National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for rock physics modeling

  1. The thin section rock physics: Modeling and measurement of seismic wave velocity on the slice of carbonates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wardaya, P. D. Noh, K. A. B. M. Yusoff, W. I. B. W.; Ridha, S.; Nurhandoko, B. E. B.

    2014-09-25

    This paper discusses a new approach for investigating the seismic wave velocity of rock, specifically carbonates, as affected by their pore structures. While the conventional routine of seismic velocity measurement highly depends on the extensive laboratory experiment, the proposed approach utilizes the digital rock physics view which lies on the numerical experiment. Thus, instead of using core sample, we use the thin section image of carbonate rock to measure the effective seismic wave velocity when travelling on it. In the numerical experiment, thin section images act as the medium on which wave propagation will be simulated. For the modeling, an advanced technique based on artificial neural network was employed for building the velocity and density profile, replacing image's RGB pixel value with the seismic velocity and density of each rock constituent. Then, ultrasonic wave was simulated to propagate in the thin section image by using finite difference time domain method, based on assumption of an acoustic-isotropic medium. Effective velocities were drawn from the recorded signal and being compared to the velocity modeling from Wyllie time average model and Kuster-Toksoz rock physics model. To perform the modeling, image analysis routines were undertaken for quantifying the pore aspect ratio that is assumed to represent the rocks pore structure. In addition, porosity and mineral fraction required for velocity modeling were also quantified by using integrated neural network and image analysis technique. It was found that the Kuster-Toksoz gives the closer prediction to the measured velocity as compared to the Wyllie time average model. We also conclude that Wyllie time average that does not incorporate the pore structure parameter deviates significantly for samples having more than 40% porosity. Utilizing this approach we found a good agreement between numerical experiment and theoretically derived rock physics model for estimating the effective seismic wave velocity of rock.

  2. Effects of uncertainty in rock-physics models on reservoir parameter estimation using marine seismic AVA and CSEM data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ajo-Franklin, Jonathan

    models on estimates of reservoir parameters from joint inversion of seismic AVA and CSEM data. The reser framework and Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods, we obtain estimates of reservoir parameters as well as of the uncertainty in the estimates. Synthetic case studies show that uncertainties in both rock-physics models

  3. Effects of uncertainty in rock-physics models on reservoirparameter estimation using marine seismic AVA and CSEM data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Jinsong; Dickens, Thomas

    2007-04-09

    This study investigates the effects of uncertainty inrockphysics models on estimates of reservoir parameters from jointinversion of seismic AVA and CSEMdata. The reservoir parameters arerelated to electrical resistivity using Archie's law, and to seismicvelocity and density using the Xu-White model. To account for errors inthe rock-physics models, we use two methods to handle uncertainty: (1)the model outputs are random functions with modes or means given by themodel predictions, and (2) the parameters of the models are themselvesrandom variables. Using a stochastic framework and Markov Chain MonteCarlo methods, we obtain estimates of reservoir parameters as well as ofthe uncertainty in the estimates. Synthetic case studies show thatuncertainties in both rock-physics models and their associated parameterscan have significant effects on estimates of reservoir parameters. Ourmethod provides a means of quantifying how the uncertainty in theestimated reservoir parameters increases with increasing uncertainty inthe rock-physics model and in the model parameters. We find that in theexample we present, the estimation of water saturation is relatively lessaffected than is the estimation of clay content and porosity.

  4. Precarious Rock Methodology for Seismic Hazard: Physical Testing, Numerical Modeling and Coherence Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anooshehpoor, Rasool; Purvance, Matthew D.; Brune, James N.; Preston, Leiph A.; Anderson, John G.; Smith, Kenneth D.

    2006-09-29

    This report covers the following projects: Shake table tests of precarious rock methodology, field tests of precarious rocks at Yucca Mountain and comparison of the results with PSHA predictions, study of the coherence of the wave field in the ESF, and a limited survey of precarious rocks south of the proposed repository footprint. A series of shake table experiments have been carried out at the University of Nevada, Reno Large Scale Structures Laboratory. The bulk of the experiments involved scaling acceleration time histories (uniaxial forcing) from 0.1g to the point where the objects on the shake table overturned a specified number of times. The results of these experiments have been compared with numerical overturning predictions. Numerical predictions for toppling of large objects with simple contact conditions (e.g., I-beams with sharp basal edges) agree well with shake-table results. The numerical model slightly underpredicts the overturning of small rectangular blocks. It overpredicts the overturning PGA for asymmetric granite boulders with complex basal contact conditions. In general the results confirm the approximate predictions of previous studies. Field testing of several rocks at Yucca Mountain has approximately confirmed the preliminary results from previous studies, suggesting that he PSHA predictions are too high, possibly because the uncertainty in the mean of the attenuation relations. Study of the coherence of wavefields in the ESF has provided results which will be very important in design of the canisters distribution, in particular a preliminary estimate of the wavelengths at which the wavefields become incoherent. No evidence was found for extreme focusing by lens-like inhomogeneities. A limited survey for precarious rocks confirmed that they extend south of the repository, and one of these has been field tested.

  5. Big Bang Day : Physics Rocks

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-04-25

    Is particle physics the new rock 'n' roll? The fundamental questions about the nature of the universe that particle physics hopes to answer have attracted the attention of some very high profile and unusual fans. Alan Alda, Ben Miller, Eddie Izzard, Dara O'Briain and John Barrowman all have interests in this branch of physics. Brian Cox - CERN physicist, and former member of 90's band D:Ream, tracks down some very well known celebrity enthusiasts and takes a light-hearted look at why this subject can appeal to all of us.

  6. Joint inversion of marine seismic AVA and CSEM data using statistical rock-physics models and Markov random fields: Stochastic inversion of AVA and CSEM data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, J.; Hoversten, G.M.

    2011-09-15

    Joint inversion of seismic AVA and CSEM data requires rock-physics relationships to link seismic attributes to electrical properties. Ideally, we can connect them through reservoir parameters (e.g., porosity and water saturation) by developing physical-based models, such as Gassmann’s equations and Archie’s law, using nearby borehole logs. This could be difficult in the exploration stage because information available is typically insufficient for choosing suitable rock-physics models and for subsequently obtaining reliable estimates of the associated parameters. The use of improper rock-physics models and the inaccuracy of the estimates of model parameters may cause misleading inversion results. Conversely, it is easy to derive statistical relationships among seismic and electrical attributes and reservoir parameters from distant borehole logs. In this study, we develop a Bayesian model to jointly invert seismic AVA and CSEM data for reservoir parameter estimation using statistical rock-physics models; the spatial dependence of geophysical and reservoir parameters are carried out by lithotypes through Markov random fields. We apply the developed model to a synthetic case, which simulates a CO{sub 2} monitoring application. We derive statistical rock-physics relations from borehole logs at one location and estimate seismic P- and S-wave velocity ratio, acoustic impedance, density, electrical resistivity, lithotypes, porosity, and water saturation at three different locations by conditioning to seismic AVA and CSEM data. Comparison of the inversion results with their corresponding true values shows that the correlation-based statistical rock-physics models provide significant information for improving the joint inversion results.

  7. Estimating reservoir parameters from seismic and electromagnetic data using stochastic rock-physics models and Markov chain Monte Carlo methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jinsong

    ) presented a method for quantitative estimation of reservoir parameters (porosity, water saturationEstimating reservoir parameters from seismic and electromagnetic data using stochastic rock Berkeley National Laboratory Summary A Bayesian model is developed to estimate porosity, fluid saturation

  8. Rock Physics of Geologic Carbon Sequestration/Storage Dvorkin...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Rock Physics of Geologic Carbon SequestrationStorage Dvorkin, Jack; Mavko, Gary 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 58 GEOSCIENCES This report covers the results of developing the rock...

  9. Assisted Seismic Matching: Joint Inversion of Seismic, Rock Physics and Basin Modeling Ulisses T. Mello*, IBM T. J. Watson Res. Center, Stewart A. Levin, Halliburton, Vanessa Lopez, Andrew Conn,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Hongchao

    Assisted Seismic Matching: Joint Inversion of Seismic, Rock Physics and Basin Modeling Ulisses T physics, and seismic attributes, including seismic amplitude to match seismic data. Introduction a match to seismic data. In particular, we seek to match not just event timing (phase) but also reflection

  10. Estimating reservoir parameters from seismic and electromagnetic data using stochastic rock-physics models and Markov chain Monte Carlo methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jinsong

    Joint inversion of 2D or 3D seismic and EM data for reservoir parameter estimation is computationallyEstimating reservoir parameters from seismic and electromagnetic data using stochastic rock, and pore pressure in reservoirs using seismic and electromagnetic (EM) data. Within the Bayesian framework

  11. Effects of uncertainty in rock-physics models on reservoir parameter estimation using marine seismic AVA and CSEM data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jinsong; Dickens, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    random functions of reservoir water saturation and porosity,models We relate reservoir water saturation S w and porosityexponent Saturation exponent Reservoir brine resistivity (W-

  12. Effects of uncertainty in rock-physics models on reservoir parameter estimation using marine seismic AVA and CSEM data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jinsong

    seismic AVA and CSEM data Jinsong Chen*, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and Thomas Dickens, ExxonMobil models on estimates of reservoir parameters from joint inversion of seismic AVA and CSEM data. The reser and CSEM data. In practice, model parameters are often derived from nearby well logs. First, an appropriate

  13. Joint inversion of marine seismic AVA and CSEM data using statistical rock-physics models and Markov random fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jinsong

    . Ideally, we can connect them through reservoir parameters (e.g., porosity and water saturation among seismic and electric attributes and reservoir parameters from distant borehole logs. In this study, we developed a Bayesian model to jointly invert seismic AVA and CSEM data for reservoir parameters

  14. Seismic-Scale Rock Physics of Methane Hydrate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amos Nur

    2009-01-08

    We quantify natural methane hydrate reservoirs by generating synthetic seismic traces and comparing them to real seismic data: if the synthetic matches the observed data, then the reservoir properties and conditions used in synthetic modeling might be the same as the actual, in-situ reservoir conditions. This approach is model-based: it uses rock physics equations that link the porosity and mineralogy of the host sediment, pressure, and hydrate saturation, and the resulting elastic-wave velocity and density. One result of such seismic forward modeling is a catalogue of seismic reflections of methane hydrate which can serve as a field guide to hydrate identification from real seismic data. We verify this approach using field data from known hydrate deposits.

  15. Rock physics and geophysics for unconventional resource, multi-component seismic, quantitative interpretation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glinsky, Michael E; Sassen, Doug; Rael, Howard; Chen, Jinsong

    2013-01-01

    An extension of a previously developed, rock physics, model is made that quantifies the relationship between the ductile fraction of a brittle/ductile binary mixture and the isotropic seismic reflection response. Making a weak scattering (Born) approximation and plane wave (eikonal) approximation, with a subsequent ordering according to the smallness of the angle of incidence, a linear singular value decomposition analysis is done to understand the stack weightings, number of stacks, and the type of stacks that will optimally estimate the two fundamental rock physics parameters. It is concluded that the full PP stack and the "full" PS stack are the two optimal stacks needed to estimate the two rock physics parameters. They dominate over both the second order AVO "gradient" stack and the higher order (4th order) PP stack.

  16. Improving the Monitoring, Verification, and Accounting of CO{sub 2} Sequestered in Geologic Systems with Multicomponent Seismic Technology and Rock Physics Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alkan, Engin; DeAngelo, Michael; Hardage, Bob; Sava, Diana; Sullivan, Charlotte; Wagner, Donald

    2012-12-31

    Research done in this study showed that P-SV seismic data provide better spatial resolution of geologic targets at our Appalachian Basin study area than do P-P data. This finding is important because the latter data (P-P) are the principal seismic data used to evaluate rock systems considered for CO{sub 2} sequestration. The increase in P-SV{sub 1} resolution over P-P resolution was particularly significant, with P-SV{sub 1} wavelengths being approximately 40-percent shorter than P-P wavelengths. CO{sub 2} sequestration projects across the Appalachian Basin should take advantage of the increased resolution provided by converted-shear seismic modes relative to P-wave seismic data. In addition to S-wave data providing better resolution of geologic targets, we found S-wave images described reservoir heterogeneities that P-P data could not see. Specifically, a channel-like anomaly was imaged in a key porous sandstone interval by P-SV{sub 1} data, and no indication of the feature existed in P-P data. If any stratigraphic unit is considered for CO{sub 2} storage purposes, it is important to know all heterogeneities internal to the unit to understand reservoir compartmentalization. We conclude it is essential that multicomponent seismic data be used to evaluate all potential reservoir targets whenever a CO{sub 2} storage effort is considered, particularly when sequestration efforts are initiated in the Appalachian Basin. Significant differences were observed between P-wave sequences and S- wave sequences in data windows corresponding to the Oriskany Sandstone, a popular unit considered for CO{sub 2} sequestration. This example demonstrates that S-wave sequences and facies often differ from P-wave sequences and facies and is a principle we have observed in every multicomponent seismic interpretation our research laboratory has done. As a result, we now emphasis elastic wavefield seismic stratigraphy in our reservoir characterization studies, which is a science based on the concept that the same weight must be given to S-wave sequences and facies as is given to P-wave sequences and facies. This philosophy differs from the standard practice of depending on only conventional P-wave seismic stratigraphy to characterize reservoir units. The fundamental physics of elastic wavefield seismic stratigraphy is that S- wave modes sense different sequences and facies across some intervals than does a P-wave mode because S-wave displacement vectors are orthogonal to P- wave displacement vectors and thus react to a different rock fabric than do P waves. Although P and S images are different, both images can still be correct in terms of the rock fabric information they reveal.

  17. SEISMIC AND ROCK PHYSICS DIAGNOSTICS OF MULTISCALE RESERVOIR TEXTURES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Mavko

    2004-08-01

    As part of our study on ''Relationships between seismic properties and rock microstructure'', we have continued our work on analyzing well logs and microstructural constraints on seismic signatures. We report results of three studies in this report. The first one deals with fractures and faults that provide the primary control on the underground fluid flow through low permeability massive carbonate rocks. Fault cores often represent lower transmissibility whereas the surrounding damaged rocks and main slip surfaces are high transmissibility elements. We determined the physical properties of fault rocks collected in and around the fault cores of large normal faults in central Italy. After studying the P- and S-wave velocity variation during cycles of confining pressure, we conclude that a rigid pore frame characterizes the fault gouge whereas the fractured limestone comprises pores with a larger aspect ratio. The second study was to characterize the seismic properties of brine as its temperature decreases from 25 C to -21 C. The purpose was to understand how the transmitted wave changes with the onset of freezing. The main practical reason for this experiment was to use partially frozen brine as an analogue for a mixture of methane hydrate and water present in the pore space of a gas hydrate reservoir. In the third study we analyzed variations in dynamic moduli in various carbonate reservoirs. The investigations include log and laboratory data from velocity, porosity, permeability, and attenuation measurements.

  18. Integration of Rock Physics and Seismic Inversion for Carbonate Reservoir Characterization 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Tingting

    2014-12-12

    Carbonate reservoir characterization based on rock physics and seismic inversion helps in better understanding the influence of deposition and diagenesis on rock property. In this dissertation, I first study a modern carbonate platform to understand...

  19. MULTI-ATTRIBUTE SEISMIC/ROCK PHYSICS APPROACH TO CHARACTERIZING FRACTURED RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Mavko

    2000-10-01

    This project consists of three key interrelated Phases, each focusing on the central issue of imaging and quantifying fractured reservoirs, through improved integration of the principles of rock physics, geology, and seismic wave propagation. This report summarizes the results of Phase I of the project. The key to successful development of low permeability reservoirs lies in reliably characterizing fractures. Fractures play a crucial role in controlling almost all of the fluid transport in tight reservoirs. Current seismic methods to characterize fractures depend on various anisotropic wave propagation signatures that can arise from aligned fractures. We are pursuing an integrated study that relates to high-resolution seismic images of natural fractures to the rock parameters that control the storage and mobility of fluids. Our goal is to go beyond the current state-of-the art to develop and demonstrate next generation methodologies for detecting and quantitatively characterizing fracture zones using seismic measurements. Our study incorporates 3 key elements: (1) Theoretical rock physics studies of the anisotropic viscoelastic signatures of fractured rocks, including up scaling analysis and rock-fluid interactions to define the factors relating fractures in the lab and in the field. (2) Modeling of optimal seismic attributes, including offset and azimuth dependence of travel time, amplitude, impedance and spectral signatures of anisotropic fractured rocks. We will quantify the information content of combinations of seismic attributes, and the impact of multi-attribute analyses in reducing uncertainty in fracture interpretations. (3) Integration and interpretation of seismic, well log, and laboratory data, incorporating field geologic fracture characterization and the theoretical results of items 1 and 2 above. The focal point for this project is the demonstration of these methodologies in the Marathon Oil Company Yates Field in West Texas.

  20. Rocks

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) byMultidayAlumni > The Energy Materials CenterRobotics KeyRocks Rocks

  1. SEISMIC AND ROCK PHYSICS DIAGNOSTICS OF MULTISCALE RESERVOIR TEXTURES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Mavko

    2003-06-30

    As part of our study on ''Relationships between seismic properties and rock microstructure'', we have studied (1) Effects of pore texture on porosity, permeability, and sonic velocity. We show how a relation can be found between porosity, permeability, and velocity by separating the formations of rocks with similar pore textures.

  2. SEISMIC AND ROCK PHYSICS DIAGNOSTICS OF MULTISCALE RESERVOIR TEXTURES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Mavko

    2003-06-01

    As part of our study on ''Relationships between seismic properties and rock microstructure'', we have studied (1) Elastic properties of clay minerals using Pulse Transmission experiments. We show measurements of elastic moduli and strain in clay minerals.

  3. SEISMIC AND ROCK PHYSICS DIAGNOSTICS OF MULTISCALE RESERVOIR TEXTURES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Mavko

    2003-10-01

    As part of our study on ''Relationships between seismic properties and rock microstructure'', we have (1) Studied relationships between velocity and permeability. (2) Used independent experimental methods to measure the elastic moduli of clay minerals as functions of pressure and saturation. (3) Applied different statistical methods for characterizing heterogeneity and textures from scanning acoustic microscope (SAM) images of shale microstructures. (4) Analyzed the directional dependence of velocity and attenuation in different reservoir rocks (5) Compared Vp measured under hydrostatic and non-hydrostatic stress conditions in sands. (6) Studied stratification as a source of intrinsic anisotropy in sediments using Vp and statistical methods for characterizing textures in sands.

  4. SEISMIC AND ROCK PHYSICS DIAGNOSTICS OF MULTISCALE RESERVOIR TEXTURES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Mavko

    2003-06-30

    As part of our study on ''Relationships between seismic properties and rock microstructure'', we have studied (1) Methods for detection of stress-induced velocity anisotropy in sands. (2) We have initiated efforts for velocity upscaling to quantify long-wavelength and short-wavelength velocity behavior and the scale-dependent dispersion caused by sediment variability in different depositional environments.

  5. Differential effective medium modeling of rock elastic moduli with critical porosity constraints

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mukerji, T.; Mavko, G. [Stanford Univ. CA (United States)] [Stanford Univ. CA (United States); Berryman, J.; Berge, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1995-03-01

    Rocks generally have a percolation porosity at which they lose rigidity and fall apart. Percolation behaviour is a purely geometrical property, independent of any physical properties, and is a powerful constraint on any valid velocity-porosity relation. The authors show how the conventional Differential Effective Medium (DEM) theory can be modified to incorporate percolation of elastic moduli in rocks by taking the material at the critical porosity as one of the constituents of a two-phase composite. Any desired percolation porosity can be specified as an input. In contrast, the conventional DEM model always predicts percolation at a porosity of either 0 or 100 percent. Most sedimentary rocks however have intermediate percolation porosities and are therefore not well represented by the conventional theory. The modified DEM model incorporates percolation behavior, and at the same time is always consistent with the Hashin-Shtrikman bounds. The predictions compare favorably with laboratory sandstone data. 24 refs., 3 figs.

  6. Multi-Attribute Seismic/Rock Physics Approach to Characterizing Fractured Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Mavko

    2004-11-30

    Most current seismic methods to seismically characterize fractures in tight reservoirs depend on a few anisotropic wave propagation signatures that can arise from aligned fractures. While seismic anisotropy can be a powerful fracture diagnostic, a number of situations can lessen its usefulness or introduce interpretation ambiguities. Fortunately, laboratory and theoretical work in rock physics indicates that a much broader spectrum of fracture seismic signatures can occur, including a decrease in P- and S-wave velocities, a change in Poisson's ratio, an increase in velocity dispersion and wave attenuation, as well as well as indirect images of structural features that can control fracture occurrence. The goal of this project was to demonstrate a practical interpretation and integration strategy for detecting and characterizing natural fractures in rocks. The approach was to exploit as many sources of information as possible, and to use the principles of rock physics as the link among seismic, geologic, and log data. Since no single seismic attribute is a reliable fracture indicator in all situations, the focus was to develop a quantitative scheme for integrating the diverse sources of information. The integrated study incorporated three key elements: The first element was establishing prior constraints on fracture occurrence, based on laboratory data, previous field observations, and geologic patterns of fracturing. The geologic aspects include analysis of the stratigraphic, structural, and tectonic environments of the field sites. Field observations and geomechanical analysis indicates that fractures tend to occur in the more brittle facies, for example, in tight sands and carbonates. In contrast, strain in shale is more likely to be accommodated by ductile flow. Hence, prior knowledge of bed thickness and facies architecture, calibrated to outcrops, are powerful constraints on the interpreted fracture distribution. Another important constraint is that fracturing is likely to be more intense near faults--sometimes referred to as the damaged zone. Yet another constraint, based on world-wide observations, is that the maximum likely fracture density increases with depth in a well-defined way. Defining these prior constrains has several benefits: they lead to a priori probability distributions of fractures, that are important for objective statistical integration; they limit the number of geologic hypotheses that need to be theoretically modeled; they provide plausible models for fracture distributions below the seismic resolution. The second element was theoretical rock physics modeling of optimal seismic attributes, including offset and azimuth dependence of traveltime, amplitude, and impedance signatures of anisotropic fractured rocks. The suggested workflow is to begin with an elastic earth model, based on well logs, theoretically add fractures to the likely facies as defined by the geologic prior information, and then compute synthetic seismic traces and attributes, including variations in P and S-wave velocities, Poisson's ratio, reflectivity, travel time, attenuation, and anisotropies of these parameters. This workflow is done in a Monte-Carlo fashion, yielding ranges of expected fracture signatures, and allowing realistic assessments of uncertainty to be honored. The third element was statistical integration of the geophysical data and prior constraints to map fracture intensity and orientations, along with uncertainties. A Bayesian framework was developed that allowed systematic integration of the prior constraints, the theoretical relations between fractures and their seismic signatures, and the various observed seismic observations. The integration scheme was successfully applied on an East Texas field site. The primary benefit from the study was the optimization and refinement of practical workflows for improved geophysical characterization of natural fractures and for quantifying the uncertainty of these interpretations. By presenting a methodology for integrating various types of information, the workflow will

  7. SEISMIC AND ROCK PHYSICS DIAGNOSTICS OF MULTISCALE RESERVOIR TEXTURES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Mavko

    2002-05-01

    As part of our study on ''Relationships between seismic properties and rock microstructure'', we have studied (1) How to quantify elastic properties of clay minerals using Atomic Force Acoustic Microscopy. We show how bulk modulus of clay can be measured using atomic force acoustic microscopy (AFAM) (2) We have successfully measured elastic properties of unconsolidated sediments in an effort to quantify attributes for detection of overpressures from seismic (3) We have initiated efforts for velocity upscaling to quantify long-wavelength and short-wavelength velocity behavior and the scale-dependent dispersion caused by sediment variability in different depositional environments.

  8. Rock Physics Based Determination of Reservoir Microstructure for Reservoir Characterization 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adesokan, Hamid 1976-

    2013-01-09

    of pore shape distribution is needed to explain the often-encountered complex interrelationship between seismic parameters (e.g. seismic velocity) and the independent physical properties (e.g. porosity) of hydrocarbon reservoirs. However, our knowledge...

  9. INTEGRATION OF ROCK PHYSICS AND RESERVOIR SIMULATION FOR THE INTERPRETATION OF TIME-LAPSE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INTEGRATION OF ROCK PHYSICS AND RESERVOIR SIMULATION FOR THE INTERPRETATION OF TIME-LAPSE SEISMIC is 15% to 20%, and should be detected in the time-lapse seismic data. Through interpretation of P This thesis research integrates reservoir simulation with time-lapse (4D) seismic monitoring of reservoir

  10. Physics Beyond the Standard Model

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Physics Beyond the Standard Model 1663 Los Alamos science and technology magazine Latest Issue:October 2015 past issues All Issues submit Physics Beyond the Standard Model...

  11. Identification of Physical Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of stiff physical models. Also the applications on the real systems represent new work in their respective a car engine at the Laboratory for Energetics. I wish to thank the participants of the Commission), on testing of building components related to passive solar energy conservation, tested under outdoor climate

  12. Shear velocity as the function of frequency in heavy oils De-hua Han and Jiajin Liu, Rock Physics Lab, UH;

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shear velocity as the function of frequency in heavy oils De-hua Han and Jiajin Liu, Rock Physics of heavy oils is discussed based on the measured data in our lab. Havriliak and Negami (HN) model is suggested to describe the frequency dispersion of heavy oils. Introduction The velocity behavior in heavy

  13. Linked multicontinuum and crack tensor approach for modeling of coupled geomechanics, fluid flow and transport in fractured rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutqvist, J.

    2014-01-01

    porosity models for fluid transport in jointed rock. Journalof coupled fluid flow, solute transport, and geomechanics ingeomechanics, fluid flow and transport in fractured rock

  14. Modeling of crack initiation, propagation and coalescence in rocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gonçalves da Silva, Bruno Miguel

    2009-01-01

    Natural or artificial fracturing of rock plays a very important role in geologic processes and for engineered structures in and on rock. Fracturing is associated with crack initiation, propagation and coalescence, which ...

  15. A CONSTITUTIVE MODEL TO PREDICT THE HYDROMECHANICAL BEHAVIOUR OF ROCK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aubertin, Michel

    in the presence of water to better assess the stability of rock structures under many situations. The accurate conditions. A rock mass behaviour can also be influenced by the water flow and ensuing pore pressure. For example, a previously stable rock structure can become unstable with an increase of water pressure inside

  16. Probabilistic model identification of the bit-rock-interaction-model uncertainties in nonlinear dynamics of a drill-string

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    , and simple models are usually considered in the analysis. This is an important constraint when uncertaintiesProbabilistic model identification of the bit-rock-interaction-model uncertainties in nonlinear model of uncertainties in a bit-rock interaction model for the nonlinear dynamics of a drill

  17. Coupled In-Rock and In-Drift Hydrothermal Model Stuudy For Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. Danko; J. Birkholzer; D. Bahrami

    2006-12-18

    A thermal-hydrologic-natural-ventilation model is configured for simulating temperature, humidity, and condensate distributions in the coupled domains of the in-drift airspace and the near-field rockmass in the proposed Yucca Mountain repository. The multi-physics problem is solved with MULTIFLUX in which a lumped-parameter computational fluid dynamics model is iterated with TOUGH2. The solution includes natural convection, conduction, and radiation for heat as well as moisture convection and diffusion for moisture transport with half waste package scale details in the drift, and mountain-scale heat and moisture transport in the porous and fractured rock-mass. The method provides fast convergence on a personal computer computational platform. Numerical examples and comparison with a TOUGH2 based, integrated model are presented.

  18. Modeling of Seismic Signatures of Carbonate Rock Types 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jan, Badr H.

    2011-02-22

    Carbonate reservoirs of different rock types have wide ranges of porosity and permeability, creating zones with different reservoir quality and flow properties. This research addresses how seismic technology can be used to identify different...

  19. Critical porosity: The key to relating physical properties to porosity in rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nur, A.M.; Mavko, G.; Dvorkin, J.; Gal, D.

    1995-12-31

    Many classes of rock such as sandstones, dolomites, chalks, and cracked igneous rocks have each a distinct characteristic porosity above which the material behaves as s suspension. The porosity at which this system changes, or transforms from isostress to solid load-bearing is defined here as the critical porosity {phi}{sub c}. It is easy to envision that at {phi}{sub c} not only the mechanical moduli, but also other properties such as strength and electrical conductivity, may also undergo transformations. Consequently, the critical porosity must be a fundamental property of a given porous system, not just of one of its physical properties. The observed values of {phi}{sub c} range from .005 for cracked granites to .30 or .40 for limestones, dolomites and sandstones, .60 for chalks and .90 for volcanic glasses. The data suggest that (1) A critical porosity value {phi}{sub c} exists which is typical of a given class of porous materials. Each class is defined on the basis of its common mineralogy or diagenetic porosity reduction processes. (2) Given {phi}{sub c} it may be possible to closely approximate the relation between porosity and velocity, over the entire range of porosity, with a modified mixture relation, in which the mixed components are the pure solid on one end, and a critical suspension on the other. (3) Without {phi}{sub c}, theory cannot yield reliable or useful velocity-porosity relations.

  20. Physics Beyond the Standard Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howard Baer

    2009-08-19

    I present a brief overview of some exciting possibilities for physics Beyond the Standard Model. I include short discussions of neutrino physics, the strong CP problem and axions, GUTs, large and warped extra dimensions, Little Higgs models and supersymmetry. The chances appear excellent that in the next few years-- as the LHC era gets underway-- data from a bevy of experiments will point the way to a new paradigm for the laws of physics as we know them.

  1. A rock physics strategy for quantifying uncertainty in common hydrocarbon indicators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mavko, G.M.; Mukerji, T.

    1995-12-31

    We present a strategy for hydrocarbon detection and for quantifying the uncertainty in hydrocarbon indicators, by combining statistical techniques with deterministic rock physics relations derived from the laboratory and theory. A simple example combines Gassmann`s deterministic equation for fluid substitution with statistics inferred from log and core data, to detect hydrocarbons from observed seismic velocities. The formulation gives the most likely estimate of the pore fluid modulus, corresponding to each observed velocity, and also the uncertainty of that interpretation. The variances of seismic velocity and porosity in the calibration data determine the uncertainty of the pore fluid interpretation. As expected, adding information about shear wave velocity, from AVO for example, narrows the uncertainty of the hydrocarbon indicator. The formulation offers a convenient way to implement deterministic fluid substitution equations in the realistic case when the reference porosity and velocity span a range of values.

  2. Preliminary validation of rock mass models by comparison to laboratory frictional sliding experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sobolik, S.R.; Miller, J.D.

    1996-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP) is studying Yucca Mountain in southwestern Nevada as a potential site for a high-level nuclear waste repository. Site characterization will be facilitated by the construction of an Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF). The ESF and potential repository will be excavated from both nonwelded and welded ashflow tuff with varying rock quality (degree of welding, rock mass strength, etc.) and fault and fracture characteristics. Design concerns for the construction of these facilities include the integrity of the structure during underground testing operations and, if it occurs, the emplacement and storage of high-level nuclear waste which could increase the local temperatures in the underground rock mass to as high as 300{degrees}C. Because of the associated issues regarding personnel and long-term environmental safety, sophisticated jointed rock mass models will be required to provide a high degree of confidence for decisions regarding the design, site characterization, and licensing of such facilities. The objective of the work documented in this report is to perform code validation calculations for three rock-mass computer models. The three rock-mass computer models used for this report are the discrete element code UDEC, Version 1.82; and the finite element continuum joint models JAC2D Version 5.10 and JAS3D Version 1.1. The rock mass behavior predicted by the models are compared to the results of laboratory experiments on layered polycarbonate (Lexan) and granite plate experiments. These experiments examine the rock mass behavior of well-defined jointed rock structures or models of jointed structures under uniaxial and biaxial loading. The laboratory environment allows control over the boundary conditions, material properties, and quality and quantity of the data obtained.

