coordinate restoration projects, monitoring, planning and other watershed activities on private and public lands. Using funding from the Bonneville Power Administration, Bureau of Reclamation, and others, the John Day Basin Office (JDBO) subcontracts the majority of its construction implementation activities with the Grant Soil and Water Conservation District (GSWCD), also located in the town of John Day. The GSWCD completes the landowner contact, preliminary planning, engineering design, permitting, construction contracting, and construction implementation phases of most projects. The JDBO completes the planning, grant solicitation/review, environmental compliance, administrative contracting, monitoring, and reporting portion of the program. Most phases of project planning, implementation, and monitoring are coordinated with the private landowners and basin agencies, such as the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and Oregon Water Resources Department. In 2000, the JDBO and GSWCD proposed continuation of a successful partnership between the two agencies and basin landowners to implement an additional six watershed conservation projects funded by the BPA. The types of projects include permanent diversions, pump stations, and return-flow cooling systems. Project costs in 2000 totaled $533,196.00 with a total amount of $354,932.00 (67%) provided by the Bonneville Power Administration and the remainder coming from other sources such as the BOR, Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board, and individual landowners.

Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon. John Day Basin Office.

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

The Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation of Oregon John Day Basin Office : Watershed Restoration Projects : Annual Report, 2001.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The John Day River is the nation's second longest free-flowing river in the contiguous United States, which is entirely unsupplemented for it's runs of anadromous fish. Located in eastern Oregon, the John Day Basin drains over 8,000 square miles, is Oregon's fourth largest drainage basin, and the basin incorporates portions of eleven counties. Originating in the Strawberry Mountains near Prairie City, the mainstem John Day River flows 284 miles in a northwesterly direction entering the Columbia River approximately four miles upstream of the John Day dam. With wild runs of spring Chinook salmon, summer steelhead, westslope cutthroat, and redband and bull trout, the John Day system is truly a basin with national significance. The Majority of the John Day Basin was ceded to the Federal government in 1855 by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes). In 1997, the Tribes established an office in John Day to coordinate basin restoration projects, monitoring, planning, and other watershed restoration activities on private and public lands. Once established, the John Day Basin Office (JDBO) formed a partnership with the Grant Soil and Water Conservation District (GSWCD), also located in John Day, who subcontracts the majority of the construction implementation activities for these restoration projects from the JDBO. The GSWCD completes the landowner contact, preliminary planning, engineering design, permitting, construction contracting, and construction implementation phases of most projects. The JDBO completes the planning, grant solicitation/defense, environmental compliance, administrative contracting, monitoring, and reporting portion of the program. Most phases of project planning, implementation, and monitoring are coordinated with the private landowners and basin agencies, such as the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and Oregon Water Resources Department. In 2001, the JDBO and GSWCD continued their successful partnership between the two agencies and basin landowners to implement an additional ten (10) watershed conservation projects. The project types include permanent lay flat diversions, pump stations, and return-flow cooling systems. Project costs in 2001 totaled $572,766.00 with $361,966.00 (67%) provided by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the remainder coming from other sources, such as the Bureau of Reclamation (BOR), Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board (OWEB), and individual landowners.

Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon. John Day Basin Office.

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Anthropolog Summer 2008  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the six tribes of the state (Crow, Blackfeet, Cree,Assiniboine, Sioux, GrosVen- tre). The goal them in subsequent years. The five students were Wilena Old Person (Blackfeet), Helen Cryer (Cree), Glen Still Smoking (Blackfeet), Eli Suzukovich III (Chippewa-Cree) and Miranda McCarvel. The faculty

Mathis, Wayne N.

267

Seismic and Acoustic Investigations of Rock Fall Initiation, Processes, and Mechanics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

38 th U.S. Rock Mechanics Symposium. 1321-?1333. 38 th U.S. Rock Mechanics Symposium, 1313-?1320. Introduction to Rock Mechanics. John Wiley and

Zimmer, Valerie Louise

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Full waveform inversion of a 3-D source inside an artificial rock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of a 3-D Source Inside an Artificial Rock Albert C. To andof a 3-D source inside an artificial rock plate inof a 3-D source inside an artificial rock plate is

To, A C; Glaser, Steven D

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Eleven Tribes Jump START Clean Energy Projects, Summer 2012 (Newsletter), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Indian Energy (OIE), Indian Energy Beat  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

BUILDING BUILDING BRIDGES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 SHARING KNOWLEDGE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 WINNING THE FUTURE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 ON THE HORIZON . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 LEADING THE CHARGE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 "Tribal communities, entrepreneurs, and small businesses will benefit greatly from the technical resources and expertise provided by DOE. START will help Native American and Alaska Native communities increase local generation capacity, enhance energy efficiency and conservation measures, and create job opportunities in the new clean energy economy." -DOE-IE Director Tracey A. LeBeau The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs (DOE-IE) has selected 11 Tribes-five in Alaska and six in the contiguous United States-to receive on-the-ground technical support for community-based energy efficiency and renewable

270

Spring Chinook Salmon Production for Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Little White Salmon National Fish Hatchery, Annual Report 2006.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This annual report covers the period from January 1, 2006 through December 31, 2006. Work completed supports the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) effort to restore a locally-adapted stock of spring Chinook to the Umatilla River Basin. During the year, staff at the Little White Salmon/Willard National Fish Hatchery Complex have completed the rearing of 218,764 Brood Year 2004 spring Chinook salmon for release into the Umatilla River during spring 2006 and initiated production of approximately 220,000 Brood Year 2005 spring Chinook for transfer and release into the Umatilla River during spring 2007. All work under this contract is performed at the Little White Salmon and Willard National Fish Hatcheries (NFH), Cook, WA.

Doulas, Speros

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

EA-1897: AltaRock's Newberry Volcano EGS Demonstration near Bend...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7: AltaRock's Newberry Volcano EGS Demonstration near Bend, Oregon EA-1897: AltaRock's Newberry Volcano EGS Demonstration near Bend, Oregon Summary This EA evaluates the...

272

Evaluation of Five Sedimentary Rocks Other Than Salt for Geologic Repository Siting Purposes  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE), in order to increase the diversity of rock types under consideration by the geologic disposal program, initiated the Sedimary ROck Program (SERP), whose immediate objectiv eis to evaluate five types of secimdnary rock - sandstone, chalk, carbonate rocks (limestone and dolostone), anhydrock, and shale - to determine the potential for siting a geologic repository. The evaluation of these five rock types, together with the ongoing salt studies, effectively results in the consideration of all types of relatively impermeable sedimentary rock for repository purposes. The results of this evaluation are expressed in terms of a ranking of the five rock types with respect to their potential to serve as a geologic repository host rock. This comparative evaluation was conducted on a non-site-specific basis, by use of generic information together with rock evaluation criteria (RECs) derived from the DOE siting guidelines for geologic repositories (CFR 1984). An information base relevant to rock evaluation using these RECs was developed in hydrology, geochemistry, rock characteristics (rock occurrences, thermal response, rock mechanics), natural resources, and rock dissolution. Evaluation against postclosure and preclosure RECs yielded a ranking of the five subject rocks with respect to their potential as repository host rocks. Shale was determined to be the most preferred of the five rock types, with sandstone a distant second, the carbonate rocks and anhydrock a more distant third, and chalk a relatively close fourth.

Croff, A.G.; Lomenick, T.F.; Lowrie, R.S.; Stow, S.H.

2003-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

273

GEOTECHNICAL ASSESSMENT AND INSTRUMENTATION NEEDS FOR NUCLEAR WASTE ISOLATION IN CRYSTALLINE AND ARGILLACEOUS ROCKS SYMPOSIUM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Masses. FIELD TESTS FOR RADIONUCLIDE TRANSPORT . BOREHOLE,Rock Masses . Radionuclide Field Tests. Borehole andaints. . Barriers to Radionuclide Movement. THE ROCK

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

FINAL REPORT WIND POWER WARM SPRINGS RESERVATION TRIBAL LANDS DOE GRANT NUMBER DE-FG36-07GO17077 SUBMITTED BY WARM SPRINGS POWER & WATER ENTERPRISES A CORPORATE ENTITY OF THE CONFEDERATED TRIBES OF WARM SPRINGS WARM SPRINGS, OREGON  

SciTech Connect

Wind Generation Feasibility Warm Springs Power and Water Enterprises (WSPWE) is a corporate entity owned by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation, located in central Oregon. The organization is responsible for managing electrical power generation facilities on tribal lands and, as part of its charter, has the responsibility to evaluate and develop renewable energy resources for the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs. WSPWE recently completed a multi-year-year wind resource assessment of tribal lands, beginning with the installation of wind monitoring towers on the Mutton Mountains site in 2003, and collection of on-site wind data is ongoing. The study identified the Mutton Mountain site on the northeastern edge of the reservation as a site with sufficient wind resources to support a commercial power project estimated to generate over 226,000 MWh per year. Initial estimates indicate that the first phase of the project would be approximately 79.5 MW of installed capacity. This Phase 2 study expands and builds on the previously conducted Phase 1 Wind Resource Assessment, dated June 30, 2007. In order to fully assess the economic benefits that may accrue to the Tribes through wind energy development at Mutton Mountain, a planning-level opinion of probable cost was performed to define the costs associated with key design and construction aspects of the proposed project. This report defines the Mutton Mountain project costs and economics in sufficient detail to allow the Tribes to either build the project themselves or contract with a developer under the most favorable terms possible for the Tribes.

Jim Manion; Michael Lofting; Wil Sando; Emily Leslie; Randy Goff

2009-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

275

Modeling rock fracturing in bench-blasting problems  

SciTech Connect

A computational model of rock blasting is being developed to examine the blasting problems associated with in situ oil shale processing. This model, however, will also be useful as a design tool for the traditional problems in rock blasting. The model includes fundamental treatment of both shock-wave propagation and the accumulation of brittle fracture in the rock. As a result, the model accurately predicts the degree and extent of fracturing as functions of design parameters. The model has proven useful for making parametric studies and for evaluation of alternate blast designs. This paper demonstrates the use of the numerical model to simulate the fracturing induced by the detonation of a vertical explosive column near a bench. The fracturing induced by three different explosives indicate that (in the chosen geometry) the most efficient breakage is done by a column of ammonium nitrate and fuel oil mixture (ANFO) used with a toe charge of aluminized ANFO. There was too much unfractured rock left when ANFO was used alone; aluminized ANFO used for the entire explosive column caused excessive fracturing. A final case involves ANFO used alone to fracture a different rock type. This case points out that in a different rock type, the ANFO will not leave excessive unfractured rock.

Kuszmaul, J.S.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

An Analytical Model for Solute Transport in Unsaturated Flow through a Single Fracture and Porous Rock Matrix  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fracture matrix solute source rock matrix rock matrix vin fracture; b) solute source in rock matrix. Draft 8-11-04for a point source in the rock matrix are presented in

Houseworth, J.E.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Rock properties in support of geothermal resource development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal rock mechanics needs have been defined and subsequently a test system was designed and built for providing appropriate material properties. The development areas identified as requiring rock mechanics were stimulation, reservoir engineering, subsidence prediction, surface exploration and subsurface evaluation, and drilling. The resulting test system provides mechanical, electrical, thermal and physical properties on 2 and 4 inch diameter cores at confining pressures and pore fluid pressures to 200 MPa (30,000 psi) and temperatures to 535/sup 0/C (1000/sup 0/F). The test system development was continued and site specific rock mechanics requirements were identified. (MHR)

Butters, S.W.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

A coupled model of fluid flow in jointed rock  

SciTech Connect

We present a fully coupled model of fluid flow in jointed rock, where the fluid flow depends on the joint openings and the joint openings depend on the fluid pressure. The joints and rock blocks are modeled discretely using the finite element method. Solutions for the fluid and rock are obtained and iteration is performed until both solutions converge. Example applications include an examination of the effects of back-pressure on flow in a geothermal reservoir and transient fluid injection into a reservoir.

Swenson, Daniel; Martineau, Rick; James, Mark; Brown, Don

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall objective of the Hot Dry Rock (HDR) Geothermal Energy Development Program is to determine the technical and economic feasibility of HDR as a significant energy source and to provide a basis for its timely commercial development. Principal operational tasks are those activities required to enable a decision to be made by FY86 on the ultimate commercialization of HDR. These include development and analyis of a 20- to 50-MW Phase II HDR reservoir at Site 1 (Fenton Hill) with the potential construction of a pilot electric generating station, Phase III; selection of a second site with subsequent reservoir development and possible construction of a direct heat utilization pilot plant of at least 30 MW thermal thereon; the determination of the overall domestic HDR energy potential; and the evaluation of 10 or more target prospect areas for future HDR plant development by commercial developers. Phase I of the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory's Fenton Hill project was completed. Phase I evaluated a small subterranean system comprised of two boreholes connected at a depth of 3 km by hydraulic fracturing. A closed-loop surface system has been constructed and tests involving round-the-clock operation have yielded promising data on heat extraction, geofluid chemistry, flow impedance, and loss of water through the underground reservoir between the two holes, leading to cautions optimism for the future prospects of private-sector HDR power plants. (MHR)

Franke, P.R.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Coso Geothermal Area (1997) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rock At Coso Geothermal Area (1997) Rock At Coso Geothermal Area (1997) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Coso Geothermal Area (1997) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Rock Activity Date 1997 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine a major lithospheric boundary Notes Sr and Nd isotope ratios of Miocene-Recent basalts in eastern California, when screened for crustal contamination, vary dramatically and indicate the presence of a major lithospheric boundary that is not obvious from surface geology. Isotope ratios from the Coso field form a bull's-eye pattern with very low 87Sr/86Sr (0.7033) centered just south of the geothermal area. The

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rock sioux tribe" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Rock Sampling At Florida Mountains Area (Brookins, 1982) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Rock Sampling At Florida Mountains Area (Brookins, 1982) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Rock Sampling At Florida Mountains Area (Brookins, 1982) Exploration Activity Details Location Florida Mountains Area Exploration Technique Rock Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Radiogenic heat production analysis from U,Th,K concentrations. References D. G. Brookins (1982) Potassium, Uranium, Thorium Radiogenic Heat Contribution To Heat Flow In The Precambrian And Younger Silicic Rocks Of The Zuni And Florida Mountains, New Mexico (Usa)

282

Lithology and alteration mineralogy of reservoir rocks at Coso Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lithology and alteration mineralogy of reservoir rocks at Coso Geothermal Lithology and alteration mineralogy of reservoir rocks at Coso Geothermal Area, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Lithology and alteration mineralogy of reservoir rocks at Coso Geothermal Area, California Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Coso is one of several high-temperature geothermal systems associated with recent volcanic activity in the Basin and Range province. Chemical and fluid inclusion data demonstrate that production is from a narrow, asymmetric plume of thermal water that originates from a deep reservoir to the south and then flows laterally to the north. Geologic controls on the geometry of the upwelling plume were investigated using petrographic and analytical analyses of reservoir rock and vein material.

283

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Rock Island Arsenal - IL 09  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rock Island Arsenal - IL 09 Rock Island Arsenal - IL 09 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: ROCK ISLAND ARSENAL ( IL.09 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP - Referred to DOD Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Rock Island , Illinois IL.09-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 IL.09-2 Site Operations: Site located on a DOD facility and operated under AEC control. Exact nature or time period of operations not clear. No indication that radioactive materials were involved. Contract work with Albuquerque Operations office performed. IL.09-1 IL.09-2 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No Authority - Referred to DOD IL.09-2 Radioactive Materials Handled: None Indicated IL.09-2 Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: None Indicated Radiological Survey(s): None Indicated

284

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- WNI Split Rock Site - 043  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Split Rock Site - 043 Split Rock Site - 043 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: WNI Split Rock Site (043) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: The Western Nuclear, Inc. (WNI) Split Rock site is a Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Title II site located in Jeffrey City, Wyoming. UMTRA Title II sites are privately owned and operated sites that were active when the Uranium Mill Tailings Control Act was passed in 1978. The majority of the milling conducted at these sites was for private sale, but a portion was sold to the U.S. Government. After the owner completes U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission license termination, the Department of

285

Photo of the Week: Laser Beats Rock | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Laser Beats Rock Laser Beats Rock Photo of the Week: Laser Beats Rock April 8, 2013 - 5:28pm Addthis On August 5, 2012, the Curiosity rover touched down on the surface of Mars. The ChemCam instrument package, developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory, is a device mounted on the Mars Curiosity rover that uses two remote sensing instruments: the Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectrometer (LIBS) and a Remote Micro-Imager (RMI). The LIBS fires a powerful laser that determines chemical compositions of rock and soil samples, while the RMI takes photos of the samples within the rover's vicinity. In this photo, the ChemCam is being prepared in the clean room prior to the launch of NASA's Mars Science Laboratory mission. Learn more about the ChemCam. | Photo courtesy of Los Alamos National Laboratory.

286

Permeability Estimation From Velocity Anisotropy In Fractured Rock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cracks in a rock mass subjected to a uniaxial stress will be preferentially closed depending on the angle between the fracture normal vectors and the direction of the applied stress. If the prestress fracture orientation ...

Gibson, Richard L., Jr.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Influence of soil parameters on the motion of rocking walls  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Introduced as a system in earthquake engineering in 2004 [6], rocking walls are a fairly new system in earthquake engineering. Their performance has been proven, both in research as in practice. However, a few uncertainties ...

Houbrechts, Jeroen J. J. (Jeroen Jose Julien)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Laser Rock Drilling Demo - The NE Multimedia Collection  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demo A high power pulsed Nd:YAG laser beam at Argonne's Laser Applications Lab is being shown in this movie to drill oil reservoir rock, a potential application in gas and oil well...

289

Laser Spallation of Rocks for Oil Well Drilling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LASER SPALLATION OF ROCKS FOR OIL WELL DRILLING Zhiyue Xu 1 , Claude B. Reed 1 , Richard Parker 2 , Ramona Graves 3 1 Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439, USA 2 Parker...

