National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for rock short ton

  1. Rocks

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) byMultidayAlumni > The Energy Materials CenterRobotics KeyRocks Rocks

  2. Billion Ton Study—A Historical Perspective

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session 1A: Biomass Feedstocks for the Bioeconomy Billion Ton Study—A Historical Perspective Bryce Stokes, Senior Advisor, CNJV

  3. Rock Art

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huyge, Dirk

    2009-01-01

    Courtesy of the Royal Museums of Art and History, Brussels.Figure 4. Rock art from Abu Ballas caravan station, 550 kmtypical of Pharaonic rock art. Kharga Oasis. Photograph by

  4. Department of Energy Releases New 'Billion-Ton' Study Highlighting...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy today released a report - 2011 U.S. Billion-Ton Update: Biomass Supply for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry - detailing U.S. biomass feedstock...

  5. U.S. Billion-Ton Update: Biomass Supply for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Downing, Mark; Eaton, Laurence M; Graham, Robin Lambert; Langholtz, Matthew H; Perlack, Robert D; Turhollow Jr, Anthony F; Stokes, Bryce; Brandt, Craig C

    2011-08-01

    The report, Biomass as Feedstock for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry: The Technical Feasibility of a Billion-Ton Annual Supply (generally referred to as the Billion-Ton Study or 2005 BTS), was an estimate of 'potential' biomass based on numerous assumptions about current and future inventory, production capacity, availability, and technology. The analysis was made to determine if conterminous U.S. agriculture and forestry resources had the capability to produce at least one billion dry tons of sustainable biomass annually to displace 30% or more of the nation's present petroleum consumption. An effort was made to use conservative estimates to assure confidence in having sufficient supply to reach the goal. The potential biomass was projected to be reasonably available around mid-century when large-scale biorefineries are likely to exist. The study emphasized primary sources of forest- and agriculture-derived biomass, such as logging residues, fuel treatment thinnings, crop residues, and perennially grown grasses and trees. These primary sources have the greatest potential to supply large, reliable, and sustainable quantities of biomass. While the primary sources were emphasized, estimates of secondary residue and tertiary waste resources of biomass were also provided. The original Billion-Ton Resource Assessment, published in 2005, was divided into two parts-forest-derived resources and agriculture-derived resources. The forest resources included residues produced during the harvesting of merchantable timber, forest residues, and small-diameter trees that could become available through initiatives to reduce fire hazards and improve forest health; forest residues from land conversion; fuelwood extracted from forests; residues generated at primary forest product processing mills; and urban wood wastes, municipal solid wastes (MSW), and construction and demolition (C&D) debris. For these forest resources, only residues, wastes, and small-diameter trees were considered. The 2005 BTS did not attempt to include any wood that would normally be used for higher-valued products (e.g., pulpwood) that could potentially shift to bioenergy applications. This would have required a separate economic analysis, which was not part of the 2005 BTS. The agriculture resources in the 2005 BTS included grains used for biofuels production; crop residues derived primarily from corn, wheat, and small grains; and animal manures and other residues. The cropland resource analysis also included estimates of perennial energy crops (e.g., herbaceous grasses, such as switchgrass, woody crops like hybrid poplar, as well as willow grown under short rotations and more intensive management than conventional plantation forests). Woody crops were included under cropland resources because it was assumed that they would be grown on a combination of cropland and pasture rather than forestland. In the 2005 BTS, current resource availability was estimated at 278 million dry tons annually from forestlands and slightly more than 194 million dry tons annually from croplands. These annual quantities increase to about 370 million dry tons from forestlands and to nearly 1 billion dry tons from croplands under scenario conditions of high-yield growth and large-scale plantings of perennial grasses and woody tree crops. This high-yield scenario reflects a mid-century timescale ({approx}2040-2050). Under conditions of lower-yield growth, estimated resource potential was projected to be about 320 and 580 million dry tons for forest and cropland biomass, respectively. As noted earlier, the 2005 BTS emphasized the primary resources (agricultural and forestry residues and energy crops) because they represent nearly 80% of the long-term resource potential. Since publication of the BTS in April 2005, there have been some rather dramatic changes in energy markets. In fact, just prior to the actual publication of the BTS, world oil prices started to increase as a result of a burgeoning worldwide demand and concerns about long-term supplies. By the end of the summer, oil pri

  6. Q00906010024 rock check dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    00906010024 rock check dam Q00906010025 rock check dam Q00906010021 rock check dam Q00906010022 rock check dam Q00906010027 rock check dam Q00906010026 rock check dam Q00906010018 rock check dam Q00906010023 rock check dam Q00906010011 rock check dam Q00906010008 rock check dam Q00906010007 rock check dam Q

  7. 1,153-ton Waste Vault Removed from 300 Area - Vault held waste...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1,153-ton Waste Vault Removed from 300 Area - Vault held waste tanks with contamination from Hanford's former laboratory facilities 1,153-ton Waste Vault Removed from 300 Area -...

  8. U.S. Manufacturers Save $1 Billion, 11 Million Tons of CO2 through...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Manufacturers Save 1 Billion, 11 Million Tons of CO2 through Energy Efficiency Investments U.S. Manufacturers Save 1 Billion, 11 Million Tons of CO2 through Energy Efficiency...

  9. U.S. Manufacturers Save $1 Billion, 11 Million Tons of CO2 through...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    U.S. Manufacturers Save 1 Billion, 11 Million Tons of CO2 through Energy Efficiency Investments U.S. Manufacturers Save 1 Billion, 11 Million Tons of CO2 through Energy...

  10. Neutrino physics with multi-ton scale liquid xenon detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baudis, L.; Ferella, A.; Kish, A.; Manalaysay, A.; Undagoitia, T. Marrodán; Schumann, M., E-mail: laura.baudis@physik.uzh.ch, E-mail: alfredo.ferella@lngs.infn.it, E-mail: alexkish@physik.uzh.ch, E-mail: aaronm@ucdavis.edu, E-mail: marrodan@mpi-hd.mpg.de, E-mail: marc.schumann@lhep.unibe.ch [Physik Institut, University of Zürich, Winterthurerstrasse 190, Zürich, CH-8057 (Switzerland)

    2014-01-01

    We study the sensitivity of large-scale xenon detectors to low-energy solar neutrinos, to coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering and to neutrinoless double beta decay. As a concrete example, we consider the xenon part of the proposed DARWIN (Dark Matter WIMP Search with Noble Liquids) experiment. We perform detailed Monte Carlo simulations of the expected backgrounds, considering realistic energy resolutions and thresholds in the detector. In a low-energy window of 2–30 keV, where the sensitivity to solar pp and {sup 7}Be-neutrinos is highest, an integrated pp-neutrino rate of 5900 events can be reached in a fiducial mass of 14 tons of natural xenon, after 5 years of data. The pp-neutrino flux could thus be measured with a statistical uncertainty around 1%, reaching the precision of solar model predictions. These low-energy solar neutrinos will be the limiting background to the dark matter search channel for WIMP-nucleon cross sections below ? 2 × 10{sup ?48} cm{sup 2} and WIMP masses around 50 GeV?c{sup ?2}, for an assumed 99.5% rejection of electronic recoils due to elastic neutrino-electron scatters. Nuclear recoils from coherent scattering of solar neutrinos will limit the sensitivity to WIMP masses below ? 6 GeV?c{sup ?2} to cross sections above ? 4 × 10{sup ?45}cm{sup 2}. DARWIN could reach a competitive half-life sensitivity of 5.6 × 10{sup 26} y to the neutrinoless double beta decay of {sup 136}Xe after 5 years of data, using 6 tons of natural xenon in the central detector region.

  11. V00306010057 rock check dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ¬« ¬« ¬« ¬« ¬« XY! 16-020 16-030(c) 16-026(l) 16-028(c) 16-026(l) V00306010057 rock check dam V00306010012 rock check dam V00306010040 rock check dam V00306010039 rock check dam V00306010058 rock check dam V00306010064 rock check dam V00306010061 rock check dam V00306010062 rock check dam V00306010063

  12. Removal of 1,082-Ton Reactor Among Richland Operations Office...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    from groundwater across the site ahead of schedule and pumped a record volume of water through treatment facilities to remove contamination, with more than 130 tons of...

  13. U.S. Billion-Ton Update. Biomass Supply for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2011-08-01

    This report is an update to the 2005 Billion-Ton Study that addresses shotcomings and questions that arose from the original report..

  14. U.S. Billion-Ton Update: Biomass Supply for a Bioenergy and Bioproduct...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    2005 report, "Biomass as a Feedstock for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry: The Technical Feasibility of a Billion-Ton Annual Supply" billiontonupdate.pdf More Documents &...

  15. DOE Will Dispose of 34 Metric Tons of Plutonium by Turning it...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Will Dispose of 34 Metric Tons of Plutonium by Turning it into Fuel for Civilian Reactors | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People...

  16. V01406010015 rock check dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    XY! ¬« ¬« V01406010015 rock check dam V01406010014 rock check dam V01406010013 rock check dam 1501403010012 earthen berm V01403010008 earthen berm V01406010003 rock check dam V01406010004 rock check dam V01406010010 rock check dam V01406010011 rock check dam 15-0651 15-0307 15-0588 15-0532 15-0575 stormdrain 7160

  17. T00706010013 rock check dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    XY! ¬« T00706010013 rock check dam T00706010014 rock check dam T00702040012 established vegetation, green hatch area T00706010002 rock check dam T00706010011 rock check dam T00703120010 rock berm T00703020003 base course berm T00706010004 rock check dam T00706010009 rock check dam T00703020008 base course

  18. DOE Partner Begins Injecting 50,000 Tons of CO2 in Michigan Basin

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Building on an initial injection project of 10,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide into a Michigan geologic formation, a U.S. Department of Energy team of regional partners has begun injecting 50,000 additional tons into the formation, which is believed capable of storing hundreds of years worth of CO2, a greenhouse gas that contributes to climate change.

  19. T00406010008 rock check dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    XY! ¬« T00406010008 rock check dam T00406010009 rock check dam T00406010010 rock check dam T00406010011 rock check dam T-SMA-2.85 0.344 Acres 35-014(g) 35-016(n) T00406010005 rock check dam T00406010006 rock check dam T00403090004 curb T00402040007 established vegetation, green hatch area 7200 7200 7180

  20. Rock Cycle and Rocks Lab Rocks are aggregates of one or many minerals.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, X. Rong

    Rock Cycle and Rocks Lab Rocks are aggregates of one or many minerals. Three types of rocks: A of their sizes, shapes and arrangement. Rule of Thumb: The size of mineral crystals in an igneous rock may, there is not enough time for large mineral crystals to form (e.g. obsidian) Igneous Rock Mineral Compositions

  1. Moab Project Disposes 2 Million Tons of Uranium Mill Tailings with Recovery Act Funds

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Moab Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project reached its primary American Recovery and Reinvestment Act milestone ahead of schedule on Wednesday with the disposal of 2 million tons of...

  2. Delivering Tons to the Register: Energy Efficient Design and Operation of Residential Cooling Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delivering Tons to the Register: Energy Efficient Design and Operation of Residential Cooling Systems Jeffrey Siegel, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Iain Walker, Lawrence Berkeley National and air conditioner performance. These parameters included placing the entire air conditioning system

  3. DOE to Remove 200 Metric Tons of Highly Enriched Uranium from...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Administration (NNSA) will remove up to 200 metric tons (MT) of Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU), in the coming decades, from further use as fissile material in U.S. nuclear...

  4. J00206010020 rock check dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    XY! J00206010020 rock check dam J00206010023 rock check dam 09-009 09-009 09-009 PJ-SMA-2 0.901 Acres J00206010021 rock check dam J00206010019 rock check dam J00206010014 rock check dam J00203010007 Smith DATE: 14-November-2014 REVISION NUMBER: 8 XY! IP sampler location Berm Channel/swale Check dam

  5. Session: Hard Rock Penetration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tennyson, George P. Jr.; Dunn, James C.; Drumheller, Douglas S.; Glowka, David A.; Lysne, Peter

    1992-01-01

    This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of five presentations: ''Hard Rock Penetration - Summary'' by George P. Tennyson, Jr.; ''Overview - Hard Rock Penetration'' by James C. Dunn; ''An Overview of Acoustic Telemetry'' by Douglas S. Drumheller; ''Lost Circulation Technology Development Status'' by David A. Glowka; ''Downhole Memory-Logging Tools'' by Peter Lysne.

  6. Engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings: Slick Rock sites, Slick Rock, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1981-09-01

    Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah, Inc., has reevaluated the Slick Rock sites in order to revise the October 1977 engineering radioactive uranium mill tailings at Slick Rock, Colorado. This engineering assessment has included the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigations of site hydrology and meteorology, and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas released from the 387,000 tons of tailings at the Slick Rock sites constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation also are factors. The five alternative actions presented in this engineering assessment include millsite decontamination with the addition of 3 m of stabilization cover material, consolidation of the piles, and removal of the tailings to remote disposal sites and decontamination of the tailings sites. Cost estimates for the five options range from about $6,800,000 for stabilization in-place, to about $11,000,000 for disposal at a distance of about 6.5 mi. Three principal alternatives for the reprocessing of the Slick Rock tailings were examined: heap leaching; treatment at an existing mill; and reprocessing at a new conventional mill constructed for tailings reprocessing. The cost of the uranium recovered would be over $800/lb of U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ whether by conventional or heap leach plant processes. The spot market price for uranium was $25/lb early in 1981. Therefore, reprocessing the tailings for uranium recovery is not economically attractive at present, nor for the foreseeable future.

  7. Summary of the engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings: Slick Rock sites, Slick Rock, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1981-09-01

    Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah, Inc., has reevaluated the Slick Rock sites in order to revise the October 1977 engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings at Slick Rock, Colorado. This engineering assessment has included the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and volumes of tailings and radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigations of site hydrology and meteorology, and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas released from the 387,000 tons of tailings at the Slick Rock sites constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation also are factors. The five alternative actions presented in this engineering assessment include millsite decontamination with the addition of 3 m of stabilization cover material, consolidation of the piles, and removal of the tailings to remote disposal sites and decontamination of the tailings sites. Cost estimates for the five options range from about $6,800,000 for stabilization in-place, to about $11,000,000 for disposal at a distance of about 6.5 mi. Three principal alternatives for the reprocessing of the Slick Rock tailings were examined: heap leaching; treatment at an existing mill; and reprocessing at a new conventional mill constructed for tailings reprocessing. The cost of the uranium recovered would be over $800/lb of U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ whether by conventional or heap leach plant processes. The spot market price for uranium was $25/lb early in 1981. Therefore, reprocessing the tailings for uranium recovery is not economically attractive at present, nor for the foreseeable future.

  8. Planning for the 400,000 tons/year AISI ironmaking demonstration plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aukrust, E. (LTV Steel Corp., Cleveland, OH (United States). AISI Direct Steelmaking Program)

    1993-01-01

    The American Iron and Steel Institute (AISI) has formulated a four-year program to design, construct, and operate a 400,000 net ton per year ironmaking demonstration plant. The plant will employ the coal-based ironmaking process developed under a 1989 cooperative agreement with DOE. AISI will manage the design and construction to be completed in the first two years and operate the plant for the second two years with a variety or ores, coals, and fluxes. Campaigns of increasing length are planned to optimize operations. After successful operation, the plant will be taken over by the host company. Results of studies to date indicate that, on a commercial scale, the AISI process will use 27% less energy and have variable operating costs $10 per ton lower and capital costs of $160 per annual ton, compared to the $250 per annual ton rebuild cost for the coke oven-blast furnace process it will replace. The process will enable the domestic steel industry to become more competitive by reducing its capital and operating cost. Furthermore, by eliminating the pollution problems associated with coke production and by completely enclosing the smelting reactions, this process represents a major step towards an environmentally friendly steel industry.

  9. 2 million tons per year: A performing biofuels supply chain for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 2 million tons per year: A performing biofuels supply chain for EU aviation NOTE It is understood that in the context of this text the term "biofuel(s) use in aviation" categorically implies "sustainably produced biofuel(s)" according to the EU legislation. June 2011 #12;2 This technical paper was drafted

  10. A Concept for a Scalable 2 kTon Liquid Argon TPC Detector for Astroparticle Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. B. Cline; F. Sergiampietri

    2005-09-14

    This paper describes the results of a study on the general lines, main construction criteria, crucial points, parameters and required preliminary R&D activities for the construction of a LAr (liquid argon) imaging detector with active mass in the 10-100 kTon range. Such detectors are crucial for supernova detection, proton decay, LBL neutrino physics and other astroparticle physics applications.

  11. A Concept for a Scalable 2 kTon Liquid Argon TPC Detector for Astroparticle Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    astroparticle physics applications. 1 Introduction The on-surface test of the 300-ton ICARUS module made the detection technique, that even with some possible improvements or changes is the well-established ICARUS one is optimized. A cylindrical vessel with the height equal to the diameter has the same S/V ratio than

  12. Engineering rock mass classifications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bieniawski, Z.T.

    1989-01-01

    This book is a reference on rock mass classification, consolidating into one handy source information widely scattered through the literature. Includes new, unpublished material and case histories. Presents the fundamental concepts of classification schemes and critically appraises their practical application in industrial projects such as tunneling and mining.

  13. How well will ton-scale dark matter direct detection experiments constrain minimal supersymmetry?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akrami, Yashar; Savage, Christopher; Scott, Pat; Conrad, Jan; Edsjö, Joakim E-mail: savage@fysik.su.se E-mail: conrad@fysik.su.se

    2011-04-01

    Weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) are amongst the most interesting dark matter (DM) candidates. Many DM candidates naturally arise in theories beyond the standard model (SM) of particle physics, like weak-scale supersymmetry (SUSY). Experiments aim to detect WIMPs by scattering, annihilation or direct production, and thereby determine the underlying theory to which they belong, along with its parameters. Here we examine the prospects for further constraining the Constrained Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (CMSSM) with future ton-scale direct detection experiments. We consider ton-scale extrapolations of three current experiments: CDMS, XENON and COUPP, with 1000 kg-years of raw exposure each. We assume energy resolutions, energy ranges and efficiencies similar to the current versions of the experiments, and include backgrounds at target levels. Our analysis is based on full likelihood constructions for the experiments. We also take into account present uncertainties on hadronic matrix elements for neutralino-quark couplings, and on halo model parameters. We generate synthetic data based on four benchmark points and scan over the CMSSM parameter space using nested sampling. We construct both Bayesian posterior PDFs and frequentist profile likelihoods for the model parameters, as well as the mass and various cross-sections of the lightest neutralino. Future ton-scale experiments will help substantially in constraining supersymmetry, especially when results of experiments primarily targeting spin-dependent nuclear scattering are combined with those directed more toward spin-independent interactions.

  14. How well will ton-scale dark matter direct detection experiments constrain minimal supersymmetry?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yashar Akrami; Christopher Savage; Pat Scott; Jan Conrad; Joakim Edsjö

    2011-04-18

    Weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) are amongst the most interesting dark matter (DM) candidates. Many DM candidates naturally arise in theories beyond the standard model (SM) of particle physics, like weak-scale supersymmetry (SUSY). Experiments aim to detect WIMPs by scattering, annihilation or direct production, and thereby determine the underlying theory to which they belong, along with its parameters. Here we examine the prospects for further constraining the Constrained Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (CMSSM) with future ton-scale direct detection experiments. We consider ton-scale extrapolations of three current experiments: CDMS, XENON and COUPP, with 1000 kg-years of raw exposure each. We assume energy resolutions, energy ranges and efficiencies similar to the current versions of the experiments, and include backgrounds at target levels. Our analysis is based on full likelihood constructions for the experiments. We also take into account present uncertainties on hadronic matrix elements for neutralino-quark couplings, and on halo model parameters. We generate synthetic data based on four benchmark points and scan over the CMSSM parameter space using nested sampling. We construct both Bayesian posterior PDFs and frequentist profile likelihoods for the model parameters, as well as the mass and various cross-sections of the lightest neutralino. Future ton-scale experiments will help substantially in constraining supersymmetry, especially when results of experiments primarily targeting spin-dependent nuclear scattering are combined with those directed more toward spin-independent interactions.

  15. Microwave assisted hard rock cutting

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lindroth, David P. (Apple Valley, MN); Morrell, Roger J. (Bloomington, MN); Blair, James R. (Inver Grove Heights, MN)

    1991-01-01

    An apparatus for the sequential fracturing and cutting of subsurface volume of hard rock (102) in the strata (101) of a mining environment (100) by subjecting the volume of rock to a beam (25) of microwave energy to fracture the subsurface volume of rock by differential expansion; and , then bringing the cutting edge (52) of a piece of conventional mining machinery (50) into contact with the fractured rock (102).

  16. S00906010006 rock check dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    XY! 53-0002 53-0890 53-1036 53-0598 53-0860 53-0056 S00906010006 rock check dam S00906010005 rock check dam S00906010007 rock check dam S00903010009 earthen berm S00903010010 earthen berm S00903120003 Channel/swale Check dam Sediment trap/basin Gabion Seed and mulch Cap Established vegetation SWMU boundary

  17. SEISMIC AND ROCK PHYSICS DIAGNOSTICS OF MULTISCALE RESERVOIR TEXTURES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Mavko

    2003-06-30

    As part of our study on ''Relationships between seismic properties and rock microstructure'', we have studied (1) Methods for detection of stress-induced velocity anisotropy in sands. (2) We have initiated efforts for velocity upscaling to quantify long-wavelength and short-wavelength velocity behavior and the scale-dependent dispersion caused by sediment variability in different depositional environments.

  18. ACG Practical Rock Mechanics and Ground Support in Mining Courses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tobar, Michael

    CENTRE FOR GEOMECHANICS Ph: +61 8 6488 3300 Fax: +61 8 6488 1130 info for Geomechanics. Practical Rock Mechanics (Introduction) Short Course 28­29 July 2014 Course objectives This course is designed to develop specific underground mining geomechanics competencies for mine geologists

  19. Rock-Around Orbits 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bourgeois, Scott K.

    2010-07-14

    , David Hyland Tom Pollock J. Maurice Rojas Head of Department, Dimitris Lagoudas December 2009 Major Subject: Aerospace Engineering iii ABSTRACT Rock-Around Orbits. (December 2009) Scott Kenneth Bourgeois, B.S., Texas A&M University Chair of Advisory...] : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 3 4 Compatible Orbits for a Circular Target Orbit (Example 1) : : : : : 8 5 Inclination Bounds Geometry for a Circular Target Orbit : : : : : : : 10 6 GEO and RAO Orbits in the Inertial Frame (Example 1) : : : : : : : 14 7 GEO and RAO Orbits...

  20. Session: Hot Dry Rock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tennyson, George P. Jr.; Duchane, David V.; Ponden, Raymond F.; Brown, Donald W.

    1992-01-01

    This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of four presentations: ''Hot Dry Rock - Summary'' by George P. Tennyson, Jr.; ''HDR Opportunities and Challenges Beyond the Long Term Flow Test'' by David V. Duchane; ''Start-Up Operations at the Fenton Hill HDR Pilot Plant'' by Raymond F. Ponden; and ''Update on the Long-Term Flow Testing Program'' by Donald W. Brown.

  1. Iron and Steel Phosphate Rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    Lime Lithium Magnesium Manganese Mercury Mica Molybdenum Nickel Nitrogen Peat Perlite Phosphate Rock . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 194 Appendix C--Resource/Reserve Definitions . . . . . . 195 Commodities: Abrasives (Manufactured

  2. Iron and Steel Phosphate Rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    Mica Molybdenum Nickel Nitrogen Peat Perlite Phosphate Rock Platinum Potash Pumice Quartz Crystal Rare . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 190 Appendix C--A Resource/Reserve Classification for Minerals

  3. Workshop on hydrology of crystalline basement rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, S.N. (comp.)

    1981-08-01

    This workshop covered the following subjects: measurements in relatively shallow boreholes; measurement and interpretation of data from deep boreholes; hydrologic properties of crystalline rocks as interpreted by geophysics and field geology; rock mechanics related to hydrology of crystalline rocks; the possible contributions of modeling to the understanding of the hydrology of crystalline rocks; and geochemical interpretations of the hydrology of crystalline rocks. (MHR)

  4. Cracked lifting lug welds on ten-ton UF{sub 6} cylinders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dorning, R.E. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Piketon, OH (United States)

    1991-12-31

    Ten-ton, Type 48X, UF{sub 6} cylinders are used at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant to withdraw enriched uranium hexafluoride from the cascade, transfer enriched uranium hexafluoride to customer cylinders, and feed enriched product to the cascade. To accomplish these activities, the cylinders are lifted by cranes and straddle carriers which engage the cylinder lifting lugs. In August of 1988, weld cracks on two lifting lugs were discovered during preparation to lift a cylinder. The cylinder was rejected and tagged out, and an investigating committee formed to determine the cause of cracking and recommend remedial actions. Further investigation revealed the problem may be general to this class of cylinder in this use cycle. This paper discusses the actions taken at the Portsmouth site to deal with the cracked lifting lug weld problem. The actions include inspection activities, interim corrective actions, metallurgical evaluation of cracked welds, weld repairs, and current monitoring/inspection program.

  5. The Landscape of Klamath Basin Rock Art

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David, Robert James

    2012-01-01

    Figure 22. Main rock art panel at QzM-1………………………………………………….31. Special Use Area rock art sites (map)………………………………………….Figure 32. Mod-17 rock art site within Modoc territory (

  6. Oil and Gas CDT Bots in Rocks: Intelligent Rock Deformation for Fault Rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henderson, Gideon

    Heriot-Watt University, Institute of Petroleum Engineering Supervisory Team · Dr Helen Lewis, Heriot://www.pet.hw.ac.uk/staff-directory/jimsomerville.htm Key Words Nano/Micro sensors; faults; fault zones; geomechanics; rock mechanics; rock deformation-deformed equivalent, a different lab-deformed example and a geomechanical simulation of a fault zone showing permanent

  7. Shotgun cartridge rock breaker

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ruzzi, Peter L. (Eagan, NM); Morrell, Roger J. (Bloomington, MN)

    1995-01-01

    A rock breaker uses shotgun cartridges or other firearm ammunition as the explosive charge at the bottom of a drilled borehole. The breaker includes a heavy steel rod or bar, a gun with a firing chamber for the ammunition which screws onto the rod, a long firing pin running through a central passage in the rod, and a firing trigger mechanism at the external end of the bar which strikes the firing pin to fire the cartridge within the borehole. A tubular sleeve surround the main body of the rod and includes slits the end to allow it to expand. The rod has a conical taper at the internal end against which the end of the sleeve expands when the sleeve is forced along the rod toward the taper by a nut threaded onto the external end of the rod. As the sleeve end expands, it pushes against the borehole and holds the explosive gasses within, and also prevents the breaker from flying out of the borehole. The trigger mechanism includes a hammer with a slot and a hole for accepting a drawbar or drawpin which, when pulled by a long cord, allows the cartridge to be fired from a remote location.

  8. (Data in thousand metric tons of copper content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: U.S. mine production of copper in 2013 increased by 4% to about 1.22 million tons,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .9% and consumption was projected to remain essentially unchanged. U.S. mine production increased by about 4% in 2013 Production and Use: U.S. mine production of copper in 2013 increased by 4% to about 1.22 million tons of production--accounted for more than 99% of domestic mine production; copper also was recovered in Idaho

  9. A Statistics-Based Method For The Short-Wave Infrared Spectral...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    A Statistics-Based Method For The Short-Wave Infrared Spectral Analysis Of Altered Rocks- An Example From The Acoculco Caldera, Eastern Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt Jump to:...

  10. High temperature experiments on a 4 tons UF6 container TENERIFE program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casselman, C.; Duret, B.; Seiler, J.M.; Ringot, C.; Warniez, P.

    1991-12-31

    The paper presents an experimental program (called TENERIFE) whose aim is to investigate the behaviour of a cylinder containing UF{sub 6} when exposed to a high temperature fire for model validation. Taking into account the experiments performed in the past, the modelization needs further information in order to be able to predict the behaviour of a real size cylinder when engulfed in a 800{degrees}C fire, as specified in the regulation. The main unknowns are related to (1) the UF{sub 6} behaviour beyond the critical point, (2) the relationship between temperature field and internal pressure and (3) the equivalent conductivity of the solid UF{sub 6}. In order to investigate these phenomena in a representative way it is foreseen to perform experiments with a cylinder of real diameter, but reduced length, containing 4 tons of UF{sub 6}. This cylinder will be placed in an electrically heated furnace. A confinement vessel prevents any dispersion of UF{sub 6}. The heat flux delivered by the furnace will be calibrated by specific tests. The cylinder will be changed for each test.

  11. Performance and results of the LBNE 35 ton membrane cryostat prototype

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Montanari, David; Adamowski, Mark; Hahn, Alan; Norris, Barry; Reichenbacher, Juergen; Rucinski, Russell; Stewart, Jim; Tope, Terry

    2015-07-15

    We report on the performance and commissioning of the first membrane cryostat to be used for scientific application. The Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE) has designed and fabricated a membrane cryostat prototype in collaboration with Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co., Ltd. (IHI). LBNE has designed and fabricated the supporting cryogenic system infrastructure and successfully commissioned and operated the first membrane cryostat. Original goals of the prototype are: to demonstrate the membrane cryostat technology in terms of thermal performance, feasibility for liquid argon and leak tightness; to demonstrate that we can remove all the impurities from the vessel and achieve the puritymore »requirements in a membrane cryostat without evacuation; to demonstrate that we can achieve and maintain the purity requirements of the liquid argon using mol sieve and copper filters. The purity requirements of a large liquid argon detector such as LBNE are contaminants below 200 parts per trillion (ppt) oxygen equivalent. LBNE is planning the design and construction of a large liquid argon detector. This presentation will present requirements, design and construction of the LBNE 35 ton membrane cryostat prototype, and detail the commissioning and performance. The experience and results of this prototype are extremely important for the development of the LBNE detector.« less

  12. The Composition Of A Disrupted Extrasolar Planetesimal At SDSS J0845+2257 (Ton 345)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, David J; Koester, Detlev; Toloza, Odette; Pala, Anna F; Breedt, Elmé; Parsons, Steven G

    2015-01-01

    We present a detailed study of the metal-polluted DB white dwarf SDSS J0845+2257 (Ton 345). Using high-resolution HST/COS and VLT spectroscopy, we have detected hydrogen and eleven metals in the atmosphere of the white dwarf. The origin of these metals is almost certainly the circumstellar disc of dusty and gaseous debris from a tidally-disrupted planetesimal, accreting at a rate of 1.6E10 gs^-1. Studying the chemical abundances of the accreted material demonstrates that the planetesimal had a composition similar to the Earth, dominated by rocky silicates and metallic iron, with a low water content. The mass of metals within the convection zone of the white dwarf corresponds to an asteroid of at least ~130-170 km in diameter, although the presence of ongoing accretion from the debris disc implies that the planetesimal was probably larger than this. While a previous abundance study of the accreted material has shown an anomalously high mass fraction of carbon (15 percent) compared to the bulk Earth, our indepe...

  13. Global MSW Generation in 2007 estimated at two billion tons Global Waste Management Market Assessment 2007, Key Note Publications Ltd ,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    Global MSW Generation in 2007 estimated at two billion tons Global Waste Management Market analyses the global waste market, with particular reference to municipal solid waste (MSW). Key Note. Industrial waste generally has a greater tonnage than MSW, but its management is the responsibility

  14. Average Stumpage Prices Measured in Price per Ton for Forest Products Large Pine Sawtimber Small Pine Sawtimber Hardwood Sawtimber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Average Stumpage Prices Measured in Price per Ton for Forest Products Large Pine Sawtimber Small Pine Sawtimber Hardwood Sawtimber Year Unweighte d Average Prices Weighted Average Prices Average of Unweighted and Weighted Prices Unweighted Average Prices Weighted Average Prices Average of Unweighted

  15. Average Stumpage Prices Measured in Price per Ton for Forest Products Large Pine Sawtimber Small Pine Sawtimber Hardwood Sawtimber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Average Stumpage Prices Measured in Price per Ton for Forest Products Large Pine Sawtimber Small Pine Sawtimber Hardwood Sawtimber Year Unweighted Average Prices Weighted Average Prices Average of Unweighted and Weighted Prices Unweighted Average Prices Weighted Average Prices Average of Unweighted

  16. Average Stumpage Prices Measured in Price per Ton for Forest Products Large Pine Sawtimber Small Pine Sawtimber Hardwood Sawtimber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Average Stumpage Prices Measured in Price per Ton for Forest Products Large Pine Sawtimber Small Pine Sawtimber Hardwood Sawtimber Year Unweighted Average Prices Weighted Average Prices Simple average of Unweighted and Weighted Prices Unweighted Average Prices Weighted Average Prices Simple average of Unweighted

  17. A Proposal for a Ton Scale Bubble Chamber for Dark Matter Detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collar, Juan; Dahl, C.Eric; Fustin, Drew; Robinson, Alan; Behnke, Ed; Behnke, Joshua; Breznau, William; Connor, Austin; Kuehnemund, Emily Grace; Levine, Ilan; Moan, Timothy; /Indiana U., South Bend /Fermilab

    2010-10-07

    The nature of non-baryonic dark matter is one of the most intriguing questions for particle physics at the start of the 21st century. There is ample evidence for its existence, but almost nothing is known of its properties. WIMPs are a very appealing candidate particle and several experimental campaigns are underway around the world to search for these particles via the nuclear recoils that they should induce. The COUPP series of bubble chambers has played a significant role in the WIMP search. Through a sequence of detectors of increasing size, a number of R&D issues have arisen and been solved, and the technology has now been advanced to the point where the construction of large chambers requires a modest research effort, some development, but mostly just engineering. It is within this context that we propose to build the next COUPP detector - COUPP-500, a ton scale device to be built over the next three years at Fermilab and then deployed deep underground at SNOLAB. The primary advantages of the COUPP approach over other technologies are: (1) The ability to reject electron and gamma backgrounds by arranging the chamber thermodynamics such that these particles do not even trigger the detector. (2) The ability to suppress neutron backgrounds by having the radioactively impure detection elements far from the active volume and by using the self-shielding of a large device and the high granularity to identify multiple bubbles. (3) The ability to build large chambers cheaply and with a choice of target fluids. (4) The ability to increase the size of the chambers without changing the size or complexity of the data acquisition. (5) Sensitivity to spin-dependent and spin-independent WIMP couplings. These key advantages should enable the goal of one background event in a ton-year of exposure to be achieved. The conceptual design of COUPP-500 is scaled from the preceding devices. In many cases all that is needed is a simple scaling up of components previously used. Calibration and R&D are still needed on some aspects of the system. We know we have the ability to distinguish alpha-induced events from nuclear recoils, but we do not yet know whether the combination of material purity and rejection are good enough to run for a year with no alpha background. We also need to have more detailed measurements of the detector threshold and a better understanding of its high gamma rejection. In addition, there are important checks to make on the longevity of the detector components in the hydraulic fluid and on the chemistry of the active fluid. The 2009 PASAG report explicitly supported the construction of the COUPP-500 device in all funding scenarios. The NSF has shown similar enthusiasm. It awarded one of its DUSEL S4 grants to assist in the engineering needed to build COUPP-500. The currently estimated cost of COUPP-500 is $8M, about half the $15M-$20M price tag expected by the PASAG report for a next generation dark matter search experiment. The COUPP-500 device will have a spin independent WIMP-nucleus cross-section sensitivity of 6 x 10{sup -47} cm{sup 2} after a background-free year of running. This device should then provide the benchmark against which all other WIMP searches are measured.