  3. Probabilistic Seismic Demand Model and Fragility Estimates for Symmetric Rigid Blocks Subject to Rocking Motions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bakhtiary, Esmaeel

    2013-01-15

    This thesis presents a probability model to predict the maximum rotation of rocking bodies exposed to seismic excitations given specific earthquake intensity measures. After obtaining the nonlinear equations of motion and clarification...

  4. Numerical and analytical modeling of heat transfer between fluid and fractured rocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Wei, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2014-01-01

    Modeling of heat transfer between fluid and fractured rocks is of particular importance for energy extraction analysis in EGS, and therefore represents a critical component of EGS design and performance evaluation. In ...

  5. Causal diagrams for physical models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kinsler, Paul

    2015-01-01

    I present a scheme of drawing causal diagrams based on physically motivated mathematical models expressed in terms of temporal differential equations. They provide a means of better understanding the processes and causal relationships contained within such systems.

  6. Electroweak physics and physics beyond the Standard Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Bellagamba; E. Sauvan; H. Spiesberger

    2006-07-25

    We summarize the recent results on electroweak physics and physics beyond the Standard Model that have been presented at the XIV International Workshop on Deep Inelastic Scattering 2006.

  7. Deformation of layered rocks in the ramp regions of thrust faults: a study with rock models 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chester, Judith Savaso

    1985-01-01

    wall at an S/Lr of 0. 20. " . . . . . . " "" . . -" . 43 17 Diagram showing the thrust belt terminology used to refer to locations and structures in the models. . . . . . 47 18 Deformation maps of configuration A models layered with lead and a... of configuration A. 65 xi LIST OF FIGURES (continued) Figure Page 25 Plot of slip across the lowest lead or mica unit of the veneer at the apex of the anticline above the ramp (location c) versus S/Lr for models of configurations A and B. 67 26 27 Plot...

  8. Modelling by homogenization of the long term rock dissolution and geomechanical effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 Modelling by homogenization of the long term rock dissolution and geomechanical effects Jolanta modifications of the hydrodynamical as well as geomechanical properties of the reservoir. The long-term safety the modelling of long term geomechanical effects related to CO2 storage are proposed. Of special interest

  9. Schematic Diagram of Physical and Chemical Steps to extract Al and Be from Quartz-bearing rocks Quartz separation and pre-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bookhagen, Bodo

    Schematic Diagram of Physical and Chemical Steps to extract Al and Be from Quartz-bearing rocks crushing A.1 sieving to 1.5 mm A.2 magnetic separation (Frantz;Chemical Separation of Al and Be from Quartz-bearing rocks Bodo Bookhagen, UC Santa Barbara 1/91 Cosmogenic

  10. Parameter estimation from flowing fluid temperature logging data in unsaturated fractured rock using multiphase inverse modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mukhopadhyay, S.; Tsang, Y.; Finsterle, S.

    2009-01-15

    A simple conceptual model has been recently developed for analyzing pressure and temperature data from flowing fluid temperature logging (FFTL) in unsaturated fractured rock. Using this conceptual model, we developed an analytical solution for FFTL pressure response, and a semianalytical solution for FFTL temperature response. We also proposed a method for estimating fracture permeability from FFTL temperature data. The conceptual model was based on some simplifying assumptions, particularly that a single-phase airflow model was used. In this paper, we develop a more comprehensive numerical model of multiphase flow and heat transfer associated with FFTL. Using this numerical model, we perform a number of forward simulations to determine the parameters that have the strongest influence on the pressure and temperature response from FFTL. We then use the iTOUGH2 optimization code to estimate these most sensitive parameters through inverse modeling and to quantify the uncertainties associated with these estimated parameters. We conclude that FFTL can be utilized to determine permeability, porosity, and thermal conductivity of the fracture rock. Two other parameters, which are not properties of the fractured rock, have strong influence on FFTL response. These are pressure and temperature in the borehole that were at equilibrium with the fractured rock formation at the beginning of FFTL. We illustrate how these parameters can also be estimated from FFTL data.

  11. Core Analysis for the Development and Constraint of Physical Models of Geothermal Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greg N. Boitnott

    2003-12-14

    Effective reservoir exploration, characterization, and engineering require a fundamental understanding of the geophysical properties of reservoir rocks and fracture systems. Even in the best of circumstances, spatial variability in porosity, fracture density, salinity, saturation, tectonic stress, fluid pressures, and lithology can all potentially produce and/or contribute to geophysical anomalies. As a result, serious uniqueness problems frequently occur when interpreting assumptions based on a knowledge base founded in validated rock physics models of reservoir material.

  12. On the seismic response of deep-seated rock slope instabilities --Insights from numerical modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    On the seismic response of deep-seated rock slope instabilities -- Insights from numerical modeling 2015 Accepted 3 April 2015 Available online 15 April 2015 Keywords: Seismic landslide hazard Spectral component of seismic hazard in mountainous regions. While many seismic slope stability analysis methods

  13. Physical layer model design for wireless networks 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Yi

    2009-06-02

    Wireless network analysis and simulations rely on accurate physical layer models. The increased interest in wireless network design and cross-layer design require an accurate and efficient physical layer model especially when a large number of nodes...

  14. Physics Models Update Chris Rogers,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    1 Physics Models Update Chris Rogers, Accelerator Science and Technology Centre (ASTeC), RutherfordH, 100000 200 MeV/c mu+, energy, QGSP_BIC 200 MeV/c => 226.194 MeV (total energy) #12;6 LiH - G4BL 10 mm LiE/dz between ICOOL3.20 and G4BL 2.06 is about 2% 10 mm LiH, 100000 200 MeV/c mu+, energy #12;8 LiH ­ G4BL vs

  15. Integrated Experimental and Modeling Studies of Mineral Carbonation as a Mechanism for Permanent Carbon Sequestration in Mafic/Ultramafic Rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Zhengrong; Qiu, Lin; Zhang, Shuang; Bolton, Edward; Bercovici, David; Ague, Jay; Karato, Shun-Ichiro; Oristaglio, Michael; Zhu, Wen-Iu; Lisabeth, Harry; Johnson, Kevin

    2014-09-30

    A program of laboratory experiments, modeling and fieldwork was carried out at Yale University, University of Maryland, and University of Hawai‘i, under a DOE Award (DE-FE0004375) to study mineral carbonation as a practical method of geologic carbon sequestration. Mineral carbonation, also called carbon mineralization, is the conversion of (fluid) carbon dioxide into (solid) carbonate minerals in rocks, by way of naturally occurring chemical reactions. Mafic and ultramafic rocks, such as volcanic basalt, are natural candidates for carbonation, because the magnesium and iron silicate minerals in these rocks react with brines of dissolved carbon dioxide to form carbonate minerals. By trapping carbon dioxide (CO2) underground as a constituent of solid rock, carbonation of natural basalt formations would be a secure method of sequestering CO2 captured at power plants in efforts to mitigate climate change. Geochemical laboratory experiments at Yale, carried out in a batch reactor at 200°C and 150 bar (15 MPa), studied carbonation of the olivine mineral forsterite (Mg2SiO4) reacting with CO2 brines in the form of sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) solutions. The main carbonation product in these reactions is the carbonate mineral magnesite (MgCO3). A series of 32 runs varied the reaction time, the reactive surface area of olivine grains and powders, the concentration of the reacting fluid, and the starting ratio of fluid to olivine mass. These experiments were the first to study the rate of olivine carbonation under passive conditions approaching equilibrium. The results show that, in a simple batch reaction, olivine carbonation is fastest during the first 24 hours and then slows significantly and even reverses. A natural measure of the extent of carbonation is a quantity called the carbonation fraction, which compares the amount of carbon removed from solution, during a run, to the maximum amount that could have been removed if the olivine initially present had fully dissolved and the cations released had subsequently precipitated in carbonate minerals. The carbonation fractions observed in batch experiments with olivine grains and powders varied significantly, from less than 0.01 (1%) to more than 0.5 (50%). Over time, the carbonation fractions reached an upper limit after about 24 to 72 hours of reaction, then stayed constant or decreased. The peak Final Scientific/Technical Report DE-FE0004275 | Mineral Carbonation | 4 coincided with the appearance of secondary magnesium-bearing silicate minerals, whose formation competes for magnesium ions in solution and can even promote conditions that dissolve magnesite. The highest carbonation fractions resulted from experiments with low ratios of concentrated solution to olivine, during which amorphous silica spheres or meshes formed, instead of secondary silicate minerals. The highest carbonation fractions appear to result from competing effects. Precipitation of silica layers on olivine reduces the reactive surface area and, thus, the rate of olivine dissolution (which ultimately limits the carbonation rate), but these same silica layers can also inhibit the formation of secondary silicate minerals that consume magnesite formed in earlier stages of carbonation. Simulation of these experiments with simple geochemical models using the software program EQ3/6 reproduces the general trends observed—especially the results for the carbonation fraction in short-run experiments. Although further experimentation and better models are needed, this study nevertheless provides a framework for understanding the optimal conditions for sequestering carbon dioxide by reacting CO2-bearing fluids with rocks containing olivine minerals. A series of experiments at the Rock Physics Laboratory at the University of Maryland studied the carbonation process during deformation of thermally cracked olivine-rich rock samples (dunit

  16. Final Report - Advanced Conceptual Models for Unsaturated and Two-Phase Flow in Fractured Rock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nicholl, Michael J.

    2006-07-10

    The Department of Energy Environmental Management Program is faced with two major issues involving two-phase flow in fractured rock; specifically, transport of dissolved contaminants in the Vadose Zone, and the fate of Dense Nonaqueous Phase Liquids (DNAPLs) below the water table. Conceptual models currently used to address these problems do not correctly include the influence of the fractures, thus leading to erroneous predictions. Recent work has shown that it is crucial to understand the topology, or ''structure'' of the fluid phases (air/water or water/DNAPL) within the subsurface. It has also been shown that even under steady boundary conditions, the influence of fractures can lead to complex and dynamic phase structure that controls system behavior, with or without the presence of a porous rock matrix. Complicated phase structures within the fracture network can facilitate rapid transport, and lead to a sparsely populated and widespread distribution of concentrated contaminants; these qualities are highly difficult to describe with current conceptual models. The focus of our work is to improve predictive modeling through the development of advanced conceptual models for two-phase flow in fractured rock.

  17. Lectures on Physics Beyond the Standard Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ben Gripaios

    2015-03-09

    These four lectures, given at the British Universities Summer School in Theoretical Elementary Particle Physics (BUSSTEPP), held in 2014 in Southampton, are a brief introduction to a selection of current topics in physics Beyond the Standard Model.

  18. Fractured rock modeling in the National Waste Terminal Storage Program: a review of requirements and status

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    St. John, C.; Krug, A.; Key, S.; Monsees, J.

    1983-05-01

    Generalized computer codes capable of forming the basis for numerical models of fractured rock masses are being used within the NWTS program. Little additional development of these codes is considered justifiable, except in the area of representation of discrete fractures. On the other hand, model preparation requires definition of medium-specific constitutive descriptions and site characteristics and is therefore legitimately conducted by each of the media-oriented projects within the National Waste Terminal Storage program. However, it is essential that a uniform approach to the role of numerical modeling be adopted, including agreement upon the contribution of modeling to the design and licensing process and the need for, and means of, model qualification for particular purposes. This report discusses the role of numerical modeling, reviews the capabilities of several computer codes that are being used to support design or performance assessment, and proposes a framework for future numerical modeling activities within the NWTS program.

  19. Measurements and modeling of surface waves in drilled shafts in rock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalinski, M.E.; Stokoe, K.H. II; Roesset, J.M.; Cheng, D.S.

    1999-07-01

    Seismic testing was conducted in the WIPP facility in November 1994 by personnel from the Geotechnical Engineering Center at the University of Texas at Austin. Surface wave measurements were made in horizontal drilled shafts in rock salt to characterize the stiffness of the rock around the shafts. The Spectral-Analysis-of-Surface-Waves (SASW) method was used to determine dispersion curves of surface wave velocity versus wavelength. Dispersion curves were measured for surface waves propagating axially and circumferentially in the shafts. Surface wave velocities determined from axial testing increased slightly with increasing wavelength due to the cylindrical geometry of the shafts. On the other hand, surface wave velocities determined from circumferential testing exhibited a completely different type of geometry-induced dispersion. In both instances, finite-element forward modeling of the experimental dispersion curves revealed the presence of a thin, slightly softer disturbed rock zone (DRZ) around the shafts. This phenomenon has been previously confirmed by crosshole and other seismic measurements and is generally associated with relaxation of the individual salt crystals after confirming stress is relieved by excavation.

  20. Actualistic and Geochemical Modeling of Reservoir Rock, CO2 and Formation Fluid Interaction, Citronelle Oil Field, Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weislogel, Amy

    2014-01-31

    This report includes description of the Citronelle field study area and the work carried out in the project to characterize the geology and composition of reservoir rock material and to collect an analyze the geochemical composition of produced fluid waters from the Citronelle field. Reservoir rock samples collected from well bore core were made into thin-sections and assessed for textural properties, including pore types and porosity distribution. Compositional framework grain modal data were collected via point-counting, and grain and cement mineralogy was assessed using SEM-EDS. Geochemistry of fluid samples is described and modeled using PHREEQC. Composition of rock and produced fluids were used as inputs for TOUGHREACT reactive transport modeling, which determined the rock-fluid system was in disequilibrium.

  1. Modeling of thermally driven hydrological processes in partially saturated fractured rock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsang, Yvonne; Birkholzer, Jens; Mukhopadhyay, Sumit

    2009-03-15

    This paper is a review of the research that led to an in-depth understanding of flow and transport processes under strong heat stimulation in fractured, porous rock. It first describes the anticipated multiple processes that come into play in a partially saturated, fractured porous volcanic tuff geological formation, when it is subject to a heat source such as that originating from the decay of radionuclides. The rationale is then given for numerical modeling being a key element in the study of multiple processes that are coupled. The paper outlines how the conceptualization and the numerical modeling of the problem evolved, progressing from the simplified to the more realistic. Examples of numerical models are presented so as to illustrate the advancement and maturation of the research over the last two decades. The most recent model applied to in situ field thermal tests is characterized by (1) incorporation of a full set of thermal-hydrological processes into a numerical simulator, (2) realistic representation of the field test geometry, in three dimensions, and (3) use of site-specific characterization data for model inputs. Model predictions were carried out prior to initiation of data collection, and the model results were compared to diverse sets of measurements. The approach of close integration between modeling and field measurements has yielded a better understanding of how coupled thermal hydrological processes produce redistribution of moisture within the rock, which affects local permeability values and subsequently the flow of liquid and gases. The fluid flow in turn will change the temperature field. We end with a note on future research opportunities, specifically those incorporating chemical, mechanical, and microbiological factors into the study of thermal and hydrological processes.

  2. Nuclear Physics and the New Standard Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramsey-Musolf, Michael J. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States) and Kellogg Radiation Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2010-08-04

    Nuclear physics studies of fundamental symmetries and neutrino properties have played a vital role in the development and confirmation of the Standard Model of fundamental interactions. With the advent of the CERN Large Hadron Collider, experiments at the high energy frontier promise exciting discoveries about the larger framework in which the Standard Model lies. In this talk, I discuss the complementary opportunities for probing the 'new Standard Model' with nuclear physics experiments at the low-energy high precision frontier.

  3. Multi-physics modeling of thermoelectric generators for waste...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    physics modeling of thermoelectric generators for waste heat recovery applications Multi-physics modeling of thermoelectric generators for waste heat recovery applications Model...

  4. Nuclear Physics & Modeling, AFC R&D Nuclear Physics Working Group...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Nuclear Physics & Modeling, AFC R&D Nuclear Physics Working Group Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Nuclear Physics & Modeling, AFC R&D Nuclear Physics Working Group...

  5. Model reduction in physical domain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ye, Yong, 1971-

    2002-01-01

    Modeling is an essential part of the analysis and the design of dynamic systems. Contemporary computer algorithms can produce very detailed models for complex systems with little time and effort. However, over complicated ...

  6. Elements of fractal generalization of dual-porosity model for solute transport in unsaturated fractured rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolshov, L.; Kondratenko, P.; Matveev, L.; Pruess, K.

    2008-09-01

    In this study, new elements were developed to generalize the dual-porosity model for moisture infiltration on and solute transport in unsaturated rocks, taking into account fractal aspects of the percolation process. Random advection was considered as a basic mechanism of solute transport in self-similar fracture systems. In addition to spatial variations in the infiltration velocity field, temporal fluctuations were also taken into account. The rock matrix, a low-permeability component of the heterogeneous geologic medium, acts as a trap for solute particles and moisture. Scaling relations were derived for the moisture infiltration flux, the velocity correlation length, the average velocity of infiltration, and the velocity correlation function. The effect of temporal variations in precipitation intensity on the infiltration processes was analyzed. It showed that the mode of solute transport is determined by the power exponent in the advection velocity correlation function and the dimensionality of the trapping system, both of which may change with time. Therefore, depending on time, various transport regimes may be realized: superdiffusion, subdiffusion, or classical diffusion. The complex structure of breakthrough curves from changes in the transport regimes was also examined. A renormalization of the solute source strength due to characteristic fluctuations of highly disordered media was established.

  7. Development of Chemical Model to Predict the Interactions between Supercritical CO2and Fluid, and Rocks in EGS Reservoirs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This project will develop a chemical model, based on existing models and databases, that is capable of simulating chemical reactions between supercritical (SC) CO2 and Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) reservoir rocks of various compositions in aqueous, non-aqueous and 2-phase environments.

  8. Advanced Computing Tools and Models for Accelerator Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryne, Robert D.

    2008-01-01

    MODELS FOR ACCELERATOR PHYSICS * Robert D. Ryne, Lawrencetools for accelerator physics. Following an introduction Icomputing in accelerator physics. INTRODUCTION To begin I

  9. Physically-based demand modeling 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calloway, Terry Marshall

    1980-01-01

    nts on the demand. Of course the demand of a real a1r cond1t1oner has lower and upper bounds equal to 0 and 0 , respec- u tively. A constra1ned system can be simulated numerically, but there 1s no explicit system response formula s1m11ar... sect1on. It may now be instruct1ve to relate this model to that of Jones and Bri ce [5] . The average demand pred1 cted by their model is the expected value of the product of a load response factor 0 and a U sw1tching process H(t), which depends...

  10. Modeling of coupled thermodynamic and geomechanical performance of underground compressed air energy storage (CAES) in lined rock caverns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutqvist, J.

    2013-01-01

    compressed air energy storage (CAES) in lined rock cavernsCompressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) in Lined Rock Cavernscompressed air energy storage (CAES) in concrete-lined rock

  11. Identi cation of Physical Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    models. Also the applications on the real systems represent new work in their respective elds. Lyngby Lillelund and Elbert Hendricks are thanked for their support during data collection from a car engine Components and Systems Testing, on testing of building components related to passive solar energy

  12. Discrimination of new physics models with the International Linear...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Discrimination of new physics models with the International Linear Collider Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Discrimination of new physics models with the International...

  13. A Coupled Model for Natural Convection and Condensation in Heated Subsurface Enclosures Embedded in Fractured Rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Halecky, N.; Birkholzer, J.T.; Webb, S.W.; Peterson, P.F.; Bodvarsson, G.S.

    2006-01-01

    and Mass Transfer in Yucca Mountain Drifts,” Proceedings ofMD- 000001 REV 00, Yucca Mountain Project Report, Bechtelthe fractured rock at Yucca Mountain have been investigated

  14. THERMO-HYDRO-MECHANICAL MODELING OF WORKING FLUID INJECTION AND THERMAL ENERGY EXTRACTION IN EGS FRACTURES AND ROCK MATRIX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Podgorney; Chuan Lu; Hai Huang

    2012-01-01

    Development of enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) will require creation of a reservoir of sufficient volume to enable commercial-scale heat transfer from the reservoir rocks to the working fluid. A key assumption associated with reservoir creation/stimulation is that sufficient rock volumes can be hydraulically fractured via both tensile and shear failure, and more importantly by reactivation of naturally existing fractures (by shearing), to create the reservoir. The advancement of EGS greatly depends on our understanding of the dynamics of the intimately coupled rock-fracture-fluid-heat system and our ability to reliably predict how reservoirs behave under stimulation and production. Reliable performance predictions of EGS reservoirs require accurate and robust modeling for strongly coupled thermal-hydrological-mechanical (THM) processes. Conventionally, these types of problems have been solved using operator-splitting methods, usually by coupling a subsurface flow and heat transport simulators with a solid mechanics simulator via input files. An alternative approach is to solve the system of nonlinear partial differential equations that govern multiphase fluid flow, heat transport, and rock mechanics simultaneously, using a fully coupled, fully implicit solution procedure, in which all solution variables (pressure, enthalpy, and rock displacement fields) are solved simultaneously. This paper describes numerical simulations used to investigate the poro- and thermal- elastic effects of working fluid injection and thermal energy extraction on the properties of the fractures and rock matrix of a hypothetical EGS reservoir, using a novel simulation software FALCON (Podgorney et al., 2011), a finite element based simulator solving fully coupled multiphase fluid flow, heat transport, rock deformation, and fracturing using a global implicit approach. Investigations are also conducted on how these poro- and thermal-elastic effects are related to fracture permeability evolution.

  15. Published online 6 August 2003 Physical modelling in biomechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koehl, Mimi

    Published online 6 August 2003 Physical modelling in biomechanics M. A. R. Koehl Department@socrates.berkeley.edu) Physical models, like mathematical models, are useful tools in biomechanical research. Physical models organ- isms. Physical models also permit some aspects of the biomechanical performance of extinct

  16. Review of Some Promising Fractional Physical Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vasily E. Tarasov

    2015-02-14

    Fractional dynamics is a field of study in physics and mechanics investigating the behavior of objects and systems that are characterized by power-law non-locality, power-law long-term memory or fractal properties by using integrations and differentiation of non-integer orders, i.e., by methods of the fractional calculus. This paper is a review of physical models that look very promising for future development of fractional dynamics. We suggest a short introduction to fractional calculus as a theory of integration and differentiation of non-integer order. Some applications of integro-differentiations of fractional orders in physics are discussed. Models of discrete systems with memory, lattice with long-range inter-particle interaction, dynamics of fractal media are presented. Quantum analogs of fractional derivatives and model of open nano-system systems with memory are also discussed.

  17. Review Article STANDARD MODEL OF PARTICLE PHYSICS--A HEALTH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cooper, Robin L.

    to the physics supporting the health physics profession. Concepts important to health physics are emphasized physics and modern physics courses and various publications describing the operation of the Large HadronReview Article STANDARD MODEL OF PARTICLE PHYSICS--A HEALTH PHYSICS PERSPECTIVE J. J. Bevelacqua

  18. Characterising and modelling the excavation damaged zone (EDZ) in crystalline rock in the context of radioactive waste disposal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hudson, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    Institute of Rock and Soil Mechanics, Chinese Academy ofis designed for rock and soil mechanics. In a TOUGH-FLAC

  19. PS-wave moveout inversion for tilted TI media: A physical-modeling study Pawan Dewangan and Ilya Tsvankin , Center for Wave Phenomena, Colorado School of Mines (CSM),

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PS-wave moveout inversion for tilted TI media: A physical-modeling study Pawan Dewangan and Ilya Tsvankin , Center for Wave Phenomena, Colorado School of Mines (CSM), Mike Batzle, Center for Rock Abuse, CSM, Kasper van Wijk, Physical Acoustics Laboratory, CSM, and Matt Haney, Center for Wave Phenomena

  20. Topos models for physics and topos theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolters, Sander

    2014-08-15

    What is the role of topos theory in the topos models for quantum theory as used by Isham, Butterfield, Döring, Heunen, Landsman, Spitters, and others? In other words, what is the interplay between physical motivation for the models and the mathematical framework used in these models? Concretely, we show that the presheaf topos model of Butterfield, Isham, and Döring resembles classical physics when viewed from the internal language of the presheaf topos, similar to the copresheaf topos model of Heunen, Landsman, and Spitters. Both the presheaf and copresheaf models provide a “quantum logic” in the form of a complete Heyting algebra. Although these algebras are natural from a topos theoretic stance, we seek a physical interpretation for the logical operations. Finally, we investigate dynamics. In particular, we describe how an automorphism on the operator algebra induces a homeomorphism (or isomorphism of locales) on the associated state spaces of the topos models, and how elementary propositions and truth values transform under the action of this homeomorphism. Also with dynamics the focus is on the internal perspective of the topos.

  1. Rock Art

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huyge, Dirk

    2009-01-01

    Courtesy of the Royal Museums of Art and History, Brussels.Figure 4. Rock art from Abu Ballas caravan station, 550 kmtypical of Pharaonic rock art. Kharga Oasis. Photograph by

  2. Dilution physics modeling: Dissolution/precipitation chemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Onishi, Y.; Reid, H.C.; Trent, D.S.

    1995-09-01

    This report documents progress made to date on integrating dilution/precipitation chemistry and new physical models into the TEMPEST thermal-hydraulics computer code. Implementation of dissolution/precipitation chemistry models is necessary for predicting nonhomogeneous, time-dependent, physical/chemical behavior of tank wastes with and without a variety of possible engineered remediation and mitigation activities. Such behavior includes chemical reactions, gas retention, solids resuspension, solids dissolution and generation, solids settling/rising, and convective motion of physical and chemical species. Thus this model development is important from the standpoint of predicting the consequences of various engineered activities, such as mitigation by dilution, retrieval, or pretreatment, that can affect safe operations. The integration of a dissolution/precipitation chemistry module allows the various phase species concentrations to enter into the physical calculations that affect the TEMPEST hydrodynamic flow calculations. The yield strength model of non-Newtonian sludge correlates yield to a power function of solids concentration. Likewise, shear stress is concentration-dependent, and the dissolution/precipitation chemistry calculations develop the species concentration evolution that produces fluid flow resistance changes. Dilution of waste with pure water, molar concentrations of sodium hydroxide, and other chemical streams can be analyzed for the reactive species changes and hydrodynamic flow characteristics.

  3. Workshop on hydrology of crystalline basement rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, S.N. (comp.)

    1981-08-01

    This workshop covered the following subjects: measurements in relatively shallow boreholes; measurement and interpretation of data from deep boreholes; hydrologic properties of crystalline rocks as interpreted by geophysics and field geology; rock mechanics related to hydrology of crystalline rocks; the possible contributions of modeling to the understanding of the hydrology of crystalline rocks; and geochemical interpretations of the hydrology of crystalline rocks. (MHR)

  4. Compaction of porous rock by dissolution on discrete stylolites: A one-dimensional model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Einat, Aharonov

    in sedimentary rocks [Weyl, 1959], with practical implications to oil, gas, and water flows, as well transport away from the clay layer followed by pore cementation. The evolution of the porosity, reactant

  5. Seismic Absorption and Modulus Measurements in Porous Rocks Under Fluid and Gas Flow-Physical and Chemical Effects: a Laboratory Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harmut Spetzler

    2005-11-28

    This paper describes the culmination of a research project in which we investigated the complex modulus change in partially fluid saturated porous rocks. The investigation started with simple flow experiments over ''clean'' and ''contaminated'' surfaces, progressed to moduli measurements on partially filled single cracks, to measurements in ''clean'' and ''contaminated'' porous rocks and finally to a feasibility study in the field. For the experiments with the simple geometries we were able to measure fundamental physical properties such as contact angles of the meniscus and time dependent forces required to get the meniscus moving and to keep it moving at various velocities. From the data thus gathered we were able to interpret the complex elastic moduli data we measured in the partially saturated single cracks. While the geometry in real rocks is too complex to make precise calculations we determined that we had indeed identified the mechanisms responsible for the changes in the moduli we had measured. Thus encouraged by the laboratory studies we embarked on a field experiment in the desert of Arizona. The field site allowed for controlled irrigation. Instrumentation for fluid sampling and water penetration were already in place. The porous loosely consolidated rocks at the site were not ideal for finding the effects of the attenuation mechanism we had identified in the lab, but for logistic and cost constraint reasons we chose to field test the idea at that site. Tiltmeters and seismometers were installed and operated nearly continuously for almost 3 years. The field was irrigated with water in the fall of 2003 and with water containing a biosurfactant in the fall of 2004. We have indications that the biosurfactant irrigation has had a notable effect on the tilt data.

  6. A physics department's role in preparing physics teachers: The Colorado learning assistant model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    of Physics Teachers. DOI: 10.1119/1.3471291 I. INTRODUCTION: THE U.S. EDUCATIONAL CONTEXT Physics majorsA physics department's role in preparing physics teachers: The Colorado learning assistant model Finkelstein Department of Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309 Received 11 November 2009

  7. Pore Fluid Effects on Shear Modulus in a Model of Heterogeneous Rocks, Reservoirs, and Granular Media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berryman, J G

    2005-03-23

    To provide quantitative measures of the importance of fluid effects on shear waves in heterogeneous reservoirs, a model material called a ''random polycrystal of porous laminates'' is introduced. This model poroelastic material has constituent grains that are layered (or laminated), and each layer is an isotropic, microhomogeneous porous medium. All grains are composed of exactly the same porous constituents, and have the same relative volume fractions. The order of lamination is not important because the up-scaling method used to determine the transversely isotropic (hexagonal) properties of the grains is Backus averaging, which--for quasi-static or long-wavelength behavior--depends only on the volume fractions and layer properties. Grains are then jumbled together totally at random, filling all space, and producing an overall isotropic poroelastic medium. The poroelastic behavior of this medium is then analyzed using the Peselnick-Meister-Watt bounds (of Hashin-Shtrikman type). We study the dependence of the shear modulus on pore fluid properties and determine the range of behavior to be expected. In particular we compare and contrast these results to those anticipated from Gassmann's fluid substitution formulas, and to the predictions of Mavko and Jizba for very low porosity rocks with flat cracks. This approach also permits the study of arbitrary numbers of constituents, but for simplicity the numerical examples are restricted here to just two constituents. This restriction also permits the use of some special exact results available for computing the overall effective stress coefficient in any two-component porous medium. The bounds making use of polycrystalline microstructure are very tight. Results for the shear modulus demonstrate that the ratio of compliance differences R (i.e., shear compliance changes over bulk compliance changes when going from drained to undrained behavior, or vice versa) is usually nonzero and can take a wide range of values, both above and below the value R = 4/15 valid for low porosity, very low aspect ratio flat cracks. Results show the overall shear modulus in this model can depend relatively strongly on mechanical properties of the pore fluids, sometimes (but rarely) more strongly than the dependence of the overall bulk modulus on the fluids.

  8. The interaction of two closely spaced cracks - rock models and computer simulations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Peng

    1990-01-01

    fractures 77 CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION It has been know for some time that brittle crystalline rock fails at stresses well below their theoretical strengths. This can be attributed to flaws in the rock such as fractures which may occur closely together... are generated from precut tips and diverge away from the precuts and curve to the loading direction; the other is called h fractures which are at high angle to the loading direction and bounded within z fractures. The cross section which is cut in the middle...

  9. Exploring the concept of compressed air energy storage (CAES) in lined rock caverns at shallow depth: A modeling study of air tightness and energy balance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, H.-M.