290

Figure 2. Stratigraphic Summary of Ages, Names and Rock Types...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Stratigraphic Summary of Ages, Names and Rock Types in the ANWR 1002 and Coastal Plain Area of the Alaska North Slope. Potentially Productive Reservoirs and Plays Assessed by...

291

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- CO2-Rock Interactions in EGS...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

CO2-Rock Interactions in EGS-CO2: New Zealand TVZ Geothermal Systems as a Natural Analog Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On...

292

Carbonation Mechanism of Reservoir Rock by Supercritical Carbon Dioxide  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Carbonation Mechanism of Reservoir Rock by Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Carbonation Mechanism of Reservoir Rock by Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Geothermal Lab Call Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Carbonation Mechanism of Reservoir Rock by Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Project Type / Topic 1 Laboratory Call for Submission of Applications for Research, Development and Analysis of Geothermal Technologies Project Type / Topic 2 Supercritical Carbon Dioxide / Reservoir Rock Chemical Interactions Project Description Supercritical CO2 is currently becoming a more common fluid for extracting volatile oil and fragrance compounds from various raw materials that are used in perfumery. Furthermore, its use as a heat transmission fluid is very attractive because of the greater uptake capability of heat from hot reservoir rock, compared with that of water. However, one concern was the reactivity of CO2 with clay and rock minerals in aqueous and non-aqueous environments. So if this reaction leads to the formation of water-soluble carbonates, such formation could be detrimental to the integrity of wellbore infrastructure.

293

Rock Physics of Geologic Carbon Sequestration/Storage  

SciTech Connect

This report covers the results of developing the rock physics theory of the effects of CO{sub 2} injection and storage in a host reservoir on the rock?s elastic properties and the resulting seismic signatures (reflections) observed during sequestration and storage. Specific topics addressed are: (a) how the elastic properties and attenuation vary versus CO{sub 2} saturation in the reservoir during injection and subsequent distribution of CO{sub 2} in the reservoir; (b) what are the combined effects of saturation and pore pressure on the elastic properties; and (c) what are the combined effects of saturation and rock fabric alteration on the elastic properties. The main new results are (a) development and application of the capillary pressure equilibrium theory to forecasting the elastic properties as a function of CO{sub 2} saturation; (b) a new method of applying this theory to well data; and (c) combining this theory with other effects of CO{sub 2} injection on the rock frame, including the effects of pore pressure and rock fabric alteration. An important result is translating these elastic changes into synthetic seismic responses, specifically, the amplitude-versus-offset (AVO) response depending on saturation as well as reservoir and seal type. As planned, three graduate students participated in this work and, as a result, received scientific and technical training required should they choose to work in the area of monitoring and quantifying CO{sub 2} sequestration.

Dvorkin, Jack; Mavko, Gary

2013-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

294

Mimbres rock art: a graphic legacy of cultural expression  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rock art abounds along the Mimbres River banks and drainage tributaries reflecting the rich cultural remains of the ancient Mimbres people. The Mimbres are a well established cultural group who lived in southwest New Mexico and northern Mexico from A.D. 200 and A.D. 1150. Physical remains of pithouses, pueblos, irrigation systems, artifacts, and rock art have survived the years to provide clues for contemporary understanding of this prehistoric culture and society. Knowledge of the symbolism and belief system has eluded understanding or remained sketchy as a result of examining only physical remains. Based on the hypothesis that by studying the archaeological record and the established characteristics of cultures with origins similar to those of the Mimbres, then assumptions can be made and applied to the understanding of the symbolism, purpose, and use of the rock art for the Mimbres. Specific to this study is the rock art adjacent to and within a one and one-half mile radius of the NAN Ranch Ruin. Research reveals how the rock art of the NAN Ranch Ruin connects to: 1) cultural context to other regional systems, 2) spatial context within the landscape, 3) temporal context with respect to Mimbres development, and 4) symbolic context, tying the rock art to its environment and revealing it as a living part of the universe as it fits into the world view of those who created it.

Tidemann, Kathryn

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Location, age, and rock type of volcanic rocks younger than 5 million years in Arizona and New Mexico  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of the assessment of the Hot Dry Rock geothermal energy potential of Arizona and New Mexico, a compilation of the locations and ages of volcanic rocks less than 5 Myr was made. The locations of those rocks less than 3 Myr are shown on a map of the region. Because the compiled information has many uses in addition to geothermal exploration, the entire compilation is presented as a tabulation. The table is organized first by state and secondly by latitude and longitude within each state. Rock type, age and error, method of dating, and original reference are also given. The K-Ar dates have not been recalculated using the most recent decay constants for /sup 40/K. A few references gave only verbal descriptions of sample location; these locations were converted to approximate latitude and longitude.

Aldrich, M.J. Jr.; Laughlin, A.W.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Deriving the shape factor of a fractured rock matrix  

SciTech Connect

Fluid flow from a fractured rock matrix was investigated for accurately predicting oil recovery from fractured reservoirs. To relate the oil rate with rock geometry and average rock matrix pressure, a shape factor is used in the mathematical model of fractured reservoirs. The shape factor in the transfer function was derived by solving the three-dimensional diffusivity equation of a rock matrix block under unsteady-state production, in contrast to the quasi-steady-state condition assumed by most previous studies denoted in the literature. The diffusivity equation in the x, y, and z coordinate was solved in four cases by assuming different boundary conditions of (1) constant fracture pressure; (2) constant flow rate; (3) constant fracture pressure followed by linearly declining fracture pressure; and (4) linearly declining fracture pressure followed by constant fracture pressure. Shape factor values are high at the initial depletion stage under an unsteady-state condition. When the fracture pressure is constant, the shape factor converges to {pi}{sup 2}/L{sup 2}, 2{pi}{sup 2}/L{sup 2}, and 3{pi}{sup 2}/L{sup 2} for one-, two-, and three-dimensional rock matrix, respectively, at the dimensionless time ({tau}) of about 0.1. When the flow rate between the rock matrix and the fracture is constant, the fracture pressure varies with location on the rock surface. Based on the average fracture pressure, the shape factor decreases with production time until a {tau} value of 0.1 is reached. The boundary conditions of constant fracture pressure followed by a constant decline in fracture pressure are equivalent to the condition of a constant fracture pressure followed by a period of constant flow rate.

Chang, Ming-Ming

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fish and Wildlife Program Habitat Protection Plan; Implementation of Fisheries Enhancement Opportunities on the Coeur d'Alene Reservation, 1997-2002 Technical Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Throughout the last century, the cumulative effects of anthropogenic disturbances have caused drastic watershed level landscape changes throughout the Reservation and surrounding areas (Coeur d'Alene Tribe 1998). Changes include stream channelization, wetland draining, forest and palouse prairie conversion for agricultural use, high road density, elimination of old growth timber stands, and denuding riparian communities. The significance of these changes is manifested in the degradation of habitats supporting native flora and fauna. Consequently, populations of native fish, wildlife, and plants, which the Tribe relies on as subsistence resources, have declined or in some instances been extirpated (Apperson et al. 1988; Coeur d'Alene Tribe 1998; Lillengreen et al. 1996; Lillengreen et al. 1993; Gerry Green Coeur d'Alene Tribe wildlife Biologist, personal communication 2002). For example, bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) are not present at detectable levels in Reservation tributaries, westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) are not present in numbers commensurate with maintaining harvestable fisheries (Lillengreen et al. 1993, 1996), and the Sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus) are not present at detectable levels on the Reservation (Gerry Green, Coeur d'Alene Tribe wildlife biologist, personal communication). The Coeur d'Alene Tribe added Fisheries and Wildlife Programs to their Natural Resources Department to address these losses and protect important cultural, and subsistence resources for future generations. The Tribal Council adopted by Resolution 89(94), the following mission statement for the Fisheries Program: 'restore, protect, expand and re-establish fish populations to sustainable levels to provide harvest opportunities'. This mission statement, focused on fisheries restoration and rehabilitation, is a response to native fish population declines throughout the Tribe's aboriginal territory, including the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation (Coeur d'Alene Tribe 1998). Implicit in this statement is a commitment to provide native subsistence resources in the present and near future as well as the long-term by employing all the mitigation and conservation measures available to them. The development of this Habitat Protection Plan is intended to provide additional planning level guidance as the implementation of conservation measures moves forward. The purpose of this plan is to develop a systematic approach to habitat restoration that will ultimately lead to self-perpetuating, harvestable populations of native fish, wildlife and botanical species. Specifically, it is our intention to apply the principles and analyses presented in this plan to prioritize future restoration efforts that receive funding under the Northwest Power Planning Council's Resident Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Programs. Using an ecosystem restoration approach based on landscape ecology concepts (Primack 1993), the basic premise of the plan is to (1) protect functioning habitat conditions and (2) restore degraded habitat conditions. This plan focuses on habitat conditions at the watershed scale (macrohabitat) rather than on the needs of single species and/or species guilds. By focusing restoration efforts at a macrohabitat level, restoration efforts target all native species inhabiting that area. This approach marks a paradigm shift that emphasizes ecological based restoration rather than species-specific restoration. Traditionally, fish managers and wildlife managers have approached restoration independently, often dedicating resources to a single species by focusing on specific habitat types on a small spatial scale (microhabitat) (Robinson and Bolen 1989, Marcot et al. 2002). This management technique has done little to curb declines despite large budgets (Pianka 1994). Restoration on a landscape level has shown promising results (Holling 1992) and many riparian and wetland restoration projects throughout the northwest have inadvertently improved habitats for non-targeted species. Landscape level restoration addresses

Vitale, Angelo; Roberts, Frank; Peters, Ronald

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

CX-002576: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

76: Categorical Exclusion Determination 76: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-002576: Categorical Exclusion Determination South Dakota-Tribe-Rosebud Sioux Tribe CX(s) Applied: B2.5, B5.1 Date: 05/24/2010 Location(s): South Dakota Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program. The Rosebud Sioux Tribe of South Dakota proposes to establish a tribal weatherization program within an existing tribal organization and provide training and weatherization skills development to tribal members. The design and implementation of a weatherization program is to ensure that every house weatherized will receive cost-effective measures. Energy weatherization, such as weather-stripping of doors and windows and caulking and sealing cracks and holes in a living structure, would be conducted to help

299

Agenda  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

INDIAN COUNTRY ENERGY AND INFRASTRUCTURE WORKING GROUP INDIAN COUNTRY ENERGY AND INFRASTRUCTURE WORKING GROUP ICEIWG 2011 KICK-OFF MEETING AUGUST 25, 2011 RENAISSANCE DENVER HOTEL 3801 QUEBEC STREET DENVER, COLORADO 80207 # 303-339-7500 FINAL AGENDA CLOSED SESSION-ICEIWG MEMBERS AND ALTERNATES ONLY PLATTE RIVER ROOM 7:30am - 8:00am REGISTRATION AND CONTINENTAL BREAKFAST 8:00am - 8:45am WELCOME AND INTRODUCTIONS DOE Representatives Tracey A. LeBeau, Director DOE-O I E Pilar Thomas, Deputy Director DOE-O I E Brandt Petrasek, Special Assistant DOE-O I E ICEIWG Members and Alternates Rodney Bordeaux, Chairman, Rosebud Sioux Tribe (Alternate) Mato Standing High, Attorney General, Rosebud Sioux Tribe Ronald Suppah, Vice Chair Tribal Council, Confederated Tribes of the

300

CX-004265: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

265: Categorical Exclusion Determination 265: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-004265: Categorical Exclusion Determination South Dakota-Tribe-Lower Brule Sioux Tribe CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B2.5, B5.1 Date: 10/15/2010 Location(s): South Dakota Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program. The Lower Brule Sioux Tribe of South Dakota proposes to 1) retain technical consultant services to assist in development of an energy and conservation strategy, 2) conduct energy audits on tribal residential and commercial buildings, and 3) conduct energy retrofits (lighting and heating, cooling, and ventilation) on the Tribal Administration Building and Veterans Memorial Community Center. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-004265.pdf More Documents & Publications

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rock sioux tribe" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Microsoft Word - Document1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Development on Tribal Lands Development on Tribal Lands Project Type Technology Applicant Name Project Title Proposed DOE Funds* Cost Share Development Wind Rosebud Sioux Tribe Wind Energy Development of Tribal Lands $456,594 $115,750 Development Wind Facility Northern Cheyenne Tribe, Inc. Wind Energy Development on Tribal Lands $515,200 $128,800 Development Wind Turbine Assiniboine & Sioux Tribes of the Fort Peck Reservation Renewable Energy Development of Tribal Lands $342,602 $724,907 Feasibility Solar Native Village of Venetie Tribal Government A Feasibility Study: Powering Remote Northern Villages with the Midnight Sun $199,654 $41,480 Feasibility Wind The Makah Indian Nation Next Steps to Implement the 30 MW Wind Power Pilot Project on the Makah Indian Nation for the

302

Environmental assessment of remedial action at the slick rock Uranium Mill Tailings sites Slick Rock, Colorado  

SciTech Connect

The Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (42 USC {section} 7901 et seq.), hereafter referred to as the UMTRCA, authorized the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to clean up two uranium mill tailings processing sites near Slick Rock, Colorado, in San Miguel County. The purpose of the cleanup is to reduce the potential health effects associated with the radioactive materials remaining on the sites and on vicinity properties (VPs) associated with the sites. Contaminated materials cover an estimated 55 acres of the Union Carbide (UC) processing site and 12 ac of the North Continent (NC) processing site. The total estimated volume of contaminated materials is approximately 61 8,300 cubic yards. In addition to the contamination in the two processing site areas, four VPs were found to contain contamination. As a result of the tailings being exposed to the environment, contamination associated with the UC and NC sites has leached into shallow ground water. Surface water has not been affected. The closest residence is approximately 0.3 air mi from either site. The proposed action is to remediate the UC and NC sites by removing all contaminated materials within the designated site boundaries or otherwise associated with the sites, and relocating them to, and stabilizing them at, a location approximately 5 road mi (8 km) northeast of the sites on land administered by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM). Remediation would be performed by the DOE`s Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. All solid contaminated materials would be buried under 5 feet (ft) of rock and soil materials. The proposed disposal site area is currently used by ranchers for cattle grazing over a 7-month period. The closest residence to the proposed disposal site is 2 air mi. An estimated 44 ac of land would be permanently transferred from the BLM to the DOE and restricted from future use.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Energy extraction characteristics of hot dry rock geothermal systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The LASL Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Project is investigating methods to extract energy at useful temperatures and rates from naturally heated crustal rock in locations where the rock does not spontaneously yield natural steam or hot water at a rate sufficient to support commercial utilization. Several concepts are discussed for application to low and high permeability formations. The method being investigated first is intended for use in formations of low initial permeability. It involves producing a circulation system within the hot rock by hydraulic fracturing to create a large crack connecting two drilled holes, then operating the system as a closed pressurized-water heat-extration loop. With the best input assumptions that present knowledge provides, the fluid-flow and heat-exchange calculations indicate that unpumped (buoyant) circulation through a large hydraulic fracture can maintain a commercially useful rate of heat extraction throughout a usefully long system life. With a power cycle designed for the temperature of the fluid produced, total capital investment and generating costs are estimated to be at least competitive with those of fossil-fuel-fired and nuclear electric plants. This paper discusses the potential of the hot dry rock resource, various heat extraction concepts, prediction of reservoir performance, and economic factors, and summarizes recent progress in the LASL field program.

Tester, J.W.; Smith, M.C.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Los Alamos hot dry rock geothermal energy experiment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Recent heat flow data indicates that about 95,000 sq. mi. in 13 western U.S. states is underlain, at a depth of 5 km (16,400 ft) by hot dry rock at temperatures above 290/sup 0/C (440/sup 0/F.). Therefore a geothermal energy development program was undertaken to develop methods from extracting thermal energy from hot rock in the earth crust by man-made underground circulation systems; demonstrate the commercial feasibility of such systems; and encourage use of this technology. Experiments performed on the Jemez Plateau in New Mexico are described with information on the drilling of boreholes, hydraulic fracturing of hot rocks, well logging, and environmental monitoring to establish base line data and define the potential effects of the project. The technical achievements of the project include boreholes were drilled to 3k (10,000 ft) with bottomhole temperatures of approximately 200/sup 0/C (390/sup 0/F); hydraulic fracturing produced fractured regions with 150 m (500 ft) radii; at least 90 percent of the water injected was recovered; and data was obtained on geologic conditions, seismic effects, and thermal, fracturing, and chemical properties of the downhole rocks. A geothermal power-production system model was formulated for evaluating the total cost of developing power production using a hot-dry-rock geothermal energy source. (LCL)

Pettitt, R.A.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

PARKER-HEADGATE ROCK & PARKER-GILA  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PARKER-HEADGATE ROCK & PARKER-GILA PARKER-HEADGATE ROCK & PARKER-GILA 161-kV TRANSMISSION LINE Cross Arm Repair and Helicopter Staging Areas Figure 1. Project Location Project Location j PARKER-HEADGATE ROCK & PARKER-GILA 161-kV TRANSMISSION LINE Cross Arm Repair and Helicopter Staging Areas Figure 2a. Project Area (North) Staging Area #4 Structure 3/5 Structure 3/6 Structure 3/4 Structure 3/7 Structure 3/5 Structure 3/6 PARKER-HEADGATE ROCK 161-kV TRANSMISSION LINE PARKER-GILA 161-kV TRANSMISSION LINE Structure 4/6 Legal Description N N 1:24000 scale 1:24000 scale Section Township Range 17 20 2 N 27 E 31 11 N 18 W 6 10 N USGS TOPO MAP: Cross Roads, Arizona-California USGS TOPO MAP: Cross Roads, Arizona-California PARKER-HEADGATE ROCK & PARKER-GILA 161-kV TRANSMISSION LINE Cross Arm Repair and Helicopter Staging Areas

306

The Effect of Heterogeneity on Matrix Acidizing of Carbonate Rocks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In matrix acidizing, the goal is to dissolve minerals in the rock to increase well productivity. This is accomplished by injecting an application-specific solution of acid into the formation at a pressure between the pore pressure and fracture pressure. A hydrochloric acid solution is used in carbonate reservoirs, which actually dissolves the calcite rock matrix in the form of conductive channels called wormholes. These wormholes propagate from the wellbore out into the reservoir, bypassing the damaged zone. In matrix acidizing of carbonates, there are four parameters that affect performance: the concentration of calcite present, injection rate of the acid, reaction type, and heterogeneity. Of these parameters, this paper will focus on how rock heterogeneity affects performance. To do this, a coreflood and acidizing apparatus was used to acidize heterogeneous limestone core samples. Rock characterizations and volumetric measurements were considered with the results from these experiments, which made it possible to correlate and quantify the results with rock and volume parameters. It was found that the core samples with more and larger heterogeneities generally required less acid (measured in pore volumes) to achieve breakthrough, that is, a wormhole created axially from one end of the core to the other. This value for pore volumes to breakthrough was one to two orders of magnitude less than more homogeneous samples. The general procedure and best practices for acidizing the core samples is also detailed in this thesis. This procedure was followed for preparation, coreflooding, and acidizing for all core samples.

