National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for rock river water

  1. SOURCE AND EFFECT OF ACID ROCK DRAINAGE IN THE SNAKE RIVER WATERSHED, SUMMIT COUNTY, COLORADO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SOURCE AND EFFECT OF ACID ROCK DRAINAGE IN THE SNAKE RIVER WATERSHED, SUMMIT COUNTY, COLORADO (the weathering of disseminated pyrite) sources of acid rock drainage (ARD). Stream waters and remediating the effects of acid rock drainage in the basin has given this research a real world application

  2. Columbia River Channel Improvement Project Rock Removal Blasting: Monitoring Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, Thomas J.; Johnson, Gary E.

    2010-01-29

    This document provides a monitoring plan to evaluate take as outlined in the National Marine Fisheries Service 2002 Biological Opinion for underwater blasting to remove rock from the navigation channel for the Columbia River Channel Improvement Project. The plan was prepared by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Portland District.

  3. Rock River Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS Report UrlNM-bRenewable Energy|Gas and Electric JumpDensityRiver Wind

  4. Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field Investigations Of In Situ Geochemical Behavior Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  5. STUDY OF LOSS AND DELAY OF SALMON PASSING ROCK ISLAND DAM, COLUMBIA RIVER, 1954-56

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STUDY OF LOSS AND DELAY OF SALMON PASSING ROCK ISLAND DAM, COLUMBIA RIVER, 1954-56 By ROBERT R. PORTLAND. OREGON ABSTRACT To determine loss or delay of salmonids in passing Rock Island Dam tagged and released both above and below the dam in 1954-56. They were subsequently observed passing

  6. Geochemical Data on Waters, Gases, Scales, and Rocks from the...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geochemical Data on Waters, Gases, Scales, and Rocks from the Dixie Valley Region, Nevada (1996-1999) Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report:...

  7. Rock Hill Utilities- Water Heater and Heat Pump Rebate Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Through the SmartChoice program, Rock Hill Utilities offers rebates for water heater and heat pump replacements. Information on financing for heat pumps can also be found on the web site listed...

  8. Think water : reconditioning the Malden River

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oda, Kazuyo, 1969-

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to link water, history and culture through architectural and urban design by researching the potential for the rejuvenation of a neglected industrial site at the edge of a river. The Malden ...

  9. Simulation of water transport in heated rock salt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schlich, M.; Jockwer, N.

    1986-01-01

    This paper summarizes computer simulation studies on water transport in German rock salt. Based on JOCKWERS experimental investigations on water content and water liberation, the object of these studies was to select a water transport model, that matches the water inflow which was measured in some heater experiments in the Asse Salt Mine. The main result is, that an evaporation front model, with Knudsen-type vapor transport combined with fluid transport by thermal expansion of the adsorbed water layers in the non evaporated zone, showed the best agreement with experimental evidence.

  10. FORT UNION COAL IN THE GREATER GREEN RIVER BASIN, EAST FLANK OF THE ROCK SPRINGS UPLIFT,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapter GS FORT UNION COAL IN THE GREATER GREEN RIVER BASIN, EAST FLANK OF THE ROCK SPRINGS UPLIFT 1999 Resource assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky in the toolbar to return. 1999 Resource assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky

  11. Rock River LLC Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/ColoradoRemsenburg-Speonk, NewMichigan: Energy Resources Jump to:RockPoint, Arizona:

  12. High Resolution River Hydraulic and Water Quality Characterization Using Rapidly Deployable Networked Infomechanical Systems (NIMS RD)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas C. Harmon; Richard F. Ambrose; Robert M. Gilbert; Jason C. Fisher; Michael Stealey; William J. Kaiser

    2006-01-01

    High Resolution River Hydraulic and Water Quality1594. High Resolution River Hydraulic and Water Qualityobserving spatiotemporal hydraulic and chemical properties

  13. Rock-Water Interactions in the Fenton Hill, New Mexico, Hot Dry...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Rock-Water Interactions in the Fenton Hill, New Mexico, Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems I. Fluid Mixing and Chemical Geothermometry Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference...

  14. Water Quality and Stormwater Contaminants in the Brunette River Watershed,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;Water Quality and Stormwater Contaminants in the Brunette River Watershed, British Columbia in the Brunette 1994/95 Water Quality and Stormwater Contaminants in the Brunette River Watershed, British Westminster. Past and currently ongoing projects have studied the water, sediment, and biota within

  15. Distribution and geochemistry of contaminated subsurface waters in fissured volcanogenic bed rocks of the Lake Karachai Area, Chelyabinsk, Southern Urals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solodov, I.N.; Belichkin, V.I.; Zotov, A.V.; Kochkin, B.T.; Drozhko, E.G.; Glagolev, A.V.; Skokov, A.N.

    1994-06-01

    The present investigation is devoted to the study of the distribution and geochemistry of contaminated subsurface waters, beneath the site of temporary storage of liquid radioactive waste known as Lake Karachai. For this purpose a method of hydrogeochemical logging (HGCL) together with standard hydrogeochemical and geophysical methods of uncased hole logging were used. The distribution of sodium nitrate brine plumes in the subsurface was determined by the physical and physico-chemical properties of these brines and by the petrochemical composition of enclosing rocks and the structural setting of the flow paths. The latter is represented by fractures and large faults in the bedrock of volcanogenic and volcanogenic-sedimentary rocks of intermediate-to-basic composition. The volcanogenic rocks are overlain in some places by a thin cover of unconsolidated sediments, i.e., by loams and relatively impermeable silts. Contaminated waters flow-in accordance with the eluvium bottom relief towards local areas of natural (Mishelyak and Techa rivers) and artificial (Novogomenskii water intake) discharge of subsurface waters. The large Mishelyak fault, southwest of Lake Karachai and under fluvial sediments of the Mishelyak, is assumed to significantly influence the flow pattern of contaminated waters, diverting them from an intake of drinking water.

  16. Hydro-geologic Investigation of the Fresh Water lens in a Small Rock Principle Investigators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhode Island, University of

    Hydro-geologic Investigation of the Fresh Water lens in a Small Rock Principle Investigators Daniel W. Urish #12;Abstract Rose Island is a small rock island located in Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island Island is a small 18.5 acre rock island located in Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island (Fig. 1

  17. A Sr-Isotopic Comparison Between Thermal Waters, Rocks, And Hydrotherm...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Caldera, California Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: A Sr-Isotopic Comparison Between Thermal Waters, Rocks, And Hydrothermal...

  18. Rocks

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) byMultidayAlumni > The Energy Materials CenterRobotics KeyRocks Rocks

  19. WATER QUALITY STUDY OF WENATCHEE AND MIDDLE COLUMBIA RIVERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WATER QUALITY STUDY OF WENATCHEE AND MIDDLE COLUMBIA RIVERS BEFORE DAM CONSTRUCTION SPECIAL. Suomela, Commissioner WATER QUALITY STUDY OF WENATCHEE AND MIDDLE COLUMBIA RIVERS BEFORE DAM CONSTRUCTION Report--Fisheries No. 290 Washington, D. C. March 1959 #12;Library of Congress catalog card for the Fish

  20. WATER QUALITY STUDY OF WENATCHEE AND MIDDLE COLUMBIA RIVERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WATER QUALITY STUDY OF WENATCHEE AND MIDDLE COLUMBIA RIVERS BEFORE DAM CONSTRUCTION iW''^^, ^^c, Commissioner WATER QUALITY STUDY OF WENATCHEE AND MIDDLE COLUMBIA RIVERS BEFORE DAM CONSTRUCTION by Robert 0 No. 290 Washington, D. C. March 1959 #12;Library of Congress catalog card for the Fish and Wildlife

  1. Subsurface cross section of lower Paleozoic rocks, Powder River basin, Wyoming and Montana

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Macke, D.L.

    1988-07-01

    The Powder River basin is one of the most actively explored Rocky Mountain basins for hydrocarbons, yet the lower Paleozoic (Cambrian through Mississippian) rocks of this interval remain little studied. As a part of a program studying the evolution of sedimentary basins, approximately 3200 km of cross section, based on more than 50 combined geophysical and lithologic logs, have been constructed covering an area of about 200,000 km/sup 2/. The present-day basin is a Cenozoic structural feature located between the stable interior of the North American craton and the Cordilleran orogenic belt. At various times during the early Paleozoic, the basin area was not distinguishable from either the stable craton, the Williston basin, the Central Montana trough, or the Cordilleran miogeocline. Both deposition and preservation in the basin have been greatly influenced by the relative uplift of the Transcontinental arch. Shows of oil and dead oil in well cuttings confirm that hydrocarbons have migrated through at least parts of the basin's lower Paleozoic carbonate section. These rocks may have been conduits for long-distance migration of hydrocarbons as early as Late Cretaceous, based on (1) the probable timing of thermal maturation of hydrocarbon-source rocks within the basin area and to the west, (2) the timing of Laramide structural events, (3) the discontinuous nature of the reservoirs in the overlying, highly productive Pennsylvanian-Permian Minnelusa Formation, and (4) the under-pressuring observed in some Minnelusa oil fields. Vertical migration into the overlying reservoirs could have been through deep fractures within the basin, represented by major lineament systems. Moreover, the lower Paleozoic rocks themselves may also be hydrocarbon reservoirs.

  2. Lumbee River EMC- Solar Water Heating Loan Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Lumbee River EMC is offering 1.50% loans to residential customers for the installation of solar water heaters on their homes.  To qualify, the systems must be certified OG-300 by the Solar Ratings...

  3. South River EMC- Solar Water Heating Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    South River Electric Membership Corporation (EMC) is providing rebates to encourage their customers to install solar water heating systems. To be eligible for the rebate solar collectors must have...

  4. Lumbee River EMC- Solar Water Heating Rebate Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Lumbee River EMC is offering $850 rebates to residential customers who install solar water heaters on their homes.  To qualify, the systems must be certified OG-300 by the Solar Ratings and...

  5. EIS-0268: Shutdown of River Water System at the Savannah River Site

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS evaluates the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to shut down the Savannah R]ver Site River Water System in order to save money; that is, to prevent further expenditure of the...

  6. Water resource management planning guide for Savannah River Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hubbard, J.E.; Stephenson, D.E.; Steele, J.L. (Du Pont de Nemours (E.I.) and Co., Aiken, SC (USA). Savannah River Lab.); Gordon, D.E. (Du Pont de Nemours (E.I.) and Co., Aiken, SC (USA). Savannah River Plant)

    1988-10-01

    The Water Resource Management Planning Guide provides an outline for the development of a Savannah River Plant Water Resource Management Plan (WRMP) to protect, manage, and monitor the site's water resources. The management plan is based on three principle elements: (1) protection of the water quality, (2) management of the water quantity, and (3) monitoring of the water quality and quantity. The plan will assure that changes in water quality and quantity are identified and that corrective action is implemented as needed. In addition, water management activities within and between Savannah River Plant (SRP) organizations and departments will be coordinated to ensure the proper management of water resources. This document is intended as a guide to suggest goals and objectives that will provide a basis for the development of a water resource plan for SRP. Planning should be flexible rather than rigid, and the plan outlines in this document was prepared to be modified or updated as conditions necessitate. 16 refs., 12 figs.

  7. Analysis of a mesoscale infiltration and water seepage test in unsaturated fractured rock: Spatial variabilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Quanlin

    Analysis of a mesoscale infiltration and water seepage test in unsaturated fractured rock: Spatial 2006 Abstract A mesoscale (21 m in flow distance) infiltration and seepage test was recently conducted flow in fractured rock at mesoscale or a larger scale is not necessarily conditional explicitly

  8. Compliance Monitoring of Underwater Blasting for Rock Removal at Warrior Point, Columbia River Channel Improvement Project, 2009/2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, Thomas J.; Johnson, Gary E.; Woodley, Christa M.; Skalski, J. R.; Seaburg, Adam

    2011-05-10

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (USACE) conducted the 20-year Columbia River Channel Improvement Project (CRCIP) to deepen the navigation channel between Portland, Oregon, and the Pacific Ocean to allow transit of fully loaded Panamax ships (100 ft wide, 600 to 700 ft long, and draft 45 to 50 ft). In the vicinity of Warrior Point, between river miles (RM) 87 and 88 near St. Helens, Oregon, the USACE conducted underwater blasting and dredging to remove 300,000 yd3 of a basalt rock formation to reach a depth of 44 ft in the Columbia River navigation channel. The purpose of this report is to document methods and results of the compliance monitoring study for the blasting project at Warrior Point in the Columbia River.

  9. CE-QUAL-W2 Version 3: Hydrodynamic and Water Quality River Basin Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wells, Scott A.

    and Oregon; the Bull Run River basin composed of 3 water sup- ply reservoirs and 2 river sections with a 2CE-QUAL-W2 Version 3: Hydrodynamic and Water Quality River Basin Modeling S. A. Wells Department for deep, long, and narrow waterbodies. The current model, Version 2, has been used in over 200 river

  10. Hydrodynamic and water quality river basin modeling using CE-QUAL-W2 version 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wells, Scott A.

    of the Lower Snake River in the Northwestern USA; the Bull Run River basin composed of 3 water supplyHydrodynamic and water quality river basin modeling using CE-QUAL-W2 version 3 Scott A. Wells for deep, long, and narrow waterbodies. The current model, Version 2, has been used in over 200 river

  11. Urban hydrological modeling of the Malden River using the Storm Water Management Model (SWMM)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenberg, Sara (Sara Elizabeth)

    2015-01-01

    The portion of the Malden River in Malden, Massachusetts, has a long history of industrial activity and urbanization, which has degraded the water quality and ecosystem of the River. Following years of water quality testing, ...

  12. Connate Water Saturation -Irreducible or Not: the Key to Reliable Hydraulic Rock Typing in Reservoirs Straddling Multiple Capillary Windows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torres-Verdín, Carlos

    SPE 166082 Connate Water Saturation - Irreducible or Not: the Key to Reliable Hydraulic Rock Typing Irreducible water saturation is an important attribute to quantify reservoir petrophysical quality in terms of flow capacity. High in-situ capillary pressure causes connate water saturation in reservoir rocks

  13. Reservoir/River System Reliability Considering Water Rights and Water Quality 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurbs, Ralph A.; Sanchez-Torres, Gerardo; Dunn, David D.

    1994-01-01

    availability studies. However, from a practical water management perspective, these are the controlling factors in many river basins in Texas and elsewhere. The study documented by this report provides expanded capabilities for modeling and analysis...

  14. Seepage flow-stability analysis of the riverbank of Saigon river due to river water level fluctuation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oya, A; Hiraoka, N; Fujimoto, M; Fukagawa, R

    2015-01-01

    The Saigon River, which flows through the center of Ho Chi Minh City, is of critical importance for the development of the city as forms as the main water supply and drainage channel for the city. In recent years, riverbank erosion and failures have become more frequent along the Saigon River, causing flooding and damage to infrastructures near the river. A field investigation and numerical study has been undertaken by our research group to identify factors affecting the riverbank failure. In this paper, field investigation results obtained from multiple investigation points on the Saigon River are presented, followed by a comprehensive coupled finite element analysis of riverbank stability when subjected to river water level fluctuations. The river water level fluctuation has been identified as one of the main factors affecting the riverbank failure, i.e. removal of the balancing hydraulic forces acting on the riverbank during water drawdown.

  15. Cesium in rock-water interaction, Yellowstone National Park. [Abstract only

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, J.M.; Keith, T.E.C.

    1983-03-01

    Chemical analyses of thermal waters from research drill holes and nearby hot springs and geysers in Upper and Lower Geyser Basins indicate that Cs may be a reactive ion. A nearly constant Cs:Cl is found for four wells drilled in Lower Geyser Basin and for some hot spring and geysers. It is inferred from this plot that points falling below the trend indicate Cs depleted waters. A plot of Cs:CHO/sub 3//Cl, another measure of rock-water interaction, also indicates Cs removal from the waters. These data correlate well with a parallel study of chemistry and mineralogy of hydrothermally altered rocks from the drill holes which show that the rocks involved in hydrothermal rock-water reactions are vitrophyric rhyolite lava flows and pumiceous tuff overlain by obsidian-rich sands and gravels. Nearly 55 m of such a section from well Y-8 has been hydrothermally altered into alternating intervals consisting of analcime - quartz - clay (smectite, celadonite) or clinoptilolite - ..cap alpha..-cristobalite - smectite. Whole rock analyses of randomly selected samples of these intervals from several wells have Cs contents somewhat higher than those of the unaltered host rhyolite. However, the Cs content of the analcime - quartz - clay intervals is as much as 700 times higher than that of the host rock. Analyses of mineral separates show that analcime, containing as much as 4700 ppM Cs, is more enriched in Cs than any other mineral. Examination of experimental data suggests that Cs is incorporated into the analcime structure during crystallization. Clinoptilolite, which has been shown to readily exchange Cs, is only slightly enriched in this system.

  16. Water scarcity and development in the Tigris-Euphrates river basin. Master`s thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-08-01

    This report will examine aspects of water scarcity and development, and discuss solutions available to avoid conflict over water in the Tigris-Euphrates River Basin. (MM).

  17. Simulation of water-rock interaction in the Yellowstone geothermal system using TOUGHREACT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dobson, Patrick F.; Salah, Sonia; Spycher, Nicolas; Sonnenthal, Eric L.

    2003-04-28

    The Yellowstone geothermal system provides an ideal opportunity to test the ability of reactive transport models to simulate the chemical and hydrological effects of water-rock interaction. Previous studies of the Yellowstone geothermal system have characterized water-rock interaction through analysis of rocks and fluids obtained from both surface and downhole samples. Fluid chemistry, rock mineralogy, permeability, porosity, and thermal data obtained from the Y-8 borehole in Upper Geyser Basin were used to constrain a series of reactive transport simulations of the Yellowstone geothermal system using TOUGHREACT. Three distinct stratigraphic units were encountered in the 153.4 m deep Y-8 drill core: volcaniclastic sandstone, perlitic rhyolitic lava, and nonwelded pumiceous tuff. The main alteration phases identified in the Y-8 core samples include clay minerals, zeolites, silica polymorphs, adularia, and calcite. Temperatures observed in the Y-8 borehole increase with depth from sub-boiling conditions at the surface to a maximum of 169.8 C at a depth of 104.1 m, with near-isothermal conditions persisting down to the well bottom. 1-D models of the Y-8 core hole were constructed to simulate the observed alteration mineral assemblage given the initial rock mineralogy and observed fluid chemistry and temperatures. Preliminary simulations involving the perlitic rhyolitic lava unit are consistent with the observed alteration of rhyolitic glass to form celadonite.

  18. Simulation of water-rock interaction in the yellowstone geothermal system using TOUGHREACT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dobson, P.F.; Salah, S.; Spycher, N.; Sonnenthal, E.

    2003-04-28

    The Yellowstone geothermal system provides an ideal opportunity to test the ability of reactive transport models to accurately simulate water-rock interaction. Previous studies of the Yellowstone geothermal system have characterized water-rock interaction through analysis of rocks and fluids obtained from both surface and downhole samples. Fluid chemistry, rock mineralogy, permeability, porosity, and thermal data obtained from the Y-8 borehole in Upper Geyser Basin were used to constrain a series of reactive transport simulations of the Yellowstone geothermal system using TOUGHREACT. Three distinct stratigraphic units were encountered in the 153.4 m deep Y-8 drill core: volcaniclastic sandstone, perlitic rhyolitic lava, and nonwelded pumiceous tuff. The main alteration phases identified in the Y-8 core samples include clay minerals, zeolites, silica polymorphs, adularia, and calcite. Temperatures observed in the Y-8 borehole increase with depth from sub-boiling conditions at the surface to a maximum of 169.8 C at a depth of 104.1 m, with near-isothermal conditions persisting down to the well bottom. 1-D models of the Y-8 core hole were constructed to determine if TOUGHREACT could accurately predict the observed alteration mineral assemblage given the initial rock mineralogy and observed fluid chemistry and temperatures. Preliminary simulations involving the perlitic rhyolitic lava unit are consistent with the observed alteration of rhyolitic glass to form celadonite.

  19. Watershed modelling of hydrology and water quality in the Sacramento River watershed, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Minghua

    Watershed modelling of hydrology and water quality in the Sacramento River watershed, California contamination in California's Sacramento River watershed where 8500 km2 of agricultural land influences water components were assessed for the Sacramento River watershed. To represent flood conveyance in the area

  20. Climate Change Impacts on Western Lake Erie, Detroit River, and Lake St. Clair Water Levels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -- - --- Climate Change Impacts on Western Lake Erie, Detroit River, and Lake St. Clair WaterConditionsScenario 36 #12;#12;-- - ---- Climate Change Impacts on Western Lake Erie, Detroit River, and Lake St. Clair and frequenciesof Lake St. Clair,Detroit River, and western Lake Erie water levelsare computed

  1. Produced Water Radioactivity Regulation Lax as Gas Wells' Tainted Water Hits Rivers, Ian Urbina, NYT, 2/26/11

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patzek, Tadeusz W.

    Produced Water Radioactivity Regulation Lax as Gas Wells' Tainted Water Hits Rivers, Ian Urbina-rich drilling mud(?) Airborne (not water-dissolved) radon is responsible for the majority of the public exposure

  2. Groundwater Surface Water Interactions in a Gold-mined Floodplain of the Merced River

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, Lynn Sager

    2013-01-01

    of small ponds on stream water chemistry. Lake and ReservoirSpeciation of iron in river water using a specific catalyticin surface-subsurface water exchange and lateral hyporheic

  3. Surface water supply for the Clearlake, California Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jager, A.R.

    1996-03-01

    It is proposed to construct a demonstration Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal plant in the vicinity of the City of Clearlake. An interim evaluation has been made of the availability of surface water to supply the plant. The evaluation has required consideration of the likely water consumption of such a plant. It has also required consideration of population, land, and water uses in the drainage basins adjacent to Clear Lake, where the HDR demonstration project is likely to be located. Five sources were identified that appear to be able to supply water of suitable quality in adequate quantity for initial filling of the reservoir, and on a continuing basis, as makeup for water losses during operation. Those sources are California Cities Water Company, a municipal supplier to the City of Clearlake; Clear Lake, controlled by Yolo County Flood Control and Water Conservation District; Borax Lake, controlled by a local developer; Southeast Regional Wastewater Treatment Plant, controlled by Lake County; and wells, ponds, and streams on private land. The evaluation involved the water uses, water rights, stream flows, precipitation, evaporation, a water balance, and water quality. In spite of California`s prolonged drought, the interim conclusion is that adequate water is available at a reasonable cost to supply the proposed HDR demonstration project.

  4. WATER QUALITY IN THE FRASER RIVER ESTUARY JANUARY, 1993 TO MARCH, 1994

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;WATER QUALITY IN THE FRASER RIVER ESTUARY JANUARY, 1993 TO MARCH, 1994 TECHNICAL REPORT SERIES Consultants Ltd., Victoria, B.C. 2 EnviroEd Consultants Ltd., Victoria, B.C. for FREMP Water Quality Waste- Water quality in the Fraser River Estuary, January 1993 to March 1994 (Technical report series ; WQM 94

  5. D. C. WRRC REPORT NO. 100 THE ANACOSTIA RIVER: ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WATER POLLUTION BIOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    District of Columbia, University of the

    .0 Watts Branch at Anacostia River, Station # 5 84 FIGURE 15.0 South Side of Station # 8, Hickey Run 85D. C. WRRC REPORT NO. 100 THE ANACOSTIA RIVER: ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WATER POLLUTION BIOLOGY BY DR. Photographs 83 #12;LIST OF FIGURES #12;LIST OF FIGURES FIGURE 1.0 The map of Anacostia River 36a FIGURE 1.0A

  6. Upper Middle Mainstem Columbia River Subbasin Water Quality Parameters Affected by Hydropower Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    hydroelectric projects are run-of-river facilities with very limited capability for storage and flow regulationAppendix E Upper Middle Mainstem Columbia River Subbasin Water Quality Parameters Affected in the Columbia River was identified in the 1960's and 1970's as a potential detriment to salmon. Those concerns

  7. The River Runs Dry: Examining Water Shortages in the Yellow River Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zusman, Eric

    2000-01-01

    in Transition Zusman/The River Runs Dry Wang Liurong.YRCC’sin Transition Zusman/The River Runs Dry not just importantin Transition Zusman/The River Runs Dry emerging market

  8. An Investigation of Metal Concentrations in Waste Rock Piles, Stream Water, Benthic Macroinvertebrates, and Stream Bed Sediments to Assess Long-term

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryan, Joe

    An Investigation of Metal Concentrations in Waste Rock Piles, Stream Water, Benthic Engineering 2006 #12;This thesis entitled: An Investigation of Metal Concentrations in Waste Rock Piles) An Investigation of Metal Concentrations in Waste Rock Piles, Stream Water, Benthic Macroinvertebrates, and Stream

  9. Impacts of Natural Salt Pollution on Water Supply Capabilities of River/Reservoir Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Chi Hun

    2011-08-08

    Salinity is a major determinant of where and how water resources are used worldwide. Natural salt pollution severely constrains the beneficial use of large amounts of water in Texas and neighboring states. High salinity loads in several major river...

  10. Final Independent External Peer Review Report Sacramento River Deep Water Ship Channel,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Final Independent External Peer Review Report Sacramento River Deep Water Ship Channel, California Institute Prepared for Department of the Army U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Deep Draft Navigation Planning Peer Review Report of the Sacramento River Deep Water Ship Channel, California Limited Reevaluation

  11. Connectivity between Eurasian snow cover extent and Canadian snow water equivalent and river

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dery, Stephen

    Connectivity between Eurasian snow cover extent and Canadian snow water equivalent and river historical time series of satellite-based measurements of Eurasian snow cover extent and of observed Canadian snow water equivalent (SWE) and freshwater discharge, with a focus on the Churchill River Basin

  12. Bacterial Stimulation in Mixed Cultures of Bacteria and Organic Carbon from River and Lake Waters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacquet, Stéphan

    (rivers or lakes) and blended (different proportions of river and lake water) batch cultures. In each those of either of the individual components and certainly important to an overall understanding. The simple mixing of water from different systems with the resulting blending of bacterial populations

  13. The impacts of `run-of-river' hydropower on the physical and ecological condition of rivers Anderson et al, 2014 (Water and Environment Journal)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hinch, Scott G.

    The impacts of `run-of-river' hydropower on the physical and ecological condition of rivers Anderson et al, 2014 (Water and Environment Journal) OF HYDROPOWER AND STREAMS A tale of run-of-river hydropower facilities and their possible impacts on fish populations #12;2 #12;3 IPCC, 2014 #12;4 From left

  14. An experimental investigaion of seawater/basalt interactions: the role of water/rock ratios and temperature gradients 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Archer, Paul Lawrence

    1978-01-01

    in the precipitation of Fe-sulfides (pyri te and pyrrhoti te) in both 5/1 and 50/1 water/rock ratio systems. As a result of this precipitation, Fe was effectively fractionated from Mn and the Fe/Mn ratio of the fluid decreased. Because the 50/1 systems had lower pH.... EPR). This investi- gation also provides data potentially useful in predicting the occur- rence and kind of mineralization at ocean spreading centers as a function of the temperature and water/rock ratio regime of that system. 11 METHODS Ex...

  15. Sources of Water Surface water and groundwater are present throughout

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacAdam, Keith

    Sources of Water Surface water and groundwater are present throughout Kentucky's 39,486 square miles. Surface water occurs as rivers, streams, ponds, lakes, and wetlands. Ground- water occurs underlain by soluble carbonate rocks (for example, limestone). Water Supply · Approximately 49 inches

  16. The future of the Salton Sea under proposed lower Colorado River basin water management scenarios 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kjelland, Michael Edward

    2009-05-15

    The Salton Sea, situated in the Lower Colorado River Basin (LCRB), is under duress due to, among other things, increased water demands of cities like San Diego, California and Mexicali, Mexico. This research developed a ...

  17. Great Lakes-St. Lawrence River Basin Water Resources Compact (multi-state)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Act describes the management of the Great Lakes - St. Lawrence River basin, and regulates water withdrawals, diversions, and consumptive uses from the basin. The Act establishes a Council,...

  18. Sewage disposal in the Musi-River, India: water quality remediation through irrigation infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, Christopher

    Sewage disposal in the Musi-River, India: water quality remediation through irrigation + Business Media B.V. 2009 Abstract The disposal of untreated urban sewage in to open water bodies is common. This paper presents a 14 month (December 2003 ­ January 2005) water quality survey which aimed to quantify

  19. Flood Control with Model Predictive Control for River Systems with Water Reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flood Control with Model Predictive Control for River Systems with Water Reservoirs Maarten consisting of multiple channels, gates, and a water reservoir. One controller is used in combination of measured water levels. It was observed that the influence of this estimator on the control performance

  20. REGIONAL PATTERNS OF SNOW WATER EQUIVALENT IN THE COLORADO RIVER BASIN USING SNOWPACK TELEMETRY (SNOTEL) DATA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Charles W.

    THESIS REGIONAL PATTERNS OF SNOW WATER EQUIVALENT IN THE COLORADO RIVER BASIN USING SNOWPACK University Fort Collins, Colorado Spring 2008 #12;#12;iii ABSTRACT OF THESIS REGIONAL PATTERNS OF SNOW WATER. Previous clustering of station based snow water equivalent (SWE) data has typically grouped stations based

  1. Airborne thermal remote sensing for water temperature assessment in rivers and streams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Sally

    ). Stream temperature monitoring presents challenges for water resource managers charged with the taskAirborne thermal remote sensing for water temperature assessment in rivers and streams Christian E are needed to assess spatial patterns of stream temperature at scales relevant to issues in water quality

  2. ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT ROCK ISLAND DAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    42) ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT ROCK ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON 1961 Marine Biological. McKeman, Director ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT - ROCK ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON, 1961--Fisheries No. 421 Washington, D. C. April 1962 #12;Rock Island Dam, Columbia River, Washington ii #12;CONTENTS

  3. ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT ROCK ISLAND DAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT ROCK ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON, 1959 :y .iiJA/i-3ri ^' WUUUi. ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT - ROCK ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON, 1959 by Paul D. Zimmer, Clifton and observations 10 Summary 13 #12;#12;ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT - ROCK ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON

  4. Annual Fish Passage Report -Rock Island Dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Annual Fish Passage Report - Rock Island Dam Columbia River, Washington, 1965 By Paul D. Zimmer L. McKeman, Director Annual Fish Passage Report - Rock Island Dam Columbia River, Washington, 1965;#12;Annual Fish Passage Report - Rock Island Dam Columbia River, Washington, 1965 By PAUL D. ZIMMER, Fishery

  5. Erosion Control Progress in the HUA IDAHO SNAKE-PAYETTE RIVERS --HUA WATER QUALITY PROJECT FINAL REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Laughlin, Jay

    Erosion Control Progress in the HUA IDAHO SNAKE-PAYETTE RIVERS -- HUA WATER QUALITY PROJECT FINAL water quality within the HUA used in #12;2 -- Erosion Control IDAHO SNAKE-PAYETTE RIVERS -- HUA WATER from farms­thus improving surface water quality. The technologies used to improve erosion control

  6. Water supply analysis for restoring the Colorado River Delta, Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Medellin-Azuara, Josue; Lund, Jay R.; Howitt, Richard E.

    2007-01-01

    to Pay for Additional Transboundary Water Flows from the US.2001). "Improving California Water Management: Optimizingloss functions to value urban water scarcity in California."

  7. Water supply analysis for restoring the Colorado River Delta, Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Medellin-Azuara, Josue; Lund, Jay R.; Howitt, Richard E.

    2007-01-01

    Price elasticity of residential demand for water: A meta-1989). "Comparing Residential Water Demand Estimates under1985). "Estimating Residential Water Demand under Multi-Part

  8. Water supply analysis for restoring the Colorado River Delta, Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Medellin-Azuara, Josue; Lund, Jay R.; Howitt, Richard E.

    2007-01-01

    1091-1109. Banco de México. (2006). "Indices de Precios alColorado River Delta in Mexico." Cohen, M. J. (2006). "TheEstadísticas del Agua en México 2004." Comisión Nacional del

  9. Simulation of water-rock interaction in the yellowstone geothermal system using TOUGHREACT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dobson, P.F.; Salah, S.; Spycher, N.; Sonnenthal, E.

    2003-01-01

    fluid flow in the Yellowstone geothermal system, Wyoming,ROCK INTERACTION IN THE YELLOWSTONE GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM USINGGeyser Basin of the Yellowstone geothermal system, has been

  10. Rock-Water Interactions in the Fenton Hill, New Mexico, Hot Dry...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Rock Geothermal Systems II. Modeling Geochemical Behavior Abstract A transient mass balance model is developed to account for the dynamic behavior of an artificially stimulated...

  11. Increasing subsurface water storage in discontinuous permafrost areas of the Lena River basin, Eurasia, detected from GRACE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Zhongping

    Increasing subsurface water storage in discontinuous permafrost areas of the Lena River basin in terrestrial water storage (TWS) in the Lena river basin, Eurasia, during the period April 2002 to September the observed TWS increase of 68 Æ 19 km3 to an increase in subsurface water storage. This large subsurface

  12. Envir202b Earth, Air, Water: the Human Context Winter 2003 F. Stahr The River Dammed: Proposed Removal of the Lower Snake River Dams A Case Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Envir202b ­ Earth, Air, Water: the Human Context Winter 2003 F. Stahr The River Dammed: Proposed Removal of the Lower Snake River Dams ­ A Case Study Assignment & Schedule for Day 2 We will next work as your group will be asked to answer the following questions: 1) What changes (if any) to the dams

  13. Methods for Quantifying Shallow-Water Habitat Availability in the Missouri River

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanrahan, Timothy P.; Larson, Kyle B.

    2012-04-09

    As part of regulatory requirements for shallow-water habitat (SWH) restoration, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) completes periodic estimates of the quantity of SWH available throughout the lower 752 mi of the Missouri River. To date, these estimates have been made by various methods that consider only the water depth criterion for SWH. The USACE has completed estimates of SWH availability based on both depth and velocity criteria at four river bends (hereafter called reference bends), encompassing approximately 8 river miles within the lower 752 mi of the Missouri River. These estimates were made from the results of hydraulic modeling of water depth and velocity throughout each bend. Hydraulic modeling of additional river bends is not expected to be completed for deriving estimates of available SWH. Instead, future estimates of SWH will be based on the water depth criterion. The objective of this project, conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the USACE Omaha District, was to develop geographic information system methods for estimating the quantity of available SWH based on water depth only. Knowing that only a limited amount of water depth and channel geometry data would be available for all the remaining bends within the lower 752 mi of the Missouri River, the intent was to determine what information, if any, from the four reference bends could be used to develop methods for estimating SWH at the remaining bends. Specifically, we examined the relationship between cross-section channel morphology and relative differences between SWH estimates based on combined depth and velocity criteria and the depth-only criterion to determine if a correction factor could be applied to estimates of SWH based on the depth-only criterion. In developing these methods, we also explored the applicability of two commonly used geographic information system interpolation methods (TIN and ANUDEM) for estimating SWH using four different elevation data scenarios. Relative differences in SWH estimates among the four data scenarios were compared to illustrate estimation ranges.

  14. Raft River monitor well potentiometric head responses and water...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    head responses and water quality as related to the conceptual ground-water flow system Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Raft...

  15. Design and installation of continuous flow and water qualitymonitoring stations to improve water quality forecasting in the lower SanJoaquin River

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, Nigel W.T.

    2007-01-20

    This project deliverable describes a number ofstate-of-the-art, telemetered, flow and water quality monitoring stationsthat were designed, instrumented and installed in cooperation with localirrigation water districts to improve water quality simulation models ofthe lower San Joaquin River, California. This work supports amulti-disciplinary, multi-agency research endeavor to develop ascience-based Total Maximum Daily Load for dissolved oxygen in the SanJoaquin River and Stockton Deep Water Ship Channel.