  18. Rock Art in the Public Trust: Managing Prehistoric Rock Art on Federal Land

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hale, John Patrick

    2010-01-01

    Stories in Stone: Rock Art Pictures by Early Americans. NewIntroduction. ? Coso Rock Art: a New Perspective, edited byIn The Archaeology of Rock Art,? edited by Christopher

  19. Methane Production: In the United States cattle emit about 5.5 million metric tons of methane per year into the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toohey, Darin W.

    Methane Production: In the United States cattle emit about 5.5 million metric tons of methane per year into the atmosphere. o Accounts for 20% of methane emissions from human sources. Globally cattle produce about 80 million metric tons of methane annually. o Accounts for 28% of global methane emissions

  20. Ion beam analyses of radionuclide migration in heterogeneous rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alonso, Ursula; Missana, Tiziana; Garcia-Gutierrez, Miguel [CIEMAT, Avda. Complutense 40, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Patelli, Alessandro [CIVEN, Via delle Industrie 5, Venezia-Marghera 30175 (Italy); Rigato, Valentino; Ceccato, Daniele [LNL-INFN, Viale dell' Universita 2, Legnaro-Padova 35020 (Italy)

    2013-07-18

    The migration of radionuclides (RN) in the environment is a topic of general interest, for its implications on public health, and it is an issue for the long-term safety studies of deep geological repositories (DGR) for high-level radioactive waste. The role played by colloids on RN migration is also of great concern. Diffusion and sorption are fundamental mechanisms controlling RN migration in rocks and many experimental approaches are applied to determine transport parameters for low sorbing RN in homogeneous rocks. However, it is difficult to obtain relevant data for high sorbing RN or colloids, for which diffusion lengths are extremely short, or within heterogeneous rocks, where transport might be different in different minerals. The ion beam techniques Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) and micro-Particle Induced X-Ray Emission ({mu}PIXE), rarely applied in the field, were selected for their micro-analytical potential to study RN diffusion and surface retention within heterogeneous rocks. Main achievements obtained during last 12 years are highlighted.

  1. April 2013 Short-Term Energy and Summer Fuels Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1 Table 1.101 (Million Short Tons) U.S. Energy5

  2. RARE EARTHS1 [Data in metric tons of rare-earth oxide (REO) content unless otherwise noted

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) -- -- -- -- 20 Rare-earth metals, alloy 880 867 784 679 210 Cerium compounds 2,170 2,590 2,680 2,080 1,190 Mixed (monazite or various thorium materials) -- -- 1 61 23 Rare-earth metals, alloys 636 733 1,470 1,390 6128 RARE EARTHS1 [Data in metric tons of rare-earth oxide (REO) content unless otherwise noted

  3. Iron and Steel Phosphate Rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    Kyanite Lead Lime Lithium Magnesium Manganese Mercury Mica Molybdenum Nickel Nitrogen Peat Perlite Graphite Peat Sulfur Beryllium Gypsum Perlite Talc Bismuth Hafnium Phosphate Rock Tantalum Boron Helium on the USGS--the Federal source for science about the Earth, its natural and living resources, natural hazards

  4. Iron and Steel Phosphate Rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    Kyanite Lead Lime Lithium Magnesium Manganese Mercury Mica Molybdenum Nickel Nitrogen Peat Perlite Graphite Peat Sulfur Beryllium Gypsum Perlite Talc Bismuth Hafnium Phosphate Rock Tantalum Boron Helium information on the USGS--the Federal source for science about the Earth, its natural and living resources

  5. Status of ArDM-1t: First observations from operation with a full ton-scale liquid argon target

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ArDM Collaboration; J. Calvo; C. Cantini; M. Daniel; U. Degunda; S. Di Luise; L. Epprecht; A. Gendotti; S. Horikawa; L. Knecht; B. Montes; W. Mu; M. Munoz; S. Murphy; G. Natterer; K. Nguyen; K. Nikolics; L. Periale; C. Regenfus; L. Romero; A. Rubbia; R. Santorelli; F. Sergiampietri; D. Sgalaberna; T. Viant; S. Wu

    2015-05-10

    ArDM-1t is the first operating ton-scale liquid argon detector for direct search of Dark Matter particles. Developed at CERN as Recognized Experiment RE18, the experiment has been approved in 2010 to be installed in the Spanish underground site LSC (Laboratorio Subterraneo de Canfranc). Under the label of LSC EXP-08-2010 the ArDM detector underwent an intensive period of technical completion and safety approval until the recent filling of the target vessel with almost 2 ton of liquid argon. This report describes the experimental achievements during commissioning of ArDM and the transition into a stage of first physics data taking in single phase operational mode. We present preliminary observations from this run. A first indication for the background discrimination power of LAr detectors at the ton-scale is shown. We present an outlook for completing the detector with the electric drift field and upgrade of the scintillation light readout system with novel detector modules based on SiPMs in order to improve the light yield.

  6. ArchRock Corporation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Arch Rock is a systems and software company that builds products and technology for wireless sensor networks. References: ArchRock Corporation1 This article is a stub. You can...

  7. Lichen: the challenge for rock art conservation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dandridge, Debra Elaine

    2007-04-25

    This study investigates the effects that lichens have on rock surfaces in which ancient rock art (petroglyphs and pictographs) may be found. The study area includes four sites in the United States: one quartzite site in ...

  8. Desert Rock Coatings Ronald I. Dorn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dorn, Ron

    Chapter 7 Desert Rock Coatings Ronald I. Dorn Introduction Desert landforms are characterized, that the supposed funda- mental bare-rock nature of desert landforms stretches the truth. In reality, rock coatings Petra tourist attraction of the Al-Khazneh Tomb fac¸ade is coated with a black manganese-rich varnish

  9. ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT ROCK ISLAND DAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    42) ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT ROCK ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON 1961 Marine Biological. McKeman, Director ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT - ROCK ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON, 1961--Fisheries No. 421 Washington, D. C. April 1962 #12;Rock Island Dam, Columbia River, Washington ii #12;CONTENTS

  10. ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT ROCK ISLAND DAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT ROCK ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON, 1959 :y .iiJA/i-3ri ^' WUUUi. ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT - ROCK ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON, 1959 by Paul D. Zimmer, Clifton and observations 10 Summary 13 #12;#12;ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT - ROCK ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON

  11. Annual Fish Passage Report -Rock Island Dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Annual Fish Passage Report - Rock Island Dam Columbia River, Washington, 1965 By Paul D. Zimmer L. McKeman, Director Annual Fish Passage Report - Rock Island Dam Columbia River, Washington, 1965;#12;Annual Fish Passage Report - Rock Island Dam Columbia River, Washington, 1965 By PAUL D. ZIMMER, Fishery

  12. Stratified precambrian rocks (sedimentary?) beneath the midcontinent region of the US. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hauser, E.C.

    1993-02-01

    A thick sequence of layered rocks occurs beneath the Phanerozoic platform strata which blanket the US midcontinent. Observed on COCORP deep reflection data in southern Illinois and Indiana and in SW Oklahoma and adjacent Texas, this sequence is locally 1--3 times as thick as the overlying Paleozoic cover, but the origin of this sequence and its ultimate lateral extent are unknown. However, the occurrences of Precambrian layered rocks on both the COCORP profiles and reprocessed industry seismic reflection data from the region lie within regions of generally low amplitude and low frequency aeromagnetic anomaly, suggesting an even greater distribution. Unmetamorphosed Precambrian sedimentary rocks have been recovered from drill holes in southwest Ohio and adjacent northern Kentucky and southwesternmost Indiana. These Precambrian sedimentary rocks lie above and may be part of an underlying package of strongly layered rocks imaged on a short and shallow seismic profile in southwest Ohio. These Precambrian sedimentary rocks were originally viewed as part of a late Precambrian (Keweenawan?) rift; however, in light of Grenville foreland structures seen on the COCORP profile to the north in west central Ohio, these Precambrian strata may (1) be part of a heretofore unrecognized Grenville foreland basin, or (2) indicate that unmetamorphosed Precambrian sedimentary material may be an important constituent of the layered rocks observed on COCORP beneath southern Illinois and Indiana.

  13. Stratified precambrian rocks (sedimentary ) beneath the midcontinent region of the US

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hauser, E.C.

    1993-02-01

    A thick sequence of layered rocks occurs beneath the Phanerozoic platform strata which blanket the US midcontinent. Observed on COCORP deep reflection data in southern Illinois and Indiana and in SW Oklahoma and adjacent Texas, this sequence is locally 1--3 times as thick as the overlying Paleozoic cover, but the origin of this sequence and its ultimate lateral extent are unknown. However, the occurrences of Precambrian layered rocks on both the COCORP profiles and reprocessed industry seismic reflection data from the region lie within regions of generally low amplitude and low frequency aeromagnetic anomaly, suggesting an even greater distribution. Unmetamorphosed Precambrian sedimentary rocks have been recovered from drill holes in southwest Ohio and adjacent northern Kentucky and southwesternmost Indiana. These Precambrian sedimentary rocks lie above and may be part of an underlying package of strongly layered rocks imaged on a short and shallow seismic profile in southwest Ohio. These Precambrian sedimentary rocks were originally viewed as part of a late Precambrian (Keweenawan ) rift; however, in light of Grenville foreland structures seen on the COCORP profile to the north in west central Ohio, these Precambrian strata may (1) be part of a heretofore unrecognized Grenville foreland basin, or (2) indicate that unmetamorphosed Precambrian sedimentary material may be an important constituent of the layered rocks observed on COCORP beneath southern Illinois and Indiana.

  14. SEISMIC AND ROCK PHYSICS DIAGNOSTICS OF MULTISCALE RESERVOIR TEXTURES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Mavko

    2002-05-01

    As part of our study on ''Relationships between seismic properties and rock microstructure'', we have studied (1) How to quantify elastic properties of clay minerals using Atomic Force Acoustic Microscopy. We show how bulk modulus of clay can be measured using atomic force acoustic microscopy (AFAM) (2) We have successfully measured elastic properties of unconsolidated sediments in an effort to quantify attributes for detection of overpressures from seismic (3) We have initiated efforts for velocity upscaling to quantify long-wavelength and short-wavelength velocity behavior and the scale-dependent dispersion caused by sediment variability in different depositional environments.

  15. X-ray reprocessing in Narrow-Line Seyfert 1 Galaxies: Ton S180 and Ark 564

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Janiuk; P. T. Zycki; B. Czerny

    2000-05-08

    We present the results of spectral analysis of the ASCA data for the Narrow-Line Seyfert 1 galaxy (NLS1) Ton S180 and simultaneous ASCA and RXTE data modelling for the NLS1 Ark 564. We model both the primary and reflected continuum as well as the iron K alpha line, the energy of which depends on the ionization state of the reprocessor. We show that the reprocessing matter is mildly ionized, and we find the soft to hard luminosity ratio to be about 2.5. The accretion rate approximately corresponds to the Eddington limit value.

  16. (Data in metric tons unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Indium was not recovered from ores in the United States in 2007. Indium-containing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    gallium diselenide (CIGS) solar cells require approximately 50 metric tons of indium to produce 1 gigawatt of solar power. Research was underway to develop a low-cost manufacturing process for flexible CIGS solar cells that would yield high productio

  17. Hot Dry Rock; Geothermal Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1990-01-01

    The commercial utilization of geothermal energy forms the basis of the largest renewable energy industry in the world. More than 5000 Mw of electrical power are currently in production from approximately 210 plants and 10 000 Mw thermal are used in direct use processes. The majority of these systems are located in the well defined geothermal generally associated with crustal plate boundaries or hot spots. The essential requirements of high subsurface temperature with huge volumes of exploitable fluids, coupled to environmental and market factors, limit the choice of suitable sites significantly. The Hot Dry Rock (HDR) concept at any depth originally offered a dream of unlimited expansion for the geothermal industry by relaxing the location constraints by drilling deep enough to reach adequate temperatures. Now, after 20 years intensive work by international teams and expenditures of more than $250 million, it is vital to review the position of HDR in relation to the established geothermal industry. The HDR resource is merely a body of rock at elevated temperatures with insufficient fluids in place to enable the heat to be extracted without the need for injection wells. All of the major field experiments in HDR have shown that the natural fracture systems form the heat transfer surfaces and that it is these fractures that must be for geothermal systems producing from naturally fractured formations provide a basis for directing the forthcoming but, equally, they require accepting significant location constraints on HDR for the time being. This paper presents a model HDR system designed for commercial operations in the UK and uses production data from hydrothermal systems in Japan and the USA to demonstrate the reservoir performance requirements for viable operations. It is shown that these characteristics are not likely to be achieved in host rocks without stimulation processes. However, the long term goal of artificial geothermal systems developed by systematic engineering procedures at depth may still be attained if high temperature sites with extensive fracturing are developed or exploited. [DJE -2005

  18. Big Bang Day : Physics Rocks

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-04-25

    Is particle physics the new rock 'n' roll? The fundamental questions about the nature of the universe that particle physics hopes to answer have attracted the attention of some very high profile and unusual fans. Alan Alda, Ben Miller, Eddie Izzard, Dara O'Briain and John Barrowman all have interests in this branch of physics. Brian Cox - CERN physicist, and former member of 90's band D:Ream, tracks down some very well known celebrity enthusiasts and takes a light-hearted look at why this subject can appeal to all of us.

  19. Post Rock | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII JumpQuarterly SmartDB-2, Blue MountainSchoolPrairiePonder,Abbey SchoolS AOakRock

  20. Rock Classification in Organic Shale Based on Petrophysical and Elastic Rock Properties Calculated from Well Logs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aranibar Fernandez, Alvaro A

    2015-01-05

    Organic Content (TOC), fluid saturation, volumetric concentrations of mineral constituents, and elastic properties facilitated identification of different rock classes, using an unsupervised artificial neural network. A good rock classification technique...

  1. Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field Investigations Of In Situ Geochemical Behavior Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  2. Taking out 1 billion tons of CO2: The magic of China's 11th Five-Year Plan?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Nan; Lin, Jiang; Zhou, Nan; Levine, Mark; Fridley, David

    2007-07-01

    China's 11th Five-Year Plan (FYP) sets an ambitious target for energy-efficiency improvement: energy intensity of the country's gross domestic product (GDP) should be reduced by 20% from 2005 to 2010 (NDRC, 2006). This is the first time that a quantitative and binding target has been set for energy efficiency, and signals a major shift in China's strategic thinking about its long-term economic and energy development. The 20% energy intensity target also translates into an annual reduction of over 1.5 billion tons of CO2 by 2010, making the Chinese effort one of most significant carbon mitigation effort in the world today. While it is still too early to tell whether China will achieve this target, this paper attempts to understand the trend in energy intensity in China and to explore a variety of options toward meeting the 20% target using a detailed end-use energy model.

  3. Manufactured caverns in carbonate rock

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bruce, David A.; Falta, Ronald W.; Castle, James W.; Murdoch, Lawrence C.

    2007-01-02

    Disclosed is a process for manufacturing underground caverns suitable in one embodiment for storage of large volumes of gaseous or liquid materials. The method is an acid dissolution process that can be utilized to form caverns in carbonate rock formations. The caverns can be used to store large quantities of materials near transportation facilities or destination markets. The caverns can be used for storage of materials including fossil fuels, such as natural gas, refined products formed from fossil fuels, or waste materials, such as hazardous waste materials. The caverns can also be utilized for applications involving human access such as recreation or research. The method can also be utilized to form calcium chloride as a by-product of the cavern formation process.

  4. Methods and results for stress analyses on 14-ton, thin-wall depleted UF{sub 6} cylinders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirkpatrick, J.R.; Chung, C.K.; Frazier, J.L.; Kelley, D.K.

    1996-10-01

    Uranium enrichment operations at the three US gaseous diffusion plants produce depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) as a residential product. At the present time, the inventory of DUF{sub 6} in this country is more than half a million tons. The inventory of DUF{sub 6} is contained in metal storage cylinders, most of which are located at the gaseous diffusion plants. The principal objective of the project is to ensure the integrity of the cylinders to prevent causing an environmental hazard by releasing the contents of the cylinders into the atmosphere. Another objective is to maintain the cylinders in such a manner that the DUF{sub 6} may eventually be converted to a less hazardous material for final disposition. An important task in the DUF{sub 6} cylinders management project is determining how much corrosion of the walls can be tolerated before the cylinders are in danger of being damaged during routine handling and shipping operations. Another task is determining how to handle cylinders that have already been damaged in a manner that will minimize the chance that a breach will occur or that the size of an existing breach will be significantly increased. A number of finite element stress analysis (FESA) calculations have been done to analyze the stresses for three conditions: (1) while the cylinder is being lifted, (2) when a cylinder is resting on two cylinders under it in the customary two-tier stacking array, and (3) when a cylinder is resting on tis chocks on the ground. Various documents describe some of the results and discuss some of the methods whereby they have been obtained. The objective of the present report is to document as many of the FESA cases done at Oak Ridge for 14-ton thin-wall cylinders as possible, giving results and a description of the calculations in some detail.

  5. WAVE GENERATIONS FROM CONFINED EXPLOSIONS IN ROCKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, Sarah T.

    WAVE GENERATIONS FROM CONFINED EXPLOSIONS IN ROCKS C. L. Liu and Thomas J. Ahrens Seismological Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 In order to record P- and S-waves on the interactions between incident P- and SV-waves and free-surfaces of rocks. The relations between particle

  6. ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT ROCK ISLAND DAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT ROCK ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON 1960 . SPECIAL SCIENTIFIC ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON, 1960 by Paul D. Zimmer and Clifton C. Davidson United States Fish This annual report of fishway operations at Rock Island Dam in 1960 is dedicated to the memory of co

  7. Fluid-rock interaction: A reactive transport approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steefel, C.

    2009-01-01

    to coupled mass transport and fluid-rock interaction in aof a reactive transport approach in fluid-rock interaction,reactive transport models for fluid-rock interaction. Case

  8. Regional Geology: GIS Database for Alternative Host Rocks and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    three alternative geologic host rocks for mined repositories (granitic crystalline, salt, and clay shale) and crystalline basement rock for deep borehole disposal. This...

  9. Rock Physics of Geologic Carbon Sequestration/Storage Dvorkin...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Rock Physics of Geologic Carbon SequestrationStorage Dvorkin, Jack; Mavko, Gary 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 58 GEOSCIENCES This report covers the results of developing the rock...

  10. Fundamental Research on Percussion Drilling: Improved rock mechanics

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    full-scale laboratory investigations Michael S. Bruno 58 GEOSCIENCES; 02 PETROLEUM; 03 NATURAL GAS; ROCK DRILLING; PRESSURE DEPENDENCE; ROCK MECHANICS; ROTARY DRILLING; WELL...

  11. Rock mechanics design in mining and tunneling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bieniawski, Z.T.

    1984-01-01

    This book introduces the design process as applied to rock mechanics aspects of underground mining and tunneling. Topics covered include a historical perspective, the design process in engineering, empirical methods of design, observational methods of design, and guided design.

  12. First Rocks from Outside the Solar System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Westphal, Andrew

    2014-10-17

    Andrew Westphal presents his findings in examining the first rocks from outside the solar system at our '8 Big Ideas' Science at the Theater event on October 8th, 2014, in Oakland, California.

  13. COMPUTED SEISMIC SPEEDS AND ATTENUATION IN ROCKS ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, J. E.

    At the gas-oil or gas-water contact in a homo- geneous reservoir rock, capillary pressure ... During production of a field, gas may come out of solution and crcatr ...

  14. Rock Slopes from Mechanics to Decision Making

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Einstein, Herbert H.

    Rock slope instabilities are discussed in the context of decision making for risk assessment and management. Hence, the state of the slope and possible failure mechanism need to be defined first. This is done with geometrical ...

  15. Chemical reactions of UF{sub 6} with water on ingress to damaged model 48X 10 ton cylinder

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rothman, A.B.

    1996-02-01

    Chemistry studies of the effects of water flooding in Model 48X 10-ton UF{sub 6} storage cylinders, as a result of impact fractures, were conducted to support the Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) review of the Paducah Tiger Overpack for transportation of those cylinders. The objectives of the study were to determine the maximum amount of water that could be admitted to the interior of such a damaged cylinder, the resulting geometries and chemical compositions from reactions of water with the UF{sub 6} contents of the cylinder, and the end-state water moderated and reflected configurations for input to nuclear criticality safety analyses. The case identified for analysis was the flooding of the inside of a cylinder, submerged horizontally in 3 ft of water. The flooding was driven by an initial pressure drop of 13 psig, through an assumed fracture (1/32 in. wide {times} 1/2 in. deep {times} 18 in. long) in the barrel of the cylinder. During the initial addition of water, transient back pressures occur from the effects of the heats of reaction and solution at the water/UF{sub 6} interface, with some chugging as more water is added to alternately coot the reaction surface and then heat it again as the added water reacts with more UF{sub 6}.

  16. (Data in metric tons of lithium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The only commercially active lithium mine in the United States was a brine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    --United States: 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 e Production W W W W W Imports for consumption 3,160 1,890 1,960 2,850 2 production capacity. Industry analysts and the major lithium producers expected worldwide consumption94 LITHIUM (Data in metric tons of lithium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production

  17. Stress-induced transverse isotropy in rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwartz, L.M.; Murphy, W.F. III [Schlumberger-Doll Research Center, Ridgefield, CT (United States); Berryman, J.G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-03-28

    The application of uniaxial pressure can induce elastic anisotropy in otherwise isotropic rock. We consider models based on two very different rock classes, granites and weakly consolidated granular systems. We show that these models share common underlying assumptions, that they lead to similar qualitative behavior, and that both provide a microscopic basis for elliptical anisotropy. In the granular case, we make experimentally verifiable predictions regarding the horizontally propagating modes based on the measured behavior of the vertical modes.

  18. XAX: a multi-ton, multi-target detection system for dark matter, double beta decay and pp solar neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Arisaka; H. Wang; P. F. Smith; D. Cline; A. Teymourian; E. Brown; W. Ooi; D. Aharoni; C. W. Lam; K. Lung; S. Davies; M. Price

    2009-01-07

    A multi-target detection system XAX, comprising concentric 10 ton targets of 136Xe and 129/131Xe, together with a geometrically similar or larger target of liquid Ar, is described. Each is configured as a two-phase scintillation/ionization TPC detector, enhanced by a full 4pi array of ultra-low radioactivity Quartz Photon Intensifying Detectors (QUPIDs) replacing the conventional photomultipliers for detection of scintillation light. It is shown that background levels in XAX can be reduced to the level required for dark matter particle (WIMP) mass measurement at a 10^-10 pb WIMP-nucleon cross section, with single-event sensitivity below 10^-11 pb. The use of multiple target elements allows for confirmation of the A^2 dependence of a coherent cross section, and the different Xe isotopes provide information on the spin-dependence of the dark matter interaction. The event rates observed by Xe and Ar would modulate annually with opposite phases from each other for WIMP mass >~100 GeV/c^2. The large target mass of 136Xe and high degree of background reduction allow neutrinoless double beta decay to be observed with lifetimes of 10^27-10^28 years, corresponding to the Majorana neutrino mass range 0.01-0.1 eV, the most likely range from observed neutrino mass differences. The use of a 136Xe-depleted 129/131Xe target will also allow measurement of the pp solar neutrino spectrum to a precision of 1-2%.

  19. Review of corrosion in 10- and 14-ton mild steel depleted UF{sub 6} storage cylinders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lykins, M.L.

    1995-08-01

    A literature review was conducted to determine the type, extent and severity of corrosion found in the 10- and 14-ton mild steel depleted UF{sub 6} storage cylinders. Also discussed in this review is corrosion found in the valves and plugs used in the cylinders. Corrosion of the cylinders is a gradual process which occurs slowly over time. Understanding corrosion of the cylinders is an important concern for long term storage of the UF{sub 6} in the cylinder yards, as well as the final disposition of the depleted UF{sub 6} tails inventory in the future. The following conclusions are made from the literature review: (1) The general external corrosion rate of the cylinders is about 1 to 2 mils per year (1 mil = 0.001{double_prime}). The highest general external corrosion rate was over 5 mpy on the 48G type cylinders. (2) General internal corrosion from the depleted UF{sub 6} is negligible under normal storage conditions. Crevice corrosion can occur at the cylinder/saddle interface from the retention of water in this area. Crevice corrosion can occur at the cylinder/skirt interface on the older skirted cylinders due to the lack of water drainage in this area. Crevice corrosion can occur on cylinders that have been in ground contact. Crevice corrosion and galvanic corrosion can occur where the stainless steel I.D. nameplates are attached to the cylinder. The packing nuts on the bronze one-inch valves used in the cylinders are susceptible to stress corrosion cracking (SCC). Mechanical damage from routine handling can lead to a breach in a cylinder with subsequent accelerated corrosion of the mild steel due to attack from HF and other UF{sub 6} hydrolysis by-products.

  20. Table 1. 2013 Summary Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    tons)", "Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",3978753 "Nitrogen oxide (short tons)",2411564 "Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons)",2172355 "Sulfur dioxide (lbsMWh)",2 "Nitrogen oxide...

  1. Short-Pulse Lasers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDidDevelopment Top Scientific Impact SinceServiceShipping ToShort-Pulse

  2. Rock melting tool with annealer section

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bussod, Gilles Y. (Santa Fe, NM); Dick, Aaron J. (Oakland, CA); Cort, George E. (Montrose, CO)

    1998-01-01

    A rock melting penetrator is provided with an afterbody that rapidly cools a molten geological structure formed around the melting tip of the penetrator to the glass transition temperature for the surrounding molten glass-like material. An annealing afterbody then cools the glass slowly from the glass transition temperature through the annealing temperature range to form a solid self-supporting glass casing. This allows thermally induced strains to relax by viscous deformations as the molten glass cools and prevents fracturing of the resulting glass liner. The quality of the glass lining is improved, along with its ability to provide a rigid impermeable casing in unstable rock formations.

  3. Biomass as Feedstock for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry: The Technical Feasibility of a Billion-Ton Annual Supply, April 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2005-04-01

    The purpose of this report is to determine whether the land resources of the United States are capable of producing a sustainable supply of biomass sufficient to displace 30 percent or more of the country’s present petroleum consumption – the goal set by the Biomass R&D Technical Advisory Committee in their vision for biomass technologies. Accomplishing this goal would require approximately 1 billion dry tons of biomass feedstock per year.

  4. LASER SCANNING TECHNOLOGY FOR ROCK ENGINEERING APPLICATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LASER SCANNING TECHNOLOGY FOR ROCK ENGINEERING APPLICATIONS Thorsten Schulz Institute of Geodesy or on the excavation surface. The use of laser scanners enables one to cope with practical constraints encountered surfaces regardless of the lighting conditions. Therefore, laser scanners have the potential to be employed

  5. Storage capacity in hot dry rock reservoirs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, Donald W. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1997-01-01

    A method of extracting thermal energy, in a cyclic manner, from geologic strata which may be termed hot dry rock. A reservoir comprised of hot fractured rock is established and water or other liquid is passed through the reservoir. The water is heated by the hot rock, recovered from the reservoir, cooled by extraction of heat by means of heat exchange apparatus on the surface, and then re-injected into the reservoir to be heated again. Water is added to the reservoir by means of an injection well and recovered from the reservoir by means of a production well. Water is continuously provided to the reservoir and continuously withdrawn from the reservoir at two different flow rates, a base rate and a peak rate. Increasing water flow from the base rate to the peak rate is accomplished by rapidly decreasing backpressure at the outlet of the production well in order to meet periodic needs for amounts of thermal energy greater than a baseload amount, such as to generate additional electric power to meet peak demands. The rate of flow of water provided to the hot dry rock reservoir is maintained at a value effective to prevent depletion of the liquid

  6. Storage capacity in hot dry rock reservoirs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, D.W.

    1997-11-11

    A method is described for extracting thermal energy, in a cyclic manner, from geologic strata which may be termed hot dry rock. A reservoir comprised of hot fractured rock is established and water or other liquid is passed through the reservoir. The water is heated by the hot rock, recovered from the reservoir, cooled by extraction of heat by means of heat exchange apparatus on the surface, and then re-injected into the reservoir to be heated again. Water is added to the reservoir by means of an injection well and recovered from the reservoir by means of a production well. Water is continuously provided to the reservoir and continuously withdrawn from the reservoir at two different flow rates, a base rate and a peak rate. Increasing water flow from the base rate to the peak rate is accomplished by rapidly decreasing backpressure at the outlet of the production well in order to meet periodic needs for amounts of thermal energy greater than a baseload amount, such as to generate additional electric power to meet peak demands. The rate of flow of water provided to the hot dry rock reservoir is maintained at a value effective to prevent depletion of the liquid inventory of the reservoir. 4 figs.

  7. Transfer of hot dry rock technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, M.C.

    1985-11-01

    The Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development Program has focused worldwide attention on the facts that natural heat in the upper part of the earth's crust is an essentially inexhaustible energy resource which is accessible almost everywhere, and that practical means now exist to extract useful heat from the hot rock and bring it to the earth's surface for beneficial use. The Hot Dry Rock Program has successfully constructed and operated a prototype hot, dry rock energy system that produced heat at the temperatures and rates required for large-scale space heating and many other direct uses of heat. The Program is now in the final stages of constructing a larger, hotter system potentially capable of satisfying the energy requirements of a small, commercial, electrical-generating power plant. To create and understand the behavior of such system, it has been necessary to develop or support the development of a wide variety of equipment, instruments, techniques, and analyses. Much of this innovative technology has already been transferred to the private sector and to other research and development programs, and more is continuously being made available as its usefulness is demonstrated. This report describes some of these developments and indicates where this new technology is being used or can be useful to industry, engineering, and science.

  8. SEARCH FOR UNDERGROUND OPENINGS FOR IN SITU TEST FACILITIES IN CRYSTALLINE ROCK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wallenberg, H.A.

    2010-01-01

    of the precambrian crystalline rocks, Park and Jeffersonmap 1-413. 1965, The crystalline rocks of South Carolina,TEST FACILITIES IN CRYSTALLINE ROCK Harold A. Wollenberg,

  9. FACTORS IN THE DESIGN OF A ROCK MECHANICS CENTRIFUGE FOR STRONG ROCK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, George B

    1984-01-01

    1 . Capacit i es of known centrifuges and v proposed SoftSolla I rock mechanics centrifuge r, ---------1~ --- dxB. , (1980), Geotechnical centrifuges for model studies and

  10. Modeling of crack initiation, propagation and coalescence in rocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gonçalves da Silva, Bruno Miguel

    2009-01-01

    Natural or artificial fracturing of rock plays a very important role in geologic processes and for engineered structures in and on rock. Fracturing is associated with crack initiation, propagation and coalescence, which ...

  11. Project Reports for Standing Rock Sioux Tribe- 2012 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Standing Rock Sioux Tribe (SRST) will perform a feasibility study and associated tasks over the course of two years on sites within the exterior boundaries of the Standing Rock Sioux...

  12. Inversion of seismic attributes for petrophysical parameters and rock facies 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shahraeeni, Mohammad Sadegh

    2011-01-01

    Prediction of rock and fluid properties such as porosity, clay content, and water saturation is essential for exploration and development of hydrocarbon reservoirs. Rock and fluid property maps obtained from such predictions ...

  13. 2.20 Properties of Rocks and Minerals -Magnetic Properties of Rocks and Minerals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    Scale Exchange Interactions and Magnetic Structure in Fe-Bearing Oxides Atomistic Simulations2.20 Properties of Rocks and Minerals - Magnetic Properties of Rocks and Minerals R. J. Harrison, R.20.5.1.3 2.20.5.2 2.20.5.2.1 2.20.5.2.2 2.20.5.2.3 2.20.5.2.4 Introduction Magnetism at the Atomic Length

  14. A CONSTITUTIVE MODEL TO PREDICT THE HYDROMECHANICAL BEHAVIOUR OF ROCK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aubertin, Michel

    in the presence of water to better assess the stability of rock structures under many situations. The accurate conditions. A rock mass behaviour can also be influenced by the water flow and ensuing pore pressure. For example, a previously stable rock structure can become unstable with an increase of water pressure inside

  15. SHORT NARRATIVE ABOUT PROMISING PRACTICES

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ATTACHMENT 2 SHORT NARRATIVE ABOUT PROMISING PRACTICES Briefly identify a policy, practice or procedure where your agency has been successful in the implementation of actions...