Keys, Ryan S.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Proceedings of the scientific visit on crystalline rock repository development.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A scientific visit on Crystalline Rock Repository Development was held in the Czech Republic on September 24-27, 2012. The visit was hosted by the Czech Radioactive Waste Repository Authority (RAWRA), co-hosted by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), and supported by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The purpose of the visit was to promote technical information exchange between participants from countries engaged in the investigation and exploration of crystalline rock for the eventual construction of nuclear waste repositories. The visit was designed especially for participants of countries that have recently commenced (or recommenced) national repository programmes in crystalline host rock formations. Discussion topics included repository programme development, site screening and selection, site characterization, disposal concepts in crystalline host rock, regulatory frameworks, and safety assessment methodology. Interest was surveyed in establishing a %E2%80%9Cclub,%E2%80%9D the mission of which would be to identify and address the various technical challenges that confront the disposal of radioactive waste in crystalline rock environments. The idea of a second scientific visit to be held one year later in another host country received popular support. The visit concluded with a trip to the countryside south of Prague where participants were treated to a tour of the laboratory and underground facilities of the Josef Regional Underground Research Centre.

Mariner, Paul E.; Hardin, Ernest L.; Miksova, Jitka [RAWRA, Czech Republic

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Office of Energy Efficiency and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

269: Categorical Exclusion Determination 269: Categorical Exclusion Determination South Dakota-Tribe-Oglala Sioux Tribe of the Pine Ridge Reservation, South Dakota CX(s) Applied: A9, B5.1 Date: 07/26/2010 Location(s): South Dakota Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy July 26, 2010 CX-003266: Categorical Exclusion Determination Nevada-County-Washoe CX(s) Applied: B3.6, B5.1 Date: 07/26/2010 Location(s): Washoe County, Nevada Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy July 26, 2010 CX-003264: Categorical Exclusion Determination Nebraska-Tribe-Ponca Tribe of Nebraska CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B5.1 Date: 07/26/2010 Location(s): Nebraska Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy July 26, 2010 CX-003263: Categorical Exclusion Determination Montana-Tribe-Blackfeet Tribe CX(s) Applied: B5.1

309

Chimney Rock Public Power Dist | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Chimney Rock Public Power Dist Chimney Rock Public Power Dist Jump to: navigation, search Name Chimney Rock Public Power Dist Place Nebraska Utility Id 3495 Utility Location Yes Ownership P NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png ELECTRIC THERMAL STORAGE Commercial GENERAL SEASONAL Commercial IRRIGATION SERVICE Single Phase Commercial IRRIGATION SERVICE Three Phase Commercial IRRIGATION STANDBY RATE, Single Phase Commercial IRRIGATION STANDBY RATE, Three Phase Commercial LARGE POWER SERVICE Commercial RESIDENTIAL SERVICE AND SEASONAL SERVICE Residential

310

City of Rock Hill, South Carolina (Utility Company) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rock Hill, South Carolina (Utility Company) Rock Hill, South Carolina (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name City of Rock Hill Place South Carolina Utility Id 16195 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SERC Activity Bundled Services Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png 175 Watt HPS lighting Lighting Economic Development Rate (Schedule EDR -1) Commercial Economic Development Rate (Schedule EDR -2) Industrial Flood Lighting Rate 1000 Watt HPS Lighting Flood Lighting Rate 400 Watt HPS Lighting General Service/ Non Demand (Schedule GS) Commercial General Service/Demand (Schedule GD) Industrial

311

Supercritical Carbon Dioxide / Reservoir Rock Chemical Interactions | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Supercritical Carbon Dioxide / Reservoir Rock Chemical Interactions Supercritical Carbon Dioxide / Reservoir Rock Chemical Interactions Jump to: navigation, search Geothermal Lab Call Projects for Supercritical Carbon Dioxide / Reservoir Rock Chemical Interactions Loading map... {"format":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"limit":200,"offset":0,"link":"all","sort":[""],"order":[],"headers":"show","mainlabel":"","intro":"","outro":"","searchlabel":"\u2026 further results","default":"","geoservice":"google","zoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","forceshow":true,"showtitle":true,"hidenamespace":false,"template":false,"title":"","label":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"locations":[{"text":"

312

Black Rock III Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Black Rock III Geothermal Project Black Rock III Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Development Project: Black Rock III Geothermal Project Project Location Information Coordinates The following coordinate was not recognized: 33°19'59" N, 115°50'3 W.The following coordinate was not recognized: 33°19'59" N, 115°50'3 W. Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

313

Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Woldegabriel & Goff, 1992) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Woldegabriel & Goff, 1992) Exploration Activity Details Location Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Rock Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Useful for age determinations - not indicated is useful for exploration. References Giday WoldeGabriel, Fraser Goff (1992) K-Ar Dates Of Hydrothermal

314

3rd Rock Systems and Technologies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rock Systems and Technologies Rock Systems and Technologies Jump to: navigation, search Name 3rd Rock Systems and Technologies Place Burlingame, California Zip 94010 Sector Renewable Energy, Services Product Provides proven renewable energy technologies and consulting services to residential, commercial, and industrial clients. Coordinates 38.753055°, -95.834619° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.753055,"lon":-95.834619,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

315

AltaRock Energy Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AltaRock Energy Inc AltaRock Energy Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name AltaRock Energy Address 7900 E Green Lake Drive N Place Seattle, Washington Zip 98103 Sector Geothermal energy Product Creates geothermal energy reservoirs, develops geothermal facilities Website http://www.altarockenergy.com/ Coordinates 47.6855466°, -122.3364827° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47.6855466,"lon":-122.3364827,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

316

Alternate operating strategies for Hot Dry Rock geothermal reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Flow testing and heat extraction experiments in prototype Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal reservoirs have uncovered several challenges which must be addressed before commercialization of the technology is possible. Foremost among these is the creation of a reservoir which simultaneously possesses high permeability pathways and a large volume of fractured rock. The current concept of heat extraction -- a steady state circulation system with fluid pumping from the injection well to a single, low pressure production well -- may limit our ability to create heat extraction systems which meet these goals. A single injection well feeding two production wells producing fluid at moderate pressures is shown to be a potentially superior way to extract heat. Cyclic production is also demonstrated to have potential as a method for sweeping fluid through a larger volume of rock, thereby inhibiting flow channeling and increasing reservoir lifetime. 10 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

Robinson, B.A.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Search for magnetic monopoles in polar volcanic rocks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For a broad range of values of magnetic monopole mass and charge, the abundance of monopoles trapped inside the Earth would be expected to be enhanced in the mantle beneath the geomagnetic poles. A search for magnetic monopoles was conducted using the signature of an induced persistent current following the passage of igneous rock samples through a SQUID-based magnetometer. A total of 24.6 kg of rocks from various selected sites, among which 23.4 kg are mantle-derived rocks from the Arctic and Antarctic areas, was analysed. No monopoles were found and a 90% confidence level upper limit of $9.8\\cdot 10^{-5}$/gram is set on the monopole density in the search samples.

K. Bendtz; D. Milstead; H. -P. Hchler; A. M. Hirt; P. Mermod; P. Michael; T. Sloan; C. Tegner; S. B. Thorarinsson

2013-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

318

Simulation of blasting induced rock motion using spherical element models  

SciTech Connect

Control of the rock motion associated with blasting can have significant economic benefits. For example, surface coal mining can be made more efficient if the overburden material can be cast further with explosives, leaving less work for mechanical equipment. The final muck pile shape in very type of surface and underground blasting is controlled by the blasting induced motion of the rock. A theoretically sound method of predicting rock motion will be beneficial to understanding the blasting process. Discrete element methods have been used for some time to predict rock motion resulting from blasting. What all of these approaches had in common was the use of polygonal elements with corners and sides as well as aspect ratio. Reasonably good results were obtained but treatment of the interactions of the corners and sides of elements was a computationally intensive process that made long simulations with many elements expensive to perform. The use of spherical elements showed increased efficiency but lacked the mechanisms for treating the bulking of the rock mass. The computer program developed was converted from an explicit code to an event-driven code and some bulking mechanisms were added that allowed spherical elements to exert a torque on other spherical elements with which contact was made. The architecture of this program and its event-driven nature made it difficult to vectorize for efficient execution on vector processing machines. A new code called DMC (Distinct Motion Code) has been developed this past year. DMC was designed and written especially to take advantage of super computer vector processing capabilities. This paper will discuss the use of DMC to perform accurate rock motion calculations with very reasonable computation times. 9 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

Taylor, L.M.; Preece, D.S. (Hibbitt, Karlsson and Sorensen, Providence, RI (USA); Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Los Alamos hot-dry-rock project: recent results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A new deeper reservoir is presently being investigated at the Laboratory's Fenton Hill Hot Dry Rock (HDR) site. The region surrounding the lower of two inclined boreholes, directionally-drilled to about 4 km in hot crystalline rock, has been pressurized in a sequence of injection tests. Based primarily on the measurements made by two close-in microseismic detectors, two similar volumetric reservoir regions have been developed by massive hydraulic fracturing, but with no significant hydraulic communication with the upper borehole as yet.

Brown, D.W.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Microfractures in rocks from two geothermal areas | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Microfractures in rocks from two geothermal areas Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Microfractures in rocks from two geothermal areas Details Activities (2) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: Core samples from the Dunes, California, and Raft River, Idaho, geothermal areas show diagenesis superimposed on episodic fracturing and fracture sealing. The minerals that fill fractures show significant temporal variations. Sealed fractures can act as barriers to fluid flow. Sealed fractures often mark boundaries between regions of significantly

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321

SEISMIC AND ROCK PHYSICS DIAGNOSTICS OF MULTISCALE RESERVOIR TEXTURES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of our study on ''Relationships between seismic properties and rock microstructure'', we have (1) Studied relationships between velocity and permeability. (2) Used independent experimental methods to measure the elastic moduli of clay minerals as functions of pressure and saturation. (3) Applied different statistical methods for characterizing heterogeneity and textures from scanning acoustic microscope (SAM) images of shale microstructures. (4) Analyzed the directional dependence of velocity and attenuation in different reservoir rocks (5) Compared Vp measured under hydrostatic and non-hydrostatic stress conditions in sands. (6) Studied stratification as a source of intrinsic anisotropy in sediments using Vp and statistical methods for characterizing textures in sands.

Gary Mavko

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Ozone generation by rock fracture: Earthquake early warning?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report the production of up to 10 ppm ozone during crushing and grinding of typical terrestrial crust rocks in air, O{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} at atmospheric pressure, but not in helium or nitrogen. Ozone is formed by exoelectrons emitted by high electric fields, resulting from charge separation during fracture. The results suggest that ground level ozone produced by rock fracture, besides its potential health hazard, can be used for early warning in earthquakes and other catastrophes, such as landslides or land shifts in excavation tunnels and underground mines.

Baragiola, Raul A.; Dukes, Catherine A.; Hedges, Dawn [Engineering Physics, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904 (United States)

2011-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

323

Fluid-rock interaction: A reactive transport approach  

SciTech Connect

Fluid-rock interaction (or water-rock interaction, as it was more commonly known) is a subject that has evolved considerably in its scope over the years. Initially its focus was primarily on interactions between subsurface fluids of various temperatures and mostly crystalline rocks, but the scope has broadened now to include fluid interaction with all forms of subsurface materials, whether they are unconsolidated or crystalline ('fluid-solid interaction' is perhaps less euphonious). Disciplines that previously carried their own distinct names, for example, basin diagenesis, early diagenesis, metamorphic petrology, reactive contaminant transport, chemical weathering, are now considered to fall under the broader rubric of fluid-rock interaction, although certainly some of the key research questions differ depending on the environment considered. Beyond the broadening of the environments considered in the study of fluid-rock interaction, the discipline has evolved in perhaps an even more important way. The study of water-rock interaction began by focusing on geochemical interactions in the absence of transport processes, although a few notable exceptions exist (Thompson 1959; Weare et al. 1976). Moreover, these analyses began by adopting a primarily thermodynamic approach, with the implicit or explicit assumption of equilibrium between the fluid and rock. As a result, these early models were fundamentally static rather than dynamic in nature. This all changed with the seminal papers by Helgeson and his co-workers (Helgeson 1968; Helgeson et al. 1969) wherein the concept of an irreversible reaction path was formally introduced into the geochemical literature. In addition to treating the reaction network as a dynamically evolving system, the Helgeson studies introduced an approach that allowed for the consideration of a multicomponent geochemical system, with multiple minerals and species appearing as both reactants and products, at least one of which could be irreversible. Helgeson's pioneering approach was given a more formal kinetic basis (including the introduction of real time rather than reaction progress as the independent variable) in subsequent studies (Lasaga 1981; Aagaard and Helgeson 1982; Lasaga 1984). The reaction path approach can be used to describe chemical processes in a batch or closed system (e.g., a laboratory beaker), but such systems are of limited interest in the Earth sciences where the driving force for most reactions is transport. Lichtner (1988) clarified the application of the reaction path models to water-rock interaction involving transport by demonstrating that they could be used to describe pure advective transport through porous media. By adopting a reference frame which followed the fluid packet as it moved through the medium, the reaction progress variable could be thought of as travel time instead. Multi-component reactive transport models that could treat any combination of transport and biogeochemical processes date back to the early 1980s. Berner and his students applied continuum reactive transport models to describe processes taking place during the early diagenesis of marine sediments (Berner 1980). Lichtner (1985) outlined much of the basic theory for a continuum model for multicomponent reactive transport. Yeh and Tripathi (1989) also presented the theoretical and numerical basis for the treatment of reactive contaminant transport. Steefel and Lasaga (1994) presented a reactive flow and transport model for nonisothermal, kinetically-controlled water-rock interaction and fracture sealing in hydrothermal systems based on simultaneous numerical solution of both reaction and transport This chapter begins with a review of the important transport processes that affect or even control fluid-rock interaction. This is followed by a general introduction to the governing equations for reactive transport, which are broadly applicable to both qualitative and quantitative interpretations of fluid-rock interactions. This framework is expanded through a discussion of specific topics that are the f

Steefel, C.; Maher, K.

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Hot dry rock energy: Hot dry rock geothermal development program. Progress report. Fiscal year 1993  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Extended flow testing at the Fenton Hill Hot Dry Rock (HDR) test facility concluded in Fiscal Year 1993 with the completion of Phase 2 of the long-term flow test (LTFT) program. As is reported in detail in this report, the second phase of the LTFT, although only 55 days in duration, confirmed in every way the encouraging test results of the 112-day Phase I LTFT carried out in Fiscal Year 1992. Interim flow testing was conducted early in FY 1993 during the period between the two LTFT segments. In addition, two brief tests involving operation of the reservoir on a cyclic schedule were run at the end of the Phase 2 LTFT. These interim and cyclic tests provided an opportunity to conduct evaluations and field demonstrations of several reservoir engineering concepts that can now be applied to significantly increase the productivity of HDR systems. The Fenton Hill HDR test facility was shut down and brought into standby status during the last part of FY 1993. Unfortunately, the world`s largest, deepest, and most productive HDR reservoir has gone essentially unused since that time.

Salazar, J.; Brown, M. [eds.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Environmental assessment of remedial action at the Slick Rock uranium mill tailings sites, Slick Rock, Colorado  

SciTech Connect

The Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978, hereafter referred to as the UMTRCA, authorized the US Department of Energy (DOE) to clean up two uranium mill tailings processing sites near Slick Rock, Colorado, in San Miguel County. The purpose of the cleanup is to reduce the potential health effects associated with the radioactive materials remaining on the processing sites and on vicinity properties (VPs) associated with the sites. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) promulgated standards for the UMTRCA that contained measures to control the contaminated materials and to protect the ground water from further degradation. The sites contain concrete foundations of mill buildings, tailings piles, and areas contaminated by windblown and waterborne radioactive tailings materials. The proposed action is to remediate the UC and NC sites by removing all contaminated materials within the designated site boundaries or otherwise associated with the sites, and relocating them to, and stabilizing them at, a location approximately 5 road mi (8 km) northeast of the processing sites on land administered by the US Bureau of Land Management (BLM). Remediation would be performed by the DOE`s Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project.