    2012-01-01

    and R. Scharf, Huntroft CAES: More than 20 years ofbase case for modeling of CAES in a lined rock cavern. TableFigure 2. Components of a CAES system (modified from http://

  10. Detailed Physical Trough Model for NREL's Solar Advisor Model: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, M. J.; Blair, N.; Dobos, A.

    2010-10-01

    Solar Advisor Model (SAM) is a free software package made available by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Sandia National Laboratory, and the US Department of Energy. SAM contains hourly system performance and economic models for concentrating solar power (CSP) systems, photovoltaic, solar hot-water, and generic fuel-use technologies. Versions of SAM prior to 2010 included only the parabolic trough model based on Excelergy. This model uses top-level empirical performance curves to characterize plant behavior, and thus is limited in predictive capability for new technologies or component configurations. To address this and other functionality challenges, a new trough model; derived from physical first principles was commissioned to supplement the Excelergy-based empirical model. This new 'physical model' approaches the task of characterizing the performance of the whole parabolic trough plant by replacing empirical curve-fit relationships with more detailed calculations where practical. The resulting model matches the annual performance of the SAM empirical model (which has been previously verified with plant data) while maintaining run-times compatible with parametric analysis, adding additional flexibility in modeled system configurations, and providing more detailed performance calculations in the solar field, power block, piping, and storage subsystems.

  11. A pore-scale model of two-phase flow in water-wet rock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silin, Dmitriy; Patzek, Tad

    2009-02-01

    A finite-difference discretization of Stokes equations is used to simulate flow in the pore space of natural rocks. Numerical solutions are obtained using the method of artificial compressibility. In conjunction with Maximal Inscribed Spheres method, these computations produce relative permeability curves. The results of computations are in agreement with laboratory measurements.

  12. Tacoma Bridge Failure-- a Physical Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Green, D; Green, Daniel; Unruh, William G.

    2004-01-01

    The cause of the collapse of the Tacoma Narrows Bridge has been a topic of much debate and confusion since the day it fell. Many mischaracterizations of the observed phenomena have limited the widespread understanding of the problem. Nevertheless, there has always been an abundance of evidence in favour of a negative damping model. Negative damping, or positive feedback, is responsible for many large amplitude oscillations observed in many applications. In this paper, we will explain some well-known examples of positive feedback. We will then present a feedback model, derived from fundamental physics, capable of explaining a number of features observed in the instabilities of many bridge decks. This model is supported by computational, experimental and historical data.

  13. Physics-based models of the plasmasphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jordanova, Vania K; Pierrard, Vivane; Goldstein, Jerry; Andr'e, Nicolas; Lemaire, Joseph F; Liemohn, Mike W; Matsui, H

    2008-01-01

    We describe recent progress in physics-based models of the plasmasphere using the Auid and the kinetic approaches. Global modeling of the dynamics and inAuence of the plasmasphere is presented. Results from global plasmasphere simulations are used to understand and quantify (i) the electric potential pattern and evolution during geomagnetic storms, and (ii) the inAuence of the plasmasphere on the excitation of electromagnetic ion cyclotron (ElvIIC) waves a.nd precipitation of energetic ions in the inner magnetosphere. The interactions of the plasmasphere with the ionosphere a.nd the other regions of the magnetosphere are pointed out. We show the results of simulations for the formation of the plasmapause and discuss the inAuence of plasmaspheric wind and of ultra low frequency (ULF) waves for transport of plasmaspheric material. Theoretical formulations used to model the electric field and plasma distribution in the plasmasphere are given. Model predictions are compared to recent CLUSTER and MAGE observations, but also to results of earlier models and satellite observations.

  14. Evaluation of experimentally measured and model-calculated pH for rock-brine-CO2 systems under geologic CO2 sequestration conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shao, Hongbo; Thompson, Christopher J.; Cantrell, Kirk J.

    2013-11-01

    pH is an essential parameter for understanding the geochemical reactions that occur in rock-brine-CO2 systems when CO2 is injected into deep geologic formations for long-term storage. Due to a lack of reliable experimental methods, most laboratory studies conducted under geological CO2 sequestration (GCS) conditions have relied on thermodynamic modeling to estimate pH. The accuracy of these model predictions is typically uncertain. In our previous work, we have developed a method for pH determination by in-situ spectrophotometry. In the present work, we expanded the applicable pH range for this method and measured the pH of several rock-brine-CO2 systems at GCS conditions for five rock samples collected from ongoing GCS demonstration projects. Experimental measurements were compared with pH values calculated using several geochemical modeling approaches. The effect of different thermodynamic databases on the accuracy of model prediction was evaluated. Results indicate that the accuracy of model calculations is rock-dependent. For rocks comprised of carbonate and sandstone, model results generally agreed well with experimentally measured pH; however, for basalt, significant differences were observed. These discrepancies may be due to the models’ failure to fully account for certain reaction occurring between the basalt minerals the CO2-saturated brine solutions.

  15. Nuclear physics with spherically symmetric supernova models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Liebendoerfer; T. Fischer; C. Fröhlich; F. -K. Thielemann; S. Whitehouse

    2007-08-31

    Few years ago, Boltzmann neutrino transport led to a new and reliable generation of spherically symmetric models of stellar core collapse and postbounce evolution. After the failure to prove the principles of the supernova explosion mechanism, these sophisticated models continue to illuminate the close interaction between high-density matter under extreme conditions and the transport of leptons and energy in general relativistically curved space-time. We emphasize that very different input physics is likely to be relevant for the different evolutionary phases, e.g. nuclear structure for weak rates in collapse, the equation of state of bulk nuclear matter during bounce, multidimensional plasma dynamics in the postbounce evolution, and neutrino cross sections in the explosive nucleosynthesis. We illustrate the complexity of the dynamics using preliminary 3D MHD high-resolution simulations based on parameterized deleptonization. With established spherically symmetric models we show that typical features of the different phases are reflected in the predicted neutrino signal and that a consistent neutrino flux leads to electron fractions larger than 0.5 in neutrino-driven supernova ejecta.

  16. Physical space and cosmology. I: Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valeriy P. Polulyakh

    2011-02-01

    The nature of the physical space seems the most important subject in physics. A present paper proceeds from the assumption of physical reality of space contrary to the standard view of the space as a purely relational nonexistence - void. The space and its evolution are the primary sources of phenomena in Mega- and micro-worlds. Thus cosmology and particle physics have the same active agent - physical space.

  17. Model independent search for new physics at the Tevatron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choudalakis, Georgios

    2008-01-01

    The Standard Model of elementary particles can not be the final theory. There are theoretical reasons to expect the appearance of new physics, possibly at the energy scale of few TeV. Several possible theories of new physics ...

  18. Statistical Mechanics Approaches to the Modeling of Nonlinear Earthquake Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Statistical Mechanics Approaches to the Modeling of Nonlinear Earthquake Physics John B. Rundle1, IN Abstract. We discuss the problem of earthquake forecasting in the context of new models for the dynamics to the modeling of earthquake faults. We show that the frictional failure physics of earthquakes in these complex

  19. Conference & Exhibition --London, UK, 11 -14 June 2007 Rock Physics and Depositional History from Seismic Matching: A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Hongchao

    , petrophysical models, and seismic acoustic models, to match observed seismic data and observed stratigraphy History from Seismic Matching: A model study Stewart A. Levin1 , Ulisses Mello2 , Vanessa Lopez2 , Liqing a match to seismic data. In particular, we seek to match not just event timing (phase) but also reflection

  20. Physics and Engineering Models | National Nuclear Security Administrat...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    are implemented into ASC integrated engineering and physics codes. Radiation & Electrical Response This area develops and delivers predictive science-based models that...

  1. Use of Physical Models to Facilitate Transfer of Physics Learning to Understand Positron Emission Tomography*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zollman, Dean

    in order to understand the image construction process in PET. For this purpose we conduct teaching of learning from the models of the activities to the PET image construction process. #12;METHODOLOGY Sixteen of the physical models in transferring physics ideas to understanding positron emission tomography technology

  2. Analyzing flow patterns in unsaturated fractured rock of Yucca Mountain using an integrated modeling approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yu-Shu; Lu, Guoping; Zhang, Keni; Pan, Lehua; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

    2008-01-01

    zone site-scale model, Yucca Mountain Site Characterizationscale model, Yucca Mountain Project Milestone 3GLM105M,lateral diversion at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, Water Resources

  3. Cognitive Effects of Physical Models in Engineering Idea Generation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cherickal Viswanathan, Vimal 1983-

    2012-08-17

    models fixates designers. In light of these conflicts, the research discussed in this dissertation focuses on understanding the cognitive effects of physical models and developing guidelines for aiding designers in their implementation. A combination...

  4. A physically based approach to modeling and animating a sailboat 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miniati, Maria Pia

    2000-01-01

    This thesis describes a method for modeling and animating a sailboat, by means of physically based techniques. Sailboats are excellent candidates for modeling and animating. Their dynamics have been well studied by nautical ...

  5. THE STATE OF THE ART OF NUMERICAL MODELING OF THERMOHYDROLOGIC FLOW IN FRACTURED ROCK MASSES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, J.S.Y.

    2013-01-01

    disposal of radioactive waste: The Sandia waste isolation flow and transport (SWIFT) model: Sandia Laboratories Report

  6. Mathematical Models in Physics : a Quest for Clarity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elemer E. Rosinger

    2008-04-08

    The role of mathematical models in physics has for longer been well established. The issue of their proper building and use appears to be less clear. Examples in this regard from relativity and quantum mechanics are mentioned. Comments concerning a more appropriate way in setting up and using mathematical models in physics are presented.

  7. Fluid-rock interaction: A reactive transport approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steefel, C.

    2009-01-01

    to coupled mass transport and fluid-rock interaction in aof a reactive transport approach in fluid-rock interaction,reactive transport models for fluid-rock interaction. Case

  8. THE STATE OF THE ART OF NUMERICAL MODELING OF THERMOHYDROLOGIC FLOW IN FRACTURED ROCK MASSES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, J.S.Y.

    2013-01-01

    improving production by hydraulic fracturing 8 the focus otfor fractures. (d) Hydraulic Fracturing: The model has been

  9. Using Neural Networks Atmospheric Model Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeng, Ning

    Physics: ­ Accurate and Fast NN Emulations of LWR and SWR Parameterizations ­ Validation in NCEP CFS · New Distribution of NCEP CFS Calculation Time NCEP CFS T126L64 Radiation Dynamics Other ~60% ~20% ~20% Radiation

  10. Modeling of coupled thermodynamic and geomechanical performance of underground compressed air energy storage (CAES) in lined rock caverns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutqvist, J.

    2013-01-01

    abandonment Underground gas storage: Worldwide ExperiencesCritical pressure for gas storage in unlined rock caverns.for the Brooklyn Union gas storage cavern at JFK Airport,

  11. Q00906010024 rock check dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    00906010024 rock check dam Q00906010025 rock check dam Q00906010021 rock check dam Q00906010022 rock check dam Q00906010027 rock check dam Q00906010026 rock check dam Q00906010018 rock check dam Q00906010023 rock check dam Q00906010011 rock check dam Q00906010008 rock check dam Q00906010007 rock check dam Q

  12. Modeling of coupled thermodynamic and geomechanical performance of underground compressed air energy storage (CAES) in lined rock caverns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rutqvist, J.; Kim, H. -M.; Ryu, D. -W.; Synn, J. -H.; Song, W. -K.

    2012-02-01

    We applied coupled nonisothermal, multiphase fluid flow and geomechanical numerical modeling to study the coupled thermodynamic and geomechanical performance of underground compressed air energy storage (CAES) in concrete-lined rock caverns. The paper focuses on CAES in lined caverns at relatively shallow depth (e.g., 100 m depth) in which a typical CAES operational pressure of 5 to 8 MPa is significantly higher than both ambient fluid pressure and in situ stress. We simulated a storage operation that included cyclic compression and decompression of air in the cavern, and investigated how pressure, temperature and stress evolve over several months of operation. We analyzed two different lining options, both with a 50 cm thick low permeability concrete lining, but in one case with an internal synthetic seal such as steel or rubber. For our simulated CAES system, the thermodynamic analysis showed that 96.7% of the energy injected during compression could be recovered during subsequent decompression, while 3.3% of the energy was lost by heat conduction to the surrounding media. Our geomechanical analysis showed that tensile effective stresses as high as 8 MPa could develop in the lining as a result of the air pressure exerted on the inner surface of the lining, whereas thermal stresses were relatively smaller and compressive. With the option of an internal synthetic seal, the maximum effective tensile stress was reduced from 8 to 5 MPa, but was still in substantial tension. We performed one simulation in which the tensile tangential stresses resulted in radial cracks and air leakage though the lining. This air leakage, however, was minor (about 0.16% of the air mass loss from one daily compression) in terms of CAES operational efficiency, and did not significantly impact the overall energy balance of the system. However, despite being minor in terms of energy balance, the air leakage resulted in a distinct pressure increase in the surrounding rock that could be quickly detected using pressure monitoring outside the concrete lining.

  13. An Integrated Modeling Analysis of Unsaturated Flow Patterns in Fractured Rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yu-Shu; Lu, Guoping; Zhang, Keni; Pan, Lehua; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

    2008-01-01

    zone transport model of Yucca Mountain, Las Alamos Nationalisotope distributions at Yucca Mountain, Las Alamos Nationalof the unsaturated zone of Yucca Mountain, NV from three-

  14. An Integrated Modeling Analysis of Unsaturated Flow Patterns in Fractured Rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yu-Shu; Lu, Guoping; Zhang, Keni; Pan, Lehua; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

    2008-01-01

    temperature profiles or geothermal gradients within the UZthe UZ by ambient geothermal gradients. Any large increaseheat convection or in geothermal gradients, such that model

  15. Analyzing flow patterns in unsaturated fractured rock of Yucca Mountain using an integrated modeling approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yu-Shu; Lu, Guoping; Zhang, Keni; Pan, Lehua; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

    2008-01-01

    temperature profiles or geothermal gradients within the UZthe UZ by ambient geothermal gradients. Any large increasein net heat flow or geothermal gradients, such that model

  16. THE STATE OF THE ART OF NUMERICAL MODELING OF THERMOHYDROLOGIC FLOW IN FRACTURED ROCK MASSES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, J.S.Y.

    2013-01-01

    thermal calculations for the WIPP site in southeastern NewWaste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in bedded salt. The codepersonal communication 1980). WIPP The modeling for WIPP is

  17. Here we develop a new control model of water injection from a growing hydrofracture into a layered soft rock. We demonstrate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patzek, Tadeusz W.

    Summary Here we develop a new control model of water injection from a growing hydrofracture design an optimal controller of water injection into a low-permeability rock from a growing vertical hydrofrac- ture. The objective of control is to inject water at a prescribed rate, which may change

  18. An analytical and numerical model to determine stresses in a Rock Melt Drill produced glass liner for potential use on Mars 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McConnell, Joshua B

    2000-01-01

    A numerical and analytical model was constructed to determine the resultant stress state imposed on a Rock Melt Drill produced liner. The purpose of this study was to determine if the liner produced would possess the strength required to prevent a...

  19. Comparison of integral equation and physical scale modelling of the electromagnetic response of models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farquharson, Colin G.

    Comparison of integral equation and physical scale modelling of the electromagnetic response history of EM numerical modelling in geophysics. · Another integral equation modelling program;Introduction: a brief history · Two main approaches to numerical modelling: integral equation; finite

  20. Modeling of thermally driven hydrological processes in partially saturated fractured rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Yvonne

    2010-01-01

    Yucca Mountain, Journal of Nuclear Technology, 163(1), pp.Yucca Mountain, Nuclear Technology 148, 138-150. Birkholzer,1: Modeling and analysis. Nuclear Technology, 104, 418–448.

  1. Analyzing flow patterns in unsaturated fractured rock of Yucca Mountain using an integrated modeling approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yu-Shu; Lu, Guoping; Zhang, Keni; Pan, Lehua; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

    2008-01-01

    repository at Yucca Mountain, Journal of Hydrology, 209,near a fault zone at Yucca Mountain, SAND87-7070, Sandiasite-scale model of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, LBL-37356,

  2. Bibliography: Physical Modeling of Musical Instruments Julius O. Smith III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith III, Julius Orion

    Bibliography: Physical Modeling of Musical Instruments Julius O. Smith III Center for Computer · N. H. Fletcher and T. D. Rossing, The Physics of Musical Instruments, Springer-Verlag, 1998 (2nd ed, eds., Mechanics of Musical Instruments, Springer-Verlag, 1995. (More specialized, advanced musical

  3. Beyond the Standard Model of Physics with Astronomical Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raul Jimenez

    2013-07-09

    There has been significant recent progress in observational cosmology. This, in turn, has provided an unprecedented picture of the early universe and its evolution. In this review I will present a (biased) view of how one can use these observational results to constraint fundamental physics and in particular physics beyond the standard model.

  4. SENSPECTRA : an elastic, strain-aware physical modeling interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leclerc, Vincent, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2006-01-01

    Senspectra is a computationally augmented physical modeling toolkit designed for sensing and visualization of structural strain. The system functions as a distributed sensor network consisting of nodes, embedded with ...

  5. Physical and Statistical Models in Deformation Geodesy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lipovsky, Brad

    2011-01-01

    Pore pressure distributions at logarithmic time intervals (The model geometry of pore pressure di?usion through a faultin the text. . . . . . Pore pressure distributions at

  6. Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay and Physics Beyond the Standard Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frank F. Deppisch; Martin Hirsch; Heinrich Päs

    2012-08-03

    Neutrinoless double beta decay is the most powerful tool to probe not only for Majorana neutrino masses but for lepton number violating physics in general. We discuss relations between lepton number violation, double beta decay and neutrino mass, review a general Lorentz invariant parametrization of the double beta decay rate, highlight a number of different new physics models showing how different mechanisms can trigger double beta decay, and finally discuss possibilities to discriminate and test these models and mechanisms in complementary experiments.

  7. Physics Beyond the Standard Model and Dark Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hitoshi Murayama

    2007-04-18

    In this lecture note, I discuss why many of us are expecting rich physics at the TeV scale, drawing analogies from the history of physics in the last century. Then I review some of the possible candidates of new physics at this energy scale. I also discuss why we believe much of the matter in the universe is not atoms (baryons) or compact astronomical objects, and hence requires physics beyond the standard model. Finally I discuss some of the candidates for the non-baryonic dark matter.

  8. Evaluation of Experimentally Measured and Model-Calculated pH for Rock-Brine-CO2 Systems under Geologic CO2 Sequestration Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shao, Hongbo; Thompson, Christopher J.; Cantrell, Kirk J.

    2013-11-14

    Reliable pH estimation is essential for understanding the geochemical reactions that occur in rock-brine-CO2 systems when CO2 is injected into deep geologic formations for long-term storage. Due to a lack of reliable experimental methods, most laboratory studies of formation reactivities conducted under geologic CO2 sequestration (GCS) conditions have relied on thermodynamic modeling to estimate pH; however, the accuracy of these model predictions is typically uncertain. In this study, we expanded the measurement range of a spectrophotometric method for pH determination, and we applied the method to measure the pH in batch-reactor experiments utilizing rock samples from five ongoing GCS demonstration projects. A combination of color-changing pH indicators, bromophenol blue and bromocresol green, was shown to enable measurements over the pH range of 2.5-5.2. In-situ pH measurements were compared with pH values calculated using geochemical models. The effect of different thermodynamic databases on the accuracy of model prediction was evaluated. For rocks comprised of carbonate, siltstone, and sandstone, model results generally agreed well with experimentally measured pH; however, for basalt, significant differences were observed. These discrepancies may be due to the models’ failure to fully account for certain proton consuming and producing reactions that occur between the basalt minerals and CO2-saturated brine solutions.

  9. Hidden sector DM models and Higgs physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ko, P.

    2014-06-24

    We present an extension of the standard model to dark sector with an unbroken local dark U(1){sub X} symmetry. Including various singlet portal interactions provided by the standard model Higgs, right-handed neutrinos and kinetic mixing, we show that the model can address most of phenomenological issues (inflation, neutrino mass and mixing, baryon number asymmetry, dark matter, direct/indirect dark matter searches, some scale scale puzzles of the standard collisionless cold dark matter, vacuum stability of the standard model Higgs potential, dark radiation) and be regarded as an alternative to the standard model. The Higgs signal strength is equal to one as in the standard model for unbroken U(1){sub X} case with a scalar dark matter, but it could be less than one independent of decay channels if the dark matter is a dark sector fermion or if U(1){sub X} is spontaneously broken, because of a mixing with a new neutral scalar boson in the models.

  10. Zangerl, C., Eberhardt, E., Loew, S., Evans, K., Coupled hydromechanical modelling of surface subsidence in crystalline rock masses due to tunnel drainage. ISRM 2003Technology roadmap for rock mechanics, South African Institute of Mining and Metallurgy, 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eberhardt, Erik

    subsidence in crystalline rock masses due to tunnel drainage. ISRM 2003­Technology roadmap for rock mechanics subsidence in crystalline rock masses due to tunnel drainage C. Zangerl, E. Eberhardt, S. Loew, K.F. Evans are rarely observed and in the past, geotechnical engineers would not expect substantial subsidence to occur

  11. Integrating Building Information Modeling with Object-Oriented Physical Modeling for Building Thermal Simulation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeong, Woon Seong

    2014-09-05

    This study presents a Building Information Modeling (BIM) to Building Energy Modeling (BEM) translation framework (BIM2BEM) through the integration of BIM with Object-Oriented Physical Modeling (OOPM) for building thermal simulation to support...

  12. Commodity market modeling and physical trading strategies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellefsen, Per Einar

    2010-01-01

    Investment and operational decisions involving commodities are taken based on the forward prices of these commodities. These prices are volatile, and a model of their evolution must correctly account for their volatility ...

  13. Topographic stress and rock fracture: a two-dimensional numerical model for arbitrary topography and preliminary comparison with borehole observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perron, J. Taylor

    Theoretical calculations indicate that elastic stresses induced by surface topography may be large enough in some landscapes to fracture rocks, which in turn could influence slope stability, erosion rates, and bedrock ...

  14. A model for the development of a lobate alpine rock glacier in southwest Colorado, USA: implications for water on Mars 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Degenhardt, John Jerome

    2004-09-30

    glacier settles during periods of melting, and the mode of deformation. A better understanding of these factors is important for engineers, engineering geologists and geomorphologists who must make prudent evaluations of rock glaciers as potential sites...

  15. The effects of gas-fluid-rock interactions on CO2 injection and storage: Insights from reactive transport modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, T.

    2009-01-01

    CO2 injection and storage, gas-fluid-rock interactions,this study covered gas injection and storage in bothof CO 2 and acid gas injection and storage is controlled by

  16. The Physics of the Vicsek Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francesco Ginelli

    2015-11-04

    These are lecture notes on the Vicsek model for flocking that I prepared for the Microswimmers Summer School 2015 at Forschungszentrum J\\"ulich. They give an essential introduction to this well known model, discussing its algorithmical implementation and the basic properties of its universality class. I present results from numerical simulations and insist on the role played by symmetries and conservation laws. Analytical arguments are presented in an accessible and simplified way, but ample references are given for more advanced readings.

  17. Technical Manual for the SAM Physical Trough Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, M. J.; Gilman, P.

    2011-06-01

    NREL, in conjunction with Sandia National Lab and the U.S Department of Energy, developed the System Advisor Model (SAM) analysis tool for renewable energy system performance and economic analysis. This paper documents the technical background and engineering formulation for one of SAM's two parabolic trough system models in SAM. The Physical Trough model calculates performance relationships based on physical first principles where possible, allowing the modeler to predict electricity production for a wider range of component geometries than is possible in the Empirical Trough model. This document describes the major parabolic trough plant subsystems in detail including the solar field, power block, thermal storage, piping, auxiliary heating, and control systems. This model makes use of both existing subsystem performance modeling approaches, and new approaches developed specifically for SAM.

  18. The lipid bilayer at the mesoscale: a physical continuum model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phillip L. Wilson; Huaxiong Huang; Shu Takagi

    2008-02-26

    We study a continuum model of the lipid bilayer based on minimizing the free energy of a mixture of water and lipid molecules. This paper extends previous work by Blom & Peletier (2004) in the following ways. (a) It formulates a more physical model of the hydrophobic effect to facilitate connections with microscale simulations. (b) It clarifies the meaning of the model parameters. (c) It outlines a method for determining parameter values so that physically-realistic bilayer density profiles can be obtained, for example for use in macroscale simulations. Points (a)-(c) suggest that the model has potential to robustly connect some micro- and macroscale levels of multiscale blood flow simulations. The mathematical modelling in point (a) is based upon a consideration of the underlying physics of inter-molecular forces. The governing equations thus obtained are minimized by gradient flows via a novel numerical approach; this enables point (b). The numerical results are shown to behave physically in terms of the effect of background concentration, in contrast to the earlier model which is shown here to not display the expected behaviour. A "short-tail" approximation of the lipid molecules also gives an analytical tool which yields critical values of some parameters under certain conditions. Point (c) involves the first quantitative comparison of the numerical data with physical experimental results.

  19. Snyder-de Sitter model from two-time physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carrisi, M. C.; Mignemi, S.

    2010-11-15

    We show that the symplectic structure of the Snyder model on a de Sitter background can be derived from two-time physics in seven dimensions and propose a Hamiltonian for a free particle consistent with the symmetries of the model.

  20. Environmental Physics Group Newsletter September 2013 Weather and Climate Modelling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Paul

    Environmental Physics Group Newsletter September 2013 9 Weather and Climate Modelling Imperial and the Grantham Institute for Climate Change A half-day meeting on the topic of 'Should weather and climate increasingly common to represent subgrid-scale features in weather and climate models by including random noise

  1. Heteropolymer freezing and design: Towards physical models of protein folding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pande, Vijay S. [Chemistry Department, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305-5080 (United States)] [Chemistry Department, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305-5080 (United States); Grosberg, Alexander Yu. [Department of Physics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States); Tanaka, Toyoichi [Department of Physics and Center for Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Center for Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2000-01-01

    Protein folding has become one of the most actively studied problems in modern molecular biophysics. Approaches to the problem combine ideas from the physics of disordered systems, polymer physics, and molecular biology. Much can be learned from the statistical properties of model heteropolymers, the chain molecules having different monomers in irregular sequences. Even in highly evolved proteins, there is a strong random element in the sequences, which gives rise to a statistical ensemble of sequences for a given folded shape. Simple analytic models give rise to phase transitions between random, glassy, and folded states, depending on the temperature T and the design temperature T{sup des} of the ensemble of sequences. Besides considering the analytic results obtainable in a random-energy model and in the Flory mean-field model of polymers, the article reports on confirming numerical simulations. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  2. Model Evaluation of the Thermo-Hydrological Response in Argillaceous Sedimentary Rock Repository for Direct Disposal of Dual-Purpose Canisters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Liange

    2014-01-01

    Alternative Concepts for Direct Disposal of Dual-PurposeRock Repository for Direct Disposal of Dual-PurposeRock Repository for Direct Disposal of Dual-Purpose

  3. Discrimination of New Physics Models with the International Linear Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masaki Asano; Tomoyuki Saito; Taikan Suehara; Keisuke Fujii; R. S. Hundi; Hideo Itoh; Shigeki Matsumoto; Nobuchika Okada; Yosuke Takubo; Hitoshi Yamamoto

    2011-09-28

    The large hadron collider (LHC) is anticipated to provide signals of new physics at the TeV scale, which are likely to involve production of a WIMP dark matter candidate. The international linear collider (ILC) is to sort out these signals and lead us to some viable model of the new physics at the TeV scale. In this article, we discuss how the ILC can discriminate new physics models, taking the following three examples: the inert Higgs model, the supersymmetric model, and the littlest Higgs model with T-parity. These models predict dark matter particles with different spins, 0, 1/2, and 1, respectively, and hence comprise representative scenarios. Specifically, we focus on the pair production process, e+e- -> chi+chi- -> chi0chi0W+W-, where chi0 and chi+- are the WIMP dark matter and a new charged particle predicted in each of these models. We then evaluate how accurately the properties of these new particles can be determined at the ILC and demonstrate that the ILC is capable of identifying the spin of the new charged particle and discriminating these models.

  4. V00306010057 rock check dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ¬« ¬« ¬« ¬« ¬« XY! 16-020 16-030(c) 16-026(l) 16-028(c) 16-026(l) V00306010057 rock check dam V00306010012 rock check dam V00306010040 rock check dam V00306010039 rock check dam V00306010058 rock check dam V00306010064 rock check dam V00306010061 rock check dam V00306010062 rock check dam V00306010063

  5. Maximization of permanent trapping of CO{sub 2} and co-contaminants in the highest-porosity formations of the Rock Springs Uplift (Southwest Wyoming): experimentation and multi-scale modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piri, Mohammad

    2014-03-31

    Under this project, a multidisciplinary team of researchers at the University of Wyoming combined state-of-the-art experimental studies, numerical pore- and reservoir-scale modeling, and high performance computing to investigate trapping mechanisms relevant to geologic storage of mixed scCO{sub 2} in deep saline aquifers. The research included investigations in three fundamental areas: (i) the experimental determination of two-­?phase flow relative permeability functions, relative permeability hysteresis, and residual trapping under reservoir conditions for mixed scCO{sub 2}-­?brine systems; (ii) improved understanding of permanent trapping mechanisms; (iii) scientifically correct, fine grid numerical simulations of CO{sub 2} storage in deep saline aquifers taking into account the underlying rock heterogeneity. The specific activities included: (1) Measurement of reservoir-­?conditions drainage and imbibition relative permeabilities, irreducible brine and residual mixed scCO{sub 2} saturations, and relative permeability scanning curves (hysteresis) in rock samples from RSU; (2) Characterization of wettability through measurements of contact angles and interfacial tensions under reservoir conditions; (3) Development of physically-­?based dynamic core-­?scale pore network model; (4) Development of new, improved high-­? performance modules for the UW-­?team simulator to provide new capabilities to the existing model to include hysteresis in the relative permeability functions, geomechanical deformation and an equilibrium calculation (Both pore-­? and core-­?scale models were rigorously validated against well-­?characterized core-­? flooding experiments); and (5) An analysis of long term permanent trapping of mixed scCO{sub 2} through high-­?resolution numerical experiments and analytical solutions. The analysis takes into account formation heterogeneity, capillary trapping, and relative permeability hysteresis.

  6. Context-sensitive Synthesis of Executable Functional Models of Cyber-Physical Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al Faruque, Mohammad Abdullah

    described in physical modeling languages (i.e. Modelica). Using a real electro- mechanical CPS application

  7. Real-time Modelling of Tsunami Data Applied Physics Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Percival, Don

    Real-time Modelling of Tsunami Data Applied Physics Laboratory Department of Statistics University for Tsunami Research #12;Background - I · even before disasterous Sumatra tsunami in December 2004, de- structive potential of earthquake-generated tsunamis was well- known · due to rate at which a tsunami

  8. ENHANCED CLOUD REGIME CLASSIFICATION FOR EVALUATION OF MODEL FAST PHYSICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ENHANCED CLOUD REGIME CLASSIFICATION FOR EVALUATION OF MODEL FAST PHYSICS Wuyin Lin1 , Yangang Liu1 of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-98CH10886 ABSTRACT Distinct cloud regimes exist locally and globally helps identify the meteorological conditions that are closely associated with specific cloud regimes

  9. Investigations of Near-Field Thermal-Hydrologic-Mechanical-Chemical Models for Radioactive Waste Disposal in Clay/Shale Rock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, H.H.; Li, L.; Zheng, L.; Houseworth, J.E.; Rutqvist, J.