  16. Designing a water leasing market for the Mimbres River, New Mexico.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reno-Trujillo, Marissa Devan; Tidwell, Vincent Carroll; Broadbent, Craig; Brookshire, David; Coursey, Don; Jackson, Charles.; Polley, Adam; Stevenson, Bryan

    2013-04-01

    The objective of this study is to develop a conceptual framework for establishing water leasing markets in New Mexico using the Mimbres River as a test case. Given the past and growing stress over water in New Mexico and the Mimbres River in particular, this work will develop a mechanism for the short term, efficient, temporary transfer of water from one user to another while avoiding adverse effects on any user not directly involved in the transaction (i.e., third party effects). Toward establishing a water leasing market, five basic tasks were performed, (1) a series of stakeholder meetings were conducted to identify and address concerns and interests of basin residents, (2) several gauges were installed on irrigation ditches to aid in the monitoring and management of water resources in the basin, (3) the hydrologic/market model and decision support interface was extended to include the Middle and Lower reaches of the Mimbres River, (4) experiments were conducted to aid in design of the water leasing market, and (5) a set of rules governing a water leasing market was drafted for future adoption by basin residents and the New Mexico Office of the State Engineer.

  17. EIS-0121: Alternative Cooling Water Systems, Savannah River Plant, Aiken, South Carolina

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The purpose of this Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is to provide environmental input into the selection and implementation of cooling water systems for thermal discharges from K– and C-Reactors and from a coal-fired powerhouse in the D-Area at the Savannah River Plant (SRP)

  18. Current and future water issues in the Oldman River Basin of Alberta, Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Selinger, Brent

    Current and future water issues in the Oldman River Basin of Alberta, Canada J. Byrne*, S. Kienzle, University of Lethbridge, Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada T1K 3M4 (E-mail: byrne@uleth.ca; stefan Health Branch, Public Health Agency of Canada, PO Box 640, Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada T1J 3Z4 (E

  19. Here we develop a new control model of water injection from a growing hydrofracture into a layered soft rock. We demonstrate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patzek, Tadeusz W.

    Summary Here we develop a new control model of water injection from a growing hydrofracture design an optimal controller of water injection into a low-permeability rock from a growing vertical hydrofrac- ture. The objective of control is to inject water at a prescribed rate, which may change

  20. Interannual variations of river water storage from a multiple satellite approach: A case study for the Rio Negro River basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frappart, Frédéric; Papa, Fabrice; Famiglietti, James S; Prigent, Catherine; Rossow, William B; Seyler, Frédérique

    2008-01-01

    satellite track runs along the river. As T/P cross track (orthe T/P tracks run parallel to the river. In these cases,

  1. Water supply aspects of river authorities in Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krishnamurthi, Sushma

    2006-10-30

    Price has been noted to be an important ingredient in any evaluation of future water demands, since it is a signal of cost administered by water wholesalers or retailers. The purpose of this study is to contribute to a better understanding of rates...

  2. Water Quality Trends in the Entiat River Subbasin: Final 2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodsmith, Richard; Bookter, Andy

    2009-03-30

    The ISEMP program monitors the status and trend of water quality elements that may affect restoration project effectiveness in the Entiat subbasin. As part of this effort, the PNW Research Station (PNW) measures, analyzes and interprets temporal trends in natural stream water pH, dissolved oxygen, specific conductivity and temperature. The Entiat River is currently on the Clean Water Act 303(d) list for pH exceedence, and there is insufficient information to determine the spatial and temporal extent or potential causes of this exceedence. In the spring 2008, PNW redeployed data-logging, multiparameter probes at four locations in the Entiat subbasin to measure water quality parameters, focusing on pH. This resumed previous data collection that was interrupted by river ice in early December 2007. Instruments were again removed from the river in early December 2008. This annual report covers the period from December 2007 through December 2008. The highest pH values occurred during the low-flow period from midsummer through the following midspring then dropped sharply during the annual snowmelt runoff period from late spring through early summer. Water temperature began rapidly increasing during the receding limb of the annual snowmelt hydrograph. Highest mean monthly temperatures occurred in July and August, while instantaneous maxima occurred during the period July-September. Dissolved oxygen reached its lowest levels during the period of highest water temperature in July-September. Specific conductivity remained very low at all sites throughout the year.

  3. Susceptibility of Granite Rock to scCO2/Water at 200 degrees C and 250 degrees C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sugama, T.; Gill, S., Ecker, L., Butcher, T., Warren, J.

    2011-01-01

    Granite rock comprising anorthoclase-type albite and quartz as its major phases and biotite mica as the minor one was exposed to supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO{sub 2})/water at 250 C and 13.78 MPa pressure for 104 hours. For comparison purpose, four other rocks, albite, hornblende, diorite, and quartz, also were exposed. During the exposure of granite, ionic carbonic acid, known as the wet carbonation reactant, preferentially reacted with anorthoclase-type albite and biotite, rather than with quartz. The susceptibility of biotite to wet carbonation was higher than that of anorthoclase-type albite. All the carbonation by-products of anorthoclase-type albite were amorphous phases including Na- and K-carbonates, a kaolinite clay-like compound, and silicon dioxide, while wet carbonation converted biotite into potassium aluminum silicate, siderite, and magnesite in crystalline phases and hydrogen fluoride (HF). Three of these reaction by-products, Na- and K-carbonates and HF, were highly soluble in water. Correspondingly, the carbonated top surface layer, about 1.27 mm thick as carbonation depth, developed porous microstructure with numerous large voids, some of which have a size of {>=} 10 {mu}m, reflecting the erosion of granite by the leaching of these water-soluble reaction by-products. Comparing with this carbonation depth, its depth of other minerals was considerable lower, particularly, for hornblende and diorite with 0.07 and 0.02 mm, while no carbonate compound was detected in quartz. The major factor governing these low carbonation depths in these rocks was the formation of water-insensitive scale-like carbonate by-products such as calcite (CaCO{sub 3}), siderite (FeCO{sub 3}), and magnesite (MgCO{sub 3}). Their formation within the superficial layer of these minerals served as protective barrier layer that inhibits and retards further carbonation of fresh underlying minerals, even if the exposure time was extended. Thus, the coverage by this barrier layer of the non-carbonated surfaces of the underlying rock was reason why the hornblende and diorite exhibited a minimum depth of carbonation. Under exposure to the scCO{sub 2}/water at 200 C and 10.34 MPa pressure for up to 42 days, the ranking of the magnitude of erosion caused by wet carbonation was in the following order; granite > albite > hornblende > diorite > quartz. The eroding-caused weight loss of granite (0.88 %) was {approx}2.4, {approx}5.2, {approx}9.8, and {approx}17.6 times greater than that of albite, hornblends, diorite, and quartz, respectively.

  4. Hydrologic and Institutional Water Availability in the Brazos River Basin 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurbs, Ralph A.; Bergman, Carla E.; Carriere, Patrick E.; Walls, W. Brian

    1988-01-01

    traditionally have been used in water supply planning and management are firm yield and, to a lesser extent, reliability. Firm yield is the estimated maximum release or withdrawal rate which can be maintained continuously during a repetition of the hydrologic...

  5. A pore-scale model of two-phase flow in water-wet rock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silin, Dmitriy; Patzek, Tad

    2009-02-01

    A finite-difference discretization of Stokes equations is used to simulate flow in the pore space of natural rocks. Numerical solutions are obtained using the method of artificial compressibility. In conjunction with Maximal Inscribed Spheres method, these computations produce relative permeability curves. The results of computations are in agreement with laboratory measurements.

  6. Phase 1 summaries of radionuclide concentration data for vegetation, river water, drinking water, and fish. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denham, D.H.; Dirkes, R.L.; Hanf, R.W.; Poston, T.M.; Thiede, M.E.; Woodruff, R.K.

    1993-06-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate the radiation doses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at the Hanford Site since 1944. As part of the HEDR Project, the Environmental Monitoring Data Task (Task 05) staff assemble, evaluate, and summarize key historical measurements of radionuclide concentrations in the environment as a result of Hanford operations. The scope of work performed during Phase I included initiating the search, recovery, and inventory of environmental reports. Summaries of the environmental monitoring data that were recovered and evaluated are presented for specific periods of interest. These periods include vegetation monitoring data (primarily sagebrush) for the years 1945 through 1947, Columbia River water and drinking water monitoring data for the years 1963 through 1966, and fish monitoring data for the years 1964 through 1966. Concern was limited to those radionuclides identified as the most likely major contributors to the dose potentially received by the public during the times of interest: phosphorous-32, copper-64, zinc-65, arsenic-76, and neptunium-239 in Columbia River fish and drinking water taken from the river, and iodine-131 in vegetation. This report documents the achievement of the Phase I objectives of the Environmental Monitoring Data Task.

  7. Behind the scenes of Trinity Waters project: Partnerships and technology deliver cooperative conservation in the Trinity River Basin 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alldredge, Blake; Kalisek, Danielle

    2012-01-01

    of Trinity River Basin landowners. With more than ? million residents, the Trinity is the most populated river basin in Texas. From its headwaters north of the Dallas?Fort Worth Metroplex, past Houston to its outlet into Galveston Bay, the ???-mile river... for protecting water resources. ?e ultimate goal of these workshops is to equip stakeholders with the information needed to determine the best direction for managing basin watersheds. A capstone summit is planned for spring ???? a?er the workshops have...

  8. Water Quality Sampling Locations Along the Shoreline of the Columbia River, Hanford Site, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, Robert E.; Patton, Gregory W.

    2009-12-14

    As environmental monitoring evolved on the Hanford Site, several different conventions were used to name or describe location information for various sampling sites along the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River. These methods range from handwritten descriptions in field notebooks to the use of modern electronic surveying equipment, such as Global Positioning System receivers. These diverse methods resulted in inconsistent archiving of analytical results in various electronic databases and published reports because of multiple names being used for the same site and inaccurate position data. This document provides listings of sampling sites that are associated with groundwater and river water sampling. The report identifies names and locations for sites associated with sampling: (a) near-river groundwater using aquifer sampling tubes; (b) riverbank springs and springs areas; (c) pore water collected from riverbed sediment; and (d) Columbia River water. Included in the listings are historical names used for a particular site and the best available geographic coordinates for the site, as of 2009. In an effort to create more consistency in the descriptive names used for water quality sampling sites, a naming convention is proposed in this document. The convention assumes that a unique identifier is assigned to each site that is monitored and that this identifier serves electronic database management requirements. The descriptive name is assigned for the convenience of the subsequent data user. As the historical database is used more intensively, this document may be revised as a consequence of discovering potential errors and also because of a need to gain consensus on the proposed naming convention for some water quality monitoring sites.

  9. series of drains returns unused and excess water to the river near Parma, which is a short distance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Laughlin, Jay

    are responsible for water pollution. While the former can easily be traced to a source, such as a manufacturing to study non-point pollution. The river has a relatively pure source of water from snow melt and is only 60 miles long down- stream from the city of Boise. It has two major potential sources of water pollution

  10. Water quality improvements in the Upper North Bosque River watershed due to phosphorous export through turfgrass sod 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, George Russell

    2005-02-17

    -1 WATER QUALITY IMPROVEMENTS IN THE UPPER NORTH BOSQUE RIVER WATERSHED DUE TO PHOSPHOROUS EXPORT THROUGH TURFGRASS SOD A Thesis by GEORGE R. STEWART Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 2004 Major Subject: Biological and Agricultural Engineering WATER QUALITY IMPROVEMENTS IN THE UPPER NORTH BOSQUE RIVER WATERSHED DUE...

  11. Land and water use characteristics in the vicinity of the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamby, D.M.

    1991-03-01

    Routine operations at the Savannah River Site (SRS) result in the release of small amounts of radionuclides to the atmosphere and to the Savannah River. The resulting radiological doses to the offsite maximum individual and the offsite population within 50 miles of the SRS are estimated on a yearly basis. These estimates are generated using dose models prescribed for the commercial nuclear power industry by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The NRC provides default values for dose model parameters for facilities not having enough data to develop site-specific values. A survey of land and water use characteristics for the Savannah River area has been conducted to determine as many site-specific values as possible for inclusion in the dose models used at the SRS. These site parameters include local characteristics of meat, milk, and vegetable production; river recreational activities; and meat, milk, and vegetable consumption rates. The report that follows describes the origin of the NRC default values, the methodology for deriving regional data, the results of the study, and the derivations of region-specific usage and consumption rates. 33 refs., 3 figs., 8 tabs.

  12. Water Resources Data Ohio: Water year 1994. Volume 1, Ohio River Basin excluding Project Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-12-31

    The Water Resources Division of the US Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with State agencies, obtains a large amount of data each water year (a water year is the 12-month period from October 1 through September 30 and is identified by the calendar year in which it ends) pertaining to the water resources of Ohio. These data, accumulated during many years, constitute a valuable data base for developing an improved understanding of the water resources of the State. To make these data readily available to interested parties outside the USGS, they are published annually in this report series entitled ``Water Resources Data--Ohio.`` This report (in two volumes) includes records on surface water and ground water in the State. Specifically, it contains: (1) Discharge records for streamflow-gaging stations, miscellaneous sites, and crest-stage stations; (2) stage and content records for streams, lakes, and reservoirs; (3) water-quality data for streamflow-gaging stations, wells, synoptic sites, and partial-record sit -aid (4) water-level data for observation wells. Locations of lake-and streamflow-gaging stations, water-quality stations, and observation wells for which data are presented in this volume are shown in figures 8a through 8b. The data in this report represent that part of the National Water Data System collected by the USGS and cooperating State and Federal agencies in Ohio. This series of annual reports for Ohio began with the 1961 water year with a report that contained only data relating to the quantities of surface water. For the 1964 water year, a similar report was introduced that contained only data relating to water quality. Beginning with the 1975 water year, the report was changed to present (in two or three volumes) data on quantities of surface water, quality of surface and ground water, and ground-water levels.

  13. Closing the Loop on Groundwater-Surface Water Interactions, River Hydrodynamics, and Metabolism on the San Joaquin River Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01

    of the rate of change of NEP ? Pressure, temperature, andstation. Calculation of NEP from the SJR-Merced RiverNet Ecosystem Productivity (NEP) using dissolved oxygen (DO)

  14. ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT ROCK ISLAND DAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT ROCK ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON 1960 . SPECIAL SCIENTIFIC ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON, 1960 by Paul D. Zimmer and Clifton C. Davidson United States Fish This annual report of fishway operations at Rock Island Dam in 1960 is dedicated to the memory of co

  15. Sponsored by: NYSDEC Hudson River Research Reserve, Hudson River Estuary Program, and NYS Water Resource Institute at Cornell University.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Tsuhan

    fish that is born in the Atlantic Ocean and enters rivers as tiny "glass eels" each spring. The species and students collect glass eels using net and trap devices on several Hudson River tributaries. Juvenile fish PROJECT VOLUNTEERS WANTED! Research migratory fish in local streams #12;

  16. Snow water equivalent along elevation gradients in the Merced and Tuolumne River basins of the Sierra Nevada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Jeff

    Snow water equivalent along elevation gradients in the Merced and Tuolumne River basins fractional snow-covered area (SCA) at 500 m resolution to estimate snow water equivalent (SWE) across) blending the fractional SCA with SWE interpolated from snow-pillow measurements; and (2) retrospectively

  17. Literature and data review for the surface-water pathway: Columbia River and adjacent coastal areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walters, W.H.; Dirkes, R.L.; Napier, B.A.

    1992-04-01

    As part of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project, Pacific Northwest Laboratory reviewed literature and data on radionuclide concentrations and distribution in the water, sediment, and biota of the Columbia River and adjacent coastal areas. Over 600 documents were reviewed including Hanford reports, reports by offsite agencies, journal articles, and graduate theses. Certain radionuclide concentration data were used in preliminary estimates of individual dose for the 1964--1966 time period. This report summarizes the literature and database review and the results of the preliminary dose estimates.

  18. Clean Water Act (Section 404) and Rivers and Harbors Act (Sections 9 and 10)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    This Reference Book contains a current copy of the Clean Water Act (Section 404) and the Rivers and Harbors Act (Sections 9 and 10) and those regulations that implement those sections of the statutes and appear to be most relevant to DOE activities. The document is provided to DOE and contractor staff for informational purposes only and should not be interpreted as legal guidance. Updates that include important new requirements will be provided periodically. Questions concerning this Reference Book may be directed to Mark Petts, IH-231 (FTS 896-2609 or Commercial 202/586-2609).

  19. Phase I Water Rental Pilot Project : Snake River Resident Fish and Wildlife Resources and Management Recommendations.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riggin, Stacey H.; Hansen, H. Jerome

    1992-10-01

    The Idaho Water Rental Pilot Project was implemented as a part of the Non-Treaty Storage Fish and Wildlife Agreement (NTSA) between Bonneville Power Administration and the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority. The goal of the project is to improve juvenile and adult salmon and steelhead passage in the lower Snake River with the use of rented water for flow augmentation. The primary purpose of this project is to summarize existing resource information and provide recommendations to protect or enhance resident fish and wildlife resources in Idaho with actions achieving flow augmentation for anadromous fish. Potential impacts of an annual flow augmentation program on Idaho reservoirs and streams are modeled. Potential sources of water for flow augmentation and operational or institutional constraints to the use of that water are identified. This report does not advocate flow augmentation as the preferred long-term recovery action for salmon. The state of Idaho strongly believes that annual drawdown of the four lower Snake reservoirs is critical to the long-term enhancement and recovery of salmon (Andrus 1990). Existing water level management includes balancing the needs of hydropower production, irrigated agriculture, municipalities and industries with fish, wildlife and recreation. Reservoir minimum pool maintenance, water quality and instream flows are issues of public concern that will be directly affected by the timing and quantity of water rental releases for salmon flow augmentation, The potential of renting water from Idaho rental pools for salmon flow augmentation is complicated by institutional impediments, competition from other water users, and dry year shortages. Water rental will contribute to a reduction in carryover storage in a series of dry years when salmon flow augmentation is most critical. Such a reduction in carryover can have negative impacts on reservoir fisheries by eliminating shoreline spawning beds, reducing available fish habitat, and exacerbating adverse water quality conditions. A reduction in carry over can lead to seasonal reductions in instream flows, which may also negatively affect fish, wildlife, and recreation in Idaho. The Idaho Water Rental Pilot Project does provide opportunities to protect and enhance resident fish and wildlife habitat by improving water quality and instream flows. Control of point sources, such as sewage and industrial discharges, alone will not achieve water quality goals in Idaho reservoirs and streams. Slow, continuous releases of rented water can increase and stabilize instream flows, increase available fish and wildlife habitat, decrease fish displacement, and improve water quality. Island integrity, requisite for waterfowl protection from mainland predators, can be maintained with improved timing of water releases. Rebuilding Snake River salmon and steelhead runs requires a cooperative commitment and increased flexibility in system operations to increase flow velocities for fish passage and migration. Idaho's resident fish and wildlife resources require judicious management and a willingness by all parties to liberate water supplies equitably.

  20. Groundwater Surface Water Interactions in a Gold-mined Floodplain of the Merced River

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, Lynn Sager

    2013-01-01

    1998). Chinook tend to run up larger river systems and occurEstimated Fall Run Chinook Merced River Year Figure 12of Merced River adult fall-run Chinook salmon ..

  1. Using HEM surveys to evaluate disposal of by-product water from CBNG development in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lipinski, B.A.; Sams, J.I.; Smith, B.D. (USGS, Denver, CO); Harbert, W.P.

    2008-05-01

    Production of methane from thick, extensive coal beds in the Powder River Basin ofWyoming has created water management issues. Since development began in 1997, more than 650 billion liters of water have been produced from approximately 22,000 wells. Infiltration impoundments are used widely to dispose of by-product water from coal bed natural gas (CBNG) production, but their hydrogeologic effects are poorly understood. Helicopter electromagnetic surveys (HEM) were completed in July 2003 and July 2004 to characterize the hydrogeology of an alluvial aquifer along the Powder River. The aquifer is receiving CBNG produced water discharge from infiltration impoundments. HEM data were subjected to Occam’s inversion algorithms to determine the aquifer bulk conductivity, which was then correlated to water salinity using site-specific sampling results. The HEM data provided high-resolution images of salinity levels in the aquifer, a result not attainable using traditional sampling methods. Interpretation of these images reveals clearly the produced water influence on aquifer water quality. Potential shortfalls to this method occur where there is no significant contrast in aquifer salinity and infiltrating produced water salinity and where there might be significant changes in aquifer lithology. Despite these limitations, airborne geophysical methods can provide a broadscale (watershed-scale) tool to evaluate CBNG water disposal, especially in areas where field-based investigations are logistically prohibitive. This research has implications for design and location strategies of future CBNG water surface disposal facilities within the Powder River Basin.

  2. Using HEM surveys to evaluate disposal of by-product water from CBNG development in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lipinski, Brian A. [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Sams, James I. [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States); Smith, Bruce D. [U.S. Geological Survey. Denver, CO (United States); Harbert, William [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2008-05-01

    Production of methane from thick, extensive coal beds in the Powder River Basin of Wyoming has created water management issues. Since development began in 1997, more than 650 billion liters of water have been produced from approximately 22,000 wells. Infiltration impoundments are used widely to dispose of by-product water from coal bed natural gas (CBNG) production, but their hydrogeologic effects are poorly understood. Helicopter electromagnetic surveys (HEM) were completed in July 2003 and July 2004 to characterize the hydrogeology of an alluvial aquifer along the Powder River. The aquifer is receiving CBNG produced water discharge from infiltration impoundments. HEM data were subjected to Occam's inversion algorithms to determine the aquifer bulk conductivity, which was then correlated to water salinity using site-specific sampling results. The HEM data provided high-resolution images of salinity levels in the aquifer, a result not attainable using traditional sampling methods. Interpretation of these images reveals clearly the produced water influence on aquifer water quality. Potential shortfalls to this method occur where there is no significant contrast in aquifer salinity and infiltrating produced water salinity and where there might be significant changes in aquifer lithology. Despite these limitations, airborne geophysical methods can provide a broadscale (watershed-scale) tool to evaluate CBNG water disposal, especially in areas where field-based investigations are logistically prohibitive. This research has implications for design and location strategies of future CBNG water surface disposal facilities within the Powder River Basin.

  3. Displacement of oil from reservoir rock using graded-viscosity water 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Atigi, Yosef A

    1974-01-01

    experiment a total of I pore volume (PV) of fluids was injected at a constant rate of 0. 766 cc/min. The oil used had a viscosity of 30 centipoise (cp). In one case, a 1 PV bank of plain water was injected. In another case, a 1 PV bank of 30 cp polymer... solution was injected. Between the two cases, 29% of the polymer used above was utilized to make a 1/2 PV bank of graded-viscosity polymer solution and, in a separate case, to make a 0. 29 PV bank of 30 cp polymer solution. The two banks were flushed...

  4. Reactivity of Charcoal-Derived Water Soluble Biomarkers in River Water 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Norwood, Matthew 1985-

    2011-04-25

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the residence time of water-soluble levoglucosan and free lignin-derived phenols, from two different plant charcoals. Dissolved organic matter (DOM) was extracted from honey mesquite and cordgrass charcoal...

  5. Interannual variations of river water storage from a multiple satellite approach: A case study for the Rio Negro River basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frappart, Frédéric; Papa, Fabrice; Famiglietti, James S; Prigent, Catherine; Rossow, William B; Seyler, Frédérique

    2008-01-01

    Climate Experiment (GRACE) water storage estimates, Geophys.2008), Analysis of terrestrial water storage changes fromGRACE and GLDAS, Water Resour. Res. , 44, W02433, doi:

  6. Water Quality Trends in the Entiat River Subbasin: Final Annual Report to BPA and NOAA Fisheries, 2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodsmith, Richard; Bookter, Andy

    2008-03-11

    The Integrated Status and Effectiveness Monitoring Project (ISEMP) program monitors the status and trend of water quality elements that may affect restoration project effectiveness in the Entiat subbasin. As part of this effort, the PNW Research Station (PNW) measures, analyzes and interprets temporal trends in natural stream water pH, dissolved oxygen, specific conductance and temperature. The Entiat River is currently on the Clean Water Act 303(d) list for pH exceedence, and there is insufficient information to determine the spatial and temporal extent or potential causes of this exceedence. In the late spring 2007, PNW deployed data-logging, multiparameter probes at four locations in the Entiat subbasin to measure water quality parameters, focusing on pH. Data collection was seasonally interrupted by river ice in early December. Daily average pH did not exceed the water quality standard of 8.5 at any of the measurements sites. However, instantaneous values did exceed this standard near the mouth of the Entiat River during late summer-fall period. This suggested that in the lowest portion of the river peaks in pH may be occurring because of photosynthesis caused by high rates of periphyton productivity in response to increased sunlight, temperature, and possible nutrient enrichment. Conversely, dissolved oxygen reached annual low levels during this same late summer-fall period, in part because of increased water temperatures and increased biochemical oxygen demand.

  7. Study on Performance Verification and Evaluation of District Heating and Cooling System Using Thermal Energy of River Water 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takahashi,N.; Niwa, H.; Kawano,M.; Koike,K.; Koga,O.; Ichitani, K.; Mishima,N.

    2014-01-01

    SEKKEI Research Institute Naoki Takahashi Study on Performance Verification and Evaluation of District Heating and Cooling System Using Thermal Energy of River Water ESL-IC-14-09-19 Proceedings of the 14th International Conference for Enhanced Building... Operations, Beijing, China, September 14-17, 2014 1The heating and cooling system used in Osaka’s Nakanoshima district uses heat pumps and river water to achieve the efficient use of the heat source and mitigate the heat island effect. The system...

  8. Application of a spatially referenced water quality model to predict E. coli flux in two Texas river basins 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Deepti

    2009-05-15

    REFERENCED WATER QUALITY MODEL TO PREDICT E. coli FLUX IN TWO TEXAS RIVER BASINS A Thesis by DEEPTI Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 2008... Major Subject: Biological and Agricultural Engineering APPLICATION OF A SPATIALLY REFERENCED WATER QUALITY MODEL TO PREDICT E. coli FLUX IN TWO TEXAS RIVER BASINS A Thesis by DEEPTI Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University...

  9. Design and Operation of Fan-Coil Units in Using River Water as Chilled Water 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, A.; Chen, H.; Ma, W.; Zhu, H.

    2006-01-01

    and the properties of indoor-air, and so on. Especially, the temperature of inlet-water can not only make a strong impact on the capacity of the energy afforded by FCUs, but also affect the economic capability of the whole air-conditioning system directly.... As a rule, the designers of A/C systems pay more attention to the design of the inlet-water temperature of FCUs, and many correlative criteria have been established. Generally, considering the economic benefit of an air-conditioning system wholly...

  10. Concept Paper for Real-Time Temperature and Water QualityManagement for San Joaquin River Riparian Habitat Restoration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, Nigel W.T.

    2004-12-20

    The San Joaquin River Riparian Habitat Restoration Program (SJRRP) has recognized the potential importance of real-time monitoring and management to the success of the San Joaquin River (SJR) restoration endeavor. The first step to realizing making real-time management a reality on the middle San Joaquin River between Friant Dam and the Merced River will be the installation and operation of a network of permanent telemetered gauging stations that will allow optimization of reservoir releases made specifically for fish water temperature management. Given the limited reservoir storage volume available to the SJJRP, this functionality will allow the development of an adaptive management program, similar in concept to the VAMP though with different objectives. The virtue of this approach is that as management of the middle SJR becomes more routine, additional sensors can be added to the sensor network, initially deployed, to continue to improve conditions for anadromous fish.

  11. Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix F: Irrigation, Municipal and Industrial/Water Supply.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Columbia River System Operations Review (U.S.); United States. Bonneville Power Administration; United States. Army. Corps of Engineers. North Pacific Division; United States. Bureau of Reclamation. Pacific Northwest Region.

    1995-11-01

    Since the 1930`s, the Columbia River has been harnessed for the benefit of the Northwest and the nation. Federal agencies have built 30 major dams on the river and its tributaries. Dozens of non-Federal projects have been developed as well. The dams provide flood control, irrigation, navigation, hydro-electric power generation, recreation, fish and wildlife, and streamflows for wildlife, anadromous fish, resident fish, and water quality. This is Appendix F of the Environmental Impact Statement for the Columbia River System, focusing on irrigation issues and concerns arrising from the Irrigation and Mitigation of impacts (M&I) working Group of the SOR process. Major subheadings include the following: Scope and process of irrigation/M&I studies; Irrigation/M&I in the Columbia Basin Today including overview, irrigated acreage and water rights, Irrigation and M&I issues basin-wide and at specific locations; and the analysis of impacts and alternative for the Environmental Impact Statement.

  12. Value creation in water allocation negotiations : lessons from the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint River and Lower Colorado River Basins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solis, Miriam

    2012-01-01

    Intense water disputes in the United States are being caused by new and conflicting demands from many quarters and changes in water availability that appear to be caused by climate change. Projections of heightened water ...

  13. Rock Art

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huyge, Dirk

    2009-01-01

    Courtesy of the Royal Museums of Art and History, Brussels.Figure 4. Rock art from Abu Ballas caravan station, 550 kmtypical of Pharaonic rock art. Kharga Oasis. Photograph by

  14. A model for the development of a lobate alpine rock glacier in southwest Colorado, USA: implications for water on Mars 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Degenhardt, John Jerome

    2004-09-30

    glacier settles during periods of melting, and the mode of deformation. A better understanding of these factors is important for engineers, engineering geologists and geomorphologists who must make prudent evaluations of rock glaciers as potential sites...

  15. Natural Salt Pollution and Water Supply Reliability in the Brazos River Basin 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurbs, Ralph A.; Karama, Awes S.; Saleh, Ishtiaque; Ganze, C. Keith

    1993-01-01

    The Brazos River Basin is representative of several major river basins in the Southwestern United States in regard to natural salt pollution. Geologic formations underlying portions of the upper watersheds of the Brazos, Colorado, Pecos, Canadian...

  16. The Impacts of Pulsed Reintroduction of River Water on a Mississippi Delta Coastal Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the twentieth century about 25% of the wetlands of the Mississippi delta was lost, partially a result, crevasse formation, great river floods, hurricanes, annual river floods, weather-front passages, and tides

  17. Microearthquake surveys of Snake River plain and Northwest Basin...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    energy; Humboldt County Nevada; Idaho; microearthquakes; Nevada; North America; passive systems; Pershing County Nevada; Raft River; reservoir rocks; seismic methods;...

  18. A Fresh Perspective for Managing Water in California: Insights from Applying the European Water Framework Directive to the Russian River

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grantham, Ted; Christian-Smith, Juliet; Kondolf, G. Mathias; Scheuer, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    drinking water supply; water extraction does not exceed theresulting from water diversions and extraction, as well asand effects of extraction water tables is generally not

  19. Remedial Action Plan and Site design for stabilization of the inactive Uranium Mill Tailings sites at Slick Rock, Colorado: Revision 1. Remedial action selection report, Attachment 2, geology report, Attachment 3, ground water hydrology report, Attachment 4, water resources protection strategy. Final

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    The Slick Rock uranium mill tailings sites are located near the small community of Slick Rock, in San Miguel County, Colorado. There are two designated Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites at Slick Rock: the Union Carbide site and the North Continent site. Both sites are adjacent to the Dolores River. The sites contain former mill building concrete foundations, tailings piles, demolition debris, and areas contaminated by windblown and waterborne radioactive materials. The total estimated volume of contaminated materials is approximately 621,000 cubic yards (475,000 cubic meters). In addition to the contamination at the two processing site areas, 13 vicinity properties were contaminated. Contamination associated with the UC and NC sites has leached into ground water. Pursuant to the requirements of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) (42 USC {section}7901 et seq.), the proposed remedial action plan (RAP) will satisfy the final US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standards in 40 CFR Part 192 (60 FR 2854) for cleanup, stabilization, and control of the residual radioactive material (RRM) (tailings and other contaminated materials) at the disposal site at Burro Canyon. The requirements for control of the RRM (Subpart A) will be satisfied by the construction of an engineered disposal cell. The proposed remedial action will consist of relocating the uranium mill tailings, contaminated vicinity property materials, demolition debris, and windblown/weaterborne materials to a permanent repository at the Burro Canyon disposal site. The site is approximately 5 road mi (8 km) northeast of the mill sites on land recently transferred to the DOE by the Bureau of Land Management.

  20. Processing Tritiated Water at the Savannah River Site: A Production-Scale Demonstration of a Palladium Membrane Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sessions, Kevin L. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company (United States)

    2005-07-15

    The Palladium Membrane Reactor (PMR) process was installed in the Tritium Facilities at the Savannah River Site to perform a production-scale demonstration for the recovery of tritium from tritiated water adsorbed on molecular sieve (zeolite). Unlike the current recovery process that utilizes magnesium, the PMR offers a means to process tritiated water in a more cost effective and environmentally friendly manner. The design and installation of the large-scale PMR process was part of a collaborative effort between the Savannah River Site and Los Alamos National Laboratory.The PMR process operated at the Savannah River Site between May 2001 and April 2003. During the initial phase of operation the PMR processed thirty-four kilograms of tritiated water from the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. The water was processed in fifteen separate batches to yield approximately 34,400 liters (STP) of hydrogen isotopes. Each batch consisted of round-the-clock operations for approximately nine days. In April 2003 the reactor's palladium-silver membrane ruptured resulting in the shutdown of the PMR process. Reactor performance, process performance and operating experiences have been evaluated and documented. A performance comparison between PMR and current magnesium process is also documented.

  1. Impact of water resource development on the hydrology and sedimentology of the Brazos River system 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minter, Larry Lane

    1976-01-01

    . Christopher C. Mathewson Major dam and reservoir development within the Brazos River Basin is correlative with a significant decrease in the suspended sediment load of the river and with increased coastal erosion rates near the delta. A hydrologic analysis... to account for the entire increase in the coastal erosion rates in the study area since at least 1937 Future sand losses brought about by the construction oi' new reservoirs downstream of those presently on the Brazos River, or one of its major tribu...

  2. Groundwater Surface Water Interactions in a Gold-mined Floodplain of the Merced River

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, Lynn Sager

    2013-01-01

    J. A. Cherry, 1979. Groundwater. Prentice-Hall, Englewoodredd site selection, groundwater upwelling, and over-winterprocess between rivers and groundwater. Freshwater Biology.

  3. An analytical model for solute transport through a water-saturated single fracture and permeable rock matrix

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Houseworth, J.E.

    2014-01-01

    in fractured porous media, Water Resour. Res. , 48, W01542,of parallel fractures, Water Resour. Res. , 18(6), 1634–for a single fracture, Water Resour. Res. , 17(3), 555–564.

  4. Skill evaluation of water supply forecasts in western Sierra Nevada and Colorado River basins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrison, Brent

    2014-01-01

    streamflow predictions for water supply forecasting in theAn assessment of seasonal water supply outlooks in thepaper, Dept. of Hydrology and Water Resources, University of

  5. Saltcedar management strategies and effects on water quality and quantity of the Pecos River 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clayton, Lindi Ann

    2002-01-01

    Aerial herbicide treatments initiated in August 1999 on the Pecos River near Orla, Texas, were evaluated for saltcedar density, vegetation cover and soil salinity pre-treatment and one and two years post-treatment. Saltcedar density was used...