NONE

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Roth Rock Wind Power Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rock Wind Power Project Rock Wind Power Project Jump to: navigation, search Name Roth Rock Wind Power Project Facility Roth Rock Wind Power Project Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Gestamp Wind North America Developer Synergics Energy Purchaser Delmarva Power Location South of Red House MD Coordinates 39.30105°, -79.458032° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.30105,"lon":-79.458032,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

327

Practices of information and secrecy in a punk rock subculture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

By examining the information practices of a punk-rock subculture, we investigate the limits of social media systems, particularly limits exposed by practices of secrecy. Looking at the exchange of information about "underground" shows, we use qualitative ... Keywords: information practices, secrecy, social network sites, subcultures

Jessica Lingel; Aaron Trammell; Joe Sanchez; Mor Naaman

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Hot dry rock heat mining: An alternative energy progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Mining Heat from the hot dry rock (HDR) resource that lies beneath the earth's crust may provide an almost inexhaustible supply of energy for mankind with minimal environmental effects. In the heat mining process, water is pumped down an injection well into a mass of hydraulically fractured hot rock. As the water flows under high pressure through the opened rock joints, it becomes heated by the rock. It is returned to the surface through a production well (or wells) located some distance from the injector where its thermal energy is recovered by a heat exchanger. The same water is then recirculated through the system to extract more thermal energy. In this closed-loop process, nothing but heat is released to the environment during normal operation. The technical feasibility of HDR heat mining already has been proven by field testing. A long-term flow test is scheduled to begin in 1991 at the world's largest HDR heat mine in New Mexico, USA, to demonstrate that energy can be produced from HDR on a continuous basis over an extended time period. Significant HDR programs are also underway in several other countries. The paper describes the HDR resource, the heat mining concept, environmental characteristics, economics, developments at Los Alamos to date, and HDR development outside the US. 15 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

Duchane, D.V.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Rock bed storage with heat pump. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The study, Rock Bed Storage with Heat Pump, established the feasibility of mating a heat pump to a rock bed storage to effect optimal performance at the lowest cost in single family residences. The operating characteristics of off-the-shelf components of heat pump/rock bed storage systems were studied, and the results were used to formulate configurations of representative systems. These systems were modeled and subsequently analyzed using the TRNSYS computer program and a life cycle cost analysis program called LCCA. A detailed load model of a baseline house was formulated as part of the TRNSYS analysis. Results of the analysis involved the development of a technique to confine the range of heat pump/rock bed storage systems to those systems which are economical for a specific location and set of economic conditions. Additionally, the results included a comparison of the detailed load model with simple UA models such as the ASHRAE bin method. Several modifications and additions were made to the TRNSYS and LCCA computer programs during the course of the study.

Remmers, H.E.; Mills, G.L.

1979-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

1 INTRODUCTION Stressing brittle rocks leads to the development of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-dependent creep driven by stress corrosion and subcritical crack growth (Lockner, 1998). This creep strongly1 INTRODUCTION Stressing brittle rocks leads to the development of distributed damage long before, 1994, Lyakhovsky et al. 1997; Lockner, 1998). Further, the stress-induced damage may facilitate time

Ze'ev, Reches

331

New project for Hot Wet Rock geothermal reservoir design concept  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the outlines of a new Hot Wet Rock (HWR) geothermal project. The goal of the project is to develop a design methodology for combined artificial and natural crack geothermal reservoir systems with the objective of enhancing the thermal output of existing geothermal power plants. The proposed concept of HWR and the research tasks of the project are described.

Takahashi, Hideaki; Hashida, Toshiyuki

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Research paper Rock magnetic stratigraphy of a mafic layered sill  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research paper Rock magnetic stratigraphy of a mafic layered sill: A key to the Karoo volcanics intrusion and part of the Karoo Large Igneous Province in South Africa. This well-exposed intrusion consists reserved. Keywords: AMS; magnetic susceptibility; Karoo; Insizwa; gabbro 1. Introduction Studies of Large

Ferré, Eric

333

Columbia River Channel Improvement Project Rock Removal Blasting: Monitoring Plan  

SciTech Connect

This document provides a monitoring plan to evaluate take as outlined in the National Marine Fisheries Service 2002 Biological Opinion for underwater blasting to remove rock from the navigation channel for the Columbia River Channel Improvement Project. The plan was prepared by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Portland District.

Carlson, Thomas J.; Johnson, Gary E.

2010-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

334

Micro-crack Damage Evolution of Fracturing Rock Chaotic Characteristics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chaotic theory and bifurcation of modern nonlinear science were used to study the evolution of micro-cracks under the hydraulic fracturing of the rock mass characteristics, the tensor damage variable which described the chao evolution of micro-cracks ... Keywords: chaos theory, bifurcation theory, damage evolution

Zhaowan Chun; Wang Tingting

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Issues facing the developmt of hot dry rock geothermal resources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Technical and economic issues related to the commercial feasibility of hot dry rock geothermal energy for producing electricity and heat will be discussed. Topics covered will include resource characteristics, reservoir thermal capacity and lifetime, drilling and surface plant costs, financial risk and anticipated rate of return.

Tester, J.W.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Rock mass response to the decline in underground coal mining  

SciTech Connect

Geomechanical problems of mining in the Ostrava-Karvina Coal Basin were studied on the basis of longterm experience gained from seismological observations. They could serve as reasonable models of rock-mass response to temporary reduction and gradual decline in mining activities and mine closure.

Holub, K. [Academy of Science in Czech Republic, Prague (Czech Republic)

2006-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

337

GEOS898 History on the Rocks Assignment 2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Goggles and aprons Magnifier Graph paper Ruler Colored pencils Small white marker boards (2x3 ft) (Prepare the remaining pictures and rock samples and continue drawing the column using graph paper, rules and colored pencils. (Additional pictures may be used from textbook and internet sources for added clarity.) (20

Frank, Tracy D.

338

New oil source rocks cut in Greek Ionian basin  

SciTech Connect

The Ionian zone of Northwest Greece (Epirus region) constitutes part of the most external zones of the Hellenides (Paxos zone, Ionian zone, Gavrovo Tripolitza zone). The rocks of the Ionian zone range from Triassic evaporites and associated breccias through a varied series of Jurassic through Upper Eocene carbonates and lesser cherts and shales followed by Oligocene flysch. The surface occurrences of petroleum in the Ionian zone are mainly attributed to Toarcian Lower Posidonia beds source rocks and lesser to late Callovian-Tithonian Upper Posidonia beds and to the Albian-Cenomanian Upper Siliceous zone or Vigla shales of the Vigla limestones. Oil that could not be attributed to the above source rocks is believed to have an origin from Triassic formations that contain potential source rocks in Albania and Italy. However, several samples of the shales of Triassic breccias from outcrops and drillholes were analyzed in the past, but the analytical results were not so promising since their hydrocarbon potential was low. In this article, the authors will present their analytical results of the Ioannina-1 well, where for the first time they identified some very rich source beds in the Triassic breccias formation of Northwest Greece.

Karakitsios, V. [Univ. of Athens (Greece); Rigakis, N. [Public Petroleum Corp., Athens (Greece)

1996-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

339

Fluid Migration During Ice/Rock Planetesimal Differentiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Much speculation on extraterrestrial life has focused on finding environments where water is present. Heating of smaller icy bodies may create and sustain a possible liquid layer below the surface. If liquid water was sustained for geologically significant times (> 108 years) within the ubiquitous small bodies in the outer solar system, the opportunities for development of simple life are much greater. The lifetime of the liquid water layer will depend on several factors, including the rate of rock/water reaction, which will depend on the rate at which water can be segregated from a melting ice/rock core. For the liquid water phase to migrate toward the surface, the denser rock phase must compact. The primary question that this thesis will answer is how fast melt water can segregate from the core of an ice-rich planetesimal. To answer this question we treat the core as two phase flow problem: a compacting viscous solid (ice/rock mixture) and a segregating liquid (melt water). The model developed here is based on the approach derived to study a different partially molten solid: in the viscously deforming partially molten upper mantle. We model a planetesimal core that initially a uniform equal mixture of solid ice and rock. We assume chondritic levels of radiogenic heating as the only heat source, and numerically solve for the evolution of solid and melt velocities and the distribution of melt fraction (porosity) during the first few million years after accretion. From a suite of numerical models, we have determined that the meltwater is segregated out of the core as fast as it is created, except in the case of very fast melting times (0.75 My vs. 0.62 My), and small ore radius (~25 to 150 km, depending on the viscosity of the ice/rock mixture in the solid core). In these latter cases, segregation is slower than migration and a high water fraction develops in the core. Heat released by water-rock reactions (not included in this model) will tend to drive up melting rates in all cases, which may favor this latter endmember.

Raney, Robert 1987-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Estimation of host rock thermal conductivities using the temperature data from the drift-scale test at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

host rock in the immediate vicinity of the heat source. Insource of heating and condensed in the cooler parts of the rock.sources, heat transfer was still happening on account of the wet rock.

Mukhopadhyay, Sumitra; Tsang, Y.W.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rock sioux tribe" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

2008 Rock Deformation GRC - Conference August 3-8, 2008  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The GRC on Rock Deformation highlights the latest research in brittle and ductile rock mechanics from experimental, field and theoretical perspectives. The conference promotes a multi-disciplinary forum for assessing our understanding of rock strength and related physical properties in the Earth. The theme for the 2008 conference is 'Real-time Rheology'. Using ever-improving geophysical techniques, our ability to constrain the rheological behavior during earthquakes and post-seismic creep has improved significantly. Such data are used to investigate the frictional behavior of faults, processes responsible for strain localization, the viscosity of the lower crust, and viscous coupling between the crust and mantle. Seismological data also provide information on the rheology of the lower crust and mantle through analysis of seismic attenuation and anisotropy. Geologists are improving our understanding of rheology by combining novel analyses of microstructures in naturally deformed rocks with petrologic data. This conference will bring together experts and students in these research areas with experimentalists and theoreticians studying the same processes. We will discuss and assess where agreement exists on rheological constraints derived at different length/time scales using different techniques - and where new insight is required. To encompass the elements of these topics, speakers and discussion leaders with backgrounds in geodesy, experimental rock deformation, structural geology, earthquake seismology, geodynamics, glaciology, materials science, and mineral physics will be invited to the conference. Thematic sessions will be organized on the dynamics of earthquake rupture, the rheology of the lower crust and coupling with the upper mantle, the measurement and interpretation of seismic attenuation and anisotropy, the dynamics of ice sheets and the coupling of reactive porous flow and brittle deformation for understanding geothermal and chemical properties of the shallow crust that are important for developing ideas in CO2 sequestration, geothermal and petrochemical research and the mechanics of shallow faults.

James G. Hirth

2009-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

342

Hot dry rock fracture propagation and reservoir characterization  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

North America's largest hydraulic fracturing opeations have been conducted at Fenton hill, New mexico to creae hot dry rock geothermal reservoirs. Microearthquakes induced by these fracturing operations were measured with geophones. The large volume of rock over which the microearthquakes were distributed indicates a mechanism of hydraulic stimulation which is at odds with conventional fracturing theory, which predicts failure along a plane which is perpendicular to the least compressive earth stress. Shear slippage along pre-existing joints in the rock is more easily induced than conventional tensile failure, particularly when the difference between minimum and maximum earth stresses is large and the pre-existing joints are oriented at angles between 30 and 60)degree) to the principal earth stresses, and a low viscosity fluid like water is injected. Shear slippage results in local redistribution of stresses, which allows a branching, or dendritic, stimulation pattern to evolve, in agreement with the patterns of microearthquake locations. Field testing of HDR reservoirs at the Fenton Hill site shows that significant reservoir growth occurred as energy was extracted. Tracer, microseismic, and geochemical measurements provided the primary quantitative evidence for the increases in accessible reservoir volume and fractured rock surface area. These temporal increases indicate that augmentation of reservoir heat production capacity in hot dry rock system occurred. For future reservoir testing, Los Alamos is developing tracer techniques using reactive chemicals to track thermal fronts. Recent studies have focused on the kinetics of hydrolysis of derivatives of bromobenzene, which can be used in reservoirs as hot as 275)degree)C.

Murphy, H.; Fehler, M.; Robinson, B.; Tester, J.; Potter, R.; Birdsell, S.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Proceedings of the second international symposium on rock fragmentation by blasting  

SciTech Connect

This is the second international meeting of researchers in rock fragmentation by blasting. The symposium continues the information exchange initiated at the previous conference and to determine relevant directions for future research on fracture and fragmentation of rock.

Fourney, W.L.; Dick, R.D. (Maryland Univ., College Park, MD (USA))

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Spectral properties and reflectance curves of the revealed volcanic rocks in Syria using radiometric measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This research aimed at studying the spectral reflectance intensity of different exposed volcanic rocks in Syria, and drawing their curves by radiometer measurements. In order to reach this goal, we have studied different kinds of volcanic rocks related ...

M. Rukieh; A. M. Al-Kafri; A. W. Khalaf

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Transport and seismoelectric properties of porous permeable rock : numerical modeling and laboratory measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this thesis is to better understand the transport and seismoelectric (SE) properties of porous permeable rock. Accurate information of rock transport properties, together with pore geometry, can aid us to ...

Zhan, Xin, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Search for underground openings for in situ test facilities in crystalline rock  

SciTech Connect

With a few exceptions, crystalline rocks in this study were limited to plutonic rocks and medium to high-grade metamorphic rocks. Nearly 1700 underground mines, possibly occurring in crystalline rock, were initially identified. Application of criteria resulted in the identification of 60 potential sites. Within this number, 26 mines and 4 civil works were identified as having potential in that they fulfilled the criteria. Thirty other mines may have similar potential. Most of the mines identified are near the contact between a pluton and older sedimentary, volcanic and metamorphic rocks. However, some mines and the civil works are well within plutonic or metamorphic rock masses. Civil works, notably underground galleries associated with pumped storage hydroelectric facilities, are generally located in tectonically stable regions, in relatively homogeneous crystalline rock bodies. A program is recommended which would identify one or more sites where a concordance exists between geologic setting, company amenability, accessibility and facilities to conduct in situ tests in crystalline rock.

Wollenberg, H.A.; Strisower, B.; Corrigan, D.J.; Graf, A.N.; O'Brien, M.T.; Pratt, H.; Board, M.; Hustrulid, W.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Modeling of thermally driven hydrological processes in partially saturated fractured rock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the heat source and encounters cooler rock, it condenses,fractured rock near the radioactive-decay heat source isrock, giving rise to a reflux of liquid back to the heat source.

Tsang, Yvonne

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

A rock mechanics perspective on the effects of hard rock workings in close proximity to overlying coal seams  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mining in the Coalfields has been ongoing for many years, however prior to the discovery of coal, Gold was being mined in the form of the Kimberley Reef. Today it is the coal that has our interest and is the primary mineral being extracted from the ground. ... Keywords: mining, pillars, rock mechanics, slabbing, stress

K. Naidoo; C. Dekker

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Coupled hydro-mechanical processes in crytalline rock and in induratedand plastic clays: A comparative discussion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at Grimsel. In Coupled Thermo-Hydro- Mechanical-ChemicalCOUPLED HYDRO-MECHANICAL PROCESSES IN CRYTALLINE ROCK AND IN

Tsang, Chin-Fu; Blumling, Peter; Bernier, Frederic

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Dispersion of elastic moduli in a porous-cracked rock: Theoretical predictions for squirt-flow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Attenuation and dispersion of compressional waves in fluid-filled porous rocks with partial gas saturationDispersion of elastic moduli in a porous-cracked rock: Theoretical predictions for squirt-flow M Available online xxxx Keywords: Frequency dispersion Rock properties Bimodal porosity Effective medium

Fortin, Jérôme

351

Modeling the cracking process of rocks from continuity to discontinuity using a cellular automaton  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A rock discontinuous cellular automaton (RDCA) was developed for modeling rock fracturing processes from continuous to discontinuous deformation under mechanical loading. RDCA is an integration of the following basic concepts: (1) representation of heterogeneity ... Keywords: Cracking process, Discontinuity, Elasto-plastic cellular automaton, Level set, Partition of unity, Rock discontinuous cellular automaton

Peng-Zhi Pan; Fei Yan; Xia-Ting Feng

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Olivella Grooved Rectangle Beads from a Middle Holocene Site in the Fort Rock Valley, Northern Great Basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lake Fort Rock and other local sources. The primary culturalRock Valley currently receives no water from a perennial source.

Jenkins, Dennis L; Erlandson, Jon M

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Rock Sampling At Socorro Mountain Area (Armstrong, Et Al., 1995) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Armstrong, Et Al., 1995) Armstrong, Et Al., 1995) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Rock Sampling At Socorro Mountain Area (Armstrong, Et Al., 1995) Exploration Activity Details Location Socorro Mountain Area Exploration Technique Rock Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Corresponding Socorro caldera Carboniferous rocks were studied in the field in 1988-1992-Renault later completed geochemistry and silica-crystallite geothermometry, Armstrong petrographic analysis and cathodoluminescence, Oscarson SEM studies, and John Repetski (USGS, Reston, Virgina) conodont stratigraphy and color and textural alteration as guides to the carbonate rocks' thermal history. The carbonate-rock classification used in this

354

West Valley Demonstration Project 10282 Rock Springs Road  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

West Valley Demonstration Project West Valley Demonstration Project 10282 Rock Springs Road West Valley, NY 141 71 -9799 Mr. Daniel W. Coyne President & General Manager CH2M HILL B&W West Valley, LLC West Valley Demonstration Project 10282 Rock Springs Road West Valley, NY 141 71 -9799 ATTENTION: J. D. Rendall, Regulatory Strategy, AC-EA SUBJECT: Environmental Checklist WVDP-20 12-0 1, " WVDP Reservoir Interconnecting Canal Maintenance Activities" REFERENCE: Letter WD:2012:0409 (357953), D. W. Coyne to R. W. Reffner, "CONTRACT NO. DE-EM000 1529, Section 5-3, Item 105, NEPA Documentation (Transmittal of Environmental Checklist WVDP-20 12-0 1, WVDP Reservoir Interconnecting Canal Maintenance Activities), Revision 1 ," dated July 24, 20 12 Dear Mr. Coyne:

355

A Study of Hydraulic Fracturing Initiation in Transversely Isotropic Rocks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydraulic fracturing of transverse isotropic reservoirs is of major interest for reservoir stimulation and in-situ stress estimation. Rock fabric anisotropy not only causes in-situ stress anisotropy, but also affects fracture initiation from the wellbore. In this study a semi-analytical method is used to investigate these effects with particular reference to shale stimulation. Using simplifying assumptions, equations are derived for stress distribution around the wellbore's walls. The model is then used to study the fracture initiation pressure variations with anisotropy. A sensitivity analysis is carried out on the impact of Young's modulus and Poisson's ration, on the fracture initiation pressure. The results are useful in designing hydraulic fractures and also can be used to develop information about in-situ rock properties using failure pressure values observed in the field. Finally, mechanical and permeability anisotropy are measured using Pulse Permeameter and triaxial tests on Pierre shale.