  16. SHACKLING SHORT SELLERS: THE 2008 SHORTING BAN Ekkehart Boehmer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Xiaodong

    degradation in market quality, as measured by spreads, price impacts, and intraday volatility. Prices,000 financial stocks. In this paper, we study changes in stock prices, the rate of short sales most short sales in nearly 1,000 financial stocks. In this paper, we study changes in stock prices

  17. A Phased Array Approach to Rock Blasting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leslie Gertsch; Jason Baird

    2006-07-01

    A series of laboratory-scale simultaneous two-hole shots was performed in a rock simulant (mortar) to record the shock wave interference patterns produced in the material. The purpose of the project as a whole was to evaluate the usefulness of phased array techniques of blast design, using new high-precision delay technology. Despite high-speed photography, however, we were unable to detect the passage of the shock waves through the samples to determine how well they matched the expected interaction geometry. The follow-up mine-scale tests were therefore not conducted. Nevertheless, pattern analysis of the vectors that would be formed by positive interference of the shockwaves from multiple charges in an ideal continuous, homogeneous, isotropic medium indicate the potential for powerful control of blast design, given precise characterization of the target rock mass.

  18. Big Rock Point severe accident management strategies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brogan, B.A. [Consumers Power Co., Charlevoix, MI (United States); Gabor, J.R. [Dames and Moore, Westmont, IL (United States)

    1996-07-01

    December 1994, the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) issued guidance relative to the formal industry position on Severe Accident Management (SAM) approved by the NEI Strategic Issues Advisory Committee on November 4, 1994. This paper summarizes how Big Rock Point (BRP) has and continues to address SAM strategies. The historical accounting portion of this presentation includes a description of how the following projects identified and defined the current Big Rock Point SAM strategies: the 1981 Level 3 Probabilistic Risk Assessment performance; the development of the Plant Specific Technical Guidelines from which the symptom oriented Emergency Operating Procedures (EOPs) were developed; the Control Room Design Review; and, the recent completion of the Individual Plant Evaluation (IPE). In addition to the historical presentation deliberation, this paper the present activities that continue to stress SAM strategies.

  19. LibShortText: A Library for Short-text Classification and Analysis LibShortText: A Library for Short-text Classification and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Chih-Jen

    LibShortText: A Library for Short-text Classification and Analysis LibShortText: A Library for Short-text Classification and Analysis Hsiang-Fu Yu rofuyu@cs.utexas.edu Department of Computer Science University, Taipei 106, Taiwan Editor: Editor name Abstract LibShortText is an open source library for short

  20. A nuclear criticality safety assessment of the loss of moderation control in 2 1/2 and 10-ton cylinders containing enriched UF{sub 6}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newvahner, R.L. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Piketon, OH (United States); Pryor, W.A. [PAI Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1991-12-31

    Moderation control for maintaining nuclear criticality safety in 2 {1/2}-ton, 10-ton, and 14-ton cylinders containing enriched uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) has been used safely within the nuclear industry for over thirty years, and is dependent on cylinder integrity and containment. This assessment evaluates the loss of moderation control by the breaching of containment and entry of water into the cylinders. The first objective of this study was to estimate the required amounts of water entering these large UF{sub 6} cylinders to react with, and to moderate the uranium compounds sufficiently to cause criticality. Hypothetical accident situations were modeled as a uranyl fluoride (UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}) slab above a UF{sub 6} hemicylinder, and a UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} sphere centered within a UF{sub 6} hemicylinder. These situations were investigated by computational analyses utilizing the KENO V.a Monte Carlo Computer Code. The results were used to estimate both the masses of water required for criticality, and the limiting masses of water that could be considered safe. The second objective of the assessment was to calculate the time available for emergency control actions before a criticality would occur, i.e., a {open_quotes}safetime{close_quotes}, for various sources of water and different size openings in a breached cylinder. In the situations considered, except the case for a fire hose, the safetime appears adequate for emergency control actions. The assessment shows that current practices for handling moderation controlled cylinders of low enriched UF{sub 6}, along with the continuation of established personnel training programs, ensure nuclear criticality safety for routine and emergency operations.

  1. Low Pore Connectivity in Natural Rock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Qinhong; Ewing, Robert P.; Dultz, Stefan

    2012-05-15

    As repositories for CO? and radioactive waste, as oil and gas reservoirs, and as contaminated sites needing remediation, rock formations play a central role in energy and environmental management. The connectivity of the rock's porespace strongly affects fluid flow and solute transport. This work examines pore connectivity and its implications for fluid flow and chemical transport. Three experimental approaches (imbibition, tracer concentration profiles, and imaging) were used in combination with network modeling. In the imbibition results, three types of imbibition slope [log (cumulative imbibition) vs. log (imbibition time)] were found: the classical 0.5, plus 0.26, and 0.26 transitioning to 0.5. The imbibition slope of 0.26 seen in Indiana sandstone, metagraywacke, and Barnett shale indicates low pore connectivity, in contrast to the slope of 0.5 seen in the well-connected Berea sandstone. In the tracer profile work, rocks exhibited different distances to the plateau porosity, consistent with the pore connectivity from the imbibition tests. Injection of a molten metal into connected pore spaces, followed by 2-D imaging of the solidified alloy in polished thin sections, allowed direct assessment of pore structure and lateral connection in the rock samples. Pore-scale network modeling gave results consistent with measurements, confirming pore connectivity as the underlying cause of both anomalous behaviors: imbibition slope not having the classical value of 0.5, and accessible porosity being a function of distance from the edge. A poorly connected porespace will exhibit anomalous behavior in fluid flow and chemical transport, such as a lower imbibition slope (in air–water system) and diffusion rate than expected from classical behavior.

  2. Rock Chalk Report, January 9, 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-09

    to both Baseball and Softball) on sale now! Season Tickets starting as low as $50! Earn two Williams Education Fund Priority Points per sport when you buy Baseball and Softball season tickets! Spirit Squad The University... of Kansas Spirit Squad The KU Cheer Squad and Rock Chalk Dancers will perform their National Competition routines on January 13 @ 4PM & 6PM! This event will be prior to their departure for Orlando to compete in the UCA/UDA College Nationals. This event...

  3. Hydrothermally Deposited Rock | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy Resources JumpNewTexas:Hydrothermally Deposited Rock Jump to: navigation,

  4. Rock Lab Analysis | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/ColoradoRemsenburg-Speonk, NewMichigan: Energy Resources Jump to:Rock

  5. Rock, Wisconsin: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/ColoradoRemsenburg-Speonk, NewMichigan: Energy Resources JumpMtSampling Jump to:Rock,

  6. Squirt flow in fully saturated rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dvorkin, J.; Mavko, G.; Nur, A. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Geophysics] [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Geophysics

    1995-01-01

    The authors estimate velocity/frequency dispersion and attenuation in fully saturated rocks by employing the squirt-flow mechanism of solid-fluid interaction. In this model, pore fluid is squeezed from thin soft cracks into the surrounding large pores. Information about the compliance of these soft cracks at low confining pressures is extracted from high-pressure velocity data. The frequency dependence of squirt-induced pressure in the soft cracks is linked with the porosity and permeability of the soft pore space, and the characteristic squirt-flow length. These unknown parameters are combined into one expression that is assumed to be a fundamental rock property that does not depend on frequency. The appropriate value of this expression for a given rock can be found by matching the authors theoretical predictions with the experimental measurements of attenuation or velocity. The low-frequency velocity limits, as given by their model, are identical to those predicted by Gassmann`s formula. The high-frequency limits may significant exceed those given by the Biot theory: the high-frequency frame bulk modulus is close to that measured at high confining pressure. They have applied their model to D`Euville Limestone, Navajo Sandstone, and Westerly Granite. The model realistically predicts the observed velocity/frequency dispersion, and attenuation.

  7. Gage for measuring displacements in rock samples

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holcomb, David J. (Albuquerque, NM); McNamee, Michael J. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1986-01-01

    A gage for measuring diametral displacement within a rock sample for use in a rock mechanics laboratory and in the field, comprises a support ring housing a linear variable differential transformer, a mounting screw, and a leaf spring. The mounting screw is adjustable and defines a first point of contact with the rock sample. The leaf spring has opposite ends fixed to the inner periphery of the mounting ring. An intermediate portion of the leaf spring projecting radially inward from the ring is formed with a dimple defining a second point of contact with the sample. The first and second points of contact are diametrically opposed to each other. The LVDT is mounted in the ring with its axis parallel to the line of measurement and its core rod received in the dimple of the leaf spring. Any change in the length of the line between the first and second support points is directly communicated to the LVDT. The leaf spring is rigid to completely support lateral forces so that the LVDT is free of all load for improved precision.

  8. Gage for measuring displacements in rock samples

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holcomb, D.J.; McNamee, M.J.

    1985-07-18

    A gage for measuring diametral displacement within a rock sample for use in a rock mechanics laboratory and in the field, comprises a support ring housing a linear variable differential transformer (LVDT), a mounting screw, and a leaf spring. The mounting screw is adjustable and defines a first point of contact with the rock sample. The leaf spring has opposite ends fixed to the inner periphery of the mounting ring. An intermediate portion of the leaf spring projecting radially inward from the ring is formed with a dimple defining a second point of contact with the sample. The first and second points of contact are diametrically opposed to each other. The LVDT is mounted in the ring with its axis parallel to the line of measurement and its core rod received in the dimple of the leaf spring. Any change in the length of the line between the first and second support points is directly communicated to the LVDT. The leaf spring is rigid to completely support lateral forces so that the LVDT is free of all load for improved precision.

  9. Hot-dry-rock energy: review of environmental aspects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Banion, K.

    1981-10-13

    The potential environmental and socioeconomic impacts of the production of energy contained in hot dry rock (HDR) is surveyed here. In general, careful siting and timing and routine control measures should be adequate to prevent significant environmental harm; sites of particular ecological or visual and recreational value, however, may require more extensive (and more expensive) precautions such as using multiwell pads to reduce land disturbance and dry or wet and dry cooling towers to reduce or eliminate the consumptive use of water. The most important uncertainty among the environmental concerns is the seismic response of HDR formations to short-duration fluid injections at pressures above fracture thresholds; continued monitoring at HDR development sites is necessary. The direct socioeconomic impacts of HDR development should be relatively minor, owing to its capital-intensive nature. Of greater potential importance are the indirect jobs resulting from such development, which could cause significant demographic (and thus fiscal and social) impacts in sparsely populated regions. However, such indirect growth is not expected to begin until a large, stable HDR industry is established in a region, and thus its impacts are expected to be permanent rather than transient.

  10. Authorized Limits for the Release of a 25 Ton Locomotive, Serial Number 21547, at the Area 25 Engine Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeremy Gwin and Douglas Frenette

    2010-04-08

    This document contains process knowledge and radiological data and analysis to support approval for release of the 25-ton locomotive, Serial Number 21547, at the Area 25 Engine Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly (EMAD) Facility, located on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The 25-ton locomotive is a small, one-of-a-kind locomotive used to move railcars in support of the Nuclear Engine for Rocket Vehicle Application project. This locomotive was identified as having significant historical value by the Nevada State Railroad Museum in Boulder City, Nevada, where it will be used as a display piece. A substantial effort to characterize the radiological conditions of the locomotive was undertaken by the NTS Management and Operations Contractor, National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec). During this characterization process, seven small areas on the locomotive had contamination levels that exceeded the NTS release criteria (limits consistent with U.S. Department of Energy [DOE] Order DOE O 5400.5, “Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment”). The decision was made to perform radiological decontamination of these known accessible impacted areas to further the release process. On February 9, 2010, NSTec personnel completed decontamination of these seven areas to within the NTS release criteria. Although all accessible areas of the locomotive had been successfully decontaminated to within NTS release criteria, it was plausible that inaccessible areas of the locomotive (i.e., those areas on the locomotive where it was not possible to perform radiological surveys) could potentially have contamination above unrestricted release limits. To access the majority of these inaccessible areas, the locomotive would have to be disassembled. A complete disassembly for a full radiological survey could have permanently destroyed parts and would have ruined the historical value of the locomotive. Complete disassembly would also add an unreasonable financial burden for the contractor. A decision was reached between the NTS regulator and NSTec, opting for alternative authorized limits from DOE Headquarters. In doing so, NSTec personnel performed a dose model using the DOE-approved modeling code RESRAD-BUILD v3.5 to evaluate scenarios. The parameters used in the dose model were conservative. NSTec’s Radiological Engineering Calculation, REC-2010-001, “Public Dose Estimate from the EMAD 25 Ton Locomotive,” concluded that the four scenarios evaluated were below the 25-millirem per year limit, the “likely” dose scenarios met the “few millirem in a year” criteria, and that the EMAD 25-ton locomotive met the radiological requirements to be released with residual radioactivity to the public.

  11. Short Manual Software Modules for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ould Ahmedou, Mohameden

    1 Short Manual Software Modules for Format Conversion, Transformation, and Synthesis 1 Introduction This document includes a short description of calling syntax and handling of the software modules developed describes the software installation process, chapter 3 shows the calling syntax of the SIF-to-CDFG format

  12. GEOTECHNICAL ASSESSMENT AND INSTRUMENTATION NEEDS FOR NUCLEAR WASTE ISOLATION IN CRYSTALLINE AND ARGILLACEOUS ROCKS SYMPOSIUM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01

    Characterization of Rock Masses Structural GeologicalCharacterization of Rock Masses . • • • • • • • • 5.2.1 Structural Geological

  13. Hot dry rock venture risks investigation:

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    This study assesses a promising resource in central Utah as the potential site of a future commerical hot dry rock (HDR) facility for generating electricity. The results indicate that, if the HDR reservoir productivity equals expectations based on preliminary results from research projects to date, a 50 MWe HDR power facility at Roosevelt Hot Springs could generate power at cost competitive with coal-fired plants. However, it is imperative that the assumed productivity be demonstrated before funds are committed for a commercial facility. 72 refs., 39 figs., 38 tabs.

  14. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Slick Rock

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and Myers Co - OH 51SavannahMill SiteSlick Rock

  15. Category:Rock Density | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmentalBowerbank,CammackFLIR Jump to:RAPID Roadmap ContactRock Density Jump to: navigation,

  16. Isotopic Analysis- Rock | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource History View NewGuam:on OpeneiAlbanianStudy)savingsInformationRock Jump to:

  17. Accelerator-based Short-baseline Neutrino Oscillation Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gollapinni, Sowjanya

    2015-01-01

    Over the last two decades, several experiments have reported anomalous results that could be hinting at the exciting possibility of sterile neutrino states in the $eV^{2}$ mass scale. Liquid Argon Time Projection Chambers (LArTPCs) are a particularly promising technology to explore this physics due to their fine-grained tracking and exceptional calorimetric capabilities. The MicroBooNE experiment, a 170 ton LArTPC scheduled to start taking data very soon with Fermilab's Booster Neutrino Beam (BNB), will combine LArTPC development with the main physics goal of understanding the low-energy electromagnetic anomaly seen by the MiniBooNE experiment. Looking towards the future, MicroBooNE will become a part of the \\textit{short-baseline neutrino} program which expands the physics capabilities of the BNB in many important ways by adding additional LArTPC detectors to search for light sterile neutrinos and bring a definitive resolution to the set of existing experimental anomalies. This paper will give an overview of...

  18. Sensitivity analysis of GSI based mechanical characterization of rock mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ván, P

    2012-01-01

    Recently, the rock mechanical and rock engineering designs and calculations are frequently based on Geological Strength Index (GSI) method, because it is the only system that provides a complete set of mechanical properties for design purpose. Both the failure criteria and the deformation moduli of the rock mass can be calculated with GSI based equations, which consists of the disturbance factor, as well. The aim of this paper is the sensitivity analysis of GSI and disturbance factor dependent equations that characterize the mechanical properties of rock masses. The survey of the GSI system is not our purpose. The results show that the rock mass strength calculated by the Hoek-Brown failure criteria and both the Hoek-Diederichs and modified Hoek-Diederichs deformation moduli are highly sensitive to changes of both the GSI and the D factor, hence their exact determination is important for the rock engineering design.

  19. United States National Waste Terminal Storage argillaceous rock studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brunton, G.D.

    1981-01-01

    The past and present argillaceous rock studies for the US National Waste Terminal Storage Program consist of: (1) evaluation of the geological characteristics of several widespread argillaceous formations in the United States; (2) laboratory studies of the physical and chemical properties of selected argillaceous rock samples; and (3) two full-scale in situ surface heater experiments that simulate the emplacement of heat-generating radioactive waste in argillaceous rock.

  20. Velocity and attenuation in partially molten rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mavko, G.M.

    1980-10-10

    Interpretation of seismic velocity and attenuation in partially molten rocks has been limited, with few exceptions, to models that assume the melt to be distributed either as spheres or as thin films. However, other melt phase geometries, such as interconnected tubes along grain edges, might equally well account for seismic observations if there is a much larger fraction of melt. Seismic velocity and attenuation are estimated in rocks in which the melt phase has the tube geometry, and the results are compared with results expected for the more familiar film model under similar conditions. For a given melt fraction, tubes are found to give moduli intermediate between moduli for rigid spherical inclusions and compliant films. For example, in polycrystalline olivine at 20 kbar the model predicts a decrease in V/sub s/ of 10% and a decrease in V/sub p/ of 5% at 0.05 melt fraction, without considering inelastic relaxation. Shear attenuation appears to be dominated by viscous flow of melt between the tubes and/or films. For olivine the tube model predicts the increment of relaxation due to melt, ..delta mu../..mu.., to be 0.01 at 0.05 melt fraction. Relaxation of the bulk modulus is dominated by flow between melt pockets of different shape, heat flow, and solid-melt phase change. If melt is present, considerable bulk attenuation is expected, although the relaxation may be observable only at long periods, outside the seismic body wave band.

  1. Elastic properties of saturated porous rocks with aligned fractures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2003-12-02

    of fluid properties on seismic characteristics. ... C. C. A . The host rock is permeated by a set of parallel fractures which are ..... Similar behaviour is ..... Page 14 ...

  2. Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Analysis- Rock Activity Date - 1995 Usefulness could be useful with more improvements DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis The study utilizes the fission-track dating method...

  3. Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Rock Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References Hisatoshi Ito, Kazuhiro Tanaka (1995) Insights On The...

  4. Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technique Isotopic Analysis- Rock Activity Date 1989 - 2000 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis The purpose of this study was to analyze deep core...

  5. Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Isotopic Analysis- Rock Activity Date - 2004 Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis The study was undertaken to refine understanding of...

  6. Stress and fault rock controls on fault zone hydrology, Coso...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    fault zone hydrology, Coso geothermal field, CA Abstract In crystalline rock of the Coso Geothermal Field, CA, fractures are the primary source of permeability. At reservoir...

  7. Lithology and alteration mineralogy of reservoir rocks at Coso...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in the overlying metamorphic rock acts as a cap to the productive zone and inhibits vertical movement of the geothermal fluids above the main upwelling zone. The upwelling...

  8. Lithology and Alteration Mineralogy of Reservoir Rocks at Coso...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in the overlying metamorphic rock acts as a cap to the productive zone and inhibits vertical movement of the geothermal fluids above the main upwelling zone. The upwelling...

  9. Carbon Dioxide Geological Sequestration in Fractured Porous Rocks

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Training and Research on Probabilistic Hydro-Thermo-Mechanical Modeling of Carbon Dioxide Geological Sequestration in Fractured Porous Rocks Gutierrez, Marte 54 ENVIRONMENTAL...

  10. Fractured rock stress-permeability relationships from in situ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Fractured rock stress-permeability relationships from in situ data and effects of temperature and chemical-mechanical couplings Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Fractured...

  11. Fundamental Research on Percussion Drilling: Improved rock mechanics...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Fundamental Research on Percussion Drilling: Improved rock mechanics analysis, advanced simulation technology, and full-scale laboratory investigations Citation Details In-Document...

  12. Seepage into drifts in unsaturated fractured rock at Yucca Mountain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birkholzer, Jens; Li, Guomin; Tsang, Chin-Fu; Tsang, Yvonne

    1998-01-01

    Fractured Rock at Yucca Mountain Jens Birkholzer, Guomin Lrepository site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as it is locatedclimate conditions at Yucca Mountain. The numerical study is

  13. Rock Sampling At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    geologically mapped the target area, obtained rock samples for age dating and mineral chemistry, performed gravity and magnetic surveys, and integrated these results to identify...

  14. Scientists Pass Solid Particles Through Rock in DOE-Sponsored...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    rock fractures in the laboratory. This technology has the potential for mapping fracture systems in detail and aid in determining reservoir characteristics. This research was...

  15. Carbonation Mechanism of Reservoir Rock by Supercritical Carbon...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technologies Project Type Topic 2 Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Reservoir Rock Chemical Interactions Project Description Supercritical CO2 is currently becoming a more...

  16. Elemental composition of two cumulate rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naeem, A.; Almohandis, A.A.

    1983-04-01

    Two cumulate rock samples K-185, K-250 from the Kapalagulu intrusion, W. Tanzania, were analyzed using X-ray fluorescence (XRF), wet chemical and neutron activation analysis (NAA) techniques. Major element oxides were determined by XRF and wet chemical methods, while the concentration of trace elements were measured by NAA, using high resolution Ge(Li) detector, minicomputer-based data acquisition system and off-line computer. The percentage of major oxides and sixteen trace elements have been reported. It has been found that Cr, Ni, and Co are highly concentrated in K-250 while Sc, and most of the major elements are more concentrated in K-185. The variation of major and trace elements in these two samples have been discussed.

  17. PTYS 109 LAB EXPLORATION AND DISCOVERY IN PLANETARY SCIENCE ROCKS AND MINERALS 133

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Barbara Anne

    PTYS 109 LAB EXPLORATION AND DISCOVERY IN PLANETARY SCIENCE ROCKS AND MINERALS 133 Rocks and Minerals I. OBJECTIVES One of the many ways to study Earth is by examining the rocks that make up its types of rocks and minerals; · determine the formation and the history of each rock and mineral; · infer

  18. Experience with in situ measurement of rock deformability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bieniawski, Z.T.

    1981-07-01

    Although in situ tests have the advantage of involving a large volume or rock tested under the same environmental conditions as are prevailing in the rock mass, such tests are expensive and time consuming. In addition, there are a number of controversial questions pertinent to in situ tests.

  19. Geophysical detection and structural characterization of discontinuities in rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Geophysical detection and structural characterization of discontinuities in rock slopes (J. Deparis geophysical methods (seismic, electric and electromagnetic) are available to address this problem, differing and geophysical methods for characterizing the rock mass. Section 2 is dedicated to a review of the main

  20. Carbonation Mechanism of Reservoir Rock by Supercritical Carbon Dioxide

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project Objectives: Elucidate comprehensively the carbonation reaction mechanisms between supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) and reservoir rocks consisting of different mineralogical compositions in aqueous and non-aqueous environments at temperatures of up to 250ºC, and to develop chemical modeling of CO2-reservior rock interactions.

  1. RUPTURE BY DAMAGE ACCUMULATION IN ROCKS David Amitrano

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    RUPTURE BY DAMAGE ACCUMULATION IN ROCKS David Amitrano LIRIGM, Université J. Fourier, Grenoble of rocks is associated with microcracks nucleation and propagation, i.e. damage. The accumulation of damage as strength and modulus. The damage process can be studied both statically by direct observation of thin

  2. SEISMIC AND ROCK PHYSICS DIAGNOSTICS OF MULTISCALE RESERVOIR TEXTURES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Mavko

    2003-06-30

    As part of our study on ''Relationships between seismic properties and rock microstructure'', we have studied (1) Effects of pore texture on porosity, permeability, and sonic velocity. We show how a relation can be found between porosity, permeability, and velocity by separating the formations of rocks with similar pore textures.

  3. Geological and mathematical framework for failure modes in granular rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borja, Ronaldo I.

    Geological and mathematical framework for failure modes in granular rock Atilla Aydina, *, Ronaldo I. Borjab , Peter Eichhubla,1 a Department of Geological and Environmental Sciences, Stanford processes in granular rock and provide a geological framework for the corresponding structures. We describe

  4. Rock to Regolith Earth's Critical Zone on Volcanic Ocean Islands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geist, Dennis

    increases monotonically towards surface #12;Frost creep transport Frequency and depth of freezing event (f in a landscape? (the w question) What governs the efficiency of regolith transport? (the Q question) What lens growth #12;Ice lenses in soils Ice lenses in rock Water freezing in soil and rocks Murton et al

  5. Consulting and short LSTAT PILLARS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Jesse

    with Master of Statistics UHasselt · Protocol agreement KU Leuven - UcL #12;Current Admission Committee · MiaLStat's Consulting and short courses #12;LSTAT PILLARS · Master of Science in Statistics Program's Education Master of Statistics and more #12;LStat and Education · Rooted in Research and Consulting · Varied

  6. Electromagnetic neutrino: a short review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander I. Studenikin

    2014-11-09

    A short review on selected issues related to the problem of neutrino electromagnetic properties is given. After a flash look at the theoretical basis of neutrino electromagnetic form factors, constraints on neutrino magnetic moments and electric millicharge from terrestrial experiments and astrophysical observations are discussed. We also focus on some recent studies of the problem and on perspectives.

  7. SHORT REVIEW Butterfly genomics eclosing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beldade, Patrícia

    SHORT REVIEW Butterfly genomics eclosing P Beldade1 , WO McMillan2 and A Papanicolaou3 1 Section to an explosion of genomic data and the emergence of new research avenues. Evolutionary and ecological functional genomics, with its focus on the genes that affect ecological success and adaptation in natural populations

  8. University Policy Process Short Version

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rev. 5/09 University Policy Process Short Version Conduct Analysis Draft Documents Get Approvals. Identify policy owner 3. Assemble team 4. Engage Stakeholders 5. Draft policy 6. Submit proposed policy approves (or not) Do we need a policy? 11. Plan communication & training 12. UPO posts approved policy

  9. Modeling of coupled thermodynamic and geomechanical performance of underground compressed air energy storage (CAES) in lined rock caverns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutqvist, J.

    2013-01-01

    compressed air energy storage (CAES) in lined rock cavernsCompressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) in Lined Rock Cavernscompressed air energy storage (CAES) in concrete-lined rock

  10. GEOCHEMICAL INVESTIGATIONS OF CO?-BRINE-ROCK INTERACTIONS OF THE KNOX GROUP IN THE ILLINOIS BASIN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoksoulian, Lois; Berger, Peter; Freiburg, Jared; Butler, Shane; Leetaru, Hannes

    2014-09-30

    Increased output of greenhouse gases, particularly carbon dioxide (CO?), into the atmosphere from anthropogenic sources is of great concern. A potential technology to reduce CO? emissions is geologic carbon sequestration. This technology is currently being evaluated in the United States and throughout the world. The geology of the Illinois Basin exhibits outstanding potential as a carbon sequestration target, as demonstrated by the ongoing Illinois Basin – Decatur Project that is using the Mt. Simon Sandstone reservoir and Eau Claire Shale seal system to store and contain 1 million tonnes of CO?. The Knox Group-Maquoketa Shale reservoir and seal system, located stratigraphically above the Mt. Simon Sandstone-Eau Claire Shale reservoir and seal system, has little economic value as a resource for fossil fuels or as a potable water source, making it ideal as a potential carbon sequestration target. In order for a reservoir-seal system to be effective, it must be able to contain the injected CO? without the potential for the release of harmful contaminants liberated by the reaction between CO?-formation fluids and reservoir and seal rocks. This study examines portions of the Knox Group (Potosi Dolomite, Gunter Sandstone, New Richmond Sandstone) and St. Peter Sandstone, and Maquoketa Shale from various locations around the Illinois Basin. A total of 14 rock and fluid samples were exposed to simulated sequestration conditions (9101–9860 kPa [1320–1430 psi] and 32°–42°C [90°– 108°F]) for varying amounts of time (6 hours to 4 months). Knox Group reservoir rocks exhibited dissolution of dolomite in the presence of CO? as indicated by petrographic examination, X-ray diffraction analysis, and fluid chemistry analysis. These reactions equilibrated rapidly, and geochemical modeling confirmed that these reactions reached equilibrium within the time frames of the experiments. Pre-reaction sample mineralogy and postreaction fluid geochemistry from this study suggests only limited potential for the release of United States Environmental Protection Agency regulated inorganic contaminants into potable water sources. Short-term core flood experiments further verify that the carbonate reactions occurring in Knox Group reservoir samples reach equilibrium rapidly. The core flood experiments also lend insight to pressure changes that may occur during CO? injection. The Maquoketa Shale experiments reveal that this rock is initially chemically reactive when in contact with CO? and brine. However, due to the conservative nature of silicate and clay reaction kinetics and the rapid equilibration of carbonate reactions that occur in the shale, these reactions would not present a significant risk to the competency of the shale as an effective seal rock.

  11. LABORATORY INVESTIGATIONS ON THE HYDRAULIC AND THERMOMECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF FRACTURED CRYSTALLINE ROCKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Witherspoon, P.A.

    2010-01-01

    PROPERTIES OF FRACTURED CRYSTALLINE ROCKS P. A. W i t h e ring of the behavior of crystalline rocks under the influencein Mined Caverns in Crystalline Rock^ ) of LBL. STRESS-FLOW

  12. Evaluation of Five Sedimentary Rocks Other Than Salt for Geologic Repository Siting Purposes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Croff, A.G.; Lomenick, T.F.; Lowrie, R.S.; Stow, S.H.

    2003-11-15

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), in order to increase the diversity of rock types under consideration by the geologic disposal program, initiated the Sedimary ROck Program (SERP), whose immediate objectiv eis to evaluate five types of secimdnary rock - sandstone, chalk, carbonate rocks (limestone and dolostone), anhydrock, and shale - to determine the potential for siting a geologic repository. The evaluation of these five rock types, together with the ongoing salt studies, effectively results in the consideration of all types of relatively impermeable sedimentary rock for repository purposes. The results of this evaluation are expressed in terms of a ranking of the five rock types with respect to their potential to serve as a geologic repository host rock. This comparative evaluation was conducted on a non-site-specific basis, by use of generic information together with rock evaluation criteria (RECs) derived from the DOE siting guidelines for geologic repositories (CFR 1984). An information base relevant to rock evaluation using these RECs was developed in hydrology, geochemistry, rock characteristics (rock occurrences, thermal response, rock mechanics), natural resources, and rock dissolution. Evaluation against postclosure and preclosure RECs yielded a ranking of the five subject rocks with respect to their potential as repository host rocks. Shale was determined to be the most preferred of the five rock types, with sandstone a distant second, the carbonate rocks and anhydrock a more distant third, and chalk a relatively close fourth.

  13. Seismic and Acoustic Investigations of Rock Fall Initiation, Processes, and Mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zimmer, Valerie Louise

    2011-01-01

    Seismic  and  Acoustic  Investigations  of  Rock  Fall  Initiation,  Processes,  Seismic  and  Acoustic  Investigations  of  Rock  Fall  Initiation,  Processes,  other  seismic  sources  was  an  iterative  process.    

  14. CORROSION OF ALUMINUM CLAD SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL IN THE 70 TON CASK DURING TRANSFER FROM L AREA TO H-CANYON

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mickalonis, J.

    2014-06-01

    Aluminum-clad spent nuclear fuel will be transported for processing in the 70-ton nuclear fuel element cask from L Basin to H-canyon. During transport these fuels would be expected to experience high temperature aqueous corrosion from the residual L Basin water that will be present in the cask. Cladding corrosion losses during transport were calculated for material test reactor (MTR) and high flux isotope reactors (HFIR) fuels using literature and site information on aqueous corrosion at a range of time/temperature conditions. Calculations of the cladding corrosion loss were based on Arrhenius relationships developed for aluminum alloys typical of cladding material with the primary assumption that an adherent passive film does not form to retard the initial corrosion rate. For MTR fuels a cladding thickness loss of 33 % was found after 1 year in the cask with a maximum temperature of 260 {degrees}C. HFIR fuels showed a thickness loss of only 6% after 1 year at a maximum temperature of 180 {degrees}C. These losses are not expected to impact the overall confinement function of the aluminum cladding.

  15. Characterising and modelling the excavation damaged zone (EDZ) in crystalline rock in the context of radioactive waste disposal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hudson, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    Institute of Rock and Soil Mechanics, Chinese Academy ofis designed for rock and soil mechanics. In a TOUGH-FLAC

  16. Characterizing Flow in Oil Reservoir Rock Using Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holmes, David W.

    In this paper, a 3D Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) simulator for modeling grain scale fluid flow in porous rock is presented. The versatility of the SPH method has driven its use in increasingly complex areas of flow ...

  17. Comparative Records of Time Nature of the rock record

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polly, David

    : sequence stratigraphy · temporal excursions and sequential changes in chemical characteristicsComparative Records of Time · Nature of the rock record · principles of stratigraphy: · deposition of StratigraphyPrinciples of Stratigraphy continuous deposition erosion for 50 years renewed deposition 100 years

  18. The Effect of Heterogeneity on Matrix Acidizing of Carbonate Rocks 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keys, Ryan S.

    2010-07-14

    In matrix acidizing, the goal is to dissolve minerals in the rock to increase well productivity. This is accomplished by injecting an application-specific solution of acid into the formation at a pressure between the pore ...

  19. Zeolitization Of Intracaldera Sediments And Rhyolitic Rocks In...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    New Mexico, USA Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Zeolitization Of Intracaldera Sediments And Rhyolitic Rocks In The 1.25 Ma...