    2011-06-20

    Clay/shale has been considered as potential host rock for geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste throughout the world, because of its low permeability, low diffusion coefficient, high retention capacity for radionuclides, and capability to self-seal fractures. For example, Callovo-Oxfordian argillites at the Bure site, France (Fouche et al., 2004), Toarcian argillites at the Tournemire site, France (Patriarche et al., 2004), Opalinus Clay at the Mont Terri site, Switzerland (Meier et al., 2000), and Boom clay at the Mol site, Belgium (Barnichon and Volckaert, 2003) have all been under intensive scientific investigation (at both field and laboratory scales) for understanding a variety of rock properties and their relationships to flow and transport processes associated with geological disposal of radioactive waste. Figure 1-1 presents the distribution of clay/shale formations within the USA.

  10. V01406010015 rock check dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    XY! ¬« ¬« V01406010015 rock check dam V01406010014 rock check dam V01406010013 rock check dam 1501403010012 earthen berm V01403010008 earthen berm V01406010003 rock check dam V01406010004 rock check dam V01406010010 rock check dam V01406010011 rock check dam 15-0651 15-0307 15-0588 15-0532 15-0575 stormdrain 7160

  11. T00706010013 rock check dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    XY! ¬« T00706010013 rock check dam T00706010014 rock check dam T00702040012 established vegetation, green hatch area T00706010002 rock check dam T00706010011 rock check dam T00703120010 rock berm T00703020003 base course berm T00706010004 rock check dam T00706010009 rock check dam T00703020008 base course

  12. Fundamental Research on Percussion Drilling: Improved rock mechanics analysis, advanced simulation technology, and full-scale laboratory investigations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael S. Bruno

    2005-12-31

    This report summarizes the research efforts on the DOE supported research project Percussion Drilling (DE-FC26-03NT41999), which is to significantly advance the fundamental understandings of the physical mechanisms involved in combined percussion and rotary drilling, and thereby facilitate more efficient and lower cost drilling and exploration of hard-rock reservoirs. The project has been divided into multiple tasks: literature reviews, analytical and numerical modeling, full scale laboratory testing and model validation, and final report delivery. Literature reviews document the history, pros and cons, and rock failure physics of percussion drilling in oil and gas industries. Based on the current understandings, a conceptual drilling model is proposed for modeling efforts. Both analytical and numerical approaches are deployed to investigate drilling processes such as drillbit penetration with compression, rotation and percussion, rock response with stress propagation, damage accumulation and failure, and debris transportation inside the annulus after disintegrated from rock. For rock mechanics modeling, a dynamic numerical tool has been developed to describe rock damage and failure, including rock crushing by compressive bit load, rock fracturing by both shearing and tensile forces, and rock weakening by repetitive compression-tension loading. Besides multiple failure criteria, the tool also includes a damping algorithm to dissipate oscillation energy and a fatigue/damage algorithm to update rock properties during each impact. From the model, Rate of Penetration (ROP) and rock failure history can be estimated. For cuttings transport in annulus, a 3D numerical particle flowing model has been developed with aid of analytical approaches. The tool can simulate cuttings movement at particle scale under laminar or turbulent fluid flow conditions and evaluate the efficiency of cutting removal. To calibrate the modeling efforts, a series of full-scale fluid hammer drilling tests, as well as single impact tests, have been designed and executed. Both Berea sandstone and Mancos shale samples are used. In single impact tests, three impacts are sequentially loaded at the same rock location to investigate rock response to repetitive loadings. The crater depth and width are measured as well as the displacement and force in the rod and the force in the rock. Various pressure differences across the rock-indentor interface (i.e. bore pressure minus pore pressure) are used to investigate the pressure effect on rock penetration. For hammer drilling tests, an industrial fluid hammer is used to drill under both underbalanced and overbalanced conditions. Besides calibrating the modeling tool, the data and cuttings collected from the tests indicate several other important applications. For example, different rock penetrations during single impact tests may reveal why a fluid hammer behaves differently with diverse rock types and under various pressure conditions at the hole bottom. On the other hand, the shape of the cuttings from fluid hammer tests, comparing to those from traditional rotary drilling methods, may help to identify the dominant failure mechanism that percussion drilling relies on. If so, encouraging such a failure mechanism may improve hammer performance. The project is summarized in this report. Instead of compiling the information contained in the previous quarterly or other technical reports, this report focuses on the descriptions of tasks, findings, and conclusions, as well as the efforts on promoting percussion drilling technologies to industries including site visits, presentations, and publications. As a part of the final deliveries, the 3D numerical model for rock mechanics is also attached.

  13. New Physics Models Facing Lepton Flavor Violating Higgs Decays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Košnik, Nejc

    2015-01-01

    We speculate about the possible interpretations of the recently observed excess in the $h \\to \\tau \\mu$ decay. We derive a robust lower bound on the Higgs boson coupling strength to a tau and a muon, even in presence of the most general new physics affecting other Higgs properties. Then we reevaluate complementary indirect constraints coming from low energy observables as well as from theoretical considerations. In particular, the tentative signal should lead to $\\tau \\to \\mu \\gamma$ at rates which could be observed at Belle II. In turn we show that, barring fine-tuned cancellations, the effect can be accommodated within models with an extended scalar sector. These general conclusions are demonstrated in explicit new physics models. Finally we show how, given the $h \\to \\tau \\mu$ signal, the current and future searches for $\\mu \\to e \\gamma$ and $\\mu \\to e$ nuclear conversions unambiguously constrain the allowed rates for $h \\to \\tau e$.

  14. ModelCraft: Capturing Freehand Annotations and Edits on Physical 3D Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keinan, Alon

    of affordable new desktop fabrication techniques such as 3D printing and laser cutting, physical models are used cur- rent 3D printing technology. ACM CLASSIFICATION: H5.2 [Information interfaces and presentation

  15. Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Group (PDG) Organizations American Institute of Physics (AIP) American Physical Society (APS) Institute of Physics (IOP) SPIE - International society for optics and photonics Top...

  16. Exploring the concept of compressed air energy storage (CAES) in lined rock caverns at shallow depth: A modeling study of air tightness and energy balance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, H.-M.

    2012-01-01

    3.3 Case of Leaky Concrete Lining and Permeable Rock In thiswith a comparatively permeable concrete lining. 3.4 Leakagesystem with relatively permeable concrete lining and rock,

  17. Physics and Seismic Modeling for Monitoring CO2 Storage JOSE M. CARCIONE,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santos, Juan

    -elastical equations model the seismic properties of reservoir rocks saturated with CO2, methane, oil and brine. The gas properties are obtained from the van der Waals equation and we take into account the absorption, methane-bearing coal beds and saline aquifers. An example of the latter is the Sleipner field in the North

  18. Final Report: Development of a Chemical Model to Predict the Interactions between Supercritical CO2, Fluid and Rock in EGS Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McPherson, Brian J.; Pan, Feng

    2014-09-24

    This report summarizes development of a coupled-process reservoir model for simulating enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) that utilize supercritical carbon dioxide as a working fluid. Specifically, the project team developed an advanced chemical kinetic model for evaluating important processes in EGS reservoirs, such as mineral precipitation and dissolution at elevated temperature and pressure, and for evaluating potential impacts on EGS surface facilities by related chemical processes. We assembled a new database for better-calibrated simulation of water/brine/ rock/CO2 interactions in EGS reservoirs. This database utilizes existing kinetic and other chemical data, and we updated those data to reflect corrections for elevated temperature and pressure conditions of EGS reservoirs.

  19. T00406010008 rock check dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    XY! ¬« T00406010008 rock check dam T00406010009 rock check dam T00406010010 rock check dam T00406010011 rock check dam T-SMA-2.85 0.344 Acres 35-014(g) 35-016(n) T00406010005 rock check dam T00406010006 rock check dam T00403090004 curb T00402040007 established vegetation, green hatch area 7200 7200 7180

  20. Discrimination of new physics models with the International Linear Collider

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Discrimination of new physics models with the

  1. Equilibrium Statistical-Thermal Models in High-Energy Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdel Nasser Tawfik

    2014-10-25

    We review some recent highlights from the applications of statistical-thermal models to different experimental measurements and lattice QCD thermodynamics, that have been made during the last decade. We start with a short review of the historical milestones on the path of constructing statistical-thermal models for heavy-ion physics. We discovered that Heinz Koppe formulated in 1948 an almost complete recipe for the statistical-thermal models. In 1950, Enrico Fermi generalized this statistical approach, in which he started with a general cross-section formula and inserted into it simplifying assumptions about the matrix element of the interaction process that likely reflects many features of the high-energy reactions dominated by density in the phase space of final states. In 1964, Hagedorn systematically analysed the high-energy phenomena using all tools of statistical physics and introduced the concept of limiting temperature based on the statistical bootstrap model. It turns to be quite often that many-particle systems can be studied with the help of statistical-thermal methods. The analysis of yield multiplicities in high-energy collisions gives an overwhelming evidence for the chemical equilibrium in the final state. The strange particles might be an exception, as they are suppressed at lower beam energies. However, their relative yields fulfill statistical equilibrium, as well. We review the equilibrium statistical-thermal models for particle production, fluctuations and collective flow in heavy-ion experiments. We also review their reproduction of the lattice QCD thermodynamics at vanishing and finite chemical potential. During the last decade, five conditions have been suggested to describe the universal behavior of the chemical freeze out parameters.

  2. Rock Cycle and Rocks Lab Rocks are aggregates of one or many minerals.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, X. Rong

    Rock Cycle and Rocks Lab Rocks are aggregates of one or many minerals. Three types of rocks: A of their sizes, shapes and arrangement. Rule of Thumb: The size of mineral crystals in an igneous rock may, there is not enough time for large mineral crystals to form (e.g. obsidian) Igneous Rock Mineral Compositions

  3. Biochemical physics modeling of biological nano-motors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santamaría-Holek, I.; López-Alamilla, N. J.

    2014-01-14

    We present a biochemical physics model accounting for the dynamics and energetics of both translational and rotational protein motors. A modified version of the hand-over-hand mechanism considering competitive inhibition by ADP is presented. Transition state-like theory is used to reconstruct the time dependent free-energy landscape of the cycle catalyst process that allows to predicting the number of steps or rotations that a single motor can perform. In addition, following the usual approach of chemical kinetics, we calculate the average translational velocity and also the stopping time of processes involving a collectivity of motors, such as exocytosis and endocytosis processes. Finally, we formulate a stochastic model reproducing very well single realizations of kinesin and rotary ATPases.

  4. Modeling of Damage, Permeability Changes and Pressure Responses during Excavation of the TSX Tunnel in Granitic Rock at URL, Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutqvist, Jonny

    2009-01-01

    Modeling of Damage, Permeability Changes and Pressureof excavation-induced damage, permeability changes, andrange of approaches to model damage and permeability changes

  5. Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Physics Physics Our science answers questions about the nature of the universe and delivers solutions for national security concerns. Contact Us Division Leader Doug Fulton Deputy...

  6. Mass, Spin, and Physics Beyond the Standard Model at Colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klemm, William Lathrop

    2011-01-01

    E. Skillman, “New BBN limits on physics beyond the standardH. Simmons, “Multi - jet physics at hadron colliders,” Nucl.Group], “Review of particle physics,” Phys. Lett. B [108] J.

  7. Mass, Spin, and Physics Beyond the Standard Model at Colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klemm, William Lathrop

    2011-01-01

    APS/DPF/DPB Summer Study on the Future of Particle Physics (APS/DPF/DPB Summer Study on the Future of Particle Physics (APS / DPF / DPB Sum- mer Study on the Future of Particle Physics (

  8. Comparing FRACHEM and TOUGHREACT for reactive transport modeling of brine-rock interactions in enhanced geothermal systems (EGS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andre, L.; Spycher, N.; Xu, T.; Pruess, K.; Vuataz, F.-D.

    2008-01-01

    modelling of enhanced geothermal systems. Geophys. J. Int. ,INTERACTIONS IN ENHANCED GEOTHERMAL SYSTEMS (EGS) Laurent

  9. A Physically Based Runoff Routing Model for Land Surface and Earth System Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Hongyi; Wigmosta, Mark S.; Wu, Huan; Huang, Maoyi; Ke, Yinghai; Coleman, Andre M.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

    2013-06-13

    A new physically based runoff routing model, called the Model for Scale Adaptive River Transport (MOSART), has been developed to be applicable across local, regional, and global scales. Within each spatial unit, surface runoff is first routed across hillslopes and then discharged along with subsurface runoff into a ‘‘tributary subnetwork’’ before entering the main channel. The spatial units are thus linked via routing through the main channel network, which is constructed in a scale-consistent way across different spatial resolutions. All model parameters are physically based, and only a small subset requires calibration.MOSART has been applied to the Columbia River basin at 1/ 168, 1/ 88, 1/ 48, and 1/ 28 spatial resolutions and was evaluated using naturalized or observed streamflow at a number of gauge stations. MOSART is compared to two other routing models widely used with land surface models, the River Transport Model (RTM) in the Community Land Model (CLM) and the Lohmann routing model, included as a postprocessor in the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) model package, yielding consistent performance at multiple resolutions. MOSART is further evaluated using the channel velocities derived from field measurements or a hydraulic model at various locations and is shown to be capable of producing the seasonal variation and magnitude of channel velocities reasonably well at different resolutions. Moreover, the impacts of spatial resolution on model simulations are systematically examined at local and regional scales. Finally, the limitations ofMOSART and future directions for improvements are discussed.

  10. Teaching statistical physics by thinking about models and algorithms Jan Tobochnika

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gould, Harvey

    Association of Physics Teachers. DOI: 10.1119/1.2839094 I. INTRODUCTION Mathematics is both the languageTeaching statistical physics by thinking about models and algorithms Jan Tobochnika Department of Physics, Kalamazoo College, Kalamazoo, Michigan 49006 Harvey Gouldb Department of Physics, Clark

  11. Stress-induced transverse isotropy in rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwartz, L.M.; Murphy, W.F. III [Schlumberger-Doll Research Center, Ridgefield, CT (United States); Berryman, J.G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-03-28

    The application of uniaxial pressure can induce elastic anisotropy in otherwise isotropic rock. We consider models based on two very different rock classes, granites and weakly consolidated granular systems. We show that these models share common underlying assumptions, that they lead to similar qualitative behavior, and that both provide a microscopic basis for elliptical anisotropy. In the granular case, we make experimentally verifiable predictions regarding the horizontally propagating modes based on the measured behavior of the vertical modes.

  12. Computational load in model physics of the parallel NCAR community climate model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michalakes, J.G.; Nanjundiah, R.S.

    1994-11-01

    Maintaining a balance of computational load over processors is a crucial issue in parallel computing. For efficient parallel implementation, complex codes such as climate models need to be analyzed for load imbalances. In the present study we focus on the load imbalances in the physics portion of the community climate model`s (CCM2) distributed-memory parallel implementation on the Intel Touchstone DELTA computer. We note that the major source of load imbalance is the diurnal variation in the computation of solar radiation. Convective weather patterns also cause some load imbalance. Land-ocean contrast is seen to have little effect on computational load in the present version of the model.

  13. Joint inversion of marine seismic AVA and CSEM data using statistical rock-physics models and Markov random fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jinsong

    of reservoir parameters (e.g., porosity and fluid saturation). Introduction Joint inversion of seismic AVA's equation and Archie's law) from nearby borehole logs to connect them through reservoir parameters (e.g., porosity and water saturation). However, in the exploration stage, this could be very difficult because

  14. Rock-physics templates for hydrocarbon source rocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-05-27

    May 27, 2014 ... geothermal gradient using the Arrhenius equation. ..... cases (the P-wave velocity increases away from the vertical if ? is positive and decreases.

  15. J00206010020 rock check dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    XY! J00206010020 rock check dam J00206010023 rock check dam 09-009 09-009 09-009 PJ-SMA-2 0.901 Acres J00206010021 rock check dam J00206010019 rock check dam J00206010014 rock check dam J00203010007 Smith DATE: 14-November-2014 REVISION NUMBER: 8 XY! IP sampler location Berm Channel/swale Check dam

  16. United States National Waste Terminal Storage argillaceous rock studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brunton, G.D.

    1981-01-01

    The past and present argillaceous rock studies for the US National Waste Terminal Storage Program consist of: (1) evaluation of the geological characteristics of several widespread argillaceous formations in the United States; (2) laboratory studies of the physical and chemical properties of selected argillaceous rock samples; and (3) two full-scale in situ surface heater experiments that simulate the emplacement of heat-generating radioactive waste in argillaceous rock.

  17. Session: Hard Rock Penetration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tennyson, George P. Jr.; Dunn, James C.; Drumheller, Douglas S.; Glowka, David A.; Lysne, Peter

    1992-01-01

    This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of five presentations: ''Hard Rock Penetration - Summary'' by George P. Tennyson, Jr.; ''Overview - Hard Rock Penetration'' by James C. Dunn; ''An Overview of Acoustic Telemetry'' by Douglas S. Drumheller; ''Lost Circulation Technology Development Status'' by David A. Glowka; ''Downhole Memory-Logging Tools'' by Peter Lysne.

  18. A Mountain-Scale Thermal Hydrologic Model for Simulating Fluid Flow and Heat Transfer in Unsaturated Fractured Rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yu-Shu; Mukhopadhyay, Sumit; Zhang, Keni; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

    2005-01-01

    Studies Using the Yucca Mountain Unsaturated Zone Model,Unsaturated Zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, to Thermal LoadUnsaturated Zone, Yucca Mountain, Nevada, Water-Resources

  19. Comparing FRACHEM and TOUGHREACT for reactive transport modeling of brine-rock interactions in enhanced geothermal systems (EGS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andre, L.; Spycher, N.; Xu, T.; Pruess, K.; Vuataz, F.-D.

    2008-01-01

    modeling for geothermal systems: predicting carbonate andmodelling of enhanced geothermal systems. Geophys. J. Int. ,IN ENHANCED GEOTHERMAL SYSTEMS (EGS) Laurent André (1) ,

  20. Carbon Dioxide Geological Sequestration in Fractured Porous Rocks

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Training and Research on Probabilistic Hydro-Thermo-Mechanical Modeling of Carbon Dioxide Geological Sequestration in Fractured Porous Rocks Gutierrez, Marte 54 ENVIRONMENTAL...

  1. Efficient Reformulation of Solid-Phase Diffusion in Physics-Based Lithium-Ion Battery Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subramanian, Venkat

    Efficient Reformulation of Solid-Phase Diffusion in Physics-Based Lithium-Ion Battery Models materials of porous electrodes for a rigorous pseudo-2D model for lithium-ion batteries. Concentration in the solid phase. Introduction Physics based Li-ion battery models use porous electrode theory. One

  2. A Statistical and Physical MechanismsBased Interference and Noise Model for Array Observations \\Lambda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blum, Rick

    A Statistical and Physical Mechanisms­Based Interference and Noise Model for Array Observations is a member of IEEE. K. F. McDonald is a student member. 1 #12; Abstract A statistical noise model is developed from mathematical modeling of the physical mechanisms that generate noise in communication

  3. Comparing FRACHEM and TOUGHREACT for reactive transport modeling of brine-rock interactions in enhanced geothermal systems (EGS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andre, L.; Spycher, N.; Xu, T.; Pruess, K.; Vuataz, F.-D.

    2008-01-01

    modelling of the Soultz-sous-Forêts Hot Fractured Rockon the properties of the Soultz fractured reservoir.Conference, March 17-18, 2005, Soultz-sous-Forêts, France.

  4. A laboratory exercise using a physical model for demonstrating countercurrent heat exchange

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loudon, Catherine; Davis-Berg, Elizabeth C; Botz, Jason T

    2012-01-01

    demonstrating countercurrent heat exchange Catherine Loudon,demonstrating countercurrent heat exchange. Adv Physiol Educ23). Countercurrent heat exchange may be physically modeled

  5. Lithium-Ion Battery Safety Study Using Multi-Physics Internal Short-Circuit Model (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, G-.H.; Smith, K.; Pesaran, A.

    2009-06-01

    This presentation outlines NREL's multi-physics simulation study to characterize an internal short by linking and integrating electrochemical cell, electro-thermal, and abuse reaction kinetics models.

  6. A Rock Physics Based Investigation of Pore Structure Variations Associated with a CO2 Flood in a Clastic Reservoir, Delhi, LA 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davidson, Daniel

    2013-08-14

    ) flood at the Delhi Holt-Bryant reservoir can be measured with acoustic data. The pore property change is measured by using the Baechle ratio, the Gassmann model, and the Sun framework flexibility factor. The change in the pore properties of the formation...

  7. Gravitational wave background from Standard Model physics: Qualitative features

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghiglieri, J

    2015-01-01

    Because of physical processes ranging from microscopic particle collisions to macroscopic hydrodynamic fluctuations, any plasma in thermal equilibrium emits gravitational waves. For the largest wavelengths the emission rate is proportional to the shear viscosity of the plasma. In the Standard Model at T > 160 GeV, the shear viscosity is dominated by the most weakly interacting particles, right-handed leptons, and is relatively large. We estimate the order of magnitude of the corresponding spectrum of gravitational waves. Even though at small frequencies (corresponding to the sub-Hz range relevant for planned observatories such as eLISA) this background is tiny compared with that from non-equilibrium sources, the total energy carried by the high-frequency part of the spectrum is non-negligible if the production continues for a long time. We suggest that this may constrain (weakly) the highest temperature of the radiation epoch. Observing the high-frequency part directly sets a very ambitious goal for future ge...

  8. Physics beyond the Standard Model from hydrogen spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ubachs, Wim; Eikema, Kjeld S E; Salumbides, Edcel J

    2015-01-01

    Spectroscopy of hydrogen can be used for a search into physics beyond the Standard Model. Differences between the absorption spectra of H$_2$ as observed at high redshift and those measured in the laboratory can be interpreted in terms of possible variations of the proton-electron mass ratio. Investigation of some ten of such absorbers in the redshift range $z= 2.0-4.2$ yields a constraint of $|\\Delta\\mu/\\mu|< 5 \\times 10^{-6}$ at 3$\\sigma$. Observation of H$_2$ from the photospheres of white dwarf stars inside our Galaxy delivers a constraint of similar magnitude on a dependence of $\\mu$ on a gravitational potential $10^4$ times as strong as on the Earth's surface. Laser-based precision measurements of dissociation energies, vibrational splittings and rotational level energies in H$_2$ molecules and their deuterated isotopomers HD and D$_2$ produce values for the rovibrational binding energies fully consistent with quantum ab initio calculations including relativistic and quantum electrodynamical (QED) ef...

  9. Gravitational wave background from Standard Model physics: Qualitative features

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Ghiglieri; M. Laine

    2015-07-17

    Because of physical processes ranging from microscopic particle collisions to macroscopic hydrodynamic fluctuations, any plasma in thermal equilibrium emits gravitational waves. For the largest wavelengths the emission rate is proportional to the shear viscosity of the plasma. In the Standard Model at T > 160 GeV, the shear viscosity is dominated by the most weakly interacting particles, right-handed leptons, and is relatively large. We estimate the order of magnitude of the corresponding spectrum of gravitational waves. Even though at small frequencies (corresponding to the sub-Hz range relevant for planned observatories such as eLISA) this background is tiny compared with that from non-equilibrium sources, the total energy carried by the high-frequency part of the spectrum is non-negligible if the production continues for a long time. We suggest that this may constrain (weakly) the highest temperature of the radiation epoch. Observing the high-frequency part directly sets a very ambitious goal for future generations of GHz-range detectors.

  10. PHYSICAL REVIEW C 87, 064608 (2013) Nuclear meson transparency in a relativistic Glauber model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gent, Universiteit

    2013-01-01

    PHYSICAL REVIEW C 87, 064608 (2013) Nuclear meson transparency in a relativistic Glauber model W traditional nuclear-physics calculations. The measurement of the onset and magnitude of the CT effect allows. Cosyn* and J. Ryckebusch Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ghent University, Proeftuinstraat 86, B

  11. CyberShake: A Physics-Based Seismic Hazard Model for Southern California ROBERT GRAVES,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deelman, Ewa

    the earthquake rupture process. Key words: Physics-based earthquake simulation, seismic hazard, ruptureCyberShake: A Physics-Based Seismic Hazard Model for Southern California ROBERT GRAVES,1 THOMAS H within seismic hazard calculations through the use of physics-based 3D ground motion simulations

  12. Functional Modeling Compiler for System-Level Design of Automotive Cyber-Physical Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al Faruque, Mohammad Abdullah

    Functional Modeling Compiler for System-Level Design of Automotive Cyber-Physical Systems Presented A typical Cyber-Physical System (CPS) such as the modern automotive includes not only the physical domains. An example of CPS: a modern automotive More than 70 ECUs More than 5 bus systems More than 10

  13. FACTORS IN THE DESIGN OF A ROCK MECHANICS CENTRIFUGE FOR STRONG ROCK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, George B

    1984-01-01

    1 . Capacit i es of known centrifuges and v proposed SoftSolla I rock mechanics centrifuge r, ---------1~ --- dxB. , (1980), Geotechnical centrifuges for model studies and

  14. Comparison of integral equation and physical scale modeling of the electromagnetic responses of models with large conductivity contrasts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, Douglas W.

    Comparison of integral equation and physical scale modeling of the electromagnetic responses geophysical electromagnetic responses: a numerical approach based upon the electric-field integral equa- tion and the physical scale modeling approach. The particular implementation of the integral-equation solution

  15. A physics-based emissions model for aircraft gas turbine combustors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allaire, Douglas L

    2006-01-01

    In this thesis, a physics-based model of an aircraft gas turbine combustor is developed for predicting NO. and CO emissions. The objective of the model is to predict the emissions of current and potential future gas turbine ...

  16. Vista at CDF: Results of a model-independent search for new physics...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Vista at CDF: Results of a model-independent search for new physics in 927 pb**-1 at CDF Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Vista at CDF: Results of a model-independent...

  17. MODELING AND VERIFICATION OF REAL-TIME AND CYBER-PHYSICAL SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Gopal

    MODELING AND VERIFICATION OF REAL-TIME AND CYBER-PHYSICAL SYSTEMS by Neda Saeedloei APPROVED Copyright 2011 Neda Saeedloei All Rights Reserved #12;To my mother. #12;MODELING AND VERIFICATION OF REAL-TIME AND CYBER-PHYSICAL SYSTEMS by NEDA SAEEDLOEI, B.S., M.S. DISSERTATION Presented to the Faculty

  18. Physical modeling of electrical conduction in printed circuit board insulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarathy, Vasanth

    2005-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with understanding the degradation of electrical and electronic components in automobiles due to environmental effects. A special emphasis is placed on understanding the physical processes underlying ...

  19. Physical influences on phytoplankton ecology : models and observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clayton, Sophie A

    2013-01-01

    The physical environment in the oceans dictates not only how phytoplankton cells are dispersed and their populations intermingled, but also mediates the supply of nutrients to the surface mixed layer. In this thesis I ...

  20. : A Model of Refactoring Physically and Virtually Separated Features

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaestner, Christian

    for SPLs. We distinguish [26] between implementation approaches that physically separate features (a.k.a that virtually separate features (a.k.a. virtual separation of concerns) by annotating code fragments in a common

  1. CFD modeling of entrained-flow coal gasifiers with improved physical and chemical sub-models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, J.; Zitney, S.

    2012-01-01

    Optimization of an advanced coal-fired integrated gasification combined cycle system requires an accurate numerical prediction of gasifier performance. While the turbulent multiphase reacting flow inside entrained-flow gasifiers has been modeled through computational fluid dynamic (CFD), the accuracy of sub-models requires further improvement. Built upon a previously developed CFD model for entrained-flow gasification, the advanced physical and chemical sub-models presented here include a moisture vaporization model with consideration of high mass transfer rate, a coal devolatilization model with more species to represent coal volatiles and heating rate effect on volatile yield, and careful selection of global gas phase reaction kinetics. The enhanced CFD model is applied to simulate two typical oxygen-blown entrained-flow configurations including a single-stage down-fired gasifier and a two-stage up-fired gasifier. The CFD results are reasonable in terms of predicted carbon conversion, syngas exit temperature, and syngas exit composition. The predicted profiles of velocity, temperature, and species mole fractions inside the entrained-flow gasifier models show trends similar to those observed in a diffusion-type flame. The predicted distributions of mole fractions of major species inside both gasifiers can be explained by the heterogeneous combustion and gasification reactions and the homogeneous gas phase reactions. It was also found that the syngas compositions at the CFD model exits are not in chemical equilibrium, indicating the kinetics for both heterogeneous and gas phase homogeneous reactions are important. Overall, the results achieved here indicate that the gasifier models reported in this paper are reliable and accurate enough to be incorporated into process/CFD co-simulations of IGCC power plants for systemwide design and optimization.

  2. A physical model for seismic noise generation from sediment transport in rivers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsai, Victor C.

    A physical model for seismic noise generation from sediment transport in rivers Victor C. Tsai,1 of seismic noise near rivers can help provide such measurements, but the lack of models linking observed model to describe the seismic noise induced by the transport of sediment in rivers. The model provides

  3. Modeling and Physical Interpretation of Cyclic Voltammetry for Pseudocapacitors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Girard, Henri-Louis Jean-Paul

    2015-01-01

    in Modern Aspects of Electrochemistry (B. E. Conway, C. G.modeling of elementary electrochemistry in lithium-ionlayer model for the electrochemistry of nanometer-sized

  4. Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDid youOxygen Generation | Center for GasPhysics Physics Print Because a

  5. Towards a Model for Computing in European Astroparticle Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Berghöfer; I. Agrafioti; B. Allen; V. Beckmann; T. Chiarusi; M. Delfino; S. Hesping; J. Chudoba; L. Dell'Agnello; S. Katsanevas; G. Lamanna; R. Lemrani; A. Margiotta; G. Maron; C. Palomba; G. Russo; P. Wegner

    2015-12-03

    Current and future astroparticle physics experiments are operated or are being built to observe highly energetic particles, high energy electromagnetic radiation and gravitational waves originating from all kinds of cosmic sources. The data volumes taken by the experiments are large and expected to grow significantly during the coming years. This is a result of advanced research possibilities and improved detector technology. To cope with the substantially increasing data volumes of astroparticle physics projects it is important to understand the future needs for computing resources in this field. Providing these resources constitutes a larger fraction of the overall running costs of future infrastructures. This document presents the results of a survey made by APPEC with the help of computing experts of major projects and future initiatives in astroparticle physics, representatives of current Tier-1 and Tier-2 LHC computing centers, as well as specifically astroparticle physics computing centers, e.g. the Albert Einstein Institute for gravitational waves analysis in Hanover. In summary, the overall CPU usage and short-term disk and long-term (tape) storage space currently available for astroparticle physics projects' computing services is of the order of one third of the central computing available for LHC data at the Tier-0 center at CERN. Till the end of the decade the requirements for computing resources are estimated to increase by a factor of 10. Furthermore, this document shall describe the diversity of astroparticle physics data handling and serve as a basis to estimate a distribution of computing and storage tasks among the major computing centers. (Abridged)

  6. Constructive Models of Discrete and Continuous Physical Phenomena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Engineering and Computer Sciences University of California at Berkeley Technical Report No. UCB/EECS-2014 (Industrial Cyber-Physical Systems, supported by IBM and United Technologies), and the Center for Hybrid permission. Acknowledgement This work was supported in part by the iCyPhy Research Center (Industrial Cyber

  7. Engineering rock mass classifications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bieniawski, Z.T.

    1989-01-01

    This book is a reference on rock mass classification, consolidating into one handy source information widely scattered through the literature. Includes new, unpublished material and case histories. Presents the fundamental concepts of classification schemes and critically appraises their practical application in industrial projects such as tunneling and mining.