Serajian, Vahid

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

North Little Rock, Arkansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Little Rock, Arkansas: Energy Resources Little Rock, Arkansas: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 34.769536°, -92.2670941° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.769536,"lon":-92.2670941,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

357

City of North Little Rock, Arkansas (Utility Company) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

North Little Rock North Little Rock Place Arkansas Utility Id 13718 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png HPS- 100 Watt Lighting HPS- 1000 Watt (Floodlights) Lighting HPS- 150 Watt Lighting HPS- 250 Watt Lighting HPS- 250 Watt (Floodlights) Lighting HPS- 400 Watt (Floodlights) Lighting LCTOU Industrial LGS Industrial LPS Industrial MH- 1000 Watt (Floodlights) Lighting

358

Window Rock, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rock, Arizona: Energy Resources Rock, Arizona: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 35.680573°, -109.0525929° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.680573,"lon":-109.0525929,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

359

Ocean Bluff-Brant Rock, Massachusetts: Energy Resources | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bluff-Brant Rock, Massachusetts: Energy Resources Bluff-Brant Rock, Massachusetts: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 42.1080418°, -70.6633175° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.1080418,"lon":-70.6633175,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

360

McKees Rocks, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

McKees Rocks, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources McKees Rocks, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 40.4656244°, -80.0656106° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.4656244,"lon":-80.0656106,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rock sioux tribe" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Rough Rock, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rock, Arizona: Energy Resources Rock, Arizona: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 36.4072229°, -109.8728929° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":36.4072229,"lon":-109.8728929,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

362

Microsoft Word - CX-Wautoma-Rock Creek_WEB.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3, 2010 3, 2010 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Corinn Castro Project Manager - TELM-TPP-3 Proposed Action: Replace spacer dampers along the Wautoma-Rock Creek No. 1 500-kV Transmission Line. Budget Information: Work Order # 00234527 PP&A Project No.: PP&A 1507 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.3, Routine maintenance activities...for structures, rights-of-way, infrastructures such as roads, equipment...routine maintenance activities, corrective....are required to maintain... infrastructures...in a condition suitable for a facility to be used for its designed purpose. Location: Wautoma-Rock Creek No. 1 500-kV Transmission Line. The proposed project is

363

Picture Rocks, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Picture Rocks, Arizona: Energy Resources Picture Rocks, Arizona: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 32.3459069°, -111.2462146° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.3459069,"lon":-111.2462146,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

364

MHK Projects/Race Rocks Demonstration | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Race Rocks Demonstration Race Rocks Demonstration < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":48.2844,"lon":-123.531,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

365

Rock County, Minnesota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rock County, Minnesota: Energy Resources Rock County, Minnesota: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 43.6927003°, -96.3226072° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.6927003,"lon":-96.3226072,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

366

Microsoft Word - CX-Hat_Rock_Switch_14June2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7, 2013 7, 2013 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Glenn Russell Project Manager -TPCV-TPP-4 Proposed Action: Hat Rock Switching Station Replacement Project Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B4.6 Additions and modifications to transmission facilities Location: Umatilla County, Oregon Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to fund PacifiCorp's rebuild of BPA's Hat Rock Tap Switching Station, which is located within PacifiCorp's McNary-Wallula 230-kilovolt (kV) transmission line right-of-way (ROW). Rebuilding the switching station would include the replacement of sectionalizing switches, the grounding grid, and all signage. The approximately 0.5-acre yard would

367

Round Rock, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Round Rock, Texas: Energy Resources Round Rock, Texas: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 30.5082551°, -97.678896° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":30.5082551,"lon":-97.678896,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

368

Rock River LLC Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

River LLC Wind Farm River LLC Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search The Rock River LLC Wind Farm is in Carbon County, Wyoming. It consists of 50 turbines and has a total capacity of 50 MW. It is owned by Shell Wind Energy.[1] Based on assertions that the site is near Arlington, its approximate coordinates are 41.5946899°, -106.2083459°.[2] References ↑ http://www.wsgs.uwyo.edu/Topics/EnergyResources/wind.aspx ↑ http://www.thefreelibrary.com/Shell+WindEnergy+Acquires+Second+Wind+Farm+in+the+U.S.,+in+an...-a082345438 Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Rock_River_LLC_Wind_Farm&oldid=132230" Category: Wind Farms What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load)

369

Big Rock, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rock, Illinois: Energy Resources Rock, Illinois: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.7639181°, -88.5470219° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.7639181,"lon":-88.5470219,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

370

East Flat Rock, North Carolina: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flat Rock, North Carolina: Energy Resources Flat Rock, North Carolina: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 35.2801166°, -82.4220631° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.2801166,"lon":-82.4220631,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

371

Prehistoric Rock Structures of the Idaho National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Over the past 13,500 years, human populations have lived in and productively utilized the natural resources offered by the cold desert environment of the northeastern Snake River Plain in eastern Idaho. Within an overall framework of hunting and gathering, groups relied on an intimate familiarity with the natural world and developed a variety of technologies to extract the resources that they needed to survive. Useful items were abundant and found everywhere on the landscape. Even the basaltic terrain and the rocks, themselves, were put to productive use. This paper presents a preliminary classification scheme for rock structures built on the Idaho National Laboratory landscape by prehistoric aboriginal populations, including discussions of the overall architecture of the structures, associated artifact assemblages, and topographic placement. Adopting an ecological perspective, the paper concludes with a discussion of the possible functions of these unique resources for the desert populations that once called the INL home.

Brenda R Pace

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Recent developments in the hot dry rock geothermal energy program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In recent years, most of the Hot Dry Rock Programs effort has been focused on the extraction technology development effort at the Fenton Hill test site. The pair of approximately 4000 m wells for the Phase II Engineering System of the Fenton Hill Project have been completed. During the past two years, hydraulic fracture operations have been carried out to develop the geothermal reservoir. Impressive advances have been made in fracture identification techniques and instrumentation. To develop a satisfactory interwellbore flow connection the next step is to redrill the lower section of one of the wells into the fractured region. Chemically reactive tracer techniques are being developed to determine the effective size of the reservoir area. A new estimate has been made of the US hot dry rock resource, based upon the latest geothermal gradiant data. 3 figs.

Franke, P.R.; Nunz, G.J.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Numerical evaluation of effective unsaturated hydraulic properties for fractured rocks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To represent a heterogeneous unsaturated fractured rock by its homogeneous equivalent, Monte Carlo simulations are used to obtain upscaled (effective) flow properties. In this study, we present a numerical procedure for upscaling the van Genuchten parameters of unsaturated fractured rocks by conducting Monte Carlo simulations of the unsaturated flow in a domain under gravity-dominated regime. The simulation domain can be chosen as the scale of block size in the field-scale modeling. The effective conductivity is computed from the steady-state flux at the lower boundary and plotted as a function of the averaging pressure head or saturation over the domain. The scatter plot is then fitted using van Genuchten model and three parameters, i.e., the saturated conductivity K{sub s}, the air-entry parameter {alpha}, the pore-size distribution parameter n, corresponding to this model are considered as the effective K{sub s}, effective {alpha}, and effective n, respectively.

Lu, Zhiming [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kwicklis, Edward M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

LASL hot dry rock geothermal energy development project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The history of the hot-dry-rock project is traced. Efforts to establish a two-hole and connecting fracture system on the southwest flank of the Valles Caldera in north-central New Mexico are summarized. Problems encountered in drilling and hydraulic fracturing are described. Current results with the loop operation for heat extraction are encouraging, and plans for a second energy extraction hole are underway. (JBG)

Hill, J.H.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Rock Island Dam Smolt Monitoring; 1994-1995 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Downstream migrating salmon and steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus spp.) smolts were monitored at the Rock Island Dam bypass trap from April 1 - August 31, 1954. This was the tenth consecutive year that the bypass trap was monitored. Data collected included: (1) number of fish caught by species, (2) number of adipose clipped and/or Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tagged fish caught by species, (3) daily average riverflow, (4) daily average powerhouse No. 1 and No. 2 flows and daily average spill. These data were transmitted to the Fish Passage Center, which manages the Smolt Monitoring Program throughout the Columbia River Basin. The Smolt Monitoring Program is used to manage the {open_quotes}water budget{close_quotes}, releasing upstream reservoir water storage allocated to supplement river flows to enhance survival of downstream migrating juvenile salmonids. The Rock Island Dam trapping facility collected 37,795 downstream migrating salmonids in 1994. Collected fish included 4 yearling and 4 sub-yearling chinook salmon (O. tshawytscha) that had been previously PIT tagged to help determine migration rates. Additionally, 1,132 sub-yearling chinook, 4,185 yearling chinook, 6,627 steelhead, (O. mykiss) and 422 sockeye (O. nerka) with clipped adipose fins were collected. The middle 80% of the 1994 spring migration (excluding sub-yearling chinooks) passed Rock Island Dam during a 34 day period, April 25 - May 28. Passage rates of chinook and steelhead smolts released from hatcheries and the downstream migration timing of all salmonids are presented. The spring migration timing of juvenile salmonids is strongly influenced by hatchery releases above Rock Island Dam.

Truscott, Keith B.; Fielder, Paul C. (Chelan County Public Utility District No. 1, Power Operations Department, Wenatchee, WA)

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Neutron Production from the Fracture of Piezoelectric Rocks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A theoretical explanation is provided for the experimental evidence that fracturing piezoelectric rocks produces neutrons. The elastic energy micro-crack production ultimately yields the macroscopic fracture. The mechanical energy is converted by the piezoelectric effect into electric field energy. The electric field energy decays via radio frequency (microwave) electric field oscillations. The radio frequency electric fields accelerate the condensed matter electrons which then collide with protons producing neutrons and neutrinos.

A. Widom; J. Swain; Y. N. Srivastava

2011-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

377

Fluid-Rock Characterization and Interactions in NMR Well Logging  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project was to characterize the fluid properties and fluid-rock interactions that are needed for formation evaluation by NMR well logging. The advances made in the understanding of NMR fluid properties are summarized in a chapter written for an AAPG book on NMR well logging. This includes live oils, viscous oils, natural gas mixtures, and the relation between relaxation time and diffusivity.

Hirasaki, George J.; Mohanty, Kishore K.

2003-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

378

Neutron Production from the Fracture of Piezoelectric Rocks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A theoretical explanation is provided for the experimental evidence that fracturing piezoelectric rocks produces neutrons. The elastic energy micro-crack production ultimately yields the macroscopic fracture. The mechanical energy is converted by the piezoelectric effect into electric field energy. The electric field energy decays via radio frequency (microwave) electric field oscillations. The radio frequency electric fields accelerate the condensed matter electrons which then collide with protons producing neutrons and neutrinos.

Widom, A; Srivastava, Y N

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Comparison and analysis of reservoir rocks and related clays  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A series of instrumental and chemical analyses was made on sedimentary rocks to determine the surface chemical properties of sedimentry rocks and the physical characteristic of the pores. A scanning electron microscope (SEM) with energy dispersive X-ray analytic capability was used to study the morphology of the samples, surface mineral composition and type and location of clays, and to obtain a qualitative estimate of the pore sizes. A centrifuge was used to determine the pore size distributions which are correlated with SEM observations. An atomic absorption spectrophotometer equipped with an inductively coupled plasma for complete spectral analysis was used to obtain analyses of the rocks, clays, and effluents from ion exchange tests. Two of the results are as follows: (1) Sweetwater gas sands have a bimodal pore size distribution composed of pores with a mean diameter of 0.2 microns which is attributed to intergranular spaces and cracks in the expanded laborboratory sample but which will be close under the pressure of the overburden formations, and these Sweetwater sands have a distribution of pores at 2 microns which are solution vugs rather than intergranular porosity since the sand grains are completely packed together with the cementing material due to the high overburden pressures; and (2) Ion-exchange capacities of two rocks were 5.3 meq/kg and 18.0 meq/kg, and the surface areas were 0.9 m/sup 2//g and 2.30 m/sup 2//g, respectively, even though each had almost identical mineral composition, clay type and quantity, and permeability. 7 references, 12 figures, 3 tables.

Crocker, M.E.; Donaldson, E.C.; Marchin, L.M.

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Engineering Characterization of Strong Ground Motion Recorded at Rock Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to define the engineering characteristics of strong ground motion recorded at rock sites. Particular emphasis is placed upon resolving the factors that control the shape of response spectra in both WNA (western North America) and ENA (central and eastern North America) tectonic environments. To accomplish this objective, a simple band-limited white noise (BLWN) ground motion model employing a constant-stress-drop, single-corner-frequency, omega-square source combined with...

1995-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rock sioux tribe" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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381

RockPort Capital Partners (Massachusetts) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

RockPort Capital Partners (Massachusetts) RockPort Capital Partners (Massachusetts) Name RockPort Capital Partners (Massachusetts) Address 160 Federal Street, 18th Floor Place Boston, Massachusetts Zip 02110 Region Greater Boston Area Product Venture capital firm that partners with cleantech entrepreneurs around the world Phone number (617) 912-1420 Website http://www.rockportcap.com/ Coordinates 42.3537726°, -71.0562094° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.3537726,"lon":-71.0562094,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

382

Simulation of rock blasting with the SHALE code  

SciTech Connect

The SHALE code and its special features for simulating rock blasting are described. SHALE first simulates the detonation of the explosive and then follows the effect of the resulting shocks and stress waves on the surrounding rock. A general description is given for SHALE as a finite-difference stress-wave-propagation code, followed by a brief discussion of numerical methods, and a section on the treatment of the explosive. The constitutive model in SHALE is the BCM (Bedded Crack Model), which describes the response of the rock, including fracture. The use of SHALE is illustrated in a discussion of the basic phenomenology of crater blasting, as seen in simulations of field experiments in oil shale. Predicted peak surface velocities are found to agree with field measurements. Comparisons between predicted fracture and observed craters give insight into the relative roles played by shock waves and the high-pressure-explosive product gases. The two-dimensional version of SHALE is being documented and will be available for use by other investigators. A three-dimensional version is planned.

Adams, T.F.; Demuth, R.B.; Margolin, L.G.; Nichols, B.D.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Progress of the US Hot-Dry-Rock Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

While other geologic environments and possible heat-extraction methods are recognized, the US Hot Dry Rock (HDR) Program has so far concentrated on the use of hydraulic fracturing to create flow passages and heat-transfer surface between two wells drilled into hot crystalline rock of low initial permeability. A recirculating pressurized-water loop has been used at Fenton Hill, New Mexico, to extract heat at rates up to 5MW(t) from a system of this type in granitic rock at a depth of 2600 m. The two wells for a larger, deeper, hotter system have now been drilled at the same location. They will be connected during 1982 by a set of hydraulic fractures, and the resulting heat-extraction loop is expected to yield the engineering experience and performance data required to demonstrate the commercial usefulness of such systems. Meanwhile, an evaluation of the HDR resource base of the United States is continuing, together with detailed investigation of local areas that appear especially promisng either for future heat-extraction experiments or for eventual commercial development.

Smith, M.C.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Black Rock Point Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Black Rock Point Geothermal Area Black Rock Point Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Black Rock Point Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.9553,"lon":-119.1141,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

385

RockPort Capital Partners (California) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

RockPort Capital Partners (California) RockPort Capital Partners (California) Name RockPort Capital Partners (California) Address 3000 Sand Hill Road, Building 2, Suite 110 Place Menlo Park, California Zip 94025 Region Bay Area Product Venture capital firm that partners with cleantech entrepreneurs around the world Phone number (650) 854-9300 Website http://www.rockportcap.com/ Coordinates 37.4244767°, -122.1942422° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.4244767,"lon":-122.1942422,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

386

High temperature water adsorption on The Geysers rocks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In order to measure water retention by geothermal reservoir rocks at the actual reservoir temperature, the ORNL high temperature isopiestic apparatus was adapted for adsorption measurements. The quality of water retained by rock samples taken from three different wells of The Geysers geothermal reservoir was measured at 150{sup degree}C, 200{sup degree}C, and 250{sup degree}C as a function of pressure in the range 0.00 {<=}p/p{sub degree} {<=} 0.98, where p{sub degree} is the saturated water vapor pressure. Both adsorption (increasing pressure) and desorption (decreasing pressure) runs were made in order to investigate the nature and the extent of the hysteresis. Additionally, low temperature gas adsorption analyses were performed on the same rock samples. Nitrogen or krypton adsorption and desorption isotherms at 77 K were used to obtain BET specific surface areas, pore volumes and their distributions with respect to pore sizes. Mercury intrusion porosimetry was also used to obtain similar information extending to very large pores (macropores). A correlation is sought between water adsorption, the surface properties, and the mineralogical and petrological characteristics of the solids.

Gruszkiewicz, M.S.; Horita, J.; Simonson, J.M.; Mesmer, R.E.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Flow dynamics and solute transport in unsaturated rock fractures  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Rock fractures play an important role in flow and contaminant transport in fractured aquifers, production of oil from petroleum reservoirs, and steam generation from geothermal reservoirs. In this dissertation, phenomenological aspects of flow in unsaturated fractures were studied in visualization experiments conducted on a transparent replica of a natural, rough-walled rock fracture for inlet conditions of constant pressure and flow rate over a range of angles of inclination. The experiments demonstrated that infiltrating liquid proceeds through unsaturated rock fractures along non-uniform, localized preferential flow paths. Even in the presence of constant boundary conditions, intermittent flow was a persistent flow feature observed, where portions of the flow channel underwent cycles of snapping and reforming. Two modes of intermittent flow were observed, the pulsating blob mode and the rivulet snapping mode. A conceptual model for the rivulet snapping mode was proposed and examined using idealized, variable-aperture fractures. The frequency of intermittent flow events was measured in several experiments and related to the capillary and Bond numbers to characterize this flow behavior.