  20. ELECTRON HOLOGRAPHY OF NANOMAGNETS IN ROCKS AND BACTERIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    ELECTRON HOLOGRAPHY OF NANOMAGNETS IN ROCKS AND BACTERIA Rafal E. Dunin-Borkowski1 , Richard J-reversed thermo-remanent magnetization. #12;Magnetotactic bacteria provide the simplest example of the use

  1. Acid Fracture and Fracture Conductivity Study of Field Rock Samples 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Underwood, Jarrod

    2013-11-15

    Acid fracturing is a well stimulation strategy designed to increase the productivity of a producing well. The parameters of acid fracturing and the effects of acid interaction on specific rock samples can be studied experimentally. Acid injection...

  2. Geochemical Data on Waters, Gases, Scales, and Rocks from the...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geochemical Data on Waters, Gases, Scales, and Rocks from the Dixie Valley Region, Nevada (1996-1999) Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report:...

  3. SEISMIC AND ROCK PHYSICS DIAGNOSTICS OF MULTISCALE RESERVOIR TEXTURES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Mavko

    2003-06-01

    As part of our study on ''Relationships between seismic properties and rock microstructure'', we have studied (1) Elastic properties of clay minerals using Pulse Transmission experiments. We show measurements of elastic moduli and strain in clay minerals.

  4. Rock Hill Utilities- Water Heater and Heat Pump Rebate Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Through the SmartChoice program, Rock Hill Utilities offers rebates for water heater and heat pump replacements. Information on financing for heat pumps can also be found on the web site listed...

  5. Drilling Complete on Australian Hot Dry Rock Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The first commercial attempt to create a commercial geothermal power plant using hot dry rock technology reached a crucial milestone on January 22, when a production well successfully reached its target depth.

  6. Project Reports for Standing Rock Sioux Tribe- 2011 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Standing Rock Sioux Tribe's (SRST) cultural identity demands that tribal development occur in a sustainable manner and in a manner protective of the tribe's natural resources to preserve them for following generations.

  7. Zeolitization Of Intracaldera Sediments And Rhyolitic Rocks In...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zeolitization Of Intracaldera Sediments And Rhyolitic Rocks In The 1.25 Ma Lake Of Valles Caldera, New Mexico, Usa Abstract Quantitative X-ray diffraction analysis of about 80...

  8. Modeling of Seismic Signatures of Carbonate Rock Types 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jan, Badr H.

    2011-02-22

    Carbonate reservoirs of different rock types have wide ranges of porosity and permeability, creating zones with different reservoir quality and flow properties. This research addresses how seismic technology can be used to identify different...

  9. Rock glacier monitoring with low-cost GPS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    moving stations on rock glacier Low-cost L1 GPS receivers (blox) Power source: solar panels Local data Rock glacier GPS antennaGPS antenna Solar panelSolar panel Box incl.Box incl. -GPS receiverData logger Instruments Solar panelSolar panel (24W, 12V, 50x50cm)(24W, 12V, 50x50cm) Costs per station: 2

  10. On Storage Rings for Short Wavelength FELs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chattopadhyay, S.

    2010-01-01

    for a hypothetical 144 m long storage ring optimized for FELin the Proceedings On Storage Rings for Short WavelengthLBL-28483 ESG Note-92 ON STORAGE RINGS FOR SHORT WAVELENGTH

  11. Estimating seismic velocities at ultrasonic frequencies in partially saturated rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mavko, G.; Nolen-Hoeksema, R. (Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Geophysics)

    1994-02-01

    Seismic velocities in rocks at ultrasonic frequencies depend not only on the degree of saturation but also on the distribution of the fluid phase at various scales within the pore space. Two scales of saturation heterogeneity are important: (1) saturation differences between thin compliant pores and larger stiffer pores, and (2) differences between saturated patches and undersaturated patches at a scale much larger than any pore. The authors propose a formalism for predicting the range of velocities in partially saturated rocks that avoids assuming idealized pore shapes by using measured dry rock velocity versus pressure and dry rock porosity versus pressure. The pressure dependence contains all of the necessary information about the distribution of pore compliance for estimating effects of saturation at the finest scales where small amounts of fluid in the thinnest, most compliant parts of the pore space stiffen the rock in both compression and shear (increasing both P- and S-wave velocities) in approximately the same way that confining pressure stiffens the rock by closing the compliant pores. Large-scale saturation patches tend to increase only the high-frequency bulk modulus by amounts roughly proportional to the saturation. The pore-scale effects will be most important at laboratory and logging frequencies when pore-scale pore pressure gradients are unrelaxed. The patchy-saturation effects can persist even at seismic field frequencies if the patch sizes are sufficiently large and the diffusivities are sufficiently low for the larger-scale pressure gradients to be unrelaxed.

  12. Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979 1.988 1.996 2.003 1990-2016November3 1 Short-Term (83/3Q)

  13. Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979 1.988 1.996 2.003 1990-2016November3 1 Short-Term

  14. Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979 1.988 1.996 2.003 1990-2016November3 1 Short-Termand

  15. Gasoline prices decrease (Short version)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural GasNatural GasEIA lowerslong version) GasolineShort version)

  16. Drop short control of electrode gap

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fisher, Robert W. (Albuquerque, NM); Maroone, James P. (Albuquerque, NM); Tipping, Donald W. (Albuquerque, NM); Zanner, Frank J. (Sandia Park, NM)

    1986-01-01

    During vacuum consumable arc remelting the electrode gap between a consumable electrode and a pool of molten metal is difficult to control. The present invention monitors drop shorts by detecting a decrease in the voltage between the consumable electrode and molten pool. The drop shorts and their associated voltage reductions occur as repetitive pulses which are closely correlated to the electrode gap. Thus, the method and apparatus of the present invention controls electrode gap based upon drop shorts detected from the monitored anode-cathode voltage. The number of drop shorts are accumulated, and each time the number of drop shorts reach a predetermined number, the average period between drop shorts is calculated from this predetermined number and the time in which this number is accumulated. This average drop short period is used in a drop short period electrode gap model which determines the actual electrode gap from the drop short. The actual electrode gap is then compared with a desired electrode gap which is selected to produce optimum operating conditions and the velocity of the consumable error is varied based upon the gap error. The consumable electrode is driven according to any prior art system at this velocity. In the preferred embodiment, a microprocessor system is utilized to perform the necessary calculations and further to monitor the duration of each drop short. If any drop short exceeds a preset duration period, the consumable electrode is rapidly retracted a predetermined distance to prevent bonding of the consumable electrode to the molten remelt.

  17. Environmental assessment of remedial action at the slick rock Uranium Mill Tailings sites Slick Rock, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (42 USC {section} 7901 et seq.), hereafter referred to as the UMTRCA, authorized the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to clean up two uranium mill tailings processing sites near Slick Rock, Colorado, in San Miguel County. The purpose of the cleanup is to reduce the potential health effects associated with the radioactive materials remaining on the sites and on vicinity properties (VPs) associated with the sites. Contaminated materials cover an estimated 55 acres of the Union Carbide (UC) processing site and 12 ac of the North Continent (NC) processing site. The total estimated volume of contaminated materials is approximately 61 8,300 cubic yards. In addition to the contamination in the two processing site areas, four VPs were found to contain contamination. As a result of the tailings being exposed to the environment, contamination associated with the UC and NC sites has leached into shallow ground water. Surface water has not been affected. The closest residence is approximately 0.3 air mi from either site. The proposed action is to remediate the UC and NC sites by removing all contaminated materials within the designated site boundaries or otherwise associated with the sites, and relocating them to, and stabilizing them at, a location approximately 5 road mi (8 km) northeast of the sites on land administered by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM). Remediation would be performed by the DOE`s Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. All solid contaminated materials would be buried under 5 feet (ft) of rock and soil materials. The proposed disposal site area is currently used by ranchers for cattle grazing over a 7-month period. The closest residence to the proposed disposal site is 2 air mi. An estimated 44 ac of land would be permanently transferred from the BLM to the DOE and restricted from future use.

  18. H.R.G.K. Hack. Slopes in rock. An overview of engineering geology in the Netherlands. pp. 111-119 SLOPES IN ROCK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hack, Robert

    H.R.G.K. Hack. Slopes in rock. An overview of engineering geology in the Netherlands. pp. 111-119 SLOPES IN ROCK H.R.G.K. Hack ITC (Int.Inst. for Aerospace Survey and Earth Sciences), Section Engineering 'the rock is hard' (normally meaning: do not bother with further study because 111 #12;H.R.G.K. Hack

  19. Proceedings of the scientific visit on crystalline rock repository development.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mariner, Paul E.; Hardin, Ernest L.; Miksova, Jitka

    2013-02-01

    A scientific visit on Crystalline Rock Repository Development was held in the Czech Republic on September 24-27, 2012. The visit was hosted by the Czech Radioactive Waste Repository Authority (RAWRA), co-hosted by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), and supported by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The purpose of the visit was to promote technical information exchange between participants from countries engaged in the investigation and exploration of crystalline rock for the eventual construction of nuclear waste repositories. The visit was designed especially for participants of countries that have recently commenced (or recommenced) national repository programmes in crystalline host rock formations. Discussion topics included repository programme development, site screening and selection, site characterization, disposal concepts in crystalline host rock, regulatory frameworks, and safety assessment methodology. Interest was surveyed in establishing a %E2%80%9Cclub,%E2%80%9D the mission of which would be to identify and address the various technical challenges that confront the disposal of radioactive waste in crystalline rock environments. The idea of a second scientific visit to be held one year later in another host country received popular support. The visit concluded with a trip to the countryside south of Prague where participants were treated to a tour of the laboratory and underground facilities of the Josef Regional Underground Research Centre.

  20. Analysis of compressive fracture in rock using statistical techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blair, S.C.

    1994-12-01

    Fracture of rock in compression is analyzed using a field-theory model, and the processes of crack coalescence and fracture formation and the effect of grain-scale heterogeneities on macroscopic behavior of rock are studied. The model is based on observations of fracture in laboratory compression tests, and incorporates assumptions developed using fracture mechanics analysis of rock fracture. The model represents grains as discrete sites, and uses superposition of continuum and crack-interaction stresses to create cracks at these sites. The sites are also used to introduce local heterogeneity. Clusters of cracked sites can be analyzed using percolation theory. Stress-strain curves for simulated uniaxial tests were analyzed by studying the location of cracked sites, and partitioning of strain energy for selected intervals. Results show that the model implicitly predicts both development of shear-type fracture surfaces and a strength-vs-size relation that are similar to those observed for real rocks. Results of a parameter-sensitivity analysis indicate that heterogeneity in the local stresses, attributed to the shape and loading of individual grains, has a first-order effect on strength, and that increasing local stress heterogeneity lowers compressive strength following an inverse power law. Peak strength decreased with increasing lattice size and decreasing mean site strength, and was independent of site-strength distribution. A model for rock fracture based on a nearest-neighbor algorithm for stress redistribution is also presented and used to simulate laboratory compression tests, with promising results.

  1. Minimize Boiler Short Cycling Losses | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Minimize Boiler Short Cycling Losses Minimize Boiler Short Cycling Losses This tip sheet on minimizing boiler short cycling losses provides how-to advice for improving industrial...

  2. Superhard nanophase cutter materials for rock drilling applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voronov, O.; Tompa, G.; Sadangi, R.; Kear, B.; Wilson, C.; Yan, P.

    2000-06-23

    The Low Pressure-High Temperature (LPHT) System has been developed for sintering of nanophase cutter and anvil materials. Microstructured and nanostructured cutters were sintered and studied for rock drilling applications. The WC/Co anvils were sintered and used for development of High Pressure-High Temperature (HPHT) Systems. Binderless diamond and superhard nanophase cutter materials were manufactured with help of HPHT Systems. The diamond materials were studied for rock machining and drilling applications. Binderless Polycrystalline Diamonds (BPCD) have high thermal stability and can be used in geothermal drilling of hard rock formations. Nanophase Polycrystalline Diamonds (NPCD) are under study in precision machining of optical lenses. Triphasic Diamond/Carbide/Metal Composites (TDCC) will be commercialized in drilling and machining applications.

  3. Multiporosity Flow in Fractured Low-Permeability Rocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuhlman, Kristopher L; Heath, Jason E

    2015-01-01

    A multiporosity extension of classical double and triple porosity fractured rock flow models for slightly compressible fluids is presented. The multiporosity model is an adaptation of the multirate solute transport model of Haggerty and Gorelick (1995) to viscous flow in fractured rock reservoirs. It is a generalization of both pseudo-steady-state and transient interporosity flow double porosity models. The model includes a fracture continuum and an overlapping distribution of multiple rock matrix continua, whose fracture-matrix exchange coefficients are specified through a discrete probability mass function. Semi-analytical cylindrically symmetric solutions to the multiporosity mathematical model are developed using the Laplace transform to illustrate its behavior. The multiporosity model presented here is conceptually simple, yet flexible enough to simulate common conceptualizations of double and triple porosity flow. This combination of generality and simplicity makes the multiporosity model a good choice ...

  4. SEISMIC AND ROCK PHYSICS DIAGNOSTICS OF MULTISCALE RESERVOIR TEXTURES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Mavko

    2003-10-01

    As part of our study on ''Relationships between seismic properties and rock microstructure'', we have (1) Studied relationships between velocity and permeability. (2) Used independent experimental methods to measure the elastic moduli of clay minerals as functions of pressure and saturation. (3) Applied different statistical methods for characterizing heterogeneity and textures from scanning acoustic microscope (SAM) images of shale microstructures. (4) Analyzed the directional dependence of velocity and attenuation in different reservoir rocks (5) Compared Vp measured under hydrostatic and non-hydrostatic stress conditions in sands. (6) Studied stratification as a source of intrinsic anisotropy in sediments using Vp and statistical methods for characterizing textures in sands.

  5. Texas Watershed Planning Short Course Final Report 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagner, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    , 2007 to August 31, 2008. ?e Contractor Performance Evaluation Reports for year three was submitted to TCEQ on September 17, ? 2009. Texas Watershed Planning Short Course Methods & Results 14 Objective 2: Develop Training Materials and Educational... Program for Watershed Planning Short Course Goal: To develop training materials for Watershed Planning Short Course. Task 2.1 Compiled and Summarized Existing Programs ? TWRI collected and compiled information about existing training programs. Below...

  6. Modulation compression for short wavelength harmonic generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiang, J.

    2010-01-01

    Wavelength Harmonic Generation Ji Qiang Lawrence Berkeleyform a basis for fourth generation light source. Currently,e?ciency was proposed for generation of short wavelength

  7. Environmental assessment of remedial action at the Slick Rock uranium mill tailings sites, Slick Rock, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-01-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978, hereafter referred to as the UMTRCA, authorized the US Department of Energy (DOE) to clean up two uranium mill tailings processing sites near Slick Rock, Colorado, in San Miguel County. The purpose of the cleanup is to reduce the potential health effects associated with the radioactive materials remaining on the processing sites and on vicinity properties (VPs) associated with the sites. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) promulgated standards for the UMTRCA that contained measures to control the contaminated materials and to protect the ground water from further degradation. The sites contain concrete foundations of mill buildings, tailings piles, and areas contaminated by windblown and waterborne radioactive tailings materials. The proposed action is to remediate the UC and NC sites by removing all contaminated materials within the designated site boundaries or otherwise associated with the sites, and relocating them to, and stabilizing them at, a location approximately 5 road mi (8 km) northeast of the processing sites on land administered by the US Bureau of Land Management (BLM). Remediation would be performed by the DOE`s Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project.

  8. Hot dry rock energy: Hot dry rock geothermal development program. Progress report. Fiscal year 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salazar, J.; Brown, M. [eds.

    1995-03-01

    Extended flow testing at the Fenton Hill Hot Dry Rock (HDR) test facility concluded in Fiscal Year 1993 with the completion of Phase 2 of the long-term flow test (LTFT) program. As is reported in detail in this report, the second phase of the LTFT, although only 55 days in duration, confirmed in every way the encouraging test results of the 112-day Phase I LTFT carried out in Fiscal Year 1992. Interim flow testing was conducted early in FY 1993 during the period between the two LTFT segments. In addition, two brief tests involving operation of the reservoir on a cyclic schedule were run at the end of the Phase 2 LTFT. These interim and cyclic tests provided an opportunity to conduct evaluations and field demonstrations of several reservoir engineering concepts that can now be applied to significantly increase the productivity of HDR systems. The Fenton Hill HDR test facility was shut down and brought into standby status during the last part of FY 1993. Unfortunately, the world`s largest, deepest, and most productive HDR reservoir has gone essentially unused since that time.

  9. Onboard Autonomous Rock Shape Analysis For Mars Rovers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in this process, we present an automated technique to allow a rover to classify the shape and other geologic were conducted by characterizing the two-dimensional rock shape while the three-dimensional shape developed and implemented. The per- formance of each measure was characterized by analyzing images from

  10. Rheological properties of minerals and rocks Shun-ichiro Karato

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Rheological properties of minerals and rocks Shun-ichiro Karato Yale University Department Earth" (edited by S. Karato) Wiley-Blackwell #12; 2 SUMMARY Plastic deformation in Earth and planetary. The rheological properties in the upper mantle are controlled mostly by temperature, pressure and water content

  11. A Holocene lacustrine rock platform around Storavatnet, Ostery, western

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fossen, Haakon

    structures, and the time and mode of formation. Location Osterøy Island is at 60 300 N, just inland from, western Norway. The lake was converted to a reservoir in 1920 and therefore is subject to frequent changes Zealand, with an oceanic climate, Allen et al. (2002) interpreted the formation of a lacustrine rock

  12. Controlled Rocking Approach for the Seismic Resistance of Structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruneau, Michel

    for the design of a single bridge pier for a specified seismic demand and set of capacity protection limitsControlled Rocking Approach for the Seismic Resistance of Structures Michael POLLINO and Michel response that can allow the system to self-center after the excitation ceases. This approach to seismic

  13. SEISMIC AND ROCK PHYSICS DIAGNOSTICS OF MULTISCALE RESERVOIR TEXTURES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Mavko

    2004-08-01

    As part of our study on ''Relationships between seismic properties and rock microstructure'', we have continued our work on analyzing well logs and microstructural constraints on seismic signatures. We report results of three studies in this report. The first one deals with fractures and faults that provide the primary control on the underground fluid flow through low permeability massive carbonate rocks. Fault cores often represent lower transmissibility whereas the surrounding damaged rocks and main slip surfaces are high transmissibility elements. We determined the physical properties of fault rocks collected in and around the fault cores of large normal faults in central Italy. After studying the P- and S-wave velocity variation during cycles of confining pressure, we conclude that a rigid pore frame characterizes the fault gouge whereas the fractured limestone comprises pores with a larger aspect ratio. The second study was to characterize the seismic properties of brine as its temperature decreases from 25 C to -21 C. The purpose was to understand how the transmitted wave changes with the onset of freezing. The main practical reason for this experiment was to use partially frozen brine as an analogue for a mixture of methane hydrate and water present in the pore space of a gas hydrate reservoir. In the third study we analyzed variations in dynamic moduli in various carbonate reservoirs. The investigations include log and laboratory data from velocity, porosity, permeability, and attenuation measurements.

  14. Fluid Migration During Ice/Rock Planetesimal Differentiation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raney, Robert 1987-

    2012-12-12

    fast melt water can segregate from the core of an ice-rich planetesimal. To answer this question we treat the core as two phase flow problem: a compacting viscous “solid” (ice/rock mixture) and a segregating liquid (melt water). The model developed...

  15. Rock dilation, nonlinear deformation, and pore pressure change under shear

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyakhovsky, Vladimir

    Rock dilation, nonlinear deformation, and pore pressure change under shear Yariv Hamiel a criterion and pore pressure response to a fault slip. We investigate the poroelastic response of two an increase of pore pressure with mean stress (according to Skempton coefficient B) under undrained conditions

  16. Colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport in fractured porous rock 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baek, Inseok

    1994-01-01

    phase, a carrier phase, and a stationary solid phase. In the basic model, one-dimensional advection in a single planar fracture of infinite extent is coupled with diffusion in the rock matrix perpendicular to the fracture. In this study, a full...

  17. Technical Note Evaluation of mechanical rock properties using a Schmidt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ze'ev, Reches

    December 1999 1. Introduction The Schmidt Hammer was developed in 1948 for non-destructive testing±6]. Such fast, non-destructive and in situ evaluations of rock mechanical parameters reduce the expenses for sample collection and laboratory testing. Consequently, the mechanical parameters can be deter- mined

  18. Overview of conservation treatments applied to rock glyph archaeological sites 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dandridge, Debra E

    2000-01-01

    . Conservation efforts to save the world's ancient rock glyphs have been approached from a scientific basis for only the last twenty-five years. Many site managers, both private and public, have little knowledge of, or training in, the use of treatments that can...

  19. Used Fuel Disposal in Crystalline Rocks. FY15 Progress Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Yifeng

    2015-08-20

    The objective of the Crystalline Disposal R&D Work Package is to advance our understanding of longterm disposal of used fuel in crystalline rocks and to develop necessary experimental and computational capabilities to evaluate various disposal concepts in such media.

  20. WATERJET ASSISTED POLYCRYSTALLINE DIAMOND INDENTATION DRILLING OF ROCK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    improved drilling rates can provide a significant benefit, justifying the costs and effort required both of drilling and completions of the wells can account for 25 ­ 50% of the cost of the electricity whichWATERJET ASSISTED POLYCRYSTALLINE DIAMOND INDENTATION DRILLING OF ROCK Santi, P, Bell, S

  1. Process of breaking and rendering permeable a subterranean rock mass

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lekas, Mitchell A. (Concord, CA)

    1980-01-01

    The process of the present invention involves the following steps: producing, as by hydrofracing, a substantially horizontal fracture in the subterranean rock mass to be processed; emplacing an explosive charge in the mass in spaced juxtaposed position to the fracture; enlarging the fracture to create a void space thereat, an initial lifting of the overburden, and to provide a free face juxtaposed to and arranged to cooperate with the emplaced explosive charge; and exploding the charge against the free face for fragmenting the rock and to distribute the space, thus providing fractured, pervious, rubble-ized rock in an enclosed subterranean chamber. Firing of the charge provides a further lifting of the overburden, an enlargement of the chamber and a larger void space to distribute throughout the rubble-ized rock within the chamber. In some forms of the invention an explosive charge is used to produce a transitory enlargement of the fracture, and the juxtaposed emplaced charge is fired during the critical period of enlargement of the fracture.

  2. Columbia River Channel Improvement Project Rock Removal Blasting: Monitoring Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, Thomas J.; Johnson, Gary E.

    2010-01-29

    This document provides a monitoring plan to evaluate take as outlined in the National Marine Fisheries Service 2002 Biological Opinion for underwater blasting to remove rock from the navigation channel for the Columbia River Channel Improvement Project. The plan was prepared by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Portland District.

  3. Reduction of VOC emissions from metal dip coating applications -- Canam Steel Corporation Point of Rocks, MD case study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monfet, J.P.

    1997-12-31

    The reduction of VOC emissions from metal dip coating applications is not an environmental constraint, it is an economic opportunity. This case study shows how the industry can reap economic benefits from VOC reductions while improving air quality. The Canam Steel Corporation plant located in Point of Rocks, MD operates dip tanks for primer application on fabricated steel joists and joist girders. This process is presently subject to a regulation that limits the paint VOC content to 3.5 pounds per gallon of coating less water. As a result of the high paint viscosity associated with that regulation, the paint thickness of the dipped steel is thicker than the customers` specifications. Most of the VOC emissions can therefore be associated with the excess of paint applied to the products rather than to the required thickness of the coating. The higher paint usage rate has more than environmental consequences, it increases the cost of the applied coating. The project is to reduce the paint usage by controlling the viscosity of the coating in the tank. Experimental results as well as actual mass balance calculations show that using a higher VOC content paint would reduce the overall VOC emissions. The author explained the project to the Maryland Department of the Environment (MDE) Air and Radiation Management Administration. First, the MDE agreed to develop a new RACT determination for fabricated steel dipping operations. The new regulation would limit the amount of VOC than can be emitted to dip coat a ton of fabricated steel. Second, the MDE agreed to allow experimentation of the higher VOC content paint as a pilot project for the new regulation. This paper demonstrates the need for a RACT determination specific to fabricated steel dipping operations.

  4. Layered rocks beneath the Phanerozoic platform of the US midcontinent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hauser, E.C. (Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States))

    1991-03-01

    A thick sequence of layered rocks lies hidden beneath the Phanerozoic cover of the central US over large regions. A thick sequence of Precambrian layered rocks in imaged on the COCORP transect across southern Illinois and Indiana. The thickness of this layered sequence varies from 1-3 times the thickness of the overlying Phanerozoic section of the Illinois basin. The layered sequence is observed for close to 200 km in an east-west direction. Similar layered reflections are seen on the COCORP data from Hardeman Co., TX, and neighboring southwest Oklahoma. Both of these known occurrences lie within the region of the middle Proterozoic Granite/Rhyolite province of the US midcontinent, an area within which scattered wells to basement commonly encounter 1.3-1.5 Ga undeformed granite and/or compositionally similar rhyolite. Therefore, these layered assemblages may comprise a thick sequence of silicic volcanic and sedimentary rocks (perhaps also injected by mafic sills) between scattered volcanic-intrusive centers, such as exposed in the St. Francois Mountains of southeast Missouri. However, in places such as Illinois and Indiana, the near absence of deep wells leaves the possibility that the upper portion of these layered rocks may locally be of late Proterozoic or earliest Paleozoic age. The reprocessing of available industry data, analyzed in conjunction with the existing COCORP data, includes extended vibroseis correlation. These industry data are invaluable in the author's effort to expand the known distribution of these layered rocks (e.g., into north-central Illinois) and to map their structures.

  5. Tracer Fluid Flow through Porous Media: Theory Applied to Acid Stimulation Treatments in Carbonate Rocks 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zakaria Mohamed Reda, Ahmed

    2014-07-29

    Most carbonate rocks are heterogeneous at multiple length scales. These heterogeneities strongly influence the outcome of the acid stimulation treatments which are routinely performed to improve well productivity. At the pore scale, carbonate rocks...

  6. The Use of Random Forest in Rock-glacier Automatic Detection based on Satellite Imagery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freitas, Nando de

    and observed global warming (Barsch, 1996), rock-glaciers are46 also threatened by major human activities variables derived10 from remote sensing imagery, together with the truth label (presence/absence of rock-11

  7. Rock-Water Interactions in the Fenton Hill, New Mexico, Hot Dry...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Rock-Water Interactions in the Fenton Hill, New Mexico, Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems I. Fluid Mixing and Chemical Geothermometry Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference...

  8. Integration of Rock Physics and Seismic Inversion for Carbonate Reservoir Characterization 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Tingting

    2014-12-12

    Carbonate reservoir characterization based on rock physics and seismic inversion helps in better understanding the influence of deposition and diagenesis on rock property. In this dissertation, I first study a modern carbonate platform to understand...

  9. Nonlinear Elastic Wave Experiments: Learning About the Behavior of Rocks and Geomaterials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (historically) the macroscopic experiments that led to our cur- rent understanding of the peculiar nonlinearity of rocks were studied and all were found to be highly nonlinear; notably, sedimentary rocks (which are oil

  10. Geochemistry of silicate-rich rocks can curtail spreading of carbon dioxide in subsurface aquifers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cardoso, Silvana S. S.; Andres, J. T. H.

    2014-12-11

    in carbonate rocks the streaming of dissolved carbon dioxide persists, the chemical interactions in silicate-rich rocks may curb this transport drastically and even inhibit it altogether. These results challenge our view of carbon sequestration...

  11. Search for underground openings for in situ test facilities in crystalline rock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wollenberg, H.A.; Strisower, B.; Corrigan, D.J.; Graf, A.N.; O'Brien, M.T.; Pratt, H.; Board, M.; Hustrulid, W.

    1980-01-01

    With a few exceptions, crystalline rocks in this study were limited to plutonic rocks and medium to high-grade metamorphic rocks. Nearly 1700 underground mines, possibly occurring in crystalline rock, were initially identified. Application of criteria resulted in the identification of 60 potential sites. Within this number, 26 mines and 4 civil works were identified as having potential in that they fulfilled the criteria. Thirty other mines may have similar potential. Most of the mines identified are near the contact between a pluton and older sedimentary, volcanic and metamorphic rocks. However, some mines and the civil works are well within plutonic or metamorphic rock masses. Civil works, notably underground galleries associated with pumped storage hydroelectric facilities, are generally located in tectonically stable regions, in relatively homogeneous crystalline rock bodies. A program is recommended which would identify one or more sites where a concordance exists between geologic setting, company amenability, accessibility and facilities to conduct in situ tests in crystalline rock.

  12. Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    tons)",, "Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",4202,43 "Nitrogen oxide (short tons)",18043,37 "Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons)",3768,44 "Sulfur dioxide (lbsMWh)",1.3,29 "Nitrogen...

  13. Table 1. 2013 Summary Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    tons)",, "Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",6565,42 "Nitrogen oxide (short tons)",7627,46 "Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons)",1942,49 "Sulfur dioxide (lbsMWh)",0.9,37 "Nitrogen...

  14. Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    tons)",, "Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",2241,47 "Nitrogen oxide (short tons)",2585,48 "Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons)",4722,43 "Sulfur dioxide (lbsMWh)",0.6,40 "Nitrogen...

  15. Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    tons)",, "Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",2109,48 "Nitrogen oxide (short tons)",96842,5 "Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons)",57323,13 "Sulfur dioxide (lbsMWh)",0,49 "Nitrogen...

  16. Table 1. 2013 Summary Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    tons)",, "Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",71,50 "Nitrogen oxide (short tons)",792,50 "Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons)",15,51 "Sulfur dioxide (lbsMWh)",0,50 "Nitrogen oxide...

  17. Table 1. 2013 Summary Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    tons)",, "Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",7436,41 "Nitrogen oxide (short tons)",16438,39 "Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons)",15690,37 "Sulfur dioxide (lbsMWh)",0.4,43 "Nitrogen...

  18. Table 1. 2013 Summary Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    tons)",, "Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",3196,46 "Nitrogen oxide (short tons)",15299,40 "Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons)",15789,36 "Sulfur dioxide (lbsMWh)",0.1,48 "Nitrogen...

  19. Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    tons)",, "Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",3512,45 "Nitrogen oxide (short tons)",9372,45 "Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons)",8726,41 "Sulfur dioxide (lbsMWh)",0.2,47 "Nitrogen...

  20. Table 1. 2013 Summary Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    tons)",, "Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",1271,49 "Nitrogen oxide (short tons)",1161,49 "Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons)",2838,48 "Sulfur dioxide (lbsMWh)",0.4,44 "Nitrogen...

  1. Table 1. 2013 Summary Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    tons)",, "Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",3733,44 "Nitrogen oxide (short tons)",5057,47 "Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons)",3447,46 "Sulfur dioxide (lbsMWh)",0.4,45 "Nitrogen...

  2. Table 1. 2013 Summary Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    tons)",, "Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",13365,38 "Nitrogen oxide (short tons)",9607,44 "Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons)",3675,45 "Sulfur dioxide (lbsMWh)",1.9,23 "Nitrogen...

  3. Table 1. 2013 Summary Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    tons)",, "Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",237091,5 "Nitrogen oxide (short tons)",86058,8 "Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons)",67193,10 "Sulfur dioxide (lbsMWh)",4.5,3 "Nitrogen...

  4. Table 1. 2013 Summary Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    tons)",, "Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",190782,7 "Nitrogen oxide (short tons)",87201,7 "Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons)",85304,7 "Sulfur dioxide (lbsMWh)",4.3,4 "Nitrogen...

  5. Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    tons)",, "Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",0,51 "Nitrogen oxide (short tons)",148,51 "Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons)",49,50 "Sulfur dioxide (lbsMWh)",0,51 "Nitrogen oxide...

  6. Coupled hydro-mechanical processes in crytalline rock and in induratedand plastic clays: A comparative discussion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin-Fu; Blumling, Peter; Bernier, Frederic

    2008-01-01

    at Grimsel. In Coupled Thermo-Hydro- Mechanical-ChemicalCOUPLED HYDRO-MECHANICAL PROCESSES IN CRYTALLINE ROCK AND IN

  7. Hydro-geologic Investigation of the Fresh Water lens in a Small Rock Principle Investigators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhode Island, University of

    Hydro-geologic Investigation of the Fresh Water lens in a Small Rock Principle Investigators Daniel W. Urish #12;Abstract Rose Island is a small rock island located in Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island Island is a small 18.5 acre rock island located in Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island (Fig. 1

  8. 4.5 Rock Coatings RI Dorn, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dorn, Ron

    4.5 Rock Coatings RI Dorn, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, USA r 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. 4.5.1 Introduction to Rock Coatings 70 4.5.2 Interpreting Rock Coatings through a Landscape: Subaerial Exposure of Subsurface Coatings 73 4.5.2.3 Third-Order Control: Competition from Lithobionts 78 4

  9. Systematic variation of bedrock channel gradients in the central Oregon Coast Range: implications for rock uplift

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roering, Joshua J.

    for rock uplift and shallow landsliding Jeremiah S. Kobor*, Joshua J. Roering Department of Geological rock uplift for several million years, did not experience Pleistocene glaciation, boasts a relatively variability in bedrock channel gradients resulting from differential rock uplift or other sources. Consistent

  10. SOURCE AND EFFECT OF ACID ROCK DRAINAGE IN THE SNAKE RIVER WATERSHED, SUMMIT COUNTY, COLORADO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SOURCE AND EFFECT OF ACID ROCK DRAINAGE IN THE SNAKE RIVER WATERSHED, SUMMIT COUNTY, COLORADO (the weathering of disseminated pyrite) sources of acid rock drainage (ARD). Stream waters and remediating the effects of acid rock drainage in the basin has given this research a real world application

  11. Bidirectional Seismic Behavior of Controlled Rocking Four-Legged Bridge Steel Truss Piers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruneau, Michel

    Bidirectional Seismic Behavior of Controlled Rocking Four-Legged Bridge Steel Truss Piers Michael rocking bridge steel truss piers to three components of seismic excitation are presented in this paper. The controlled rocking approach for seismic protection allows a pier to uplift from its base, limiting the force

  12. Petrography and Bedrock Origin of Shelter Rock, a Large Glacial Erratic in Western Long Island, New York

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merguerian, Charles

    Petrography and Bedrock Origin of Shelter Rock, a Large Glacial Erratic constrain the mineralogy and petrography of Shelter Rock. The dominant mineral suite

  13. Linked multicontinuum and crack tensor approach for modeling of coupled geomechanics, fluid flow and transport in fractured rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutqvist, J.