  6. Pore-Level Analysis of the Relationship Between Porosity, Irreducible Water Saturation, and Permeability of Clastic Rocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torres-Verdín, Carlos

    SPE 109878 Pore-Level Analysis of the Relationship Between Porosity, Irreducible Water Saturation permeability from well- log calculations of porosity and irreducible water satura- tion. However, these models of compaction, cementation, and distribution of dispersed hydrated clay minerals. Irreducible water

  7. A Fresh Perspective for Managing Water in California: Insights from Applying the European Water Framework Directive to the Russian River

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grantham, Ted; Christian-Smith, Juliet; Kondolf, G. Mathias; Scheuer, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    from Applying the European Water Framework Directive to theSingle family Residents family residents in the Water Supplyfor Water supply for single in the City of Santa Rosa City

  8. A Fresh Perspective for Managing Water in California: Insights from Applying the European Water Framework Directive to the Russian River

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grantham, Ted; Christian-Smith, Juliet; Kondolf, G. Mathias; Scheuer, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    by increasing water security, reducing pollution treatmentby increasing water security, reducing pollution treatmentwater bodies Point Pollution Sources Outfalls for industrial and commercial waste and sewage treatment

  9. Comparative Water Law and Management: The Yellow River Basin In Western China and the State of Kansas In the Western United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Griggs, Burke W.; Peck, John C.; Yupeng, Xue

    2009-01-01

    have nearly run the River dry during the irrigation season. 36 In 2002 the Yellow River Conservancy Commission (YRCC), for the first time, suspended the issuance of new water permits in the region, to force these regions to improve irrigation... 3 /s of streamflow in the downstream Inner Mongolia Reach. Sometimes that flow can fall below the minimum flow alarm threshold of 50 m 3 /s, nearly running the river dry over the 200 km stretch between the Upper Reach and the Middle Reach...

  10. A Multivariate Water Quality Investigation of Select Drainage Ditches in the Arroyo Colorado River Watershed, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uddameri, V.; Singaraju, S.

    2012-01-01

    Drainage ditches are widely used for agricultural water management to help remove excess water from fields, which mitigates the effects of water logging and salinization. These ditches act as a direct hydraulic link between the agricultural field...

  11. A Fresh Perspective for Managing Water in California: Insights from Applying the European Water Framework Directive to the Russian River

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grantham, Ted; Christian-Smith, Juliet; Kondolf, G. Mathias; Scheuer, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    Stormwater Management Hydropower Generation Wastewateragricultural irrigation, hydropower, industry, fishing,dams for water storage and hydropower and diversions for

  12. Water Quality Trends in the Fraser River Basin, 1985-1995

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Consulting Vancouver, B.C. and Patrick Shaw. Environment Canada Pacific and Yukon Region November 1998 DOE conducted by both Environment Canada and the British Columbia Ministry of Environment, Lands and Parks-basin monitoring site, the Salmon River at Salmon Arm, identified trends in turbidity and dissolved ions may

  13. A CONSTITUTIVE MODEL TO PREDICT THE HYDROMECHANICAL BEHAVIOUR OF ROCK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aubertin, Michel

    in the presence of water to better assess the stability of rock structures under many situations. The accurate conditions. A rock mass behaviour can also be influenced by the water flow and ensuing pore pressure. For example, a previously stable rock structure can become unstable with an increase of water pressure inside

  14. Do constructed flow through wetlands improve water quality in the San Joaquin River?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Geen, Anthony T

    2006-01-01

    disposal of agricultural tailwaters and total maximum daily load (TMDL) efforts related water quality

  15. Q00906010024 rock check dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    00906010024 rock check dam Q00906010025 rock check dam Q00906010021 rock check dam Q00906010022 rock check dam Q00906010027 rock check dam Q00906010026 rock check dam Q00906010018 rock check dam Q00906010023 rock check dam Q00906010011 rock check dam Q00906010008 rock check dam Q00906010007 rock check dam Q

  16. Quasi-three dimensional ground-water modeling of the hydrologic influence of paleozoic rocks on the ground-water table at Yucca Mountain, Nevada 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Si-Yong

    1994-01-01

    The proposed high-level radioactive waste repository site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, has created a need to understand the, ground-water system at the site. One of the important hydrologic characteristics is a steep gradient on the ground-water table...

  17. Legacy of historic mining and water quality in a heavily mined Scottish river catchment 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haunch, Simon

    2013-11-28

    Mine abandonment and the discharge of contaminated mine water is recognised globally as a major source of surface water and groundwater pollution. Contamination generally arises from the oxidation of sulphide minerals, ...

  18. River/Reservoir System Water Availability Modeling Support for Drought Management 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bista, Ankit

    2015-07-30

    interruptible and firm water supply commitments. The methodology is tested and demonstrated by application to the LCRA System. Improvements in water supply reliabilities provided by off-channel storage are also investigated in the simulation study. The research...

  19. Feasibility Study of the Effects of Water Quality on Soil Properties in the Red River Valley 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerard, C. J.; Hipp, B. W.; Runkles, J. R.; Bordovsky, D. J.; McCully, W. G.

    1981-01-01

    The suitability of water for irrigation depends upon many factors, of primary concern is the quantity and quality of salts present in the water Ayers and Wescot1. If total dissolved solids in the irrigation water are too high, salts accumulate...

  20. Tidal-Fluvial and Estuarine Processes in the Lower Columbia River: I. Along-channel Water Level Variations, Pacific Ocean to Bonneville Dam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jay, D. A.; Leffler, K.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Borde, Amy B.

    2014-06-07

    This two-part paper provides comprehensive time and frequency domain analyses and models of along-channel water level variations in the 234km-long Lower Columbia River and Estuary (LCRE) and documents the response of floodplain wetlands thereto. In Part I, power spectra, continuous wavelet transforms, and harmonic analyses are used to understand the influences of tides, river flow, upwelling and downwelling, and hydropower operations ("power-peaking") on the water level regime. Estuarine water levels are influenced primarily by astronomical tides and coastal processes, and secondarily by river flow. The importance of coastal and tidal influences decreases in the landward direction, and water levels are increasingly controlled by river flow variations at periods from ?1day to years. Water level records are only slightly non-stationary near the ocean, but become increasingly irregular upriver. Although astronomically forced tidal constituents decrease above the estuary, tidal fortnightly and overtide variations increase for 80-200km landward, both relative to major tidal constituents and in absolute terms.

  1. Views from the River Front: Rio Grande Decision Makers Rank Water Conservation Strategies 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silvy, Valeen; Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2005-10-18

    watering 4.05 3.59 5 Require drip irrigation as appropriate 4.03 3.67 6 Reuse treated municipal wastewater 3.99 3.77 7 Restrict outdoor watering 3.95 3.66 8 Restrict watering schedules 3.86 3.59 9 Establish rainwater harvest programs 3.79 3.59 10 Provide... Reuse treated municipal wastewater 4.06 3.90 7 Restrict outdoor watering 3.71 3.36 8 Restrict watering schedules 3.62 3.31 9 Establish rainwater harvest programs 3.80 3.55 10 Provide low-fl ow showerheads 3.38 3.07 11 Restrict water run-off 3.29 2.95 12...

  2. Coastal Upwelling Supplies Oxygen-Depleted Water to the Columbia River Estuary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -water environments, and is often attributed to anthropogenic nutrient enrichment from terrestrial-fluvial pathways to anthropogenic nutrient enrichment delivered by terrestrial-fluvial pathways [4]. Subsequent phytoplankton

  3. Elements of an environmental decision support system for seasonal wetland salt management in a river basin subjected to water quality regulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, N.W.T.

    2009-06-01

    Seasonally managed wetlands in the Grasslands Basin on the west-side of California's San Joaquin Valley provide food and shelter for migratory wildfowl during winter months and sport for waterfowl hunters during the annual duck season. Surface water supply to these wetlands contain salt which, when drained to the San Joaquin River during the annual drawdown period, can negatively impact water quality and cause concern to downstream agricultural riparian water diverters. Recent environmental regulation, limiting discharges salinity to the San Joaquin River and primarily targeting agricultural non-point sources, now also targets return flows from seasonally managed wetlands. Real-time water quality management has been advocated as a means of continuously matching salt loads discharged from agricultural, wetland and municipal operations to the assimilative capacity of the San Joaquin River. Past attempts to build environmental monitoring and decision support systems (EDSS's) to implement this concept have enjoyed limited success for reasons that are discussed in this paper. These reasons are discussed in the context of more general challenges facing the successful implementation of a comprehensive environmental monitoring, modelling and decision support system for the San Joaquin River Basin.

  4. Energy, Agriculture, and Environment in Rural New York For several years, Congress has been funding research on water quality in the Susquehanna River

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    Energy, Agriculture, and Environment in Rural New York Abstract For several years, Congress has been funding research on water quality in the Susquehanna River basin in New York. Until 2009 environmental quality in the rural environments of New York State in the 21st Century. The Program continues

  5. Positive correlation between Li and Mg isotope ratios in the river waters of the Mackenzie Basin challenges the interpretation of apparent isotopic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paytan, Adina

    Positive correlation between Li and Mg isotope ratios in the river waters of the Mackenzie Basin a Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris, Sorbonne Paris Cite´, Univ Paris Diderot, UMR 7154 CNRS, F-75005 Paris, France b Department of Earth Sciences, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB23EQ

  6. Evaluation of Phytoremediation of Coal Bed Methane Product Water and Waters of Quality Similar to that Associated with Coal Bed Methane Reserves of the Powder River Basin, Montana and Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James Bauder

    2008-09-30

    U.S. emphasis on domestic energy independence, along with advances in knowledge of vast biogenically sourced coalbed methane reserves at relatively shallow sub-surface depths with the Powder River Basin, has resulted in rapid expansion of the coalbed methane industry in Wyoming and Montana. Techniques have recently been developed which constitute relatively efficient drilling and methane gas recovery and extraction techniques. However, this relatively efficient recovery requires aggressive reduction of hydrostatic pressure within water-saturated coal formations where the methane is trapped. Water removed from the coal formation during pumping is typically moderately saline and sodium-bicarbonate rich, and managed as an industrial waste product. Current approaches to coalbed methane product water management include: surface spreading on rangeland landscapes, managed irrigation of agricultural crop lands, direct discharge to ephermeral channels, permitted discharge of treated and untreated water to perennial streams, evaporation, subsurface injection at either shallow or deep depths. A Department of Energy-National Energy Technology Laboratory funded research award involved the investigation and assessment of: (1) phytoremediation as a water management technique for waste water produced in association with coalbed methane gas extraction; (2) feasibility of commercial-scale, low-impact industrial water treatment technologies for the reduction of salinity and sodicity in coalbed methane gas extraction by-product water; and (3) interactions of coalbed methane extraction by-product water with landscapes, vegetation, and water resources of the Powder River Basin. Prospective, greenhouse studies of salt tolerance and water use potential of indigenous, riparian vegetation species in saline-sodic environments confirmed the hypothesis that species such as Prairie cordgrass, Baltic rush, American bulrush, and Nuttall's alkaligrass will thrive in saline-sodic environments when water supplies sourced from coalbed methane extraction are plentiful. Constructed wetlands, planted to native, salt tolerant species demonstrated potential to utilize substantial volumes of coalbed methane product water, although plant community transitions to mono-culture and limited diversity communities is a likely consequence over time. Additionally, selected, cultured forage quality barley varieties and native plant species such as Quail bush, 4-wing saltbush, and seaside barley are capable of sustainable, high quality livestock forage production, when irrigated with coalbed methane product water sourced from the Powder River Basin. A consequence of long-term plant water use which was enumerated is elevated salinity and sodicity concentrations within soil and shallow alluvial groundwater into which coalbed methane product water might drain. The most significant conclusion of these investigations was the understanding that phytoremediation is not a viable, effective technique for management of coalbed methane product water under the present circumstances of produced water within the Powder River Basin. Phytoremediation is likely an effective approach to sodium and salt removal from salt-impaired sites after product water discharges are discontinued and site reclamation is desired. Coalbed methane product water of the Powder River Basin is most frequently impaired with respect to beneficial use quality by elevated sodicity, a water quality constituent which can cause swelling, slaking, and dispersion of smectite-dominated clay soils, such as commonly occurring within the Powder River Basin. To address this issue, a commercial-scale fluid-bed, cationic resin exchange treatment process and prototype operating treatment plant was developed and beta-tested by Drake Water Technologies under subcontract to this award. Drake Water Technologies secured U.S. Patent No. 7,368,059-B2, 'Method for removal of benevolent cations from contaminated water', a beta Drake Process Unit (DPU) was developed and deployed for operation in the Powder River Basin. First year operatio

  7. Properties and potential uses of water treatment sludge from the Neches River of southeast Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kan, Weiqun

    1995-01-01

    Land application of water treatment plant (WTP) sludge has been an unsolved problem. The objectives of this study were (1) to investigate characteristics of organic polymer sludge, and (2) to determine the effects of the sludge on soil properties...

  8. Groundwater Surface Water Interactions in a Gold-mined Floodplain of the Merced River

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, Lynn Sager

    2013-01-01

    the rocky tailings, water levels in swale ponds and canalstailings, and the red azola, green duckweed-covered swale pondsas swale ponds and at locations between the tailing rows.

  9. The Water Budget of the Kuparuk River Basin, Alaska* STEPHEN J. DRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dery, Stephen

    - transpiration contributes another 43% to the water budget and is mainly associated with warm summertime input, whereas cool, wet years tend to augment soil moisture. 1. Introduction Over the past century

  10. Inversion of seismic attributes for petrophysical parameters and rock facies 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shahraeeni, Mohammad Sadegh

    2011-01-01

    Prediction of rock and fluid properties such as porosity, clay content, and water saturation is essential for exploration and development of hydrocarbon reservoirs. Rock and fluid property maps obtained from such predictions ...

  11. Evaluation of the water quality in the releases from thirty dams in the Tennessee River Valley

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Butkus, S.R.

    1990-09-01

    The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) has routinely monitored dissolved oxygen (DO) and temperature from the tailwater releases of its dams since the 1950s. The original objective of this monitoring was to collect baseline information to support reaeration research and determine the relative impact of impoundments on the assimilative capacity of the river system. This monitoring has continued even though the original objective was satisfied. New purposes for this monitoring data have arisen in support of several programs, without new consideration of the monitoring strategy and sampling design. The primary purpose of this report is to compare the historical release data for 30 dams in the Tennessee Valley based on four different objectives: (1) comparison of seasonal patterns, (2) comparison of baseline conditions using descriptive statistics, (3) evaluation of monotonic trends, and (4) discussion of monitoring strategies that might be required to determine compliance with existing and proposed criteria. A secondary purpose of the report is to compile the existing database into tables and figures that would be useful for other investigators. 51 refs., 210 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Engineers, are focused on advanced water quality modeling on the Cumberland River in Kentucky and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    111-11) producing a new understanding of future hydroelectric generation from federal facilities hydroelectricity generation and water management. · The NHAAP New Stream-reach Development (NSD) project uses segments that do not currently have hydroelectric facilities. · The NHAAP Environmental Attribution

  13. Assessment of Water Resources in A Humid Watershed and A Semi-arid Watershed; Neches River Basin, TX and Canadian River Basin, NM 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heo, Joonghyeok

    2013-07-16

    Water is the most important resource on Earth. Climate and land cover changes are two important factors that directly influenced water resources. This research provides important information for water resources management and contributes...

  14. Rivanna River Basin Commission (Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Rivanna River Basin Commission is an independent local entity tasked with providing guidance for the stewardship and enhancement of the water quality and natural resources of the Rivanna River...

  15. A STUDY ON LEGIONELLA PNEUMOPHILA, WATER CHEMISTRY, AND ATMOSPHERIC CONDITIONS IN COOLING TOWERS AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, C.; Brigmon, R.

    2009-10-20

    Legionnaires disease is a pneumonia caused by the inhalation of the bacterium Legionella pneumophila. The majority of illnesses have been associated with cooling towers since these devices can harbor and disseminate the bacterium in the aerosolized mist generated by these systems. Historically, Savannah River Site (SRS) cooling towers have had occurrences of elevated levels of Legionella in all seasons of the year and in patterns that are difficult to predict. Since elevated Legionella in cooling tower water are a potential health concern a question has been raised as to the best control methodology. In this work we analyze available chemical, biological, and atmospheric data to determine the best method or key parameter for control. The SRS 4Q Industrial Hygiene Manual, 4Q-1203, 1 - G Cooling Tower Operation and the SRNL Legionella Sampling Program, states that 'Participation in the SRNL Legionella Sampling Program is MANDATORY for all operating cooling towers'. The resulting reports include L. pneumophila concentration information in cells/L. L. pneumophila concentrations >10{sup 7} cells/L are considered elevated and unsafe so action must be taken to reduce these densities. These remedial actions typically include increase biocide addition or 'shocking'. Sometimes additional actions are required if the problem persists including increase tower maintenance (e.g. cleaning). Evaluation of 14 SRS cooling towers, seven water quality parameters, and five Legionella serogroups over a three-plus year time frame demonstrated that cooling tower water Legionella densities varied widely though out this time period. In fact there was no one common consistent significant variable across all towers. The significant factors that did show up most frequently were related to suspended particulates, conductivity, pH, and dissolved oxygen, not chlorine or bromine as might be expected. Analyses of atmospheric data showed that there were more frequent significant elevated Legionella concentrations when the dew point temperature was high--a summertime occurrence. However, analysis of the three years of Legionella monitoring data of the 14 different SRS Cooling Towers demonstrated that elevated concentrations are observed at all temperatures and seasons. The objective of this study is to evaluate the ecology of L. pneumophila including serogroups and population densities, chemical, and atmospheric data, on cooling towers at SRS to determine whether relationships exist among water chemistry, and atmospheric conditions. The goal is to more fully understand the conditions which inhibit or encourage L. pneumophila growth and supply this data and associated recommendations to SRS Cooling Tower personnel for improved management of operation. Hopefully this information could then be used to help control L. pneumophila growth more effectively in SRS cooling tower water.

  16. Linking Water Conservation and Natural Resource Stewardship in the Trinity River Basin 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cathey, James; Locke, Shawn; Feldpausch, A.M.; Parker, I.D.; Frentress, C.; Whiteside, J.; Mason, C.; Wagner, M.

    2007-09-04

    in order to provide water in the future. 14 RESOURCES Cathey, J. C., R. A. Persyn, D. O. Porter, and M. C. Dozier. 2006. Harvesting rainwater for wild life. Texas A&M University System, Texas Cooperative Extension Publication B-6182 Pp. 1-16. Chen, X... Department of Wildlife & Fisheries Sciences http://wfscnet.tamu.edu/ Institute of Renewable Natural Resources http://irnr.tamu.edu/ Rainwater Harvesting http://rainwaterharvesting.tamu.edu/ Texas Cooperative Extension http://texasextension.tamu.edu/ Texas...

  17. Raft River monitor well potentiometric head responses and water quality as

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/Colorado <RAPID/Geothermal/Water Use/NevadaaToolsRadioactiveRadiometricsIII

  18. Wet processing of palladium for use in the tritium facility at Westinghouse, Savannah River, SC. Preparation of palladium using the Mound Muddy Water process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baldwin, D.P.; Zamzow, D.S.

    1998-11-10

    Palladium used at Savannah River for tritium storage is currently obtained from a commercial source. In order to better understand the processes involved in preparing this material, Savannah River is supporting investigations into the chemical reactions used to synthesize this material and into the conditions necessary to produce palladium powder that meets their specifications. This better understanding may help to guarantee a continued reliable source for this material in the future. As part of this evaluation, a work-for-others contract between Westinghouse Savannah River Company and the Ames Laboratory Metallurgy and Ceramics Program was initiated. During FY98, the process for producing palladium powder developed in 1986 by Dan Grove of Mound Applied Technologies (USDOE) was studied to understand the processing conditions that lead to changes in morphology in the final product. This report details the results of this study of the Mound Muddy Water process, along with the results of a round-robin analysis of well-characterized palladium samples that was performed by Savannah River and Ames Laboratory. The Mound Muddy Water process is comprised of three basic wet chemical processes, palladium dissolution, neutralization, and precipitation, with a number of filtration steps to remove unwanted impurity precipitates.

  19. V00306010057 rock check dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ¬« ¬« ¬« ¬« ¬« XY! 16-020 16-030(c) 16-026(l) 16-028(c) 16-026(l) V00306010057 rock check dam V00306010012 rock check dam V00306010040 rock check dam V00306010039 rock check dam V00306010058 rock check dam V00306010064 rock check dam V00306010061 rock check dam V00306010062 rock check dam V00306010063

  20. Green River Formation water flood demonstration project. Report for the period October 1992--March 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pennington, B.I.; Lomax, J.D.; Neilson, D.L.; Deo, M.D.

    1994-12-01

    The current project targeted three fluvial deltaic reservoirs in the Uinta Basin, Utah. In primary recovery, the performance of the Monument Butte unit was typical of an undersaturated reservoir whose initial pressure was close to the bubble point pressure. The unit was producing at a rate of 40 stb/day when the water flood was initiated. The unit has been producing at more than 300 stb/day for the past four years. The reservoir characteristics of Monument Butte were established in the geologic characterization study. The reservoir fluid properties were measured in the engineering study. Results of a comprehensive reservoir simulation study using these characteristics provided excellent match with the field production data. Extended predictions using the model showed that it would be possible to recover a total of 20--25% of the oil in place. In the Travis unit, logs from the newly drilled 14a-28 showed extensively fractured zones. A new reservoir was discovered and developed on the basis of the information provided by the formation micro imaging logs. This reservoir also behaved in a manner similar to undersaturated reservoirs with initial reservoir pressures close to the reservoir fluid bubble point. The water flood activity was enhanced in the Travis unit. Even through the reservoir continued to be gradually pressurized, the water flood in the Travis unit appeared to be significantly affected by existing or created fractures. A dual-porosity, dual permeability reservoir model provided a good match with the primary production history. The well drilled in the Boundary unit did not intersect any producible zones, once again illustrating the unique challenges to developing fluvial deltaic reservoirs.

  1. Task 3: PNNL Visit by JAEA Researchers to Participate in TODAM Code Applications to Fukushima Rivers and to Evaluate the Feasibility of Adaptation of FLESCOT Code to Simulate Radionuclide Transport in the Pacific Ocean Coastal Water Around Fukushima

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Onishi, Yasuo

    2013-03-29

    Four JAEA researchers visited PNNL for two weeks in February, 2013 to learn the PNNL-developed, unsteady, one-dimensional, river model, TODAM and the PNNL-developed, time-dependent, three dimensional, coastal water model, FLESCOT. These codes predict sediment and contaminant concentrations by accounting sediment-radionuclide interactions, e.g., adsorption/desorption and transport-deposition-resuspension of sediment-sorbed radionuclides. The objective of the river and coastal water modeling is to simulate • 134Cs and 137Cs migration in Fukushima rivers and the coastal water, and • their accumulation in the river and ocean bed along the Fukushima coast. Forecasting the future cesium behavior in the river and coastal water under various scenarios would enable JAEA to assess the effectiveness of various on-land remediation activities and if required, possible river and coastal water clean-up operations to reduce the contamination of the river and coastal water, agricultural products, fish and other aquatic biota. PNNL presented the following during the JAEA visit to PNNL: • TODAM and FLESCOT’s theories and mathematical formulations • TODAM and FLESCOT model structures • Past TODAM and FLESCOT applications • Demonstrating these two codes' capabilities by applying them to simple hypothetical river and coastal water cases. • Initial application of TODAM to the Ukedo River in Fukushima and JAEA researchers' participation in its modeling. PNNL also presented the relevant topics relevant to Fukushima environmental assessment and remediation, including • PNNL molecular modeling and EMSL computer facilities • Cesium adsorption/desorption characteristics • Experiences of connecting molecular science research results to macro model applications to the environment • EMSL tour • Hanford Site road tour. PNNL and JAEA also developed future course of actions for joint research projects on the Fukushima environmental and remediation assessments.

  2. COMPUTED SEISMIC SPEEDS AND ATTENUATION IN ROCKS ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, J. E.

    At the gas-oil or gas-water contact in a homo- geneous reservoir rock, capillary pressure ... During production of a field, gas may come out of solution and crcatr ...

  3. Energy - Water Nexus -- Meeting the Energy and Water Needs of the Snake/Columbia River Basin in the 21st CenturyScience and Technology SummitConference Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul L. Wichlacz; Gerald Sehlke

    2008-02-01

    In June 2007, representatives from federal, state, and academic institutions met to discuss the role of innovative science, technology, and policy in meeting future energy and water demands in the Snake-Columbia River Basin. Conference members assessed the state-of-the-science, technology, and associated research to develop cost-effective and environmentally sound methodologies and technologies to maximize the production of energy and availability of water and to minimize the consumption of both water and energy in the Snake-Columbia River system. Information on all phases of science and technology development, theoretical analysis, laboratory experiments, pilot tests, and field applications were relevant topics for discussion. An overview of current management needs was presented the first day. On the second day, five focus groups were created: ? Energy Generation and Use ? Water Allocation and Use ? Energy/Water Storage ? Environmental Considerations ? Social, Economic, Political, and Regulatory Considerations. Each group started with a list of status items and trends, and discussed the future challenges and research needed to reach four goals: ? Balance energy production and resource consumption ? Balance water availability and competing needs ? Balance water consumption/energy production and competing needs ? Balance environmental impacts and water use/energy production ? Balance costs and benefits of water use. The resulting initiatives were further broken down into three categories of importance: critical, important, and nice to do but could be delayed. Each initiative was assigned a number of dots to show a more refined ranking. The results of each focus group are given in the pages that follow. These results are intended to help local and regional researchers 1. Develop a technical strategy for developing cost-effective science and technology to predict, measure, monitor, purify, conserve, and store water and to maximize power generation, storage, and efficiency in the region 2. Evaluate methods and technologies for reducing the impacts of energy and water development and use on the environment.

  4. V01406010015 rock check dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    XY! ¬« ¬« V01406010015 rock check dam V01406010014 rock check dam V01406010013 rock check dam 1501403010012 earthen berm V01403010008 earthen berm V01406010003 rock check dam V01406010004 rock check dam V01406010010 rock check dam V01406010011 rock check dam 15-0651 15-0307 15-0588 15-0532 15-0575 stormdrain 7160

  5. T00706010013 rock check dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    XY! ¬« T00706010013 rock check dam T00706010014 rock check dam T00702040012 established vegetation, green hatch area T00706010002 rock check dam T00706010011 rock check dam T00703120010 rock berm T00703020003 base course berm T00706010004 rock check dam T00706010009 rock check dam T00703020008 base course

  6. Rappahannock River Basin Commission (Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Rappahannock River Basin Commission is an independent local entity tasked with providing guidance for the stewardship and enhancement of the water quality and natural resources of the...

  7. Susquehanna River Basin Compact (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation enables the state's entrance into the Susquehanna River Basin Compact, which provides for the conservation, development, and administration of the water resources of the...

  8. Population Recovery and Conservation Habitat Restoration Water Use and Hydropower Forests and Fish EAST FORK OWYHEE RIVER SALMON AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Population Recovery and Conservation · Habitat Restoration · Water Use and Hydropower · Forests........................................................................................................................................... 18 Water Quality Analysis ....................................................................................................................... 18 Nevada Division of Environmental Protection Water Quality Sampling

  9. Water's Way at Sleepers River watershed - revisiting flow generation in a post-glacial landscape, Vermont USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shanley, JB; Sebestyen, SD; Mcdonnell, JJ; Mcdonnell, JJ; Mcglynn, BL; Dunne, T

    2015-01-01

    production in permeable soils. Water Resources Research 6:New England watershed. Water Resources Research 6: 1296–processes during snowmelt. Water Resources Research 7: 1160–

  10. Increasing subsurface water storage in discontinuous permafrost areas of the Lena River basin, Eurasia, detected from GRACE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Velicogna, I.; Tong, J.; Zhang, T.; Kimball, J. S

    2012-01-01

    materials, U.S. Geol. Surv. Water Supply Pap. , 1662-D, 74.the global terrestrial water budget using satellite remotepassive microwave-derived snow water equiva- lent estimates

  11. Hydrological urbanism in China's Pearl River Delta : how water landscape shapes the urban form in a changing climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Wenji, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2015-01-01

    When standing among urban villages, residential towers and warehouses in an urbanizing city in the Pearl River delta (PRD), it is hard to imagine that just forty years ago this area was filled with streams, ponds and rice ...

  12. Guide to using Multiple Regression in Excel (MRCX v.1.1) for Removal of River Stage Effects from Well Water Levels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mackley, Rob D.; Spane, Frank A.; Pulsipher, Trenton C.; Allwardt, Craig H.

    2010-09-01

    A software tool was created in Fiscal Year 2010 (FY11) that enables multiple-regression correction of well water levels for river-stage effects. This task was conducted as part of the Remediation Science and Technology project of CH2MHILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC). This document contains an overview of the correction methodology and a user’s manual for Multiple Regression in Excel (MRCX) v.1.1. It also contains a step-by-step tutorial that shows users how to use MRCX to correct river effects in two different wells. This report is accompanied by an enclosed CD that contains the MRCX installer application and files used in the tutorial exercises.

  13. On tropospheric rivers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Yuanlong, 1964-

    2002-01-01

    In this thesis, we investigate atmospheric water vapor transport through a distinct synoptic phenomenon, namely, the Tropospheric River (TR), which is a local filamentary structure on a daily map of vertically integrated ...

  14. STATUS OF COLUMBIA RIVER BLUEBACK SALMON RUNS, 1951

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STATUS OF COLUMBIA RIVER BLUEBACK SALMON RUNS, 1951 Marine Biological Laboratory J'JN13 1952 WOODS AND WILDLIFE SERVICE #12;#12;STATUS OF COLUMBIA RIVER BLUEBACK SALMON RUNS, 1951 Marine Biological Laboratory J blueback salmon counts over Bonneville and Rock Island Dams and total run data 1938-51 8 5. Columbia River

  15. Water Clean Water Clean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishida, Yuko

    Keep Our Water Clean Keep Our Water Clean Home and garden pesticides and fertilizers are polluting residues wash into gutters, storm drains, and streams by rain,garden watering,or cleaning up drinking water. Follow these tips to keep our rivers, creeks, and oceans clean. What can you do to protect

  16. Literature and data review for the surface-water pathway: Columbia River and adjacent coastal areas. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walters, W.H.; Dirkes, R.L.; Napier, B.A.

    1992-04-01

    As part of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project, Pacific Northwest Laboratory reviewed literature and data on radionuclide concentrations and distribution in the water, sediment, and biota of the Columbia River and adjacent coastal areas. Over 600 documents were reviewed including Hanford reports, reports by offsite agencies, journal articles, and graduate theses. Certain radionuclide concentration data were used in preliminary estimates of individual dose for the 1964--1966 time period. This report summarizes the literature and database review and the results of the preliminary dose estimates.

  17. Clean Water Act (Section 404) and Rivers and Harbors Act (Sections 9 and 10). Environmental Guidance Program Reference Book, Revision 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    This Reference Book contains a current copy of the Clean Water Act (Section 404) and the Rivers and Harbors Act (Sections 9 and 10) and those regulations that implement those sections of the statutes and appear to be most relevant to DOE activities. The document is provided to DOE and contractor staff for informational purposes only and should not be interpreted as legal guidance. Updates that include important new requirements will be provided periodically. Questions concerning this Reference Book may be directed to Mark Petts, IH-231 (FTS 896-2609 or Commercial 202/586-2609).

  18. WATER QUALITY MODELING OF THE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keller, Arturo A.

    WATER QUALITY MODELING OF THE STATE OF OHIO COMPONENT OF THE OHIO RIVER BASIN WATER QUALITY TRADING PROGRAM #12;Water Quality Modeling of the State of Ohio Component of the Ohio River Basin Water Quality Trading Program #12;2 Water Quality Modeling of the State of Ohio Component of the Ohio River Basin Water

  19. T00406010008 rock check dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    XY! ¬« T00406010008 rock check dam T00406010009 rock check dam T00406010010 rock check dam T00406010011 rock check dam T-SMA-2.85 0.344 Acres 35-014(g) 35-016(n) T00406010005 rock check dam T00406010006 rock check dam T00403090004 curb T00402040007 established vegetation, green hatch area 7200 7200 7180

  20. Water use by saltcedar (Tamarix sp.) and associated vegetation on the Canadian, Colorado and Pecos Rivers in Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hays, Kenneth Brian

    2003-01-01

    Increasing water demands in Texas have led to state supported brush control programs for enhancing water yields. This study was initiated to: 1) determine a method for calculating estimated water use by saltcedar (Tamarix ...

  1. Examination of the relationship of river water to occurrences of bottom water with reduced oxygen concentrations in the northern Gulf of Mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belabbassi, Leila

    2007-04-25

    and only in water depths between 10 and 60 m. Four regions in the northern Gulf show considerable differences in the occurrence of low-oxygen waters. Lowoxygen waters are observed almost exclusively in regions subject to large riverine influences...

  2. Rock Cycle and Rocks Lab Rocks are aggregates of one or many minerals.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, X. Rong

    Rock Cycle and Rocks Lab Rocks are aggregates of one or many minerals. Three types of rocks: A of their sizes, shapes and arrangement. Rule of Thumb: The size of mineral crystals in an igneous rock may, there is not enough time for large mineral crystals to form (e.g. obsidian) Igneous Rock Mineral Compositions

  3. Changes in Flood Management along the Pajaro River: A Transition to Watershed Management Approaches and Lessons from the Water Framework Directive and Flood Directive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jagger, Stacie

    2009-01-01

    European Parliment (2007).  Flood Risk Directive.  E.  2001).  Pajaro River Flood Protection Community  Planning Report.  Pajaro River Flood Protection Community Planning 

  4. Wadter Resources Data Ohio: Water year 1994. Volume 2, St. Lawrence River Basin and Statewide Project Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-12-31

    The Water Resources Division of the US Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with State agencies, obtains a large amount of data each water year (a water year is the 12-month period from October 1 through September 30 and is identified by the calendar year in which it ends) pertaining to the water resources of Ohio. These data, accumulated during many years, constitute a valuable data base for developing an improved understanding of the water resources of the State. To make these data readily available to interested parties outside the USGS, they are published annually in this report series entitled ``Water Resources Data--Ohio.`` This report (in two volumes) includes records on surface water and ground water in the State. Specifically, it contains: (1) Discharge records for streamflow-gaging stations, miscellaneous sites, and crest-stage stations; (2) stage and content records for streams, lakes, and reservoirs; (3) water-quality data for streamflow-gaging stations, wells, synaptic sites, and partial-record sites; and (4) water-level data for observation wells. Locations of lake- and streamflow-gaging stations, water-quality stations, and observation wells for which data are presented in this volume are shown in figures ga through 8b. The data in this report represent that part of the National Water Data System collected by the USGS and cooperating State and Federal agencies in Ohio. This series of annual reports for Ohio began with the 1961 water year with a report that contained only data relating to the quantities of surface water. For the 1964 water year, a similar report was introduced that contained only data relating to water quality. Beginning with the 1975 water year, the report was changed to present (in two to three volumes) data on quantities of surface water, quality of surface and ground water, and ground-water levels.

  5. INTEGRATED RIVER QUALITY MANAGEMENT USING INTERNET TECHNOLOGIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INTEGRATED RIVER QUALITY MANAGEMENT USING INTERNET TECHNOLOGIES P. Cianchi*, S. Marsili such a computing architecture can be implemented using current internet technologies. Based on the "intelligent a normal web browser. KEYWORDS River water quality, Environmental management, Internet computing, Systems

  6. Hydropower production and river rehabilitation: A case study on an alpine river

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Introduction For centuries, man has modified running waters [51]. In alpine rivers, production of hydropower of power plants are commonly in use: (1) run-of-river power plants that continuously pro- cessHydropower production and river rehabilitation: A case study on an alpine river M. Fette & C. Weber

  7. Storage capacity in hot dry rock reservoirs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, Donald W. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1997-01-01

    A method of extracting thermal energy, in a cyclic manner, from geologic strata which may be termed hot dry rock. A reservoir comprised of hot fractured rock is established and water or other liquid is passed through the reservoir. The water is heated by the hot rock, recovered from the reservoir, cooled by extraction of heat by means of heat exchange apparatus on the surface, and then re-injected into the reservoir to be heated again. Water is added to the reservoir by means of an injection well and recovered from the reservoir by means of a production well. Water is continuously provided to the reservoir and continuously withdrawn from the reservoir at two different flow rates, a base rate and a peak rate. Increasing water flow from the base rate to the peak rate is accomplished by rapidly decreasing backpressure at the outlet of the production well in order to meet periodic needs for amounts of thermal energy greater than a baseload amount, such as to generate additional electric power to meet peak demands. The rate of flow of water provided to the hot dry rock reservoir is maintained at a value effective to prevent depletion of the liquid

  8. Storage capacity in hot dry rock reservoirs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, D.W.

    1997-11-11

    A method is described for extracting thermal energy, in a cyclic manner, from geologic strata which may be termed hot dry rock. A reservoir comprised of hot fractured rock is established and water or other liquid is passed through the reservoir. The water is heated by the hot rock, recovered from the reservoir, cooled by extraction of heat by means of heat exchange apparatus on the surface, and then re-injected into the reservoir to be heated again. Water is added to the reservoir by means of an injection well and recovered from the reservoir by means of a production well. Water is continuously provided to the reservoir and continuously withdrawn from the reservoir at two different flow rates, a base rate and a peak rate. Increasing water flow from the base rate to the peak rate is accomplished by rapidly decreasing backpressure at the outlet of the production well in order to meet periodic needs for amounts of thermal energy greater than a baseload amount, such as to generate additional electric power to meet peak demands. The rate of flow of water provided to the hot dry rock reservoir is maintained at a value effective to prevent depletion of the liquid inventory of the reservoir. 4 figs.