Su, G. W.

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Protected Polycrystalline Diamond Compact Bits For Hard Rock Drilling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two bits were designed. One bit was fabricated and tested at Terra-Tek's Drilling Research Laboratory. Fabrication of the second bit was not completed due to complications in fabrication and meeting scheduled test dates at the test facility. A conical bit was tested in a Carthage Marble (compressive strength 14,500 psi) and Sierra White Granite (compressive strength 28,200 psi). During the testing, Hydraulic Horsepower, Bit Weight, Rotation Rate, were varied for the Conical Bit, a Varel Tricone Bit and Varel PDC bit. The Conical Bi did cut rock at a reasonable rate in both rocks. Beneficial effects from the near and through cutter water nozzles were not evident in the marble due to test conditions and were not conclusive in the granite due to test conditions. At atmospheric drilling, the Conical Bit's penetration rate was as good as the standard PDC bit and better than the Tricone Bit. Torque requirements for the Conical Bit were higher than that required for the Standard Bits. Spudding the conical bit into the rock required some care to avoid overloading the nose cutters. The nose design should be evaluated to improve the bit's spudding characteristics.

Robert Lee Cardenas

2000-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

389

Direct laboratory tensile testing of select yielding rock bolt systems  

SciTech Connect

Yielding rock bolt support systems have been developed to accommodate ground movement in shifting ground such as in coal operations; in creeping ground such as salt, trona, and potash; and in swelling ground associated with some clays. These systems, designed to remain intact despite ground movement, should enhance mine safety and help contain costs in areas where rebolting of rigid non-yielding systems is typically required. Four such systems were tested in straight tensile pulls in the laboratory. They include the Slip Nut System from Dywidag Systems International USA, Inc., Ischebeck`s bolt mounted Titan Load Indicator, Rocky Mountain Bolt Company`s Yielding Cable Bolt, and a rock bolt installed variation of the yielding steel post developed by RE/SPEC Inc. The first two systems are currently marketed products and the latter two are prototype systems. Each system responds to load and displacement by yielding in an unique manner. All are designed to yield at predetermined loads. A description of each system and its yield function is provided. Each system was tested over its prescribed yield range in a test machine. At least five tests were performed on each system. Each system yielded and continued to provide support according to its design. Each shows promise for ground control use in shifting or creeping rock. This work helps to illustrate the comparative differences in performance between these specialized systems and the applications where they may be most useful.

VandeKraats, J.D.; Watson, S.O.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Slick Rock Mill Site - CO 08  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Slick Rock Mill Site - CO 08 Slick Rock Mill Site - CO 08 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Slick Rock Mill Site (CO.08) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: Also see Slick Rock, Colorado, Processing Site Documents Related to Slick Rock Mill Site 2012 Annual Site Inspection and Monitoring Report for Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title I Disposal Sites-Slick Rock, Colorado, Disposal Site. LMS/S09461. February 2013 Verification Monitoring Report for the Slick Rock, Colorado, Processing Sites, 2007 Update June 2008 Office of Legacy Management DOE M/1577 2008 - -L Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S.

391

Environmental assessment of remedial action at the Slick Rock uranium mill tailings sites Slick Rock, Colorado. Draft  

SciTech Connect

The Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (UMTRCA) authorized the US Department of Energy (DOE) to clean up two uranium mill tailings processing sites near Slick Rock, Colorado, in San Miguel County. The purpose of the cleanup is to reduce the potential health effects associated with the radioactive materials remaining on the sites and on vicinity properties (VP) associated with the sites. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) promulgated standards for the UMTRCA that contained measures to control the contaminated materials and to protect the groundwater from further degradation. Remedial actions at the Slick Rock sites must be performed in accordance with these standards and with the concurrence of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC).

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Native American and Alaskan Native  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7, 2010 7, 2010 CX-003001: Categorical Exclusion Determination Alaska-Tribe-Asa'carsarmiut Tribal Council CX(s) Applied: B2.5, B5.1 Date: 07/07/2010 Location(s): Alaska Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy July 6, 2010 CX-003016: Categorical Exclusion Determination South Dakota-Tribal Energy Program-Rosebud Sioux Tribe CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1 Date: 07/06/2010 Location(s): South Dakota Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy July 6, 2010 CX-003004: Categorical Exclusion Determination Arizona-Tribal Energy Program-Hualapai Tribe CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1 Date: 07/06/2010 Location(s): Hualapai Tribe, Arizona Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy July 1, 2010 CX-002927: Categorical Exclusion Determination Montana-Tribe-Fort Belknap Indian Community of the Fort Belknap Reservation

393

Pore Connectivity Effects on Solute Transport in Rocks  

SciTech Connect

Retardation of nuclear contaminants in rock matrices can lead to long retention times, allowing substantial radionuclide decay prior to eventual release. Imbibition and diffusion into the rock matrix can move contaminants away from an active fracture, thereby contributing to their retardation. However, diffusive transport in some rocks may behave anomalously because of their sparsely connected porespace, in contrast to diffusion in rocks with denser pore connections. We examined imbibition of weakly sorbing tracers into welded tuff and Indiana sandstone, and water imbibition into metagraywacke and Berea sandstone. Tuff samples were initially equilibrated to 12% and 76% water (v/v) within controlled humidity chambers, while the other rocks were air-dried. For imbibition, one face was exposed to water, with or without tracer, and uptake was measured over time. Following imbibition, tracer concentration measurements were made at fine (1 mm) increments. Three anomalous results were observed: (1) Indiana sandstone and metagraywacke showed mass of imbibed water scaling as time{sup 0.26}, while tuff and Berea sandstone showed the more classical scaling with time{sup 0.05}; (2) tracer movement into dry (2% initial saturation) Indiana sandstone showed a dispersion pattern similar to that expected during tracer movement into moist (76% initial saturation) tuft and (3) tracer concentrations at the inlet face of the tuff sample were approximately twice those deeper inside the sample. The experiment was then modeled using random walk methods on a 3-D lattice with different values of pore coordination. Network model simulations that used a pore coordination of 1.49 for Indiana sandstone and 1.56 for metagraywacke showed similar temporal scaling, a result of their porespace being close to the percolation threshold. Tracer concentration profiles in Indiana sandstone and tuff were closely matched by simulations that used pore coordinations of 1.49 and 1.68, respectively, because of how low connectivity alters the accessible porosity in the vicinity of the inlet face. The study supports pore connectivity as a coherent explanation for the observed anomalies and demonstrates the utility of pore-scale modeling in elucidating mechanisms critical to radionuclide retardation in geological repositories.

Oinhong Hu

2001-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

394

Implementation of Fisheries Enhancement Opportunities on the Coeur d'Alene Reservation; Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fish, Water, and Wildlife Program, Progress Report 1996-1998.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of an ongoing project to restore fisheries resources in tributaries located on the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation, this report details the activities of the Coeur d'Alene Tribe's Fisheries Program for FY 1997 and 1998. This report (1) analyses the effect introduced species and water quality have on the abundance of native trout in Coeur d'Alene Lake and selected target tributaries; (2) details results from an ongoing mark-recapture study on predatory game fish; (3) characterizes spawning habitats in target tributaries and evaluates the effects of fine sediment on substrate composition and estimated emergence success; and (4) provides population estimates for westslope cutthroat trout in target tributaries. Low dissolved oxygen values in the hypolimnion of Coeur d'Alene Lake continue to be a cause for concern with regard to available fisheries habitat. Four sample sites in 1997 and eight sample sites in 1998 had measured levels of dissolved oxygen below what is considered optimum (6.0 mg/L) for cutthroat trout. As well, two sample points located north of the Coeur d'Alene River showed hypolimnetic dissolved oxygen deficits. This could lead to a more serious problem associated with the high concentration of heavy metals bound up in the sediment north of the Coeur d'Alene River. Most likely these oxygen deficits are a result of allochthonous input of organic matter and subsequent decomposition. Sediment loading from tributaries continues to be a problem in the lake. The build up of sediments at the mouths of all incoming tributaries results in the modification of existing wetlands and provides ideal habitat for predators of cutthroat trout, such as northern pike and largemouth bass. Furthermore, increased sediment deposition provides additional substrate for colonization by aquatic macrophytes, which serve as forage and habitat for other non-native species. There was no significant difference in the relative abundance of fishes in Coeur d'Alene Lake from 1997 to 1998. Four out of the six most commonly sampled species are non-native. Northern pikeminnow and largescale suckers are the only native species among the six most commonly sampled. Northern pikeminnow comprise 8-9% of the electroshocking catch and 18-20% of the gillnet catch. Largescale suckers comprise 24-28% of the electroshocking catch and 9-21% of the gillnet catch. Cutthroat trout and mountain whitefish, on the other hand, comprise less than 1% of the catch when using electroshocking methods and about 1.4% of the gillnet catch. Since 1994, the Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fish, Water and Wildlife Program has conducted an extensive mark-recapture study (Peters et al. 1999). To date, 636 fish have been tagged and 23 fish have been recaptured. We are finding that northern pike have a tendency to migrate from the original sampling site, while largemouth bass appear very territorial, rarely moving from the site where they were tagged. Both species are most commonly associated with shallow, near-shore habitats, where the potential for encountering seasonal migrations of cutthroat trout is maximized. Low-order tributaries provide the most important spawning habitat for cutthroat trout on the Reservation. The mapped distribution of potentially suitable spawning gravel was patchy and did not vary considerably within reaches or between watersheds. Furthermore, the quantity of spawning gravel was low, averaging just 4.1% of measured stream area. The lack of a strong association between spawning gravel abundance and several reach characteristics (gradient, proportion of gravel and pea gravel) corroborates the findings of other authors who suggest that local hydrologic features influence spawning gravel availability. Although the distribution of spawning substrate was patchy within the target watersheds, there is probably adequate habitat to support resident and adfluvial spawners because of currently depressed numbers. Spawning gravels in target tributaries of the Reservation contained proportions of fine sediments comparable to those in egg pockets of salmonid redds in th

Vitale, Angelo; Bailey, Dee; Peters, Ron

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Summary - Hot Dry Rock R&D Strategies and Applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In geothermal energy technology, the hydrothermal systems rely on volcanic hot rocks being fortuitously co-located with an adequate supply of natural ground water, usually at some considerable depth within the earth. This represents essentially two accidents in the same place, and the occurrence is relatively rare. Yellowstone Park and the desert valley of southern California are the most noteworthy US. examples. Since the heat is the energy needed, if we could just get the water down to it and back. Well, that's what is being done with the hot dry rock program. A well is drilled down to where there is adequate heat in the rocks. The well is then pressurized until the rock fractures creating what amounts to a reservoir full of hot, shattered rock. Finally, a well is drilled into the reservoir and water is pumped in one well, heated by the rock, and taken out through the other well at useful temperatures and pressures. We are getting ready to run significant long-term flow tests at the Fenton Hill Hot Dry Rock site west of Los Alamos, New Mexico. We expect the operational information to provide the data to forecast the energy life of the wells as a production facility. This kind of resource is much more common than regular geothermal resources. Robert H. Hendron described the Long Term Flow Test and reservoir studies for which the project is preparing. A shortfall of available funding has slowed preparations, delaying the start of that test. The test is planning to gather data for more definitive reservoir modeling with energy availability or reservoir lifetime of primary interest. Other interests include geochemistry and tracer studies, microseismic response, water requirements and flow impedance which relates directly to the pumping power required. Progress has been made in modeling studies, chemically reactive tracer techniques, and in improvements in acoustic or microseismic event analysis. Donald W. Brown discussed reservoir modeling as it relates to production management of the HDR well. For wells which are fracture dominated rather than matrix-permeability controlled, a knowledge of the pressure-dependent permeability of the interconnected system of natural joints (or pre-existing fractures is critical to long-term power production from the wells) through optimized pressure management. It was mentioned that a knowledge of the pressure-dependent joint permeability could aid in designing more appropriate secondary recovery strategies in petroleum reservoirs, or reinjection I procedures of geothermal reservoirs. Dr. Bruce A. Robinson discussed the development of fluid flow and transport models for simulation of HDR geothermal reservoirs. These models are also expected to provide accurate predictions of long-term behavior and help in the development of strategies for reservoir improvement and operation. Two approaches were discussed. The discrete fracture approach is based on a random fracture network subject to prescribed statistical properties of the fracture set. It is used to simulate steady state fluid flow and solute transport. The other approach used the continuum approximation. This type of model is appropriate when the reservoir consists of many interconnected fractures, as is the case at Fenton Hill.

Tennyson, George P..

1989-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

396

Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fisheries Program Research, Monitoring and Evaluation Plan; Implementation of Fisheries Enhancement Opportunities on the Coeur d'Alene Reservation, 1997-2002 Technical Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) and bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) are currently of special concern regionally and are important to the culture and subsistence needs of the Coeur d'Alene Tribe. The mission of the Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fisheries Program is to restore and maintain these native trout and the habitats that sustain them in order to provide subsistence harvest and recreational fishing opportunities for the Reservation community. The adfluvial life history strategy exhibited by westslope cutthroat and bull trout in the Lake Coeur d'Alene subbasin makes these fish susceptible to habitat degradation and competition in both lake and stream environments. Degraded habitat in Lake Coeur d'Alene and its associated streams and the introduction of exotic species has lead to the decline of westslope cutthroat and listing of bull trout under the endangered species act (Peters et al. 1998). Despite the effects of habitat degradation, several streams on the Reservation still maintain populations of westslope cutthroat trout, albeit in a suppressed condition (Table 1). The results of several early studies looking at fish population status and habitat condition on the Reservation (Graves et al. 1990; Lillengreen et al. 1993, 1996) lead the Tribe to aggressively pursue funding for habitat restoration under the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NWPPC) resident fish substitution program. Through these efforts, habitat restoration needs were identified and projects were initiated. The Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fisheries Program is currently involved in implementing stream habitat restoration projects, reducing the transport of sediment from upland sources, and monitoring fish populations in four watersheds on the Coeur d'Alene Reservation (Figure 1). Restoration projects have included riparian plantings, addition of large woody debris to streams, and complete channel reconstruction to restore historical natural channel forms. In addition, ponds have been constructed to trap sediment from rill and gully erosion associated with agricultural practices, and to provide flow enhancement and ameliorate elevated stream temperatures during the summer base flow period. The implementation of restoration efforts that target the key habitats and lifestages for resident westslope cutthroat trout on the Coeur d'Alene Reservation is one means the Tribe is using to partially mitigate for lost anadromous fisheries. In this context, restoration is consistent with the definition provided by Ebersole et al. (1997), who described stream restoration as the reexpression of habitat capacity in a stream system. At the reach scale, habitat capacity is affected by biotic (e.g., riparian vegetation) and physical (e.g., flooding) processes. Superimposed on the natural biotic and physical processes are anthropogenic stressors (e.g., logging, roads and grazing) that suppress habitat capacity and can result in simplified, degraded stream reaches. The effectiveness of habitat restoration, measured as an increase in native trout abundance, is dependent on reducing limiting factors (e.g., passage barriers, high water temperatures, sediment transport from source areas) in areas that are critical for spawning and rearing lifestages. This plan outlines a monitoring strategy to help determine the effectiveness of specific restoration/enhancement treatments and to track the status of trout populations in four target watersheds.

Vitale, Angelo; Lamb, Dave; Peters, Ronald

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Preliminary measurements of the thermal conductivity of rocks from LASL geothermal test holes GT-1 and GT-2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The conductivities on a number of dry rocks have been measured in an air environment. These experimental values are probably about 10 percent lower than the in situ values. Initial attempts to prepare ''wet'' rock samples (rocks saturated with water) have so far resulted in only ''damp'' rocks. Considerable effort will be required to characterize the crack system in ''solid'' rocks and to predict the probable conductivity values for in situ conditions.

Sibbitt, W.L.

1975-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

CX-003016: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

16: Categorical Exclusion Determination 16: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-003016: Categorical Exclusion Determination South Dakota-Tribal Energy Program-Rosebud Sioux Tribe CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1 Date: 07/06/2010 Location(s): South Dakota Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy The Rosebud Sioux Tribe (RST) and Citizens Wind propose to complete the required pre-construction activities necessary to secure funding for the proposed 190 megawatt North Antelope Highlands wind farm, including identification of power purchasers, National Environmental Policy Act permitting requirements, transmission and interconnection studies, and subsequent interconnection agreements required to deliver energy to a specific set of potential purchasers. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-003016.pdf

399

White Sturgeon Management Plan in the Snake River between Lower Granite and Hells Canyon Dams; Nez Perce Tribe, 1997-2005 Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

White sturgeon in the Hells Canyon reach (HCR) of the Snake River are of cultural importance to the Nez Perce Tribe. However, subsistence and ceremonial fishing opportunities have been severely limited as a result of low numbers of white sturgeon in the HCR. Hydrosystem development in the Columbia River Basin has depressed numbers and productivity of white sturgeon in the HCR by isolating fish in impounded reaches of the basin, restricting access to optimal rearing habitats, reducing the anadromous forage base, and modifying early life-history habitats. Consequently, a proactive management plan is needed to mitigate for the loss of white sturgeon production in the HCR, and to identify and implement feasible measures that will restore and rebuild the white sturgeon population to a level that sustains viability and can support an annual harvest. This comprehensive and adaptive management plan describes the goals, objectives, strategies, actions, and expected evaluative timeframes for restoring the white sturgeon population in the HCR. The goal of this plan, which is to maintain a viable, persistent population that can support a sustainable fishery, is supported by the following objectives: (1) a natural, stable age structure comprising both juveniles and a broad spectrum of spawning age-classes; (2) stable or increasing numbers of both juveniles and adults; (3) consistent levels of average recruitment to ensure future contribution to reproductive potential; (4) stable genetic diversity comparable to current levels; (5) a minimum level of abundance of 2,500 adults to minimize extinction risk; and (6) provision of an annual sustainable harvest of 5 kg/ha. To achieve management objectives, potential mitigative actions were developed by a Biological Risk Assessment Team (BRAT). Identified strategies and actions included enhancing growth and survival rates by restoring anadromous fish runs and increasing passage opportunities for white sturgeon, reducing mortality rates of early life stages by modifying flows in the HCR, reducing mortality imposed by the catch and release fishery, augmenting natural production through translocation or hatchery releases, and assessing detrimental effects of contaminants on reproductive potential. These proposed actions were evaluated by assessing their relative potential to affect population growth rate and by determining the feasibility of their execution, including a realistic timeframe (short-term, mid-term, long-term) for their implementation and evaluation. A multi-pronged approach for management was decided upon whereby various actions will be implemented and evaluated under different timeframes. Priority management actions include: Action I- Produce juvenile white sturgeon in a hatchery and release into the management area; Action G- Collect juvenile white sturgeon from other populations in the Snake or Columbia rivers and release them into the management area; and Action D- Restore white sturgeon passage upriver and downriver at Lower Snake and Idaho Power dams. An integral part of this approach is the continual monitoring of performance measures to assess the progressive response of the population to implemented actions, to evaluate the actions efficacy toward achieving objectives, and to refine and redirect strategies if warranted.