    2014-01-01

    porosity models for fluid transport in jointed rock. Journalof coupled fluid flow, solute transport, and geomechanics ingeomechanics, fluid flow and transport in fractured rock

  14. Panel discussion on rock mechanics issues in repository design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bieniawski, Z.T.; Kim, K.S.; Nataraja, M.

    1996-04-01

    The panel discussion was introduced by Mr. Z.T.(Richard) Bieniawski and then continued with five additional speakers. The topics covered in the discussion included rock mechanics pertaining to the design of underground facilities for the disposal of radioactive wastes and the safety of such facilities. The speakers included: Mr. Kun-Soo Kim who is a specialist in the area of rock mechanics testing during the Basalt Waste Isolation Project; Dr. Mysore Nataraja who is the senior project manager with the NRC; Dr. Michael Voegele who is the project manager for Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) on the Yucca Mountain Project; Dr. Edward Cording who is a member of the Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board; and Dr. Hemendra Kalia who is employed by Los Alamos National Laboratory and coordinates various activities of testing programs at the Yucca Mountain Site.

  15. Lithophysal Rock Mass Mechanical Properties of the Repository Host Horizon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. Rigby

    2004-11-10

    The purpose of this calculation is to develop estimates of key mechanical properties for the lithophysal rock masses of the Topopah Spring Tuff (Tpt) within the repository host horizon, including their uncertainties and spatial variability. The mechanical properties to be characterized include an elastic parameter, Young's modulus, and a strength parameter, uniaxial compressive strength. Since lithophysal porosity is used as a surrogate property to develop the distributions of the mechanical properties, an estimate of the distribution of lithophysal porosity is also developed. The resulting characterizations of rock parameters are important for supporting the subsurface design, developing the preclosure safety analysis, and assessing the postclosure performance of the repository (e.g., drift degradation and modeling of rockfall impacts on engineered barrier system components).

  16. SHORT ROTATION WOODY CROPS FACTSHEET SERIES # 5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    SHORT ROTATION WOODY CROPS FACTSHEET SERIES # 5 Sustainability of SRWC for Energy1 WHAT of the SRWC systems and the relatively narrow genetic base in Salix, Populus or Eucalyptus SRWC may promote

  17. Signal Processing 85 (2005) 18591868 Short communication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ray, Asok

    2005-01-01

    Signal Processing 85 (2005) 1859­1868 Short communication Symbolic time series analysis for anomaly anomalies. Time series data of observed process variables on the fast time-scale of dynamical systems

  18. ForPeerReview Cavity expansion in cross anisotropic rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagner, Peter

    for Numerical and Analytical Methods in Geomechanics Manuscript ID: NAG-10-0026.R1 Wiley - Manuscript type in Geomechanics #12;ForPeerReview Only Cavity expansion in cross-anisotropic rock Dimitrios Kolymbas Peter Wagner://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/nag International Journal for Numerical and Analytical Methods in Geomechanics 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15

  19. Fluid-Rock Characterization and Interactions in NMR Well Logging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirasaki, George J.; Mohanty, Kishore K.

    2003-02-10

    The objective of this project was to characterize the fluid properties and fluid-rock interactions that are needed for formation evaluation by NMR well logging. The advances made in the understanding of NMR fluid properties are summarized in a chapter written for an AAPG book on NMR well logging. This includes live oils, viscous oils, natural gas mixtures, and the relation between relaxation time and diffusivity.

  20. Buoyancy driven dispersion in a layered porous rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farcas, Adrian; Woods, Andrew W.

    2015-02-12

    for example from a radioactive leak in a geological waste repository (Woods and Norris, 2010). One key challenge associated with modelling buoyancy driven flows in real rocks is the complex layering, on a range of length scales. In order to describe flows... ) Scaling, self-similarity and intermediate asymptotics. CUP, Cambridge. Bear, J. (1972) Dynamics of fluids in porous media. Elsevier. Bear, J., and Cheng A.H.-D (2010) Modeling groundwater flow and contaminant transport. Springer. Bijelic, J., Muggeridge A...

  1. Fluid-Rock Characterization and Interactions in NMR Well Logging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirasaki, George J.; Mohanty, Kishore K.

    2003-02-10

    The objective of this project was to characterize the fluid properties and fluid-rock interactions which are needed for formation evaluation by NMR well logging. NMR well logging is finding wide use in formation evaluation. The formation parameters commonly estimated were porosity, permeability, and capillary bound water. Special cases include estimation of oil viscosity, residual oil saturation, location of oil/water contact, and interpretation on whether the hydrocarbon is oil or gas.

  2. Overprinting Deformations in Mantle Rocks, Dun Mountain, New Zealand 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Donnelly, Sara

    2014-04-25

    ; Hansen et al., 2012a). Understanding these relationships as well as the nature of deformation in poly- and mono- mineralic rocks give insight to natural deformations in the mantle. Understanding of mantle deformation comes from coupling studies...-pyroxene formulations and argued that the thermometer developed by Taylor (1998) most accurately reproduced temperatures of laboratory experiments designed to equilibrate co-existing pyroxenes. We have applied 22 Figure 8: REE and trace element...

  3. Neutron Production from the Fracture of Piezoelectric Rocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Widom; J. Swain; Y. N. Srivastava

    2012-02-08

    A theoretical explanation is provided for the experimental evidence that fracturing piezoelectric rocks produces neutrons. The elastic energy micro-crack production ultimately yields the macroscopic fracture. The mechanical energy is converted by the piezoelectric effect into electric field energy. The electric field energy decays via radio frequency (microwave) electric field oscillations. The radio frequency electric fields accelerate the condensed matter electrons which then collide with protons producing neutrons and neutrinos.

  4. Rock County, Minnesota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/ColoradoRemsenburg-Speonk, NewMichigan: Energy Resources Jump to:Rock County, Minnesota:

  5. Rock County, Nebraska: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/ColoradoRemsenburg-Speonk, NewMichigan: Energy Resources Jump to:Rock County,

  6. Rock Island County, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/ColoradoRemsenburg-Speonk, NewMichigan: Energy Resources Jump to:Rock County,Silver

  7. Rock Island, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/ColoradoRemsenburg-Speonk, NewMichigan: Energy Resources Jump to:Rock County,SilverIsland,

  8. Rock Point, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/ColoradoRemsenburg-Speonk, NewMichigan: Energy Resources Jump to:RockPoint, Arizona: Energy

  9. Rock River LLC Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/ColoradoRemsenburg-Speonk, NewMichigan: Energy Resources Jump to:RockPoint, Arizona:

  10. Rock Sampling At Chena Geothermal Area (Kolker, 2008) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/ColoradoRemsenburg-Speonk, NewMichigan: Energy Resources Jump to:RockPoint, Arizona:2012)

  11. Rock Sampling At Coso Geothermal Area (1995) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/ColoradoRemsenburg-Speonk, NewMichigan: Energy Resources Jump to:RockPoint,

  12. Rock Sampling At Florida Mountains Area (Brookins, 1982) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/ColoradoRemsenburg-Speonk, NewMichigan: Energy Resources Jump to:RockPoint,Information

  13. RockPort Capital Partners (California) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/ColoradoRemsenburg-Speonk, NewMichigan: Energy Resources JumpMtSamplingRockPort Capital

  14. City of North Little Rock, Arkansas (Utility Company) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmentalBowerbank,CammackFLIRChurchFontanelle,Information North Little Rock, Arkansas

  15. Short run effects of a price on carbon dioxide emissions from U.S. electric generators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adam Newcomer; Seth A. Blumsack; Jay Apt; Lester B. Lave; M. Granger Morgan [Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Carnegie Mellon Electricity Industry Center

    2008-05-01

    The price of delivered electricity will rise if generators have to pay for carbon dioxide emissions through an implicit or explicit mechanism. There are two main effects that a substantial price on CO{sub 2} emissions would have in the short run (before the generation fleet changes significantly). First, consumers would react to increased price by buying less, described by their price elasticity of demand. Second, a price on CO{sub 2} emissions would change the order in which existing generators are economically dispatched, depending on their carbon dioxide emissions and marginal fuel prices. Both the price increase and dispatch changes depend on the mix of generation technologies and fuels in the region available for dispatch, although the consumer response to higher prices is the dominant effect. We estimate that the instantaneous imposition of a price of $35 per metric ton on CO{sub 2} emissions would lead to a 10% reduction in CO{sub 2} emissions in PJM and MISO at a price elasticity of -0.1. Reductions in ERCOT would be about one-third as large. Thus, a price on CO{sub 2} emissions that has been shown in earlier work to stimulate investment in new generation technology also provides significant CO{sub 2} reductions before new technology is deployed at large scale. 39 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Are shorted pipeline casings a problem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibson, W.F. )

    1994-11-01

    The pipeline industry has many road and railroad crossings with casings which have been in service for more than 50 years without exhibiting any major problems, regardless of whether the casing is shorted to or isolated from the carrier pipe. The use of smart pigging and continual visual inspection when retrieving a cased pipeline segment have shown that whether shorted or isolated, casings have no significant bearing on the presence or absence of corrosion on the carrier pipe.

  17. Chemical hydrofracturing of the Hot Dry Rock reservoir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yakovlev, Leonid

    1996-01-24

    The experimental study of the water-rock interaction shows that the secondary mineral assemblage depends on the water composition. For example, granite-pure water interaction produces zeolites (relatively low-dense, Mg-poor minerals), whereas seawater yields chlorites (high-dense, Mg-rich minerals). The reactions have volumetric effects from several % to 20 % in magnitude. Volume deformations in the heterogeneous matrix cause uneven mechanical strains. Reactions with the effect of about 0,1 vol.% may cause strains of the order of 100-1000 bars being enough for destruction of rocks. Signs and magnitudes of local volume changes depend on the mineral composition of the secondary assemblage. Hence, one can provide either healing or cracking of primary fractures, as desired, by changing the composition of water in the water-felsic rock system where some elements (Mg, Fe) are in lack. The techniques of "chemical hydrofracturing" looks promising as applied to a granite HDR massif. One can regulate the permeability of fractured flow paths by changing in concord the composition and pressure of the injected water. This approach should promote efficient extraction of the petrothermal energy.

  18. Integrated Experimental and Modeling Studies of Mineral Carbonation as a Mechanism for Permanent Carbon Sequestration in Mafic/Ultramafic Rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Zhengrong; Qiu, Lin; Zhang, Shuang; Bolton, Edward; Bercovici, David; Ague, Jay; Karato, Shun-Ichiro; Oristaglio, Michael; Zhu, Wen-Iu; Lisabeth, Harry; Johnson, Kevin

    2014-09-30

    A program of laboratory experiments, modeling and fieldwork was carried out at Yale University, University of Maryland, and University of Hawai‘i, under a DOE Award (DE-FE0004375) to study mineral carbonation as a practical method of geologic carbon sequestration. Mineral carbonation, also called carbon mineralization, is the conversion of (fluid) carbon dioxide into (solid) carbonate minerals in rocks, by way of naturally occurring chemical reactions. Mafic and ultramafic rocks, such as volcanic basalt, are natural candidates for carbonation, because the magnesium and iron silicate minerals in these rocks react with brines of dissolved carbon dioxide to form carbonate minerals. By trapping carbon dioxide (CO2) underground as a constituent of solid rock, carbonation of natural basalt formations would be a secure method of sequestering CO2 captured at power plants in efforts to mitigate climate change. Geochemical laboratory experiments at Yale, carried out in a batch reactor at 200°C and 150 bar (15 MPa), studied carbonation of the olivine mineral forsterite (Mg2SiO4) reacting with CO2 brines in the form of sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) solutions. The main carbonation product in these reactions is the carbonate mineral magnesite (MgCO3). A series of 32 runs varied the reaction time, the reactive surface area of olivine grains and powders, the concentration of the reacting fluid, and the starting ratio of fluid to olivine mass. These experiments were the first to study the rate of olivine carbonation under passive conditions approaching equilibrium. The results show that, in a simple batch reaction, olivine carbonation is fastest during the first 24 hours and then slows significantly and even reverses. A natural measure of the extent of carbonation is a quantity called the carbonation fraction, which compares the amount of carbon removed from solution, during a run, to the maximum amount that could have been removed if the olivine initially present had fully dissolved and the cations released had subsequently precipitated in carbonate minerals. The carbonation fractions observed in batch experiments with olivine grains and powders varied significantly, from less than 0.01 (1%) to more than 0.5 (50%). Over time, the carbonation fractions reached an upper limit after about 24 to 72 hours of reaction, then stayed constant or decreased. The peak Final Scientific/Technical Report DE-FE0004275 | Mineral Carbonation | 4 coincided with the appearance of secondary magnesium-bearing silicate minerals, whose formation competes for magnesium ions in solution and can even promote conditions that dissolve magnesite. The highest carbonation fractions resulted from experiments with low ratios of concentrated solution to olivine, during which amorphous silica spheres or meshes formed, instead of secondary silicate minerals. The highest carbonation fractions appear to result from competing effects. Precipitation of silica layers on olivine reduces the reactive surface area and, thus, the rate of olivine dissolution (which ultimately limits the carbonation rate), but these same silica layers can also inhibit the formation of secondary silicate minerals that consume magnesite formed in earlier stages of carbonation. Simulation of these experiments with simple geochemical models using the software program EQ3/6 reproduces the general trends observed—especially the results for the carbonation fraction in short-run experiments. Although further experimentation and better models are needed, this study nevertheless provides a framework for understanding the optimal conditions for sequestering carbon dioxide by reacting CO2-bearing fluids with rocks containing olivine minerals. A series of experiments at the Rock Physics Laboratory at the University of Maryland studied the carbonation process during deformation of thermally cracked olivine-rich rock samples (dunit

  19. Environmental assessment of remedial action at the Slick Rock uranium mill tailings sites Slick Rock, Colorado. Draft

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1993-06-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (UMTRCA) authorized the US Department of Energy (DOE) to clean up two uranium mill tailings processing sites near Slick Rock, Colorado, in San Miguel County. The purpose of the cleanup is to reduce the potential health effects associated with the radioactive materials remaining on the sites and on vicinity properties (VP) associated with the sites. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) promulgated standards for the UMTRCA that contained measures to control the contaminated materials and to protect the groundwater from further degradation. Remedial actions at the Slick Rock sites must be performed in accordance with these standards and with the concurrence of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC).

  20. Summary - Hot Dry Rock R&D Strategies and Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tennyson, George P..

    1989-03-21

    In geothermal energy technology, the hydrothermal systems rely on volcanic hot rocks being fortuitously co-located with an adequate supply of natural ground water, usually at some considerable depth within the earth. This represents essentially two accidents in the same place, and the occurrence is relatively rare. Yellowstone Park and the desert valley of southern California are the most noteworthy US. examples. Since the heat is the energy needed, if we could just get the water down to it and back. Well, that's what is being done with the hot dry rock program. A well is drilled down to where there is adequate heat in the rocks. The well is then pressurized until the rock fractures creating what amounts to a reservoir full of hot, shattered rock. Finally, a well is drilled into the reservoir and water is pumped in one well, heated by the rock, and taken out through the other well at useful temperatures and pressures. We are getting ready to run significant long-term flow tests at the Fenton Hill Hot Dry Rock site west of Los Alamos, New Mexico. We expect the operational information to provide the data to forecast the energy life of the wells as a production facility. This kind of resource is much more common than regular geothermal resources. Robert H. Hendron described the Long Term Flow Test and reservoir studies for which the project is preparing. A shortfall of available funding has slowed preparations, delaying the start of that test. The test is planning to gather data for more definitive reservoir modeling with energy availability or reservoir lifetime of primary interest. Other interests include geochemistry and tracer studies, microseismic response, water requirements and flow impedance which relates directly to the pumping power required. Progress has been made in modeling studies, chemically reactive tracer techniques, and in improvements in acoustic or microseismic event analysis. Donald W. Brown discussed reservoir modeling as it relates to production management of the HDR well. For wells which are fracture dominated rather than matrix-permeability controlled, a knowledge of the pressure-dependent permeability of the interconnected system of natural joints (or pre-existing fractures is critical to long-term power production from the wells) through optimized pressure management. It was mentioned that a knowledge of the pressure-dependent joint permeability could aid in designing more appropriate secondary recovery strategies in petroleum reservoirs, or reinjection I procedures of geothermal reservoirs. Dr. Bruce A. Robinson discussed the development of fluid flow and transport models for simulation of HDR geothermal reservoirs. These models are also expected to provide accurate predictions of long-term behavior and help in the development of strategies for reservoir improvement and operation. Two approaches were discussed. The discrete fracture approach is based on a random fracture network subject to prescribed statistical properties of the fracture set. It is used to simulate steady state fluid flow and solute transport. The other approach used the continuum approximation. This type of model is appropriate when the reservoir consists of many interconnected fractures, as is the case at Fenton Hill.

  1. Can short sellers predict accounting restatements and foresee their severity 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Efendi, Jap

    2005-11-01

    This dissertation investigates whether short sellers establish short positions prior to accounting restatement announcements and whether the levels of short interest are related to the severity of restatements. Using 565 firms with restatement...

  2. 2 INVESTIGATION OF CRUDE OIL/BRINE/ROCK INTERACTION 2.1 EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF CRUDE/BRINE/ROCK INTERACTION AT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schechter, David S.

    44 2 INVESTIGATION OF CRUDE OIL/BRINE/ROCK INTERACTION 2.1 EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF CRUDE in this section and expand the understanding of the interactions of the Spraberry reservoir rock, oil and brine used Spraberry oil, synthetic reservoir brine and Spraberry core at reservoir temperature (138o F

  3. Means for limiting and ameliorating electrode shorting

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Van Konynenburg, Richard A. (Livermore, CA); Farmer, Joseph C. (Tracy, CA)

    1999-01-01

    A fuse and filter arrangement for limiting and ameliorating electrode shorting in capacitive deionization water purification systems utilizing carbon aerogel, for example. This arrangement limits and ameliorates the effects of conducting particles or debonded carbon aerogel in shorting the electrodes of a system such as a capacitive deionization water purification system. This is important because of the small interelectrode spacing and the finite possibility of debonding or fragmentation of carbon aerogel in a large system. The fuse and filter arrangement electrically protect the entire system from shutting down if a single pair of electrodes is shorted and mechanically prevents a conducting particle from migrating through the electrode stack, shorting a series of electrode pairs in sequence. It also limits the amount of energy released in a shorting event. The arrangement consists of a set of circuit breakers or fuses with one fuse or breaker in the power line connected to one electrode of each electrode pair and a set of screens of filters in the water flow channels between each set of electrode pairs.

  4. Means for limiting and ameliorating electrode shorting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Konynenburg, R.A. van; Farmer, J.C.

    1999-11-09

    A fuse and filter arrangement is described for limiting and ameliorating electrode shorting in capacitive deionization water purification systems utilizing carbon aerogel, for example. This arrangement limits and ameliorates the effects of conducting particles or debonded carbon aerogel in shorting the electrodes of a system such as a capacitive deionization water purification system. This is important because of the small interelectrode spacing and the finite possibility of debonding or fragmentation of carbon aerogel in a large system. The fuse and filter arrangement electrically protect the entire system from shutting down if a single pair of electrodes is shorted and mechanically prevents a conducting particle from migrating through the electrode stack, shorting a series of electrode pairs in sequence. It also limits the amount of energy released in a shorting event. The arrangement consists of a set of circuit breakers or fuses with one fuse or breaker in the power line connected to one electrode of each electrode pair and a set of screens of filters in the water flow channels between each set of electrode pairs.

  5. DSOPilot project Automatic receipt of short circuiting indicators...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    DSOPilot project Automatic receipt of short circuiting indicators (Smart Grid Project) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name DSOPilot project Automatic receipt of short...

  6. Status of High Power Tests of Normal Conducting Short Standing...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Status of High Power Tests of Normal Conducting Short Standing Wave Structures Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Status of High Power Tests of Normal Conducting Short...

  7. Minimize Boiler Short Cycling Losses, Energy Tips: STEAM, Steam...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    6 Minimize Boiler Short Cycling Losses Boiler "short cycling" occurs when an oversized boiler quickly satisfies process or space heating demands, and then shuts down until heat is...

  8. Electricity storage for short term power system service (Smart...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Electricity storage for short term power system service (Smart Grid Project) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name Electricity storage for short term power system service...

  9. Source rock screening studies of Ordovician Maquoketa shale in western Illinois

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Autrey, A.; Crockett, J.E.; Dickerson, D.R.; Oltz, D.F.; Seyler, B.J.; Warren, R.

    1987-09-01

    Rock-Eval (pyrolysis) studies of Ordovician Maquoketa Shale samples (cuttings and cores) from the shallow subsurface (500-800 ft deep) in western Illinois indicate that facies within the Maquoketa have potential as hydrocarbon source rocks. Dark, presumably organic-rich zones within the Maquoketa Shale were selected and analyzed for total organic carbon (TOC), Rock-Eval (pyrolysis), and bulk and clay mineralogy using x-ray diffraction. Preliminary results from six samples from Schuyler, McDonough, and Fulton Counties show TOC values ranging from 4.70% to as high as 12.90%. Rock-Eval parameters, measured by heating organic matter in an inert atmosphere, indicate source rock maturity and petroleum-generative potential. Screening studies, using the Rock-Eval process, describe very good source rock potential in facies of the Maquoketa Shale. Further studies at the Illinois State Geological Survey will expand on these preliminary results. This study complements a proposed exploration model in western Illinois and further suggests the possibility of source rocks on the flanks of the Illinois basin. Long-distance migration from more deeply buried effective source rocks in southern Illinois has been the traditional mechanism proposed for petroleum in basin-flank reservoirs. Localized source rocks can be an alternative to long-distance migration, and can expand the possibilities of basin-flank reservoirs, encouraging further exploration in these areas.

  10. Setting in the Modern Short Story

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hodgson, Elizabeth

    1913-06-05

    . Tlte Am r oan Slort-8tor¥. ewood, N. J., 1 12. r. TA Philo8op!?'y of the ftlort- • Y., 1 01. Pit ln, alter B., T Art and. B iness of StOJ1'y r1t1n. N. Y., 1 12. Phil080ph¥ or Composition, horne' 8 TaJ. 8. 1842. Q~irk, Lesl! • Ko to Writ N. Y., 1... 04. III. ColI otlons _ ............ Short-story. Bal n, ,Ch e. S. Am rio n Short-storie. 1 04. Co,d-Y f Sherwin. Tlt Q rld t 8 B st Short- at or Cb1oaso, 1 11. . .. , • De; son, • J'. and Coning b,y .. Great l1ne1Ueh art ... ator.V' r1 t ere...

  11. Catalysts for synthesizing various short chain hydrocarbons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Colmenares, Carlos (Alamo, CA)

    1991-01-01

    Method and apparatus (10), including novel photocatalysts, are disclosed for the synthesis of various short chain hydrocarbons. Light-transparent SiO.sub.2 aerogels doped with photochemically active uranyl ions (18) are fluidized in a fluidized-bed reactor (12) having a transparent window (16), by hydrogen and CO, C.sub.2 H.sub.4 or C.sub.2 H.sub.6 gas mixtures (20), and exposed to radiation (34) from a light source (32) external to the reactor (12), to produce the short chain hydrocarbons (36).

  12. Short-Term Farm Credit in Texas. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Virgil P.

    1927-01-01

    contains analysis of information on short-term farm credit received from 455 farmers, 52 bankers, and 279 merchants. The study indicates that about 69 per cent of the farmers in Texas received short-term credit in 1925. Banks are the most important... source. Approximately 83 per cent of those receiving credit obtained all or a part of it from banks, 52 per cent received credit from merchants, and 17 per cent received credit from individuals. Approximately 53 per cent of the bank loans were secured...

  13. A short overview of the "Topological recursion"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Eynard

    2014-12-12

    This review is an extended version of the Seoul ICM 2014 proceedings.It is a short overview of the "topological recursion", a relation appearing in the asymptotic expansion of many integrable systems and in enumerative problems. We recall how computing large size asymptotics in random matrices, has allowed to discover some fascinating and ubiquitous geometric invariants. Specializations of this method recover many classical invariants, like Gromov--Witten invariants, or knot polynomials (Jones, HOMFLY,...). In this short review, we give some examples, give definitions, and review some properties and applications of the formalism.

  14. Gasoline prices inch down (short version)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural GasNatural GasEIA lowerslong4, 2014short version)short

  15. Reactor Vessel Removal: Improving Performance Big Rock Point Lessons Learned

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daly, P.T. [BNG America, D and D Operations, 804 South Illinois Avenue, Oak Ridge, TN 37830 (United States)

    2006-07-01

    The Big Rock Point (BRP) reactor vessel was successfully removed, packaged in a Type B shipping container, transported, and buried. The process took almost 4 years of work by many people and a variety of companies. This paper will discuss several areas that can reduce schedule time, resulting in reduced cost and employee dose exposure. For maximum cost effectiveness, these lessons should be applied during the planning stages when developing baseline cost and schedule, As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) budgets, and work processes. (authors)

  16. Simulation of water transport in heated rock salt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schlich, M.; Jockwer, N.

    1986-01-01

    This paper summarizes computer simulation studies on water transport in German rock salt. Based on JOCKWERS experimental investigations on water content and water liberation, the object of these studies was to select a water transport model, that matches the water inflow which was measured in some heater experiments in the Asse Salt Mine. The main result is, that an evaporation front model, with Knudsen-type vapor transport combined with fluid transport by thermal expansion of the adsorbed water layers in the non evaporated zone, showed the best agreement with experimental evidence.

  17. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Rock Island Arsenal - IL 09

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and Myers Co - OH 51 FUSRAP Considered SitesRock

  18. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- WNI Split Rock Site - 043

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and Myers Co -VA 03 VirginiaVapofierSplit Rock

  19. HotRock GmbH | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy Resources JumpNew Jersey:Hopkinsville, Kentucky:OpenHotOpen EnergyHotRock

  20. McKees Rocks, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,McDonoughNorth Dakota:McKees Rocks,

  1. North Little Rock, Arkansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPI VenturesNew Hampshire:source History ViewLittle Rock, Arkansas: Energy

  2. EA-225 Split Rock Energy LLC | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-inPPL EnergyPlus, LLC to export electric energy toNRG PowerSplit Rock Energy

  3. Roth Rock Wind Power Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS Report UrlNM-bRenewable Energy|Gas andRofinRoscoeRosneft JumpRothRock

  4. Alum Rock, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAand DaltonSolarOpen5All HomeAlphakatResources |Altus AG JumpRock,

  5. Category:Rock Lab Analysis | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmentalBowerbank,CammackFLIR Jump to:RAPID Roadmap ContactRock Density Jump to:

  6. Property:CapRockAge | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceIIInformationEnergyReportNumber Jump to: navigation, searchCapRockAge Jump to:

  7. Property:CapRockLithology | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceIIInformationEnergyReportNumber Jump to: navigation, searchCapRockAge Jump

  8. Method and apparatus for determining two-phase flow in rock fracture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Persoff, Peter (Oakland, CA); Pruess, Karsten (Berkeley, CA); Myer, Larry (Benicia, CA)

    1994-01-01

    An improved method and apparatus as disclosed for measuring the permeability of multiple phases through a rock fracture. The improvement in the method comprises delivering the respective phases through manifolds to uniformly deliver and collect the respective phases to and from opposite edges of the rock fracture in a distributed manner across the edge of the fracture. The improved apparatus comprises first and second manifolds comprising bores extending within porous blocks parallel to the rock fracture for distributing and collecting the wetting phase to and from surfaces of the porous blocks, which respectively face the opposite edges of the rock fracture. The improved apparatus further comprises other manifolds in the form of plenums located adjacent the respective porous blocks for uniform delivery of the non-wetting phase to parallel grooves disposed on the respective surfaces of the porous blocks facing the opposite edges of the rock fracture and generally perpendicular to the rock fracture.

  9. Electricity and short wavelength radiation generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    George, E.V.

    1985-08-26

    Methods and associated apparati for use of collisions of high energy atoms and ions of He, Ne, or Ar with themselves or with high energy neutrons to produce short wavelength radiation (lambda approx. = 840-1300 A) that may be utilized to produce cathode-anode currents or photovoltaic currents.

  10. SHORT-TUBE SUBCRITICAL FLOW Enerag Division

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    due to the wide variation of the upstream and downstream conditions. In a previous paper [7 that at the same short tube upstream and downstream pressure differentials, the higher the level of upstream liquid and downstream pressure differentials as well as the level of upstream liquid subcooling. C = -0.019337 NF + 0

  11. SHORT REVIEW Statistical tests of selective neutrality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nielsen, Rasmus

    SHORT REVIEW Statistical tests of selective neutrality in the age of genomics RASMUS NIELSEN genomic data for traces of selection provides a powerful tool for identifying genomic regions genomic data sets has invigorated the ®eld of molecular population genetics and spurred new controversies

  12. Introduction to Programming ATS Short Course

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    Introduction to Programming ATS Short Course Objectives: Provide a general overview of programming) 2 Jan 27 Introduction to the concepts of programming, algorithm design (loops, statements: Kate Thayer-Calder 5 Feb 17 Introduction, developing a program, creating and compiling a Fortran

  13. SHORT REVIEW Ecological genomics: understanding gene and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herman, Mike

    SHORT REVIEW Ecological genomics: understanding gene and genome function in the natural environment MC Ungerer, LC Johnson and MA Herman Division of Biology, Ecological Genomics Institute, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, USA The field of ecological genomics seeks to understand the genetic mechanisms

  14. SHORT CONTRIBUTION J. Choi S. Y. Lee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1990). To date, there have been several reports on the pro- cess analysis and economic evaluation and methods Process analysis and economic evaluation of P(3HB/V) production and recovery were carried outSHORT CONTRIBUTION J. Choi á S. Y. Lee Economic considerations in the production of poly(3

  15. Micromachined low frequency rocking accelerometer with capacitive pickoff

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, Abraham P. (Arlington, VA); Simon, Jonathon N. (San Leandro, CA); McConaghy, Charles F. (Livermore, CA)

    2001-01-01

    A micro electro mechanical sensor that uses capacitive readout electronics. The sensor involves a micromachined low frequency rocking accelerometer with capacitive pickoff fabricated by deep reactive ion etching. The accelerometer includes a central silicon proof mass, is suspended by a thin polysilicon tether, and has a moving electrode (capacitor plate or interdigitated fingers) located at each end the proof mass. During movement (acceleration), the tethered mass moves relative to the surrounding packaging, for example, and this defection is measured capacitively by a plate capacitor or interdigitated finger capacitor, having the cooperating fixed electrode (capacitor plate or interdigitated fingers) positioned on the packaging, for example. The micromachined rocking accelerometer has a low frequency (<500 Hz), high sensitivity (.mu.G), with minimal power usage. The capacitors are connected to a power supply (battery) and to sensor interface electronics, which may include an analog to digital (A/D) converter, logic, RF communication link, antenna, etc. The sensor (accelerometer) may be, for example, packaged along with the interface electronics and a communication system in a 2".times.2".times.2" cube. The proof mass may be asymmetric or symmetric. Additional actuating capacitive plates may be used for feedback control which gives a greater dynamic range.

  16. Design methodology for rock excavations at the Yucca Mountain project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alber, M.; Bieniawski, Z.T.

    1993-12-31

    The problems involved in the design of the proposed underground repository for high-level nuclear waste call for novel design approaches. Guidelines for the design are given by the Mission Plan Amendment in which licensing and regulatory aspects have to be satisfied. Moreover, systems engineering was proposed, advocating a top-down approach leading to the identification of discrete, implementable system elements. These objectives for the design process can be integrated in an engineering design methodology. While design methodologies for some engineering disciplines are available, they were of limited use for rock engineering because of the inherent uncertainties about the geologic media. Based on the axiomatic design approach of Suh, Bieniawski developed a methodology for design in rock. Design principles and design stages are clearly stated to assist in effective decision making. For overall performance goals, the domain of objectives is defined through components (DCs) - representing a design solution - satisfy the FRs, resulting in discrete, independent functional relations. Implementation is satisfied by evaluation and optimization of the design with respect to the constructibility of the design components.

  17. Fluid-Rock Characterization and Interactions in NMR Well Logging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George J. Hirasaki; Kishore K. Mohanty

    2005-09-05

    The objective of this report is to characterize the fluid properties and fluid-rock interactions that are needed for formation evaluation by NMR well logging. The advances made in the understanding of NMR fluid properties are summarized in a chapter written for an AAPG book on NMR well logging. This includes live oils, viscous oils, natural gas mixtures, and the relation between relaxation time and diffusivity. Oil based drilling fluids can have an adverse effect on NMR well logging if it alters the wettability of the formation. The effect of various surfactants on wettability and surface relaxivity are evaluated for silica sand. The relation between the relaxation time and diffusivity distinguishes the response of brine, oil, and gas in a NMR well log. A new NMR pulse sequence in the presence of a field gradient and a new inversion technique enables the T{sub 2} and diffusivity distributions to be displayed as a two-dimensional map. The objectives of pore morphology and rock characterization are to identify vug connectivity by using X-ray CT scan, and to improve NMR permeability correlation. Improved estimation of permeability from NMR response is possible by using estimated tortuosity as a parameter to interpolate between two existing permeability models.