  9. Application of Specialized Optimization Techniques in Water Quantity and Quality Management with Respect to Planning for the Trinity River Basi 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meier Jr., W. L.; Shih, C. S.

    1970-01-01

    One of the major problems in the United States today involves controlling and limiting the pollution of the nation's water resources. The quality of water in streams, reservoirs and estuaries is continually being altered by natural and man...

  10. J00206010020 rock check dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    XY! J00206010020 rock check dam J00206010023 rock check dam 09-009 09-009 09-009 PJ-SMA-2 0.901 Acres J00206010021 rock check dam J00206010019 rock check dam J00206010014 rock check dam J00203010007 Smith DATE: 14-November-2014 REVISION NUMBER: 8 XY! IP sampler location Berm Channel/swale Check dam

  11. Session: Hard Rock Penetration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tennyson, George P. Jr.; Dunn, James C.; Drumheller, Douglas S.; Glowka, David A.; Lysne, Peter

    1992-01-01

    This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of five presentations: ''Hard Rock Penetration - Summary'' by George P. Tennyson, Jr.; ''Overview - Hard Rock Penetration'' by James C. Dunn; ''An Overview of Acoustic Telemetry'' by Douglas S. Drumheller; ''Lost Circulation Technology Development Status'' by David A. Glowka; ''Downhole Memory-Logging Tools'' by Peter Lysne.

  12. Infiltration from an impoundment for coal-bed natural gas, Powder River Basin, Wyoming: Evolution of water and sediment chemistry - article no. W06424

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Healy, R.W.; Rice, C.A.; Bartos, T.T.; McKinley, M.P. [US Geological Survey, Lakewood, CO (United States). Denver Federal Center

    2008-06-15

    Development of coal-bed natural gas (CBNG) in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming, has increased substantially in recent years. Among environmental concerns associated with this development is the fate of groundwater removed with the gas. A preferred water-management option is storage in surface impoundments. A study was conducted on changes in water and sediment chemistry as water from an impoundment infiltrated the subsurface. Sediment cores were collected prior to operation of the impoundment and after its closure and reclamation. Suction lysimeters were used to collect water samples from beneath the impoundment. Large amounts of chloride (12,300 kg) and nitrate (13,500 kg as N), most of which accumulated naturally in the sediments over thousands of years, were released into groundwater by infiltrating water. Nitrate was more readily flushed from the sediments than chloride. If sediments at other impoundment locations contain similar amounts of chloride and nitrate, impoundments already permitted could release over 48 x 10{sup 6} kg of chloride and 52 x 10{sup 6} kg of nitrate into groundwater in the basin. A solute plume with total dissolved solid (TDS) concentrations at times exceeding 100,000 mg/L was created in the subsurface. TDS concentrations in the plume were substantially greater than those in the CBNG water (about 2300 mg/L) and in the ambient shallow groundwater (about 8000 mg/L). Sulfate, sodium, and magnesium are the dominant ions in the plume. The elevated concentrations are attributed to cation-exchange-enhanced gypsum dissolution. As gypsum dissolves, calcium goes into solution and is exchanged for sodium and magnesium on clays. Removal of calcium from solution allows further gypsum dissolution.

  13. A Political Ecology of the Citarum River Basin: Exploring "Integrated Water Resources Management" in West Java, Indonesia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cavelle, Jenna

    2013-01-01

    5. Goeltom, Diana. Debtwatch Indonesia coordinator. PersonalGrant. Republic of Indonesia: Integrated Citarum WaterDevelopment in Jakarta, Indonesia”, Human Development Report

  14. Installation of River and Drain Instrumentation Stations to Monitor Flow and Water Quality and Internet Data Sharing 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheng, Z.; Brown, C.; Creel, B.; Srinivasan, R.; Michelsen, A.; Fahy, M. P.

    2008-01-01

    IMS, data sharing and transfer, user needs assessment, Rio Grande, Rio Grande Project, gage station, surface water flow, groundwater, downloadable Microsoft Access database....

  15. Design and installation of continuous flow and water quality monitoring stations to improve water quality forecasting in the lower San Joaquin River

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quinn, Nigel W.T.

    2007-01-01

    district telemetry and/or SCADA systems. Water Districtsintegrated with the current District SCADA systems (TID andMID use different SCADA systems, requiring different system

  16. Environmental assessment of remedial action at the Slick Rock uranium mill tailings sites, Slick Rock, Colorado. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (42 USC {section}7901 et seq.), hereafter referred to as the UMTRCA, authorized the US Department of Energy (DOE) to clean up two uranium mill tailings processing sites near Slick Rock, Colorado, in San Miquel County. Contaminated materials cover an estimated 63 acres of the Union Carbide (UC) processing site and 15 ac of the North Continent (NC) processing site. The sites are within 1 mile of each other and are adjacent to the Dolores River. The sites contain concrete foundations of mill buildings, tailings piles, and areas contaminated by windblown and waterborne radioactive tailings materials. The total estimated volume of contaminated materials is approximately 621,300 cubic yards (yd{sup 3}). In addition to the contamination in the two processing site areas, four VPs were found to contain contamination. As a result of the tailings being exposed to the environment, contamination associated with the UC and NC sites has leached into shallow ground water. Surface water has not been affected. The closest residence is approximately 0.3 air mi from either site. The proposed action is to remediate the UC and NC sites by removing all contaminated materials within the designing site boundaries or otherwise associated with the sites, and relocating them to, and stabilizing them at, a location approximately 5 road mi northeast of the sites on land administered by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

  17. Thesis proposal CSF Brazil 2014 Modeling of water transfer and suspended sediments in the Amazons river continuum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bordenave, Charles

    Thesis proposal CSF Brazil 2014 Title: Modeling of water transfer and suspended sediments is to modeling water and sediment transport at the Amazon catchment scale. Investigations will consist storage and sediment deposition on scenario in a context of global changes. Subject description: spended

  18. Rock to Regolith Earth's Critical Zone on Volcanic Ocean Islands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geist, Dennis

    increases monotonically towards surface #12;Frost creep transport Frequency and depth of freezing event (f in a landscape? (the w question) What governs the efficiency of regolith transport? (the Q question) What lens growth #12;Ice lenses in soils Ice lenses in rock Water freezing in soil and rocks Murton et al

  19. ACOUSTICAL IMAGING AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF SOFT ROCK AND MARINE SEDIMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thurman E. Scott, Jr., Ph.D.; Musharraf Zaman, Ph.D.; Younane Abousleiman, Ph.D.

    2001-04-01

    The oil and gas industry has encountered significant problems in the production of oil and gas from weak rocks (such as chalks and limestones) and from unconsolidated sand formations. Problems include subsidence, compaction, sand production, and catastrophic shallow water sand flows during deep water drilling. Together these cost the petroleum industry hundreds of millions of dollars annually. The goals of this first quarterly report is to document the progress on the project to provide data on the acoustic imaging and mechanical properties of soft rock and marine sediments. The project is intended to determine the geophysical (acoustic velocities) rock properties of weak, poorly cemented rocks and unconsolidated sands. In some cases these weak formations can create problems for reservoir engineers. For example, it cost Phillips Petroleum 1 billion dollars to repair of offshore production facilities damaged during the unexpected subsidence and compaction of the Ekofisk Field in the North Sea (Sulak 1991). Another example is the problem of shallow water flows (SWF) occurring in sands just below the seafloor encountered during deep water drilling operations. In these cases the unconsolidated sands uncontrollably flow up around the annulus of the borehole resulting in loss of the drill casing. The $150 million dollar loss of the Ursa development project in the U.S. Gulf Coast resulted from an uncontrolled SWF (Furlow 1998a,b; 1999a,b). The first three tasks outlined in the work plan are: (1) obtain rock samples, (2) construct new acoustic platens, (3) calibrate and test the equipment. These have been completed as scheduled. Rock Mechanics Institute researchers at the University of Oklahoma have obtained eight different types of samples for the experimental program. These include: (a) Danian Chalk, (b) Cordoba Cream Limestone, (c) Indiana Limestone, (d) Ekofisk Chalk, (e) Oil Creek Sandstone, (f) unconsolidated Oil Creek sand, and (g) unconsolidated Brazos river sand. These weak rocks and sands are intended to represent analogs to the formations that present oil and gas engineers with problems during oil and gas production and drilling operations. A series of new axial acoustic sensors have been constructed (and tested) to allow measurement of compressional and shear wave velocities during high pressure triaxial tests on these weak rock and sand samples. In addition, equipment to be utilized over the next 18 months of the project have tested and calibrated. These include the load frames, triaxial pressure cells, pressure sensors, load cells, extensometers, and oscilloscopes have been calibrated and tested. The multichannel acoustic emission and acoustic pulse transmission systems have also been tested. Graduate research assistant, research faculty, and the laboratory technician have begun Tasks 4 and 5 which involve preparing the sand samples and rock samples for testing. The construction of the lateral acoustic sensors has also been started during this quarter as outlined in the project timeline. With the equipment having been tested and calibrated, and the samples now being prepared, the experiments are on schedule to be started in April, 2001.

  20. ACOUSTICAL IMAGING AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF SOFT ROCK AND MARINE SEDIMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thurman E. Scott, Jr., Ph.D.; Younane Abousleiman, Ph.D.; Musharraf Zaman, Ph.D., P.E.

    2001-07-01

    Mechanically weak formations, such as chalks, high porosity sandstones, and marine sediments, pose significant problems for oil and gas operators. Problems such as compaction, subsidence, and loss of permeability can affect reservoir production operations. For example, the unexpected subsidence of the Ekofisk chalk in the North Sea required over one billion dollars to re-engineer production facilities to account for losses created during that compaction (Sulak 1991). Another problem in weak formations is that of shallow water flows (SWF). Deep water drilling operations sometimes encounter cases where the marine sediments, at shallow depths just below the seafloor, begin to uncontrollably flow up and around the drill pipe. SWF problems created a loss of $150 million for the Ursa development project in the U.S. Gulf Coast SWF (Furlow 1998a,b; 1999a,b). The goal of this project is to provide a database on both the rock mechanical properties and the geophysical properties of weak rocks and sediments. These could be used by oil and gas companies to detect, evaluate, and alleviate potential production and drilling problems. The results will be useful in, for example, pre-drill detection of events such as SWF's by allowing a correlation of seismic data (such as hazard surveys) to rock mechanical properties. The data sets could also be useful for 4-D monitoring of the compaction and subsidence of an existing reservoir and imaging the zones of damage. During the second quarter of the project the research team has: (1) completed acoustic sensor construction, (2) conducted reconnaissance tests to map the deformational behaviors of the various rocks, (3) developed a sample assembly for the measurement of dynamic elastic and poroelastic parameters during triaxial testing, and (4) conducted a detailed review of the scientific literature and compiled a bibliography of that review. During the first quarter of the project the research team acquired several rock types for testing including: (a) Danian chalk, (b) Cordoba Cream limestone, (c) Indiana limestone, (d) Ekofisk chalk, (e) Oil Creek sandstone, (f) unconsolidated Oil Creek sand, and (g) unconsolidated Brazos river sand. During the second quarter experiments were begun on these rock types. A series of reconnaissance experiments have been carried out on all but the Ekofisk (for which there is a preliminary data set already inhouse). A series of triaxial tests have been conducted on the Danian chalk, the Cordoba Cream limestone, the Indiana limestone, and sand samples to make a preliminary determination of the deformational mechanisms present in these samples.

  1. Lumbee River EMC- Residential Energy Efficiency Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lumbee River EMC (LREMC) offers rebates to its residential customers who purchase and install qualified energy efficient products or services. Rebates are available for water heaters, refrigerator...

  2. Cuivre River Electric- Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Cuivre River Electric Cooperative, through the Take Control & Save program, offers rebates for cooperative members who purchase efficient geothermal and dual fuel heat pumps, and electric water...

  3. Water Resources Milind Sohoni

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohoni, Milind

    TD 603 Water Resources Milind Sohoni www.cse.iitb.ac.in/sohoni/ Lecture 4: Groundwater () December in dried sample. Saturation: When these voids are fully filled with water. Specific Yield Sy : the ration of the colume of water that drains from a rock owing to gravity, to the total rock volumne. 00000000

  4. Quantity and Fate of Water Salvage as a Result of Saltcedar Control on the Pecos River in Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheng, Z.; McDonald, A.K.; Hart, C.; Hatler, W.; Villalobos, J.

    2007-01-01

    of saltcedar control be conducted. For future studies using the paired plot method, it is recommended that both sites be logged for at least 3 years prior to treatment. To reduce the potential for upriver treatment affect on downriver study areas... by saltcedar at night, and that there is no significant water use prior to April or after September. In order to estimate potential water salvage from control of saltcedar, the study site was set up following the EPA (1993) Paired Plot Study Design...

  5. Origin of retrograde fluids in metamorphic rocks B. Yardley*, S. Gleeson, S. Bruce, D. Banks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banks, David

    infiltration of near-surface waters, rather than to the action of deep metamorphic fluids. In this study, we basement rocks is often the result of infiltration of water from sedimentary basins or the surface. At high examine the evidence for deep infiltration of surface-derived waters into metamorphic basement rocks

  6. A STUDY OF ROCK-WATER-NUCLEAR WASTE INTERACTIONS IN THE PASCO BASIN, WASHINGTON -- Part: Distribution and Composition of Secondary and Primary Mineral Phases in Basalts of the Pasco Basin, Washington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benson, L.V.

    2010-01-01

    ROCK COMPOSITION THIN SECTION PETROGRAPHY Procedures Resultsfrom Thin Section Petrography Estimates of Relative AmountsData from thin section petrography has helped to resolve

  7. The Role of Multimodel Climate Forecasts in Improving Water and Energy Management over the Tana River Basin, Kenya

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arumugam, Sankar

    - logical ensembles are used in a reservoir model to allocate water for power generation by ensuring clima. Retrospective reservoir analysis shows that inflow forecasts developed from single GCM and multiple GCMs perform the single- model inflow forecasts by reducing uncertainty and the overconfidence of individual model

  8. Possible impacts of anthropogenic aerosols on water resources of the Jordan River and the Sea of Galilee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel, Rosenfeld

    in the concentrations of submicron air pollution particles during the last half century. These particles slow down mitigated by cloud seeding for rain enhancement, but apparently, the air pollution dominated and caused be compromised by the air pollution produced by the very people who depend on that water. Citation: Givati, A

  9. Evidence for the incorporation of lead into barite from waste rock pile materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    COURTIN-NOMADE, ALEXANDRA

    2009-01-01

    waste rock associated with acid drainage at the Penn Mine,in urban runoff, acid mine drainage, and contaminatedof waters affected by acid mine drainage and nonaffected

  10. Review and problem definition of water/rock reactions associated with injection of spent geothermal fluids from a geothermal plant into aquifers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elders, W.A.

    1986-07-01

    Among the technical problems faced by the burgeoning geothermal industry is the disposal of spent fluids from power plants. Except in unusual circumstances the normal practice, especially in the USA, is to pump these spent fluids into injection wells to prevent contamination of surface waters, and possibly in some cases, to reduce pressure drawdown in the producing aquifers. This report is a survey of experience in geothermal injection, emphasizing geochemical problems, and a discussion of approaches to their possible mitigation. The extraction of enthalpy from geothermal fluid in power plants may cause solutions to be strongly supersaturated in various dissolved components such as silica, carbonates, sulfates, and sulfides. Injection of such supersaturated solutions into disposal wells has the potential to cause scaling in the well bores and plugging of the aquifers, leading to loss of injectivity. Various aspects of the geochemistry of geothermal brines and their potential for mineral formation are discussed, drawing upon a literature survey. Experience of brine treatment and handling, and the economics of mineral extraction are also addressed in this report. Finally suggestions are made on future needs for possible experimental, field and theoretical studies to avoid or control mineral scaling.

  11. Predicted macroinvertebrate response to water diversion from a montane stream using two-dimensional hydrodynamic models and zero flow approximation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holmquist, Jeffrey G; Waddle, Terry J

    2013-01-01

    rivers with differing water extraction. Fundamental andecological effects of water extraction in small, unregulated

  12. Evaluation of supplemental aeration for the Trinity River System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reap, Edward John

    1974-01-01

    of the water management system for the Ruhr River Valley, Germany. The system makes use of both a mechanical and diffuser 16 aeration system to maintain high quality water. To achieve comparable water quality by erecting advanced water treatment facilities...

  13. Engineering rock mass classifications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bieniawski, Z.T.

    1989-01-01

    This book is a reference on rock mass classification, consolidating into one handy source information widely scattered through the literature. Includes new, unpublished material and case histories. Presents the fundamental concepts of classification schemes and critically appraises their practical application in industrial projects such as tunneling and mining.

  14. July 2003 / Vol. 53 No. 7 BioScience 647 Throughout the world, rivers support particularly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rood, Stewart

    and shrubs, especially cottonwoods (Popu- lus spp.) and willows (Salix spp.) along rivers throughout landscape shaped by and dependent on the flowing river. However, rivers also provide water and energy

  15. Microwave assisted hard rock cutting

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lindroth, David P. (Apple Valley, MN); Morrell, Roger J. (Bloomington, MN); Blair, James R. (Inver Grove Heights, MN)

    1991-01-01

    An apparatus for the sequential fracturing and cutting of subsurface volume of hard rock (102) in the strata (101) of a mining environment (100) by subjecting the volume of rock to a beam (25) of microwave energy to fracture the subsurface volume of rock by differential expansion; and , then bringing the cutting edge (52) of a piece of conventional mining machinery (50) into contact with the fractured rock (102).

  16. Idaho Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for the Snake River Plain, which is currently undergoing the largest water rights adjudication effort

  17. S00906010006 rock check dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    XY! 53-0002 53-0890 53-1036 53-0598 53-0860 53-0056 S00906010006 rock check dam S00906010005 rock check dam S00906010007 rock check dam S00903010009 earthen berm S00903010010 earthen berm S00903120003 Channel/swale Check dam Sediment trap/basin Gabion Seed and mulch Cap Established vegetation SWMU boundary

  18. spe451-00 1st pgs page v Introduction: Managing Rivers with Broad Historical Changes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James, L. Allan

    spe451-00 1st pgs page v v Introduction: Managing Rivers with Broad Historical Changes and Human global environmental change, water resources, river restoration, and sustainable river management of studies and inter- pretations of river-channel change that reflect modern viewpoints of river management

  19. Rock-Around Orbits 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bourgeois, Scott K.

    2010-07-14

    , David Hyland Tom Pollock J. Maurice Rojas Head of Department, Dimitris Lagoudas December 2009 Major Subject: Aerospace Engineering iii ABSTRACT Rock-Around Orbits. (December 2009) Scott Kenneth Bourgeois, B.S., Texas A&M University Chair of Advisory...] : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 3 4 Compatible Orbits for a Circular Target Orbit (Example 1) : : : : : 8 5 Inclination Bounds Geometry for a Circular Target Orbit : : : : : : : 10 6 GEO and RAO Orbits in the Inertial Frame (Example 1) : : : : : : : 14 7 GEO and RAO Orbits...

  20. Session: Hot Dry Rock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tennyson, George P. Jr.; Duchane, David V.; Ponden, Raymond F.; Brown, Donald W.

    1992-01-01

    This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of four presentations: ''Hot Dry Rock - Summary'' by George P. Tennyson, Jr.; ''HDR Opportunities and Challenges Beyond the Long Term Flow Test'' by David V. Duchane; ''Start-Up Operations at the Fenton Hill HDR Pilot Plant'' by Raymond F. Ponden; and ''Update on the Long-Term Flow Testing Program'' by Donald W. Brown.

  1. Environmental Assessment of the Lower Cape Fear River System, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mallin, Michael

    along Cape Fear Estuary Persistent blue-green Microcystis algal bloom in Cape Fear River, fall 2009 UNCW. These rivers are classified as blackwater systems because of their tea colored water. The Northeast Cape Fear

  2. Environmental Assessment of the Lower Cape Fear River System, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mallin, Michael

    along Cape Fear Estuary Persistent blue-green Microcystis algal bloom in Cape Fear River, fall 2009 UNCW because of their tea colored water. The Northeast Cape Fear River often seems to be more oxygen stressed

  3. Comparative Evaluation of Generalized River/Reservoir System Models 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurbs, Ralph A.

    2005-01-01

    modeling systems that simulate the storage, flow, and diversion of water in a system of reservoirs and river reaches. Generalized means that a computer modeling system is designed for application to a range of concerns dealing with river basin systems...

  4. Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin (Multiple States)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin's (ICPRB) mission is to enhance, protect, and conserve the water and associated land resources of the Potomac River and its tributaries through...

  5. Malheur River Wildlife Mitigation Project, Annual Report 2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashley, Paul

    2004-01-01

    Hydropower development within the Columbia and Snake River Basins has significantly affected riparian, riverine, and adjacent upland habitats and the fish and wildlife species dependent upon them. Hydroelectric dams played a major role in the extinction or major loss of both anadromous and resident salmonid populations and altered instream and adjacent upland habitats, water quality, and riparian/riverine function. Hydroelectric facility construction and inundation directly affected fish and wildlife species and habitats. Secondary and tertiary impacts including road construction, urban development, irrigation, and conversion of native habitats to agriculture, due in part to the availability of irrigation water, continue to affect wildlife and fish populations throughout the Columbia and Snake River Basins. Fluctuating water levels resulting from facility operations have created exposed sand, cobble, and/or rock zones. These zones are generally devoid of vegetation with little opportunity to re-establish riparian plant communities. To address the habitat and wildlife losses, the United States Congress in 1980 passed the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act (Act) (P.L. 96-501), which authorized the states of Idaho, Montana, Oregon, and Washington to create the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council). The Act directed the Council to prepare a program in conjunction with federal, state, and tribal wildlife resource authorities to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife species affected by the construction, inundation and operation of hydroelectric dams in the Columbia River Basin (NPPC 2000). Under the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Program), the region's fish and wildlife agencies, tribes, non-government organizations (NGOs), and the public propose fish and wildlife projects that address wildlife and fish losses resulting from dam construction and subsequent inundation. As directed by the Council, project proposals are subjected to a rigorous review process prior to receiving final approval. An eleven-member panel of scientists referred to as the Independent Scientific Review Panel (ISRP) examines project proposals. The ISRP recommends project approval based on scientific merit. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority (CBFWA), Council staff, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and subbasin groups also review project proposals to ensure each project meets regional and subbasin goals and objectives. The Program also includes a public involvement component that gives the public an opportunity to provide meaningful input on management proposals. After a thorough review, the Burns Paiute Tribe (BPT) acquired the Malheur River Mitigation Project (Project) with BPA funds to compensate, in part, for the loss of fish and wildlife resources in the Columbia and Snake River Basins and to address a portion of the mitigation goals identified in the Council's Program (NPPC 2000).

  6. IWA Balkan Young Water Professionals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Psarrakos, Panayiotis

    Networks Industrial Waste Treatment and Disposal River Basins Management Legislation in the Water those associated with cross-border water management issues, which require experience exchange among 2015 - Thessaloniki, Greece Topics Water Management (Water Loss ­ Mitigation Methods and Technologies

  7. The Columbia River System Inside Story

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2001-04-01

    The Columbia River is one of the greatest natural resources in the western United States. The river and its tributaries touch the lives of nearly every resident of the Pacific Northwest—from fostering world-famous Pacific salmon to supplying clean natural fuel for 50 to 65 percent of the region’s electrical generation. Since early in the 20th century, public and private agencies have labored to capture the benefits of this dynamic river. Today, dozens of major water resource projects throughout the region are fed by the waters of the Columbia Basin river system.

  8. Clearing Up Murky Waters: Clarifying the Relationship Between Indicator Organisms and Disease in Recreational Water Settings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yau, Vincent Ming-Dao

    2011-01-01

    Health effects of beach water pollution in Hong Kong. ”for river recreational waters. ” Int J Epidemiol 18 (1):Health effects of white-water canoeing. ” Lancet 339 (8809):

  9. Fluid Migration During Ice/Rock Planetesimal Differentiation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raney, Robert 1987-

    2012-12-12

    fast melt water can segregate from the core of an ice-rich planetesimal. To answer this question we treat the core as two phase flow problem: a compacting viscous “solid” (ice/rock mixture) and a segregating liquid (melt water). The model developed...

  10. Delta Flow Factors Influencing Stray Rate of Escaping Adult San Joaquin River Fall-Run Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01

    due to insufficient instream flow releases. Report preparedhead of Old River barrier on flow and water quality in theeffects of San Joaquin River flows and Delta export rates

  11. OkanoganRiver SpringChinookSalmon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Water Source 48 Section 5. Facilities 51 Section 6. Broodstock Origin and Identity 57 Section 7 at Rock Island and Wells Dams 33 Table 2. Future Tribal & Recreational Selective Harvest of Spring 44

  12. Integrated simulation of snow and glacier melt in water and energy balance-based, distributed hydrological modeling framework at Hunza River Basin of Pakistan Karakoram region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    will affect the Asian water towers, Science, 328(5984),hydrologic modelling, J. Water Resour. Plann. Manag. , 119(impact of climate change on the water resource of Hindukush-

  13. Losses of Sacramento River Chinook Salmon and Delta Smelt to Entrainment in Water Diversions in the Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kimmerer, Wim J.

    2008-01-01

    through the lower Sacramento River system. Journal of theand survival in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Estuary. In:transport and fate in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta using

  14. Ground water provides drinking water, irrigation for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saldin, Dilano

    they join tributaries to the Mississippi River. · The deep ground water divide is the underground boundary Deep ground water divide Racine Kenosha Walworth Waukesha Washington Ozaukee Milwaukee LAKE MICHIGANGround water provides drinking water, irrigation for crops and water for indus- tries. It is also

  15. The Columbia River System : the Inside Story.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1991-09-01

    The Columbia Ricer is one of the greatest natural resources in the western United States. The river and its tributaries touch the lives of nearly every resident of the Northwest-from providing the world-famous Pacific salmon to supplying the clean natural fuel for over 75 percent of the region's electrical generation. Since early in the century, public and private agencies have labored to capture the benefits of this dynamic river. Today, dozens of major water resource projects throughout the region are fed by the waters of the Columbia Basin river system. And through cooperative efforts, the floods that periodically threaten developments near the river can be controlled. This publication presents a detailed explanation of the planning and operation of the multiple-use dams and reservoirs of the Columbia River system. It describes the river system, those who operate and use it, the agreements and policies that guide system operation, and annual planning for multiple-use operation.

  16. Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    are: · Monitor streambed temperatures in the Lower Bull Run River to characterize vertical Focus Category: Models, Sediments, Water Quality Descriptors: TMDLs, water quality modeling, Bull Run River, temperature modeling Principal Investigators: Scott A. Wells, Robert L. Annear Publication #12

  17. Iron and Steel Phosphate Rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    Lime Lithium Magnesium Manganese Mercury Mica Molybdenum Nickel Nitrogen Peat Perlite Phosphate Rock . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 194 Appendix C--Resource/Reserve Definitions . . . . . . 195 Commodities: Abrasives (Manufactured

  18. Iron and Steel Phosphate Rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    Mica Molybdenum Nickel Nitrogen Peat Perlite Phosphate Rock Platinum Potash Pumice Quartz Crystal Rare . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 190 Appendix C--A Resource/Reserve Classification for Minerals

  19. Identifying sources of dissolved organic carbon in agriculturally dominated rivers using radiocarbon age dating: Sacramento–San Joaquin River Basin, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sickman, James O.; DiGiorgio, Carol L.; Lee Davisson, M.; Lucero, Delores M.; Bergamaschi, Brian

    2010-01-01

    Water Project and -152% in the Sacramento River. Electronicof Water Resources, Sacramento, CA 95814, USA e-mail:United States Geological Survey, Sacramento, CA, USA e-mail:

  20. Fish Assemblage and Food Web Structure in Whedos (Shallow Floodplain Habitats) of the Oueme River, West Africa 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Andrew

    2012-10-19

    In the Oueme River, a lowland river in Benin, Africa, artificial ponds constructed in the floodplain (whedos) are colonized during the high-water period by a presumably random sample of fishes from the river channel. As ...

  1. AN OPERATIONS MODEL FOR TEMPERATURE MANAGEMENT OF THE TRUCKEE RIVER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 AN OPERATIONS MODEL FOR TEMPERATURE MANAGEMENT OF THE TRUCKEE RIVER Authors: David Neumann and local agencies have agreed to purchase water rights to be used to help manage water quality in the river to threatened and endangered fish. Through the Water Quality Settlement Agreement (WQSA), the federal government

  2. Indian River Research and Education Center 2199 South Rock Road

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jeffrey E.

    years as a postdoctoral research associate in the Soil and Crop Sciences Department at Texas A professional trade organizations, including the Soil Science Society of America, the Crop Science Society. His expertise is with soil management related to crop production and wetlands conservation. He said

  3. Database of radionuclide measurements in Columbia River water, fish, waterfowl, gamebirds, and shellfish downstream of Hanford`s single-pass production reactors, 1960--1970. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thiede, M.E.; Duncan, J.P.

    1994-03-01

    This report is a result of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project. The goal of the HEDR Project is to estimate the radiation dose that individuals could have received from radionuclide emissions since 1944 at the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. The HEDR Project is conducted by Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories. The time periods of greatest interest to the HEDR study vary depending on the type of environmental media concerned. Concentrations of radionuclides in Columbia River media from 1960--1970 provide the best historical data for validation of the Columbia River pathway computer models. This report provides the historical radionuclide measurements in Columbia River water (1960--1970), fish (1960--1967), waterfowl (1960--1970), gamebirds (1967--1970), and shellfish (1960--1970). Because of the large size of the databases (845 pages), this report is being published on diskette. A diskette of this report is available from the Technical Steering Panel (c/o K. CharLee, Office of Nuclear Waste Management, Department of Ecology, Technical Support and Publication Information Section, P.O. Box 47651, Olympia, Washington 98504-7651).

  4. Workshop on hydrology of crystalline basement rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, S.N. (comp.)

    1981-08-01

    This workshop covered the following subjects: measurements in relatively shallow boreholes; measurement and interpretation of data from deep boreholes; hydrologic properties of crystalline rocks as interpreted by geophysics and field geology; rock mechanics related to hydrology of crystalline rocks; the possible contributions of modeling to the understanding of the hydrology of crystalline rocks; and geochemical interpretations of the hydrology of crystalline rocks. (MHR)

  5. A rapid method for measuring local groundwater-surface water interactions and identifying potential non-point source pollution inputs to rivers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Butler, Christopher Aaron

    2009-01-01

    Anderson, M.P. , 2005. Heat as a Ground Water Tracer.Ground Water, 43(6): 951-968-951-968. Bencala, K.E. , 1993.the Earth's thermal profile. Water resources research, 1(2):

  6. Investigating groundwater and surface water interactions using novel isotopes and geochemical tracers in the upper Merced River Basin, Sierra Nevada, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaw, Glenn David

    2009-01-01

    Mountains of the world, water towers for humanity: typology,and global significance, Water Resources Research, 43,36 Cl pulse in natural water, Letters to Nature, 300, 737-

  7. Integrated simulation of snow and glacier melt in water and energy balance-based, distributed hydrological modeling framework at Hunza River Basin of Pakistan Karakoram region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    model of land surface water and energy ?uxes for GSMs, J.glacier melt in water and energy balance-based, distributedglacier melt in water and energy balance-based, distributed

  8. Improved Water Flooding through Injection Brine Modification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robertson, Eric Partridge; Thomas, Charles Phillip; Morrow, Norman

    2003-01-01

    Crude oil/brine/rock interactions can lead to large variations in the displacement efficiency of waterflooding, by far the most widely applied method of improved oil recovery. Laboratory waterflood tests show that injection of dilute brine can increase oil recovery. Numerous fields in the Powder River basin have been waterflooded using low salinity brine (about 500 ppm) from the Madison limestone or Fox Hills sandstone. Although many uncertainties arise in the interpretation and comparison of field production data, injection of low salinity brine appears to give higher recovery compared to brine of moderate salinity (about 7,000 ppm). Laboratory studies of the effect of brine composition on oil recovery cover a wide range of rock types and crude oils. Oil recovery increases using low salinity brine as the injection water ranged from a low of no notable increase to as much as 37.0% depending on the system being studied. Recovery increases using low salinity brine after establishing residual oil saturation (tertiary mode) ranged from no significant increase to 6.0%. Tests with two sets of reservoir cores and crude oil indicated slight improvement in recovery for low salinity brine. Crude oil type and rock type (particularly the presence and distribution of kaolinite) both play a dominant role in the effect that brine composition has on waterflood oil recovery.

  9. WINTER-RUN CHINOOK SALMON IN THE SACRAMENTO RIVER, CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    461 WINTER-RUN CHINOOK SALMON IN THE SACRAMENTO RIVER, CALIFORNIA WITH NOTES ON WATER TEMPERATURE REPORT-FISHERIES Na 461 #12;#12;WINTER-RUN CHINOOK SALMON IN THE SACRAMENTO RIVER, CALIFORNIA WITH NOTES HAMILTON CITY O Frontispiece.--Upper Sacramento River and Tributaries iv #12;WINTER-RUN CHINOOK SALMON

  10. EA-1987: Parker-Headgate Rock and Parker-Bouse Rebuild Project, Arizona and California

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE’s Western Area Power Administration is preparing an EA that will assess the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to rebuild the existing Parker Dam-Headgate Rock and Parker Dam-Bouse 161-kilovolt transmission lines along the Colorado River in western Arizona and eastern California.