  8. Modeling and Physical Interpretation of Cyclic Voltammetry for Pseudocapacitors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Girard, Henri-Louis Jean-Paul

    2015-01-01

    mathematical model for a lithium-ion battery/electrochemicalmodel reformulation for lithium-ion battery simulations:

  9. Report on High Performance Building's Energy Modeling, Physical Building Information Modeling for Solar Building Design and Simulation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alcocer, J.; Haberl, J. S.

    2012-01-01

    This report was created for the National Science Foundation-Physical Building Information Modeling (NSF-PBIM) project. This report describes the analysis of a solar office building using the following software: the legacy ...

  10. A Term Logic for Physically Realizable Models of Information Steven Lindell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lindell, Steven

    theory of computing based on ordinary informational analysis". (Here, the term `physiological' is being, and hardware, material objects governed by physical law. The fundamental mathematical theory behind software1 A Term Logic for Physically Realizable Models of Information Steven Lindell Department

  11. Efficient Reformulation of Solid-Phase Diffusion in Physics-Based Lithium-Ion Battery Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subramanian, Venkat

    Efficient Reformulation of Solid-Phase Diffusion in Physics-Based Lithium-Ion Battery Models, Berkeley, California 94720-8168, USA Lithium-ion batteries are typically modeled using porous electrode the active materials of porous electrodes for a pseudo-two- dimensional model for lithium-ion batteries

  12. Simple Physical Models Connect Theory and Experiment in Protein Folding Kinetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morozov, Alexandre V.

    Simple Physical Models Connect Theory and Experiment in Protein Folding Kinetics Eric Alm1 underlying the protein-folding problem can be tested by developing and characterizing simple models that make prefactor for protein folding. Finally, we discuss the limitations of simple native-state-based models

  13. Nested and multi-physics modeling of tsunami evolution from generation to inundation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lynett, Patrick

    Nested and multi-physics modeling of tsunami evolution from generation to inundation Sangyoung Son water equations Boussinesq equations Coupling Coherent structures Turbulence Tsunami a b s t r a c used in tsunami modeling, as well as an approach to two-way couple these models together

  14. A PHYSICALLY-BASED SCHEME FOR THE URBAN ENERGY BUDGET IN ATMOSPHERIC MODELS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    winds. The two model types presented above are used in urban climatology in order to comprehend townA PHYSICALLY-BASED SCHEME FOR THE URBAN ENERGY BUDGET IN ATMOSPHERIC MODELS VALÉRY MASSON Centre) Abstract. An urban surface scheme for atmospheric mesoscale models is presented. A generaliz- ation

  15. Modeling the Physical and Biochemical Influence of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Plant Discharges into their Adjacent Waters

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Modeling the Physical and Biochemical Influence of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Plant Discharges into their Adjacent Waters

  16. Microwave assisted hard rock cutting

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lindroth, David P. (Apple Valley, MN); Morrell, Roger J. (Bloomington, MN); Blair, James R. (Inver Grove Heights, MN)

    1991-01-01

    An apparatus for the sequential fracturing and cutting of subsurface volume of hard rock (102) in the strata (101) of a mining environment (100) by subjecting the volume of rock to a beam (25) of microwave energy to fracture the subsurface volume of rock by differential expansion; and , then bringing the cutting edge (52) of a piece of conventional mining machinery (50) into contact with the fractured rock (102).

  17. Physical Building Information Modeling for Solar Building Design and Simulation- Annual Report 2011 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yan, W.; Haberl, J.; Clayton, M.; Jeong, W.; Kim, J.; Kota, S.; Alcocer, J.; Dixit, M.

    2011-01-01

    This report was created for the National Science Foundation-Physical Building Information Modeling (NSF-PBIM) project. This report describes the analysis of a solar office building using the following software: the legacy ...

  18. Physical modeling of wind turbine generators in a small scale analog system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Xuntuo

    2014-01-01

    This project represents the physical modeling and experimental test of a Doubly-fed Induction Machine (DFIM), in order to substantially analyze the characteristic behaviors of wind turbines and its use in the micro-grid ...

  19. A physically based model for dielectric charging in an integrated optical MEMS wavelength selective switch.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nielson, Gregory N.; Barbastathis, George (Massachusetts Institute of Technology)

    2005-07-01

    A physical parameter based model for dielectric charge accumulation is proposed and used to predict the displacement versus applied voltage and pull-in response of an electrostatic MEMS wavelength selective integrated optical switch.

  20. A Unifying Platform for Water Resources Management Using Physically-Based Model and Remote Sensing Data 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shin, Yongchul

    2012-12-07

    In recent years, physically-based hydrological models provided a robust approach to better understand the cause-effect relationships of effective hydraulic properties in soil hydrology. These have increased the flexibility ...

  1. Nordic electricity congestion's arrangement as a model for Europe : physical constraints or operators' opportunism?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glachant, Jean-Michel

    2002-01-01

    Congestion on power grids seems a physical reality, a "hard" fact easy to check. Our paper models a different idea: congestion signal may be distorted by transmission system operators (TSOs), which puts the European ...

  2. Hot Dry Rock; Geothermal Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1990-01-01

    The commercial utilization of geothermal energy forms the basis of the largest renewable energy industry in the world. More than 5000 Mw of electrical power are currently in production from approximately 210 plants and 10 000 Mw thermal are used in direct use processes. The majority of these systems are located in the well defined geothermal generally associated with crustal plate boundaries or hot spots. The essential requirements of high subsurface temperature with huge volumes of exploitable fluids, coupled to environmental and market factors, limit the choice of suitable sites significantly. The Hot Dry Rock (HDR) concept at any depth originally offered a dream of unlimited expansion for the geothermal industry by relaxing the location constraints by drilling deep enough to reach adequate temperatures. Now, after 20 years intensive work by international teams and expenditures of more than $250 million, it is vital to review the position of HDR in relation to the established geothermal industry. The HDR resource is merely a body of rock at elevated temperatures with insufficient fluids in place to enable the heat to be extracted without the need for injection wells. All of the major field experiments in HDR have shown that the natural fracture systems form the heat transfer surfaces and that it is these fractures that must be for geothermal systems producing from naturally fractured formations provide a basis for directing the forthcoming but, equally, they require accepting significant location constraints on HDR for the time being. This paper presents a model HDR system designed for commercial operations in the UK and uses production data from hydrothermal systems in Japan and the USA to demonstrate the reservoir performance requirements for viable operations. It is shown that these characteristics are not likely to be achieved in host rocks without stimulation processes. However, the long term goal of artificial geothermal systems developed by systematic engineering procedures at depth may still be attained if high temperature sites with extensive fracturing are developed or exploited. [DJE -2005

  3. Summer 2014 Undergraduate Research Experience in Physics: Materials and Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) nuclear reactor found on a college campus. The MU Research Reactor (MURR) provides advanced research experiments, theory, and modeling and span a variety of research projects (see http

  4. Project Profile: Physics-Based Reliability Models for Supercritical...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    developed models to predict the reliability of hybrid gas bearing (HGB) and dry gas seal (DGS) components in the turboexpander of a supercritical CO2 turbine. The...

  5. Introduction to the Standard Model and Electroweak Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul Langacker

    2009-01-02

    A concise introduction is given to the standard model, including the structure of the QCD and electroweak Lagrangians, spontaneous symmetry breaking, experimental tests, and problems.

  6. S00906010006 rock check dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    XY! 53-0002 53-0890 53-1036 53-0598 53-0860 53-0056 S00906010006 rock check dam S00906010005 rock check dam S00906010007 rock check dam S00903010009 earthen berm S00903010010 earthen berm S00903120003 Channel/swale Check dam Sediment trap/basin Gabion Seed and mulch Cap Established vegetation SWMU boundary

  7. Carbonation Mechanism of Reservoir Rock by Supercritical Carbon Dioxide

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project Objectives: Elucidate comprehensively the carbonation reaction mechanisms between supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) and reservoir rocks consisting of different mineralogical compositions in aqueous and non-aqueous environments at temperatures of up to 250ºC, and to develop chemical modeling of CO2-reservior rock interactions.

  8. Physical scale modelling of urban flood Research student: Matteo Rubinato

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wyatt, Lucy

    and unsteady flow conditions in a scaled sewer system. Originally the model was composed of six manholes by including local losses in the calibration process. After modification the model was used to quantify sewer to surface and surface to sewer flow exchange through a single manhole during pluvial flooding. The work has

  9. Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics 66 (2004) 14911497 Sun-to-magnetosphere modeling: CISM forecast model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2004-01-01

    -to-magnetosphere modeling: CISM forecast model development using linked empirical methods D.N. Bakera,Ã, R.S. Weigela , E Space Weather Modeling (CISM) is to provide linked end-to- end models of the connected Sun­Earth system. It is envisioned that the ultimate product of the CISM effort will be a single, physics-based (i.e., ``forward

  10. Physics-Based Constraints in the Forward Modeling Analysis of

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTech ConnectSpeeding accessusers' guide. V1.0.0.Report)Physics FlashTime-Correlated Image

  11. Physics-Based Constraints in the Forward Modeling Analysis of

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTech ConnectSpeeding accessusers' guide. V1.0.0.Report)Physics FlashTime-Correlated

  12. Physics-based constraints in the forward modeling analysis of

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTech ConnectSpeeding accessusers' guide. V1.0.0.Report)Physics

  13. The Physical Model in Action: Quality Control for X-Shooter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moehler, Sabine; Kerber, Florian; Modigliani, Andrea; Vernet, Joel

    2010-01-01

    The data reduction pipeline for the VLT 2nd generation instrument X-Shooter uses a physical model to determine the optical distortion and derive the wavelength calibration. The parameters of this model describe the positions, orientations, and other physical properties of the optical components in the spectrograph. They are updated by an optimisation process that ensures the best possible fit to arc lamp line positions. ESO Quality Control monitors these parameters along with all of the usual diagnostics. This enables us to look for correlations between inferred physical changes in the instrument and, for example, instrument temperature sensor readings.

  14. The Hadronic Models for Cosmic Ray Physics: the FLUKA Code Solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Battistoni, G.; Garzelli, M.V.; Gadioli, E.; Muraro, S.; Sala, P.R.; Fasso, A.; Ferrari, A.; Roesler, S.; Cerutti, F.; Ranft, J.; Pinsky, L.S.; Empl, A.; Pelliccioni, M.; Villari, R.; /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /SLAC /CERN /Siegen U. /Houston U. /Frascati /ENEA, Frascati

    2007-01-31

    FLUKA is a general purpose Monte Carlo transport and interaction code used for fundamental physics and for a wide range of applications. These include Cosmic Ray Physics (muons, neutrinos, EAS, underground physics), both for basic research and applied studies in space and atmospheric flight dosimetry and radiation damage. A review of the hadronic models available in FLUKA and relevant for the description of cosmic ray air showers is presented in this paper. Recent updates concerning these models are discussed. The FLUKA capabilities in the simulation of the formation and propagation of EM and hadronic showers in the Earth's atmosphere are shown.

  15. Rock-Around Orbits 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bourgeois, Scott K.

    2010-07-14

    , David Hyland Tom Pollock J. Maurice Rojas Head of Department, Dimitris Lagoudas December 2009 Major Subject: Aerospace Engineering iii ABSTRACT Rock-Around Orbits. (December 2009) Scott Kenneth Bourgeois, B.S., Texas A&M University Chair of Advisory...] : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 3 4 Compatible Orbits for a Circular Target Orbit (Example 1) : : : : : 8 5 Inclination Bounds Geometry for a Circular Target Orbit : : : : : : : 10 6 GEO and RAO Orbits in the Inertial Frame (Example 1) : : : : : : : 14 7 GEO and RAO Orbits...

  16. Session: Hot Dry Rock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tennyson, George P. Jr.; Duchane, David V.; Ponden, Raymond F.; Brown, Donald W.

    1992-01-01

    This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of four presentations: ''Hot Dry Rock - Summary'' by George P. Tennyson, Jr.; ''HDR Opportunities and Challenges Beyond the Long Term Flow Test'' by David V. Duchane; ''Start-Up Operations at the Fenton Hill HDR Pilot Plant'' by Raymond F. Ponden; and ''Update on the Long-Term Flow Testing Program'' by Donald W. Brown.

  17. Cellular Networks as Models for Planck-Scale Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manfred Requardt

    1998-06-17

    Starting from the working hypothesis that both physics and the corresponding mathematics have to be described by means of discrete concepts on the Planck scale, one of the many problems one has to face in this enterprise is to find the discrete protoforms of the building blocks of our ordinary continuum physics and mathematics. We base our own approach on what we call `cellular networks', consisting of cells (nodes) interacting with each other via bonds (figuring as elementary interactions) according to a certain `local law'. Geometrically our dynamical networks are living on graphs. Hence a substantial amount of the investigation is devoted to the developement of various versions of discrete (functional) analysis and geometry on such (almost random) webs. Another important topic we address is a suitable concept of intrinsic (fractal) dimension on erratic structures of this kind. In the course of the investigation we make comments concerning both different and related approaches to quantum gravity as, say, the spin network framework. It may perhaps be said that certain parts of our programme seem to be a realisation of ideas sketched by Smolin some time ago (see the introduction).

  18. Mathematical Physics: A mathematical model of frying processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Primicerio, Mario

    in the organic material by the thermal history (see [8] [9] and e.g. [7] for an introduction to the influence the correct Rankine-Hugoniot type conditions. Moreover, in the model that will be presented and discussed

  19. Reactivity-equivalent physical transformation model for pin cell arrays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lynch, Steven T. (Steven Tyler)

    2010-01-01

    The behavior of TRISO fuel used in high temperature gas reactors in order to achieve high fuel performance is difficult to model using traditional lattice codes due to the double-heterogeneity effect created by the ...

  20. Rock-Water Interactions in the Fenton Hill, New Mexico, Hot Dry...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Rock Geothermal Systems II. Modeling Geochemical Behavior Abstract A transient mass balance model is developed to account for the dynamic behavior of an artificially stimulated...

  1. Cyber-Physical System Requirements -A Model Driven Approach Cyber-physical systems (CPS) networked

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    systems such as infusion pumps. Complete and consistent requirements are central to analysis. A generic patient controlled analgesia (GPCA) infusion pump system was used as a case example to provide: Generic Patient Controlled Analgesia Infusion Pump System. Figure: Infusion Pump Plant Model. Figure

  2. The application of high-resolution 3D seismic data to model the distribution of mechanical and hydrogeological properties of a potential host rock for the deep storage of radioactive waste in France

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mari, Jean-Luc

    2014-01-01

    In the context of a deep geological repository of high-level radioactive wastes, the French National Radioactive Waste Management Agency (Andra) has conducted an extensive characterization of the Callovo-Oxfordian argillaceous rock and surrounding formations in the Eastern Paris Basin. As part of this project, an accurate 3D seismic derived geological model is needed. The paper shows the procedure used for building the 3D seismic constrained geological model in depth by combining time-to-depth conversion of seismic horizons, consistent seismic velocity model and elastic impedance in time. It also shows how the 3D model is used for mechanical and hydrogeological studies. The 3D seismic field data example illustrates the potential of the proposed depth conversion procedure for estimating density and velocity distributions, which are consistent with the depth conversion of seismic horizons using the Bayesian Kriging method. The geological model shows good agreement with well log data obtained from a reference we...

  3. Integration of Advanced Probabilistic Analysis Techniques with Multi-Physics Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cetiner, Mustafa Sacit; none,; Flanagan, George F.; Poore III, Willis P.; Muhlheim, Michael David

    2014-07-30

    An integrated simulation platform that couples probabilistic analysis-based tools with model-based simulation tools can provide valuable insights for reactive and proactive responses to plant operating conditions. The objective of this work is to demonstrate the benefits of a partial implementation of the Small Modular Reactor (SMR) Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) Detailed Framework Specification through the coupling of advanced PRA capabilities and accurate multi-physics plant models. Coupling a probabilistic model with a multi-physics model will aid in design, operations, and safety by providing a more accurate understanding of plant behavior. This represents the first attempt at actually integrating these two types of analyses for a control system used for operations, on a faster than real-time basis. This report documents the development of the basic communication capability to exchange data with the probabilistic model using Reliability Workbench (RWB) and the multi-physics model using Dymola. The communication pathways from injecting a fault (i.e., failing a component) to the probabilistic and multi-physics models were successfully completed. This first version was tested with prototypic models represented in both RWB and Modelica. First, a simple event tree/fault tree (ET/FT) model was created to develop the software code to implement the communication capabilities between the dynamic-link library (dll) and RWB. A program, written in C#, successfully communicates faults to the probabilistic model through the dll. A systems model of the Advanced Liquid-Metal Reactor–Power Reactor Inherently Safe Module (ALMR-PRISM) design developed under another DOE project was upgraded using Dymola to include proper interfaces to allow data exchange with the control application (ConApp). A program, written in C+, successfully communicates faults to the multi-physics model. The results of the example simulation were successfully plotted.

  4. Physical model of a hybrid electric drive train

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, Brady W. (Brady William)

    2006-01-01

    A motor and flywheel system was designed to simulate the dynamics of the electric drive train and inertial mass of a hybrid electric vehicle. The model will serve as a test bed for students in 2.672 to study the energy ...

  5. A Physics Based Method for Combining Multiple Anatomy Models with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magee, Derek

    of Leeds, UK b Mid Yorkshire Hospitals NHS Trust, Wakefield, UK c Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Leeds model is a volumetric segmentation that contains the labelling of the anatomy components of 1Corresponding Author: School of Computing, University of Leeds, UK. E-mail: drm@comp.leeds.ac.uk #12;Current

  6. Validation of Erosion Modeling: Physical and Numerical Mehrad Kamalzare1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franklin, W. Randolph

    -3590 ABSTRACT The overall intent of this research is to develop numerical models of erosion of levees, dams is necessary for emergency plans for levee or dam breaches. Griffis, 2007 addressed the overall design and hydraulic shear stress. #12;2 Xu and Zhang (2009) found that in addition to soil type, the degree

  7. VALIDATION OF EROSION MODELING: PHYSICAL AND Mehrad Kamalzare1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -3590 ABSTRACT The overall intent of this research is to develop numerical models of erosion of levees, dams is necessary for emergency plans for levee or dam breaches. Griffis, 2007 addressed the overall design and hydraulic shear stress. Xu and Zhang (2009) found that in addition to soil type, the degree of compaction

  8. Toward Real-Time Simulation of Physics Based Lithium-Ion Battery Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subramanian, Venkat

    Toward Real-Time Simulation of Physics Based Lithium-Ion Battery Models Venkat R. Subramanian Technological University, Cookeville, Tennessee 38505, USA Recent interest in lithium-ion batteries for electric on the computational efficiency of lithium-ion battery models. This paper presents an effective approach to simulate

  9. PHYSICAL REVIEW E 83, 066216 (2011) "Weak quantum chaos" and its resistor network modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Doron

    2011-01-01

    PHYSICAL REVIEW E 83, 066216 (2011) "Weak quantum chaos" and its resistor network modeling number(s): 05.45.Mt, 03.65.-w, 73.23.-b I. INTRODUCTION So-called quantum chaos is the study of quantized. This is the case if we have weak quantum chaos (WQC) circumstances, in which the traditional RMT modeling does

  10. PHYSICAL REVIEW E VOLUME 48, NUMBER 2 AUGUST 1993 Toy model for protein folding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stillinger, Frank

    PHYSICAL REVIEW E VOLUME 48, NUMBER 2 AUGUST 1993 Toy model for protein folding Frank H. Stillinger (Received 1 March 1993) A conceptually simple model for protein-folding phenomena has been created thus far suggest that protein folding has a more complex cooperative character than has been embodied

  11. Sliding Mode Control for Uncertain Thermal SOFC Models with Physical Actuator Constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Appelrath, Hans-Jürgen

    Mathematical models for the dynamics of high-temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs) can be subdividedSliding Mode Control for Uncertain Thermal SOFC Models with Physical Actuator Constraints Thomas D that high operating temperatures are advantageous for the efficiency of SOFCs. Moreover, high operating

  12. PHYSICAL REVIEW B 88, 115423 (2013) Nanoscopic interferometer model for spin resonance in current noise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horovitz, Baruch

    2013-01-01

    as seen by a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) via its current noise. The model for this ESRPHYSICAL REVIEW B 88, 115423 (2013) Nanoscopic interferometer model for spin resonance in current noise Anatoly Golub and Baruch Horovitz Department of Physics, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer

  13. PHYSICAL REVIEW B 89, 075412 (2014) Model for electron spin resonance in STM noise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horovitz, Baruch

    2014-01-01

    PHYSICAL REVIEW B 89, 075412 (2014) Model for electron spin resonance in STM noise Alvaro Caso,1; published 12 February 2014) We propose a model to account for the observed ESR-like signal at the Larmor frequency in the current noise scanning tunnel microscope (STM) experiments identifying spin centers

  14. Physically-Based Distributed Models for Multi-Layer Ceramic Capacitors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Physically-Based Distributed Models for Multi-Layer Ceramic Capacitors C. R. Sullivan Yuqin Sun-Layer Ceramic Capacitors Charles R. Sullivan and Yuqin Sun charles.r.sullivan@dartmouth.edu http-603-646-3856 Abstract Measurements show that lumped RLC models for multilayer ceramic capacitors are inadequate. A new

  15. Probing particle and nuclear physics models of neutrinoless double beta decay with different nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. L. Fogli; E. Lisi; A. M. Rotunno

    2009-08-06

    Half-life estimates for neutrinoless double beta decay depend on particle physics models for lepton flavor violation, as well as on nuclear physics models for the structure and transitions of candidate nuclei. Different models considered in the literature can be contrasted - via prospective data - with a "standard" scenario characterized by light Majorana neutrino exchange and by the quasiparticle random phase approximation, for which the theoretical covariance matrix has been recently estimated. We show that, assuming future half-life data in four promising nuclei (Ge-76, Se-82, Te-130, and Xe-136), the standard scenario can be distinguished from a few nonstandard physics models, while being compatible with alternative state-of-the-art nuclear calculations (at 95% C.L.). Future signals in different nuclei may thus help to discriminate at least some decay mechanisms, without being spoiled by current nuclear uncertainties. Prospects for possible improvements are also discussed.

  16. Probing particle and nuclear physics models of neutrinoless double beta decay with different nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fogli, G. L.; Rotunno, A. M. [Dipartimento Interateneo di Fisica 'Michelangelo Merlin', Via Amendola 173, 70126 Bari (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Bari, Via Orabona 4, 70126 Bari (Italy); Lisi, E. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Bari, Via Orabona 4, 70126 Bari (Italy)

    2009-07-01

    Half-life estimates for neutrinoless double beta decay depend on particle physics models for lepton-flavor violation, as well as on nuclear physics models for the structure and transitions of candidate nuclei. Different models considered in the literature can be contrasted - via prospective data - with a 'standard' scenario characterized by light Majorana neutrino exchange and by the quasiparticle random phase approximation, for which the theoretical covariance matrix has been recently estimated. We show that, assuming future half-life data in four promising nuclei ({sup 76}Ge, {sup 82}Se, {sup 130}Te, and {sup 136}Xe), the standard scenario can be distinguished from a few nonstandard physics models, while being compatible with alternative state-of-the-art nuclear calculations (at 95% C.L.). Future signals in different nuclei may thus help to discriminate at least some decay mechanisms, without being spoiled by current nuclear uncertainties. Prospects for possible improvements are also discussed.

  17. A model for including Arduino microcontroller programming in the introductory physics lab

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haugen, Andrew J

    2014-01-01

    The paper describes a curricular framework for introducing microcontroller programming in the University Physics lab. The approach makes use of Modeling Instruction, an effective approach for teaching science at the secondary level in which student learn the standard material by developing and deploying models of the physical world. In our approach, students engage with a context-rich problem that can be solved with one or more sensors and a microcontroller. The solution path we describe then consists of developing a mathematical model for how the sensors' data can be mapped to a meaningful measurement, and further, developing an algorithmic model that will be implemented in the microcontroller. Once the system is developed and implemented, students are given an array of similar problems in which they can deploy their data collection system. Results from the implementation of this idea, in two University Physics sections, using Arduino microcontrollers, are also described.

  18. Joint physical and numerical modeling of water distribution networks.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zimmerman, Adam; O'Hern, Timothy John; Orear, Leslie Jr.; Kajder, Karen C.; Webb, Stephen Walter; Cappelle, Malynda A.; Khalsa, Siri Sahib; Wright, Jerome L.; Sun, Amy Cha-Tien; Chwirka, J. Benjamin; Hartenberger, Joel David; McKenna, Sean Andrew; van Bloemen Waanders, Bart Gustaaf; McGrath, Lucas K.; Ho, Clifford Kuofei

    2009-01-01

    This report summarizes the experimental and modeling effort undertaken to understand solute mixing in a water distribution network conducted during the last year of a 3-year project. The experimental effort involves measurement of extent of mixing within different configurations of pipe networks, measurement of dynamic mixing in a single mixing tank, and measurement of dynamic solute mixing in a combined network-tank configuration. High resolution analysis of turbulence mixing is carried out via high speed photography as well as 3D finite-volume based Large Eddy Simulation turbulence models. Macroscopic mixing rules based on flow momentum balance are also explored, and in some cases, implemented in EPANET. A new version EPANET code was developed to yield better mixing predictions. The impact of a storage tank on pipe mixing in a combined pipe-tank network during diurnal fill-and-drain cycles is assessed. Preliminary comparison between dynamic pilot data and EPANET-BAM is also reported.

  19. Mixed-Symmetry Shell-Model Calculations in Nuclear Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. G. Gueorguiev

    2010-02-17

    We consider a novel approach to the nuclear shell model. The one-dimensional harmonic oscillator in a box is used to introduce the concept of an oblique-basis shell-model theory. By implementing the Lanczos method for diagonalization of large matrices, and the Cholesky algorithm for solving generalized eigenvalue problems, the method is applied to nuclei. The mixed-symmetry basis combines traditional spherical shell-model states with SU(3) collective configurations. We test the validity of this mixed-symmetry scheme on 24Mg and 44Ti. Results for 24Mg, obtained using the Wilthental USD intersection in a space that spans less than 10% of the full-space, reproduce the binding energy within 2% as well as an accurate reproduction of the low-energy spectrum and the structure of the states - 90% overlap with the exact eigenstates. In contrast, for an m-scheme calculation, one needs about 60% of the full space to obtain compatible results. Calculations for 44Ti support the mixed-mode scheme although the pure SU(3) calculations with few irreps are not as good as the standard m-scheme calculations. The strong breaking of the SU(3) symmetry results in relatively small enhancements within the combined basis. However, an oblique-basis calculation in 50% of the full pf-shell space is as good as a usual m-scheme calculation in 80% of the space. Results for the lower pf-shell nuclei 44-48Ti and 48Cr, using the Kuo-Brown-3 interaction, show that SU(3) symmetry breaking in this region is driven by the single-particle spin-orbit splitting. In our study we observe some interesting coherent structures, such as coherent mixing of basis states, quasi-perturbative behavior in the toy model, and enhanced B(E2) strengths close to the SU(3) limit even though SU(3) appears to be rather badly broken.

  20. A Search for Physics Beyond the Standard Model using Like-Sign Muon Pairs in pp Collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV with the ATLAS Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skinnari, Louise Anastasia

    2012-01-01

    the Standard Model . . . . . 2.2 Physics Beyond the Standardregion for different new physics models, all producing like-region, shown for different new physics models. The quoted

  1. Physics-based statistical model and simulation method of RF propagation in urban environments

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pao, Hsueh-Yuan (San Jose, CA); Dvorak, Steven L. (Tucson, AZ)

    2010-09-14

    A physics-based statistical model and simulation/modeling method and system of electromagnetic wave propagation (wireless communication) in urban environments. In particular, the model is a computationally efficient close-formed parametric model of RF propagation in an urban environment which is extracted from a physics-based statistical wireless channel simulation method and system. The simulation divides the complex urban environment into a network of interconnected urban canyon waveguides which can be analyzed individually; calculates spectral coefficients of modal fields in the waveguides excited by the propagation using a database of statistical impedance boundary conditions which incorporates the complexity of building walls in the propagation model; determines statistical parameters of the calculated modal fields; and determines a parametric propagation model based on the statistical parameters of the calculated modal fields from which predictions of communications capability may be made.

  2. Physical modelling in Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering – 2: Session Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Madabhushi, Gopal

    2015-06-02

    Defae A.H. & Knappett J.A. UK Pile foundations: sloping ground In p u t m o ti o n s Use of Ricker wavelet ground motions as an alternative to push-over testing M. Loli& I., Anastasopoulos, J.A. Knappett & M.J. Brown Greece/UK Facilities... model tests on the measurement of impact energy on bridge pier foundations embedded in sand Viswanadham BVS, Guha A, Sudarshan BV, Kundu, S & Bhattacharjee D India Facilities development: Centrifuge testing: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8...

  3. New perspectives in physics beyond the standard model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weiner, Neal Jonathan

    2000-09-09

    In 1934 Fermi postulated a theory for weak interactions containing a dimensionful coupling with a size of roughly 250 GeV. Only now are we finally exploring this energy regime. What arises is an open question: supersymmetry and large extra dimensions are two possible scenarios. Meanwhile, other experiments will begin providing definitive information into the nature of neutrino masses and CP violation. In this paper, we explore features of possible theoretical scenarios, and study the phenomenological implications of various models addressing the open questions surrounding these issues.

  4. Characterizing Flow in Oil Reservoir Rock Using Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holmes, David W.

    In this paper, a 3D Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) simulator for modeling grain scale fluid flow in porous rock is presented. The versatility of the SPH method has driven its use in increasingly complex areas of flow ...

  5. Multi-Dimensional Modeling of Nova with Realistic Nuclear Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zingale, M; Hoffman, R D

    2011-01-27

    This contract covered the period from 03/09/2010 to 09/30/2010. Over this period, we adapted the low Mach number hydrodynamics code MAESTRO to perform simulations of novae. A nova is the thermonuclear runaway of an accreted hydrogen layer on the surface of a white dwarf. As the accreted layer grows in mass, the temperature and density at the base increase to the point where hydrogen fusion can begin by the CNO cycle - a burning process that uses carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen to complete the fusion of four hydrogen nuclei into one helium-4 nucleus. At this point, we are running initial models of nova, exploring the details of the convection. In the follow-on contract to this one, we will continue this investigation.