  18. ChemCam Rock Laser for the Mars Science Laboratory

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    LANL

    2009-09-01

    Los Alamos has a long history of space-related instr... Los Alamos has a long history of space-related instruments, tied primarily to its role in defense-related treaty verification. Space-based detectors have helped determine the differences between signals from lightning bolts and potential nuclear explosions. LANL-developed gamma-ray detection instruments first revealed the existence of what we now know as gamma-ray bursts, an exciting area of astrophysical research. And the use of LANL instruments on varied space missions continues with such products as the ChemCam rock laser for NASA, shown here. The Engineering Model of the ChemCam Mars Science Laboratory rover instrument arrived at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory on February 6, 2008. ChemCam will use imaging and laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) to determine rock and soil compositions on Mars, up to 9 meters from the rover. The engineering model is being integrated into the rover test bed for the development and testing of the rover software. The actual flight model components are concurrently being assembled at Los Alamos and in Toulouse, France, and will be delivered to JPL in July. The Mars Science Laboratory is scheduled to launch in 2009. Animations courtesy of JPL/NASA.

  19. ChemCam rock laser for Mars Science Laboratory "Curiosity"

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Wiens, Roger

    2014-08-12

    Los Alamos has a long history of space-related instruments, tied primarily to its role in defense-related treaty verification. Space-based detectors have helped determine the differences between signals from lightning bolts and potential nuclear explosions. LANL-developed gamma-ray detection instruments first revealed the existence of what we now know as gamma-ray bursts, an exciting area of astrophysical research. And the use of LANL instruments on varied space missions continues with such products as the ChemCam rock laser for NASA, shown here. The Engineering Model of the ChemCam Mars Science Laboratory rover instrument arrived at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory on February 6, 2008. The Flight Model was shipped in August, 2010 for installation on the rover at JPL. ChemCam will use imaging and laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) to determine rock and soil compositions on Mars, up to 9 meters from the rover. The engineering model is being integrated into the rover test bed for the development and testing of the rover software. The actual flight model components were concurrently assembled at Los Alamos and in Toulouse, France. The Mars Science Laboratory is scheduled to launch in 2011. Animations courtesy of JPL/NASA.

  20. Fluid-Rock Characterization and Interactions in NMR Well Logging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirasaki, George J.; Mohanty, Kishore, K.

    2001-07-13

    The objective of this project is to characterize the fluid properties and fluid-rock interactions that are needed for formation evaluation by NMR well logging. This is the first annual progress report submitted to the DOE. It reports on the work completed during the reporting period even if it may have started before this period. This project is a partnership between Professor George J. Hirasaki at Rice University and Professor Kishore Mohanty at University of Houston. In addition to the DOE, this project is supported by a consortium of oil companies and service companies. The fluid properties characterization has emphasized the departure of live oils from correlations based on dead oils. Also, asphaltic components can result in a difference between the T1 and T2 relaxation time distributions as well as reduce the hydrogen index. The fluid rock characterizations that are reported here are the effects of wettability and internal magnetic field gradients. A pore reconstruction method ha s been developed to recreate three-dimensional porous media from two-dimensional images that reproduce some of their key statistical properties. A Monte Carlo simulation technique has been developed to calculate the magnetization decay in fluid saturated porous media given their pore structure.

  1. Advanced Mitigating Measures for the Cell Internal Short Risk (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Darcy, E.; Smith, K.

    2010-04-01

    This presentation describes mitigation measures for internal short circuits in lithium-ion battery cells.

  2. HETEROGENEITY IN SHORT GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norris, Jay P. [Physics and Astronomy Department, University of Denver, Denver, CO 80208 (United States); Gehrels, Neil [Astroparticle Physics Laboratory, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Scargle, Jeffrey D. [Space Science and Astrobiology Division, NASA/Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035-1000 (United States)

    2011-07-01

    We analyze the Swift/BAT sample of short gamma-ray bursts, using an objective Bayesian Block procedure to extract temporal descriptors of the bursts' initial pulse complexes (IPCs). The sample is comprised of 12 and 41 bursts with and without extended emission (EE) components, respectively. IPCs of non-EE bursts are dominated by single pulse structures, while EE bursts tend to have two or more pulse structures. The medians of characteristic timescales-durations, pulse structure widths, and peak intervals-for EE bursts are factors of {approx}2-3 longer than for non-EE bursts. A trend previously reported by Hakkila and colleagues unifying long and short bursts-the anti-correlation of pulse intensity and width-continues in the two short burst groups, with non-EE bursts extending to more intense, narrower pulses. In addition, we find that preceding and succeeding pulse intensities are anti-correlated with pulse interval. We also examine the short burst X-ray afterglows as observed by the Swift/X-Ray Telescope (XRT). The median flux of the initial XRT detections for EE bursts ({approx}6x10{sup -10} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}) is {approx}>20x brighter than for non-EE bursts, and the median X-ray afterglow duration for EE bursts ({approx}60,000 s) is {approx}30x longer than for non-EE bursts. The tendency for EE bursts toward longer prompt-emission timescales and higher initial X-ray afterglow fluxes implies larger energy injections powering the afterglows. The longer-lasting X-ray afterglows of EE bursts may suggest that a significant fraction explode into denser environments than non-EE bursts, or that the sometimes-dominant EE component efficiently powers the afterglow. Combined, these results favor different progenitors for EE and non-EE short bursts.

  3. Pore-Scale Simulation Of Experimentally Realizable, Oscillatory Flow In Porous Rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olson, John F.

    1999-01-01

    We report new simulations of oscillating flow in porous rock. Our goal is to better understand the frequency dependence of pore-scale fluid motion, which should ultimately

  4. Simulation of water-rock interaction in the yellowstone geothermal system using TOUGHREACT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dobson, P.F.; Salah, S.; Spycher, N.; Sonnenthal, E.

    2003-01-01

    fluid flow in the Yellowstone geothermal system, Wyoming,ROCK INTERACTION IN THE YELLOWSTONE GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM USINGGeyser Basin of the Yellowstone geothermal system, has been

  5. A Sr-Isotopic Comparison Between Thermal Waters, Rocks, And Hydrotherm...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Caldera, California Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: A Sr-Isotopic Comparison Between Thermal Waters, Rocks, And Hydrothermal...

  6. Chemical and petrological characteristics of the intrusive rocks of the Quitman Mountains, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seay, Christopher Sidney

    1973-01-01

    ) on stained rock slabs. The procedure of staining by sodium cobalti-nitrate and amaranth dye (Laniz and others, 1964) proved to be ideal for these medium- and coarse-grained rocks. 14 Before modal analysis was made, the rock was ' examined in thin... activation methods. For X-ray spectrographic analyses the stan- dards used were USGS Rock Standards W-l, G-2, and GSP-1, supplemented by National Bureau of Stan- dard's Mineral 70a (potassium feldspar) and Min- eral 99a (sodium feldspar) (Appendix 1...

  7. Summary of Rock-Property Measurements for Hong Kong TuffSamples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dobson, Patrick F.; Nakagawa, Seiji

    2005-09-21

    A series of rock-property measurements was performed on a suite of rhyolitic tuff samples from the area above the Aberdeen Tunnel of Hong Kong. The goal of this study was to determine the mechanical properties of these samples after weathering. This report contains petrographic descriptions, porosity, bulk and grain density, as well as ultrasonic measurements, elastic modulii calculations, and rock-strength determinations. Variations in rock properties are related to alteration and the presence of fractures in the tuff. Granitic rocks located adjacent to the altered tuffs would be better candidates for underground excavations.

  8. A Coupled Model for Natural Convection and Condensation in Heated Subsurface Enclosures Embedded in Fractured Rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Halecky, N.; Birkholzer, J.T.; Webb, S.W.; Peterson, P.F.; Bodvarsson, G.S.

    2006-01-01

    and Mass Transfer in Yucca Mountain Drifts,” Proceedings ofMD- 000001 REV 00, Yucca Mountain Project Report, Bechtelthe fractured rock at Yucca Mountain have been investigated

  9. Rock-Water Interactions in the Fenton Hill, New Mexico, Hot Dry...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Rock Geothermal Systems II. Modeling Geochemical Behavior Abstract A transient mass balance model is developed to account for the dynamic behavior of an artificially stimulated...

  10. Evidence for the incorporation of lead into barite from waste rock pile materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    COURTIN-NOMADE, ALEXANDRA

    2009-01-01

    waste rock associated with acid drainage at the Penn Mine,in urban runoff, acid mine drainage, and contaminatedof waters affected by acid mine drainage and nonaffected

  11. Bibliography of the geological and geophysical aspects of hot dry rock geothermal resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heiken, G.; Sayer, S.

    1980-02-01

    This is the first issue of an annual compilation of references that are useful to the exploration, understanding and development of the hot dry rock geothermal resource.

  12. Evidence for the incorporation of lead into barite from waste rock pile materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    COURTIN-NOMADE, ALEXANDRA

    2009-01-01

    ed in the iron hardpan of the mining site and constitutes airon hardpans developed within waste rock pile originated from a former mining

  13. GEOTECHNICAL ASSESSMENT AND INSTRUMENTATION NEEDS FOR NUCLEAR WASTE ISOLATION IN CRYSTALLINE AND ARGILLACEOUS ROCKS SYMPOSIUM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01

    Interactions between nuclear waste and surrounding rock.AND INSTRUMENTATION NEEDS FOR NUCLEAR WASTE ISOLATION INwill provide Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation and the

  14. Paradox of Peroxy Defects and Positive Holes in Rocks Part II: Outflow of Electric Currents from Stressed Rocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scoville, John; Freund, Friedemann

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the electrical properties of rocks is of fundamental interest. We report on currents generated when stresses are applied. Loading the center of gabbro tiles, 30x30x0.9 cm$^3$, across a 5 cm diameter piston, leads to positive currents flowing from the center to the unstressed edges. Changing the constant rate of loading over 5 orders of magnitude from 0.2 kPa/s to 20 MPa/s produces positive currents, which start to flow already at low stress levels, <5 MPa. The currents increase as long as stresses increase. At constant load they flow for hours, days, even weeks and months, slowly decreasing with time. When stresses are removed, they rapidly disappear but can be made to reappear upon reloading. These currents are consistent with the stress-activation of peroxy defects, such as O$_3$Si-OO-SiO$_3$, in the matrix of rock-forming minerals. The peroxy break-up leads to positive holes h$^{\\bullet}$, i.e. electronic states associated with O$^-$ in a matrix of O$^{2-}$, plus electrons, e'. Propagating...

  15. Short pulse free electron laser amplifier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schlitt, Leland G. (Livermore, CA); Szoke, Abraham (Fremont, CA)

    1985-01-01

    Method and apparatus for amplification of a laser pulse in a free electron laser amplifier where the laser pulse duration may be a small fraction of the electron beam pulse duration used for amplification. An electron beam pulse is passed through a first wiggler magnet and a short laser pulse to be amplified is passed through the same wiggler so that only the energy of the last fraction, f, (f<1) of the electron beam pulse is consumed in amplifying the laser pulse. After suitable delay of the electron beam, the process is repeated in a second wiggler magnet, a third, . . . , where substantially the same fraction f of the remainder of the electron beam pulse is consumed in amplification of the given short laser pulse in each wiggler magnet region until the useful electron beam energy is substantially completely consumed by amplification of the laser pulse.

  16. Short distance physics with heavy quark potentials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zantow, F; Karsch, Frithjof; Petreczky, P

    2002-01-01

    We present lattice studies of heavy quark potentials in the quenched approximation of QCD at finite temperatures. Both, the color singlet and color averaged potentials are calculated. While the potentials are well known at large distances, we give a detailed analysis of their short distance behavior (from 0.015 fm to 1 fm) near the critical temperature. At these distances we expect that the T-dependent potentials go over into the zero temperature potential. Indeed, we find evidences that the temperature influence gets suppressed and the potentials starts to become a unique function of the underlying distance scale. We use this feature to normalize the heavy quark potentials at short distances and extract the free energy of the quark system in a gluonic heat bath.

  17. A short proof of the unpredictability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, Daniel

    u+m(g1, g2, . .,.gm ) = u(u(. .u.(u(g1) + g2) + . .).+ gm ). This paper presents a short u+ (g1, g2, . .,.gm ) = u+m(g1, g2, . .,.gm ) = u(u(. .u.(u(g1) + g2) + . .).* *+ gm ) for each integer m 0 and each mb-bit string (g1, g2, . .,.gm ). For example, u+ () = u+0() = 0, and u+ (g1, g2

  18. Hydrologic test system for fracture flow studies in crystalline rock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raber, E; Lord, D.; Burklund, P.

    1982-05-05

    A hydrologic test system has been designed to measure the intrinsic permeabilities of individual fractures in crystalline rock. This system is used to conduct constant pressure-declining flow rate and pressure pulse hydraulic tests. The system is composed of four distinct units: (1) the Packer System, (2) Injection system, (3) Collection System, and (4) Electronic Data Acquisition System. The apparatus is built in modules so it can be easily transported and re-assembled. It is also designed to operate over a wide range of pressures (0 to 300 psig) and flow rates (0.2 to 1.0 gal/min). This system has proved extremely effective and versatile in its use at the Climax Facility, Nevada Test Site.

  19. Constitutive Theory for Velocity Dispersion in Rock with Dual Porosity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, H F; Berryman, J G

    2002-03-28

    The high frequency behavior of the bulk modulus of fluid-saturated rock can be obtained from a double-porosity constitutive model, which is a direct conceptual extension of Biot's (1941) constitutive equations and which provides additional stiffening due to unrelaxed induced pore pressures in the soft porosity phase. Modeling the stiffening of the shear modulus at high frequency requires an effective medium average over the unequal induced pore pressures in cracks of different orientations. The implicit assumptions are that pore fluid equilibration does not occur between cracks of different orientations and between cracks and porous matrix. The correspondence between the constitutive equations of Berryman and Wang (1995) and Mavko and Jizba (1991) is explicitly noted.

  20. Predicting stress-induced velocity anisotropy in rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mavko, G.; Mukerji, T.; Godfrey, N. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Rock Physics Lab.] [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Rock Physics Lab.

    1995-07-01

    A simple transformation, using measured isotropic V{sub P} and V{sub S} versus hydrostatic pressure, is presented for predicting stress-induced seismic velocity anisotropy in rocks. The compliant, crack-like portions of the pore space are characterized by generalized compressional and shear compliances that are estimated form the isotropic V{sub P} and V{sub S}. The physical assumption that the compliant porosity is crack-like means that the pressure dependence of the generalized compliances is governed primarily by normal tractions resolved across cracks and defects. This allows the measured pressure dependence to be mapped form the hydrostatic stress state to any applied nonhydrostatic stress. Predicted P- and S-wave velocities agree reasonably well with uniaxial stress data for Barre Granite and Massillon Sandstone. While it is mechanically similar to methods based on idealized ellipsoidal cracks, the approach is relatively independent of any assumed crack geometry and is not limited to small crack densities.

  1. Seismic-Scale Rock Physics of Methane Hydrate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amos Nur

    2009-01-08

    We quantify natural methane hydrate reservoirs by generating synthetic seismic traces and comparing them to real seismic data: if the synthetic matches the observed data, then the reservoir properties and conditions used in synthetic modeling might be the same as the actual, in-situ reservoir conditions. This approach is model-based: it uses rock physics equations that link the porosity and mineralogy of the host sediment, pressure, and hydrate saturation, and the resulting elastic-wave velocity and density. One result of such seismic forward modeling is a catalogue of seismic reflections of methane hydrate which can serve as a field guide to hydrate identification from real seismic data. We verify this approach using field data from known hydrate deposits.

  2. Sedimentary basin geochemistry and fluid/rock interactions workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1991-12-31

    Fundamental research related to organic geochemistry, fluid-rock interactions, and the processes by which fluids migrate through basins has long been a part of the U.S. Department of Energy Geosciences program. Objectives of this program were to emphasize those principles and processes which would be applicable to a wide range of problems associated with petroleum discovery, occurrence and extraction, waste disposal of all kinds, and environmental management. To gain a better understanding of the progress being made in understanding basinal fluids, their geochemistry and movement, and related research, and to enhance communication and interaction between principal investigators and DOE and other Federal program managers interested in this topic, this workshop was organized by the School of Geology and Geophysics and held in Norman, Oklahoma in November, 1991.

  3. Saturated Zone Plumes in Volcanic Rock: Implications for Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Kelkar; R. Roback; B. Robinson; G. Srinivasan; C. Jones; P. Reimus

    2006-02-14

    This paper presents a literature survey of the occurrences of radionuclide plumes in saturated, fractured rocks. Three sites, Idaho National laboratory, Hanford, and Oak Ridge are discussed in detail. Results of a modeling study are also presented showing that the length to width ratio of a plume starting within the repository footprint at the Yucca Mountain Project site, decreases from about 20:1 for the base case to about 4:1 for a higher value of transverse dispersivity, indicating enhanced lateral spreading of the plume. Due to the definition of regulatory requirements, this lateral spreading does not directly impact breakthrough curves at the 18 km compliance boundary, however it increases the potential that a plume will encounter reducing conditions, thus significantly retarding the transport of sorbing radionuclides.

  4. Uranium and thorium decay series disequilibria in young volcanic rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, R.W.

    1988-01-01

    Two of the central questions in igneous geochemistry that study of radioactive disequilibria can help to answer are: what are the rates of magma genesis; and what are the timescales of magma separation and transport. In addition to the temporal information that may be extracted from disequilibria data, the {sup 230}Th/{sup 232}Th of a young rock may be used as a tracer of the Th/U ratio of its source region. Measurements were made by isotope dilution alpha-spectrometry of {sup 238}U, {sup 234}U, {sup 230}Th, and {sup 232}Th in 20 subduction related, 3 oceanic intraplate, and 10 continental intraplate volcanics. {sup 210}Pb was measured in all, {sup 226}Ra was measured in about half, and {sup 228}Th was measured in 10 of the most recent samples. Disequilibrium between {sup 228}Th and {sup 232}Th was found only in the Nacarbonatite samples from Oldoinyo Lengai volcano in Tanzania, which is attributable to {sup 228}Ra/{sup 232}Th {approximately} 27 at the time of eruption. These rocks also have {sup 226}Ra/{sup 230}Th > 60. Three Ra-enrichment models are developed which constrain carbonatite magma formation at less than 20 years before eruption. The effects of different partial melting processes on the {sup 238}U decay series are investigated. If mid-ocean ridge basalts are formed by a dynamic melting process, the {sup 230}Th/{sup 232}Th of the basalts provides a minimum estimate of the Th/U ratio of the source region. The {sup 238}U enrichment in arc volcanics is probably the results of metasomatism of the source by fluids derived from the subducting slab, and the {sup 230}Th enrichment observed for other volcanics is probably due to the partial melting process in the absence of U-bearing fluids.

  5. Pore fluid effects on seismic velocity in anisotropic rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mukerji, T.; Mavko, G. (Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Geophysics)

    1994-02-01

    A simple new technique predicts the high- and low-frequency saturated velocities in anisotropic rocks entirely in terms of measurable dry rock properties without the need for idealized crack geometries. Measurements of dry velocity versus pressure and porosity versus pressure contain all of the necessary information for predicting the frequency-dependent effects of fluid saturation. Furthermore, these measurements automatically incorporate all pore interaction, so there is no limitation to low crack density. The velocities are found to depend on five key interrelated variables: frequency, the distribution of compliant crack-like porosity, the intrinsic or noncrack anisotropy, fluid viscosity and compressibility, and effective pressure. The sensitivity of velocities to saturation is generally greater at high frequencies than low frequencies. The magnitude of the differences from dry to saturated and from low frequency to high frequency is determined by the compliant or crack-like porosity. Predictions of saturated velocities based on dry data for sandstone and granite show that compressional velocities generally increase with saturation and with frequency. However, the degree of compressional wave anisotropy may either increase or decrease upon saturation depending on the crack distribution, the effective pressure, and the frequency at which the measurements are made. Shear-wave velocities can either increase or decrease with saturation, and the degree of anisotropy depends on the microstructure, pressure, and frequency. Consequently great care must be taken when interpreting observed velocity anisotropy for measurements at low frequencies, typical of in situ observations, will generally be different from those at high frequencies, typical of the laboratory.

  6. Spatial statistics for predicting flow through a rock fracture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coakley, K.J.

    1989-03-01

    Fluid flow through a single rock fracture depends on the shape of the space between the upper and lower pieces of rock which define the fracture. In this thesis, the normalized flow through a fracture, i.e. the equivalent permeability of a fracture, is predicted in terms of spatial statistics computed from the arrangement of voids, i.e. open spaces, and contact areas within the fracture. Patterns of voids and contact areas, with complexity typical of experimental data, are simulated by clipping a correlated Gaussian process defined on a N by N pixel square region. The voids have constant aperture; the distance between the upper and lower surfaces which define the fracture is either zero or a constant. Local flow is assumed to be proportional to local aperture cubed times local pressure gradient. The flow through a pattern of voids and contact areas is solved using a finite-difference method. After solving for the flow through simulated 10 by 10 by 30 pixel patterns of voids and contact areas, a model to predict equivalent permeability is developed. The first model is for patterns with 80% voids where all voids have the same aperture. The equivalent permeability of a pattern is predicted in terms of spatial statistics computed from the arrangement of voids and contact areas within the pattern. Four spatial statistics are examined. The change point statistic measures how often adjacent pixel alternate from void to contact area (or vice versa ) in the rows of the patterns which are parallel to the overall flow direction. 37 refs., 66 figs., 41 tabs.

  7. /sup 10/Be profiles in lunar surface rock 68815

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nishiizumi, K.; Imamura, M.; Kohl, C.P.; Nagai, H.; Kobayashi, K.; Yoshida, K.; Yamashita, H.; Reedy, R.C.; Honda, M.; Arnold, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    Cosmic ray produced /sup 10/Be (t/sub 1/2/ = 1.6 x 10/sup 6/ years) activities have been measured in fourteen carefully ground samples of lunar surface rock 68815. The /sup 10/Be profiles from 0 to 4 mm are nearly flat for all three surface angles measured and show a very slight increase with depth from the surface to a depth of 1.5 cm. These depth profiles are in contrast to the SCR (solar cosmic ray) produced /sup 26/Al and /sup 53/Mn profiles measured from these same samples. There is no sign of SCR produced /sup 10/Be in this rock. The discrepancy between the data and the Reedy-Arnold theoretical calculation (about 2 dpm /sup 10/Be/kg at the surface) can be explained in two ways: (1) the low energy proton induced cross sections for /sup 10/Be production from oxygen are really lower than those used in the calculations or, (2) compared to the reported fits for /sup 26/Al and /sup 53/Mn, the solar proton spectral shape is actually softer (exponential rigidity parameter Ro less than 100 MV), the omnidirectional flux above 10 MeV is higher (more than 70 protons/cm/sup 2/ s), and the erosion rate is higher (greater than 1.3 mm/My). /sup 10/Be, as a high energy product, is a very useful nuclide for helping to obtain the SCR spectral shape in the past. 23 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  8. ISRM -Lisbon -General Report Theme T1 -Robert Hack -10 July 2007 1 Rock Engineering and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hack, Robert

    ISRM - Lisbon - General Report Theme T1 - Robert Hack - 10 July 2007 1 Rock Engineering Observation (ITC), The Netherlands Robert Hack General Report International Society for Rock Mechanics ­ ISRM 11th Congress ­ Lisbon - July 2007 #12;ISRM - Lisbon - General Report Theme T1 - Robert Hack - 10

  9. Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development in the USA David Duchane and Donald Brown

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development in the USA by David Duchane and Donald Brown Los of the world's store of geothermal energy. The real potential for growth in the use of geothermal energy lies-engineered geothermal reservoir in hot, crystalline rock by the application of hydraulic fracturing techniques

  10. Time-lapse monitoring of rock properties with coda wave interferometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snieder, Roel

    exploited ultrasonic coda waves to monitor time-varying rock properties in a laboratory environment. We haveTime-lapse monitoring of rock properties with coda wave interferometry Alexandre Gre^t,1 Roel dam and volcano monitoring, time-lapse reservoir characterization, earthquake relocation, and stress

  11. SPE 159255-PP Rock Classification from Conventional Well Logs in Hydrocarbon-Bearing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torres-Verdín, Carlos

    SPE 159255-PP Rock Classification from Conventional Well Logs in Hydrocarbon-Bearing Shale Andrew C typing method for application in hydrocarbon-bearing shale (specifically source rock) reservoirs using-hoc correlations where the interpretation becomes a core matching exercise. Scale effects on measurements

  12. Analysis of a mesoscale infiltration and water seepage test in unsaturated fractured rock: Spatial variabilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Quanlin

    Analysis of a mesoscale infiltration and water seepage test in unsaturated fractured rock: Spatial 2006 Abstract A mesoscale (21 m in flow distance) infiltration and seepage test was recently conducted flow in fractured rock at mesoscale or a larger scale is not necessarily conditional explicitly

  13. Nondestructive and automated testing for soil and rock properties. ASTM special technical publication 1350

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marr, W.A.; Fairhurst, C.E.

    1999-07-01

    The purpose of the symposium was to highlight recent developments in nondestructive and automated testing for soil and rock properties. Speakers present results of recent research in these areas that have practical application for the rapid and economical testing of soil and rock. Authors were encouraged to identify which testing equipment and methods have sufficient practical application to warrant standards development.

  14. Determining the modal mineralogy of mafic and ultramafic igneous rocks using thermal emission spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton, Victoria E.

    Determining the modal mineralogy of mafic and ultramafic igneous rocks using thermal emission their thermal infrared emission spectra using a linear deconvolution approach, which uses a library of end-member mineral spectra to model a bulk rock spectrum. Over 90% of the modes obtained from thermal emission

  15. STUDY OF LOSS AND DELAY OF SALMON PASSING ROCK ISLAND DAM, COLUMBIA RIVER, 1954-56

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STUDY OF LOSS AND DELAY OF SALMON PASSING ROCK ISLAND DAM, COLUMBIA RIVER, 1954-56 By ROBERT R. PORTLAND. OREGON ABSTRACT To determine loss or delay of salmonids in passing Rock Island Dam tagged and released both above and below the dam in 1954-56. They were subsequently observed passing

  16. The influence of mineral detritus on rock varnish formation Ronald I. Dorn a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dorn, Ron

    The influence of mineral detritus on rock varnish formation Ronald I. Dorn a, , David H. Krinsley b of aeolian mineral is not incorporated into manganiferous rock varnish. Of those dust particles that are enveloped, submicron sized oval-shaped quartz minerals are the most common type of detritus seen

  17. NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS OF LONG TERM UNSATURATED FLOW AND ACID MINE DRAINAGE AT WASTE ROCK PILES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aubertin, Michel

    NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS OF LONG TERM UNSATURATED FLOW AND ACID MINE DRAINAGE AT WASTE ROCK PILES Omar present a numerical modeling study of unsaturated water flow and acid mine drainage in idealized (but of oxygen diffusion and acid mine drainage through the waste rock piles showed that oxygen is generally

  18. SOURCES AND EFFECTS OF MINING-RELATED AND NATURAL ACID ROCK DRAINAGE QUANTIFIED USING TRACER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryan, Joe

    SOURCES AND EFFECTS OF MINING-RELATED AND NATURAL ACID ROCK DRAINAGE QUANTIFIED USING TRACER Acid Rock Drainage Quantified Using Tracer Dilution, Coal Creek Watershed, Gunnison County, Colorado of Mining-Related and Natural Acid Drainage Quantified Using Tracer Dilution, Coal Creek Watershed, Gunnison

  19. Elastic waves push organic fluids from reservoir rock Igor A. Beresnev,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beresnev, Igor

    Elastic waves push organic fluids from reservoir rock Igor A. Beresnev,1 R. Dennis Vigil,2 Wenqing in a laboratory experiment, in which residual saturation is created in a glass micromodel, and mobilization waves push organic fluids from reservoir rock, Geophys. Res. Lett., 32, L13303, doi:10.1029/ 2005GL

  20. Documenting Visual Quality Controls on the Evaluation of Petroleum Reservoir-rocks through

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliveira, Manuel M.

    , natural gas or water ­ and their permeability ­ the amount of such fluids that can flow through a rockDocumenting Visual Quality Controls on the Evaluation of Petroleum Reservoir-rocks through Ontology and prediction of the quality (porosity, permeability) of petroleum reservoirs during their exploration

  1. Origin of retrograde fluids in metamorphic rocks B. Yardley*, S. Gleeson, S. Bruce, D. Banks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banks, David

    infiltration of near-surface waters, rather than to the action of deep metamorphic fluids. In this study, we basement rocks is often the result of infiltration of water from sedimentary basins or the surface. At high examine the evidence for deep infiltration of surface-derived waters into metamorphic basement rocks

  2. Apatite in early Archean Isua supracrustal rocks, southern West Greenland: its origin, association with graphite and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arrhenius, Gustaf

    (Mojzsis et al., 1996; Rosing, 1999). The minimum age of Isua supracrustal rocks is :/ 3.7 Ga (Moorbath et to be reached; either :/3.85 Ga (Nutman et al., 1997b; Mojzsis and Harrison, 2000) or :/3.65 Ga (Kamber and generally high strain of Isua and Akilia rocks respectively (Bridgewater and McGregor, 1974; Griffin et al

  3. MAGNETIC ANISOTROPY AS AN AID TO IDENTIFYING CRM AND DRM IN RED SEDIMENTARY ROCKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    the remanence anisotropy of hematite-bearing sedimentary rocks. It also shows that very high magnetic fieldsMAGNETIC ANISOTROPY AS AN AID TO IDENTIFYING CRM AND DRM IN RED SEDIMENTARY ROCKS K.P. KODAMA1 June, 2004; Accepted: August 25, 2004 ABSTRACT To further evaluate the potential of magnetic anisotropy

  4. Final Report: Geothermal Dual Acoustic Tool for Measurement of Rock Stress

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Normann, Randy A.

    2014-12-01

    This paper outlines the technology need for a rock formation stress measurement in future EGS wells. This paper reports on the results of work undertaken under a Phase I, DOE/SBIR on the feasibility to build an acoustic well logging tool for measuring rock formation stress.

  5. Final Report. Geothermal Dual Acoustic Tool for Measurement of Rock Stress

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Normann, Randy A

    2014-12-01

    This paper outlines the technology need for a rock formation stress measurement in future EGS wells. This paper reports on the results of work undertaken under a Phase I, DOE/SBIR on the feasibility to build an acoustic well logging tool for measuring rock formation stress.

  6. Aggregate production: Fines generation during rock crushing M.S. Guimaraes a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palomino, Angelica M.

    Aggregate production: Fines generation during rock crushing M.S. Guimaraes a , J.R. Valdes b , A.M. Palomino c,, J.C. Santamarina d a Aalborg Portland, Denmark b Department of Civil and Environmental Eng; accepted 16 August 2006 Available online 25 September 2006 Abstract The energy required to crush rocks

  7. Solid As A Rock: The Utilization of Polyvinyl Acetate to Stabilize and Consolidate Museum Sandstone Objects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rock, Chris

    Solid As A Rock: The Utilization of Polyvinyl Acetate to Stabilize and Consolidate Museum Sandstone) commonly used sandstone in creating various objects. Sandstone slabs used in hearth construction these objects unstable. Sandstone is a porous rock. The heat treatment and weathering drives off water and makes

  8. Triple oxygen isotope variations in sedimentary rocks Naomi E. Levin a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . However, recent oxygen isotope measurements of terrestrial rocks, minerals and waters also reveal common for various equilibrium and kinetic mechanisms. Here we pres- ent triple oxygen isotope data on sedimentary; Pack and Herwartz, 2014), but they are gener- ally overlooked in analysis of terrestrial rocks

  9. The development of short sea shipping in the United States : a dynamic alternative

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Connor, Peter H. (Peter Harold)

    2004-01-01

    Current projections show that U.S. international trade is expected to reach nearly two billion tons by 2020, approximately double today's level. With such a large forecasted growth in trade coming through the United States ...

  10. Zangerl, C., Eberhardt, E., Loew, S., Evans, K., Coupled hydromechanical modelling of surface subsidence in crystalline rock masses due to tunnel drainage. ISRM 2003Technology roadmap for rock mechanics, South African Institute of Mining and Metallurgy, 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eberhardt, Erik

    subsidence in crystalline rock masses due to tunnel drainage. ISRM 2003­Technology roadmap for rock mechanics subsidence in crystalline rock masses due to tunnel drainage C. Zangerl, E. Eberhardt, S. Loew, K.F. Evans are rarely observed and in the past, geotechnical engineers would not expect substantial subsidence to occur

  11. Naked Short Selling: Is it Information-Based Trading? 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Hu

    2012-10-19

    Naked short selling occurs when a short seller fails to deliver shares on the settlement day. The business press and many corporate managers characterize it as abusive price manipulation, alleging that selling nonexistent shares causes a price...

  12. Hopper compilers and DDT short outage next Wed, May 16

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    compilers and DDT short outage next Wed, May 16 Hopper compilers and DDT short outage next Wed, May 16 May 10, 2012 (0 Comments) Due to a scheduled maintenance for the License...

  13. Divergence of opinions, short sales, and asset prices 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erturk, Bilal

    2009-06-02

    Prior research has established that stocks with high dispersion of earnings forecasts or short interest are associated with low subsequent returns. Assuming dispersion of forecasts is a proxy for divergence of opinions and short interest is a proxy...

  14. Short fiction creative writing: storytelling with a film perspective 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francis, James

    2005-08-29

    The research and material contained in this thesis will examine short story theory from current perspectives in the field and provide a response to questions posed about the composition of short fiction. A critical ...

  15. Short-Term Energy Carbon Dioxide Emissions Forecasts August 2009

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2009-01-01

    Supplement to the Short-Term Energy Outlook. Short-term projections for U.S. carbon dioxide emissions of the three fossil fuels: coal, natural gas, and petroleum.