  11. FRAMEWORK GEOLOGY OF FORT UNION COAL IN THE EASTERN ROCK SPRINGS UPLIFT,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapter GF FRAMEWORK GEOLOGY OF FORT UNION COAL IN THE EASTERN ROCK SPRINGS UPLIFT, GREATER GREEN RIVER BASIN, WYOMING By R.M. Flores,1 A.M. Ochs,2 and L.R. Bader1 in U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 1625-A 1 U.S. Geological Survey 2 Consultant, U.S. Geological Survey, Denver, Colorado 1999

  12. The Landscape of Klamath Basin Rock Art

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David, Robert James

    2012-01-01

    Figure 22. Main rock art panel at QzM-1………………………………………………….31. Special Use Area rock art sites (map)………………………………………….Figure 32. Mod-17 rock art site within Modoc territory (

  13. EXTENSION WATER SUMMIT PRIORITY: WATER QUALITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slatton, Clint

    EXTENSION WATER SUMMIT PRIORITY: WATER QUALITY Leadership Team Subcommittee: Mark Clark Karl Havens BJ Jarvis Kelly Morgan Ramesh Reddy #12;Water Quality ­ Situation (resources) Florida has extensive and diverse water resources 54,836 miles of rivers and streams 1.8 million acres of lakes, reservoirs

  14. Oil and Gas CDT Bots in Rocks: Intelligent Rock Deformation for Fault Rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henderson, Gideon

    Heriot-Watt University, Institute of Petroleum Engineering Supervisory Team · Dr Helen Lewis, Heriot://www.pet.hw.ac.uk/staff-directory/jimsomerville.htm Key Words Nano/Micro sensors; faults; fault zones; geomechanics; rock mechanics; rock deformation-deformed equivalent, a different lab-deformed example and a geomechanical simulation of a fault zone showing permanent

  15. Direct dating of left-lateral deformation along the Red River shear zone, China and Vietnam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Direct dating of left-lateral deformation along the Red River shear zone, China and Vietnam Lisa D-lateral shearing. Data from the southern RRSZ within Vietnam are complicated by Tertiary overprinting of rocks dating of left-lateral deformation along the Red River shear zone, China and Vietnam, J. Geophys. Res

  16. Low Pore Connectivity in Natural Rock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Qinhong; Ewing, Robert P.; Dultz, Stefan

    2012-05-15

    As repositories for CO? and radioactive waste, as oil and gas reservoirs, and as contaminated sites needing remediation, rock formations play a central role in energy and environmental management. The connectivity of the rock's porespace strongly affects fluid flow and solute transport. This work examines pore connectivity and its implications for fluid flow and chemical transport. Three experimental approaches (imbibition, tracer concentration profiles, and imaging) were used in combination with network modeling. In the imbibition results, three types of imbibition slope [log (cumulative imbibition) vs. log (imbibition time)] were found: the classical 0.5, plus 0.26, and 0.26 transitioning to 0.5. The imbibition slope of 0.26 seen in Indiana sandstone, metagraywacke, and Barnett shale indicates low pore connectivity, in contrast to the slope of 0.5 seen in the well-connected Berea sandstone. In the tracer profile work, rocks exhibited different distances to the plateau porosity, consistent with the pore connectivity from the imbibition tests. Injection of a molten metal into connected pore spaces, followed by 2-D imaging of the solidified alloy in polished thin sections, allowed direct assessment of pore structure and lateral connection in the rock samples. Pore-scale network modeling gave results consistent with measurements, confirming pore connectivity as the underlying cause of both anomalous behaviors: imbibition slope not having the classical value of 0.5, and accessible porosity being a function of distance from the edge. A poorly connected porespace will exhibit anomalous behavior in fluid flow and chemical transport, such as a lower imbibition slope (in air–water system) and diffusion rate than expected from classical behavior.

  17. Computerized Waters 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2006-01-01

    supply diversions, several hydroelectric plants and numerous environ- mental instream flow requirements. Each of these active permits is included in the datasets. Besides the commission using the WAM/WRAP modeling system in water rights permiting... actions be consistent with relevant regional plans. River authorities, water districts and other water management organizations are beginning to use the WRAP model in operational planning studies to optimize operations of their facilities...

  18. Shotgun cartridge rock breaker

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ruzzi, Peter L. (Eagan, NM); Morrell, Roger J. (Bloomington, MN)

    1995-01-01

    A rock breaker uses shotgun cartridges or other firearm ammunition as the explosive charge at the bottom of a drilled borehole. The breaker includes a heavy steel rod or bar, a gun with a firing chamber for the ammunition which screws onto the rod, a long firing pin running through a central passage in the rod, and a firing trigger mechanism at the external end of the bar which strikes the firing pin to fire the cartridge within the borehole. A tubular sleeve surround the main body of the rod and includes slits the end to allow it to expand. The rod has a conical taper at the internal end against which the end of the sleeve expands when the sleeve is forced along the rod toward the taper by a nut threaded onto the external end of the rod. As the sleeve end expands, it pushes against the borehole and holds the explosive gasses within, and also prevents the breaker from flying out of the borehole. The trigger mechanism includes a hammer with a slot and a hole for accepting a drawbar or drawpin which, when pulled by a long cord, allows the cartridge to be fired from a remote location.

  19. River System Hydrology in Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurbs, R.; Zhang, Y.

    2014-01-01

    and databases maintained by the Texas Water Development Board and the U.S. Geological Survey. River basin volume budgets and trend and frequency metrics for simulated naturalized and regulated stream flows and reservoir storage are developed using the WAM System...

  20. NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS OF LONG TERM UNSATURATED FLOW AND ACID MINE DRAINAGE AT WASTE ROCK PILES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aubertin, Michel

    NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS OF LONG TERM UNSATURATED FLOW AND ACID MINE DRAINAGE AT WASTE ROCK PILES Omar present a numerical modeling study of unsaturated water flow and acid mine drainage in idealized (but of oxygen diffusion and acid mine drainage through the waste rock piles showed that oxygen is generally

  1. Documenting Visual Quality Controls on the Evaluation of Petroleum Reservoir-rocks through

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliveira, Manuel M.

    , natural gas or water ­ and their permeability ­ the amount of such fluids that can flow through a rockDocumenting Visual Quality Controls on the Evaluation of Petroleum Reservoir-rocks through Ontology and prediction of the quality (porosity, permeability) of petroleum reservoirs during their exploration

  2. Solid As A Rock: The Utilization of Polyvinyl Acetate to Stabilize and Consolidate Museum Sandstone Objects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rock, Chris

    Solid As A Rock: The Utilization of Polyvinyl Acetate to Stabilize and Consolidate Museum Sandstone) commonly used sandstone in creating various objects. Sandstone slabs used in hearth construction these objects unstable. Sandstone is a porous rock. The heat treatment and weathering drives off water and makes

  3. Triple oxygen isotope variations in sedimentary rocks Naomi E. Levin a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . However, recent oxygen isotope measurements of terrestrial rocks, minerals and waters also reveal common for various equilibrium and kinetic mechanisms. Here we pres- ent triple oxygen isotope data on sedimentary; Pack and Herwartz, 2014), but they are gener- ally overlooked in analysis of terrestrial rocks

  4. Rheological properties of minerals and rocks Shun-ichiro Karato

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Rheological properties of minerals and rocks Shun-ichiro Karato Yale University Department Earth" (edited by S. Karato) Wiley-Blackwell #12; 2 SUMMARY Plastic deformation in Earth and planetary. The rheological properties in the upper mantle are controlled mostly by temperature, pressure and water content

  5. Carbon and Water Resource Management for Water Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hendrickson, Thomas Peter

    2013-01-01

    Buckley, C. A. ; Carbon footprint analysis for increasingeffectively reduce their carbon footprint. To accomplish7 February 2013. (8) The Carbon Footprint of Water; River

  6. E.2. Electronic Appendix -Food Web Elements of the Fraser River Upper River (above rkm 210)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 E.2. Electronic Appendix - Food Web Elements of the Fraser River Basin Upper River (above rkm 210) Food webs: Microbenthic algae (periphyton), detritus from riparian vegetation and littoral insects). Stressors: Water quality and habitat conditions have changed food webs in specific locations in the upper

  7. Fluid-Rock Characterization and Interactions in NMR Well Logging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirasaki, George J.; Mohanty, Kishore K.

    2003-02-10

    The objective of this project was to characterize the fluid properties and fluid-rock interactions which are needed for formation evaluation by NMR well logging. NMR well logging is finding wide use in formation evaluation. The formation parameters commonly estimated were porosity, permeability, and capillary bound water. Special cases include estimation of oil viscosity, residual oil saturation, location of oil/water contact, and interpretation on whether the hydrocarbon is oil or gas.

  8. Water Quality of a Reservoir Used for Reclaimed Water Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dixon, Peter S; Scherfig, Jan

    1981-01-01

    off from upper Santiago Creek and Colorado River water fromSantiago Reservoir (by this time a blend of surface run-off and Colorado RiverSantiago Reservoir, the inputs are derived from direct surface run-off and Colorado River

  9. Chemical hydrofracturing of the Hot Dry Rock reservoir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yakovlev, Leonid

    1996-01-24

    The experimental study of the water-rock interaction shows that the secondary mineral assemblage depends on the water composition. For example, granite-pure water interaction produces zeolites (relatively low-dense, Mg-poor minerals), whereas seawater yields chlorites (high-dense, Mg-rich minerals). The reactions have volumetric effects from several % to 20 % in magnitude. Volume deformations in the heterogeneous matrix cause uneven mechanical strains. Reactions with the effect of about 0,1 vol.% may cause strains of the order of 100-1000 bars being enough for destruction of rocks. Signs and magnitudes of local volume changes depend on the mineral composition of the secondary assemblage. Hence, one can provide either healing or cracking of primary fractures, as desired, by changing the composition of water in the water-felsic rock system where some elements (Mg, Fe) are in lack. The techniques of "chemical hydrofracturing" looks promising as applied to a granite HDR massif. One can regulate the permeability of fractured flow paths by changing in concord the composition and pressure of the injected water. This approach should promote efficient extraction of the petrothermal energy.

  10. Environmental Assessment of the Lower Cape Fear River System, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mallin, Michael

    along Cape Fear Estuary Persistent blue-green Microcystis algal bloom in Cape Fear River, fall 2009 Microcystis blue-green bloom magnified 150X #12;Executive Summary Multiparameter water sampling for the Lower as blackwater systems because of their tea colored water. The Northeast Cape Fear River often seems to be more

  11. Quantifying the Effect of Kerogen on Electrical Resistivity Measurements on Organic-rich Source Rocks 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kethireddy, Nikhil Reddy

    2013-12-04

    Interpretation of electrical resistivity logs in organic-rich source rocks has been challenging for petrophysicists. Conventional resistivity-porosity-saturation models (e.g., Archie’s, Dual-Water, and Waxman-Smits equations) ...

  12. Compaction of porous rock by dissolution on discrete stylolites: A one-dimensional model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Einat, Aharonov

    in sedimentary rocks [Weyl, 1959], with practical implications to oil, gas, and water flows, as well transport away from the clay layer followed by pore cementation. The evolution of the porosity, reactant

  13. WATER TEMPERATURES Marine BiolOiical Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    =temperature data are valuable to several agencies working in the Sacramento River basin,, Fishery researchers collection is further restricted to waters of the Sacramento Valley and the Sacramento - San Joaquin Delta the exceotion of readings from Sacramento River near the Sacramento Water Works and Sacramento River at Hay

  14. River Basin Commissions (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation establishes river basin commissions, for the Kankakee, Maumee, St. Joseph, and Upper Wabash Rivers. The commissions facilitate and foster cooperative planning and coordinated...

  15. Integrated simulation of snow and glacier melt in water and energy balance-based, distributed hydrological modeling framework at Hunza River Basin of Pakistan Karakoram region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    basin, Nepal Himalaya, in Snow and Glacier Hydrology, vol.274, 198–210. INTEGRATED SNOW AND GLACIERMELT MODEL Journalon water availability in snow-dominated regions, Nature,

  16. Experimental Validation of Pore-Level Calculations of Static and Dynamic Petrophysical Properties of Clastic Rocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torres-Verdín, Carlos

    is consistent with laboratory measure- ments. For the case of two-phase simulations of water-wet conditions- tal measurements when immovable fluid saturations of oil and water are taken into account. Our of heterogeneous rock forma- tions. We also find that the amount of clay-bound water should be accounted

  17. Fractured rock aquifer tests in the Western Siberian Basin, Ozyorsk, Russia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nichols, R.L.; Looney, B.B.; Eddy-Dilek, C.A.

    1997-10-01

    A series of multi-zone pumping tests was conducted in a contaminated fractured rock aquifer in the Western Siberian Basin, Ozyorsk, Russia. The tests were conducted adjacent to the Mishelyak River floodplain in fractured Paleozoic porphyrites, tufts, tuff breccia, and lava typical of the Ural mountain complex. Geophysical logs, borehole photography, core samples, and results from previous borehole contamination studies were used to identify the zones to be tested. A network of three uncased wells was tested using a system of inflatable packers, pressure transducers and data loggers. Seven zones were isolated and monitored in two of the uncased wells. A straddle packer assembly was used to isolate individual zones within the pumping well. Eight constant rate pumping tests were conducted. Results of the testing indicate that shallow groundwater migrates primarily in two intervals that are separated by an interval with low lateral conductivity. The water bearing intervals have moderate to high specific capacities (1.3 and 30 L/min/m). Several processes are responsible for fracturing present in the lower interval. The network of compound fractures produced a complex array of fracture intersections yielding a fractured media with hydraulic behavior similar to porous media. Models used for the analysis of pumping tests in porous media provide a good estimation of the hydraulic response of the lower interval to pumping. Future work will include more complex analysis of the data to determine hydraulic conductivity ellipses.

  18. Rock Art in the Public Trust: Managing Prehistoric Rock Art on Federal Land

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hale, John Patrick

    2010-01-01

    Stories in Stone: Rock Art Pictures by Early Americans. NewIntroduction. ? Coso Rock Art: a New Perspective, edited byIn The Archaeology of Rock Art,? edited by Christopher

  19. This category generally includes lower order rivers and streams that tend to be higher gradient. These are waters that typically support coldwater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    the erosive force of water by eliminating the flood storage capacity of floodplains. This increases bank species seek thermal refuge from rising water temperatures. Watersheds with limited connectivity Hampshire estimates that the expected increase in evapotranspiration during a longer growing season

  20. THE OHIO RIVER VALLEY CO2 STORAGE PROJECT - PRELIMINARY ASSESSMENT OF DEEP SALINE RESERVOIRS AND COAL SEAMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael J. Mudd; Howard Johnson; Charles Christopher; T.S. Ramakrishnan, Ph.D.

    2003-08-01

    This report describes the geologic setting for the Deep Saline Reservoirs and Coal Seams in the Ohio River Valley CO{sub 2} Storage Project area. The object of the current project is to site and design a CO{sub 2} injection facility. A location near New Haven, WV, has been selected for the project. To assess geologic storage reservoirs at the site, regional and site-specific geology were reviewed. Geologic reports, deep well logs, hydraulic tests, and geologic maps were reviewed for the area. Only one well within 25 miles of the site penetrates the deeper sedimentary rocks, so there is a large amount of uncertainty regarding the deep geology at the site. New Haven is located along the Ohio River on the border of West Virginia and Ohio. Topography in the area is flat in the river valley but rugged away from the Ohio River floodplain. The Ohio River Valley incises 50-100 ft into bedrock in the area. The area of interest lies within the Appalachian Plateau, on the western edge of the Appalachian Mountain chain. Within the Appalachian Basin, sedimentary rocks are 3,000 to 20,000 ft deep and slope toward the southeast. The rock formations consist of alternating layers of shale, limestone, dolomite, and sandstone overlying dense metamorphic continental shield rocks. The Rome Trough is the major structural feature in the area, and there may be some faults associated with the trough in the Ohio-West Virginia Hinge Zone. The area has a low earthquake hazard with few historical earthquakes. Target injection reservoirs include the basal sandstone/Lower Maryville and the Rose Run Sandstone. The basal sandstone is an informal name for sandstones that overlie metamorphic shield rock. Regional geology indicates that the unit is at a depth of approximately 9,100 ft below the surface at the project site and associated with the Maryville Formation. Overall thickness appears to be 50-100 ft. The Rose Run Sandstone is another potential reservoir. The unit is located approximately 1,100 ft above the basal sandstone and is 100-200 ft thick. The storage capacity estimates for a 20-mile radius from the injection well ranged from 39-78 million tons (Mt) for each formation. Several other oil and gas plays have hydraulic properties conducive for injection, but the formations are generally only 5-50 ft thick in the study area. Overlying the injection reservoirs are thick sequences of dense, impermeable dolomite, limestone, and shale. These layers provide containment above the potential injection reservoirs. In general, it appears that the containment layers are much thicker and extensive than the injection intervals. Other physical parameters for the study area appear to be typical for the region. Anticipated pressures at maximum depths are approximately 4,100 psi based on a 0.45 psi/ft pressure gradient. Temperatures are likely to be 150 F. Groundwater flow is slow and complex in deep formations. Regional flow directions appear to be toward the west-northwest at less than 1 ft per year within the basal sandstone. Vertical gradients are downward in the study area. A review of brine geochemistry indicates that formation fluids have high salinity and dissolved solids. Total dissolved solids ranges from 200,000-325,000 mg/L in the deep reservoirs. Brine chemistry is similar throughout the different formations, suggesting extensive mixing in a mature basin. Unconsolidated sediments in the Ohio River Valley are the primary source of drinking water in the study area.

  1. Improving parameter estimation and water table depth simulation in a land surface model using GRACE water storage and estimated base flow data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lo, Min-Hui; Famiglietti, James S; Yeh, P. J.-F.; Syed, T. H

    2010-01-01

    variations of river water storage from a multiple satellite2007), Estimating ground water storage changes in theAnalysis of terrestrial water storage changes from GRACE and

  2. Final project report on arsenic biogeochemistry in the Clinch River and Watts Bar Reservoir: Volume 1, Main text. Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ford, C.J.; Byrd, J.T.; Grebmeier, J.M.; Harris, R.A.; Moore, R.C.; Madix, S.E.; Newman, K.A.; Rash, C.D.

    1995-04-01

    This document reports on the study of arsenic contamination in the Clinch River/Watts Bar Reservoir (CR/WBR) system, downstream from the US Department of Energy`s Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). Arsenic is of particular interest and concern because it occurs commonly in coal-bearing rock and waste products, such as fly ash associated with the burning of coal; it is classified as a Class A carcinogen by the Environmental Protection Agency; and disposal of fly ash, both on and off the ORR, may have contaminated surface water and sediments in the Clinch River and Watts Bar Reservoir. Four main sites were sampled quarterly over a 3-year period. Sites investigated included lower Watts Bar Reservoir near Watts Bar Dam [Tennessee River kilometer (TRK) 849.6], the Kingston area [Clinch River kilometer (CRK) 1.6], Poplar Creek, and the McCoy Branch Embayment. Additional sites were investigated in the vicinity of these main stations to determine the distribution of contamination and to identify possible alternative or additional sources of arsenic.

  3. Geochronology and geochemistry of high-pressure granulites of the Arthur River Complex, Fiordland, New Zealand: Cretaceous

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daczko, Nathan

    Geochronology and geochemistry of high-pressure granulites of the Arthur River Complex, Fiordland margin. Key words: Arthur River Complex; Fiordland; geochronology; Median Tectonic Zone; Western geochronological examinations of the rocks of the MTZ indicate two distinct phases of magmatic activity, at 345

  4. Speeding up solar disinfection : effects of hydrogen peroxide, temperature, and copper plus ascorbate on the photoinactivation of E. coli in Charles River water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Michael Benjamin, 1979-

    2004-01-01

    Sunlight efficiently disinfects drinking water in plastic bottles over two days, but simple additives may show promise for reducing this time to several hours. This study found that adding up to 500 [micro]M hydrogen ...

  5. Iron and Steel Phosphate Rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    Kyanite Lead Lime Lithium Magnesium Manganese Mercury Mica Molybdenum Nickel Nitrogen Peat Perlite Graphite Peat Sulfur Beryllium Gypsum Perlite Talc Bismuth Hafnium Phosphate Rock Tantalum Boron Helium on the USGS--the Federal source for science about the Earth, its natural and living resources, natural hazards

  6. Iron and Steel Phosphate Rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    Kyanite Lead Lime Lithium Magnesium Manganese Mercury Mica Molybdenum Nickel Nitrogen Peat Perlite Graphite Peat Sulfur Beryllium Gypsum Perlite Talc Bismuth Hafnium Phosphate Rock Tantalum Boron Helium information on the USGS--the Federal source for science about the Earth, its natural and living resources

  7. ArchRock Corporation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Arch Rock is a systems and software company that builds products and technology for wireless sensor networks. References: ArchRock Corporation1 This article is a stub. You can...

  8. Lichen: the challenge for rock art conservation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dandridge, Debra Elaine

    2007-04-25

    This study investigates the effects that lichens have on rock surfaces in which ancient rock art (petroglyphs and pictographs) may be found. The study area includes four sites in the United States: one quartzite site in ...

  9. The Integrated Status and Effectiveness Monitoring Program : Variation (Status and Trend) of Stream Water Temperature within th Entiat River Subbasin : January 2008 - October 2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dawson, Pierre

    2008-01-29

    The Integrated Status and Effectiveness Monitoring Program (ISEMP - BPA project No.2003-017-00) has been created as a cost effective means of developing protocols and new technologies, novel indicators, sample designs, analytical, data management and communication tools and skills, and restoration experiments that support the development of a region-wide Research, Monitoring and Evaluation (RME) program to assess the status of anadromous salmonid populations, their tributary habitat and restoration and management actions. The most straightforward approach to developing a regional-scale monitoring and evaluation program would be to increase standardization among status and trend monitoring programs. However, the diversity of species and their habitat, as well as the overwhelming uncertainty surrounding indicators, metrics, and data interpretation methods, requires the testing of multiple approaches. Thus, the approach ISEMP has adopted is to develop a broad template that may differ in the details among subbasins, but one that will ultimately lead to the formation of a unified RME process for the management of anadromous salmonid populations and habitat across the Columbia River Basin. ISEMP has been initiated in three pilot subbasins, the Wenatchee/Entiat, John Day, and Salmon. To balance replicating experimental approaches with the goal of developing monitoring and evaluation tools that apply as broadly as possible across the Pacific Northwest, these subbasins were chosen as representative of a wide range of potential challenges and conditions, e.g., differing fish species composition and life histories, ecoregions, institutional settings, and existing data. ISEMP has constructed a framework that builds on current status and trend monitoring infrastructures in these pilot subbasins, but challenges current programs by testing alternative monitoring approaches. In addition, the ISEMP is: (1) Collecting information over a hierarchy of spatial scales, allowing for a greater flexibility of data aggregation for multi-scale recovery planning assessments, and (2) Designing methods that: (a) Identify factors limiting fish production in watersheds; (b) Determine restoration actions to address these problems; (c) Implement actions as a large-scale experiment (e.g. Before After Control Impact, or BACI design), and (d) Implement intensive monitoring and research to evaluate the action's success. The intent of the ISEMP project is to design monitoring programs that can efficiently collect information to address multiple management objectives over a broad range of scales. This includes: Evaluating the status of anadromous salmonids and their habitat; Identifying opportunities to restore habitat function and fish performance, and Evaluating the benefits of the actions to the fish populations across the Columbia River Basin. The multi-scale nature of this goal requires the standardization of protocols and sampling designs that are statistically valid and powerful, properties that are currently inconsistent across the multiple monitoring programs in the region. Other aspects of the program will aid in the ability to extrapolate information beyond the study area, such as research to elucidate causal mechanisms, and a classification of watersheds throughout the Columbia River Basin. Obviously, the scale of the problem is immense and the ISEMP does not claim to be the only program working towards this goal. As such, ISEMP relies heavily on the basin's current monitoring infrastructure to test and develop monitoring strategies, while acting as a coordinating body and providing support for key elements such as data management and technical analyses. The ISEMP also ensures that monitoring programs can address large-scale management objectives (resulting largely from the ESA) through these local efforts. While the ISEMP maintains a regional focus it also returns the necessary information to aid in management at the smaller spatial scales (individual projects) where manipulations (e.g., habitat restoration actions) actually occur. The work captur

  10. Desert Rock Coatings Ronald I. Dorn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dorn, Ron

    Chapter 7 Desert Rock Coatings Ronald I. Dorn Introduction Desert landforms are characterized, that the supposed funda- mental bare-rock nature of desert landforms stretches the truth. In reality, rock coatings Petra tourist attraction of the Al-Khazneh Tomb fac¸ade is coated with a black manganese-rich varnish

  11. River Data Package for Hanford Assessments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Guensch, Gregory R.; Patton, Gregory W.

    2006-08-01

    This data package documents the technical basis for selecting physical and hydraulic parameters and input values that will be used in river modeling for Hanford assessments. This work was originally conducted as part of the Characterization of Systems Task of the Groundwater Remediation Project managed by Fluor Hanford, Inc. and revised as part of the Characterization of Systems Project managed by PNNL for DOE. The river data package provides calculations of flow and transport in the Columbia River system. The module is based on the legacy code for the Modular Aquatic Simulation System II (MASS2), which is a two-dimensional, depth-averaged model that provides the capability to simulate the lateral (bank-to-bank) variation of flow and contaminants. It simulates river hydrodynamics (water velocities and surface elevations), sediment transport, contaminant transport, biotic transport, and sediment-contaminant interaction, including both suspended sediments and bed sediments. This document presents the data assembled to run the river module components for the section of the Columbia River from Vernita Bridge to the confluence with the Yakima River. MASS2 requires data on the river flow rate, downstream water surface elevation, groundwater influx and contaminants flux, background concentrations of contaminants, channel bathymetry, and the bed and suspended sediment properties. Stochastic variability for some input parameters such as partition coefficient (kd) values and background radionuclide concentrations is generated by the Environmental Stochastic Preprocessor. River flow is randomized on a yearly basis. At this time, the conceptual model does not incorporate extreme flooding (for example, 50 to 100 years) or dam removal scenarios.

  12. Snake and Columbia Rivers Sediment Sampling Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pinza, M.R.; Word, J.Q; Barrows, E.S.; Mayhew, H.L.; Clark, D.R. (Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States))

    1992-12-01

    The disposal of dredged material in water is defined as a discharge under Section 404 of the Clean Water Act and must be evaluated in accordance with US Environmental Protection Agency regulation 40 CFR 230. Because contaminant loads in the dredged sediment or resuspended sediment may affect water quality or contaminant loading, the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Walla Walla District, has requested Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory to collect and chemically analyze sediment samples from areas that may be dredged near the Port Authority piers on the Snake and Columbia rivers. Sediment samples were also collected at River Mile (RM) stations along the Snake River that may undergo resuspension of sediment as a result of the drawdown. Chemical analysis included grain size, total organic carbon, total volatile solids, ammonia, phosphorus, sulfides, oil and grease, total petroleum hydrocarbons, metals, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls, and 21 congeners of polychlorinated dibenzodioxins and dibenzofurans.

  13. Development and evaluation of a mathematical model for surface-water ow within the Shark River Slough of the Florida Everglades

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saiers, James

    the model are derived under the assumption that a power-law relationship quanti®es the dependence of ¯ow velocity on water depth. We simplify the model formulation by assuming uniform rates of evaporation a critical role in ¯ood mitiga- tion, biogeochemical cycling of nutrients, and reten- tion of toxic

  14. A study to determine the feasibility of diverting a portion of the Red River into the Trinity, Neches and Sabine River basins 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, John Henry

    1967-01-01

    outlook ~Pt t 1 Trinity River Basin EconoInic outlook ~Pt t 1 Neches River Basin 10 10 Economic outlook 10 ~Pt t 1 Sabine River Basin Economic outlook 12 I I I. THE WATER RESOURCES DF THE NECHES AND RED RIVER BASINS 14 Neches River Basin 14..., '' is a general discussion of the economic factors as they are related to demand for water in each basin. In addition to a statewide outlook, a separate discussion for each basin is presented which includes future population projections. In closing...

  15. Climate-driven shifts in quantity and seasonality of river discharge over the past 1000 years from the hydrographic apex of North America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwards, Thomas W.D.

    for the Athabasca River because the Alberta oil sands industry remains dependent on its water for bitumen extrac

  16. A Study of the Dielectric Properties of Dry and Saturated Green River Oil Shale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sweeney, J; Roberts, J; Harben, P

    2007-02-07

    We measured dielectric permittivity of dry and fluid-saturated Green River oil shale samples over a frequency range of 1 MHz to 1.8 GHz. Dry sample measurements were carried out between room temperature and 146 C, saturated sample measurements were carried out at room temperature. Samples obtained from the Green River formation of Wyoming and from the Anvil Points Mine in Colorado were cored both parallel and perpendicular to layering. The samples, which all had organic richness in the range of 10-45 gal/ton, showed small variations between samples and a relatively small level of anisotropy of the dielectric properties when dry. The real and imaginary part of the relative dielectric permittivity of dry rock was nearly constant over the frequency range observed, with low values for the imaginary part (loss factor). Saturation with de-ionized water and brine greatly increased the values of the real and imaginary parts of the relative permittivity, especially at the lower frequencies. Temperature effects were relatively small, with initial increases in permittivity to about 60 C, followed by slight decreases in permittivity that diminished as temperature increased. Implications of these observations for the in situ electromagnetic, or radio frequency (RF) heating of oil shale to produce oil and gas are discussed.

  17. Kootenai River Fisheries Investigation : Stock Status of Burbot : Project Progress Report 2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paragamian, Valughn L.; Laude Dorothy C.

    2008-12-26

    Objectives of this investigation were to (1) monitor the population status and recruitment of burbot Lota lota in the Kootenai River, Idaho and British Columbia, Canada during the winter of 2006-2007; (2) evaluate the selective withdrawal system in place at Libby Dam to maintain the river temperature near Bonners Ferry between 1-4 C (November-December) to improve burbot migration and spawning activity; and (3) determine if a hatching success of 10% of eyed burbot embryos could be achieved through extensive rearing and produce fingerlings averaging 9.8 cm in six months. Water temperature did not fall below the upper limit (4 C) until mid-January but was usually maintained between 1-4 C January through February and was acceptable. Snowpack was characterized by a 101% of normal January runoff forecast. Adult burbot were sampled with hoop nets and slat traps. Only three burbot were captured in hoop nets, all at Ambush Rock (rkm 244.5). No burbot were caught in either slat traps or juvenile sampling gear, indicating the population is nearly extirpated. Burbot catch per unit effort in hoop nets was 0.003 fish/net d. Extensive rearing was moved to a smaller private pond and will be reported in the 2008-2009 annual report.

  18. Hydroelectric power provides a cheap source of electricity with few carbon emissions. Yet, reservoirs are not operated sustainably, which we define as meeting societal needs for water and power while protecting long-term health of the river ecosystem. Reservoirs that generate hydropower are typically operated with the goal of maximizing energy reve

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jager, Yetta; Smith, Brennan T

    2008-02-01

    Hydroelectric power provides a cheap source of electricity with few carbon emissions. Yet, reservoirs are not operated sustainably, which we define as meeting societal needs for water and power while protecting long-term health of the river ecosystem. Reservoirs that generate hydropower are typically operated with the goal of maximizing energy revenue, while meeting other legal water requirements. Reservoir optimization schemes used in practice do not seek flow regimes that maximize aquatic ecosystem health. Here, we review optimization studies that considered environmental goals in one of three approaches. The first approach seeks flow regimes that maximize hydropower generation, while satisfying legal requirements, including environmental (or minimum) flows. Solutions from this approach are often used in practice to operate hydropower projects. In the second approach, flow releases from a dam are timed to meet water quality constraints on dissolved oxygen (DO), temperature and nutrients. In the third approach, flow releases are timed to improve the health of fish populations. We conclude by suggesting three steps for bringing multi-objective reservoir operation closer to the goal of ecological sustainability: (1) conduct research to identify which features of flow variation are essential for river health and to quantify these relationships, (2) develop valuation methods to assess the total value of river health and (3) develop optimal control softwares that combine water balance modelling with models that predict ecosystem responses to flow.

  19. IDAHO WATER USER RECOMMENDATIONS MAINSTEM PLAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IDAHO WATER USER RECOMMENDATIONS ON THE MAINSTEM PLAN COLUMBIA RIVER BASIN FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM SUBMITTED ON BEHALF OF THE COMMITTEE OF NINE AND THE IDAHO WATER USERS ASSOCIATION JUNE 15, 2001 and Flow Augmentation Policy in the Columbia River Basin #12;1 IDAHO WATER USER RECOMMENDATIONS

  20. Devasting effects of river flooding to the ground-nesting bee, Andrena vaga (Hymenoptera: Andrenidae), and its associated fauna

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paxton, Robert

    -1 Devasting effects of river flooding to the ground-nesting bee, Andrena vaga (Hymenoptera, (Andrenidae), a typical insect species of river flood plains, which forms sizeable nesting aggregations along 1999, a record flood of the River Rhine led to extreme water levels at the high water dams of the Upper

  1. SEISMIC AND ROCK PHYSICS DIAGNOSTICS OF MULTISCALE RESERVOIR TEXTURES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Mavko

    2004-08-01

    As part of our study on ''Relationships between seismic properties and rock microstructure'', we have continued our work on analyzing well logs and microstructural constraints on seismic signatures. We report results of three studies in this report. The first one deals with fractures and faults that provide the primary control on the underground fluid flow through low permeability massive carbonate rocks. Fault cores often represent lower transmissibility whereas the surrounding damaged rocks and main slip surfaces are high transmissibility elements. We determined the physical properties of fault rocks collected in and around the fault cores of large normal faults in central Italy. After studying the P- and S-wave velocity variation during cycles of confining pressure, we conclude that a rigid pore frame characterizes the fault gouge whereas the fractured limestone comprises pores with a larger aspect ratio. The second study was to characterize the seismic properties of brine as its temperature decreases from 25 C to -21 C. The purpose was to understand how the transmitted wave changes with the onset of freezing. The main practical reason for this experiment was to use partially frozen brine as an analogue for a mixture of methane hydrate and water present in the pore space of a gas hydrate reservoir. In the third study we analyzed variations in dynamic moduli in various carbonate reservoirs. The investigations include log and laboratory data from velocity, porosity, permeability, and attenuation measurements.

  2. River Corridor Achievements

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Washington Closure Hanford and previous contractors have completed much of the cleanup work in the River Corridor, shown here.

  3. Volume II, Chapter 12 Lewis River Subbasin--Upper North Fork

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volume II, Chapter 12 Lewis River Subbasin--Upper North Fork #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS.................................................................................................. 12-17 12.5.3 Water Quality

  4. Volume II, Chapter 11 Lewis River Subbasin--Lower North Fork

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volume II, Chapter 11 Lewis River Subbasin--Lower North Fork #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS..................................................................................................... 11-33 11.5.3 Water Quality

  5. Information technology and decision support tools for stakeholder-driven river basin salinity management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quinn, N.W.T

    2010-01-01

    water and salinity load management within the Hunter Rivermandated for pollutant load management in the US. 5.load regulation in the Hunter River Basin Salinity management

  6. Raft River geoscience case study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dolenc, M.R.; Hull, L.C.; Mizell, S.A.; Russell, B.F.; Skiba, P.A.; Strawn, J.A.; Tullis, J.A.

    1981-11-01

    The Raft River Geothermal Site has been evaluated over the past eight years by the United States Geological Survey and the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory as a moderate-temperature geothermal resource. The geoscience data gathered in the drilling and testing of seven geothermal wells suggest that the Raft River thermal reservoir is: (a) produced from fractures found at the contact metamorphic zone, apparently the base of detached normal faulting from the Bridge and Horse Well Fault zones of the Jim Sage Mountains; (b) anisotropic, with the major axis of hydraulic conductivity coincident to the Bridge Fault Zone; (c) hydraulically connected to the shallow thermal fluid of the Crook and BLM wells based upon both geochemistry and pressure response; (d) controlled by a mixture of diluted meteoric water recharging from the northwest and a saline sodium chloride water entering from the southwest. Although the hydrogeologic environment of the Raft River geothermal area is very complex and unique, it is typical of many Basin and Range systems.

  7. Green River Lake and Dam interim plan benefits ecosystem By John Hickey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    11 Green River Lake and Dam interim plan benefits ecosystem By John Hickey Hydrologic Engineering that water is released from Green River Dam in Kentucky. In May 2006, the interim plan was approved shown that operation of Green River Dam can be changed in ways that improve ecosystems while continuing

  8. Estimating reservoir parameters from seismic and electromagnetic data using stochastic rock-physics models and Markov chain Monte Carlo methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jinsong

    ) presented a method for quantitative estimation of reservoir parameters (porosity, water saturationEstimating reservoir parameters from seismic and electromagnetic data using stochastic rock Berkeley National Laboratory Summary A Bayesian model is developed to estimate porosity, fluid saturation

  9. Role of snow and glacier melt in controlling river hydrology in Liddar watershed (western Himalaya) under current and future climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeelani, G.; Feddema, Johannes J.; van der Veen, Cornelis J.; Stearns, Leigh

    2012-12-12

    [1] Snowmelt and icemelt are believed to be important regulators of seasonal discharge of Himalayan rivers. To analyze the long term contribution of snowmelt and glacier/icemelt to river hydrology we apply a water budget model to simulate hydrology...