Nez Perce Tribe Resources Management Staff, (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Lapwai, ID)

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Industrial applications of hot dry rock geothermal energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal resources in the form of naturally occurring hot water or steam have been utilized for many years. While these hydrothermal resources are found in many places, the general case is that the rock at depth is hot, but does not contain significant amounts of mobile fluid. An extremely large amount of geothermal energy is found around the world in this hot dry rock (HDR). Technology has been under development for more than twenty years at the Los Alamos National Laboratory in the United States and elsewhere to develop the technology to extract the geothermal energy from HDR in a form useful for electricity generation, space heating, or industrial processing. HDR technology is especially attractive for industrial applications because of the ubiquitous distribution of the HDR resource and the unique aspects of the process developed to recover it. In the HDR process, as developed at Los Alamos, water is pumped down a well under high pressure to open up natural joints in hot rock and create an artificial geothermal reservoir. Energy is extracted by circulating water through the reservoir. Pressurized hot water is returned to the surface through the production well, and its thermal energy is extracted for practical use. The same water is then recirculated through the system to mine more geothermal heat. Construction of a pilot HDR facility at Fenton Hill, NM, USA, has recently been completed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory. It consists of a large underground reservoir, a surface plant, and the connecting wellbores. This paper describes HDR technology and the current status of the development program. Novel industrial applications of geothermal energy based on the unique characteristics of the HDR energy extraction process are discussed.

Duchane, D.V.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

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401

Industrial applications of hot dry rock geothermal energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal resources in the form of naturally occurring hot water or steam have been utilized for many years. While these hydrothermal resources are found in many places, the general case is that the rock at depth is hot, but does not contain significant amounts of mobile fluid. An extremely large amount of geothermal energy is found around the world in this hot dry rock (HDR). Technology has been under development for more than twenty years at the Los Alamos National Laboratory in the United States and elsewhere to develop the technology to extract the geothermal energy from HDR in a form useful for electricity generation, space heating, or industrial processing. HDR technology is especially attractive for industrial applications because of the ubiquitous distribution of the HDR resource and the unique aspects of the process developed to recover it. In the HDR process, as developed at Los Alamos, water is pumped down a well under high pressure to open up natural joints in hot rock and create an artificial geothermal reservoir. Energy is extracted by circulating water through the reservoir. Pressurized hot water is returned to the surface through the production well, and its thermal energy is extracted for practical use. The same water is then recirculated through the system to mine more geothermal heat. Construction of a pilot HDR facility at Fenton Hill, NM, USA, has recently been completed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory. It consists of a large underground reservoir, a surface plant, and the connecting wellbores. This paper describes HDR technology and the current status of the development program. Novel industrial applications of geothermal energy based on the unique characteristics of the HDR energy extraction process are discussed.

Duchane, D.V.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport in fractured porous rock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Numerical methods have been applied for the prediction of colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport through water-saturated fractured porous rock. The presence of colloids may enhance the transport of radionuclides in groundwater by reducing retardation effects. The colloids existing in the groundwater act as carriers, adsorbing radionuclides on their large surface area and moving faster than the average water velocity. With colloids present, the system consists of three phases, i. e., an aqueous phase, a carrier phase, and a stationary solid phase. In the basic model, one-dimensional advection in a single planar fracture of infinite extent is coupled with diffusion in the rock matrix perpendicular to the fracture. In this study, a full-equilibrium model was developed to describe the transport and fate of the radionuclides in the fracture. Sorption onto rock matrix, fracture surface and sorption into mobile and immobile colloids are included. The effect of colloidal particle size was also considered. Mass partition mechanisms between the colloids and solid matrix and between colloid and contaminant are represented by local equilibrium. In the three-phase i.e., retardation coefficient, hydrodynamic dispersion system, the coefficient, and fracture width are modified to include the equilibrium distribution coefficient of contaminant with a carrier. In the three phase model, much smaller retardation and hydrodynamic dispersion coefficients are obtained and the effect of fracture width is larger. With the additional consideration of colloidal particle sizes, these effects become ever larger. Numerical solutions for the model were obtained using a fully implicit finite difference scheme. A significant sensitivity to model parameters was discovered, and in particular, the equilibrium distribution coefficients between a contaminant and the carrier were found to be the most important factors.

Baek, Inseok

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Anisotropic yielding of rocks at high temperatures and pressures  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results to date are: All of the starting materials for the three year project have been collected. Included in our collection are relatively fine-grained, fresh, oriented blocks of schist, gneiss, and micaceous quartzite with well-defined foliations and lineations as well as granite blocks oriented with respect to the principal quarrying orientations, the rift, grain, and hardway. A suite of samples has also been collected from an exposed granite stock and surrounding country rocks in order to evaluate the strengths and distribution of fabrics which may be encountered while drilling. These fabrics appear to be directly related to the forceful emplacement of the pluton. The literature on the mechanics of intrusion has been reviewed with regard to strain gradients and foliation development associated with diapiric flow. This information will be used to evaluate flow of varying fabrics on yield criteria within and surrounding magma chambers. Twenty-three successful experiments have been performed on samples of gneiss cored along six different orientations at temperatures ranging from 25{degrees} to 700{degrees}C. These experiments include extension tests, unconfined compression tests, and compression tests performed at P{sub c} = 100 MPa. Theoretical yield conditions for anisotropic materials have been reviewed and the assumptions upon which they are based probed. These yield conditions will ultimately be used to fit our data on gneiss, and the other foliated rocks under investigation. Two abstracts have been published and oral presentations made at the 1987 Fall Meeting of the American Geophysical Union, based upon our previous DOE-sponsored work on tensile fracturing of quartzite and related work on semi-brittle deformation of granitic rocks. 21 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

Kronenberg, A.K.; Russell, J.E.; Handin, J.; Gottschalk, R.R.; Shea, W.T.

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Federal hot dry rock geothermal energy development program: an overview  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The formulation and evolution of the Federal Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development Program at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory are traced. Program motivation is derived from the enormous potential of the resource. Accomplishments to date, including the establishment and evaluation of the 5-MW/sub t/ Phase 1 reservoir at Fenton Hill, NM and various instrument and equipment developments, are discussed. Future plans presented include (1) establishment of a 20- to 50-MW/sub t/ Phase 2 reservoir at Fenton Hill that will be used to demonstrate longevity and, eventually, electric power production and (2) the selection of a second site at which a direct thermal application will be demonstrated.

Nunz, G.J.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Reservoir modeling of the Phase II Hot Dry Rock System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Phase II system has been created with a series of hydraulic fracturing experiments at the Fenton Hill Hot Dry Rock site. Experiment 2032, the largest of the fracturing operations, involved injecting 5.6 million gallons (21,200m/sup 3/) of water into wellbore EE-2 over the period December 6-9, 1983. The experiment has been modeled using geothermal simulator FEHM developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The modeling effort has produced strong evidence of a large highly fractured reservoir. Two long term heat extraction schemes for the reservoir are studied with the model.

Zyvoloski, G.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Future of hot dry rock geothermal energy systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Where natural groundwater circulation does not exist, the obvious method of extracting heat from the earth's crust is to imitate nature by creating it. A means of doing so by hydraulic fracturing has been demonstrated. Alternatively, explosives or mechanical or chemical methods might be used to open circulation paths. However, where permeabilities are sufficient so that fluid loss is excessive, other approaches are also possible. The magnitude and distribution of hot dry rock and the variety of possible heat-extraction techniques make it appear inevitable that this energy supply will eventually be used on a large scale.

Smith, M.C.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

SEISMIC AND ROCK PHYSICS DIAGNOSTICS OF MULTISCALE RESERVOIR TEXTURES  

SciTech Connect

As part of our study on ''Relationships between seismic properties and rock microstructure'', we have studied (1) How to quantify elastic properties of clay minerals using Atomic Force Acoustic Microscopy. We show how bulk modulus of clay can be measured using atomic force acoustic microscopy (AFAM) (2) We have successfully measured elastic properties of unconsolidated sediments in an effort to quantify attributes for detection of overpressures from seismic (3) We have initiated efforts for velocity upscaling to quantify long-wavelength and short-wavelength velocity behavior and the scale-dependent dispersion caused by sediment variability in different depositional environments.

Gary Mavko

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Energy Efficiency Upgrades for Little Rock Air Force Base  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Little Rock Air Force Base (LRAFB), in partnership with the local utility, Entergy Services, Inc., has reduced energy costs and used savings from investments in high-efficiency equipment to maintain and improve the condition of base housing and other facilities. Three projects were completed, with over $10 million invested. Major accomplishments include replacing air-to-air heat pumps with high-efficiency ground-source heat pumps (GSHPs) in more than 1,500 base housing units, lighting modifications to 10 buildings, upgrade of HVAC equipment in the base's enlisted club, and energy-efficient lighting retrofits for LRAFB's flight simulator.

Goldman, C.; Dunlap, M.A.

2000-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

409

Hot Dry Rock resources of the Clear Lake area, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hot Dry Rock resources of the Clear Lake area of northern California are hot, large and areally uniform. The geological situation is special, probably overlying a slabless window caused by interaction between tectonic plates. Consequent magmatic processes have created a high-grade resource, in which the 300{degree}C isotherm is continuous, subhorizontal, and available at the shallow depth of 2.4 to 4.7 km over an area of 800 km{sup 2}. The region is very favorable for HDR development.

Burns, K.L.; Potter, R.M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Peake, R.A. [California Energy Commission, CA (United States)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Simulation of water transport in heated rock salt  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper summarizes computer simulation studies on water transport in German rock salt. Based on JOCKWERS experimental investigations on water content and water liberation, the object of these studies was to select a water transport model, that matches the water inflow which was measured in some heater experiments in the Asse Salt Mine. The main result is, that an evaporation front model, with Knudsen-type vapor transport combined with fluid transport by thermal expansion of the adsorbed water layers in the non evaporated zone, showed the best agreement with experimental evidence.

Schlich, M.; Jockwer, N.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Zeolitization Of Intracaldera Sediments And Rhyolitic Rocks In The 1.25 Ma  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Zeolitization Of Intracaldera Sediments And Rhyolitic Rocks In The 1.25 Ma Zeolitization Of Intracaldera Sediments And Rhyolitic Rocks In The 1.25 Ma Lake Of Valles Caldera, New Mexico, Usa Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Zeolitization Of Intracaldera Sediments And Rhyolitic Rocks In The 1.25 Ma Lake Of Valles Caldera, New Mexico, USA Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Quantitative X-ray diffraction analysis of about 80 rhyolite and associated lacustrine rocks has characterized previously unrecognized zeolitic alteration throughout the Valles caldera resurgent dome. The alteration assemblage consists primarily of smectite-clinoptilolite-mordenite-silica, which replaces groundmass and fills voids, especially in the tuffs and lacustrine rocks. Original rock textures are routinely preserved. Mineralization typically extends to

412

NAWIG News: The Quarterly Newsletter of the Native American Wind Interest Group, Fall 2009  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of its Native American outreach, DOE's Wind Powering America program has initiated a NAWIG newsletter to present Native American wind information, including projects, interviews with pioneers, issues, WPA activities, and related events. It is our hope that this newsletter will both inform and elicit comments and input on wind development in Indian Country. This issue profiles the Campo Band Wind Project in California and a feature on the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe's plans for a 100- to 125-MW project.

Not Available

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

A Coupled Model for Natural Convection and Condensation in Heated Subsurface Enclosures Embedded in Fractured Rock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Mass Transfer in Yucca Mountain Drifts, Proceedings ofMD- 000001 REV 00, Yucca Mountain Project Report, Bechtelthe fractured rock at Yucca Mountain have been investigated

Halecky, N.; Birkholzer, J.T.; Webb, S.W.; Peterson, P.F.; Bodvarsson, G.S.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Rock, Mineral, Coal, Oil, and Gas Resources on State Lands (Montana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This chapter authorizes and regulates prospecting permits and mining leases for the exploration and development of rock, mineral, oil, coal, and gas resources on state lands.

415

A Sr-Isotopic Comparison Between Thermal Waters, Rocks, And Hydrotherm...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sr-Isotopic Comparison Between Thermal Waters, Rocks, And Hydrothermal Calcites, Long Valley Caldera, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home...

416

INSTRUMENTATION AND COMPUTER BASED DATA ACQUISTION FOR IN-SITU ROCK PROPERTY MEASUREMENTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and R. Lingle, "Rock Instrumentation Problems Experiencedand R. Haught, "Instrumentation Evaluation, Calibration, andUniversity of California. INSTRUMENTATION AND COMPUTER BASED

Binnall, Eugene P.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Bibliography of the geological and geophysical aspects of hot dry rock geothermal resources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the first issue of an annual compilation of references that are useful to the exploration, understanding and development of the hot dry rock geothermal resource.

Heiken, G.; Sayer, S.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Figure 2. Stratigraphic Summary of Ages, Names and Rock Types in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Figure 2. Stratigraphic Summary of Ages, Names and Rock Types in the ANWR 1002 and Coastal Plain Area of the Alaska North Slope. Potentially Productive ...

419

Meta-tourism, sense of place and the rock art of the Little Karoo.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The subject is the rock art within the region known as the Little Karoo in the Western Cape that lies between the coastal plain and (more)

Rust, Catharine

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Rock Density At Silver Peak Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Density At Silver Peak Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Rock Density At Silver Peak Area (DOE GTP) Exploration...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rock sioux tribe" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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421

On the relationship between stress and elastic strain for porous and fractured rock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of pressure on electrical resistivity of rocks. J Geophysproperties are electrical resistivity/conductivity dataof pressure on the electrical resistivity of water-saturated

Liu, Hui-Hai

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

On the Relationship between Stress and Elastic Strain for Porous and Fractured Rock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Orange, A. S. , Electrical resistivity in saturated rockof pressure on electrical resistivity of rocks, J. Geophys.of pressure on the electrical resistivity of water-saturated

Berryman, Hui-Hai Liu, Jonny Rutqvist and James G.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Black Rock I Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rock I Geothermal Project Rock I Geothermal Project Project Location Information Coordinates The following coordinate was not recognized: 33°19'59" N, 115°50'3 W.The following coordinate was not recognized: 33°19'59" N, 115°50'3 W. Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.3705792,"lon":-115.77401,"alt":0,"address":"33\u00b019'59\" N, 115\u00b050'3 W","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

424

Black Rock II Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Black Rock II Geothermal Project Black Rock II Geothermal Project Project Location Information Coordinates The following coordinate was not recognized: 33°19'59" N, 115°50'3 W.The following coordinate was not recognized: 33°19'59" N, 115°50'3 W. Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.3705792,"lon":-115.77401,"alt":0,"address":"33\u00b019'59\" N, 115\u00b050'3 W","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

425

Hot dry rock: A climate change action opportunity for industry  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal resources in the form of heat found in rock that is hot but is not in contact with sufficient mobile fluid to transport that heat to the surface are a large, as yet virtually unexploited, source of clean energy. The technology to extract useful amounts of energy from this ubiquitous hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal resource has been under development for more than twenty years. During the last two years, flow testing at the Fenton Hill HDR pilot facility in New Mexico has answered many of the questions about the viability of HDR heat mining. While the most important issue of thermal longevity of the artificial geothermal reservoir that is the heart of an HDR energy system was not fully resolved, the test results provided good reasons to be optimistic that such reservoirs can have long lifetimes. No decline was observed in the temperature of the fluid produced during the relatively short test period and tracer testing indicated that the reservoir may be thermally self sustaining. In addition, water consumption during the circulation test was reduced to very low levels, the production of significant excess energy over that required simply to operate the system was verified, and routine energy production with virtually no emissions to the environment, except waste heat, was demonstrated.

Duchane, D.V.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Fluid-Rock Characterization and Interactions in NMR Well Logging  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to characterize the fluid properties and fluid-rock interactions that are needed for formation evaluation by NMR well logging. This is the first annual progress report submitted to the DOE. It reports on the work completed during the reporting period even if it may have started before this period. This project is a partnership between Professor George J. Hirasaki at Rice University and Professor Kishore Mohanty at University of Houston. In addition to the DOE, this project is supported by a consortium of oil companies and service companies. The fluid properties characterization has emphasized the departure of live oils from correlations based on dead oils. Also, asphaltic components can result in a difference between the T1 and T2 relaxation time distributions as well as reduce the hydrogen index. The fluid rock characterizations that are reported here are the effects of wettability and internal magnetic field gradients. A pore reconstruction method ha s been developed to recreate three-dimensional porous media from two-dimensional images that reproduce some of their key statistical properties. A Monte Carlo simulation technique has been developed to calculate the magnetization decay in fluid saturated porous media given their pore structure.