  16. Longitudinal Diagnostics for Short Electron Beam Bunches

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loos, H.; ,

    2010-06-11

    Single-pass free electron lasers require high peak currents from ultra-short electron bunches to reach saturation and an accurate measurement of bunch length and longitudinal bunch profile is necessary to control the bunch compression process from low to high beam energy. The various state-of-the-art diagnostics methods from ps to fs time scales using coherent radiation detection, RF deflection, and other techniques are presented. The use of linear accelerators as drivers for free electron lasers (FEL) and the advent of single-pass (SASE) FELs has driven the development of a wide range of diagnostic techniques for measuring the length and longitudinal distribution of short and ultra-short electron bunches. For SASE FELs the radiation power and the length of the undulator needed to achieve saturation depend strongly on the charge density of the electron beam. In the case of X-ray FELs, this requires the accelerator to produce ultra-high brightness beams with micron size transverse normalized emittances and peak currents of several kA through several stages of magnetic bunch compression. Different longitudinal diagnostics are employed to measure the peak current and bunch profile along these stages. The measurement techniques can be distinguished into different classes. Coherent methods detect the light emitted from the beam by some coherent radiation process (spectroscopic measurement), or directly measure the Coulomb field traveling with the beam (electro-optic). Phase space manipulation techniques map the time coordinate onto a transverse dimension and then use conventional transverse beam diagnostics (transverse deflector, rf zero-phasing). Further methods measure the profile or duration of an incoherent light pulse emitted by the bunch at wavelengths much shorted than the bunch length (streak camera, fluctuation technique) or modulate the electron beam at an optical wavelength and then generate a narrow bandwidth radiation pulse with the longitudinal profile of the beam mapped onto (optical replicator). The operational needs for bunch length measurements to have fast acquisitions, to be used in feedback systems, to distinguish pulse to pulse changes and to be nondestructive or parasitically have resulted into developing many of the diagnostics into single-shot techniques and in the following the main discussion will emphasize them.

  17. Short wavelength ion temperature gradient turbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chowdhury, J.; Ganesh, R. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar (India); Brunner, S.; Lapillonne, X.; Villard, L. [CRPP, Association EURATOM-Confederation Suisse, EPFL, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Jenko, F. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2012-10-15

    The ion temperature gradient (ITG) mode in the high wavenumber regime (k{sub y}{rho}{sub s}>1), referred to as short wavelength ion temperature gradient mode (SWITG) is studied using the nonlinear gyrokinetic electromagnetic code GENE. It is shown that, although the SWITG mode may be linearly more unstable than the standard long wavelength (k{sub y}{rho}{sub s}<1) ITG mode, nonlinearly its contribution to the total thermal ion heat transport is found to be low. We interpret this as resulting from an increased zonal flow shearing effect on the SWITG mode suppression.

  18. Neutron scattering and extra short range interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. V. Nesvizhevsky; G. Pignol; K. V. Protasov

    2007-11-14

    The available data on neutron scattering were analyzed to constrain a hypothetical new short-range interaction. We show that these constraints are several orders of magnitude better than those usually cited in the range between 1 pm and 5 nm. This distance range occupies an intermediate space between collider searches for strongly coupled heavy bosons and searches for new weak macroscopic forces. We emphasise the reliability of the neutron constraints in so far as they provide several independent strategies. We have identified the most promising way to improve them.

  19. Ion Acceleration by Short Chirped Laser Pulses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jian-Xing; Keitel, Christoph H; Harman, Zoltán

    2015-01-01

    Direct laser acceleration of ions by short frequency-chirped laser pulses is investigated theoretically. We demonstrate that intense beams of ions with a kinetic energy broadening of about 1 % can be generated. The chirping of the laser pulse allows the particles to gain kinetic energies of hundreds of MeVs, which is required for hadron cancer therapy, from pulses of energies of the order of 100 J. It is shown that few-cycle chirped pulses can accelerate ions more efficiently than long ones, i.e. higher ion kinetic energies are reached with the same amount of total electromagnetic pulse energy.

  20. August 2012 Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1 Table 1.101 (Million Short6 Macroeconomic8

  1. Short Term Energy Outlook, February 2003

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979 1.988 1.996 2.003 1990-2016November3 1 Short-Term Energy

  2. Short Term Energy Outlook, January 2003

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979 1.988 1.996 2.003 1990-2016November3 1 Short-Term Energy3

  3. Short Term Energy Outlook, March 2003

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979 1.988 1.996 2.003 1990-2016November3 1 Short-Term

  4. Gasoline prices continue to fall (short version)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural GasNatural GasEIA lowers 2015ValuesEFueluplonglong (short

  5. Gasoline prices continue to fall (short version)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural GasNatural GasEIA lowerslong version) The U.S. average(short

  6. Gasoline prices continue to fall (short version)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural GasNatural GasEIA lowerslong version) The U.S.short version)

  7. Gasoline prices continue to fall (short version)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural GasNatural GasEIA lowerslong version) The U.S.short

  8. Gasoline prices fall slightly (short version)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural GasNatural GasEIA lowerslong4, 2014short version) The U.S.

  9. Gasoline prices inch down (Short version)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural GasNatural GasEIA lowerslong4, 2014short version) The

  10. Gasoline prices inch down slightly (short version)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural GasNatural GasEIA lowerslong4, 2014short

  11. Evaluation of Used Fuel Disposition in Clay-Bearing Rock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jové Colón, Carlos F.; Weck, Philippe F.; Sassani, David H.; Zheng, Liange; Rutqvist, Jonny; Steefel, Carl I.; Kim, Kunhwi; Nakagawa, Seiji; Houseworth, James; Birkholzer, Jens; Caporuscio, Florie A.; Cheshire, Michael; Rearick, Michael S.; McCarney, Mary K.; Zavarin, Mavrik; Benedicto, Ana; Kersting, Annie B.; Sutton, Mark; Jerden, James; Frey, Kurt E.; Copple, Jacqueline M.; Ebert, William

    2014-08-29

    Radioactive waste disposal in shale/argillite rock formations has been widely considered given its desirable isolation properties (low permeability), geochemically reduced conditions, anomalous groundwater pressures, and widespread geologic occurrence. Clay/shale rock formations are characterized by their high content of clay minerals such as smectites and illites where diffusive transport and chemisorption phenomena predominate. These, in addition to low permeability, are key attributes of shale to impede radionuclide mobility. Shale host-media has been comprehensively studied in international nuclear waste repository programs as part of underground research laboratories (URLs) programs in Switzerland, France, Belgium, and Japan. These investigations, in some cases a decade or more long, have produced a large but fundamental body of information spanning from site characterization data (geological, hydrogeological, geochemical, geomechanical) to controlled experiments on the engineered barrier system (EBS) (barrier clay and seals materials). Evaluation of nuclear waste disposal in shale formations in the USA was conducted in the late 70’s and mid 80’s. Most of these studies evaluated the potential for shale to host a nuclear waste repository but not at the programmatic level of URLs in international repository programs. This report covers various R&D work and capabilities relevant to disposal of heat-generating nuclear waste in shale/argillite media. Integration and cross-fertilization of these capabilities will be utilized in the development and implementation of the shale/argillite reference case planned for FY15. Disposal R&D activities under the UFDC in the past few years have produced state-of-the-art modeling capabilities for coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical (THMC), used fuel degradation (source term), and thermodynamic modeling and database development to evaluate generic disposal concepts. The THMC models have been developed for shale repository leveraging in large part on the information garnered in URLs and laboratory data to test and demonstrate model prediction capability and to accurately represent behavior of the EBS and the natural (barrier) system (NS). In addition, experimental work to improve our understanding of clay barrier interactions and TM couplings at high temperatures are key to evaluate thermal effects as a result of relatively high heat loads from waste and the extent of sacrificial zones in the EBS. To assess the latter, experiments and modeling approaches have provided important information on the stability and fate of barrier materials under high heat loads. This information is central to the assessment of thermal limits and the implementation of the reference case when constraining EBS properties and the repository layout (e.g., waste package and drift spacing). This report is comprised of various parts, each one describing various R&D activities applicable to shale/argillite media. For example, progress made on modeling and experimental approaches to analyze physical and chemical interactions affecting clay in the EBS, NS, and used nuclear fuel (source term) in support of R&D objectives. It also describes the development of a reference case for shale/argillite media. The accomplishments of these activities are summarized as follows: ? Development of a reference case for shale/argillite; ? Investigation of Reactive Transport and Coupled THM Processes in EBS: FY14; ? Update on Experimental Activities on Buffer/Backfill Interactions at elevated Pressure and Temperature; ? Thermodynamic Database Development: Evaluation Strategy, Modeling Tools, First-Principles Modeling of Clay, and Sorption Database Assessment; ? ANL Mixed Potential Model For Used Fuel Degradation: Application to Argillite and Crystalline Rock Environments.

  12. Hot dry rock geothermal energy. Draft final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    This second EPRI workshop on hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal energy, held in May 1994, focused on the status of worldwide HDR research and development and used that status review as the starting point for discussions of what could and should be done next: by U.S. federal government, by U.S. industry, by U.S. state governments, and by international organizations or through international agreements. The papers presented and the discussion that took place indicate that there is a community of researchers and industrial partners that could join forces, with government support, to begin a new effort on hot dry rock geothermal development. This new heat mining effort would start with site selection and confirmatory studies, done concurrently. The confirmatory studies would test past evaluations against the most current results (from the U.S. site at Fenton Hill, New Mexico, and from the two sites in Japan, the one in Russia, and the two in western Europe) and the best models of relevant physical and economic aspects. Site selection would be done in the light of the confirmatory studies and would be influenced by the need to find a site where success is probable and which is representative enough of other sites so that its success would imply good prospects for success at numerous other sites. The test of success would be circulation between a pair of wells, or more wells, in a way that confirmed, with the help of flow modeling, that a multi-well system would yield temperatures, flows and lifetimes that support economically feasible power generation. The flow modeling would have to have previously achieved its own confirmation from relevant data taken from both heat mining and conventional hydrothermal geothermal experience. There may be very relevant experience from the enhancement of ''hot wet rock'' sites, i.e., sites where hydrothermal reservoirs lack, or have come to lack, enough natural water or steam and are helped by water injected cold and produced hot. The new site would have to be selected in parallel with the confirmatory studies because it would have to be modeled as part of the studies and because its similarity to other candidate sites must be known well enough to assure that results at the selected site are relevant to many others. Also, the industry partners in the joint effort at the new site must be part of the confirmatory studies, because they must be convinced of the economic feasibility. This meeting may have brought together the core of people who can make such a joint effort take place. EPRI sponsored the organization of this meeting in order to provide utilities with an update on the prospects for power generation via heat mining. Although the emerging rules for electric utilities competing in power generation make it very unlikely that the rate-payers of any one utility (or small group of utilities) can pay the differential to support this new heat mining research and development effort, the community represented at this meeting may be able to make the case for national or international support of a new heat mining effort, based on the potential size and economics of this resource as a benefit for the nation as a whole and as a contribution to reduced emissions of fossil CO{sub 2} worldwide.

  13. An Appraisal of Underground Radioactive Waste Disposal in Argillaceous and Crystalline Rocks: Some Geochemical, Geomechanical, and Hydrogeological Questions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apps, J.A.

    2011-01-01

    fracturing would be advantageous in retarding migration of hazardous materials from a repository in these rocks by sorption, the hydraulic

  14. Short-term energy outlook quarterly projections. Third quarter 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-07-01

    This document presents the 1997 third quarter short term energy projections. Information is presented for fossil fuels and renewable energy.

  15. E TON Solar Tech | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EA Jump to:of the NationalDynetek Europe GmbH Jump to:OpenMoli

  16. Bioenergy Impacts Â… Billion Dry Tons

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based Fuels Researchof Energy|Make Fuels and ChemicalsEnergyBioenergyand

  17. Fracture and Healing of Rock Salt Related to Salt Caverns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chan, K.S.; Fossum, A.F.; Munson, D.E.

    1999-03-01

    In recent years, serious investigations of potential extension of the useful life of older caverns or of the use of abandoned caverns for waste disposal have been of interest to the technical community. All of the potential applications depend upon understanding the reamer in which older caverns and sealing systems can fail. Such an understanding will require a more detailed knowledge of the fracture of salt than has been necessary to date. Fortunately, the knowledge of the fracture and healing of salt has made significant advances in the last decade, and is in a position to yield meaningful insights to older cavern behavior. In particular, micromechanical mechanisms of fracture and the concept of a fracture mechanism map have been essential guides, as has the utilization of continuum damage mechanics. The Multimechanism Deformation Coupled Fracture (MDCF) model, which is summarized extensively in this work was developed specifically to treat both the creep and fracture of salt, and was later extended to incorporate the fracture healing process known to occur in rock salt. Fracture in salt is based on the formation and evolution of microfractures, which may take the form of wing tip cracks, either in the body or the boundary of the grain. This type of crack deforms under shear to produce a strain, and furthermore, the opening of the wing cracks produce volume strain or dilatancy. In the presence of a confining pressure, microcrack formation may be suppressed, as is often the case for triaxial compression tests or natural underground stress situations. However, if the confining pressure is insufficient to suppress fracture, then the fractures will evolve with time to give the characteristic tertiary creep response. Two first order kinetics processes, closure of cracks and healing of cracks, control the healing process. Significantly, volume strain produced by microfractures may lead to changes in the permeability of the salt, which can become a major concern in cavern sealing and operation. The MDCF model is used in three simulations of field experiments in which indirect measures were obtained of the generation of damage. The results of the simulations help to verify the model and suggest that the model captures the correct fracture behavior of rock salt. The model is used in this work to estimate the generation and location of damage around a cylindrical storage cavern. The results are interesting because stress conditions around the cylindrical cavern do not lead to large amounts of damage. Moreover, the damage is such that general failure can not readily occur, nor does the extent of the damage suggest possible increased permeation when the surrounding salt is impermeable.

  18. Short-term energy outlook quarterly projections. First quarter 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-07

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares quarterly, short- term energy supply, demand, and price projections for publication in February, May, August, and November in the Short-Term Energy Outlook (Outlook). An annual supplement analyzes the performance of previous forecasts, compares recent cases with those of other forecasting services, and discusses current topics related to the short-term energy markets.

  19. Transient channel incision along Bolinas Ridge, California: Evidence for differential rock uplift adjacent to the San Andreas fault

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heimsath, Arjun M.

    Transient channel incision along Bolinas Ridge, California: Evidence for differential rock uplift as an index of rock uplift rate in steady state landscapes. Here we extend this analysis to landscapes form and inferred incision rate are explained by differential rock uplift within the region east

  20. Finite Element Solution of Nonlinear Transient Rock Damage with Application in Geomechanics of Oil and Gas Reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patzek, Tadeusz W.

    the geomechanics of oil and gas reservoirs. The fragile microstructure of some rocks makes it difficult to predict of Steel, Aluminum, Concrete, etc. Moreover, the pattern of rock damage in oil and gas reservoirsFinite Element Solution of Nonlinear Transient Rock Damage with Application in Geomechanics of Oil

  1. Geological Field Trips UHP eclogite and garnet ultramafic rock in the Cuaba Unit, Rio San Juan Metamorphic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abbott Jr., Richard N.

    1 Geological Field Trips UHP eclogite and garnet ultramafic rock in the Cuaba Unit, Rio San Juan eclogite and garnet ultramafic rock in the Cuaba Unit, Rio San Juan Metamorphic Complex, Dominican Republic) the UHP rocks in the Cuaba unit of the Rio San Juan complex in the Dominican Republic was the second

  2. On the Relationship between Stress and Elastic Strain for Porous and Fractured Rock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Hui-Hai; Rutqvist, Jonny; Berryman, James G.

    2008-02-25

    Modeling the mechanical deformations of porous and fractured rocks requires a stress-strain relationship. Experience with inherently heterogeneous earth materials suggests that different varieties of Hook's law should be applied within regions of the rock having significantly different stress-strain behavior, e.g., such as solid phase and various void geometries. We apply this idea by dividing a rock body conceptually into two distinct parts. The natural strain (volume change divided by rock volume at the current stress state), rather than the engineering strain (volume change divided by the unstressed rock volume), should be used in Hooke's law for accurate modeling of the elastic deformation of that part of the pore volume subject to a relatively large degree of relative deformation (i.e., cracks or fractures). This approach permits the derivation of constitutive relations between stress and a variety of mechanical and/or hydraulic rock properties. We show that the theoretical predictions of this method are generally consistent with empirical expressions (from field data) and also laboratory rock experimental data.

  3. Short-term energy outlook, January 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-01-01

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares the Short-Term Energy Outlook (energy supply, demand, and price projections) monthly. The forecast period for this issue of the Outlook extends from January 1999 through December 2000. Data values for the fourth quarter 1998, however, are preliminary EIA estimates (for example, some monthly values for petroleum supply and disposition are derived in part from weekly data reported in EIA`s Weekly Petroleum Status Report) or are calculated from model simulations that use the latest exogenous information available (for example, electricity sales and generation are simulated by using actual weather data). The historical energy data, compiled in the January 1999 version of the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS) database, are mostly EIA data regularly published in the Monthly Energy Review, Petroleum Supply Monthly, and other EIA publications. Minor discrepancies between the data in these publications and the historical data in this Outlook are due to independent rounding. The STIFS model is driven principally by three sets of assumptions or inputs: estimates of key macroeconomic variables, world oil price assumptions, and assumptions about the severity of weather. Macroeconomic estimates are produced by DRI/McGraw-Hill but are adjusted by EIA to reflect EIA assumptions about the world price of crude oil, energy product prices, and other assumptions which may affect the macroeconomic outlook. By varying the assumptions, alternative cases are produced by using the STIFS model. 28 figs., 19 tabs.

  4. Short-term energy outlook, July 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-07-01

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares The Short-Term Energy Outlook (energy supply, demand, and price projections) monthly for distribution on the internet at: www.eia.doe.gov/emeu/steo/pub/contents.html. In addition, printed versions of the report are available to subscribers in January, April, July and October. The forecast period for this issue of the Outlook extends from July 1998 through December 1999. Values for second quarter of 1998 data, however, are preliminary EIA estimates (for example, some monthly values for petroleum supply and disposition are derived in part from weekly data reported in EIA`s Weekly Petroleum Status Report) or are calculated from model simulations that use the latest exogenous information available (for example, electricity sales and generation are simulated by using actual weather data). The historical energy data, compiled in the July 1998 version of the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS) database, are mostly EIA data regularly published in the Monthly Energy Review, Petroleum Supply Monthly, and other EIA publications. Minor discrepancies between the data in these publications and the historical data in this Outlook are due to independent rounding. 28 figs., 19 tabs.

  5. Model Evaluation of the Thermo-Hydrological Response in Argillaceous Sedimentary Rock Repository for Direct Disposal of Dual-Purpose Canisters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Liange

    2014-01-01

    Alternative Concepts for Direct Disposal of Dual-PurposeRock Repository for Direct Disposal of Dual-PurposeRock Repository for Direct Disposal of Dual-Purpose

  6. Preliminary validation of rock mass models by comparison to laboratory frictional sliding experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sobolik, S.R.; Miller, J.D.

    1996-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP) is studying Yucca Mountain in southwestern Nevada as a potential site for a high-level nuclear waste repository. Site characterization will be facilitated by the construction of an Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF). The ESF and potential repository will be excavated from both nonwelded and welded ashflow tuff with varying rock quality (degree of welding, rock mass strength, etc.) and fault and fracture characteristics. Design concerns for the construction of these facilities include the integrity of the structure during underground testing operations and, if it occurs, the emplacement and storage of high-level nuclear waste which could increase the local temperatures in the underground rock mass to as high as 300{degrees}C. Because of the associated issues regarding personnel and long-term environmental safety, sophisticated jointed rock mass models will be required to provide a high degree of confidence for decisions regarding the design, site characterization, and licensing of such facilities. The objective of the work documented in this report is to perform code validation calculations for three rock-mass computer models. The three rock-mass computer models used for this report are the discrete element code UDEC, Version 1.82; and the finite element continuum joint models JAC2D Version 5.10 and JAS3D Version 1.1. The rock mass behavior predicted by the models are compared to the results of laboratory experiments on layered polycarbonate (Lexan) and granite plate experiments. These experiments examine the rock mass behavior of well-defined jointed rock structures or models of jointed structures under uniaxial and biaxial loading. The laboratory environment allows control over the boundary conditions, material properties, and quality and quantity of the data obtained.

  7. Rock drilling bit and a method of producing the same

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kane, R.F.; Portugal, J.J.; Kuzniar, P.S.

    1989-09-19

    This patent describes a method for forming a drill bit of the type used for drilling rock and including a drill bit body defining a cutting face having a plurality of hard material cutting inserts mounted in openings formed in the cutting face. The method comprising the steps of: providing a drill bit body formed from a steel capable of being carburized, the body having a cutting face surface; identifying on the cutting face surface those locations wherein insert mounting openings are needed; covering each location with a material capable of preventing penetration of carbon into the bit body in the area of the location during carburizing, the area covered at each such location being at least slightly greater that the size of the insert mounting opening needed; with the insert mounting locations covered, carburizing and heat treating the bit body to case harden the cutting face to a hardness above 50 on the Rockwell C scale; and thereafter, drilling an insert receiving opening at each location and press-fitting hard material cutting inserts into each such opening.

  8. Assessment of industrial minerals and rocks in the controlled area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Castor, S.B.; Lock, D.E.

    1996-08-01

    Yucca Mountain in Nye County, Nevada, is a potential site for a permanent repository for high-level nuclear waste in Miocene ash flow tuff. The Yucca Mountain controlled area occupies approximately 98 km{sup 2} that includes the potential repository site. The Yucca Mountain controlled area is located within the southwestern Nevada volcanic field, a large area of Miocene volcanism that includes at least four major calderas or cauldrons. It is sited on a remnant of a Neogene volcanic plateau that was centered around the Timber Mountain caldera complex. The Yucca Mountain region contains many occurrences of valuable or potentially valuable industrial minerals, including deposits with past or current production of construction aggregate, borate minerals, clay, building stone, fluorspar, silicate, and zeolites. The existence of these deposits in the region and the occurrence of certain mineral materials at Yucca Mountain, indicate that the controlled area may have potential for industrial mineral and rock deposits. Consideration of the industrial mineral potential within the Yucca Mountain controlled area is mainly based on petrographic and lithologic studies of samples from drill holes in Yucca Mountain. Clay minerals, zeolites, fluorite, and barite, as minerals that are produced economically in Nevada, have been identified in samples from drill holes in Yucca Mountain.

  9. PRESENTED BY THE DEPARTMENT OF FILMPRESENTED BY THE DEPARTMENT OF FILM The UNLV Short Film ArchiveThe UNLV Short Film Archive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Lawrence R.

    PRESENTED BY THE DEPARTMENT OF FILMPRESENTED BY THE DEPARTMENT OF FILM The UNLV Short Film ArchiveThe UNLV Short Film Archive 48-HOUR SHORT FILM contest48-HOUR SHORT FILM contest The UNLV Short Film Archive and the Film Dept. are sponsoring the Third Annual 48-HOUR SHORT FILM CONTEST in Las Vegas, Nevada

  10. The Department Of Film andThe Department Of Film and The UNLV Short Film ArchiveThe UNLV Short Film Archive present thepresent the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Lawrence R.

    The Department Of Film andThe Department Of Film and The UNLV Short Film ArchiveThe UNLV Short Film Archive present thepresent the 4848--HOUR SHORT FILM contestHOUR SHORT FILM contest The UNLV Short Film Archive and the Department of Film. are sponsoring the Fifth Annual 48- HOUR SHORT FILM CONTEST in Las

  11. Long pulse production from short pulses

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Toeppen, J.S.

    1994-08-02

    A method of producing a long output pulse from a short pump pulse is disclosed, using an elongated amplified fiber having a doped core that provides an amplifying medium for light of one color when driven into an excited state by light of a shorter wavelength and a surrounding cladding. A seed beam of the longer wavelength is injected into the core at one end of the fiber and a pump pulse of the shorter wavelength is injected into the cladding at the other end of the fiber. The counter-propagating seed beam and pump pulse will produce an amplified output pulse having a time duration equal to twice the transit time of the pump pulse through the fiber plus the length of the pump pulse. 3 figs.

  12. Short course review and the future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corden, Pierce S. [Center for Science, Technology and Security Policy, American Association for the Advancement of Science, Washington, DC 20005 (United States)

    2014-05-09

    The presentations at the short course that were the basis of the present Proceedings covered many critical issues related to the objective of eliminating nuclear weapons as a means of ensuring global security and stability. This paper is based on the concluding talk, which briefly reviewed the course, offered a net assessment of where the project of elimination - a policy objective for nearly all the world's states - stands, and discussed some of the factors that need to be dealt with in achieving a nuclear weapon free world. These include understanding what 'proliferation' means and how it has changed over time, how the spread of nuclear weapons has proceeded over time, both 'vertical' in numbers and 'horizontal' to additional countries, what way the 'vector' of reversing proliferation is pointing, and the roles of nuclear energy and international governance.

  13. Environmental assessment of remedial action at the Slick Rock uranium mill tailings sites, Slick Rock, Colorado. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (42 USC {section}7901 et seq.), hereafter referred to as the UMTRCA, authorized the US Department of Energy (DOE) to clean up two uranium mill tailings processing sites near Slick Rock, Colorado, in San Miquel County. Contaminated materials cover an estimated 63 acres of the Union Carbide (UC) processing site and 15 ac of the North Continent (NC) processing site. The sites are within 1 mile of each other and are adjacent to the Dolores River. The sites contain concrete foundations of mill buildings, tailings piles, and areas contaminated by windblown and waterborne radioactive tailings materials. The total estimated volume of contaminated materials is approximately 621,300 cubic yards (yd{sup 3}). In addition to the contamination in the two processing site areas, four VPs were found to contain contamination. As a result of the tailings being exposed to the environment, contamination associated with the UC and NC sites has leached into shallow ground water. Surface water has not been affected. The closest residence is approximately 0.3 air mi from either site. The proposed action is to remediate the UC and NC sites by removing all contaminated materials within the designing site boundaries or otherwise associated with the sites, and relocating them to, and stabilizing them at, a location approximately 5 road mi northeast of the sites on land administered by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

  14. Petroleum potentialities of central Tunisia as deduced from identification and characterization of oil source rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saidi, M.; Acheche, M.H.; Inoubli, H. (ETAP, Tunis (Tunisia)); Belayouni, H. (Faculte des Sciences de Tunis (Tunisia))

    1991-08-01

    Many potential oil source rocks occur within the Tunisian stratigraphic column, including Silurian-Devonian shales, Albian and upper Albian-Vraconian carbonates, Cenomanian-Turonian black shales and lower Eocene carbonates. This focuses on the inventory of potential oil source rocks in central Tunisia ranging from middle Jurassic to Turonian. The emphasis is on determining their genetic potential and whether they could have generated oil and gas. Geochemical data obtained from the analysis of at least 2,147 samples show this region to be of significant interest as a petroleum prospective area. The main source rocks identified are Toarcian shales, upper Albian-Vraconian carbonates and Cenomanian-Turonian black shales. They contain predominantly type 2 organic matter (oil and gas prone) and are at the low maturity limit of the oil window. The occurrence of those source rocks close to numerous potential reservoir facies supports the conclusion that central Tunisia is a very interesting area for petroleum exploration.

  15. Richard A. Schultz Geomechanics-Rock Fracture Group, Department of Geological

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AUTHORS Richard A. Schultz Geomechanics-Rock Fracture Group, Department of Geological Sciences University (1982), and his Ph.D. in geomechanics from Purdue University (1987). He has worked at the Lunar

  16. Multidisciplinary Imaging of Rock Properties in Carbonate Reservoirs for Flow-Unit Targeting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruppel, Stephen C.

    2002-10-08

    During the period major accomplishments were in (1) characterization of facies and cyclicity in subsurface cores and in outcrop, (2) construction of a preliminary stratigraphic framework, (3) definition of rock fabrics, and (4) correlation of 3-D seismic data.

  17. An Improved Synthesis of BrettPhos- and RockPhos-Type Biarylphosphine Ligands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoshiya, Naoyuki

    Improved processes for the preparation of biphenyl-based phosphine ligands t-BuBrettPhos, RockPhos, and BrettPhos are presented. The new methods, featuring the use of Grignard reagents and catalytic amounts of copper, are ...

  18. Quantifying the Effect of Kerogen on Electrical Resistivity Measurements on Organic-rich Source Rocks 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kethireddy, Nikhil Reddy

    2013-12-04

    Interpretation of electrical resistivity logs in organic-rich source rocks has been challenging for petrophysicists. Conventional resistivity-porosity-saturation models (e.g., Archie’s, Dual-Water, and Waxman-Smits equations) ...

  19. Probabilistic Seismic Demand Model and Fragility Estimates for Symmetric Rigid Blocks Subject to Rocking Motions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bakhtiary, Esmaeel

    2013-01-15

    This thesis presents a probability model to predict the maximum rotation of rocking bodies exposed to seismic excitations given specific earthquake intensity measures. After obtaining the nonlinear equations of motion and clarification...

  20. Photo-Disintegration of the Iron Nucleus in Fractured Magnetite Rocks with Magnetostriction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Widom; J. Swain; Y. N. Srivastava

    2013-06-25

    There has been considerable interest in recent experiments on iron nuclear disintegrations observed when rocks containing such nuclei are crushed and fractured. The resulting nuclear transmutations are particularly strong for the case of magnetite rocks, i.e. loadstones. We argue that the fission of the iron nucleus is a consequence of photo-disintegration. The electro-strong coupling between electromagnetic fields and nuclear giant dipole resonances are central for producing observed nuclear reactions. The large electron energies produced during the fracture of piezomagnetic rocks are closely analogous to the previously discussed case of the fracture of piezoelectric rocks. In both cases electro-weak interactions can produce neutrons and neutrinos from energetic protons and electrons thus inducing nuclear transmutations. The electro-strong condensed matter coupling discussed herein represents new many body collective nuclear photo-disintegration effects.

  1. Conditions of Metamorphism in Lower-Plate Rocks at Bare Mountain, Nevada--

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoisch, Thomas D.

    1 Chapter B Conditions of Metamorphism in Lower-Plate Rocks at Bare Mountain, Nevada-- Implications........................................................................................................................ 4 General Geology of Bare Mountain................................................................. 16 North-Central, Northeastern, and Eastern Bare Mountain

  2. Compaction of porous rock by dissolution on discrete stylolites: A one-dimensional model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Einat, Aharonov

    in sedimentary rocks [Weyl, 1959], with practical implications to oil, gas, and water flows, as well transport away from the clay layer followed by pore cementation. The evolution of the porosity, reactant

  3. Three-dimensional displacement-length scaling and maximum dimension of normal faults in layered rocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Scholz, 2000], (2) linkage [e.g., Cartwright et al., 1995] or (3) variations in rock properties [Bu on a 30­70° dipping bedding plane of early Maestrichtian continental limestone in the lignite quarry from

  4. Vesicle-Specific Noble Gas Analyses of "Popping Rock": Implications for Primordial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graham, David W.

    -rich basaltic glass "popping rock" were found to have the same carbon dioxide, helium-4, and argon-40, production of 21 Ne and production of 4 He are both related to U Th concentrations (10, 11). The vola- tiles

  5. Coupled hydro-mechanical processes in crytalline rock and ininduratedand plastic clays: A comparative discussion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsang, Chin-Fu; Blumling, Peter; Bernier, Frederic

    2006-02-15

    This paper provides a comparative discussion of coupledhydromechanical processes in three different geological formations:crystalline rock, plastic clay, and indurated clay. First, the importantprocesses and associated property characteristics in the three rock typesare discussed. Then, one particular hydromechanical coupling is broughtup for detailed consideration, that of pore pressure changes in nearbyrock during tunnel excavation. Three field experiments in the three rocktypes are presented and their results are discussed. It is shown that themain physical processes are common to all three rock types, but with verydifferent time constants. The different issues raised by these cases arepointed out, and the transferable lessons learned are identified. Suchcross fertilization and simultaneous understanding of coupled processesin three very different rock types help to greatly enhance confidence inthe state of science in this field.

  6. The effects of acid contact time and rock surfaces on acid fracture conductivity 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melendez Castillo, Maria Georgina

    2009-06-02

    in rock strength at the contact points for dolomite yielded lower conductivity after closure. The effects of hardness variation on conductivity are higher in dolomite than in limestone and chalk. It is apparent that longer contact times do not always...

  7. Numerical and analytical modeling of heat transfer between fluid and fractured rocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Wei, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2014-01-01

    Modeling of heat transfer between fluid and fractured rocks is of particular importance for energy extraction analysis in EGS, and therefore represents a critical component of EGS design and performance evaluation. In ...

  8. Metamorphic style and development of the blueschist-to eclogite-facies rocks, Cyclades, Greece

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brady, John B.

    Metamorphic style and development of the blueschist- to eclogite-facies rocks, Cyclades, Greece.c.schumacher@bristol.ac.uk Abstract. The island of Syros, Greece is part of the Attic-Cycladic blueschist belt, formed during Mesozoic

  9. Proceedings of the Second International Symposium on Dynamics of Fluids in Fractured Rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faybishenko, Boris; Witherspoon, Paul A.

    2004-01-01

    of hydraulic tests at Soultz-sous-Forêts, European Hot-Dry-Hot Dry Rock (HDR) site Soultz-sous-Forêts in Alsace/France,test interpretation from the Soultz- sous-Fôrets geothermal

  10. Rock-Fluid Chemistry Impacts on Shale Hydraulic Fracture and Microfracture Growth 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aderibigbe, Aderonke

    2012-07-16

    The role of surface chemical effects in hydraulic fracturing of shale is studied using the results of unconfined compression tests and Brazilian tests on Mancos shale- cored at depths of 20-60 ft. The rock mineralogy, total ...

  11. From Gondwanaland, with love : the tale of how Boston got its rocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cull, Selby (Selby C.)

    2006-01-01

    The rocks on which the city of Boston was built did not form as part of North America. They formed about 600 million years ago, at the South Pole, as the northern coast of a supercontinent called Gondwanaland. Boston's ...