  10. Hot Dry Rock; Geothermal Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1990-01-01

    The commercial utilization of geothermal energy forms the basis of the largest renewable energy industry in the world. More than 5000 Mw of electrical power are currently in production from approximately 210 plants and 10 000 Mw thermal are used in direct use processes. The majority of these systems are located in the well defined geothermal generally associated with crustal plate boundaries or hot spots. The essential requirements of high subsurface temperature with huge volumes of exploitable fluids, coupled to environmental and market factors, limit the choice of suitable sites significantly. The Hot Dry Rock (HDR) concept at any depth originally offered a dream of unlimited expansion for the geothermal industry by relaxing the location constraints by drilling deep enough to reach adequate temperatures. Now, after 20 years intensive work by international teams and expenditures of more than $250 million, it is vital to review the position of HDR in relation to the established geothermal industry. The HDR resource is merely a body of rock at elevated temperatures with insufficient fluids in place to enable the heat to be extracted without the need for injection wells. All of the major field experiments in HDR have shown that the natural fracture systems form the heat transfer surfaces and that it is these fractures that must be for geothermal systems producing from naturally fractured formations provide a basis for directing the forthcoming but, equally, they require accepting significant location constraints on HDR for the time being. This paper presents a model HDR system designed for commercial operations in the UK and uses production data from hydrothermal systems in Japan and the USA to demonstrate the reservoir performance requirements for viable operations. It is shown that these characteristics are not likely to be achieved in host rocks without stimulation processes. However, the long term goal of artificial geothermal systems developed by systematic engineering procedures at depth may still be attained if high temperature sites with extensive fracturing are developed or exploited. [DJE -2005

  11. Big Bang Day : Physics Rocks

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-04-25

    Is particle physics the new rock 'n' roll? The fundamental questions about the nature of the universe that particle physics hopes to answer have attracted the attention of some very high profile and unusual fans. Alan Alda, Ben Miller, Eddie Izzard, Dara O'Briain and John Barrowman all have interests in this branch of physics. Brian Cox - CERN physicist, and former member of 90's band D:Ream, tracks down some very well known celebrity enthusiasts and takes a light-hearted look at why this subject can appeal to all of us.

  12. Post Rock | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII JumpQuarterly SmartDB-2, Blue MountainSchoolPrairiePonder,Abbey SchoolS AOakRock

  13. Final Project Report on Arsenic Biogeochemistry in the Clinch River and Watts Bar Reservoir, Volume 2: Quality Assurance/Quality Control Summary Report for Arsenic Biogeochemistry in the Clinch River and Watts Bar Reservoir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newman, K.A.

    1995-01-01

    Arsenic contamination was studied in the Clinch River/Watts Bar Reservoir (CR/WBR) system downstream from the U.S. Department of Energy's Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). Arsenic is of particular interest and concern because (1) it occurs commonly in coal-bearing rock and waste products such as fly ash associated with the burning of coal, (2) it is classified as a Class A carcinogen by the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency, and (3) disposal of fly ash, both on and off the ORR, may have contaminated surface water and sediments in the Clinch River and Watts Bar Reservoir. The present study differs from previous reports on arsenic concentrations in the CR/WBR system in the use of much more sensitive and precise processing and analytical techniques to measure arsenic species (arsenate, arsenite, and organic arsenic) at levels well below the ecological and human health risk screening criteria. The absolute detection limits using these techniques are approximately 20 to 40 pmol/L, or 0.0015 to 0.003 {micro}g/L. Four main sites were sampled quarterly over a 3-year period (1990 through 1992). Sites investigated included Lower Watts Bar Reservoir near the Watts Bar Dam (Tennessee River kilometer 849.6), the Kingston area (Clinch River kilometer 1.6), Poplar Creek (Poplar Creek kilometer 1.6), and the McCoy Branch Embayment (McCoy Branch kilometer 0.3). Additional sites were investigated in the vicinity of these main stations to determine the distribution of contamination and to identify possible alternative or additional sources of arsenic. Detection limits that were a factor of 20 below the minimum risk screening criteria were achieved for 100% of arsenic speciation data. However, 118 samples for inductively coupled plasma metals analysis were not preserved to analytical specifications, and the analytical holding times for 180 ion chromatography samples were not met. More rigorous preservative testing protocols and more tightly defined analytical statements of work will prevent these problems in the future. Introduction, background, materials and methods, results, discussion, and conclusions are presented in Volume 1. The Quality Assurance/Quality Control Summary Report; the listing of water quality and surface water arsenic speciation data by source and site; and the listing of pore water arsenic speciation and particle-to-water distribution coefficients for As, Fe, and Mn by source, site, and season are presented in Volume 2. The Clinch River Environmental Restoration Program is currently completing the second phase of the Clinch River Remedial Investigation, with the intent of performing a baseline risk assessment on collected data. The data collected for this report will contribute to the baseline risk assessment for the Clinch River. Many of the goals of the Clinch River Remedial Investigation were refined using the results of this study.

  14. Sediment Transport in the Lower Guadalupe and San Antonio Rivers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holley, Edward R.

    1992-01-01

    Texas law requires that fresh water inflows into coastal regions be maintained at adequate levels for an ecologically sound environment; however, very limited data are available on the relation between river flow and sediment transport to coastal...

  15. Idaho Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a Conjunctive Water Resources Planning and Management Model for the Eastern Snake River Plain Basic Information River Plain Project Number: 2012ID178B Start Date: 3/1/2012 End Date: 2/28/2013 Funding Source: 104B services in our river basins; developing a conjunctive planning model for Idaho's most important water

  16. Columbia River Treaty History and 2014/2024 Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-02-01

    The Columbia River, the fourth largest river on the continent as measured by average annual ?ow, generates more power than any other river in North America. While its headwaters originate in British Columbia, only about 15 percent of the 259,500 square miles of the Columbia River Basin is actually located in Canada. Yet the Canadian waters account for about 38 percent of the average annual volume, and up to 50 percent of the peak ?ood waters, that ?ow by The Dalles Dam on the Columbia River between Oregon and Washington. In the 1940s, of?cials from the United States and Canada began a long process to seek a joint solution to the ?ooding caused by the unregulated Columbia River and to the postwar demand for greater energy resources. That effort culminated in the Columbia River Treaty, an international agreement between Canada and the United States for the cooperative development of water resources regulation in the upper Columbia River Basin. It was signed in 1961 and implemented in 1964.

  17. Revisiting Assumptions that Underlie Estimates of Proportional Entrainment of Delta Smelt by State and Federal Water Diversions from the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, William J.

    2011-01-01

    Internet]. Winter 2009. Sacramento (CA): Dept. of WaterKimmerer WJ. 2008. Losses of Sacramento River chinook salmonthe con- fluence of the Sacramento and San Joaquin rivers.

  18. Environmental assessment of remedial action at the slick rock Uranium Mill Tailings sites Slick Rock, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (42 USC {section} 7901 et seq.), hereafter referred to as the UMTRCA, authorized the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to clean up two uranium mill tailings processing sites near Slick Rock, Colorado, in San Miguel County. The purpose of the cleanup is to reduce the potential health effects associated with the radioactive materials remaining on the sites and on vicinity properties (VPs) associated with the sites. Contaminated materials cover an estimated 55 acres of the Union Carbide (UC) processing site and 12 ac of the North Continent (NC) processing site. The total estimated volume of contaminated materials is approximately 61 8,300 cubic yards. In addition to the contamination in the two processing site areas, four VPs were found to contain contamination. As a result of the tailings being exposed to the environment, contamination associated with the UC and NC sites has leached into shallow ground water. Surface water has not been affected. The closest residence is approximately 0.3 air mi from either site. The proposed action is to remediate the UC and NC sites by removing all contaminated materials within the designated site boundaries or otherwise associated with the sites, and relocating them to, and stabilizing them at, a location approximately 5 road mi (8 km) northeast of the sites on land administered by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM). Remediation would be performed by the DOE`s Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. All solid contaminated materials would be buried under 5 feet (ft) of rock and soil materials. The proposed disposal site area is currently used by ranchers for cattle grazing over a 7-month period. The closest residence to the proposed disposal site is 2 air mi. An estimated 44 ac of land would be permanently transferred from the BLM to the DOE and restricted from future use.

  19. Summary of three dimensional pump testing of a fractured rock aquifer in the western Siberian Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nichols, R.L.; Looney, B.B.; Eddy-Dilek, C.A.; Drozhko, E.G.; Glalolenko, Y.V.; Mokrov, Y.G.; Ivanov, I.A.; Glagolev, A.V.; Vasil`kova, N.A.

    1996-10-30

    A group of scientists from the Savannah River Technology Center and Russia successfully completed a 17 day field investigation of a fractured rock aquifer at the MAYAK PA nuclear production facility in Russia. The test site is located in the western Siberian Basin near the floodplain of the Mishelyak river. The fractured rock aquifer is composed of orphyrites, tuff, tuffbreccia and lava and is overlain by 0.5--12 meters of elluvial and alluvial sediments. A network of 3 uncased wells (176, 1/96, and 2/96) was used to conduct the tests. Wells 176 and 2/96 were used as observation wells and the centrally located well 1/96 was used as the pumping well. Six packers were installed and inflated in each of the observation wells at a depth of up to 85 meters. The use of 6 packers in each well resulted in isolating 7 zones for monitoring. The packers were inflated to different pressures to accommodate the increasing hydrostatic pressure. A straddle packer assembly was installed in the pumping well to allow testing of each of the individual zones isolated in the observation wells. A constant rate pumping test was run on each of the 7 zones. The results of the pumping tests are included in Appendix A. The test provided new information about the nature of the fractured rock aquifers in the vicinity of the Mishelyak river and will be key information in understanding the behavior of contaminants originating from process wastes discharged to Lake Karachi. Results from the tests will be analyzed to determine the hydraulic properties of different zones within the fractured rock aquifer and to determine the most cost effective clean-up approach for the site.

  20. Metal pollution of river Msimbazi, Tanzania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ak'habuhaya, J.; Lodenius, M. )

    1988-01-01

    The Misimbazi River in Dar es Salaam is polluted with industrial, urban and agricultural waste waters. A preliminary investigation on the extent of metal pollution (Hg, Cr, Cu, Zn, Fe, Ni, Cd, Mn, Al) was made from samples of sediments and biological indicators. The metal concentrations were in general low, but some of our results indicated industrial pollution.

  1. Rock Classification in Organic Shale Based on Petrophysical and Elastic Rock Properties Calculated from Well Logs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aranibar Fernandez, Alvaro A

    2015-01-05

    Organic Content (TOC), fluid saturation, volumetric concentrations of mineral constituents, and elastic properties facilitated identification of different rock classes, using an unsupervised artificial neural network. A good rock classification technique...

  2. Survey and Control of Synthetic Organics in Texas Water Supplies 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Batchelor, B.; Shannon, J. D.; Yang, P.

    1981-01-01

    Four Texas water supplies (Lake Somerville, Lake Livingston, Neches River, and Sabine River) were surveyed to determine their tendency to form trihalomethanes when chlorinated. The ability of conventional and innovative treatment processes to reduce...

  3. Water Requirements for Future Energy production in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathaye, J.A.

    2011-01-01

    obtained from the New and Alamo waste water. minimal rivers,400,000 acre-ft/yr The New and Alamo rivers Sea. These carrythe requirements. the New and Alamo, the "Mono Lake area

  4. Idaho Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in Idaho's Eastern Snake River Plain in southern Idaho; the impacts that climate change may have on the Snake River Plain's surface & ground water resources in southern Idaho; ; and the sinks for metaloids

  5. Water Resour Manage DOI 10.1007/s11269-012-0214-y

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Halgamuge, Malka N.

    in river navigation (Schuurmans et al. 1997), hydro power generation (Cheng et al. 2008), and water quality

  6. Multifunctional Riverscapes: Stream restoration, Capability Brown's water features, and artificial whitewater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Podolak, Kristen

    2012-01-01

    treatment and improvements in the control of point sources of pollution to the river due to regulations (Federal Water

  7. Multifunctional Riverscapes: Stream restoration, Capability Brown’s water features, and artificial whitewater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Podolak, Kristen

    2012-01-01

    treatment and improvements in the control of point sources of pollution to the river due to regulations (Federal Water

  8. Combining Multicomponent Seismic Attributes, New Rock Physics Models, and In Situ Data to Estimate Gas-Hydrate Concentrations in Deep-Water, Near-Seafloor Strata of the Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bureau of Economic Geology

    2009-04-30

    The Bureau of Economic Geology was contracted to develop technologies that demonstrate the value of multicomponent seismic technology for evaluating deep-water hydrates across the Green Canyon area of the Gulf of Mexico. This report describes the methodologies that were developed to create compressional (P-P) and converted-shear (P-SV) images of near-seafloor geology from four-component ocean-bottom-cable (4C OBC) seismic data and the procedures used to integrate P-P and P-SV seismic attributes with borehole calibration data to estimate hydrate concentration across two study areas spanning 16 and 25 lease blocks (or 144 and 225 square miles), respectively. Approximately 200 km of two-dimensional 4C OBC profiles were processed and analyzed over the course of the 3-year project. The strategies we developed to image near-seafloor geology with 4C OBC data are unique, and the paper describing our methodology was peer-recognized with a Best Paper Award by the Society of Exploration Geophysicists in the first year of the project (2006). Among the valuable research findings demonstrated in this report, the demonstrated ability to image deep-water near-seafloor geology with sub-meter resolution using a standard-frequency (10-200 Hz) air gun array on the sea surface and 4C sensors on the seafloor has been the accomplishment that has received the most accolades from professional peers. Our study found that hydrate is pervasive across the two study areas that were analyzed but exists at low concentrations. Although our joint inversion technique showed that in some limited areas, and in some geologic units across those small areas, hydrates occupied up to 40-percent of the sediment pore space, we found that when hydrate was present, hydrate concentration tended to occupy only 10-percent to 20-percent of the pore volume. We also found that hydrate concentration tended to be greater near the base of the hydrate stability zone than it was within the central part of the stability zone.

  9. Geology of the central part of the James River Valley, Mason County, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dannemiller, George David

    1957-01-01

    ~ ' ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ P LATE I ~ II ' XIII' ILLUSTHATIOJJS GEOLOGIC J"A: AND CROSS SECTIONS GF THF CENTRAL PART OP THE JAMi'S RIVER VALLEY MASON COUNTY, IIJDr~ MAP OP THE CENTRAL PART OP HJ? JAMES RIVER VALLEY, MASON COUNTY, TEXAS ~ "WAGON TRACKS~ IN THE UPPER... VALLEY, RA~OR COURTY, TEXAS ABSTRACT The Central Part of the James River Valley is located ln south-central mason County, southwest of the town of' %aeon, Rock units of Uppex O'brien, Lower Ordovician, and Quaternary age sre found in the area, Ihe...

  10. Manufactured caverns in carbonate rock

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bruce, David A.; Falta, Ronald W.; Castle, James W.; Murdoch, Lawrence C.

    2007-01-02

    Disclosed is a process for manufacturing underground caverns suitable in one embodiment for storage of large volumes of gaseous or liquid materials. The method is an acid dissolution process that can be utilized to form caverns in carbonate rock formations. The caverns can be used to store large quantities of materials near transportation facilities or destination markets. The caverns can be used for storage of materials including fossil fuels, such as natural gas, refined products formed from fossil fuels, or waste materials, such as hazardous waste materials. The caverns can also be utilized for applications involving human access such as recreation or research. The method can also be utilized to form calcium chloride as a by-product of the cavern formation process.

  11. d Onion River Review d river run by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weaver, Adam Lee

    d Onion River Review d 2009 d river run by Eireann Aspell Jamie Gorton Heidi Lynch Matt Serron #12 lives. #12;BLANK Editors' Note There were portents hinting at the Onion River Review's future as early

  12. WAVE GENERATIONS FROM CONFINED EXPLOSIONS IN ROCKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, Sarah T.

    WAVE GENERATIONS FROM CONFINED EXPLOSIONS IN ROCKS C. L. Liu and Thomas J. Ahrens Seismological Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 In order to record P- and S-waves on the interactions between incident P- and SV-waves and free-surfaces of rocks. The relations between particle

  13. Summary - Hot Dry Rock R&D Strategies and Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tennyson, George P..

    1989-03-21

    In geothermal energy technology, the hydrothermal systems rely on volcanic hot rocks being fortuitously co-located with an adequate supply of natural ground water, usually at some considerable depth within the earth. This represents essentially two accidents in the same place, and the occurrence is relatively rare. Yellowstone Park and the desert valley of southern California are the most noteworthy US. examples. Since the heat is the energy needed, if we could just get the water down to it and back. Well, that's what is being done with the hot dry rock program. A well is drilled down to where there is adequate heat in the rocks. The well is then pressurized until the rock fractures creating what amounts to a reservoir full of hot, shattered rock. Finally, a well is drilled into the reservoir and water is pumped in one well, heated by the rock, and taken out through the other well at useful temperatures and pressures. We are getting ready to run significant long-term flow tests at the Fenton Hill Hot Dry Rock site west of Los Alamos, New Mexico. We expect the operational information to provide the data to forecast the energy life of the wells as a production facility. This kind of resource is much more common than regular geothermal resources. Robert H. Hendron described the Long Term Flow Test and reservoir studies for which the project is preparing. A shortfall of available funding has slowed preparations, delaying the start of that test. The test is planning to gather data for more definitive reservoir modeling with energy availability or reservoir lifetime of primary interest. Other interests include geochemistry and tracer studies, microseismic response, water requirements and flow impedance which relates directly to the pumping power required. Progress has been made in modeling studies, chemically reactive tracer techniques, and in improvements in acoustic or microseismic event analysis. Donald W. Brown discussed reservoir modeling as it relates to production management of the HDR well. For wells which are fracture dominated rather than matrix-permeability controlled, a knowledge of the pressure-dependent permeability of the interconnected system of natural joints (or pre-existing fractures is critical to long-term power production from the wells) through optimized pressure management. It was mentioned that a knowledge of the pressure-dependent joint permeability could aid in designing more appropriate secondary recovery strategies in petroleum reservoirs, or reinjection I procedures of geothermal reservoirs. Dr. Bruce A. Robinson discussed the development of fluid flow and transport models for simulation of HDR geothermal reservoirs. These models are also expected to provide accurate predictions of long-term behavior and help in the development of strategies for reservoir improvement and operation. Two approaches were discussed. The discrete fracture approach is based on a random fracture network subject to prescribed statistical properties of the fracture set. It is used to simulate steady state fluid flow and solute transport. The other approach used the continuum approximation. This type of model is appropriate when the reservoir consists of many interconnected fractures, as is the case at Fenton Hill.

  14. The Agricultural Benefits of Salinity Control on the Red River of Texas and Oklahoma 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, D. H.; Lacewell, R. D.; Moore, D. S.

    1980-01-01

    Salinity of the waters from the Red River and its major tributaries has virtually eliminated its use for irrigation of agricultural crops in Texas and Oklahoma. A chloride control project has been proposed whereby the source salt waters...

  15. TVA's Integrated River System

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and controlling floods. So far as may be consistent with such purposes, ...for the generation of electric energy... TVA Power Service Area TVA'S INTEGRATED RIVER SYSTEM | 3...

  16. Large River Floodplains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunne, T; Aalto, RE

    2013-01-01

    River, California. Sedimentology 57, 389–407. http://J. (Eds. ), Fluvial Sedimentology VI. Special PublicationsAnatomy of an avulsion. Sedimentology 36, 1–24. Stallard,

  17. Final project report on arsenic biogeochemistry in the Clinch River and Watts Bar Reservoir: Volume 2, Quality assurance/quality control summary report for arsenic biogeochemistry in the Clinch River and Watts Bar Reservoir. Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newman, K.A.; Ford, C.J.; Byrd, J.T.

    1995-04-01

    Arsenic contamination was studied in the Clinch River/Watts Bar Reservoir (CR/WBR) system downstream from the US Department of Energy`s Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). Arsenic is of particular interest and concern because (1) it occurs commonly in coal-bearing rock and waste products such as fly ash associated with the burning of coal, (2) it is classified as a Class A carcinogen by the US Environmental Protection Agency, and (3) disposal of fly ash, both on and off the ORR, may have contaminated surface water and sediments in the Clinch River and Watts Bar Reservoir. The present study dffers from previous reports on arsenic concentrations in the CR/WBR system in the use of much more sensitive and precise processing and analytical techniques to measure arsenic species (arsenate, arsenite, and organic arsenic) at levels well below the ecological and human health risk screening criteria. The absolute detection limits using these techniques are approximately 20 to 40 pmol/L or 0.0015 to 0.003 {mu}g/L.

  18. BIBLIOGRAPHY Abernethy, C.L. 2001. Financing River Basin Organizations. In Abernethy, C.L. (Ed.)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolf, Aaron

    317 BIBLIOGRAPHY Abernethy, C.L. 2001. Financing River Basin Organizations. In Abernethy, C.L. (Ed.) Intersectoral Management of River Basins. Colombo: International Water Management Institute (IWMI). Africa. 1984: A New Approach to Water Management in the 21st Century. Paris: Réalisation les éditions Textuel

  19. Freeing up Water 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2006-01-01

    Freeing up Water Story by Kathy Wythe Freeing up Water Brush control efforts yield water tx H2O | pg. 15 For 10 years during the 1990s drought, H. R.Wardlaw, a West Texas rancher, watchedand waited. He watched as the Middle Concho River and Rocky... and Water Conservation Board and designed to increase water yield by removing or controlling water-con- suming plants such as mesquite, cedar and saltcedar. In 2004, just as he finished excavating cedar, aerially spraying mesquite and hand spraying...

  20. National Smart Water Grid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beaulieu, R A

    2009-07-13

    The United States repeatedly experiences floods along the Midwest's large rivers and droughts in the arid Western States that cause traumatic environmental conditions with huge economic impact. With an integrated approach and solution these problems can be alleviated. Tapping into the Mississippi River and its tributaries, the world's third largest fresh water river system, during flood events will mitigate the damage of flooding and provide a new source of fresh water to the Western States. The trend of increased flooding on the Midwest's large rivers is supported by a growing body of scientific literature. The Colorado River Basin and the western states are experiencing a protracted multi-year drought. Fresh water can be pumped via pipelines from areas of overabundance/flood to areas of drought or high demand. Calculations document 10 to 60 million acre-feet (maf) of fresh water per flood event can be captured from the Midwest's Rivers and pumped via pipelines to the Colorado River and introduced upstream of Lake Powell, Utah, to destinations near Denver, Colorado, and used in areas along the pipelines. Water users of the Colorado River include the cities in southern Nevada, southern California, northern Arizona, Colorado, Utah, Indian Tribes, and Mexico. The proposed start and end points, and routes of the pipelines are documented, including information on right-of-ways necessary for state and federal permits. A National Smart Water Grid{trademark} (NSWG) Project will create thousands of new jobs for construction, operation, and maintenance and save billions in drought and flood damage reparations tax dollars. The socio-economic benefits of NWSG include decreased flooding in the Midwest; increased agriculture, and recreation and tourism; improved national security, transportation, and fishery and wildlife habitats; mitigated regional climate change and global warming such as increased carbon capture; decreased salinity in Colorado River water crossing the US-Mexico border; and decreased eutrophication (excessive plant growth and decay) in the Gulf of Mexico to name a few. The National Smart Water Grid{trademark} will pay for itself in a single major flood event.

  1. Sorptivity of rocks and soils of the van Genuchten-Mualem type

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zimmerman, R.W.; Bodvarsson, G.S. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1991-06-01

    One hydrological process that will have great relevance to the performance of the proposed underground radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, is that of the absorption of water from a water-filled fracture into the adjacent unsaturated rock formation. The rate at which water is imbibed by a rock depends on the hydrological properties of the rock and on the initial saturation (or initial capillary suction) of the formation. The hydrological properties that affect imbibition are the relative permeability function and the capillary pressure function. These functions are often collectively referred to as the `characteristic functions` of the porous medium. For one-dimensional absorption, it can be shown that, regardless of the details of the characteristic functions, the total amount of water imbibed by the formation, per unit surface area, will be proportional to the square root of the elapsed time. Hence the ability of a rock or soil to imbibe water can be quantified by a parameter known as the sorptivity S, which is defined such that the cumulative volumetric liquid influx per unit area is given by Q = S{radical}t. The paper discusses the simplification of these characteristic functions of porous medium.

  2. Fluid-rock interaction: A reactive transport approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steefel, C.

    2009-01-01

    to coupled mass transport and fluid-rock interaction in aof a reactive transport approach in fluid-rock interaction,reactive transport models for fluid-rock interaction. Case

  3. The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    The Environmental Monitoring Section of the Environmental and Health Protection (EHP) Department administers the Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program. During fourth quarter 1989 (October--December), EHP conducted routine sampling of monitoring wells and drinking water locations. EHP collected the drinking water samples from Savannah River Site (SRS) drinking water systems supplied by wells. EHP established two sets of flagging criteria in 1986 to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. An explanation of flagging criteria for the fourth quarter is presented in the Flagging Criteria section of this document. All analytical results from fourth quarter 1989 are listed in this report, which is distributed to all waste-site custodians.

  4. Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/ColoradoRemsenburg-Speonk, NewMichigan: Energy Resources JumpMtSampling Jump

  5. Rock-Water Interactions in the Fenton Hill, New Mexico, Hot Dry Rock

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/ColoradoRemsenburg-Speonk, NewMichigan: Energy Resources JumpMtSampling JumpGeothermal

  6. Rock-Water Interactions in the Fenton Hill, New Mexico, Hot Dry Rock

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/ColoradoRemsenburg-Speonk, NewMichigan: Energy Resources JumpMtSampling

  7. The Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta: The Evolution and Implementation of Water Policy: An Historical Perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, W. Turrentine; Paterson, Alan M

    1977-01-01

    1929, in Schedler Files. Sacramento 8ee, January 6, 1930. "Below Confluence of Sacramento and San Joaguin Rivers, 1932,Division of Water Resources, Sacramento-San Joaquin Water

  8. Water Resources: Hydraulics and Hydrology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Water Resources: Hydraulics and Hydrology Interview with Margaret S. Petersen #12;This manuscript of History, Headquarters, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Alexandria, Virginia. MARGARET So PETERSEN WATER civilian and military engineers studied the behavior of rivers and the motion of water. They investigated

  9. Regional Geology: GIS Database for Alternative Host Rocks and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    three alternative geologic host rocks for mined repositories (granitic crystalline, salt, and clay shale) and crystalline basement rock for deep borehole disposal. This...

  10. Rock Physics of Geologic Carbon Sequestration/Storage Dvorkin...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Rock Physics of Geologic Carbon SequestrationStorage Dvorkin, Jack; Mavko, Gary 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 58 GEOSCIENCES This report covers the results of developing the rock...

  11. Fundamental Research on Percussion Drilling: Improved rock mechanics

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    full-scale laboratory investigations Michael S. Bruno 58 GEOSCIENCES; 02 PETROLEUM; 03 NATURAL GAS; ROCK DRILLING; PRESSURE DEPENDENCE; ROCK MECHANICS; ROTARY DRILLING; WELL...

  12. Biological surveys on the Savannah River in the vicinity of the Savannah River Plant (1951-1976)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthews, R. A.

    1982-04-01

    In 1951, the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia was contracted by the Savannah River Plant to initiate a long-term monitoring program in the Savannah River. The purpose of this program was to determine the effect of the Savannah River Plant on the Savannah River aquatic ecosystem. The data from this monitoring program have been computerized by the Savannah River Laboratory, and are summarized in this report. During the period from 1951-1976, 16 major surveys were conducted by the Academy in the Savannah River. Water chemistry analyses were made, and all major biological communities were sampled qualitatively during the spring and fall of each survey year. In addition, quantitative diatom data have been collected quarterly since 1953. Major changes in the Savannah River basin, in the Savannah River Plant's activities, and in the Academy sampling patterns are discussed to provide a historical overview of the biomonitoring program. Appendices include a complete taxonomic listing of species collected from the Savannah River, and summaries of the entire biological and physicochemical data base.

  13. A Living Mediterranean River: Restoration and Management of the Rio Real in Portugal to Achieve Good Ecological Condition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Natali, Jennifer; Kondolf, G. Mathias; Landeiro, Clara; Christian-Smith, Juliet; Grantham, Ted

    2009-01-01

    connected to water supply and sewer systems, but only 14% ofthe artificial inputs from sewer outfalls keep river bedsand flow towards streams. SEWER PIPES LANDFILL ROADS SEPTIC

  14. HUDSON RIVER ALMANAC for OCTOBER 14, 2010 A DAY IN THE LIFE OF THE HUDSON RIVER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lance, Veronica P.

    at Upper Works Trailhead - Doug Reed, Hudson Basin River Watch Hudson Shores Park, Green Island, HRM 153 in and many had wet feet, all enjoyed the day. - Kate Perry, Robert C. Parker School Schodack Island, HRM 133 - 1 - #12;Lasher Memorial Park, Germantown, HRM 105: With morning mist rising off the water, 30 Hudson

  15. THE BULL RUN RIVER-RESERVOIR SYSTEM MODEL Robert L. Annear, Research Assistant, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Portland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wells, Scott A.

    1 THE BULL RUN RIVER-RESERVOIR SYSTEM MODEL Robert L. Annear, Research Assistant, Civil selective withdrawal operations from historical patterns. INTRODUCTION The Bull Run River-Reservoir system from Reservoir #2 into the Lower Bull Run River during the summer months. Water temperatures

  16. Onion River OnionRiverReview2011dd

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weaver, Adam Lee

    2011 d river run by Lauren Fish Heather Lessard Jenna McCarthy Philip Noonan Erica Sabelawski #12;TheOnion River Review OnionRiverReview2011dd 2011 Our Lives in Dance Alex Dugas We were born with bare. Then we tap-danced on our graves, and back through the womb again, shoeless. #12;d Onion River Review d

  17. d Onion River Review d river run by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weaver, Adam Lee

    d Onion River Review d 2013 d river run by Alex Dugas Sarah Fraser Bryan Hickey Nick Lemon Diana Marchessault Mickey O'Neill Amy Wilson #12;#12;Editors' Note For this edition of the Onion River Review, we are finally able to present to you this year's edition of the Onion River Review: our love child, our shining

  18. Electrical conductivity of minerals and rocks Shun-ichiro Karato1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Electrical conductivity of minerals and rocks Shun-ichiro Karato1 and Duojun Wang1,2 1 : Yale-Blackwell #12;2 SUMMARY Electrical conductivity of most minerals is sensitive to hydrogen (water) content, temperature, major element chemistry and oxygen fugacity. The influence of these parameters on electrical

  19. The Use of WBM to Improve ROP in HTHP/Hard Rock Environments 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kraussman, Andrew

    2012-07-16

    experimental research is needed to confirm or disprove this theory. At this time the actual cause of this behavior is unknown, however the trend has been established showing water base drilling fluids performance versus oil base in the HTHP/hard rock...

  20. Development of connected permeability in massive crystalline rocks through hydraulic fracture propagation and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    at targeted depths for enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) applications, that is, >3 km. Therefore, fluid water, oil, and gas. In massive crystalline rocks, often favored for enhanced geothermal system (EGS- standing of permeability and its enhancement is required. This paper reports findings from a series

  1. Rock mechanics design in mining and tunneling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bieniawski, Z.T.

    1984-01-01

    This book introduces the design process as applied to rock mechanics aspects of underground mining and tunneling. Topics covered include a historical perspective, the design process in engineering, empirical methods of design, observational methods of design, and guided design.

  2. First Rocks from Outside the Solar System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Westphal, Andrew

    2014-10-17

    Andrew Westphal presents his findings in examining the first rocks from outside the solar system at our '8 Big Ideas' Science at the Theater event on October 8th, 2014, in Oakland, California.

  3. Rock Slopes from Mechanics to Decision Making

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Einstein, Herbert H.

    Rock slope instabilities are discussed in the context of decision making for risk assessment and management. Hence, the state of the slope and possible failure mechanism need to be defined first. This is done with geometrical ...

  4. Water Power for a Clean Energy Future (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-07-01

    Water power technologies harness energy from rivers and oceans to generate electricity for the nation's homes and businesses, and can help the United States meet its pressing energy, environmental, and economic challenges. Water power technologies; fall into two broad categories: conventional hydropower and marine and hydrokinetic technologies. Conventional hydropower uses dams or impoundments to store river water in a reservoir. Marine and hydrokinetic technologies capture energy from waves, tides, ocean currents, free-flowing rivers, streams, and ocean thermal gradients.

  5. SOIL MOISTURE CHARACTERISTICS IN UPPER PART OF HINDON RIVER CATCHMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, C.P.

    1 SOIL MOISTURE CHARACTERISTICS IN UPPER PART OF HINDON RIVER CATCHMENT C. P. Kumar* Vijay Kumar** Vivekanand Singh*** ABSTRACT Knowledge of the physics of soil water movement is crucial to the solution for estimating the soil hydraulic properties are required for prediction of soil water flow. This paper presents

  6. ACOUSTICAL IMAGING AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF SOFT ROCK AND MARINE SEDIMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thurman E. Scott, Jr.; Younane Abousleiman

    2004-04-01

    The research during this project has concentrated on developing a correlation between rock deformation mechanisms and their acoustic velocity signature. This has included investigating: (1) the acoustic signature of drained and undrained unconsolidated sands, (2) the acoustic emission signature of deforming high porosity rocks (in comparison to their low porosity high strength counterparts), (3) the effects of deformation on anisotropic elastic and poroelastic moduli, and (4) the acoustic tomographic imaging of damage development in rocks. Each of these four areas involve triaxial experimental testing of weak porous rocks or unconsolidated sand and involves measuring acoustic properties. The research is directed at determining the seismic velocity signature of damaged rocks so that 3-D or 4-D seismic imaging can be utilized to image rock damage. These four areas of study are described in the report: (1) Triaxial compression experiments have been conducted on unconsolidated Oil Creek sand at high confining pressures. (2) Initial experiments on measuring the acoustic emission activity from deforming high porosity Danian chalk were accomplished and these indicate that the AE activity was of a very low amplitude. (3) A series of triaxial compression experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of induced stress on the anisotropy developed in dynamic elastic and poroelastic parameters in rocks. (4) Tomographic acoustic imaging was utilized to image the internal damage in a deforming porous limestone sample. Results indicate that the deformation damage in rocks induced during laboratory experimentation can be imaged tomographically in the laboratory. By extension the results also indicate that 4-D seismic imaging of a reservoir may become a powerful tool for imaging reservoir deformation (including imaging compaction and subsidence) and for imaging zones where drilling operation may encounter hazardous shallow water flows.

  7. Stress-induced transverse isotropy in rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwartz, L.M.; Murphy, W.F. III [Schlumberger-Doll Research Center, Ridgefield, CT (United States); Berryman, J.G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-03-28

    The application of uniaxial pressure can induce elastic anisotropy in otherwise isotropic rock. We consider models based on two very different rock classes, granites and weakly consolidated granular systems. We show that these models share common underlying assumptions, that they lead to similar qualitative behavior, and that both provide a microscopic basis for elliptical anisotropy. In the granular case, we make experimentally verifiable predictions regarding the horizontally propagating modes based on the measured behavior of the vertical modes.

  8. EGS rock reactions with Supercritical CO2 saturated with water...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    CO2 as a working fluid. less Authors: Earl D. Mattson ; Travis L. McLing ; William Smith ; Carl Palmer Publication Date: 2013-02-01 OSTI Identifier: 1076541 Report Number(s):...

  9. Reining in drought : how water limits influence conservation in Massachusetts towns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Anna L. (Anna Libby)

    2006-01-01

    It's surprising to learn that the water-rich state of Massachusetts experiences incidences of water stress, where rivers go dry for stretches of the year and where municipalities struggle to meet water demand. Water ...