  6. High-Performance Computing Modeling Advances Accelerator Science for High-Energy Physics

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Amundson, James; Macridin, Alexandru; Spentzouris, Panagiotis

    2014-11-01

    The development and optimization of particle accelerators are essential for advancing our understanding of the properties of matter, energy, space and time. Particle accelerators are complex devices whose behavior involves many physical effects on multiple scales. Therefore, advanced computational tools utilizing high-performance computing (HPC) are essential for accurately modeling them. In the past decade, the DOE SciDAC program has produced such accelerator-modeling tools, which have beem employed to tackle some of the most difficult accelerator science problems. In this article we discuss the Synergia beam-dynamics framework and its applications to high-intensity particle accelerator physics. Synergia is an accelerator simulation packagemore »capable of handling the entire spectrum of beam dynamics simulations. We present the design principles, key physical and numerical models in Synergia and its performance on HPC platforms. Finally, we present the results of Synergia applications for the Fermilab proton source upgrade, known as the Proton Improvement Plan (PIP).« less

  7. High-Performance Computing Modeling Advances Accelerator Science for High-Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amundson, James; Macridin, Alexandru; Spentzouris, Panagiotis

    2014-11-01

    The development and optimization of particle accelerators are essential for advancing our understanding of the properties of matter, energy, space and time. Particle accelerators are complex devices whose behavior involves many physical effects on multiple scales. Therefore, advanced computational tools utilizing high-performance computing (HPC) are essential for accurately modeling them. In the past decade, the DOE SciDAC program has produced such accelerator-modeling tools, which have beem employed to tackle some of the most difficult accelerator science problems. In this article we discuss the Synergia beam-dynamics framework and its applications to high-intensity particle accelerator physics. Synergia is an accelerator simulation package capable of handling the entire spectrum of beam dynamics simulations. We present the design principles, key physical and numerical models in Synergia and its performance on HPC platforms. Finally, we present the results of Synergia applications for the Fermilab proton source upgrade, known as the Proton Improvement Plan (PIP).

  8. Iron and Steel Phosphate Rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    Lime Lithium Magnesium Manganese Mercury Mica Molybdenum Nickel Nitrogen Peat Perlite Phosphate Rock . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 194 Appendix C--Resource/Reserve Definitions . . . . . . 195 Commodities: Abrasives (Manufactured

  9. Iron and Steel Phosphate Rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    Mica Molybdenum Nickel Nitrogen Peat Perlite Phosphate Rock Platinum Potash Pumice Quartz Crystal Rare . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 190 Appendix C--A Resource/Reserve Classification for Minerals

  10. Multiporosity Flow in Fractured Low-Permeability Rocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuhlman, Kristopher L; Heath, Jason E

    2015-01-01

    A multiporosity extension of classical double and triple porosity fractured rock flow models for slightly compressible fluids is presented. The multiporosity model is an adaptation of the multirate solute transport model of Haggerty and Gorelick (1995) to viscous flow in fractured rock reservoirs. It is a generalization of both pseudo-steady-state and transient interporosity flow double porosity models. The model includes a fracture continuum and an overlapping distribution of multiple rock matrix continua, whose fracture-matrix exchange coefficients are specified through a discrete probability mass function. Semi-analytical cylindrically symmetric solutions to the multiporosity mathematical model are developed using the Laplace transform to illustrate its behavior. The multiporosity model presented here is conceptually simple, yet flexible enough to simulate common conceptualizations of double and triple porosity flow. This combination of generality and simplicity makes the multiporosity model a good choice ...

  11. Squirt flow in fully saturated rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dvorkin, J.; Mavko, G.; Nur, A. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Geophysics] [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Geophysics

    1995-01-01

    The authors estimate velocity/frequency dispersion and attenuation in fully saturated rocks by employing the squirt-flow mechanism of solid-fluid interaction. In this model, pore fluid is squeezed from thin soft cracks into the surrounding large pores. Information about the compliance of these soft cracks at low confining pressures is extracted from high-pressure velocity data. The frequency dependence of squirt-induced pressure in the soft cracks is linked with the porosity and permeability of the soft pore space, and the characteristic squirt-flow length. These unknown parameters are combined into one expression that is assumed to be a fundamental rock property that does not depend on frequency. The appropriate value of this expression for a given rock can be found by matching the authors theoretical predictions with the experimental measurements of attenuation or velocity. The low-frequency velocity limits, as given by their model, are identical to those predicted by Gassmann`s formula. The high-frequency limits may significant exceed those given by the Biot theory: the high-frequency frame bulk modulus is close to that measured at high confining pressure. They have applied their model to D`Euville Limestone, Navajo Sandstone, and Westerly Granite. The model realistically predicts the observed velocity/frequency dispersion, and attenuation.

  12. Project Profile: Physics-Based Reliability Models for Supercritical-CO2 Turbomachinery Components

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    GE, under the Physics of Reliability: Evaluating Design Insights for Component Technologies in Solar (PREDICTS) Program will be leveraging internally developed models to predict the reliability of hybrid gas bearing (HGB) and dry gas seal (DGS) components in the turboexpander of a supercritical CO2 turbine. The Bayesian model is to include phase changes, low cycle fatigue/high cycle fatigue, dynamic instabilities, and corrosion processes.

  13. A wave equation including leptons and quarks for the standard model of quantum physics in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    A wave equation including leptons and quarks for the standard model of quantum physics in Clifford-m@orange.fr August 27, 2014 Abstract A wave equation with mass term is studied for all particles and an- tiparticles of color and antiquarks u and d. This wave equation is form invariant under the Cl 3 group generalizing

  14. Access Nets: Modeling Access to Physical Robert Frohardt, Bor-Yuh Evan Chang, and Sriram Sankaranarayanan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Bor-Yuh Evan

    Access Nets: Modeling Access to Physical Spaces Robert Frohardt, Bor-Yuh Evan Chang, and Sriram) Robert Frohardt, Bor-Yuh Evan Chang, and Sriram Sankaranarayanan University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado, USA {frohardt,bec,srirams}@cs.colorado.edu Abstract. Electronic, software-managed mechanisms

  15. Modeling Physical Quantities in Industrial Systems using Fluid Stochastic Petri Nets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gribaudo, Marco

    of a case study, in which the quantity to be regulated is a real fluid quantity: the fuel demand in a gas: Start Fuel Controller 2 Fluid Stochastic Petri Nets Fluid Stochastic Petri Nets are Petri net basedModeling Physical Quantities in Industrial Systems using Fluid Stochastic Petri Nets M. Gribaudo

  16. Modeling the physics of FtsZ assembly and force generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erickson, Harold P.

    Modeling the physics of FtsZ assembly and force generation Harold P. Erickson1 Department of Cell) The tubulin homolog FtsZ is the major cytoskeletal protein in bacterial cytokinesis. It can generate proposed for how this force might be generated. These fall into 2 categories. The first is based

  17. Port-Hamiltonian systems: network modeling and control of nonlinear physical systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schaft, Arjan van der

    Port-Hamiltonian systems: network modeling and control of nonlinear physical systems A.J. van der-Hamiltonian system with a controller port-Hamiltonian system, leading to a closed-loop port-Hamiltonian system. Finally, extensions to the distributed-parameter case are provided by formulating boundary control systems

  18. Mathematical, physical and numerical principles essential for models of turbulent mixing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharp, David Howland [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lim, Hyunkyung [STONY BROOK UNIV; Yu, Yan [STONY BROOK UNIV; Glimm, James G [STONY BROOK UNIV

    2009-01-01

    We propose mathematical, physical and numerical principles which are important for the modeling of turbulent mixing, especially the classical and well studied Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities which involve acceleration driven mixing of a fluid discontinuity layer, by a steady accerleration or an impulsive force.

  19. Periodic migration in a physical model of cells on micropatterns Brian A. Camley,1, 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Bo

    Periodic migration in a physical model of cells on micropatterns Brian A. Camley,1, 2 Yanxiang Zhao, bipedal motion, and periodic migration, in which the cell crawls persistently in one direction before-dimensional extracellular ma- trix (ECM). However, cells in ECM often exhibit qualitatively different modes of migration

  20. Final Technical Report Modeling the Physical and Biochemical Influence of Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -EE0003638 Prepared For THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (DOE): MARINE AND HYDROKINETIC INITIATIVE Prepared By MAKAI of the global OTEC resource dwarfs that of other other marine renewable energy technologies, and OTEC powerFinal Technical Report Modeling the Physical and Biochemical Influence of Ocean Thermal Energy

  1. Physically Based Model-Predictive Control for SOFC Stacks and Systems Tyrone L. Vincent, Borhan Sanandaji

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanandaji, Borhan M.

    Physically Based Model-Predictive Control for SOFC Stacks and Systems Tyrone L. Vincent, Borhan output tra- jectory. The process is demonstrated for a tubular SOFC stack that could be used, solid-oxide fuel cells (SOFC) must deliver power profiles that meet the demands of transient loads

  2. Physical model of back line-contact front-junction solar cells Andres Cuevas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    electron-collector region is made by thermal dif- fusion of phosphorus, and the localized metal contactsPhysical model of back line-contact front-junction solar cells Andres Cuevas Citation: J. Appl-junction solar cells Andres Cuevasa) Research School of Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra

  3. Breaking Cosmological Degeneracies in Galaxy Cluster Surveys with a Physical Model of Cluster Structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joshua D. Younger; Zoltan Haiman; Greg L. Bryan; Sheng Wang

    2006-12-22

    Forthcoming large galaxy cluster surveys will yield tight constraints on cosmological models. It has been shown that in an idealized survey, containing > 10,000 clusters, statistical errors on dark energy and other cosmological parameters will be at the percent level. It has also been shown that through "self-calibration", parameters describing the mass-observable relation and cosmology can be simultaneously determined, though at a loss in accuracy by about an order of magnitude. Here we examine the utility of an alternative approach of self-calibration, in which a parametrized ab-initio physical model is used to compute cluster structure and the resulting mass-observable relations. As an example, we use a modified-entropy ("pre-heating") model of the intracluster medium, with the history and magnitude of entropy injection as unknown input parameters. Using a Fisher matrix approach, we evaluate the expected simultaneous statistical errors on cosmological and cluster model parameters. We study two types of surveys, in which a comparable number of clusters are identified either through their X-ray emission or through their integrated Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect. We find that compared to a phenomenological parametrization of the mass-observable relation, using our physical model yields significantly tighter constraints in both surveys, and offers substantially improved synergy when the two surveys are combined. These results suggest that parametrized physical models of cluster structure will be useful when extracting cosmological constraints from SZ and X-ray cluster surveys. (abridged)

  4. 288 Int. J. Nuclear Energy Science and Technology, Vol. 7, No. 4, 2013 Multi-physics modelling of nuclear reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demazière, Christophe

    of nuclear reactors: current practices in a nutshell Christophe Demazière Department of Applied Physics of nuclear reactors are based on the use of different solvers for resolving the different physical fields and the corresponding approximations. Keywords: nuclear reactors; multi-physics; multi-scale; modelling; deterministic

  5. The Landscape of Klamath Basin Rock Art

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David, Robert James

    2012-01-01

    Figure 22. Main rock art panel at QzM-1………………………………………………….31. Special Use Area rock art sites (map)………………………………………….Figure 32. Mod-17 rock art site within Modoc territory (

  6. Oil and Gas CDT Bots in Rocks: Intelligent Rock Deformation for Fault Rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henderson, Gideon

    Heriot-Watt University, Institute of Petroleum Engineering Supervisory Team · Dr Helen Lewis, Heriot://www.pet.hw.ac.uk/staff-directory/jimsomerville.htm Key Words Nano/Micro sensors; faults; fault zones; geomechanics; rock mechanics; rock deformation-deformed equivalent, a different lab-deformed example and a geomechanical simulation of a fault zone showing permanent

  7. Electroweak Symmetry Breaking, Intermediate Regulators and Physics Beyond the Standard Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Holman

    2015-07-29

    According to the long-standing received wisdom, a "small" value of the Higgs mass - as for instance implied by general unitarity constraints - is highly "unnatural" and essentially $\\mbox{requires}$ new physics to be present at or near currently accessible energy scales. Following the discovery of a new, Higgslike boson at the LHC facility in 2012, but with no sign of new physics after having explored a large region of parameter space, a dilemma thus seems to present itself : either the newly discovered boson is indeed the long-sought Higgs boson of the standard model of particle physics (or some appropriate variant of that model) and the new physics at the TeV scale, supposedly required by the naturalness argument, is still waiting to be discovered, possibly by LHC-II, or the identification of the new boson as the Higgs cannot be maintained. It is shown that this apparent dilemma is in fact a false one, in that nothing in contemporary particle physics dictates that a small Higgs mass be unnatural in any way.

  8. A physical model of radiated enhancement of plasma-surrounded antenna

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Xiaotian; Wang, Chunsheng, E-mail: wangcs@hit.edu.cn; Jiang, Binhao; Zhang, Zhonglin [Harbin Institute of Technology, 92 West Dazhi Street, Nan Gang District, 150001 Harbin (China)

    2014-09-15

    A phenomenon that the radiated power may be enhanced when an antenna is surrounded by a finite plasma shell has been found in numerical and experimental studies. In this paper, a physical model was built to express the mechanism of the radiated enhancement. In this model, the plasma shell is treated as a parallel connection of a capacitance and a conductance whose parameters change with the system parameters (plasma density, collision frequency, and antenna frequency). So, the radiated enhancement can be explained by the resonance between the plasma shell and the infinite free space. Furthermore, the effects of system parameters on the radiated power are given and effects corresponding to mechanisms are performed based on the physical model.

  9. Prototype Data Models and Data Dictionaries for Hanford Sediment Physical and Hydraulic Properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rockhold, Mark L.; Last, George V.; Middleton, Lisa A.

    2010-09-30

    The Remediation Decision Support (RDS) project, managed by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC), has been compiling physical and hydraulic property data and parameters to support risk analyses and waste management decisions at Hanford. In FY09 the RDS project developed a strategic plan for a physical and hydraulic property database. This report documents prototype data models and dictionaries for these properties and associated parameters. Physical properties and hydraulic parameters and their distributions are required for any type of quantitative assessment of risk and uncertainty associated with predictions of contaminant transport and fate in the subsurface. The central plateau of the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State contains most of the contamination at the Site and has up to {approx}100 m of unsaturated and unconsolidated or semi-consolidated sediments overlying the unconfined aquifer. These sediments contain a wide variety of contaminants ranging from organic compounds, such as carbon tetrachloride, to numerous radionuclides including technetium, plutonium, and uranium. Knowledge of the physical and hydraulic properties of the sediments and their distributions is critical for quantitative assessment of the transport of these contaminants in the subsurface, for evaluation of long-term risks and uncertainty associated with model predictions of contaminant transport and fate, and for evaluating, designing, and operating remediation alternatives. One of the goals of PNNL's RDS project is to work with the Hanford Environmental Data Manager (currently with CHPRC) to develop a protocol and schedule for incorporation of physical property and hydraulic parameter datasets currently maintained by PNNL into HEIS. This requires that the data first be reviewed to ensure quality and consistency. New data models must then be developed for HEIS that are approved by the HTAG that oversees HEIS development. After approval, these new data models then need to be implemented in HEIS by the EDM before there is an actual repository for the data. This document summarizes modifications to previously developed data models, and new data models and data dictionaries for physical and hydraulic property data and parameters to be transferred to HEIS. A prototype dataset that conforms to the specifications of these recommended data models has been identified and processed, and is ready for transfer to CHPRC for inclusion in HEIS. Additional datasets are planned for transfer from PNNL to CHPRC in FY11.

  10. Shotgun cartridge rock breaker

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ruzzi, Peter L. (Eagan, NM); Morrell, Roger J. (Bloomington, MN)

    1995-01-01

    A rock breaker uses shotgun cartridges or other firearm ammunition as the explosive charge at the bottom of a drilled borehole. The breaker includes a heavy steel rod or bar, a gun with a firing chamber for the ammunition which screws onto the rod, a long firing pin running through a central passage in the rod, and a firing trigger mechanism at the external end of the bar which strikes the firing pin to fire the cartridge within the borehole. A tubular sleeve surround the main body of the rod and includes slits the end to allow it to expand. The rod has a conical taper at the internal end against which the end of the sleeve expands when the sleeve is forced along the rod toward the taper by a nut threaded onto the external end of the rod. As the sleeve end expands, it pushes against the borehole and holds the explosive gasses within, and also prevents the breaker from flying out of the borehole. The trigger mechanism includes a hammer with a slot and a hole for accepting a drawbar or drawpin which, when pulled by a long cord, allows the cartridge to be fired from a remote location.

  11. Low Pore Connectivity in Natural Rock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Qinhong; Ewing, Robert P.; Dultz, Stefan

    2012-05-15

    As repositories for CO? and radioactive waste, as oil and gas reservoirs, and as contaminated sites needing remediation, rock formations play a central role in energy and environmental management. The connectivity of the rock's porespace strongly affects fluid flow and solute transport. This work examines pore connectivity and its implications for fluid flow and chemical transport. Three experimental approaches (imbibition, tracer concentration profiles, and imaging) were used in combination with network modeling. In the imbibition results, three types of imbibition slope [log (cumulative imbibition) vs. log (imbibition time)] were found: the classical 0.5, plus 0.26, and 0.26 transitioning to 0.5. The imbibition slope of 0.26 seen in Indiana sandstone, metagraywacke, and Barnett shale indicates low pore connectivity, in contrast to the slope of 0.5 seen in the well-connected Berea sandstone. In the tracer profile work, rocks exhibited different distances to the plateau porosity, consistent with the pore connectivity from the imbibition tests. Injection of a molten metal into connected pore spaces, followed by 2-D imaging of the solidified alloy in polished thin sections, allowed direct assessment of pore structure and lateral connection in the rock samples. Pore-scale network modeling gave results consistent with measurements, confirming pore connectivity as the underlying cause of both anomalous behaviors: imbibition slope not having the classical value of 0.5, and accessible porosity being a function of distance from the edge. A poorly connected porespace will exhibit anomalous behavior in fluid flow and chemical transport, such as a lower imbibition slope (in air–water system) and diffusion rate than expected from classical behavior.

  12. Simulation and physical model based gamma-ray burst afterglow analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Eerten, Hendrik

    2015-01-01

    Advances in our numerical and theoretical understanding of gamma-ray burst afterglow processes allow us to construct models capable of dealing with complex relativistic jet dynamics and non-thermal emission, that can be compared directly to data from instruments such as Swift. Because afterglow blast waves and power law spectra are intrinsically scale-invariant under changes of explosion energy and medium density, templates can be generated from large-scale hydrodynamics simulations. This allows for iterative template-based model fitting using the physical model parameters (quantifying the properties of the burster, emission and observer) directly as fit variables. Here I review how such an approach to afterglow analysis works in practice, paying special attention to the underlying model assumptions, possibilities, caveats and limitations of this type of analysis. Because some model parameters can be degenerate in certain regions of parameter space, or unconstrained if data in a limited number of a bands is a...

  13. Physical Model Development and Benchmarking for MHD Flows in Blanket Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramakanth Munipalli; P.-Y.Huang; C.Chandler; C.Rowell; M.-J.Ni; N.Morley; S.Smolentsev; M.Abdou

    2008-06-05

    An advanced simulation environment to model incompressible MHD flows relevant to blanket conditions in fusion reactors has been developed at HyPerComp in research collaboration with TEXCEL. The goals of this phase-II project are two-fold: The first is the incorporation of crucial physical phenomena such as induced magnetic field modeling, and extending the capabilities beyond fluid flow prediction to model heat transfer with natural convection and mass transfer including tritium transport and permeation. The second is the design of a sequence of benchmark tests to establish code competence for several classes of physical phenomena in isolation as well as in select (termed here as “canonical”,) combinations. No previous attempts to develop such a comprehensive MHD modeling capability exist in the literature, and this study represents essentially uncharted territory. During the course of this Phase-II project, a significant breakthrough was achieved in modeling liquid metal flows at high Hartmann numbers. We developed a unique mathematical technique to accurately compute the fluid flow in complex geometries at extremely high Hartmann numbers (10,000 and greater), thus extending the state of the art of liquid metal MHD modeling relevant to fusion reactors at the present time. These developments have been published in noted international journals. A sequence of theoretical and experimental results was used to verify and validate the results obtained. The code was applied to a complete DCLL module simulation study with promising results.

  14. A brief introduction to the noncommutative geometry description of particle physics standard model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierre Martinetti

    2003-06-17

    Notes from a course given at Oujda university, Morocco, october 2002 - march 2003 within the support of a fellowship from the Agence Universitaire de la Francophonie. These notes present a brief introduction to Connes' non commutative geometry description of the standard model of particle physics. The notion of distance is emphasized, especially the possible interpretation of the Higgs field as the component of a discrete internal dimension. These notes are in french and are taken from the author's phD thesis.

  15. GFDL's ESM2 Global Coupled ClimateCarbon Earth System Models. Part I: Physical Formulation and Baseline Simulation Characteristics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wittenberg, Andrew

    GFDL's ESM2 Global Coupled Climate­Carbon Earth System Models. Part I: Physical Formulation coupled carbon­climate Earth System Models, ESM2M and ESM2G, are described. These models demonstrate al. 2002; Delworth et al. 2006). Our approach has been to de- velop two Earth System Models

  16. Analysis of compressive fracture in rock using statistical techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blair, S.C.

    1994-12-01

    Fracture of rock in compression is analyzed using a field-theory model, and the processes of crack coalescence and fracture formation and the effect of grain-scale heterogeneities on macroscopic behavior of rock are studied. The model is based on observations of fracture in laboratory compression tests, and incorporates assumptions developed using fracture mechanics analysis of rock fracture. The model represents grains as discrete sites, and uses superposition of continuum and crack-interaction stresses to create cracks at these sites. The sites are also used to introduce local heterogeneity. Clusters of cracked sites can be analyzed using percolation theory. Stress-strain curves for simulated uniaxial tests were analyzed by studying the location of cracked sites, and partitioning of strain energy for selected intervals. Results show that the model implicitly predicts both development of shear-type fracture surfaces and a strength-vs-size relation that are similar to those observed for real rocks. Results of a parameter-sensitivity analysis indicate that heterogeneity in the local stresses, attributed to the shape and loading of individual grains, has a first-order effect on strength, and that increasing local stress heterogeneity lowers compressive strength following an inverse power law. Peak strength decreased with increasing lattice size and decreasing mean site strength, and was independent of site-strength distribution. A model for rock fracture based on a nearest-neighbor algorithm for stress redistribution is also presented and used to simulate laboratory compression tests, with promising results.

  17. Comparing non-nested models in the search for new physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Algeri, Sara; van Dyk, David A

    2015-01-01

    Searches for unknown physics and deciding between competing physical models to explain data rely on statistical hypotheses testing. A common approach, used for example in the discovery of the Brout-Englert-Higgs boson, is based on the statistical Likelihood Ratio Test (LRT) and its asymptotic properties. In the common situation, when neither of the two models under comparison is a special case of the other i.e., when the hypotheses are non-nested, this test is not applicable, and so far no efficient solution exists. In physics, this problem occurs when two models that reside in different parameter spaces are to be compared. An important example is the recently reported excess emission in astrophysical $\\gamma$-rays and the question whether its origin is known astrophysics or dark matter. We develop and study a new, generally applicable, frequentist method and validate its statistical properties using a suite of simulations studies. We exemplify it on realistic simulated data of the Fermi-LAT $\\gamma$-ray sate...

  18. Comparing non-nested models in the search for new physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sara Algeri; Jan Conrad; David A. van Dyk

    2015-09-03

    Searches for unknown physics and deciding between competing physical models to explain data rely on statistical hypotheses testing. A common approach, used for example in the discovery of the Brout-Englert-Higgs boson, is based on the statistical Likelihood Ratio Test (LRT) and its asymptotic properties. In the common situation, when neither of the two models under comparison is a special case of the other i.e., when the hypotheses are non-nested, this test is not applicable, and so far no efficient solution exists. In physics, this problem occurs when two models that reside in different parameter spaces are to be compared. An important example is the recently reported excess emission in astrophysical $\\gamma$-rays and the question whether its origin is known astrophysics or dark matter. We develop and study a new, generally applicable, frequentist method and validate its statistical properties using a suite of simulations studies. We exemplify it on realistic simulated data of the Fermi-LAT $\\gamma$-ray satellite, where non-nested hypotheses testing appears in the search for particle dark matter.

  19. Modeling brine-rock interactions in an enhanced geothermal system deep fractured reservoir at Soultz-Sous-Forets (France): a joint approach using two geochemical codes: frachem and toughreact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andre, Laurent; Spycher, Nicolas; Xu, Tianfu; Vuataz, Francois-D.; Pruess, Karsten.

    2006-01-01

    rock interactions in enhanced geothermal systems (EGS).the study of enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) to forecastrate, porosity, Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS), Soultz-

  20. A method for the quantification of model form error associated with physical systems.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wallen, Samuel P.; Brake, Matthew Robert

    2014-03-01

    In the process of model validation, models are often declared valid when the differences between model predictions and experimental data sets are satisfactorily small. However, little consideration is given to the effectiveness of a model using parameters that deviate slightly from those that were fitted to data, such as a higher load level. Furthermore, few means exist to compare and choose between two or more models that reproduce data equally well. These issues can be addressed by analyzing model form error, which is the error associated with the differences between the physical phenomena captured by models and that of the real system. This report presents a new quantitative method for model form error analysis and applies it to data taken from experiments on tape joint bending vibrations. Two models for the tape joint system are compared, and suggestions for future improvements to the method are given. As the available data set is too small to draw any statistical conclusions, the focus of this paper is the development of a methodology that can be applied to general problems.

  1. Physical model of the contact resistivity of metal-graphene junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chaves, Ferney A., E-mail: ferneyalveiro.chaves@uab.cat; Jiménez, David [Departament d'Enginyeria Electrònica, Escola d'Enginyeria, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Cummings, Aron W. [ICN2–Institut Català de Nanociència i Nanotecnologia, Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Roche, Stephan [ICN2–Institut Català de Nanociència i Nanotecnologia, Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); ICREA, Institució Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avançats, 08070 Barcelona (Spain)

    2014-04-28

    While graphene-based technology shows great promise for a variety of electronic applications, including radio-frequency devices, the resistance of the metal-graphene contact is a technological bottleneck for the realization of viable graphene electronics. One of the most important factors in determining the resistance of a metal-graphene junction is the contact resistivity. Despite the large number of experimental works that exist in the literature measuring the contact resistivity, a simple model of it is still lacking. In this paper, we present a comprehensive physical model for the contact resistivity of these junctions, based on the Bardeen Transfer Hamiltonian method. This model unveils the role played by different electrical and physical parameters in determining the specific contact resistivity, such as the chemical potential of interaction, the work metal-graphene function difference, and the insulator thickness between the metal and graphene. In addition, our model reveals that the contact resistivity is strongly dependent on the bias voltage across the metal-graphene junction. This model is applicable to a wide variety of graphene-based electronic devices and thus is useful for understanding how to optimize the contact resistance in these systems.

  2. Hybrid models for the simulation of microstructural evolution influenced by coupled, multiple physical processes.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tikare, Veena; Hernandez-Rivera, Efrain; Madison, Jonathan D.; Holm, Elizabeth Ann; Patterson, Burton R.; Homer, Eric R.

    2013-09-01

    Most materials microstructural evolution processes progress with multiple processes occurring simultaneously. In this work, we have concentrated on the processes that are active in nuclear materials, in particular, nuclear fuels. These processes are coarsening, nucleation, differential diffusion, phase transformation, radiation-induced defect formation and swelling, often with temperature gradients present. All these couple and contribute to evolution that is unique to nuclear fuels and materials. Hybrid model that combines elements from the Potts Monte Carlo, phase-field models and others have been developed to address these multiple physical processes. These models are described and applied to several processes in this report. An important feature of the models developed are that they are coded as applications within SPPARKS, a Sandiadeveloped framework for simulation at the mesoscale of microstructural evolution processes by kinetic Monte Carlo methods. This makes these codes readily accessible and adaptable for future applications.

  3. Evaluation of Used Fuel Disposition in Clay-Bearing Rock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jové Colón, Carlos F.; Weck, Philippe F.; Sassani, David H.; Zheng, Liange; Rutqvist, Jonny; Steefel, Carl I.; Kim, Kunhwi; Nakagawa, Seiji; Houseworth, James; Birkholzer, Jens; Caporuscio, Florie A.; Cheshire, Michael; Rearick, Michael S.; McCarney, Mary K.; Zavarin, Mavrik; Benedicto, Ana; Kersting, Annie B.; Sutton, Mark; Jerden, James; Frey, Kurt E.; Copple, Jacqueline M.; Ebert, William

    2014-08-29

    Radioactive waste disposal in shale/argillite rock formations has been widely considered given its desirable isolation properties (low permeability), geochemically reduced conditions, anomalous groundwater pressures, and widespread geologic occurrence. Clay/shale rock formations are characterized by their high content of clay minerals such as smectites and illites where diffusive transport and chemisorption phenomena predominate. These, in addition to low permeability, are key attributes of shale to impede radionuclide mobility. Shale host-media has been comprehensively studied in international nuclear waste repository programs as part of underground research laboratories (URLs) programs in Switzerland, France, Belgium, and Japan. These investigations, in some cases a decade or more long, have produced a large but fundamental body of information spanning from site characterization data (geological, hydrogeological, geochemical, geomechanical) to controlled experiments on the engineered barrier system (EBS) (barrier clay and seals materials). Evaluation of nuclear waste disposal in shale formations in the USA was conducted in the late 70’s and mid 80’s. Most of these studies evaluated the potential for shale to host a nuclear waste repository but not at the programmatic level of URLs in international repository programs. This report covers various R&D work and capabilities relevant to disposal of heat-generating nuclear waste in shale/argillite media. Integration and cross-fertilization of these capabilities will be utilized in the development and implementation of the shale/argillite reference case planned for FY15. Disposal R&D activities under the UFDC in the past few years have produced state-of-the-art modeling capabilities for coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical (THMC), used fuel degradation (source term), and thermodynamic modeling and database development to evaluate generic disposal concepts. The THMC models have been developed for shale repository leveraging in large part on the information garnered in URLs and laboratory data to test and demonstrate model prediction capability and to accurately represent behavior of the EBS and the natural (barrier) system (NS). In addition, experimental work to improve our understanding of clay barrier interactions and TM couplings at high temperatures are key to evaluate thermal effects as a result of relatively high heat loads from waste and the extent of sacrificial zones in the EBS. To assess the latter, experiments and modeling approaches have provided important information on the stability and fate of barrier materials under high heat loads. This information is central to the assessment of thermal limits and the implementation of the reference case when constraining EBS properties and the repository layout (e.g., waste package and drift spacing). This report is comprised of various parts, each one describing various R&D activities applicable to shale/argillite media. For example, progress made on modeling and experimental approaches to analyze physical and chemical interactions affecting clay in the EBS, NS, and used nuclear fuel (source term) in support of R&D objectives. It also describes the development of a reference case for shale/argillite media. The accomplishments of these activities are summarized as follows: ? Development of a reference case for shale/argillite; ? Investigation of Reactive Transport and Coupled THM Processes in EBS: FY14; ? Update on Experimental Activities on Buffer/Backfill Interactions at elevated Pressure and Temperature; ? Thermodynamic Database Development: Evaluation Strategy, Modeling Tools, First-Principles Modeling of Clay, and Sorption Database Assessment; ? ANL Mixed Potential Model For Used Fuel Degradation: Application to Argillite and Crystalline Rock Environments.

  4. Proceedings of the Workshop on Numerical Modeling of Thermohydrological Flow in Fractured Rock Masses, Feb. 19-20, 1980, Berkeley, CA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Witherspoon, P.A.

    2010-01-01

    n The variable is the hydraulic head Energy T r a n s p o rhydraulic fractur­ ing process requires the modeling of the energy

  5. Geophysical Prospecting, 2009, 57, 6174 doi:10.1111/j.1365-2478.2008.00721.x Effects of uncertainty in rock-physics models on reservoir parameter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jinsong

    ExxonMobil Upstream Research Company, Greenway Plaze 3, URC-GW30926, Houston TX 77252­2189, USA Received with angle and controlled-source electromagnetics data Jinsong Chen1 and Thomas A. Dickens2 1Lawrence and controlled- source electromagnetics data. The reservoir parameters are related to electrical resis- tivity

  6. Joint inversion of marine seismic AVA and CSEM data using statistical rock-physics models and Markov random fields: Stochastic inversion of AVA and CSEM data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, J.