  12. What brought them up? Exhumation of the Dabie Shan ultrahigh-pressure rocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hacker, Bradley R.

    What brought them up? Exhumation of the Dabie Shan ultrahigh-pressure rocks Bradley R. Hacker containing coesite recrys- tallized in Late Triassic time (Ames et al., 1995; Eide et al., 1994; Hacker et al

  13. REGIONAL THERMOHYDROLOGICAL EFFECTS OF AN UNDERGROUND REPOSITORY FOR NUCLEAR WASTES IN HARD ROCK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, J.S.Y.

    2014-01-01

    underground repository for nuclear waste in hard rock, LBL-and Vath, J.E. , Nuclear waste projections and source-termthe Scientific Basis for Nuclear Waste Management, Material

  14. Effects of burial history, rock ductility and recovery magnitude on inversion of normal faulted strata 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuhle, Nathan John

    2001-01-01

    , and distributed fracturing and folding. The relative contribution of these mechanisms depends on the relative ductility of the rock and magnitude of inversion. Reverse slip on the normal fault and distributed fracturing occur during early stages of inversion...

  15. Subsurface Geology of the Fenton Hill Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levey, Schon S.

    2010-12-01

    The Precambrian rock penetrated by wells EE-2A and -3A belongs to one or more granitic to granodioritic plutons. The plutonic rock contains two major xenolith zones of amphibolite, locally surrounded by fine-grained mafic rock of hybrid igneous origin. The granodiorite is cut by numerous leucogranite dikes that diminish in abundance with depth. The most prominent structural feature is the main breccia zone, in which the rock is highly fractured and moderately altered. This zone is at least 75 m thick and is of uncertain but near-horizontal orientation. Fracture abundance decreases with increasing depth below the main breccia zone, and fractures tend to be associated with leucogranite dikes. This association suggests that at least some of the fractures making up the geothermal reservoir are of Precambrian age or have long-range orientations controlled by the presence of Precambrian-age granitic dikes.

  16. Properties of CO2-Rich Pore Fluids and Their Effect on Porosity Evolution in EGS Rocks

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project objective: Quantify key parameters critically needed for developing and validating numerical modeling of chemical interactions between EGS reservoir rocks and supercritical CO2and CO2-rich aqueous fluids.

  17. Synchrotron X-ray Studies of Super-critical Carbon Dioxide / Reservoir Rock Interfaces

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project obectives: Utilize synchrotron X-ray measurements, to monitor all aspects of atomic to nanoscale structural changes resulting from chemical interactions of scCO2-H2O binary fluids with rocks under environments directly relevant to EGS.

  18. Comparison of the effects in the rock mass of large-scale chemical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Comparison of the effects in the rock mass of large-scale chemical and nuclear explosions. Final technical report, June 9, 1994--October 9, 1994 Citation Details In-Document Search...

  19. Table 1. 2013 Summary Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",87718,17 "Nitrogen oxide (short tons)",24490,32 "Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons)",22633,33 "Sulfur dioxide (lbsMWh)",3.3,9 "Nitrogen...

  20. Table 1. 2013 Summary Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",47671,25 "Nitrogen oxide (short tons)",19035,36 "Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons)",28809,30 "Sulfur dioxide (lbsMWh)",1,35 "Nitrogen...

  1. Table 1. 2013 Summary Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",13259,39 "Nitrogen oxide (short tons)",17975,38 "Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons)",12543,39 "Sulfur dioxide (lbsMWh)",0.2,46 "Nitrogen...

  2. Table 1. 2013 Summary Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",123735,10 "Nitrogen oxide (short tons)",55462,20 "Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons)",56812,15 "Sulfur dioxide (lbsMWh)",2,20 "Nitrogen...

  3. Table 1. 2013 Summary Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",203951,6 "Nitrogen oxide (short tons)",63358,11 "Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons)",97812,6 "Sulfur dioxide (lbsMWh)",2,21 "Nitrogen...

  4. Table 1. 2013 Summary Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",30027,30 "Nitrogen oxide (short tons)",30860,30 "Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons)",33125,27 "Sulfur dioxide (lbsMWh)",1.2,30 "Nitrogen...

  5. Table 1. 2013 Summary Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",86204,18 "Nitrogen oxide (short tons)",23189,33 "Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons)",38118,22 "Sulfur dioxide (lbsMWh)",2.2,19 "Nitrogen...

  6. Table 1. 2013 Summary Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",12339,40 "Nitrogen oxide (short tons)",15150,41 "Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons)",14735,38 "Sulfur dioxide (lbsMWh)",0.8,38 "Nitrogen...

  7. Table 1. 2013 Summary Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",68077,21 "Nitrogen oxide (short tons)",39706,27 "Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons)",34686,25 "Sulfur dioxide (lbsMWh)",1.8,26 "Nitrogen...

  8. Table 1. 2013 Summary Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",17511,35 "Nitrogen oxide (short tons)",13803,42 "Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons)",9500,40 "Sulfur dioxide (lbsMWh)",0.6,39 "Nitrogen...

  9. Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",41539,26 "Nitrogen oxide (short tons)",21995,34 "Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons)",18950,34 "Sulfur dioxide (lbsMWh)",2.3,17 "Nitrogen...

  10. Table 1. 2013 Summary Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",17735,34 "Nitrogen oxide (short tons)",59055,16 "Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons)",28535,31 "Sulfur dioxide (lbsMWh)",1,36 "Nitrogen...

  11. Table 1. 2013 Summary Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",346873,2 "Nitrogen oxide (short tons)",102526,4 "Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons)",102466,4 "Sulfur dioxide (lbsMWh)",5.1,1 "Nitrogen...

  12. Table 1. 2013 Summary Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",157488,8 "Nitrogen oxide (short tons)",78033,10 "Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons)",78344,8 "Sulfur dioxide (lbsMWh)",3.4,8 "Nitrogen...

  13. Table 1. 2013 Summary Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",106879,14 "Nitrogen oxide (short tons)",44657,25 "Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons)",39175,21 "Sulfur dioxide (lbsMWh)",3.8,6 "Nitrogen...

  14. Table 1. 2013 Summary Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",80418,19 "Nitrogen oxide (short tons)",57024,17 "Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons)",46268,19 "Sulfur dioxide (lbsMWh)",2.2,18 "Nitrogen...

  15. Table 1. 2013 Summary Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",30947,29 "Nitrogen oxide (short tons)",44824,24 "Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons)",33456,26 "Sulfur dioxide (lbsMWh)",0.5,41 "Nitrogen...

  16. Table 1. 2013 Summary Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",122578,11 "Nitrogen oxide (short tons)",82286,9 "Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons)",58274,12 "Sulfur dioxide (lbsMWh)",2.4,16 "Nitrogen...

  17. Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",40012,27 "Nitrogen oxide (short tons)",49623,21 "Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons)",39387,20 "Sulfur dioxide (lbsMWh)",1.5,27 "Nitrogen...

  18. Table 1. 2013 Summary Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",66884,22 "Nitrogen oxide (short tons)",31505,29 "Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons)",28043,32 "Sulfur dioxide (lbsMWh)",3.6,7 "Nitrogen...

  19. Table 1. 2013 Summary Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",93888,15 "Nitrogen oxide (short tons)",60229,14 "Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons)",68862,9 "Sulfur dioxide (lbsMWh)",2.5,14 "Nitrogen...

  20. Table 1. 2013 Summary Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",49587,24 "Nitrogen oxide (short tons)",55615,19 "Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons)",50687,17 "Sulfur dioxide (lbsMWh)",1.9,24 "Nitrogen...

  1. Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",23716,31 "Nitrogen oxide (short tons)",59416,15 "Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons)",55342,16 "Sulfur dioxide (lbsMWh)",0.4,42 "Nitrogen...

  2. Table 1. 2013 Summary Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",273718,4 "Nitrogen oxide (short tons)",121681,3 "Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons)",98895,5 "Sulfur dioxide (lbsMWh)",5,2 "Nitrogen oxide...

  3. Table 1. 2013 Summary Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",20710,33 "Nitrogen oxide (short tons)",25416,31 "Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons)",7428,42 "Sulfur dioxide (lbsMWh)",4,5 "Nitrogen oxide...

  4. Table 1. 2013 Summary Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",16865,36 "Nitrogen oxide (short tons)",21789,35 "Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons)",16951,35 "Sulfur dioxide (lbsMWh)",1.2,31 "Nitrogen...

  5. Table 1. 2013 Summary Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",383728,1 "Nitrogen oxide (short tons)",228695,1 "Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons)",257465,1 "Sulfur dioxide (lbsMWh)",1.8,25 "Nitrogen...

  6. Table 1. 2013 Summary Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",23670,32 "Nitrogen oxide (short tons)",62296,13 "Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons)",35699,24 "Sulfur dioxide (lbsMWh)",1.1,33 "Nitrogen...

  7. Table 1. 2013 Summary Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",71293,20 "Nitrogen oxide (short tons)",62397,12 "Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons)",56940,14 "Sulfur dioxide (lbsMWh)",1.1,32 "Nitrogen...

  8. Table 1. 2013 Summary Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",56854,23 "Nitrogen oxide (short tons)",48454,22 "Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons)",30274,28 "Sulfur dioxide (lbsMWh)",3.2,11 "Nitrogen...

  9. Table 1. 2013 Summary Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",117797,12 "Nitrogen oxide (short tons)",88345,6 "Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons)",108431,3 "Sulfur dioxide (lbsMWh)",1.1,34 "Nitrogen...

  10. Table 1. 2013 Summary Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",15347,37 "Nitrogen oxide (short tons)",11430,43 "Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons)",3228,47 "Sulfur dioxide (lbsMWh)",3,12 "Nitrogen...

  11. Table 1. 2013 Summary Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",108306,13 "Nitrogen oxide (short tons)",44114,26 "Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons)",47686,18 "Sulfur dioxide (lbsMWh)",3.3,10 "Nitrogen...

  12. Table 1. 2013 Summary Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",276851,3 "Nitrogen oxide (short tons)",151148,2 "Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons)",108729,2 "Sulfur dioxide (lbsMWh)",2.4,15 "Nitrogen...

  13. Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",35625,28 "Nitrogen oxide (short tons)",36972,28 "Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons)",29255,29 "Sulfur dioxide (lbsMWh)",1.4,28 "Nitrogen...

  14. Uranium mineralization in fluorine-enriched volcanic rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burt, D.M.; Sheridan, M.F.; Bikun, J.; Christiansen, E.; Correa, B.; Murphy, B.; Self, S.

    1980-09-01

    Several uranium and other lithophile element deposits are located within or adjacent to small middle to late Cenozoic, fluorine-rich rhyolitic dome complexes. Examples studied include Spor Mountain, Utah (Be-U-F), the Honeycomb Hills, Utah (Be-U), the Wah Wah Mountains, Utah (U-F), and the Black Range-Sierra Cuchillo, New Mexico (Sn-Be-W-F). The formation of these and similar deposits begins with the emplacement of a rhyolitic magma, enriched in lithophile metals and complexing fluorine, that rises to a shallow crustal level, where its roof zone may become further enriched in volatiles and the ore elements. During initial explosive volcanic activity, aprons of lithicrich tuffs are erupted around the vents. These early pyroclastic deposits commonly host the mineralization, due to their initial enrichment in the lithophile elements, their permeability, and the reactivity of their foreign lithic inclusions (particularly carbonate rocks). The pyroclastics are capped and preserved by thick topaz rhyolite domes and flows that can serve as a source of heat and of additional quantities of ore elements. Devitrification, vapor-phase crystallization, or fumarolic alteration may free the ore elements from the glassy matrix and place them in a form readily leached by percolating meteoric waters. Heat from the rhyolitic sheets drives such waters through the system, generally into and up the vents and out through the early tuffs. Secondary alteration zones (K-feldspar, sericite, silica, clays, fluorite, carbonate, and zeolites) and economic mineral concentrations may form in response to this low temperature (less than 200 C) circulation. After cooling, meteoric water continues to migrate through the system, modifying the distribution and concentration of the ore elements (especially uranium).

  15. Laboratory measurements on reservoir rocks from The Geysers geothermal field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boitnott, G.N.

    1995-01-26

    A suite of laboratory measurements have been conducted on Geysers metagraywacke and metashale recovered from a drilled depth of 2599 to 2602 meters in NEGU-17. The tests have been designed to constrain the mechanical and water-storage properties of the matrix material. Various measurements have been made at a variety of pressures and at varying degrees of saturation. Both compressional and shear velocities exhibit relatively little change with effective confining pressure. In all of the samples, water saturation causes an increase in the compressional velocity. In some samples, saturation results in a moderate decrease in shear velocity greater in magnitude than would be expected based on the slight increase in bulk density. It is found that the effect of saturation on the velocities can be quantitatively modeled through a modification of Biot-Gassmann theory to include weakening of the shear modulus with saturation. The decrease is attributed to chemo-mechanical weakening caused by the presence of water. The degree of frame weakening of the shear modulus is variable between samples, and appears correlated with petrographic features of the cores. Two related models are presented through which we can study the importance of saturation effects on field-scale velocity variations. The model results indicate that the saturation effects within the matrix are significant and may contribute to previously observed field anomalies. The results help to define ways in which we may be able to separate the effects of variations in rock properties, caused by phenomena such as degree of fracturing, from similar effects caused by variations in matrix saturation. The need for both compressional and shear velocity data in order to interpret field anomalies is illustrated through comparisons of model results with the field observations.

  16. ACOUSTICAL IMAGING AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF SOFT ROCK AND MARINE SEDIMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thurman E. Scott, Jr.; Younane Abousleiman

    2004-04-01

    The research during this project has concentrated on developing a correlation between rock deformation mechanisms and their acoustic velocity signature. This has included investigating: (1) the acoustic signature of drained and undrained unconsolidated sands, (2) the acoustic emission signature of deforming high porosity rocks (in comparison to their low porosity high strength counterparts), (3) the effects of deformation on anisotropic elastic and poroelastic moduli, and (4) the acoustic tomographic imaging of damage development in rocks. Each of these four areas involve triaxial experimental testing of weak porous rocks or unconsolidated sand and involves measuring acoustic properties. The research is directed at determining the seismic velocity signature of damaged rocks so that 3-D or 4-D seismic imaging can be utilized to image rock damage. These four areas of study are described in the report: (1) Triaxial compression experiments have been conducted on unconsolidated Oil Creek sand at high confining pressures. (2) Initial experiments on measuring the acoustic emission activity from deforming high porosity Danian chalk were accomplished and these indicate that the AE activity was of a very low amplitude. (3) A series of triaxial compression experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of induced stress on the anisotropy developed in dynamic elastic and poroelastic parameters in rocks. (4) Tomographic acoustic imaging was utilized to image the internal damage in a deforming porous limestone sample. Results indicate that the deformation damage in rocks induced during laboratory experimentation can be imaged tomographically in the laboratory. By extension the results also indicate that 4-D seismic imaging of a reservoir may become a powerful tool for imaging reservoir deformation (including imaging compaction and subsidence) and for imaging zones where drilling operation may encounter hazardous shallow water flows.

  17. Precise orientation of single crystals by a simple x-ray diffraction rocking curve method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doucette, L.D.; Pereira da Cunha, M.; Lad, R.J.

    2005-03-01

    A simple method has been developed for accurately measuring the crystallographic orientation of a single crystal boule, employing a conventional four-circle x-ray diffraction arrangement in the rocking curve mode which relaxes the need for precise instrument and/or reference alignment. By acquiring a total of eight rocking curve measurements at specific orientations about the specimen azimuth, the absolute miscut angle between a crystal surface and the desired crystallographic plane can be resolved to within {+-}0.01 deg.

  18. Release of uranium and thorium from granitic rocks during in situ weathering and initial erosion 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ledger, Ernest Broughton

    1978-01-01

    RELEASE OF URANIUM AND THORIUM FROM GRANITIC ROCKS DURING IN SITU WEATHERING AND INITIAL EROSION A Thesis by ERNEST BROUGHTON LEDGER, JR. Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August. 1978 Major Subject: Geology RELEASE OF URANIUM AND THORIUM FROM GRANITIC ROCKS DURING IN SITU WEATHERING AND INITIAL EROSION A Thesis by ERNEST BROUGHTON LEDGER, JR. Approved as to style and content by...

  19. Displacement of oil from reservoir rock using high molecular weight polymer solutions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barzi, Houshang

    1972-01-01

    DISPLACEMENT OF OIL FROM RESERVOIR ROCK USING HIGH MOLECULAR MEIGHT POLYMER SOLUTIONS A Thesis by HOUSHANG BARZI Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AIM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE Aup;ust l972 Major Subject; Petroleum Engineering DISPLACENJENT OF OIL FROM RESERVOIR ROCK USING HIGH MOLECULAR WEIGHT POLYMER SOLUTIONS A Thesis by HOUSHANG BARZI Approved as +o style and content by~ airman of Commi+tee Member ~ed f' D p...

  20. Proceedings of the International Symposium on Dynamics of Fluids in Fractured Rocks: Concepts and Recent Advances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faybishenko, B.

    1999-02-01

    This publication contains extended abstracts of papers presented at the International Symposium ''Dynamics of Fluids in Fractured Rocks: Concepts and Recent Advances'' held at Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory on February 10-12, 1999. This Symposium is organized in Honor of the 80th Birthday of Paul A. Witherspoon, who initiated some of the early investigations on flow and transport in fractured rocks at the University of California, Berkeley, and at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. He is a key figure in the development of basic concepts, modeling, and field measurements of fluid flow and contaminant transport in fractured rock systems. The technical problems of assessing fluid flow, radionuclide transport, site characterization, modeling, and performance assessment in fractured rocks remain the most challenging aspects of subsurface flow and transport investigations. An understanding of these important aspects of hydrogeology is needed to assess disposal of nu clear wastes, development of geothermal resources, production of oil and gas resources, and remediation of contaminated sites. These Proceedings of more than 100 papers from 12 countries discuss recent scientific and practical developments and the status of our understanding of fluid flow and radionuclide transport in fractured rocks. The main topics of the papers are: Theoretical studies of fluid flow in fractured rocks; Multi-phase flow and reactive chemical transport in fractured rocks; Fracture/matrix interactions; Hydrogeological and transport testing; Fracture flow models; Vadose zone studies; Isotopic studies of flow in fractured systems; Fractures in geothermal systems; Remediation and colloid transport in fractured systems; and Nuclear waste disposal in fractured rocks.

  1. ACOUSTICAL IMAGING AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF SOFT ROCK AND MARINE SEDIMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thurman E. Scott, Jr., Ph.D.; Younane Abousleiman, Ph.D.; Musharraf Zaman, Ph.D., P.E.

    2001-01-31

    During this phase of the project the research team concentrated on acquisition of acoustic emission data from the high porosity rock samples. The initial experiments indicated that the acoustic emission activity from high porosity Danian chalk were of a very low amplitude. Even though the sample underwent yielding and significant plastic deformation the sample did not generate significant AE activity. This was somewhat surprising. These initial results call into question the validity of attempting to locate AE activity in this weak rock type. As a result the testing program was slightly altered to include measuring the acoustic emission activity from many of the rock types listed in the research program. The preliminary experimental results indicate that AE activity in the sandstones is much higher than in the carbonate rocks (i.e., the chalks and limestones). This observation may be particularly important for planning microseismic imaging of reservoir rocks in the field environment. The preliminary results suggest that microseismic imaging of reservoir rock from acoustic emission activity generated from matrix deformation (during compaction and subsidence) would be extremely difficult to accomplish.

  2. Short-term energy outlook, April 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-04-01

    The forecast period for this issue of the Outlook extends from April 1999 through December 2000. Data values for the first quarter 1999, however, are preliminary EIA estimates (for example, some monthly values for petroleum supply and disposition are derived in part from weekly data reported in EIA`s Weekly Petroleum Status Report) or are calculated from model simulations that use the latest exogenous information available (for example, electricity sales and generation are simulated by using actual weather data). The historical energy data, compiled in the April 1999 version of the Short-Term Integrated forecasting system (STIFS) database, are mostly EIA data regularly published in the Monthly Energy Review, Petroleum Supply Monthly, and other EIA publications. Minor discrepancies between the data in these publications and the historical data in this Outlook are due to independent rounding. The STIFS model is driven principally by three sets of assumptions or inputs: estimates of key macroeconomic variables, world oil price assumptions, and assumptions about the severity of weather. Macroeconomic estimates are produced by DRI/McGraw-Hill but are adjusted by EIA to reflect EIA assumptions about the world price of crude oil, energy product prices, and other assumptions which may affect the macroeconomic outlook. By varying the assumptions, alternative cases are produced by using the STIFS model. 25 figs., 19 tabs.

  3. Short-term energy outlook. Quarterly projections, Third quarter 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-02

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares quarterly, short-term energy supply, demand, and price projections for publication in February, May, August, and November in the Short-Term Energy Outlook (Outlook). An annual supplement analyzes the performance of previous forecasts, compares recent cases with those of other forecasting services, and discusses current topics related to the short-term energy markets. (See Short-Term Energy Outlook Annual Supplement, DOE/EIA-0202). The feature article for this issue is Demand, Supply and Price Outlook for Reformulated Gasoline, 1995.

  4. Abstract: Development and Deployment of a Short Rotation Woody...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Development and Deployment of a Short Rotation Woody Crops Harvesting System Based on a Case New Holland Forage Harvester and SRC Woody Crop Header Abstract: Development and...

  5. Short wavelength topography on the inner-core boundary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, A.; Masson, Y.; Romanowicz, B.

    2006-01-01

    Short wavelength topography on the inner-core boundary Aimin94720 Constraining the topography of the inner-core boundaryindicates the presence of topography at the inner- core

  6. Integrating rock mechanics issues with repository design through design process principles and methodology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bieniawski, Z.T.

    1996-04-01

    A good designer needs not only knowledge for designing (technical know-how that is used to generate alternative design solutions) but also must have knowledge about designing (appropriate principles and systematic methodology to follow). Concepts such as {open_quotes}design for manufacture{close_quotes} or {open_quotes}concurrent engineering{close_quotes} are widely used in the industry. In the field of rock engineering, only limited attention has been paid to the design process because design of structures in rock masses presents unique challenges to the designers as a result of the uncertainties inherent in characterization of geologic media. However, a stage has now been reached where we are be able to sufficiently characterize rock masses for engineering purposes and identify the rock mechanics issues involved but are still lacking engineering design principles and methodology to maximize our design performance. This paper discusses the principles and methodology of the engineering design process directed to integrating site characterization activities with design, construction and performance of an underground repository. Using the latest information from the Yucca Mountain Project on geology, rock mechanics and starter tunnel design, the current lack of integration is pointed out and it is shown how rock mechanics issues can be effectively interwoven with repository design through a systematic design process methodology leading to improved repository performance. In essence, the design process is seen as the use of design principles within an integrating design methodology, leading to innovative problem solving. In particular, a new concept of {open_quotes}Design for Constructibility and Performance{close_quotes} is introduced. This is discussed with respect to ten rock mechanics issues identified for repository design and performance.

  7. SHORT DYNAMIC FIBRILS IN SUNSPOT CHROMOSPHERES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rouppe van der Voort, L.; De la Cruz Rodríguez, J.

    2013-10-10

    Sunspot chromospheres display vigorous oscillatory signatures when observed using chromospheric diagnostics such as the strong Ca II lines and H?. New high-resolution sunspot observations from the Swedish 1 m Solar Telescope show the ubiquitous presence of small-scale, periodic, jet-like features that move up and down. This phenomenon has not been described before. The typical width of these features is about 0.''3 and they display clear parabolic trajectories in space-time diagrams. The maximum extension of the top of the jets is lowest in the umbra, a few 100 km, and progressively longer further away from the umbra in the penumbra, with the longest extending more than 1000 km. These jets resemble the dynamic fibrils found in plage regions but at smaller extensions. Local thermodynamic equilibrium inversion of spectropolarimetric Ca II 8542 observations enabled a comparison of the magnetic field inclination and properties of these short jets. We find that the most extended of these jets also have longer periods and tend to be located in regions with more horizontal magnetic fields. These results are direct observational confirmation of the mechanism of long-period waves propagating along inclined magnetic fields into the solar chromosphere. This mechanism was identified earlier as the driver of dynamic fibrils in plage, part of the mottles in the quiet Sun, and the type I spicules at the limb. The sunspot dynamic fibrils that we report here represent a new class of manifestation of this mechanism, distinct from the transient penumbral and umbral micro-jets reported earlier.

  8. Influence of Lithophysal Geometry on the Uniaxial Compression of Tuff-Like Rock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rigby, Douglas B.

    2007-06-13

    A large portion of the rock of the high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain contains lithophysae or voids. These voids have a significant detrimental effect on the engineering properties of the rock mass and its performance. The lithophysae were formed at the time of volcanic deposition by pockets of gas trapped within the compressing and cooling pyroclastic flow material. Lithophysae vary by size, shape, and spatial frequency of occurrence. Due to the difficulties of testing actual lithophysal rock, the current mechanical property data set is limited and the numerical models of lithophysal rock are not well validated. The purpose of this task was to experimentally quantify the effect of void geometry in the mechanical compression of cubes of analog lithophysal-like rock. In this research the mechanical properties of the analog rock were systematically studied by examining various patterns of voids based on variables consisting of hole shape, size, and geometrical distribution. Each specified hole pattern was cast into 6 by 6 by 6-in. Hydro-StoneTB® specimens (produced in triplicate) and then tested under uniaxial compression. Solid Hydro-StoneTB® specimens exhibited similar mechanical properties to those estimated for rock mass solid specimens of Topopah Spring tuff. The results indicated that the compressive strength and Young’s Modulus values decrease with increasing specimen void porosity. The modulus and strength with void porosity relationships are essentially linear over the 5 to 20 percent void porosity range. When zero void porosity (solid specimen) results are added, exponential functions do not provide a good fit to the data due to a significant sensitivity of strength and modulus to the presence of macro-sized voids. From solid specimens there is roughly a 60 percent drop in strength with about 7 percent void porosity, increasing to an 80 percent drop at about 20 percent void porosity. The percent change in modulus from the solid specimen value is roughly 30 and 45 percent at 7 and 19 percent void porosity, respectively. A bilinear model gives a much better fit to the observed experimental data. Shape of hole appears to be significant for strength, but not for Young’s Modulus. Size of hole (at similar values of porosity) does not effect modulus values, but there may be a correlation with strength (smaller hole specimens are slightly stronger). Overall, the results help to validate the Yucca Mountain numerical model of lithophysal rock, but there are also some differences that should be looked into and explained. Hydro-Stone TB® specimens give mechanical strength results that are about one rock mass category lower than is expected based on their lithophysal porosity.

  9. Short-term energy outlook, annual supplement 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    The Short-Term Energy Outlook Annual Supplement (Supplement) is published once a year as a complement to the Short-Term Energy Outlook (Outlook), Quarterly Projections. The purpose of the Supplement is to review the accuracy of the forecasts published in the Outlook, make comparisons with other independent energy forecasts, and examine current energy topics that affect the forecasts.

  10. Short-Circuit Modeling of a Wind Power Plant: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muljadi, E.; Gevorgian, V.

    2011-03-01

    This paper investigates the short-circuit behavior of a WPP for different types of wind turbines. The short-circuit behavior will be presented. Both the simplified models and detailed models are used in the simulations and both symmetrical faults and unsymmetrical faults are discussed.

  11. Short-term energy outlook annual supplement, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1993-08-06

    The Short-Term Energy Outlook Annual Supplement (supplement) is published once a year as a complement to the Short-Term Energy Outlook (Outlook), Quarterly Projections. The purpose of the Supplement is to review the accuracy of the forecasts published in the Outlook, make comparisons with other independent energy forecasts, and examine current energy topics that affect the forecasts.

  12. Simulation of water-rock interaction in the Yellowstone geothermal system using TOUGHREACT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dobson, Patrick F.; Salah, Sonia; Spycher, Nicolas; Sonnenthal, Eric L.

    2003-04-28

    The Yellowstone geothermal system provides an ideal opportunity to test the ability of reactive transport models to simulate the chemical and hydrological effects of water-rock interaction. Previous studies of the Yellowstone geothermal system have characterized water-rock interaction through analysis of rocks and fluids obtained from both surface and downhole samples. Fluid chemistry, rock mineralogy, permeability, porosity, and thermal data obtained from the Y-8 borehole in Upper Geyser Basin were used to constrain a series of reactive transport simulations of the Yellowstone geothermal system using TOUGHREACT. Three distinct stratigraphic units were encountered in the 153.4 m deep Y-8 drill core: volcaniclastic sandstone, perlitic rhyolitic lava, and nonwelded pumiceous tuff. The main alteration phases identified in the Y-8 core samples include clay minerals, zeolites, silica polymorphs, adularia, and calcite. Temperatures observed in the Y-8 borehole increase with depth from sub-boiling conditions at the surface to a maximum of 169.8 C at a depth of 104.1 m, with near-isothermal conditions persisting down to the well bottom. 1-D models of the Y-8 core hole were constructed to simulate the observed alteration mineral assemblage given the initial rock mineralogy and observed fluid chemistry and temperatures. Preliminary simulations involving the perlitic rhyolitic lava unit are consistent with the observed alteration of rhyolitic glass to form celadonite.

  13. Simulation of water-rock interaction in the yellowstone geothermal system using TOUGHREACT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dobson, P.F.; Salah, S.; Spycher, N.; Sonnenthal, E.

    2003-04-28

    The Yellowstone geothermal system provides an ideal opportunity to test the ability of reactive transport models to accurately simulate water-rock interaction. Previous studies of the Yellowstone geothermal system have characterized water-rock interaction through analysis of rocks and fluids obtained from both surface and downhole samples. Fluid chemistry, rock mineralogy, permeability, porosity, and thermal data obtained from the Y-8 borehole in Upper Geyser Basin were used to constrain a series of reactive transport simulations of the Yellowstone geothermal system using TOUGHREACT. Three distinct stratigraphic units were encountered in the 153.4 m deep Y-8 drill core: volcaniclastic sandstone, perlitic rhyolitic lava, and nonwelded pumiceous tuff. The main alteration phases identified in the Y-8 core samples include clay minerals, zeolites, silica polymorphs, adularia, and calcite. Temperatures observed in the Y-8 borehole increase with depth from sub-boiling conditions at the surface to a maximum of 169.8 C at a depth of 104.1 m, with near-isothermal conditions persisting down to the well bottom. 1-D models of the Y-8 core hole were constructed to determine if TOUGHREACT could accurately predict the observed alteration mineral assemblage given the initial rock mineralogy and observed fluid chemistry and temperatures. Preliminary simulations involving the perlitic rhyolitic lava unit are consistent with the observed alteration of rhyolitic glass to form celadonite.

  14. Propagation of ultra-short solitons in stochastic Maxwell's equations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurt, Levent; Schäfer, Tobias

    2014-01-15

    We study the propagation of ultra-short short solitons in a cubic nonlinear medium modeled by nonlinear Maxwell's equations with stochastic variations of media. We consider three cases: variations of (a) the dispersion, (b) the phase velocity, (c) the nonlinear coefficient. Using a modified multi-scale expansion for stochastic systems, we derive new stochastic generalizations of the short pulse equation that approximate the solutions of stochastic nonlinear Maxwell's equations. Numerical simulations show that soliton solutions of the short pulse equation propagate stably in stochastic nonlinear Maxwell's equations and that the generalized stochastic short pulse equations approximate the solutions to the stochastic Maxwell's equations over the distances under consideration. This holds for both a pathwise comparison of the stochastic equations as well as for a comparison of the resulting probability densities.

  15. Numerical studies of fluid-rock interactions in Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) with CO2 as working fluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Tianfu; Pruess, Karsten; Apps, John

    2008-01-01

    2006), “The Future of Geothermal Energy Impact of Enhanced2000), “A Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Concept UtilizingEnergy has broadly defined Enhanced (or Engineered) Geothermal

  16. Structure of the eastern Red Rocks and Wind Ridge thrust faults, Wyoming: how a thrust fault gains displacement along strike 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huntsman, Brent Stanley

    1983-01-01

    OF FIELD MAPPING Methods . Thrust Faults . The Wind Ridge Thrust Fault System The Red Rocks Thrust Fault System CLAY MODEL STUDIES Purpose and Description Model Results DISCUSSION OF RESULTS Kinematics of the Red Rocks Thrust Fault Termination... . Kinematics of the Southern Wind Ridge Thrust Fault . . . A Conceptual Model of the Red Rocks Thrust Fault Termination Implications of the Red Rocks Fault Termination . . . . . . Page V1 V11 1X X1 X11 7 9 17 18 18 21 24 27 35 35 38 49 49...

  17. The role of eldwork in rock decay research: Case studies from the fringe Ronald I. Dorn a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dorn, Ron

    , Geoinfomatics and Meteorology, University of Pretoria, South Africa i Department of Geography, University Scientists publishing papers on the decay of rocks hail from arche- ology, architecture, astrobiology, botany

  18. Modeling of coupled thermodynamic and geomechanical performance of underground compressed air energy storage (CAES) in lined rock caverns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutqvist, J.

    2013-01-01

    abandonment Underground gas storage: Worldwide ExperiencesCritical pressure for gas storage in unlined rock caverns.for the Brooklyn Union gas storage cavern at JFK Airport,

  19. The Department Of Film and The UNLV Short Film Archive presents the 7 48-HOUR SHORT FILM contest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Lawrence R.

    The Department Of Film and The UNLV Short Film Archive presents the 7 th annual 48-HOUR SHORT FILM contest This event is open to anyone who) will write, shoot and edit a film no less than 1 minute and no more than 5

  20. The Department Of Film and The UNLV Short Film Archive presents the 8th 48-HOUR SHORT FILM contest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Lawrence R.

    The Department Of Film and The UNLV Short Film Archive presents the 8th annual 48-HOUR SHORT FILM contest This event is open to anyone who) will write, shoot and edit a film no less than 1 minute and no more than 5