Hirasaki, George J.; Mohanty, Kishore, K.

2001-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

427

Fluid-Rock Characterization and Interactions in NMR Well Logging  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this report is to characterize the fluid properties and fluid-rock interactions that are needed for formation evaluation by NMR well logging. The advances made in the understanding of NMR fluid properties are summarized in a chapter written for an AAPG book on NMR well logging. This includes live oils, viscous oils, natural gas mixtures, and the relation between relaxation time and diffusivity. Oil based drilling fluids can have an adverse effect on NMR well logging if it alters the wettability of the formation. The effect of various surfactants on wettability and surface relaxivity are evaluated for silica sand. The relation between the relaxation time and diffusivity distinguishes the response of brine, oil, and gas in a NMR well log. A new NMR pulse sequence in the presence of a field gradient and a new inversion technique enables the T{sub 2} and diffusivity distributions to be displayed as a two-dimensional map. The objectives of pore morphology and rock characterization are to identify vug connectivity by using X-ray CT scan, and to improve NMR permeability correlation. Improved estimation of permeability from NMR response is possible by using estimated tortuosity as a parameter to interpolate between two existing permeability models.

George J. Hirasaki; Kishore K. Mohanty

2005-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

428

Some characteristics of the Hardhat chimney and surrounding wall rock  

SciTech Connect

The Hardhat event was a 4.9 + 1.5 kt nuclear explosion at a depth of 286.2 m in granodiorite. Data from 3 underground drill holes have been analyzed in an effort to further define chimney characteristics. The chimney radius was determined to be 20.3 m near shot point level and 17.7 m near the apical void. The earlier determined cavity radius of 19.2 m was confirmed. Total chimney volume is calculated to be 113,860 cu m consisting of 30,800 cu m of void space and 222 million kg of rock. Of the total chimney volume, 27% is void space. In the rubble column itself, exclusive of the apical void, 22% is void space. The nature of the radioactive melt and its distribution in the puddle suggest that the cavity did not collapse until H + 11 hr when an audible rumble was heard. The zone of highly crushed rock outside the chimney is calculated to have a void column of about 2,500 cu m, roughly 8% of the void volume inside the chimney.

Boardman, C.R.

1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Borehole temperature survey analysis hot dry rock geothermal reservoir  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) has been actively investigating the potential for extracting geothermal energy from hot dry rock. A man-made geothermal reservoir has been formed at the Fenton Hill Test Site in northern New Mexico. The 10-MW (thermal) prototype energy extraction circulation loop has been completed and has been continuously operating since January 28 of this year. The performance of the Phase I 1000-h circulation experiment would establish technological assessment of the particular hot dry rock geothermal reservoir. The major parameters of interest include equipment operations, geochemistry, water loss, and reservoir thermal drawdown. Temperature measurements were used extensively as one method to study the man-made geothermal reservoir. The temperature probe is one of the less complex wellbore survey tools that is readily fielded to allow on-line analysis of changing conditions in the hydraulic-fracture system. Several downhole temperature instruments have been designed and fabricated for use in the GT-2/EE-1 wellbores.

Dennis, B.R.; Murphy, H.D.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Characterization of hot dry rock geothermal energy extraction systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The engineering of heat exchange systems by which geothermal heat can be efficiently extracted from hot impermeable rocks is studied. The system currently under investigation at Fenton Hill, New Mexico consists of a network of large fractures created through the hydraulic pressurization of a well penetrating hot basement rocks and subsequently intersected by a second well drilled to form a flow-thru system. Cool water pumped into the fractures through one well, once heated in the reservoir, returns to the surface through the second well, is cooled, and then recirculated. While much is known about the performance parameters of the fracture network from short-term flow tests, little is understood concerning the spatial dimensions and geometrical relationship of individual fractures comprising the network. Ultimately, the success one has in estimating the long-term performance of such a system where commercialization is an issue, and in engineering future systems with optimal performance, depends on the success in characterizing the flow-thru fracture networks. To date only nonconventional application of oil field logging techniques and acoustic emissions studies have been used in the characterization of the fracture network.

Albright, J.N.; Newton, C.A.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Source Parameter Investigation of the 1993 Rock Valley Earthquake Sequence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Close portable recordings of the RockValley earthquake sequence con#rm the unusually shallow 2 km average hypocentral depths, and provide data for an investigation of the source parameters. Stress drops are estimated using both a spectral #tting technique that #rst corrects for attenuation, and a deconvolution technique that inherently accounts for attenuation. The shallow depths suggest a relatively low level of shear stress acting on the RockValley fault, and allow an estimation of seismic e#ciencies. The data allow the possibility of large stress drops, on the order of 100 bars, implying seismic e#ciencies much greater than 0.1. This has important implications for the unresolved issue of the strength of faults in general. A dependence of stress drop with seismic moment remains unresolvable with this data. However, the possibility of partial stress drops and non-linear responses does exist. A seismic survey designed speci#cally for the purpose of measuring attenuation could resolve t...

Gordon Shields; Gordon Shields

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Micromachined low frequency rocking accelerometer with capacitive pickoff  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A micro electro mechanical sensor that uses capacitive readout electronics. The sensor involves a micromachined low frequency rocking accelerometer with capacitive pickoff fabricated by deep reactive ion etching. The accelerometer includes a central silicon proof mass, is suspended by a thin polysilicon tether, and has a moving electrode (capacitor plate or interdigitated fingers) located at each end the proof mass. During movement (acceleration), the tethered mass moves relative to the surrounding packaging, for example, and this defection is measured capacitively by a plate capacitor or interdigitated finger capacitor, having the cooperating fixed electrode (capacitor plate or interdigitated fingers) positioned on the packaging, for example. The micromachined rocking accelerometer has a low frequency (<500 Hz), high sensitivity (.mu.G), with minimal power usage. The capacitors are connected to a power supply (battery) and to sensor interface electronics, which may include an analog to digital (A/D) converter, logic, RF communication link, antenna, etc. The sensor (accelerometer) may be, for example, packaged along with the interface electronics and a communication system in a 2".times.2".times.2" cube. The proof mass may be asymmetric or symmetric. Additional actuating capacitive plates may be used for feedback control which gives a greater dynamic range.

Lee, Abraham P. (Arlington, VA); Simon, Jonathon N. (San Leandro, CA); McConaghy, Charles F. (Livermore, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Key Outcomes:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Key Points & Action Items Key Points & Action Items Inaugural Meeting Thursday, August 25, 2011 Renaissance Denver Hotel Denver, Colorado Participants Tracey LeBeau, Director, Pilar Thomas, Deputy Director, and Brandt Petrasek, Special Assistant, Department of Energy, Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs; Vice Chairman Ronald Suppah and Jim Manion, Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon; William Micklin, Ewiiaapaayp Band of Kumeyaay Indians; Councilman Barney Enos, Jr., Jason Hauter, Gila River Indian Community; Mato Standing High, Rosebud Sioux Tribe; R. Allen Urban, Yocha Dehe Wintun Nation; Glen Andersen, Scott Hendrick, Brooke Oleen, Jacquelyn Pless, Jim Reed and Julia Verdi, National Conference of State Legislatures-staff

434

City of Rock Falls, Illinois (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Illinois (Utility Company) Illinois (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name City of Rock Falls Place Illinois Utility Id 16198 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Economic Development Rate Rider Irrigation System: Off-Peak Rider Commercial Rate C (Commercial) Commercial Rate GS: municipal and governmental entities Commercial Rate GS: other than municipal or governmental entities Commercial Rate R (Residential) Residential

435

Coupled rock motion and gas flow modeling in blasting  

SciTech Connect

The spherical element computer code DMC (Distinct Motion Code) used to model rock motion resulting from blasting has been enhanced to allow routine computer simulations of bench blasting. The enhancements required for bench blast simulation include: (1) modifying the gas flow portion of DMC, (2) adding a new explosive gas equation of state capability, (3) modifying the porosity calculation, and (4) accounting for blastwell spacing parallel to the face. A parametric study performed with DMC shows logical variation of the face velocity as burden, spacing, blastwell diameter and explosive type are varied. These additions represent a significant advance in the capability of DMC which will not only aid in understanding the physics involved in blasting but will also become a blast design tool. 8 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

Preece, D.S. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Knudsen, S.D. (RE/SPEC, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Reservoir Model Development at Los Alamos  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Discrete fracture and continuum models are being developed to simulate Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal reservoirs. The discrete fracture model is a two-dimensional steady state simulator of fluid flow and tracer transport in a fracture network which is generated from assumed statistical properties of the fractures. The model's strength lies in its ability to compute the steady state pressure drop and tracer response in a realistic network of interconnected fractures. The continuum approach models fracture behavior by treating permeability and porosity as functions of temperature and effective stress. With this model it is practical to model transient behavior as well as the coupled processes of fluid flow, heat transfer, and stress effects in a three-dimensional system. The model capabilities being developed will also have applications in conventional geothermal systems undergoing reinjection and in fractured geothermal reservoirs in general.

Robinson, Bruce A.; Birdsell, Stephen A.

1989-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

437

Fracture network modeling of a Hot Dry Rock geothermal reservoir  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fluid flow and tracer transport in a fractured Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal reservoir are modeled using fracture network modeling techniques. The steady state pressure and flow fields are solved for a two-dimensional, interconnected network of fractures with no-flow outer boundaries and constant-pressure source and sink points to simulate wellbore-fracture intersections. The tracer response is simulated by particle tracking, which follows the progress of a representative sample of individual tracer molecules traveling through the network. Solute retardation due to matrix diffusion and sorption is handled easily with these particle tracking methods. Matrix diffusion is shown to have an important effect in many fractured geothermal reservoirs, including those in crystalline formations of relatively low matrix porosity. Pressure drop and tracer behavior are matched for a fractured HDR reservoir tested at Fenton Hill, NM.

Robinson, B.A.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Hot Dry Rock geothermal reservoir model development at Los Alamos  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Discrete fracture and continuum models are being developed to simulate Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal reservoirs. The discrete fracture model is a two-dimensional steady state simulator of fluid flow and tracer transport in a fracture network which is generated from assumed statistical properties of the fractures. The model's strength lies in its ability to compute the steady state pressure drop and tracer response in a realistic network of interconnected fractures. The continuum approach models fracture behavior by treating permeability and porosity as functions of temperature and effective stress. With this model it is practical to model transient behavior as well as the coupled processes of fluid flow, heat transfer, and stress effects in a three-dimensional system. The model capabilities being developed will also have applications in conventional geothermal systems undergoing reinjection and in fractured geothermal reservoirs in general. 15 refs., 7 figs.

Robinson, B.A.; Birdsell, S.A.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Developing hot dry rock reservoirs with inflatable open hole packers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An open hole packer system was designed for high pressure injection operations in high temperature wells at the Fenton Hill, Hot Dry Rock (HDR) Geothermal Site. The packer runs were required to verify that the HDR reservoir fractures had been penetrated during the drilling of well EE-3A. They were also used to stimulate fractures connecting EE-3A to the reservoir and to conduct two massive hydraulic fracture treatments at the bottom of EE-3A. An attempt to use a modified packer design as a temporary well completion system was not successful but with modification the system may prove to be an important HDR completion technique. The eleven packer runs have demonstrated that formation testing, stimulation and HDR reservoir development can now be conducted with an open hole inflatable packer operating over large temperature ranges and high differential pressures.

Dreesen, D.S.; Miller, J.R.; Nicholson, R.W.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Seismic-Scale Rock Physics of Methane Hydrate  

SciTech Connect

We quantify natural methane hydrate reservoirs by generating synthetic seismic traces and comparing them to real seismic data: if the synthetic matches the observed data, then the reservoir properties and conditions used in synthetic modeling might be the same as the actual, in-situ reservoir conditions. This approach is model-based: it uses rock physics equations that link the porosity and mineralogy of the host sediment, pressure, and hydrate saturation, and the resulting elastic-wave velocity and density. One result of such seismic forward modeling is a catalogue of seismic reflections of methane hydrate which can serve as a field guide to hydrate identification from real seismic data. We verify this approach using field data from known hydrate deposits.

Amos Nur

2009-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rock sioux tribe" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Method and apparatus for water jet drilling of rock  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Rock drilling method and apparatus utilizing high pressure water jets for drilling holes of relatively small diameter at speeds significantly greater than that attainable with existing drilling tools. Greatly increased drilling rates are attained due to jet nozzle geometry and speed of rotation. The jet nozzle design has two orifices, one pointing axially ahead in the direction of travel and the second inclined at an angle of approximately 30.degree. from the axis. The two orifices have diameters in the ratio of approximately 1:2. Liquid jet velocities in excess of 1,000 ft/sec are used, and the nozzle is rotated at speeds up to 1,000 rpm and higher.

Summers, David A. (Rolla, MO); Mazurkiewicz, Marian (Wroclaw, PL); Bushnell, Dwight J. (Corvallis, OR); Blaine, James (Rolla, MO)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development in the USA David Duchane and Donald Brown  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

utility options such as pumped storage or compressed air energy storage (CAES) is that the HDR power plant1 Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development in the USA by David Duchane and Donald Brown Los energy resources lies right beneath our feet in the form of hot dry rock (HDR), the common geologic

443

Nonlinear pressure and temperature waves propagation in fluid-saturated rocks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A numerical study for the simulation of rock deformation due to nonlinear temperature and pressure waves in fluid saturated porous rock is presented. The problem of an homogeneous, thermoelastic, and isotropic fluid-saturated matrix, lying over an aquifer ... Keywords: Fluid dynamics, Geothermics, Nonlinear model, Quasi-Newton solver

M. De' Michieli Vitturi; F. Beux

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

New Equipment of Distinguishing Rock from Coal Based on Statistical Analysis of Fast Fourier Transform  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new equipment of distinguishing rock from coal based on statistical analysis of Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) is invented which can be used in the mechanized caving coal locales. First, eight groups of sound signals which had been measured during caving ... Keywords: Threshold of Distinguishing Rock from Coal, Fast Fourier Transform (FFT), Frequency Energy Variance, Frequency Energy Ratio

Gu Tao; Li Xu

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Location-based services to control roller compaction quality for rock-fill dams  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is very important for rock-fill dams to carry out more accurately monitoring and remotely quality controlling in real time. Based on location based services, an integration platform, with the name of CRCQ-DAM, is proposed to control roller compaction ... Keywords: RTK, WebGIS, location-based services, rock-fill dams, roller compaction quality

Hao Wu; Qiankun Wang; Jiru Zhang; Qin Chen; Xupeng Wang

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Comparison of two hot dry rock geothermal reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal energy reservoirs were created by hydraulic fracturing of granite at 2.7 to 3.0 km (9000 to 10,000 ft) at the Fenton Hill site, near the Valles Caldera in northern New Mexico. Both reservoirs are research reservoirs, in the sense that both are fairly small, generally yielding 5 MWt or less, and are intended to serve as the basic building blocks of commercial-sized reservoirs, consisting of 10 to 15 similar fractures that would yield approximately 35 MWt over a 10 to 20 yr period. Both research reservoirs were created in the same well-pair, with energy extraction well number 1 (EE-1) serving as the injection well, and geothermal test well number 2 (GT-2) serving as the extraction, or production, well. The first reservoir was created in the low permeability host rock by fracturing EE-1 at a depth of 2.75 km (9020 ft) where the indigenous temperature was 185/sup 0/C (364/sup 0/F). A second, larger reservoir was formed by extending a small, existing fracture at 2.93 km (9620 ft) in the injection well about 100 m deeper and 10/sup 0/C hotter than the first reservoir. The resulting large fracture propagated upward to about 2.6 km (8600 ft) and appeared to Rave an inlet-to-outlet spacing of 300m (1000 ft), more then three times that of the first fracture. Comparisons are made with the first reservoir. Evaluation of the new reservoir was accomplished in two steps: (1) with a 23-day heat extraction experiment that began October 23, 1979, and (2) a second, longer-term heat extraction experiment still in progress, which as of November 25, 1980 has been in effect for 260 days. The results of this current experiment are compared with earlier experiments.

Murphy, H.D.; Tester, J.W.; Potter, R.M.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

The UK geothermal hot dry rock R&D programme  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The UK hot dry rock research and development programme is funded by the Department of Energy and aims to demonstrate the feasibility of commercial exploitation of HDR in the UK. The philosophy of the UK programme has been to proceed to a full-scale prototype HDR power station via a number of stages: Phase 1--Experiments at shallow depth (300 m) to assess the feasibility of enhancing the permeability of the rock. Phase 2--Studies at intermediate depth (2500 m) to determine the feasibility of creating a viable HDR subsurface heat exchanger. Phase 3--Establishment of an HDR prototype at commercial depth. The programme has run over a 15 year period, and has been formally reviewed at stages throughout its progress. The 1987 review towards the end of Phase 2 identified a number of technical objectives for continuing research and proposed that the initial design stage of the deep HDR prototype should start. Phase 3A is now complete. It addressed: the feasibility of creating an underground HDR heat exchanger suitable for commercial operation; techniques for improving hydraulic performance and correcting short circuits in HDR systems; modeling of the performance, resource size and economic aspects of HDR systems. The work has been conducted by a number of contractors, including Cambome School of Mines, Sunderland and Sheffield City Polytechnics and RTZ Consultants Limited. This paper focuses upon the experimental work at Rosemanowes in Cornwall and the recently completed conceptual design of a prototype HDR power station. The economics of HDR-generated electricity are also discussed and the conclusions of a 1990 program review are presented. Details of the HDR program to 1994, as announced by the UK Department of Energy in February 1991, are included.

MacDonald, Paul; Stedman, Ann; Symons, Geoff

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448