    2013-01-01

    reservoir distributions of porosity, water saturation, etc.reservoir with relatively high porosity, low water saturationreservoir properties such as porosity and water saturation,

  7. Velocity and attenuation in partially molten rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mavko, G.M.

    1980-10-10

    Interpretation of seismic velocity and attenuation in partially molten rocks has been limited, with few exceptions, to models that assume the melt to be distributed either as spheres or as thin films. However, other melt phase geometries, such as interconnected tubes along grain edges, might equally well account for seismic observations if there is a much larger fraction of melt. Seismic velocity and attenuation are estimated in rocks in which the melt phase has the tube geometry, and the results are compared with results expected for the more familiar film model under similar conditions. For a given melt fraction, tubes are found to give moduli intermediate between moduli for rigid spherical inclusions and compliant films. For example, in polycrystalline olivine at 20 kbar the model predicts a decrease in V/sub s/ of 10% and a decrease in V/sub p/ of 5% at 0.05 melt fraction, without considering inelastic relaxation. Shear attenuation appears to be dominated by viscous flow of melt between the tubes and/or films. For olivine the tube model predicts the increment of relaxation due to melt, ..delta mu../..mu.., to be 0.01 at 0.05 melt fraction. Relaxation of the bulk modulus is dominated by flow between melt pockets of different shape, heat flow, and solid-melt phase change. If melt is present, considerable bulk attenuation is expected, although the relaxation may be observable only at long periods, outside the seismic body wave band.

  8. Nuclear Physics: A Key Ingredient in Astrophysical Modeling F.-K. Thielemann, D. Argast, F. Brachwitz, J.L. Fisker, C. Frohlich, R. Hirschi, E.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rauscher, Thomas

    1 Nuclear Physics: A Key Ingredient in Astrophysical Modeling F.-K. Thielemann, D. Argast, F of Physics & Astronomy, Univ. of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 82, CH-4056 Basel, Switzerland Nuclear physics. In this review we will survey how these aspects of nuclear physics enter the modeling of astrophysical objects. 1

  9. Physics Case for the ILC Project: Perspective from Beyond the Standard Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howard Baer; Mikael Berggren; Jenny List; Mihoko M. Nojiri; Maxim Perelstein; Aaron Pierce; Werner Porod; Tomohiko Tanabe

    2013-07-19

    The International Linear Collider (ILC) has recently proven its technical maturity with the publication of a Technical Design Report, and there is a strong interest in Japan to host such a machine. We summarize key aspects of the Beyond the Standard Model physics case for the ILC in this contribution to the US High Energy Physics strategy process. On top of the strong guaranteed physics case in the detailed exploration of the recently discovered Higgs boson, the top quark and electroweak precision measurements, the ILC will offer unique opportunities which are complementary to the LHC program of the next decade. Many of these opportunities have connections to the Cosmic and Intensity Frontiers, which we comment on in detail. We illustrate the general picture with examples of how our world could turn out to be and what the ILC would contribute in these cases, with an emphasis on value-added beyond the LHC. These comprise examples from Supersymmetry including light Higgsinos, a comprehensive bottom-up coverage of NLSP-LSP combinations for slepton, squark, chargino and neutralino NLSP, a stau-coannihilation dark matter scenario and bilinear R-parity violation as explanation for neutrino masses and mixing, as well as generic WIMP searches and Little Higgs models as non-SUSY examples.

  10. An integrated experimental and numerical study: Developing a reaction transport model that couples chemical reactions of mineral dissolution/precipitation with spatial and temporal flow variations in CO2/brine/rock systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project objectives: Generate and characterize mineral dissolution/precipitation reactions in supercritical CO2/brine/rock systems under pressure-temperature-chemistry conditions resembling CO2injection into EGS. Characterize three-dimensional spatial and temporal distributions of rock structures subject to mineral dissolution/precipitation processes by X-ray tomography, SEM imaging, and Microprobe analysis.

  11. Modeling of coupled heat transfer and reactive transport processes in porous media: Application to seepage studies at Yucca Mountain, Nevad a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhopadhyay, Sumit; Sonnenthal, Eric L.; Spycher, Nicolas

    2008-01-01

    Fractured Rock of Yucca Mountain, Nevada: Heterogeneity andFractured Rocks at Yucca Mountain: Model Validation UsingFractured Rocks at Yucca Mountain, In: Faybishenko B,

  12. An ensemble Kalman filter for statistical estimation of physics constrained nonlinear regression models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harlim, John; Mahdi, Adam; Majda, Andrew J.

    2014-01-15

    A central issue in contemporary science is the development of nonlinear data driven statistical–dynamical models for time series of noisy partial observations from nature or a complex model. It has been established recently that ad-hoc quadratic multi-level regression models can have finite-time blow-up of statistical solutions and/or pathological behavior of their invariant measure. Recently, a new class of physics constrained nonlinear regression models were developed to ameliorate this pathological behavior. Here a new finite ensemble Kalman filtering algorithm is developed for estimating the state, the linear and nonlinear model coefficients, the model and the observation noise covariances from available partial noisy observations of the state. Several stringent tests and applications of the method are developed here. In the most complex application, the perfect model has 57 degrees of freedom involving a zonal (east–west) jet, two topographic Rossby waves, and 54 nonlinearly interacting Rossby waves; the perfect model has significant non-Gaussian statistics in the zonal jet with blocked and unblocked regimes and a non-Gaussian skewed distribution due to interaction with the other 56 modes. We only observe the zonal jet contaminated by noise and apply the ensemble filter algorithm for estimation. Numerically, we find that a three dimensional nonlinear stochastic model with one level of memory mimics the statistical effect of the other 56 modes on the zonal jet in an accurate fashion, including the skew non-Gaussian distribution and autocorrelation decay. On the other hand, a similar stochastic model with zero memory levels fails to capture the crucial non-Gaussian behavior of the zonal jet from the perfect 57-mode model.

  13. Rock Art in the Public Trust: Managing Prehistoric Rock Art on Federal Land

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hale, John Patrick

    2010-01-01

    Stories in Stone: Rock Art Pictures by Early Americans. NewIntroduction. ? Coso Rock Art: a New Perspective, edited byIn The Archaeology of Rock Art,? edited by Christopher

  14. Impacts of WRF Physics and Measurement Uncertainty on California Wintertime Model Wet Bias

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chin, H S; Caldwell, P M; Bader, D C

    2009-07-22

    The Weather and Research Forecast (WRF) model version 3.0.1 is used to explore California wintertime model wet bias. In this study, two wintertime storms are selected from each of four major types of large-scale conditions; Pineapple Express, El Nino, La Nina, and synoptic cyclones. We test the impacts of several model configurations on precipitation bias through comparison with three sets of gridded surface observations; one from the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration, and two variations from the University of Washington (without and with long-term trend adjustment; UW1 and UW2, respectively). To simplify validation, California is divided into 4 regions (Coast, Central Valley, Mountains, and Southern California). Simulations are driven by North American Regional Reanalysis data to minimize large-scale forcing error. Control simulations are conducted with 12-km grid spacing (low resolution) but additional experiments are performed at 2-km (high) resolution to evaluate the robustness of microphysics and cumulus parameterizations to resolution changes. We find that the choice of validation dataset has a significant impact on the model wet bias, and the forecast skill of model precipitation depends strongly on geographic location and storm type. Simulations with right physics options agree better with UW1 observations. In 12-km resolution simulations, the Lin microphysics and the Kain-Fritsch cumulus scheme have better forecast skill in the coastal region while Goddard, Thompson, and Morrison microphysics, and the Grell-Devenyi cumulus scheme perform better in the rest of California. The effect of planetary boundary layer, soil-layer, and radiation physics on model precipitation is weaker than that of microphysics and cumulus processes for short- to medium-range low-resolution simulations. Comparison of 2-km and 12-km resolution runs suggests a need for improvement of cumulus schemes, and supports the use of microphysics schemes in coarser-grid applications.

  15. A Model-Based Design of Cyber-Physical Energy Systems Mohammad Abdullah Al Faruque, Fereidoun Ahourai

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al Faruque, Mohammad Abdullah

    ]. However, the introduction of Distributed Energy Resources (DERs) including renewable sources, and newA Model-Based Design of Cyber-Physical Energy Systems Mohammad Abdullah Al Faruque, Fereidoun, CA, USA Email: {alfaruqu, fahourai}@uci.edu Abstract-- Cyber-Physical Energy Systems (CPES

  16. A Case Study on the Model-Based Design and Integration of Automotive Cyber-Physical Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koutsoukos, Xenofon D.

    A Case Study on the Model-Based Design and Integration of Automotive Cyber-Physical Systems Di--Cyber-physical systems (CPS), such as automotive systems, are very difficult to design due to the tight interactions of an integrated automotive control system. The system is composed of two independently designed controllers

  17. GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, A Physical Model for Seismic Noise Generation from Sediment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ampuero, Jean Paul

    GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, A Physical Model for Seismic Noise noise induced by the transport of sediment in rivers. The model pro- vides an expression for the power on seismic noise observations. The model predictions for the PSD are consistent with recent measurements and

  18. A dynamic battery model for co-design in cyber-physical systems Fumin Zhang, Zhenwu Shi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Fumin

    A dynamic battery model for co-design in cyber-physical systems Fumin Zhang, Zhenwu Shi School, Georgia 30332 Email: wolf@ece.gatech.edu Abstract We introduce a dynamic battery model that describes the variations of the capacity of a battery under time varying discharge current. This model supports a co

  19. Numerical simulation of gas flow through unsaturated fractured rock at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooper, C.A.

    1990-01-01

    Numerical analysis is used to identify the physical phenomena associated with barometrically driven gas (air and water vapor) flow through unsaturated fractured rock at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Results from simple finite difference simulations indicate that for a fractured rock scenario, the maximum velocity of air out of an uncased 10 cm borehole is 0.002 m s{sub {minus}1}. An equivalent porous medium (EPM) model was incorporated into a multiphase, multicomponent simulator to test more complex conceptual models. Results indicate that for a typical June day, a diurnal pressure wave propagates about 160 m into the surrounding Tiva Canyon hydrogeologic unit. Dry air that enters the formation evaporates water around the borehole which reduces capillary pressure. Multiphase countercurrent flow develops in the vicinity of the hole; the gas phase flows into the formation while the liquid phase flows toward the borehole. The effect occurs within 0.5 m of the borehole. The amount of water vapor leaving the formation during 1 day is 900 cm{sup 3}. This is less than 0.1% of the total recharge into the formation, suggesting that the barometric effect may be insignificant in drying the unsaturated zone. However, gas phase velocities out of the borehole (3 m s{sup {minus}1}), indicating that observed flow rates from wells along the east flank of Yucca Mountain were able to be simulated with a barometric model.

  20. A general approach to statistical modeling of physical laws: nonparametric regression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. Grabec

    2007-04-01

    Statistical modeling of experimental physical laws is based on the probability density function of measured variables. It is expressed by experimental data via a kernel estimator. The kernel is determined objectively by the scattering of data during calibration of experimental setup. A physical law, which relates measured variables, is optimally extracted from experimental data by the conditional average estimator. It is derived directly from the kernel estimator and corresponds to a general nonparametric regression. The proposed method is demonstrated by the modeling of a return map of noisy chaotic data. In this example, the nonparametric regression is used to predict a future value of chaotic time series from the present one. The mean predictor error is used in the definition of predictor quality, while the redundancy is expressed by the mean square distance between data points. Both statistics are used in a new definition of predictor cost function. From the minimum of the predictor cost function, a proper number of data in the model is estimated.

  1. Tsunami inundation modeling in constructed environments: A physical and numerical comparison of free-surface elevation, velocity, and momentum flux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lynett, Patrick

    Tsunami inundation modeling in constructed environments: A physical and numerical comparison April 2013 Available online 17 May 2013 Keywords: Tsunami Inundation Macro-roughness Benchmark COULWAVE Friction factor A laboratory benchmark test for tsunami inundation through an urban waterfront including

  2. Some Important Aspects of Physical Modelling of Liquefaction in 1-g Shaking Table

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alam, Md. Jahangir; Towhata, Ikuo

    2008-07-08

    Physical modeling of liquefaction in 1-g shaking table and dynamic centrifuge test become very popular to simulate the ground behavior during earthquake motion. 1-g shaking table tests require scaled down model ground which can be prepared in three methods; water sedimentation, moist tamping and dry deposition method. Moist tamping and dry deposition method need saturation of model ground which is expensive and very difficult to achieve. Some model tests were performed in 1-g shaking table to see the influence of preparation method of model ground. Wet tamping and water sedimentation method of ground preparation were compared in these tests. Behavior of level ground and slope were also examined. Slope and level ground model test increased the understanding of excess pore pressure generation in both cases. Wet tamping method has a possibility of not being fully saturated. Pore pressure transducers should be fixed vertically so that it can not settle down during shaking but can move with ground. There was insignificant difference in acceleration and excess pore pressure responses between wet tamping and water sedimentation method in case of level ground. Spiky accelerations were prominent in slope prepared by water sedimentation method. Spiky accelerations were the result of lateral displacement induced dilatancy of soil.

  3. Standard Model updates and new physics analysis with the Unitarity Triangle fit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adrian Bevan; Marcella Bona; Marco Ciuchini; Denis Derkach; Enrico Franco; Vittorio Lubicz; Guido Martinelli; Fabrizio Parodi; Maurizio Pierini; Carlo Schiavi; Luca Silvestrini; Viola Sordini; Achille Stocchi; Cecilia Tarantino; Vincenzo Vagnoni

    2014-11-26

    We present here the update of the Unitarity Triangle (UT) analysis performed by the UTfit Collaboration within the Standard Model (SM) and beyond. Continuously updated flavour results contribute to improving the precision of several constraints and through the global fit of the CKM parameters and the SM predictions. We also extend the UT analysis to investigate new physics (NP) effects on $\\Delta F=2$ processes. Finally, based on the NP constraints, we derive upper bounds on the coefficients of the most general $\\Delta F=2$ effective Hamiltonian. These upper bounds can be translated into lower bounds on the scale of NP that contributes to these low-energy effective interactions.

  4. Hydraulic transmissivity and heat exchanges: aperture lowpass filtering model 1 Natural open joints in rocks commonly present multi-scale self-affine apertures. This

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Hydraulic transmissivity and heat exchanges: aperture lowpass filtering model 1 SUMMARY Natural aperture that describes at best the macroscopic properties (hydraulic conductivity, heat exchange of the effective hydraulic and thermal properties (apertures). A detailed study of the influence of the bandwidth

  5. Iron and Steel Phosphate Rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    Kyanite Lead Lime Lithium Magnesium Manganese Mercury Mica Molybdenum Nickel Nitrogen Peat Perlite Graphite Peat Sulfur Beryllium Gypsum Perlite Talc Bismuth Hafnium Phosphate Rock Tantalum Boron Helium on the USGS--the Federal source for science about the Earth, its natural and living resources, natural hazards

  6. Iron and Steel Phosphate Rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    Kyanite Lead Lime Lithium Magnesium Manganese Mercury Mica Molybdenum Nickel Nitrogen Peat Perlite Graphite Peat Sulfur Beryllium Gypsum Perlite Talc Bismuth Hafnium Phosphate Rock Tantalum Boron Helium information on the USGS--the Federal source for science about the Earth, its natural and living resources

  7. Source rock screening studies of Ordovician Maquoketa shale in western Illinois

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Autrey, A.; Crockett, J.E.; Dickerson, D.R.; Oltz, D.F.; Seyler, B.J.; Warren, R.

    1987-09-01

    Rock-Eval (pyrolysis) studies of Ordovician Maquoketa Shale samples (cuttings and cores) from the shallow subsurface (500-800 ft deep) in western Illinois indicate that facies within the Maquoketa have potential as hydrocarbon source rocks. Dark, presumably organic-rich zones within the Maquoketa Shale were selected and analyzed for total organic carbon (TOC), Rock-Eval (pyrolysis), and bulk and clay mineralogy using x-ray diffraction. Preliminary results from six samples from Schuyler, McDonough, and Fulton Counties show TOC values ranging from 4.70% to as high as 12.90%. Rock-Eval parameters, measured by heating organic matter in an inert atmosphere, indicate source rock maturity and petroleum-generative potential. Screening studies, using the Rock-Eval process, describe very good source rock potential in facies of the Maquoketa Shale. Further studies at the Illinois State Geological Survey will expand on these preliminary results. This study complements a proposed exploration model in western Illinois and further suggests the possibility of source rocks on the flanks of the Illinois basin. Long-distance migration from more deeply buried effective source rocks in southern Illinois has been the traditional mechanism proposed for petroleum in basin-flank reservoirs. Localized source rocks can be an alternative to long-distance migration, and can expand the possibilities of basin-flank reservoirs, encouraging further exploration in these areas.

  8. Extension of the quantum-kinetic model to lunar and Mars return physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liechty, D. S.; Lewis, M. J.

    2014-02-15

    The ability to compute rarefied, ionized hypersonic flows is becoming more important as missions such as Earth reentry, landing high-mass payloads on Mars, and the exploration of the outer planets and their satellites are being considered. A recently introduced molecular-level chemistry model, the quantum-kinetic, or Q-K, model that predicts reaction rates for gases in thermal equilibrium and non-equilibrium using only kinetic theory and fundamental molecular properties, is extended in the current work to include electronic energy level transitions and reactions involving charged particles. Like the Q-K procedures for neutral species chemical reactions, these new models are phenomenological procedures that aim to reproduce the reaction/transition rates but do not necessarily capture the exact physics. These engineering models are necessarily efficient due to the requirement to compute billions of simulated collisions in direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) simulations. The new models are shown to generally agree within the spread of reported transition and reaction rates from the literature for near equilibrium conditions.

  9. Neutrinoless Double-Beta Decay: a Probe of Physics Beyond the Standard Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. M. Bilenky; C. Giunti

    2015-02-16

    In the Standard Model the total lepton number is conserved. Thus, neutrinoless double-beta decay, in which the total lepton number is violated by two units, is a probe of physics beyond the Standard Model. In this review we consider the basic mechanism of neutrinoless double-beta decay induced by light Majorana neutrino masses. After a brief summary of the present status of our knowledge of neutrino masses and mixing and an introduction to the seesaw mechanism for the generation of light Majorana neutrino masses, in this review we discuss the theory and phenomenology of neutrinoless double-beta decay. We present the basic elements of the theory of neutrinoless double-beta decay, our view of the present status of the challenging problem of the calculation of the nuclear matrix element of the process and a summary of the experimental results.

  10. ArchRock Corporation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Arch Rock is a systems and software company that builds products and technology for wireless sensor networks. References: ArchRock Corporation1 This article is a stub. You can...

  11. Lichen: the challenge for rock art conservation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dandridge, Debra Elaine

    2007-04-25

    This study investigates the effects that lichens have on rock surfaces in which ancient rock art (petroglyphs and pictographs) may be found. The study area includes four sites in the United States: one quartzite site in ...

  12. Spin Determination and Physics Beyond the Standard Model at the LHC and ILC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rentala, Vikram

    2010-01-01

    APS/DPF/DPB Summer Study on the Future of Particle Physics (APS/DPF/DPB Summer Study on the Future of Particle Physics (APS / DPF / DPB Summer Study on the Future of Particle Physics (

  13. Desert Rock Coatings Ronald I. Dorn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dorn, Ron

    Chapter 7 Desert Rock Coatings Ronald I. Dorn Introduction Desert landforms are characterized, that the supposed funda- mental bare-rock nature of desert landforms stretches the truth. In reality, rock coatings Petra tourist attraction of the Al-Khazneh Tomb fac¸ade is coated with a black manganese-rich varnish

  14. ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT ROCK ISLAND DAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    42) ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT ROCK ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON 1961 Marine Biological. McKeman, Director ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT - ROCK ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON, 1961--Fisheries No. 421 Washington, D. C. April 1962 #12;Rock Island Dam, Columbia River, Washington ii #12;CONTENTS

  15. ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT ROCK ISLAND DAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT ROCK ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON, 1959 :y .iiJA/i-3ri ^' WUUUi. ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT - ROCK ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON, 1959 by Paul D. Zimmer, Clifton and observations 10 Summary 13 #12;#12;ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT - ROCK ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON

  16. Annual Fish Passage Report -Rock Island Dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Annual Fish Passage Report - Rock Island Dam Columbia River, Washington, 1965 By Paul D. Zimmer L. McKeman, Director Annual Fish Passage Report - Rock Island Dam Columbia River, Washington, 1965;#12;Annual Fish Passage Report - Rock Island Dam Columbia River, Washington, 1965 By PAUL D. ZIMMER, Fishery

  17. Hot dry rock geothermal energy. Draft final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    This second EPRI workshop on hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal energy, held in May 1994, focused on the status of worldwide HDR research and development and used that status review as the starting point for discussions of what could and should be done next: by U.S. federal government, by U.S. industry, by U.S. state governments, and by international organizations or through international agreements. The papers presented and the discussion that took place indicate that there is a community of researchers and industrial partners that could join forces, with government support, to begin a new effort on hot dry rock geothermal development. This new heat mining effort would start with site selection and confirmatory studies, done concurrently. The confirmatory studies would test past evaluations against the most current results (from the U.S. site at Fenton Hill, New Mexico, and from the two sites in Japan, the one in Russia, and the two in western Europe) and the best models of relevant physical and economic aspects. Site selection would be done in the light of the confirmatory studies and would be influenced by the need to find a site where success is probable and which is representative enough of other sites so that its success would imply good prospects for success at numerous other sites. The test of success would be circulation between a pair of wells, or more wells, in a way that confirmed, with the help of flow modeling, that a multi-well system would yield temperatures, flows and lifetimes that support economically feasible power generation. The flow modeling would have to have previously achieved its own confirmation from relevant data taken from both heat mining and conventional hydrothermal geothermal experience. There may be very relevant experience from the enhancement of ''hot wet rock'' sites, i.e., sites where hydrothermal reservoirs lack, or have come to lack, enough natural water or steam and are helped by water injected cold and produced hot. The new site would have to be selected in parallel with the confirmatory studies because it would have to be modeled as part of the studies and because its similarity to other candidate sites must be known well enough to assure that results at the selected site are relevant to many others. Also, the industry partners in the joint effort at the new site must be part of the confirmatory studies, because they must be convinced of the economic feasibility. This meeting may have brought together the core of people who can make such a joint effort take place. EPRI sponsored the organization of this meeting in order to provide utilities with an update on the prospects for power generation via heat mining. Although the emerging rules for electric utilities competing in power generation make it very unlikely that the rate-payers of any one utility (or small group of utilities) can pay the differential to support this new heat mining research and development effort, the community represented at this meeting may be able to make the case for national or international support of a new heat mining effort, based on the potential size and economics of this resource as a benefit for the nation as a whole and as a contribution to reduced emissions of fossil CO{sub 2} worldwide.

  18. Determining the modal mineralogy of mafic and ultramafic igneous rocks using thermal emission spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton, Victoria E.

    Determining the modal mineralogy of mafic and ultramafic igneous rocks using thermal emission their thermal infrared emission spectra using a linear deconvolution approach, which uses a library of end-member mineral spectra to model a bulk rock spectrum. Over 90% of the modes obtained from thermal emission

  19. NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS OF LONG TERM UNSATURATED FLOW AND ACID MINE DRAINAGE AT WASTE ROCK PILES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aubertin, Michel

    NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS OF LONG TERM UNSATURATED FLOW AND ACID MINE DRAINAGE AT WASTE ROCK PILES Omar present a numerical modeling study of unsaturated water flow and acid mine drainage in idealized (but of oxygen diffusion and acid mine drainage through the waste rock piles showed that oxygen is generally

  20. Modeling CO{sub 2}-Brine-Rock Interaction Including Mercury and H{sub 2}S Impurities in the Context of CO{sub 2} Geologic Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spycher, N.; Oldenburg, C.M.

    2014-01-01

    This study uses modeling and simulation approaches to investigate the impacts on injectivity of trace amounts of mercury (Hg) in a carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) stream injected for geologic carbon sequestration in a sandstone reservoir at ~2.5 km depth. At the range of Hg concentrations expected (7-190 ppbV, or ~ 0.06-1.6 mg/std.m{sup 3}CO{sub 2}), the total volumetric plugging that could occur due to complete condensation of Hg, or due to complete precipitation of Hg as cinnabar, results in a very small porosity change. In addition, Hg concentration much higher than the concentrations considered here would be required for Hg condensation to even occur. Concentration of aqueous Hg by water evaporation into CO{sub 2} is also unlikely because the higher volatility of Hg relative to H{sub 2}O at reservoir conditions prevents the Hg concentration from increasing in groundwater as dry CO{sub 2} sweeps through, volatilizing both H{sub 2}O and Hg. Using a model-derived aqueous solution to represent the formation water, batch reactive geochemical modeling show that the reaction of the formation water with the CO{sub 2}-Hg mixture causes the pH to drop to about 4.7 and then become buffered near 5.2 upon reaction with the sediments, with a negligible net volume change from mineral dissolution and precipitation. Cinnabar (HgS(s)) is found to be thermodynamically stable as soon as the Hg-bearing CO{sub 2} reacts with the formation water which contains small amounts of dissolved sulfide. Liquid mercury (Hg(l)) is not found to be thermodynamically stable at any point during the simulation. Two-dimensional radial reactive transport simulations of CO{sub 2} injection at a rate of 14.8 kg/s into a 400 m-thick formation at isothermal conditions of 106°C and average pressure near 215 bar, with varying amounts of Hg and H{sub 2}S trace gases, show generally that porosity changes only by about ±0.05% (absolute, i.e., new porosity = initial porosity ±0.0005) with Hg predicted to readily precipitate from the CO{sub 2} as cinnabar in a zone mostly matching the single-phase CO{sub 2} plume. The precipitation of minerals other than cinnabar, however, dominates the evolution of porosity. Main reactions include the replacement of primarily Fe-chlorite by siderite, of calcite by dolomite, and of K-feldspar by muscovite. Chalcedony is also predicted to precipitate from the dissolution of feldspars and quartz. Although the range of predicted porosity change is quite small, the amount of dissolution and precipitation predicted for these individual minerals is not negligible. These reactive transport simulations assume that Hg gas behaves ideally. To examine effects of non-ideality on these simulations, approximate calculations of the fugacity coefficient of Hg in CO{sub 2} were made. Results suggest that Hg condensation could be significantly overestimated when assuming ideal gas behavior, making our simulation results conservative with respect to impacts on injectivity. The effect of pressure on Henry’s constant for Hg is estimated to yield Hg solubilities about 10% lower than when this effect is not considered, a change that is considered too small to affect the conclusions of this report. Although all results in this study are based on relatively mature data and modeling approaches, in the absence of experimental data and more detailed site-specific information, it is not possible to fully validate the results and conclusions.

  1. Accelerator System Model (ASM) user manual with physics and engineering model documentation. ASM version 1.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1993-07-01

    The Accelerator System Model (ASM) is a computer program developed to model proton radiofrequency accelerators and to carry out system level trade studies. The ASM FORTRAN subroutines are incorporated into an intuitive graphical user interface which provides for the {open_quotes}construction{close_quotes} of the accelerator in a window on the computer screen. The interface is based on the Shell for Particle Accelerator Related Codes (SPARC) software technology written for the Macintosh operating system in the C programming language. This User Manual describes the operation and use of the ASM application within the SPARC interface. The Appendix provides a detailed description of the physics and engineering models used in ASM. ASM Version 1.0 is joint project of G. H. Gillespie Associates, Inc. and the Accelerator Technology (AT) Division of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Neither the ASM Version 1.0 software nor this ASM Documentation may be reproduced without the expressed written consent of both the Los Alamos National Laboratory and G. H. Gillespie Associates, Inc.

  2. Fluid Migration During Ice/Rock Planetesimal Differentiation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raney, Robert 1987-

    2012-12-12

    fast melt water can segregate from the core of an ice-rich planetesimal. To answer this question we treat the core as two phase flow problem: a compacting viscous “solid” (ice/rock mixture) and a segregating liquid (melt water). The model developed...

  3. Colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport in fractured porous rock 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baek, Inseok

    1994-01-01

    phase, a carrier phase, and a stationary solid phase. In the basic model, one-dimensional advection in a single planar fracture of infinite extent is coupled with diffusion in the rock matrix perpendicular to the fracture. In this study, a full...

  4. Multiscale Modeling and Simulations of Flows in Naturally Fractured Karst Reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Popov, Peter

    ) and a free flow region, where the fluid (oil, water, gas) meets no resistance form the surrounding rock [13Multiscale Modeling and Simulations of Flows in Naturally Fractured Karst Reservoirs Peter Popov1-Brinkman equations can naturally be used to model additional physical effects pertaining to vugular media

  5. Physical and Mathematical Properties of a Quasi-Geostrophic Model of Intermediate Complexity of the Mid-Latitudes Atmospheric Circulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valerio Lucarini; Antonio Speranza; Renato VItolo

    2005-11-24

    A quasi-geostrophic intermediate complexity model is considered, providing a schematic representation of the baroclinic conversion processes which characterize the physics of the mid-latitudes atmospheric circulation. The model is relaxed towards a given latitudinal temperature profile, which acts as baroclinic forcing, controlled by a parameter TE determining the forced equator-to-pole temperature gradient. As TE increases, a transition takes place from a stationary regime to a periodic regime, and eventually to an earth-like chaotic regime where evolution takes place on a strange attractor. The dependence of the attractor dimension, metric entropy, and bounding box volume in phase space is studied by varying both TE and model resolution. The statistical properties of observables having physical relevance, namely the total energy of the system and the latitudinally averaged zonal wind, are also examined. It is emphasized that while the attractor's properties are quite sensitive to model resolution, the global physical observables depend less critically on it. For more detailed physical observables, such as the latitudinal profiles of the zonal wind, model resolution again may be critical: the effectiveness of the zonal wind convergence, acting as barotropic stabilization of the baroclinic waves, heavily relies on the details of the latitudinal structure of the fields. The necessity and complementarity of both the dynamical systems and physical approach is underlined.

  6. Structure of the eastern Red Rocks and Wind Ridge thrust faults, Wyoming: how a thrust fault gains displacement along strike 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huntsman, Brent Stanley

    1983-01-01

    OF FIELD MAPPING Methods . Thrust Faults . The Wind Ridge Thrust Fault System The Red Rocks Thrust Fault System CLAY MODEL STUDIES Purpose and Description Model Results DISCUSSION OF RESULTS Kinematics of the Red Rocks Thrust Fault Termination... . Kinematics of the Southern Wind Ridge Thrust Fault . . . A Conceptual Model of the Red Rocks Thrust Fault Termination Implications of the Red Rocks Fault Termination . . . . . . Page V1 V11 1X X1 X11 7 9 17 18 18 21 24 27 35 35 38 49 49...

  7. Physics-Based Multi-State Models of Passive Component Degradation for the R7 Reactor Simulation Environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unwin, Stephen D.; Layton, Robert F.; Johnson, Kenneth I.; Lowry, Peter P.