  10. GPS precipitable water measurements used in the analysis of California and Nevada climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Means, James Douglas

    2011-01-01

    Remote-Sensing Of Atmospheric Water-Vapor Using The GlobalWet Delays Onto Precipitable Water, Journal of AppliedRivers, Floods and the Water Resources of California, Water,

  11. Running the rivers: Scientists say 2011 drought showed importance of environmental flows regulations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Leslie

    2012-01-01

    stream_source_info Running the rivers.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 10306 Content-Encoding windows-1252 stream_name Running the rivers.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=windows-1252 Summer... 2012 tx H2O 19 ] Story by Leslie Lee Running the rivers Carrying water so precious it has been called liquid gold, the ?? major rivers in Texas ?ow past pastures and cities, factories and suburbs. ?ese waters have endured the we?est and driest...

  12. Rules of the River

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anonymous,

    1980-01-01

    't overexert. Be careful of sunburn, heat exhaustion and heat stroke. ? Leave car keys hidden at launch point or take-out (with shuttle cars), or firmly attach them to an article of clothing on your person with a strong safety pin. Don't leave valuables... are organized into four parts: ? Planning Your River Trip ? Selecting Your Equipment ? Rules of Safety ? Rules of Conduct When put into practice, these "Rules of the River" may turn an uncomfortable river trip into a lasting and special experience. Read...

  13. Valuing the Environmental Benefits of Urban Water Conservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coughlin, Katie M.; Bolduc, Chris A.; Chan, Peter T.; Dunham-Whitehead, C.; Van Buskirk, R.D.

    2008-01-01

    default ecological impact and environmental value estimates.Bass stream/river environmental impact factors by HR. . .Water Savings . 4.3 Environmental Impacts 4.4 Environmental

  14. Chemical and light-stable isotope characteristics of waters from...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Chemical and light-stable isotope characteristics of waters from the raft river geothermal area and environs, Cassia County, Idaho, Box Elder county, Utah Jump to: navigation,...

  15. Hydrologic Impacts of Saltcedar Control Along a Regulated Dryland River 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Alyson Kay

    2012-02-14

    hydrology is an under-developed discipline (Tooth, 2000). At present, much of our understanding of river systems comes from studies in humid regions (Nanson et al., 2002). Transferring these concepts to arid regions is complicated at best, primarily... and prevalence of drought in arid regions has led to damming of some rivers to provide a consistent supply of water for municipalities and irrigation. Flow regulation has a variety of downstream effects such as disconnection of channels from floodplains...

  16. Characterization of rock for constraining reservoir scale tomography at the Geysers geothermal field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boitnott, G.N.; Bonner, B.P.

    1994-01-20

    A suite of laboratory measurements are being conducted on Geysers graywacke recovered from a drilled depth of 2599 meters in NEGU-17. The tests are being conducted to characterize the effect of pressure and fluid saturation on the seismic properties of the graywacke matrix. The measurements indicate that the graywacke is an unusual rock in many respects. Both compressional and shear velocities exhibit relatively little change with pressure. Water saturation causes a slight increase in the compressional velocity, quantitatively consistent with predictions from the Biot-Gassmann equations. Shear velocity decreases with water saturation by an amount greater than that predicted by the Biot-Gassmann equations. This decrease is attributed to chemomechanical weakening caused by the presence of water. Measurements of Q, from torsion experiments on room dry samples at seismic frequencies indicate unusually high Q, (~500). Water saturation decreases the shear modulus by 12 percent, again indicative of chemomechanical weakening. Q, is lower for the water saturated condition, but still relatively high for rock at low stress. Results of ultrasonic pulse propagation experiments on partially saturated samples are typical of low porosity rocks, being characterized by a monotonic decrease in compressional and shear velocity with decrease in saturation. An increase in shear velocity and low frequency shear modulus after vacuum drying indicates the presence of chemo-mechanical weakening resulting from the presence of small amounts of water.

  17. A Review of the 2011 Water Year in Colorado

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    JUN JUL AUG SEP Discharge,(1000CFS) Cache La Poudre River at Mouth of Canyon Mean Discharge 2011 NOV DEC JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUG SEP Discharge(1000CFS) Colorado River near Dotsero, CO 2011 Discharge,(1000CFS) Animas River at Durango, CO 2011 Discharge Mean Discharge Water Year 2011 Daily

  18. Idaho Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    contamination in lakes; methods to improve the estimates of key components of the Snake River Plain's hydrology; and linkage between Idaho's energy and water infrastructure in the Snake River. Research Program Introduction the designated Bunker Hill Mining and Metallurgical Superfund Site, contaminating the CDA River and CDA Lake

  19. An experimental investigation of leading edge vortical flow about a delta wing during wing rock 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nelson, Michael Denis

    1991-01-01

    moment coefficient in water and wind tunnel. , Fig. 4 Wing rock time history for et=40' (No initial breakdown). . . . . . , , , Fig, 5 Spanwise and normal vortex positions at x/c = 0. 95 (et=30'). . . . . . . Fig. 6 Free-to-roll test apparatus. Fig. 7... G 2 4 6 2 10 12 14 16 18 2G T)HE (aac. ) Fig. 4 Wing rock time history for a=40' (No initial breakdown). ' 5 quantified with respect to roll angle at the 95% chord station of the modeL Their model was mounted on a free-to-roll air bearing...

  20. Environmental assessment of remedial action at the Slick Rock uranium mill tailings sites, Slick Rock, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-01-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978, hereafter referred to as the UMTRCA, authorized the US Department of Energy (DOE) to clean up two uranium mill tailings processing sites near Slick Rock, Colorado, in San Miguel County. The purpose of the cleanup is to reduce the potential health effects associated with the radioactive materials remaining on the processing sites and on vicinity properties (VPs) associated with the sites. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) promulgated standards for the UMTRCA that contained measures to control the contaminated materials and to protect the ground water from further degradation. The sites contain concrete foundations of mill buildings, tailings piles, and areas contaminated by windblown and waterborne radioactive tailings materials. The proposed action is to remediate the UC and NC sites by removing all contaminated materials within the designated site boundaries or otherwise associated with the sites, and relocating them to, and stabilizing them at, a location approximately 5 road mi (8 km) northeast of the processing sites on land administered by the US Bureau of Land Management (BLM). Remediation would be performed by the DOE`s Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project.

  1. Pecos River Watershed Protection Plan Update 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gregory, L.; Hauck, L.; Blumenthal, B.; Brown, M.; Porter, A.

    2013-01-01

    not helped salinity conditions in the watershed as much lower than normal levels of fresh rainwater and snowmelt have entered the watershed. Despite adverse conditions, the need to reduce salinity levels in the river persists as the water quality needs... of constructing and operating a salt harvesting facility. When completed, the brine evaporation system will consist of four 20-acre holding ponds located 3 miles north of the well, a fiberglass distribution tank and approximately 3 miles of pipeline...

  2. Savannah River Site Waste Disposition Project

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Terrel J. Spears Assistant Manager Waste Disposition Project DOE Savannah River Operations Office Savannah River Site Savannah River Site Waste Disposition Project Waste...

  3. 108 CHIH-KAI YANG AND CHUNG-KEE YEHInternational Agricultural Engineering Journal 2009, 18(1-2):1-13 HYDROLOGIC EVALUATION OF THE LOWER MEKONG RIVER BASIN WITH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) is the land area that includes the streams and rivers that run into the Mekong River. The headwaters commence(1-2):1-13 HYDROLOGIC EVALUATION OF THE LOWER MEKONG RIVER BASIN WITH THE SOIL AND WATER ASSESSMENT TOOL MODEL C. G, Texas A&M University, 77843-2120, USA 3 Mekong River Commission Secretariat, Vientiane, Lao PDR 4

  4. First Western Forum on Energy & Water Sustainability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keller, Arturo A.

    (1987 - 1998) ...Leads to Subsidence in the Central City #12;Colorado River Water Renewable GroundwaterFirst Western Forum on Energy & Water Sustainability March 22, 2007 WATER PLAN: 2000-2050 CITY Provide Service Which Meets Our Customers' Expectations Maximize Use of Renewable Water Supplies Achieve

  5. New York State Water Resources Institute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    New York State Water Resources Institute Prioritizing Culverts and Dams in the Hudson River Estuary Program New York State Department of Environmental Conservation in cooperation with Cornell University NYS Water Resources Institute New York State Water Resources Institute New York State Water Resources

  6. The effect of raft removal and dam construction on the lower Colorado River, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartopo

    1991-01-01

    of these reservoirs were constructed for water conservation, flood control, municipal, industrial, irrigation, hydroelectric and recreational purposes (U. S. Army Corps of Fngineers, 1988). The development of water resources in the Colorado River Basin... and ranches in the Colorado River Basin. These ponds are used for farm and domestic water supplies, the proper management of grass lands, and also for the prevention of soil erosion. These minor reservoirs have total capacity of 203, 400 acre-ft (Board...

  7. Significant development pressure currently affects the flows of the Verde River. In order to protect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, Noah

    - informed water management. To understand conse- quences to the ecosystem of various water use scenari- os surface water flows required to support the Verde River ecosystem. The Ecosystem Flows ap- proach used the information needed to define rela- tionships between water supply conditions and the biological system

  8. Cover image: Atmospheric rivers are long and concentrated bands of water vapor originating from the tropics that often result in precipitation extremes and flooding when they hit land. Pictured is a model representation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    shows an atmospheric river heading for the U.S. West Coast, transporting abundant moisture from in 2014. We're proud of their impact on science and on some of the most important challenges in energy--in part via development and use of new computational and imaging approaches. Molecular-level discoveries

  9. Ecology of the river dolphin, Inia geoffrensis, in the Cinaruco River, Venezuela 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGuire, Tamara Lee

    1995-01-01

    The Cinaruco River is a tributary of the Orinoco River, and forms the southern boundary of Venezuela's newest national park, Santos Luzardo. Like other rivers of this region, the Cinaruco River undergoes an extreme seasonal flood cycle. River...

  10. Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Island Water Resources Center supported one research project; MTBE Drinking Water Contamination Aquifer. The MTBE contamination problem in Pascoag, which contaminated the only public drinking water well hydrocarbons present within the Pascoag fractured rock aquifer. This contamination site will become a one

  11. Wind River Watershed Restoration: 1999 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Connolly, Patrick J.

    2001-09-01

    This document represents work conducted as part of the Wind River Watershed Restoration Project during its first year of funding through the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The project is a comprehensive effort involving public and private entities seeking to restore water quality and fishery resources in the basin through cooperative actions. Project elements include coordination, watershed assessment, restoration, monitoring, and education. Entities involved with implementing project components are the Underwood Conservation District (UCD), USDA Forest Service (USFS), U.S. Geological Survey--Columbia River Research Lab (USGS-CRRL), and WA Department of Fish & Wildlife (WDFW). Following categories given in the FY1999 Statement of Work, the broad categories, the related objectives, and the entities associated with each objective (lead entity in boldface) were as follows: Coordination--Objective 1: Coordinate the Wind River watershed Action Committee (AC) and Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) to develop a prioritized list of watershed enhancement projects. Monitoring--Objective 2: Monitor natural production of juvenile, smolt, and adult steelhead in the Wind River subbasin. Objective 3: Evaluate physical habitat conditions in the Wind River subbasin. Assessment--Objective 4: Assess watershed health using an ecosystem-based diagnostic model that will provide the technical basis to prioritize out-year restoration projects. Restoration--Objective 5: Reduce road related sediment sources by reducing road densities to less than 2 miles per square mile. Objective 6: Rehabilitate riparian corridors, flood plains, and channel morphology to reduce maximum water temperatures to less than 61 F, to increase bank stability to greater than 90%, to reduce bankfull width to depth ratios to less than 30, and to provide natural levels of pools and cover for fish. Objective 7: Maintain and evaluate passage for adult and juvenile steelhead at artificial barriers. Education--Objective 8: Promote watershed stewardship among students, the community, private landowners, and local governments. Progress towards six of eight of these objectives is described within nine separate reports included in a four-volume document.

  12. Thinking outside the channel: Modeling nitrogen cycling in networked river ecosystems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Helton, Ashley; Poole, Geoffrey C.; Meyer, Judy; Wollheim, Wilfred; Peterson, Bruce; Mulholland, Patrick J; Bernhardt, Emily; Stanford, Jack; Arango, Clay; Ashkenas, Linda; Cooper, Lee W; Dodds, Walter; Gregory, Stanley; Hall, Robert; Hamilton, Stephen; Johnson, Sherri; McDowell, William; Potter, Jody; Tank, Jennifer; Thomas, Suzanne; Valett, H. Maurice; Webster, Jackson; Zeglin, Lydia

    2011-01-01

    Agricultural and urban development alters nitrogen and other biogeochemical cycles in rivers worldwide. Because such biogeochemical processes cannot be measured empirically across whole river networks, simulation models are critical tools for understanding river-network biogeochemistry. However, limitations inherent in current models restrict our ability to simulate biogeochemical dynamics among diverse river networks. We illustrate these limitations using a river-network model to scale up in situ measures of nitrogen cycling in eight catchments spanning various geophysical and land-use conditions. Our model results provide evidence that catchment characteristics typically excluded from models may control river-network biogeochemistry. Based on our findings, we identify important components of a revised strategy for simulating biogeochemical dynamics in river networks, including approaches to modeling terrestrial-aquatic linkages, hydrologic exchanges between the channel, floodplain/riparian complex, and subsurface waters, and interactions between coupled biogeochemical cycles.

  13. Reservoir characterization of the Ordovician Red River Formation in southwest Williston Basin Bowman County, ND and Harding County, SD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sippel, M.A.; Luff, K.D.; Hendricks, M.L.; Eby, D.E.

    1998-07-01

    This topical report is a compilation of characterizations by different disciplines of the Red River Formation in the southwest portion of the Williston Basin and the oil reservoirs which it contains in an area which straddles the state line between North Dakota and South Dakota. Goals of the report are to increase understanding of the reservoir rocks, oil-in-place, heterogeneity, and methods for improved recovery. The report is divided by discipline into five major sections: (1) geology, (2) petrography-petrophysical, (3) engineering, (4) case studies and (5) geophysical. Interwoven in these sections are results from demonstration wells which were drilled or selected for special testing to evaluate important concepts for field development and enhanced recovery. The Red River study area has been successfully explored with two-dimensional (2D) seismic. Improved reservoir characterization utilizing 3-dimensional (3D) and has been investigated for identification of structural and stratigraphic reservoir compartments. These seismic characterization tools are integrated with geological and engineering studies. Targeted drilling from predictions using 3D seismic for porosity development were successful in developing significant reserves at close distances to old wells. Short-lateral and horizontal drilling technologies were tested for improved completion efficiency. Lateral completions should improve economics for both primary and secondary recovery where low permeability is a problem and higher density drilling is limited by drilling cost. Low water injectivity and widely spaced wells have restricted the application of waterflooding in the past. Water injection tests were performed in both a vertical and a horizontal well. Data from these tests were used to predict long-term injection and oil recovery.

  14. Multiscale heterogeneity characterization of tidal channel, tidal delta and foreshore facies, Almond Formation outcrops, Rock Springs uplift, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schatzinger, R.A.; Tomutsa, L.

    1997-08-01

    In order to accurately predict fluid flow within a reservoir, variability in the rock properties at all scales relevant to the specific depositional environment needs to be taken into account. The present work describes rock variability at scales from hundreds of meters (facies level) to millimeters (laminae) based on outcrop studies of the Almond Formation. Tidal channel, tidal delta and foreshore facies were sampled on the eastern flank of the Rock Springs uplift, southeast of Rock Springs, Wyoming. The Almond Fm. was deposited as part of a mesotidal Upper Cretaceous transgressive systems tract within the greater Green River Basin. Bedding style, lithology, lateral extent of beds of bedsets, bed thickness, amount and distribution of depositional clay matrix, bioturbation and grain sorting provide controls on sandstone properties that may vary more than an order of magnitude within and between depositional facies in outcrops of the Almond Formation. These features can be mapped on the scale of an outcrop. The products of diagenesis such as the relative timing of carbonate cement, scale of cemented zones, continuity of cemented zones, selectively leached framework grains, lateral variability of compaction of sedimentary rock fragments, and the resultant pore structure play an equally important, although less predictable role in determining rock property heterogeneity. A knowledge of the spatial distribution of the products of diagenesis such as calcite cement or compaction is critical to modeling variation even within a single facies in the Almond Fin. because diagenesis can enhance or reduce primary (depositional) rock property heterogeneity. Application of outcrop heterogeneity models to the subsurface is greatly hindered by differences in diagenesis between the two settings. The measurements upon which this study is based were performed both on drilled outcrop plugs and on blocks.

  15. Alkali Soils, Irrigation Waters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

    1910-01-01

    ............................................................................ Chloride of soda.. 101 This is an escellcnt water. WATER OF COLORADO RIVER, NEAB SEARON, TEXAS. TPater soluble solids, 1.245 parts per million. MISCELLANEOUS WATERS. The follomirlg ai~alyses give the amount of alkaline salts pre IRIETGITTON WATERS.- S....4LTS IN PARTS PER MILLION . Alkaline Alkaline Alkaline Carbonate Sulphate Chloride I I i 1. 895 ' 1. 558 180 21 112 302 ' 1. 964 703 775 6. 237 F . 934 . 2. 909 635 2. 124 1. 785 951 523 150 1. 788 1. 947 4. 031 1. 698 201...

  16. Potential petroleum source rock deposition in the middle Cretaceous Wasia Formation, Rub'Al Khali, Saudi Arabia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newell, K.D.; Hennington, R.D.

    1983-03-01

    Stratigraphic correlation and regional geochemical sampling in the Rub'Al Khali (The Empty Quarter) of Saudi Arabia indicate at least two potential petroleum source rock units occur in the middle Cretaceous Wasia Formation. These two sequences, informally named the Safaniya ''source rock'' and the lower Mishrif, are dominated by oil-prone amorphous (Type II) organic matter, in places in excess of 10 weight percent organic carbon. Both units are fine-grained pelagic lime mudstones which were probably deposited in relatively quiet anoxic waters of large intraplatform embayments or basins. The Safaniya ''source rock'' and the lower Mishrif reflect strong marine transgressions on the Arabian craton in Albian to Cenomanian and Cenomanian to Turonian time, respectively. Regressive-phase sedimentary rocks overlying these two transgressive organic-rock phases are generally poor in organic carbon despite being deposited, in part, in similar forereef open-marine depositional settings. The sealevel high-stands associated with the Safaniya ''source rock'' and the lower Mishrif are partly synchronous with two recently described ''oceanic anoxic events'' respectively occurring in late Barremian to late Albian time and late Cenomanian to early Turonian time. Although there is a credible time correlation of these organic-rock units with oceanic anoxic events, their connection to oceanic anoxic events could be strengthened if they could be traced out to the vicinity of the middle Cretaceous continental margin.

  17. Rock melting tool with annealer section

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bussod, Gilles Y. (Santa Fe, NM); Dick, Aaron J. (Oakland, CA); Cort, George E. (Montrose, CO)

    1998-01-01

    A rock melting penetrator is provided with an afterbody that rapidly cools a molten geological structure formed around the melting tip of the penetrator to the glass transition temperature for the surrounding molten glass-like material. An annealing afterbody then cools the glass slowly from the glass transition temperature through the annealing temperature range to form a solid self-supporting glass casing. This allows thermally induced strains to relax by viscous deformations as the molten glass cools and prevents fracturing of the resulting glass liner. The quality of the glass lining is improved, along with its ability to provide a rigid impermeable casing in unstable rock formations.

  18. Water Body Temperature Model for Assessing Climate Change Impacts on Thermal Cooling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strzepek, K.

    We develop and test a physically based semi-Lagrangian water body temperature model to apply climatological data and thermal pollution from river-based power plants to historical river flow data in order to better understand ...

  19. Irrigation Depletions 1928-1989 : 1990 Level of Irrigation, Snake Yakima and Deschutes River Basins.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administation; A.G. Crook Company

    1993-07-01

    The vast amount of irrigation in relation to the available water and extensive system of reservoirs located in the Snake River Basin above Brownlee reservoir precludes this area from using methods such as Blaney-Criddle for estimating irrigation depletions. Also the hydrology, irrigation growth patterns, and water supply problems are unique and complex. Therefore regulation studies were utilized to reflect the net effect on streamflow of the changes in irrigated acreage in terms of corresponding changes in storage regulation and in the amount of water depleted and diverted from and returned to the river system. The regulation study for 1990 conditions was conducted by the Idaho Department of Water Resources. The end product of the basin simulation is 61 years of regulated flows at various points in the river system that are based on 1990 conditions. Data used by the Idaho Department of Water Resources is presented in this section and includes natural gains to the river system and diversions from the river system based on a 1990 level of development and operation criteria. Additional information can be obtained for an Idaho Department of Water Resources Open-File Report ``Stream Flows in the Snake River Basin 1989 Conditions of Use and Management`` dated June 1991. Similar considerations apply to the Yakima and Deschutes river basins.

  20. Actualistic and Geochemical Modeling of Reservoir Rock, CO2 and Formation Fluid Interaction, Citronelle Oil Field, Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weislogel, Amy

    2014-01-31

    This report includes description of the Citronelle field study area and the work carried out in the project to characterize the geology and composition of reservoir rock material and to collect an analyze the geochemical composition of produced fluid waters from the Citronelle field. Reservoir rock samples collected from well bore core were made into thin-sections and assessed for textural properties, including pore types and porosity distribution. Compositional framework grain modal data were collected via point-counting, and grain and cement mineralogy was assessed using SEM-EDS. Geochemistry of fluid samples is described and modeled using PHREEQC. Composition of rock and produced fluids were used as inputs for TOUGHREACT reactive transport modeling, which determined the rock-fluid system was in disequilibrium.

  1. d Onion River Review d river run by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weaver, Adam Lee

    d Onion River Review d 2012 d river run by Alex Dugas Lauren Fish Heather Lessard Jenna Mc jokes. Together these things helped shape the 2012 edition of the Onion River Review. A worthwhile departing on an adventure, you simply have no idea what will happen or who you will meet. You may run

  2. Kootenai River Resident Fish Assessment, FY2008 KTOI Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holderman, Charles

    2009-06-26

    The overarching goal of project 1994-049-00 is to recover a productive, healthy and biologically diverse Kootenai River ecosystem, with emphasis on native fish species rehabilitation. It is especially designed to aid the recovery of important fish stocks, i.e. white sturgeon, burbot, bull trout, kokanee and several other salmonids important to the Kootenai Tribe of Idaho and regional sport-fisheries. The objectives of the project have been to address factors limiting key fish species within an ecosystem perspective. Major objectives include: establishment of a comprehensive and thorough biomonitoring program, investigate ecosystem--level in-river productivity, test the feasibility of a large-scale Kootenai River nutrient addition experiment (completed), to evaluate and rehabilitate key Kootenai River tributaries important to the health of the lower Kootenai River ecosystem, to provide funding for Canadian implementation of nutrient addition and monitoring in the Kootenai River ecosystem (Kootenay Lake) due to lost system productivity created by construction and operation of Libby Dam, mitigate the cost of monitoring nutrient additions in Arrow Lakes due to lost system productivity created by the Libby-Arrow water swap, provide written summaries of all research and activities of the project, and, hold a yearly workshop to convene with other agencies and institutions to discuss management, research, and monitoring strategies for this project and to provide a forum to coordinate and disseminate data with other projects involved in the Kootenai River basin.

  3. Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Erosion and surface runoff are the main concerns in the Piedmont, while leaching of contaminants and Maryland. Water quality of the White Clay and Red Clay Creeks and Brandywine River are strongly affected has 2509 miles of streams and rivers, 2954 acres of lakes/reservoirs/ponds, 841 square miles

  4. Fish Assemblages and Substrates in the Middle Wabash River, USA Robert Mueller, Jr.1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pyron, Mark

    Fish Assemblages and Substrates in the Middle Wabash River, USA Robert Mueller, Jr.1,2 and Mark Pyron1 We collected fishes at 28 sites of the middle Wabash River, Indiana, using a boat electrofisher for fish assemblage variation that was explained by variation in water depth and substrate frequency

  5. The dynamics of the Mississippi River plume: Impact of topography, wind and offshore forcing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    The dynamics of the Mississippi River plume: Impact of topography, wind and offshore forcing), The dynamics of the Mississippi River plume: Impact of topography, wind and offshore forcing on the fate of topography, winddriven and eddydriven circulation on the offshore removal of plume waters. A realistically

  6. Reconstruction of sediment flux from the Changjiang (Yangtze River) to the sea since the 1860s

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Paul

    Reconstruction of sediment flux from the Changjiang (Yangtze River) to the sea since the 1860s 2007; accepted 8 November 2007 KEYWORDS Changjiang (Yangtze River); Sediment flux; Rating curves; Human over the past 50 yr. However, the 50-yr measurements of water and sediment are inadequate to show

  7. Mitigation measures for fish habitat improvement in Alpine rivers affected by hydropower operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitigation measures for fish habitat improvement in Alpine rivers affected by hydropower operations In mountainous areas, high-head-storage hydropower plants produce peak load energy. The resulting unsteady water habitat improvement. This method was applied to an Alpine river downstream of a complex storage hydropower

  8. Study of spatial scaling in braided river patterns using synthetic aperture radar imagery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foufoula-Georgiou, Efi

    imagery was used to extract braided river patterns such that their spatial scaling characteristics could to build bridges across sections of braided rivers, to harvest the rich mineral deposits left on their bars, determin- istic approach of water flow over a cohesionless bed. Their model reproduced the main spatial

  9. Stream periphyton and coal mining: Comparative Effects in the Elk Flathead Rivers of Southeastern British Columbia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renn, Susan C.P.

    ecosystems. Drainage from mines and mine tailings often leach acid waters, heavy metals, and dissolved drainage of Michel Creek, a tributary of the Elk River. Michel Creek receives various forms of runoff from the Coal Mountain Mine in the Elk River Basin. Compared to Flathead drainage streams, Michel Creek biomass

  10. Mercury level in fish caught in Indian River Lagoon higher than it should be?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    Mercury level in fish caught in Indian River Lagoon higher than it should be? Harbor Branch launches new study of humans who eat fish and live around the estuary By Scott Wyland Tuesday, May 22, 2012 INDIAN RIVER COUNTY -- A 20-year-old man fishes local waters every day for his meals and scoffs

  11. 1992 Columbia River Salmon Flow Measures Options Analysis/EIS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    This Options Analysis/Environmental Impact Statement (OA/EIS) identifies, presents effects of, and evaluates the potential options for changing instream flow levels in efforts to increase salmon populations in the lower Columbia and Snake rivers. The potential actions would be implemented during 1992 to benefit juvenile and adult salmon during migration through eight run-of-river reservoirs. The Corps of Engineers (Corps) prepared this document in cooperation with the Bonneville Power Administration and the Bureau of Reclamation. The US Fish and Wildlife Service (FSWS) is a participating agency. The text and appendices of the document describe the characteristics of 10 Federal projects and one private water development project in the Columbia River drainage basin. Present and potential operation of these projects and their effects on the salmon that spawn and rear in the Columbia and Snake River System are presented. The life history, status, and response of Pacific salmon to current environmental conditions are described.

  12. LASER SCANNING TECHNOLOGY FOR ROCK ENGINEERING APPLICATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LASER SCANNING TECHNOLOGY FOR ROCK ENGINEERING APPLICATIONS Thorsten Schulz Institute of Geodesy or on the excavation surface. The use of laser scanners enables one to cope with practical constraints encountered surfaces regardless of the lighting conditions. Therefore, laser scanners have the potential to be employed

  13. Transfer of hot dry rock technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, M.C.

    1985-11-01

    The Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development Program has focused worldwide attention on the facts that natural heat in the upper part of the earth's crust is an essentially inexhaustible energy resource which is accessible almost everywhere, and that practical means now exist to extract useful heat from the hot rock and bring it to the earth's surface for beneficial use. The Hot Dry Rock Program has successfully constructed and operated a prototype hot, dry rock energy system that produced heat at the temperatures and rates required for large-scale space heating and many other direct uses of heat. The Program is now in the final stages of constructing a larger, hotter system potentially capable of satisfying the energy requirements of a small, commercial, electrical-generating power plant. To create and understand the behavior of such system, it has been necessary to develop or support the development of a wide variety of equipment, instruments, techniques, and analyses. Much of this innovative technology has already been transferred to the private sector and to other research and development programs, and more is continuously being made available as its usefulness is demonstrated. This report describes some of these developments and indicates where this new technology is being used or can be useful to industry, engineering, and science.

  14. Rio Grande River

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hills Photo Shop

    2011-09-05

    FORKS BIRDBEAR-NISKU JEFFERSON GROUP DUPEROW O (IJ o BEAVER HILL LAKE GR UP ELK POINT GROUP SOURIS RIVER Ist. RED BED DAWSON BAY 2ll(IRED BED PRAIRIE EVAP WI NI ASHERN INTERLAKE STONY MOUNTAIN RED RIVER WINN IP EG Figure 3... and is bounded by the Sioux Arch, the Black Hills Uplift, the Miles City Arch, and the Bowdoin Dome. The structural trends within the basin parallel the major structural trends of the Rocky Mountain Belt. The Williston Basin is characterized by gently...

  15. The Future of Global Water Stress: An Integrated Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schlosser, C. Adam

    We assess the ability of global water systems, resolved at 282 large river basins or Assessment Sub Regions (ASRs), to the meet water requirements over the coming decades under integrated projections of socioeconomic growth ...

  16. An Evaluation Of Water Needs in South African Communities 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brainard, Laura

    2015-05-11

    water conservation and control measures for rivers and lakes; water usage outpacing supply; pollution; soil erosion; and desertification (CIA, 2013). The Limpopo providence is South Africa’s northernmost province. Its total area is 125,755 square...

  17. Coupling Groundwater Modeling with Biology to Identify Strategic Water Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Coupling Groundwater Modeling with Biology to Identify Strategic Water Resources Didier Graillot 1 ABSTRACT The identification of hydraulic interactions between rivers and groundwater is part and parcel hinders groundwater modeling everywhere and simulating water management scenarios in every place

  18. VOLUNTEER-BASED SALMON RIVER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Institute Environment Canada VOLUNTEER-BASED MONITORING PROGRAM FOR THE SALMON RIVER BASIN: USING BENTHICVOLUNTEER-BASED MONITORING PROGRAM FOR THE SALMON RIVER BASIN: USING BENTHIC INDICATORS TO ASSESS INDICATORS TO ASSESS STREAM ECOSYSTEM HEALTH #12;Volunteer-Based Monitoring Program for the Salmon River

  19. UPPER SACRAMENTO RIVER SPORT FISHERY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UPPER SACRAMENTO RIVER SPORT FISHERY Marine Biological Laborato«y L I B R. A. R "ST OCT 2 31950 significant changes in the environmental conditions which affect fisheries in Sacramento River have resulted number of sportsmen who are turning to the Upper Sacramento River is indicative of the magnitude

  20. SEARCH FOR UNDERGROUND OPENINGS FOR IN SITU TEST FACILITIES IN CRYSTALLINE ROCK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wallenberg, H.A.

    2010-01-01

    of the precambrian crystalline rocks, Park and Jeffersonmap 1-413. 1965, The crystalline rocks of South Carolina,TEST FACILITIES IN CRYSTALLINE ROCK Harold A. Wollenberg,

  1. Idaho Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Management Model for the Eastern Snake River Plain Basic Information Title: Developing a Conjunctive Water Resources Planning and Management Model for the Eastern Snake River Plain Project Number: 2012ID178B Start., Tracy, J. 2012. System Dynamics to Sustainable Water Resources Management in the Eastern Snake Plain

  2. The Soil and Water Assessment Environmental Consequences of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    River Basin #12;Root Zone Shallow (unconfined) Aquifer Vadose (unsaturated) Zone Confining Layer Deep Weather Stations and Time Series Hydrography Run Output Maps The Soil and Water Assessment Tool #12;The Tana River Basin Poor Land Management Poor Downstream Water Supply Disruption of wildlife habitat

  3. FACTORS IN THE DESIGN OF A ROCK MECHANICS CENTRIFUGE FOR STRONG ROCK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, George B

    1984-01-01

    1 . Capacit i es of known centrifuges and v proposed SoftSolla I rock mechanics centrifuge r, ---------1~ --- dxB. , (1980), Geotechnical centrifuges for model studies and

  4. Modeling of crack initiation, propagation and coalescence in rocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gonçalves da Silva, Bruno Miguel

    2009-01-01

    Natural or artificial fracturing of rock plays a very important role in geologic processes and for engineered structures in and on rock. Fracturing is associated with crack initiation, propagation and coalescence, which ...

  5. Project Reports for Standing Rock Sioux Tribe- 2012 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Standing Rock Sioux Tribe (SRST) will perform a feasibility study and associated tasks over the course of two years on sites within the exterior boundaries of the Standing Rock Sioux...

  6. 2.20 Properties of Rocks and Minerals -Magnetic Properties of Rocks and Minerals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    Scale Exchange Interactions and Magnetic Structure in Fe-Bearing Oxides Atomistic Simulations2.20 Properties of Rocks and Minerals - Magnetic Properties of Rocks and Minerals R. J. Harrison, R.20.5.1.3 2.20.5.2 2.20.5.2.1 2.20.5.2.2 2.20.5.2.3 2.20.5.2.4 Introduction Magnetism at the Atomic Length

  7. Characterization of Savannah River Plant waste glass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plodinec, M J

    1985-01-01

    The objective of the glass characterization programs at the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) is to ensure that glass containing Savannah River Plant high-level waste can be permanently stored in a federal repository, in an environmentally acceptable manner. To accomplish this objective, SRL is carrying out several experimental programs, including: fundamental studies of the reactions between waste glass and water, particularly repository groundwater; experiments in which candidate repository environments are simulated as accurately as possible; burial tests of simulated waste glass in candidate repository geologies; large-scale tests of glass durability; and determination of the effects of process conditions on glass quality. In this paper, the strategy and current status of each of these programs is discussed. The results indicate that waste packages containing SRP waste glass will satisfy emerging regulatory criteria.

  8. Z-Bed Recovery Water Disposal

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Z-Bed Recovery Water Disposal Tritium Programs Engineering Louis Boone Josh Segura Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC M-TRT-H-00087 Rev 0 Date: 4102014 Tritium Facilities...

  9. Screening model optimization for Panay River Basin planning in the Philippines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Millspaugh, John Henry

    2010-01-01

    The state of the water resources of the Panay River Basin have motivated studies and initial basin planning to mitigate flood damages, to produce hydroelectricity, and to increase irrigated rice areas. The goal of this ...

  10. The Composition and Distribution of the Fish Fauna of the Navasota River 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strawn, R. K.; Clark, W.J.

    1972-01-01

    . Proposed water development projects for the Navasota River include the construction of dams. If these dams are constructed, changes in the fish populations are sure to occur. This study should contribute basic information from which the effects of future...

  11. Multiple trophic levels fueled by recirculation in the Columbia River plume

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    dis- charged river water sufficiently to create a regional bioreactor. Fueled by a fluvial nitrate during periods of increased warming and stratifi- cation that lead to decreased ocean productivity

  12. The use of turbulent jets to destratify the Charles River Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Church, Jeffrey H. (Jeffrey Harrison)

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the feasibility of using turbulent jets to destratify the Lower Charles River Basin between the Longfellow and Craigie Bridges between Boston and Cambridge. The basin is currently filled with salt water ...

  13. Savannah River Site Robotics

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2012-06-14

    Meet Sandmantis and Frankie, two advanced robotic devices that are key to cleanup at Savannah River Site. Sandmantis cleans hard, residual waste off huge underground storage tanks. Frankie is equipped with unique satellite capabilities and sensing abilties that can determine what chemicals still reside in the tanks in a cost effective manner.

  14. ANAEROBIC FERMENTATION OF SIMULATED IN-SITU OIL SHALE RETORT WATER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ossio, E.A.

    2011-01-01

    Water from Green River Oil Shale, Chemistry and Industry,an In-Situ Produced Oil-Shale Processin g Water, LERC ReportOf Simulated In-Situ Oil Shale Retort Water B.A. Ossio, J.P.

  15. ANAEROBIC FERMENTATION OF SIMULATED IN-SITU OIL SHALE RETORT WATER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ossio, E.A.

    2011-01-01

    Water from Green River Oil Shale, Chemistry and Industry,for an In-Situ Produced Oil-Shale Processin g Water, LERCOf Simulated In-Situ Oil Shale Retort Water B.A. Ossio, J.P.

  16. Impact of Reservoir Evaporation and Evaporation Suppression on Water Supply Capabilities 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ayala, Rolando A

    2013-04-01

    Reservoir storage is essential for developing dependable water supplies and is a major component of the river system water budget. The storage contents of reservoirs fluctuate greatly with variations in water use and climatic conditions that range...

  17. Designing Water Smart Landscapes 1 Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service Designing Water Smart Landscapes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Designing Water Smart Landscapes 1 Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service Designing Water Smart with concepts like Xeriscape LandscapingTM and Water Smart landscapes. These concepts can save as much as 50, region-specific yards that anyone would be proud to call their own. Water-smart landscapes are not rock

  18. Biogeochemical Characteristics of the Lower Mississippi River, USA, During June 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Breed, Greg A.

    , Louisiana, United States. Properties measured at the surface during each of the 48 stations were temperature (PN). Air-water CO2 flux was calculated from surface water dissolved inorganic carbon and pH. During. 1990; Meade 1995). River water contains high concentrations of dissolved inorganic nutrients, natural

  19. The Development of a Coordinated Database for Water Resources and Flow Model in the Paso Del Norte Watershed (Phase III) Part I Lower Rio Grande Flood Control Model [LRGFCM] RiverWare Model Development 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tillery, Sue; Sheng, Zhuping; King, J. Phillip; Creel, Bobby; Brown, Christopher; Michelsen, Ari; Srinivasan, Raghavan; Granados, Alfredo

    2009-01-01

    of Las Cruces, Elephant Butte Irrigation District, El Paso County Water Improvement District #1 (EPCWID No. 1), El Paso Water Utilities, New Mexico Water Resources Research Institute (NMWRRI, which also houses the Project on its data server), Project... ..... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 FIGURE 17. Correlations for Del Rio and La Mesa Drain s ..... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 F I G U R E 18. Correl a t i o n s for East and Montoy a Dr ain...

  20. An Analysis of Texas Waterways: A Report on the Physical Characteristics of Rivers, Streams, and Bayous in Texas. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belisle, Harold J.; Josselet, Ron

    1977-01-01

    Cree k San Jacinto River, East Fork Spring Creek Taylor Bayou Turkey Creek V. CENTRAL TEXAS WATE RWAYS A. Major Waterways Blanco River Bosque River Brazos River Colorado River Concho River . Frio River Guadalupe River Lampasas River... MAJOR CENTRAL TEXAS WATERWAYS 13. Blanco River 14. Bosque River 15. Brazos River 16. Colorado River 17. Concho River 18. Frio River 19. Guadal upe River 20. Lampasas River 21. Lavaca River 22. Leon River 23. Little River 24. Llano River 25...

  1. The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program, first quarter 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    The Environmental Monitoring Section of the Environmental and Health Protection (EHP) Department administers the Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program. During first quarter 1989 (January--March), EHP conducted routine sampling of monitoring wells and drinking water locations. EHP collected the drinking water samples from Savannah River Site (SRS) drinking water systems supplied by wells. EHP established two sets of flagging criteria in 1986 to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. The flagging criteria are based on detection limits, background levels in SRS groundwater, and drinking water standards. An explanation of flagging criteria for the first quarter is presented in the Flagging Criteria section of this document. All analytical results from first quarter 1989 are listed in this report, which is distributed to all waste-site custodians.

  2. The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program, second quarter 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    The Environmental Monitoring Section of the Environmental and Health Protection (EHP) Department administers the Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program. During second quarter 1989 (April--June), EHP conducted routine sampling of monitoring wells and drinking water locations. EHP collected the drinking water samples from Savannah River Site (SRS) drinking water systems supplied by wells. EHP established two sets of flagging criteria in 1986 to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. The flagging criteria are based on detection limits, background levels in SRS groundwater, and drinking water standards. An explanation of flagging criteria for the second quarter is presented in the Flagging Criteria section of this document. All analytical results from second quarter 1989 are listed in this report, which is distributed to all waste-site custodians.

  3. The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program, third quarter 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    The Environmental Monitoring Section of the Environmental and Health Protection (EHP) Department administers the Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program. During third quarter 1989 (July--September), EHP conducted routine sampling of monitoring wells and drinking water locations. EHP collected the drinking water samples from Savannah River Site (SRS) drinking water systems supplied by wells. EHP established two sets of flagging criteria in 1986 to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria do not define contamination levels; instead they aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. The flagging criteria are based on detection limits, background levels in SRS groundwater, and drinking water standards. An explanation of flagging criteria for the third quarter is presented in the Flagging Criteria section of this document. All analytical results from third quarter 1989 are listed in this report, which is distributed to all waste-site custodians.

  4. Atmospheric rivers as Lagrangian coherent structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garaboa, Daniel; Huhn, Florian; Perez-Muñuzuri, Vicente

    2015-01-01

    We show that filamentous Atmospheric Rivers (ARs) over the Northern Atlantic Ocean are closely linked to attracting Lagrangian Coherent Structures (LCSs) in the large scale wind field. LCSs represent lines of attraction in the evolving flow with a significant impact on all passive tracers. Using Finite-Time Lyapunov Exponents (FTLE), we extract LCSs from a two-dimensional flow derived from water vapor flux of atmospheric reanalysis data and compare them to the three-dimensional LCS obtained from the wind flow. We correlate the typical filamentous water vapor patterns of ARs with LCSs and find that LCSs bound the filaments on the back side. Passive advective transport of water vapor from tropical latitudes is potentially possible.

  5. Pesticide Properties that Affect Water Quality 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stevenson, Douglas; Baumann, Paul A.; Jackman, John A.

    1997-06-30

    . over the land before running into rivers, aquifers and lakes. It also seeps into underground aquifers. Irrigation and drinking water come from both surface and ground water. Eventually, all of the chemicals we use can pollute our water supplies (see Fig... or disposal of pesticides can lead to water pollution. There is reason for optimism, however. Without being oppressive, the regulation of pesticides is reducing pesticide pollution of surface and ground water. Understanding Pesticides Pesticides are poisons...

  6. EIS-0163-S: Supplemental EIS/1993 Interim Columbia and Snake Rivers Flow Improvement Measures for Salmon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers – Walla Walla District has prepared this statement to assess alternatives to improve flows of water in the lower Columbia-Snake rivers in 1993 and future years to assist the migration of juvenile and adult anadromous fish past eight hydropower dams. The U.S. Department of Energy’s Bonneville Power Administration served as a cooperating agency in developing this supplement due to its key role in direct operation of the integrated and coordinated Columbia-Snake River System, and adopted this statement in March of 1993. This statement supplements the 1992 Columbia River Salmon Flow Measures Options Analysis Environmental Impact Statement, which evaluated ways to alter water management operations in 1992 on the lower Columbia and Snake rivers to enhance the survival of wild Snake River salmon.

  7. Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix N: Wildlife.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Columbia River System Operation Review

    1995-11-01

    The Columbia River System is a vast and complex combination of Federal and non-Federal facilities used for many purposes including power production, irrigation, navigation, flood control, recreation, fish and wildlife habitat and municipal and industrial water supply. Each river use competes for the limited water resources in the Columbia River Basin. This technical appendix addresses only the effects of alternative system operating strategies for managing the Columbia River system. The environmental impact statement (EIS) itself and some of the other appendices present analyses of the alternative approaches to the other three decisions considered as part of the SOR. This document is the product of the Wildlife Work Group, focusing on wildlife impacts but not including fishes. Topics covered include the following: scope and process; existing and affected environment, including specific discussion of 18 projects in the Columbia river basin. Analysis, evaluation, and alternatives are presented for all projects. System wide impacts to wildlife are also included.

  8. Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix O: Economic and Social Impact.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Columbia River System Operation Review (U.S.)

    1995-11-01

    This Appendix O of the Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Columbia River System measures the economic and social effects of the alternative system operation strategies and includes both geographic and methodology components. Areas discussed in detail include the following: purpose, scope and process; an economic history of the Columbia River Basin and its use today including the Columbia River and Socio-economic development in the Northwest and Major uses of the River System; Analysis procedures and methodologies including national economic evaluation, the concepts, analysis of assumptions, analysis for specific river uses, water quality, Regional evaluation, analysis, and social impacts; alternatives and impacts including implementation costs, andromous fish, resident fish and wildlife, flood control, irrigation and municipal and industrial water supply, navigation impacts, power, recreation, annual costs, regional economic analysis. Extensive comparison of alternatives is included.

  9. A Phased Array Approach to Rock Blasting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leslie Gertsch; Jason Baird

    2006-07-01

    A series of laboratory-scale simultaneous two-hole shots was performed in a rock simulant (mortar) to record the shock wave interference patterns produced in the material. The purpose of the project as a whole was to evaluate the usefulness of phased array techniques of blast design, using new high-precision delay technology. Despite high-speed photography, however, we were unable to detect the passage of the shock waves through the samples to determine how well they matched the expected interaction geometry. The follow-up mine-scale tests were therefore not conducted. Nevertheless, pattern analysis of the vectors that would be formed by positive interference of the shockwaves from multiple charges in an ideal continuous, homogeneous, isotropic medium indicate the potential for powerful control of blast design, given precise characterization of the target rock mass.

  10. Big Rock Point severe accident management strategies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brogan, B.A. [Consumers Power Co., Charlevoix, MI (United States); Gabor, J.R. [Dames and Moore, Westmont, IL (United States)

    1996-07-01

    December 1994, the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) issued guidance relative to the formal industry position on Severe Accident Management (SAM) approved by the NEI Strategic Issues Advisory Committee on November 4, 1994. This paper summarizes how Big Rock Point (BRP) has and continues to address SAM strategies. The historical accounting portion of this presentation includes a description of how the following projects identified and defined the current Big Rock Point SAM strategies: the 1981 Level 3 Probabilistic Risk Assessment performance; the development of the Plant Specific Technical Guidelines from which the symptom oriented Emergency Operating Procedures (EOPs) were developed; the Control Room Design Review; and, the recent completion of the Individual Plant Evaluation (IPE). In addition to the historical presentation deliberation, this paper the present activities that continue to stress SAM strategies.

  11. Brazos River Erosion Management Project (BREM) Briefing Paper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    in Section 219, Water Resources Development Act of 1992, for Environmental Infrastructure Projects of historic Brazos River alluvium, extending downstream to the Gulf of Mexico. Additional scour and soil loss by Fort Bend County and private property. Additionally, further erosion will impact public infrastructure

  12. Subsurface characterization of the San Jacinto River Research site 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leik, Jason Allan

    1998-01-01

    . The average horizontal flow velocity was found to be 2x10-7 m/s. The average azimuth of all data from the cove was 2100, trending towards the south-southwest in a direction consistent with river basin direction. Because the shallow subsurface water is confined...

  13. Factors governing sustainable groundwater pumping near a river

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Y.; Hubbard, S.S.; Finsterle, S.

    2011-01-15

    The objective of this paper is to provide new insights into processes affecting riverbank filtration (RBF). We consider a system with an inflatable dam installed for enhancing water production from downstream collector wells. Using a numerical model, we investigate the impact of groundwater pumping and dam operation on the hydrodynamics in the aquifer and water production. We focus our study on two processes that potentially limit water production of an RBF system: the development of an unsaturated zone and riverbed clogging. We quantify river clogging by calibrating a time-dependent riverbed permeability function based on knowledge of pumping rate, river stage, and temperature. The dynamics of the estimated riverbed permeability reflects clogging and scouring mechanisms. Our results indicate that (1) riverbed permeability is the dominant factor affecting infiltration needed for sustainable RBF production; (2) dam operation can influence pumping efficiency and prevent the development of an unsaturated zone beneath the riverbed only under conditions of sufficient riverbed permeability; (3) slow river velocity, caused by dam raising during summer months, may lead to sedimentation and deposition of fine-grained material within the riverbed, which may clog the riverbed, limiting recharge to the collector wells and contributing to the development of an unsaturated zone beneath the riverbed; and (4) higher river flow velocities, caused by dam lowering during winter storms, scour the riverbed an thus increase its permeability. These insights can be used as the basis for developing sustainable water management of a RBF system.

  14. Final Report - Advanced Conceptual Models for Unsaturated and Two-Phase Flow in Fractured Rock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nicholl, Michael J.

    2006-07-10

    The Department of Energy Environmental Management Program is faced with two major issues involving two-phase flow in fractured rock; specifically, transport of dissolved contaminants in the Vadose Zone, and the fate of Dense Nonaqueous Phase Liquids (DNAPLs) below the water table. Conceptual models currently used to address these problems do not correctly include the influence of the fractures, thus leading to erroneous predictions. Recent work has shown that it is crucial to understand the topology, or ''structure'' of the fluid phases (air/water or water/DNAPL) within the subsurface. It has also been shown that even under steady boundary conditions, the influence of fractures can lead to complex and dynamic phase structure that controls system behavior, with or without the presence of a porous rock matrix. Complicated phase structures within the fracture network can facilitate rapid transport, and lead to a sparsely populated and widespread distribution of concentrated contaminants; these qualities are highly difficult to describe with current conceptual models. The focus of our work is to improve predictive modeling through the development of advanced conceptual models for two-phase flow in fractured rock.

  15. Rock Chalk Report, January 9, 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-09

    to both Baseball and Softball) on sale now! Season Tickets starting as low as $50! Earn two Williams Education Fund Priority Points per sport when you buy Baseball and Softball season tickets! Spirit Squad The University... of Kansas Spirit Squad The KU Cheer Squad and Rock Chalk Dancers will perform their National Competition routines on January 13 @ 4PM & 6PM! This event will be prior to their departure for Orlando to compete in the UCA/UDA College Nationals. This event...

  16. Hydrothermally Deposited Rock | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy Resources JumpNewTexas:Hydrothermally Deposited Rock Jump to: navigation,

  17. Rock Lab Analysis | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/ColoradoRemsenburg-Speonk, NewMichigan: Energy Resources Jump to:Rock

  18. Rock, Wisconsin: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/ColoradoRemsenburg-Speonk, NewMichigan: Energy Resources JumpMtSampling Jump to:Rock,

  19. Response of Alum Rock springs to the October 30, 2007 Alum Rock earthquake and implications for the origin of increased discharge after earthquake

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowland, Joel C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Manga, Michael [UC BERKELEY

    2009-01-01

    The origin of increased stream flow and spring discharge following earthquakes have been the subject of controversy, in large part because there are many models to explain observations and few measurements suitable for distinguishing between hypotheses. On October 30, 2007 a magnitude 5.5 earthquake occurred near the Alum Rock springs, California, USA. Within a day we documented a several-fold increase in discharge. Over the following year, we have monitored a gradual return towards pre-earthquake properties, but for the largest springs there appears to be a permanent increase in the steady discharge at all the springs. The Alum Rock springs discharge waters that represent a mixture between modern ('shallow') meteoric water and old ('deep') connate waters expelled by regional transpression. After the earthquake, the increased discharge at the largest springs was accompanied by a small decrease in the fraction of connate water in the spring discharge. Combined with the rapid response, this implies that the increased discharge has a shallow origin. Increased discharge at these springs occurs for earthquakes that cause static volumetric expansion and those that cause contraction, supporting models in which dynamic strains are responsible for the subsurface changes that cause flow to increase. We show that models in which the permeability of the fracture system feeding the springs increases after the earthquake are in general consistent with the changes in discharge. The response of these springs to another earthquake will provide critical constraints on the changes that occur in the subsurface.

  20. Squirt flow in fully saturated rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dvorkin, J.; Mavko, G.; Nur, A. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Geophysics] [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Geophysics

    1995-01-01

    The authors estimate velocity/frequency dispersion and attenuation in fully saturated rocks by employing the squirt-flow mechanism of solid-fluid interaction. In this model, pore fluid is squeezed from thin soft cracks into the surrounding large pores. Information about the compliance of these soft cracks at low confining pressures is extracted from high-pressure velocity data. The frequency dependence of squirt-induced pressure in the soft cracks is linked with the porosity and permeability of the soft pore space, and the characteristic squirt-flow length. These unknown parameters are combined into one expression that is assumed to be a fundamental rock property that does not depend on frequency. The appropriate value of this expression for a given rock can be found by matching the authors theoretical predictions with the experimental measurements of attenuation or velocity. The low-frequency velocity limits, as given by their model, are identical to those predicted by Gassmann`s formula. The high-frequency limits may significant exceed those given by the Biot theory: the high-frequency frame bulk modulus is close to that measured at high confining pressure. They have applied their model to D`Euville Limestone, Navajo Sandstone, and Westerly Granite. The model realistically predicts the observed velocity/frequency dispersion, and attenuation.

  1. Gage for measuring displacements in rock samples

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holcomb, David J. (Albuquerque, NM); McNamee, Michael J. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1986-01-01

    A gage for measuring diametral displacement within a rock sample for use in a rock mechanics laboratory and in the field, comprises a support ring housing a linear variable differential transformer, a mounting screw, and a leaf spring. The mounting screw is adjustable and defines a first point of contact with the rock sample. The leaf spring has opposite ends fixed to the inner periphery of the mounting ring. An intermediate portion of the leaf spring projecting radially inward from the ring is formed with a dimple defining a second point of contact with the sample. The first and second points of contact are diametrically opposed to each other. The LVDT is mounted in the ring with its axis parallel to the line of measurement and its core rod received in the dimple of the leaf spring. Any change in the length of the line between the first and second support points is directly communicated to the LVDT. The leaf spring is rigid to completely support lateral forces so that the LVDT is free of all load for improved precision.

  2. Gage for measuring displacements in rock samples

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holcomb, D.J.; McNamee, M.J.

    1985-07-18

    A gage for measuring diametral displacement within a rock sample for use in a rock mechanics laboratory and in the field, comprises a support ring housing a linear variable differential transformer (LVDT), a mounting screw, and a leaf spring. The mounting screw is adjustable and defines a first point of contact with the rock sample. The leaf spring has opposite ends fixed to the inner periphery of the mounting ring. An intermediate portion of the leaf spring projecting radially inward from the ring is formed with a dimple defining a second point of contact with the sample. The first and second points of contact are diametrically opposed to each other. The LVDT is mounted in the ring with its axis parallel to the line of measurement and its core rod received in the dimple of the leaf spring. Any change in the length of the line between the first and second support points is directly communicated to the LVDT. The leaf spring is rigid to completely support lateral forces so that the LVDT is free of all load for improved precision.

  3. GEOTECHNICAL ASSESSMENT AND INSTRUMENTATION NEEDS FOR NUCLEAR WASTE ISOLATION IN CRYSTALLINE AND ARGILLACEOUS ROCKS SYMPOSIUM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01

    Characterization of Rock Masses Structural GeologicalCharacterization of Rock Masses . • • • • • • • • 5.2.1 Structural Geological

  4. Turbid water Clear water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaffe, Jules

    Turbid water Clear water pixel position cameraresponsecameraresponse pixel position ABSTRACT: A new underwater laser scanning system, providing microbathymetric information in coastal waters is described the backscatter component resulting in enhanced performance in turbid waters. The system is expected to provide

  5. Sedimentary Rocks, Processes, and Environments Sediments are loose grains and chemical residues of earth materials, which include things such as

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, X. Rong

    Sedimentary Rocks, Processes, and Environments Sediments are loose grains and chemical residues, and rust (oxidized iron). Formation of Sediments All sediments have a source or provenance, a place and sediments. Erosion and Transportation of Sediments Weathered materials are transported via wind, water

  6. CONFLICTS IN RIVER MANAGEMENT: A CONSERVATIONIST'S PERSPECTIVE ON SACRAMENTO RIVER RIPARIAN HABITATS--

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CONFLICTS IN RIVER MANAGEMENT: A CONSERVATIONIST'S PERSPECTIVE ON SACRAMENTO RIVER RIPARIAN, Defenders of Wildlife, Sacramento, California. Abstract: The Sacramento River's historic riparian habi- tats on this conference's plenary session panel, I will provide a conservationist perspective on Sacramento River riparian

  7. Contribution potential of glaciers to water availability in different climate regimes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marzeion, Ben

    Contribution potential of glaciers to water availability in different climate regimes Georg Kaser availability in river systems under the influence of ongoing global climate change. We estimate the contribution potential of seasonally delayed glacier melt water to total water availability in large river

  8. Water Levels of the Great Lakes Who is Affected by Changing Lake Levels?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to businesses and residents, but water that runs off the land carries pesticides and nutrients with it. Water of 1986 affected many residents and businesses located along the rivers that provide water to the lakes and along the shoreline of the lakes themselves. In 1986, the Tittabawassee River basin, which eventually

  9. Water and Climate 1. Peter Rhines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    basins are cyclically created by plate tectonics. So, why don t the seas become saturated with salt....and hence we have life #12;#12;water not water #12;#12;· Salt enters the seas from weathering of rocks eventually? That would be about 26.5% salinity (26.5 g of salt in 100 g. of seawater

  10. Hood River Passive House

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hales, D.

    2013-03-01

    The Hood River Passive Project was developed by Root Design Build of Hood River Oregon using the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP) to meet all of the requirements for certification under the European Passive House standards. The Passive House design approach has been gaining momentum among residential designers for custom homes and BEopt modeling indicates that these designs may actually exceed the goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program to reduce home energy use by 30%-50% (compared to 2009 energy codes for new homes). This report documents the short term test results of the Shift House and compares the results of PHPP and BEopt modeling of the project.

  11. EFFECT OF ENCROACHMENT OF WANAPUM DAM RESERVOIR ON FISH PASSAGE OVER ROCK ISLAND DAM, COLUMBIA RIVER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the survivors. Similarly, man-made fa- cilities such as hydroelectric dams, even though equipped with fish for hydroelectric dams are utilized and the reservoir of one dam begins to encroach on the tailrace of the dam

  12. Fluid-rock interactions in a carbon storage site analogue, Green River, Utah

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kampman, Niko

    2011-07-12

    , or will be submitted for any other qualification at any other University. The number of pages is within the prescribed limit. NIKO KAMPMAN January 2011 Acknowledgments I would like to take this opportunity to first thank Mike Bickle for his... insight, wisdom and witticisms throughout this project. This project has challenged and stretched both my understanding and appreciation of the sciences; I am grateful for Mike’s patience and guidance on both aspects of this work and the direction of my...

  13. Rock art boundaries: considering geographically limited elements within the Pecos River Style 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrison, James Burr

    2004-09-30

    , identified only in the neighboring Seminole and Painted Canyon systems. As part of this spatial analysis, the previously undocumented principle of intersite stylistic traditions is introduced. Possible explanations for these anthropomorph attributes are also...

  14. Mercury in shallow Savannah River Plant soil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlton, W.H.; Price, V.; Cook, J.R.

    1988-10-01

    Soil concentrations of adsorbed mercury at 999 sites at the Savannah River Plant (SRP) were determined by Microseeps Limited of Indianola, PA. The sites were in and around the 643-C Burial Ground, at the Savannah River Swamp adjacent to TNX Area, and at a background area. The Burial Ground was chosen as a test site because of a history of disposal of radioactive mercury there prior to 1968. Extremely low traces of mercury have been detected in the water table beneath the Burial Ground. Although the mercury concentrations at the majority of these sites are at background levels, several areas appear to be anomalously high. In particular, an area of large magnitude anomaly was found in the northwest part of the Burial Ground. Three other single point anomalies and several other areas of more subtle but consistently high values were also found. Several sites with anomalous mercury levels were found in an area of the Savannah River flood plain adjacent to TNX Area.

  15. Eocene climates, depositional environments, and geography, greater Green River basin, Wyoming, Utah, and Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roehler, H.W.

    1993-12-31

    The climates, depositional environments, and geography of Eocene rocks in the greater Green River basin are investigated to determine the origin, mode of deposition, and areal distribution of the Wasatch, Green River, Bridger, and Washakie Formations. The data indicate that Eocene climates ranged from cool temperature to tropical and were affected by both terrestrial and astronomical factors. The terrestrial factors were mainly latitude, altitude, regional geography, tectonism, and volcanism. The astronomical factors are interpreted from reptitious rock sequences in the Wilkins Peak Member of the Green River Formation that record seasonal changes, 21,000 year precession of the equinox cycles, 100,000 year eccentricity cycles, and an undetermined cycle of 727,000 years. Eight depositional environments are identified, discussed, and illustrated by diagrams, columnar sections, and photographs. They are: (1) fluvial, (2) paludal, (3) freshwater lacustrine, (4) saltwater lacustrine, (5) pond and playa lake, (6) evaporite (salt pan), (7) mudflat, and (8) volcanic and fluviovolcanic. The areal distribution of the eight depositional environments in the Wasatch, Green River, Bridger, and Washakie Formations is illustrated by photographs and 13 paleogeographic maps. 76 refs., 90 figs.

  16. d Onion River Review d OnionRiverReview2010dd

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weaver, Adam Lee

    ://www.smcvt.edu/onionriver/. #12;d Onion River Review d 2010 d river run by Eireann Aspell Lauren Fish Jamie Gorton Heidi Lynchd Onion River Review d 2010 d OnionRiverReview2010dd #12;The Onion River Review is the literary Matt Serron #12;BLANK Editors' Note The only certainty of the Onion River Review is the editors' un

  17. Quantification of sediment bed - water column exchange processes in the South San Francisco Bay estuary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gladding, Steven Michael

    2011-01-01

    Term Sediment Deposition and Resuspension in the Fox River,2010). "Wind- enhanced resuspension in the shallow waters ofFlocculation, Deposition, and Resuspension of Fine-Grained

  18. Final Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Remedial Action (Project) UMTRCA Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act USFWS U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service EA of Ground Water Compliance at the Slick Rock Sites DOE Grand...

  19. RiverHeath Appleton, WI

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The goal of the project is to produce a closed loop neighborhood-wide geothermal exchange system using the river as the source of heat exchange.

  20. Florida Nuclear Profile - Crystal River

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Crystal River1" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  1. Louisiana Nuclear Profile - River Bend

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    River Bend" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  2. Securing Texas water: Experts call for additional planning, policies, expanding "new" water 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2012-01-01

    and policy for the Guadalupe-Blanco River Authority, said the state no longer has the surplus water it had from SECURING TEXAS WATER Experts call for additional planning, policies, expanding ?new? water Summer 2012 tx H2O 3 ] the reservoirs built a...

  3. Spatial design principles for sustainable hydropower development in river basins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jager, Henriette I.

    : Freshwater reserve design Hydroelectric power Network theory Optimization Regulated rivers River portfolio

  4. Hot dry rock venture risks investigation:

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    This study assesses a promising resource in central Utah as the potential site of a future commerical hot dry rock (HDR) facility for generating electricity. The results indicate that, if the HDR reservoir productivity equals expectations based on preliminary results from research projects to date, a 50 MWe HDR power facility at Roosevelt Hot Springs could generate power at cost competitive with coal-fired plants. However, it is imperative that the assumed productivity be demonstrated before funds are committed for a commercial facility. 72 refs., 39 figs., 38 tabs.

  5. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Slick Rock

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and Myers Co - OH 51SavannahMill SiteSlick Rock

  6. Category:Rock Density | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmentalBowerbank,CammackFLIR Jump to:RAPID Roadmap ContactRock Density Jump to: navigation,

  7. Isotopic Analysis- Rock | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource History View NewGuam:on OpeneiAlbanianStudy)savingsInformationRock Jump to:

  8. Lab 3 GEO 465/565 Storm Water Pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Dawn Jeannine

    1 Lab 3 ­ GEO 465/565 Storm Water Pollution The Nation's Most Significant Water Quality Problem our rivers, lakes and coastal waters by controlling pollution from industry and sewage treatment, is that we have not done enough to stop storm water pollution, or non-point source pollution, that runs off

  9. MSU at Work in Africa: Safe Water and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MSU at Work in Africa: Safe Water and Environmental Health Issues and Problems Water contamination and lack of infrastructure for water and sewage systems have contributed to the global burden of waterborne to waterborne and water-based diseases, including malaria, diarrheal diseases, river blindness

  10. Columbia River Pathway Dosimetry Report, 1944-1992. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farris, W.T.; Napier, B.A.; Simpson, J.C.; Snyder, S.F.; Shipler, D.B.

    1994-04-01

    The purpose of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate the radiation dose that individuals could have received as a result of radionuclide emissions since 1944 from the Hanford Site. One objective of the HEDR Project is to estimate doses to individuals who were exposed to the radionuclides released to the Columbia River (the river pathway). This report documents the last in a series of dose calculations conducted on the Columbia River pathway. The report summarizes the technical approach used to estimate radiation doses to three classes of representative individuals who may have used the Columbia River as a source of drinking water, food, or for recreational or occupational purposes. In addition, the report briefly explains the approaches used to estimate the radioactivity released to the river, the development of the parameters used to model the uptake and movement of radioactive materials in aquatic systems such as the Columbia River, and the method of calculating the Columbia River`s transport of radioactive materials. Potential Columbia River doses have been determined for representative individuals since the initiation of site activities in 1944. For this report, dose calculations were performed using conceptual models and computer codes developed for the purpose of estimating doses. All doses were estimated for representative individuals who share similar characteristics with segments of the general population.

  11. Uranium mineralization in fluorine-enriched volcanic rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burt, D.M.; Sheridan, M.F.; Bikun, J.; Christiansen, E.; Correa, B.; Murphy, B.; Self, S.

    1980-09-01

    Several uranium and other lithophile element deposits are located within or adjacent to small middle to late Cenozoic, fluorine-rich rhyolitic dome complexes. Examples studied include Spor Mountain, Utah (Be-U-F), the Honeycomb Hills, Utah (Be-U), the Wah Wah Mountains, Utah (U-F), and the Black Range-Sierra Cuchillo, New Mexico (Sn-Be-W-F). The formation of these and similar deposits begins with the emplacement of a rhyolitic magma, enriched in lithophile metals and complexing fluorine, that rises to a shallow crustal level, where its roof zone may become further enriched in volatiles and the ore elements. During initial explosive volcanic activity, aprons of lithicrich tuffs are erupted around the vents. These early pyroclastic deposits commonly host the mineralization, due to their initial enrichment in the lithophile elements, their permeability, and the reactivity of their foreign lithic inclusions (particularly carbonate rocks). The pyroclastics are capped and preserved by thick topaz rhyolite domes and flows that can serve as a source of heat and of additional quantities of ore elements. Devitrification, vapor-phase crystallization, or fumarolic alteration may free the ore elements from the glassy matrix and place them in a form readily leached by percolating meteoric waters. Heat from the rhyolitic sheets drives such waters through the system, generally into and up the vents and out through the early tuffs. Secondary alteration zones (K-feldspar, sericite, silica, clays, fluorite, carbonate, and zeolites) and economic mineral concentrations may form in response to this low temperature (less than 200 C) circulation. After cooling, meteoric water continues to migrate through the system, modifying the distribution and concentration of the ore elements (especially uranium).

  12. Laboratory measurements on reservoir rocks from The Geysers geothermal field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boitnott, G.N.

    1995-01-26

    A suite of laboratory measurements have been conducted on Geysers metagraywacke and metashale recovered from a drilled depth of 2599 to 2602 meters in NEGU-17. The tests have been designed to constrain the mechanical and water-storage properties of the matrix material. Various measurements have been made at a variety of pressures and at varying degrees of saturation. Both compressional and shear velocities exhibit relatively little change with effective confining pressure. In all of the samples, water saturation causes an increase in the compressional velocity. In some samples, saturation results in a moderate decrease in shear velocity greater in magnitude than would be expected based on the slight increase in bulk density. It is found that the effect of saturation on the velocities can be quantitatively modeled through a modification of Biot-Gassmann theory to include weakening of the shear modulus with saturation. The decrease is attributed to chemo-mechanical weakening caused by the presence of water. The degree of frame weakening of the shear modulus is variable between samples, and appears correlated with petrographic features of the cores. Two related models are presented through which we can study the importance of saturation effects on field-scale velocity variations. The model results indicate that the saturation effects within the matrix are significant and may contribute to previously observed field anomalies. The results help to define ways in which we may be able to separate the effects of variations in rock properties, caused by phenomena such as degree of fracturing, from similar effects caused by variations in matrix saturation. The need for both compressional and shear velocity data in order to interpret field anomalies is illustrated through comparisons of model results with the field observations.

  13. ACOUSTICAL IMAGING AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF SOFT ROCK AND MARINE SEDIMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thurman E. Scott, Jr., Ph.D.; Younane Abousleiman, Ph.D.; Musharraf Zaman, Ph.D., P.E.

    2002-11-18

    During the seven quarter of the project the research team analyzed some of the acoustic velocity data and rock deformation data. The goal is to create a series of ''deformation-velocity maps'' which can outline the types of rock deformational mechanisms which can occur at high pressures and then associate those with specific compressional or shear wave velocity signatures. During this quarter, we began to analyze both the acoustical and deformational properties of the various rock types. Some of the preliminary velocity data from the Danian chalk will be presented in this report. This rock type was selected for the initial efforts as it will be used in the tomographic imaging study outlined in Task 10. This is one of the more important rock types in the study as the Danian chalk is thought to represent an excellent analog to the Ekofisk chalk that has caused so many problems in the North Sea. Some of the preliminary acoustic velocity data obtained during this phase of the project indicates that during pore collapse and compaction of this chalk, the acoustic velocities can change by as much as 200 m/s. Theoretically, this significant velocity change should be detectable during repeated successive 3-D seismic images. In addition, research continues with an analysis of the unconsolidated sand samples at high confining pressures obtained in Task 9. The analysis of the results indicate that sands with 10% volume of fines can undergo liquefaction at lower stress conditions than sand samples which do not have fines added. This liquefaction and/or sand flow is similar to ''shallow water'' flows observed during drilling in the offshore Gulf of Mexico.

  14. Preliminary Notice of Violation, Westinghouse Savannah River...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    March 6, 2000 Issued to Westinghouse Savannah River Company, related to Procurement Quality Assurance and Quality Improvement Deficiencies at the Savannah River Site. On March 6,...

  15. Preliminary Notice of Violation, Westinghouse Savannah River...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EA 98-09 Preliminary Notice of Violation, Westinghouse Savannah River Company - EA 98-09 September 21, 1998 Preliminary Notice of Violation issued to Westinghouse Savannah River...

  16. PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Electronic Safeguards...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electronic Safeguards Security System (E3S) PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Electronic Safeguards Security System (E3S) PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Electronic...

  17. Project Management Institute Highlights Savannah River Nuclear...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Management Institute Highlights Savannah River Nuclear Solutions in Publication Project Management Institute Highlights Savannah River Nuclear Solutions in Publication February 6,...

  18. Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Operations Office...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Savannah River Operations Office - July 2013 Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Operations Office - July 2013 July 2013 Review of the Employee Concerns Program at the...

  19. Flambeau River Biofuels Demonstration-Scale Biorefinery

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    in Wisconsin (NewPage Corporation in Wisconsin Rapids and Flambeau River Papers, LLC in Park Falls). NewPage and Flambeau River have demonstrated successful collaboration on...

  20. Sensitivity analysis of GSI based mechanical characterization of rock mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ván, P

    2012-01-01

    Recently, the rock mechanical and rock engineering designs and calculations are frequently based on Geological Strength Index (GSI) method, because it is the only system that provides a complete set of mechanical properties for design purpose. Both the failure criteria and the deformation moduli of the rock mass can be calculated with GSI based equations, which consists of the disturbance factor, as well. The aim of this paper is the sensitivity analysis of GSI and disturbance factor dependent equations that characterize the mechanical properties of rock masses. The survey of the GSI system is not our purpose. The results show that the rock mass strength calculated by the Hoek-Brown failure criteria and both the Hoek-Diederichs and modified Hoek-Diederichs deformation moduli are highly sensitive to changes of both the GSI and the D factor, hence their exact determination is important for the rock engineering design.