    2012-06-25

    Abstract: The Next Generation Systems Analysis Code - referred to as R7 - is reactor systems simulation software being developed to support the Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization Pathway of the U.S. Department of Energy's Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program. It will provide an integrated multi-physics environment, implemented in an uncertainty quantification (UQ) framework that can produce risk and other performance insights on long-term reactor operations. An element of this simulation environment will be the performance of passive components and materials. Conventional models of component reliability are largely parametric, relying on plant service data to estimate component lifetimes and failure rates. This type of model has limited usefulness in the R7 environment where the intent is to explicitly determine the influence of physical stressors on component degradation. In this paper, we describe a new class of multi-state physics-based component models designed to be R7-compatible. These models capture the physics of materials degradation while also incorporating the effects of interventions and component rejuvenation. The models are implemented in a cumulative damage framework that allows the impact of an evolving physical environment to be addressed without recourse to resampling within the Monte Carlo-based UQ framework. The paper describes an application to stress corrosion cracking in dissimilar metal welds - a principal contributor to potential loss of coolant accidents. So while R7 will have the more conventional capability of reactor simulation codes to model the impact of degraded components and systems on plant performance, the methodology described here allows R7 to model the inverse effect; the impact of the physical environment on component degradation and performance.

  8. Paradox of Peroxy Defects and Positive Holes in Rocks - Part I: Effect of Temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freund, Friedemann T

    2015-01-01

    Though ubiquitous in minerals of igneous and high-grade metamorphic rocks, peroxy defects have been widely overlooked in the past. The charge carriers of interest are positive holes, chemically equivalent to O$^-$ in a matrix of O$^{2-}$, physically defect electrons in the O$^{2-}$ sublattice, highly mobile, able to propagate fast and far. O$^-$ are oxidized relative to O$^{2-}$. As such O$^-$ are not supposed to exist in minerals and rocks that come from deep within the Earth crust or upper mantle, where the environments are overwhelmingly reduced. In order to understand how peroxy defects are introduced, we look at peroxy defects in a crystallographically and compositionally well characterized model system: single crystals of nominally high-purity MgO, grown from the melt under highly reducing conditions. During crystallization the MgO crystals incorporate OH$^-$ through dissolution of traces of H$_2$O into the MgO matrix, leading to a solid solution (ss) Mg$_{1-\\delta}$(OH)$_{2\\delta}$O$_{1-2\\delta}$, wher...

  9. Development of a HEX-Z Partially Homogenized Benchmark Model for the FFTF Isothermal Physics Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John D. Bess

    2012-05-01

    A series of isothermal physics measurements were performed as part of an acceptance testing program for the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). A HEX-Z partially-homogenized benchmark model of the FFTF fully-loaded core configuration was developed for evaluation of these measurements. Evaluated measurements include the critical eigenvalue of the fully-loaded core, two neutron spectra, 32 reactivity effects measurements, an isothermal temperature coefficient, and low-energy gamma and electron spectra. Dominant uncertainties in the critical configuration include the placement of radial shielding around the core, reactor core assembly pitch, composition of the stainless steel components, plutonium content in the fuel pellets, and boron content in the absorber pellets. Calculations of criticality, reactivity effects measurements, and the isothermal temperature coefficient using MCNP5 and ENDF/B-VII.0 cross sections with the benchmark model are in good agreement with the benchmark experiment measurements. There is only some correlation between calculated and measured spectral measurements; homogenization of many of the core components may have impacted computational assessment of these measurements. This benchmark evaluation has been added to the IRPhEP Handbook.

  10. The Weak Charge of the Proton: A Search For Physics Beyond the Standard Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MacEwan, Scott

    2015-05-01

    The Qweak experiment, which completed running in May of 2012 at Jefferson Laboratory, has measured the parity-violating asymmetry in elastic electron-proton scattering at four-momentum transfer Q^2=0.025 (GeV/c)^2 in order to provide the first direct measurement of the proton?s weak charge, Qpw. The Standard Model makes firm predictions for the weak charge; deviations from the predicted value would provide strong evidence of new physics beyond the Standard Model. Using an 89% polarized electron beam at 145 microA scattering from a 34.4 cm long liquid hydrogen target, scattered electrons were detected using an array of eight fused-silica detectors placed symmetric about the beam axis. The parity-violating asymmetry was then measured by reversing the helicity of the incoming electrons and measuring the normalized difference in rate seen in the detectors. The low Q^2 enables a theoretically clean measurement; the higher order hadronic corrections are constrained using previous parity-violating electron scattering world data. The experimental method will be discussed, with recent results constituting 4% of our total data and projections of our proposed uncertainties on the full data set.

  11. CalcHEP 3.4 for collider physics within and beyond the Standard Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Belyaev; Neil D. Christensen; Alexander Pukhov

    2012-10-23

    We present version 3.4 of the CalcHEP software package which is designed for effective evaluation and simulation of high energy physics collider processes at parton level. The main features of CalcHEP are the computation of Feynman diagrams, integration over multi-particle phase space and event simulation at parton level. The principle attractive key-points along these lines are that it has: a) an easy startup even for those who are not familiar with CalcHEP; b) a friendly and convenient graphical user interface; c) the option for a user to easily modify a model or introduce a new model by either using the graphical interface or by using an external package with the possibility of cross checking the results in different gauges; d) a batch interface which allows to perform very complicated and tedious calculations connecting production and decay modes for processes with many particles in the final state. With this features set, CalcHEP can efficiently perform calculations with a high level of automation from a theory in the form of a Lagrangian down to phenomenology in the form of cross sections, parton level event simulation and various kinematical distributions. In this paper we report on the new features of CalcHEP 3.4 which improves the power of our package to be an effective tool for the study of modern collider phenomenology.

  12. CalcHEP 3.4 for collider physics within and beyond the Standard Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belyaev, Alexander; Pukhov, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    We present version 3.4 of the CalcHEP software package which is designed for effective evaluation and simulation of high energy physics collider processes at parton level. The main features of CalcHEP are the computation of Feynman diagrams, integration over multi-particle phase space and event simulation at parton level. The principle attractive key-points along these lines are that it has: a) an easy startup even for those who are not familiar with CalcHEP; b) a friendly and convenient graphical user interface; c) the option for a user to easily modify a model or introduce a new model by either using the graphical interface or by using an external package with the possibility of cross checking the results in different gauges; d) a batch interface which allows to perform very complicated and tedious calculations connecting production and decay modes for processes with many particles in the final state. With this features set, CalcHEP can efficiently perform calculations with a high level of automation from a...

  13. Buoyancy driven dispersion in a layered porous rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farcas, Adrian; Woods, Andrew W.

    2015-02-12

    for example from a radioactive leak in a geological waste repository (Woods and Norris, 2010). One key challenge associated with modelling buoyancy driven flows in real rocks is the complex layering, on a range of length scales. In order to describe flows... ) Scaling, self-similarity and intermediate asymptotics. CUP, Cambridge. Bear, J. (1972) Dynamics of fluids in porous media. Elsevier. Bear, J., and Cheng A.H.-D (2010) Modeling groundwater flow and contaminant transport. Springer. Bijelic, J., Muggeridge A...

  14. Post Rock | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII JumpQuarterly SmartDB-2, Blue MountainSchoolPrairiePonder,Abbey SchoolS AOakRock

  15. p-n Junction Heterostructure Device Physics Model of a Four Junction Melissa J. Griggs*, Brendan M. Kayes, and Harry A. Atwater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atwater, Harry

    portion of the solar spectrum more effectively (see Fig. 1). High efficiency triple junction solar cellsp-n Junction Heterostructure Device Physics Model of a Four Junction Solar Cell Melissa J. Griggs-n junction device physics model for GaInP/GaAs/GaInAsP/GaInAs four junction solar cells. The model employs

  16. Quantifying the Effect of Kerogen on Electrical Resistivity Measurements on Organic-rich Source Rocks 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kethireddy, Nikhil Reddy

    2013-12-04

    Interpretation of electrical resistivity logs in organic-rich source rocks has been challenging for petrophysicists. Conventional resistivity-porosity-saturation models (e.g., Archie’s, Dual-Water, and Waxman-Smits equations) ...

  17. Properties of CO2-Rich Pore Fluids and Their Effect on Porosity Evolution in EGS Rocks

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project objective: Quantify key parameters critically needed for developing and validating numerical modeling of chemical interactions between EGS reservoir rocks and supercritical CO2and CO2-rich aqueous fluids.

  18. Les Houches Physics at TeV Colliders 2005 Beyond the Standard Model Working Group: Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allanach, B.C.; Grojean, C.; Skands, P.; Accomando, E.; Azuelos, G.; Baer, H.; Balazs, C.; Belanger, G.; Benakli, K.; Boudjema, F.; Brelier, B.; Bunichev, V.; Cacciapaglia, G.; Carena, M.; Choudhury, D.; Delsart, P.-A.; De Sanctis, U.; Desch, K.; Dobrescu, B.A.; Dudko, L.; El Kacimi, M.; /Saclay, SPhT /CERN /Fermilab /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /Montreal U. /TRIUMF /Florida State U. /Argonne /Annecy, LAPTH /Paris, LPTHE /Moscow State U. /Cornell U., CIHEP /Delhi U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Freiburg U. /Cadi Ayyad U., Marrakech /Orsay, LPT /Oslo U. /Lancaster U.

    2006-03-17

    The work contained herein constitutes a report of the ''Beyond the Standard Model'' working group for the Workshop ''Physics at TeV Colliders'', Les Houches, France, 2-20 May, 2005. We present reviews of current topics as well as original research carried out for the workshop. Supersymmetric and non-supersymmetric models are studied, as well as computational tools designed in order to facilitate their phenomenology.

  19. PS-wave moveout inversion for tilted TI media: A physical-modeling study Pawan Dewangan1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PS-wave moveout inversion for tilted TI media: A physical-modeling study Pawan Dewangan1 , Ilya Tsvankin2 , Mike Batzle3 , Kasper van Wijk4 , and Matthew Haney5 ABSTRACT Mode-converted PS-waves can- and PS- waves can be inverted for the parameters of a horizontal TI layer with a tilted symmetry axis

  20. Journal of Statistical Physics, Vol. 74. Nos. 1/2, 1994 Energy-Level Statistics of Model Quantum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bleher, Pavel

    Journal of Statistical Physics, Vol. 74. Nos. 1/2, 1994 Energy-Level Statistics of Model Quantum limit of a distribution for annuli of finite area. KEY WORDS: Energy-level statistics; integrable Received June 17. 1993 We investigate the statistics of the number N(R, S) of lattice points, n EZ

  1. Linking fish and fluid behavior: Results from a physical model of turbulence and bioenergetics around large wood in rivers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    Linking fish and fluid behavior: Results from a physical model of turbulence and bioenergetics the hydraulics around and fish use of large wood is lacking. Fish energetically balance the need for predation are controlled, we hypothesized that fish behavioral patches will be driven by turbulence intensity

  2. PHYSICAL REVIEW C VOLUME 49, NUMBER 1 JANUARY 1994 Hanbury-Brown --Twiss analysis in a solvable model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertsch George F.

    PHYSICAL REVIEW C VOLUME 49, NUMBER 1 JANUARY 1994 Hanbury-Brown --Twiss analysis in a solvable of meson correlations by Hanbury-~rown --Twiss interferometry is tested with a simple model of meson the correlation function depends on the Bose symmetry of the particles as in the Hanbury-Brown --Twiss (HBT

  3. Access Nets: Modeling Access to Physical Spaces Robert Frohardt, Bor-Yuh Evan Chang, and Sriram Sankaranarayanan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Bor-Yuh Evan

    Access Nets: Modeling Access to Physical Spaces Robert Frohardt, Bor-Yuh Evan Chang, and Sriram Sankaranarayanan University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado, USA {frohardt,bec,srirams}@cs.colorado.edu Abstract Frohardt, Bor-Yuh Evan Chang, and Sriram Sankaranarayanan Lobby Archive Gallery visitor guard curator

  4. Condensed Matter Physics 2009, Vol. 12, No 4, pp. 739752 Football fever: self-affirmation model for goal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Janke, Wolfhard

    Condensed Matter Physics 2009, Vol. 12, No 4, pp. 739­752 Football fever: self-affirmation model, Germany Received July 22, 2009 The outcome of football games, as well as matches of most other popular football score data with the toolbox of mathematical statistics in order to separate deterministic from

  5. PHYSICAL REVIEW E VOLUME 52, NUMBER 3 Collective aspects of protein folding illustrated by a toy model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stillinger, Frank

    PHYSICAL REVIEW E VOLUME 52, NUMBER 3 Collective aspects of protein folding illustrated by a toy to illuminate some nonlocal, or collective, as- pects of protein folding phenomena. The model is two dimensional variables generated by the primary amino acid structure may be required for fully effective protein folding

  6. Incorporation of a physically based melt pond scheme into the sea ice component of a climate model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feltham, Daniel

    Incorporation of a physically based melt pond scheme into the sea ice component of a climate model and evolution of melt ponds. Melt ponds accumulate on the surface of sea ice from snow and sea ice melt, melt ponds cover up to 50% of the sea ice surface. We have developed a melt pond evolution theory. Here

  7. Protein folding dynamics in lattice model with physical movement Sema Kachalo, Hsiao-Mei Lu and Jie Liang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dai, Yang

    Protein folding dynamics in lattice model with physical movement S¨ema Kachalo, Hsiao-Mei Lu analysis of the kinetic energy landscape. I. INTRODUCTION The dynamics of protein folding has been studied exten- sively [1, 3­5]; A remarkable empirical observation is that protein folding rates are well

  8. Physical and Mathematical Properties of a Quasi-Geostrophic Model of Intermediate Complexity of the Mid-Latitudes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . The Atmospheric Circulation is the basic engine which transforms solar heating into the energy of the atmospheric. The statistical properties of observables having physical relevance, namely the total energy of the system complexity model is considered, providing a schematic repre- sentation of the baroclinic conversion processes

  9. PHYSICAL REVIEW A 87, 032341 (2013) Simulating the transverse Ising model on a quantum computer: Error correction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geller, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    code. Section III maps the calculation of the ground-state energy for the TIM onto a quantum phase in the transverse Ising model (TIM) [12], there is a large number of physical qubits and lengthy computational time]. Here we investigate the quantum simulation of the TIM ground-state energy on a surface code quantum

  10. A statistical, physical-based, micro-mechanical model of hydrogen-induced intergranular fracture in steel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritchie, Robert

    . For the hydrogen economy to be fully realized though, efficient hydrogen storage and transportation, for exampleA statistical, physical-based, micro-mechanical model of hydrogen-induced intergranular fracture 2009 Received in revised form 10 September 2009 Accepted 17 October 2009 Keywords: Hydrogen

  11. Rock Classification in Organic Shale Based on Petrophysical and Elastic Rock Properties Calculated from Well Logs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aranibar Fernandez, Alvaro A

    2015-01-05

    Organic Content (TOC), fluid saturation, volumetric concentrations of mineral constituents, and elastic properties facilitated identification of different rock classes, using an unsupervised artificial neural network. A good rock classification technique...

  12. Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field Investigations Of In Situ Geochemical Behavior Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  13. Simulated diurnal rainfall physics in a multi-scale global climate model with embedded explicit convection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pritchard, Michael Stephen

    2011-01-01

    their Community Earth System Model (Richard Neale, personaldevelopment of Earth system models capable of reproducing

  14. Physical properties and analytical models of band-to-band tunneling in low-bandgap semiconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shih, Chun-Hsing Dang Chien, Nguyen

    2014-01-28

    Low-bandgap semiconductors, such as InAs and InSb, are widely considered to be ideal for use in tunnel field-effect transistors to ensure sufficient on-current boosting at low voltages. This work elucidates the physical and mathematical considerations of applying conventional band-to-band tunneling models in low-bandgap semiconductors, and presents a new analytical alternative for practical use. The high-bandgap tunneling generates most at maximum field region with shortest tunnel path, whereas the low-bandgap generations occur dispersedly because of narrow tunnel barrier. The local electrical field associated with tunneling-electron numbers dominates in low-bandgap materials. This work proposes decoupled electric-field terms in the pre-exponential factor and exponential function of generation-rate expressions. Without fitting, the analytical results and approximated forms exhibit great agreements with the sophisticated forms both in high- and low-bandgap semiconductors. Neither nonlocal nor local field is appropriate to be used in numerical simulations for predicting the tunneling generations in a variety of low- and high-bandgap semiconductors.

  15. Charmless $B \\to PV, VV $ decays and new physics effects in the mSUGRA model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wenjuan Zou; Zhenjun Xiao

    2005-10-24

    By employing the QCD factorization approach, we calculate the new physics contributions to the branching radios of the two-body charmless $ B \\to PV$ and $B \\to VV$ decays in the framework of the minimal supergravity (mSUGRA) model. we choose three typical sets of the mSUGRA input parameters in which the Wilson coefficient $C_{7\\gamma}(m_b)$ can be either SM-like (the case A and C) or has a flipped-sign (the case B). We found numerically that (a) the SUSY contributions are always very small for both case A and C; (b) for those tree-dominated decays, the SUSY contributions in case B are also very small; (c) for those QCD penguin-dominated decay modes, the SUSY contributions in case B can be significant, and can provide an enhancement about $30% \\sim 260%$ to the branching ratios of $B \\to K^*(\\pi,\\phi,\\rho)$ and $K \\phi$ decays, but a reduction about $30% \\sim 80%$ to $ B\\to K(\\rho, \\omega)$ decays; and (d) the large SUSY contributions in the case B may be masked by the large theoretical errors dominated by the uncertainty from our ignorance of calculating the annihilation contributions in the QCD factorization approach.

  16. Coupled hydro-mechanical processes in crytalline rock and ininduratedand plastic clays: A comparative discussion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsang, Chin-Fu; Blumling, Peter; Bernier, Frederic

    2006-02-15

    This paper provides a comparative discussion of coupledhydromechanical processes in three different geological formations:crystalline rock, plastic clay, and indurated clay. First, the importantprocesses and associated property characteristics in the three rock typesare discussed. Then, one particular hydromechanical coupling is broughtup for detailed consideration, that of pore pressure changes in nearbyrock during tunnel excavation. Three field experiments in the three rocktypes are presented and their results are discussed. It is shown that themain physical processes are common to all three rock types, but with verydifferent time constants. The different issues raised by these cases arepointed out, and the transferable lessons learned are identified. Suchcross fertilization and simultaneous understanding of coupled processesin three very different rock types help to greatly enhance confidence inthe state of science in this field.

  17. B Physics (Experiment)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michal Kreps

    2010-08-13

    In past few years the flavor physics made important transition from the work on confirmation the standard model of particle physics to the phase of search for effects of a new physics beyond standard model. In this paper we review current state of the physics of b-hadrons with emphasis on results with a sensitivity to new physics.

  18. A Physical Model For The Origin Of Volcanism Of The Tyrrhenian...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    mechanism was therefore analyzed in physical terms on the assumption of an elasto-plastic behaviour of the crust and with reference to the "limit analysis theorems". Authors...

  19. Manufactured caverns in carbonate rock

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bruce, David A.; Falta, Ronald W.; Castle, James W.; Murdoch, Lawrence C.

    2007-01-02

    Disclosed is a process for manufacturing underground caverns suitable in one embodiment for storage of large volumes of gaseous or liquid materials. The method is an acid dissolution process that can be utilized to form caverns in carbonate rock formations. The caverns can be used to store large quantities of materials near transportation facilities or destination markets. The caverns can be used for storage of materials including fossil fuels, such as natural gas, refined products formed from fossil fuels, or waste materials, such as hazardous waste materials. The caverns can also be utilized for applications involving human access such as recreation or research. The method can also be utilized to form calcium chloride as a by-product of the cavern formation process.

  20. Topological Performance Measures as Surrogates for Physical Flow Models for Risk and Vulnerability Analysis for Electric Power Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LaRocca, Sarah; Hassel, Henrik; Guikema, Seth

    2013-01-01

    Critical infrastructure systems must be both robust and resilient in order to ensure the functioning of society. To improve the performance of such systems, we often use risk and vulnerability analysis to find and address system weaknesses. A critical component of such analyses is the ability to accurately determine the negative consequences of various types of failures in the system. Numerous mathematical and simulation models exist which can be used to this end. However, there are relatively few studies comparing the implications of using different modeling approaches in the context of comprehensive risk analysis of critical infrastructures. Thus in this paper, we suggest a classification of these models, which span from simple topologically-oriented models to advanced physical flow-based models. Here, we focus on electric power systems and present a study aimed at understanding the tradeoffs between simplicity and fidelity in models used in the context of risk analysis. Specifically, the purpose of this pa...

  1. Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 562 (2006) 380388 Modeling solid-state boron carbide low energy neutron detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01

    Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 562 (2006) 380­388 Modeling solid-state boron Available online 10 March 2006 Abstract Two independent techniques for modeling boron-based solid

  2. WAVE GENERATIONS FROM CONFINED EXPLOSIONS IN ROCKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, Sarah T.

    WAVE GENERATIONS FROM CONFINED EXPLOSIONS IN ROCKS C. L. Liu and Thomas J. Ahrens Seismological Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 In order to record P- and S-waves on the interactions between incident P- and SV-waves and free-surfaces of rocks. The relations between particle

  3. ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT ROCK ISLAND DAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT ROCK ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON 1960 . SPECIAL SCIENTIFIC ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON, 1960 by Paul D. Zimmer and Clifton C. Davidson United States Fish This annual report of fishway operations at Rock Island Dam in 1960 is dedicated to the memory of co

  4. Looking for new physics beyond the Standard Model through flavour transitions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Physics by Diptimoy Ghosh Department of Theoretical Physics Tata Institute of Fundamental Research Mumbai Submitted of Fundamental Research, Mumbai. Diptimoy Ghosh In my capacity as supervisor of the candidate's thesis, I certify

  5. On the Relationship between Stress and Elastic Strain for Porous and Fractured Rock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Hui-Hai; Rutqvist, Jonny; Berryman, James G.

    2008-02-25

    Modeling the mechanical deformations of porous and fractured rocks requires a stress-strain relationship. Experience with inherently heterogeneous earth materials suggests that different varieties of Hook's law should be applied within regions of the rock having significantly different stress-strain behavior, e.g., such as solid phase and various void geometries. We apply this idea by dividing a rock body conceptually into two distinct parts. The natural strain (volume change divided by rock volume at the current stress state), rather than the engineering strain (volume change divided by the unstressed rock volume), should be used in Hooke's law for accurate modeling of the elastic deformation of that part of the pore volume subject to a relatively large degree of relative deformation (i.e., cracks or fractures). This approach permits the derivation of constitutive relations between stress and a variety of mechanical and/or hydraulic rock properties. We show that the theoretical predictions of this method are generally consistent with empirical expressions (from field data) and also laboratory rock experimental data.

  6. Rock Physics of Geologic Carbon Sequestration/Storage (Technical Report) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnical Report:Speeding access toSmall ReactorRaymond Davis,Robert Curl, Jr. andSciTech

  7. Rock Physics of Geologic Carbon Sequestration/Storage (Technical Report) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail. (Conference) | SciTech Connect Robust emergent climateSciTech Connect

  8. Uncertainties propagation in the framework of a Rod Ejection Accident modeling based on a multi-physics approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Le Pallec, J. C.; Crouzet, N.; Bergeaud, V.; Delavaud, C. [CEA/DEN/DM2S, CEA/Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette Cedex (France)

    2012-07-01

    The control of uncertainties in the field of reactor physics and their propagation in best-estimate modeling are a major issue in safety analysis. In this framework, the CEA develops a methodology to perform multi-physics simulations including uncertainties analysis. The present paper aims to present and apply this methodology for the analysis of an accidental situation such as REA (Rod Ejection Accident). This accident is characterized by a strong interaction between the different areas of the reactor physics (neutronic, fuel thermal and thermal hydraulic). The modeling is performed with CRONOS2 code. The uncertainties analysis has been conducted with the URANIE platform developed by the CEA: For each identified response from the modeling (output) and considering a set of key parameters with their uncertainties (input), a surrogate model in the form of a neural network has been produced. The set of neural networks is then used to carry out a sensitivity analysis which consists on a global variance analysis with the determination of the Sobol indices for all responses. The sensitivity indices are obtained for the input parameters by an approach based on the use of polynomial chaos. The present exercise helped to develop a methodological flow scheme, to consolidate the use of URANIE tool in the framework of parallel calculations. Finally, the use of polynomial chaos allowed computing high order sensitivity indices and thus highlighting and classifying the influence of identified uncertainties on each response of the analysis (single and interaction effects). (authors)

  9. PHYSICS OF FLUIDS 24, 022109 (2012) Modeling resistance of nanofibrous superhydrophobic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tafreshi, Hooman Vahedi

    2012-01-01

    electrospinning. In particular, our study is focused on pre- dicting the resistance of such coatings against electrospinning. C 2012 American Institute of Physics. [http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.3686833] I. INTRODUCTION

  10. Development of a Fast and Detailed Model of Urban-Scale Chemical and Physical Processing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prinn, Ronald G.

    A reduced form metamodel has been produced to simulate the effects of physical, chemical, and meteorological processing of highly reactive trace species in hypothetical urban areas, which is capable of efficiently simulating ...

  11. Regional Geology: GIS Database for Alternative Host Rocks and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    three alternative geologic host rocks for mined repositories (granitic crystalline, salt, and clay shale) and crystalline basement rock for deep borehole disposal. This...

  12. Fundamental Research on Percussion Drilling: Improved rock mechanics

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    full-scale laboratory investigations Michael S. Bruno 58 GEOSCIENCES; 02 PETROLEUM; 03 NATURAL GAS; ROCK DRILLING; PRESSURE DEPENDENCE; ROCK MECHANICS; ROTARY DRILLING; WELL...

  13. A physically based calving model applied to marine outlet glaciers and implications for the glacier dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van der Veen, Cornelis J.; Nick, F. M.; Vieli, A.; Venn, D. I.

    2010-11-05

    height-above-buoyancy calving model. Qualitatively, both models CDw and CD produce similar behaviour. Unlike previous models for calving, the new calving criteria are applicable to both grounded termini and floating ice shelves and tongues. The numerical...

  14. QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; 74 ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR PHYSICS...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of model atoms in fields Milonni, P.W. 71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; 74 ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR PHYSICS; ATOMS; OPTICAL MODELS; QUANTUM MECHANICS;...

  15. Lithophysal Rock Mass Mechanical Properties of the Repository Host Horizon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. Rigby

    2004-11-10

    The purpose of this calculation is to develop estimates of key mechanical properties for the lithophysal rock masses of the Topopah Spring Tuff (Tpt) within the repository host horizon, including their uncertainties and spatial variability. The mechanical properties to be characterized include an elastic parameter, Young's modulus, and a strength parameter, uniaxial compressive strength. Since lithophysal porosity is used as a surrogate property to develop the distributions of the mechanical properties, an estimate of the distribution of lithophysal porosity is also developed. The resulting characterizations of rock parameters are important for supporting the subsurface design, developing the preclosure safety analysis, and assessing the postclosure performance of the repository (e.g., drift degradation and modeling of rockfall impacts on engineered barrier system components).

  16. Multi-physics modeling of thermoelectric generators for waste heat recovery applications

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Model developed provides effective guidelines to designing thermoelectric generation systems for automotive waste heat recovery applications

  17. Proceedings of the International Symposium on Dynamics of Fluids in Fractured Rocks: Concepts and Recent Advances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faybishenko, B.

    1999-02-01

    This publication contains extended abstracts of papers presented at the International Symposium ''Dynamics of Fluids in Fractured Rocks: Concepts and Recent Advances'' held at Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory on February 10-12, 1999. This Symposium is organized in Honor of the 80th Birthday of Paul A. Witherspoon, who initiated some of the early investigations on flow and transport in fractured rocks at the University of California, Berkeley, and at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. He is a key figure in the development of basic concepts, modeling, and field measurements of fluid flow and contaminant transport in fractured rock systems. The technical problems of assessing fluid flow, radionuclide transport, site characterization, modeling, and performance assessment in fractured rocks remain the most challenging aspects of subsurface flow and transport investigations. An understanding of these important aspects of hydrogeology is needed to assess disposal of nu clear wastes, development of geothermal resources, production of oil and gas resources, and remediation of contaminated sites. These Proceedings of more than 100 papers from 12 countries discuss recent scientific and practical developments and the status of our understanding of fluid flow and radionuclide transport in fractured rocks. The main topics of the papers are: Theoretical studies of fluid flow in fractured rocks; Multi-phase flow and reactive chemical transport in fractured rocks; Fracture/matrix interactions; Hydrogeological and transport testing; Fracture flow models; Vadose zone studies; Isotopic studies of flow in fractured systems; Fractures in geothermal systems; Remediation and colloid transport in fractured systems; and Nuclear waste disposal in fractured rocks.

  18. Rock mechanics design in mining and tunneling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bieniawski, Z.T.

    1984-01-01

    This book introduces the design process as applied to rock mechanics aspects of underground mining and tunneling. Topics covered include a historical perspective, the design process in engineering, empirical methods of design, observational methods of design, and guided design.

  19. First Rocks from Outside the Solar System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Westphal, Andrew

    2014-10-17

    Andrew Westphal presents his findings in examining the first rocks from outside the solar system at our '8 Big Ideas' Science at the Theater event on October 8th, 2014, in Oakland, California.

  20. COMPUTED SEISMIC SPEEDS AND ATTENUATION IN ROCKS ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, J. E.

    At the gas-oil or gas-water contact in a homo- geneous reservoir rock, capillary pressure ... During production of a field, gas may come out of solution and crcatr ...

  1. Rock Slopes from Mechanics to Decision Making

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Einstein, Herbert H.

    Rock slope instabilities are discussed in the context of decision making for risk assessment and management. Hence, the state of the slope and possible failure mechanism need to be defined first. This is done with geometrical ...

  2. Summary - Hot Dry Rock R&D Strategies and Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tennyson, George P..

    1989-03-21

    In geothermal energy technology, the hydrothermal systems rely on volcanic hot rocks being fortuitously co-located with an adequate supply of natural ground water, usually at some considerable depth within the earth. This represents essentially two accidents in the same place, and the occurrence is relatively rare. Yellowstone Park and the desert valley of southern California are the most noteworthy US. examples. Since the heat is the energy needed, if we could just get the water down to it and back. Well, that's what is being done with the hot dry rock program. A well is drilled down to where there is adequate heat in the rocks. The well is then pressurized until the rock fractures creating what amounts to a reservoir full of hot, shattered rock. Finally, a well is drilled into the reservoir and water is pumped in one well, heated by the rock, and taken out through the other well at useful temperatures and pressures. We are getting ready to run significant long-term flow tests at the Fenton Hill Hot Dry Rock site west of Los Alamos, New Mexico. We expect the operational information to provide the data to forecast the energy life of the wells as a production facility. This kind of resource is much more common than regular geothermal resources. Robert H. Hendron described the Long Term Flow Test and reservoir studies for which the project is preparing. A shortfall of available funding has slowed preparations, delaying the start of that test. The test is planning to gather data for more definitive reservoir modeling with energy availability or reservoir lifetime of primary interest. Other interests include geochemistry and tracer studies, microseismic response, water requirements and flow impedance which relates directly to the pumping power required. Progress has been made in modeling studies, chemically reactive tracer techniques, and in improvements in acoustic or microseismic event analysis. Donald W. Brown discussed reservoir modeling as it relates to production management of the HDR well. For wells which are fracture dominated rather than matrix-permeability controlled, a knowledge of the pressure-dependent permeability of the interconnected system of natural joints (or pre-existing fractures is critical to long-term power production from the wells) through optimized pressure management. It was mentioned that a knowledge of the pressure-dependent joint permeability could aid in designing more appropriate secondary recovery strategies in petroleum reservoirs, or reinjection I procedures of geothermal reservoirs. Dr. Bruce A. Robinson discussed the development of fluid flow and transport models for simulation of HDR geothermal reservoirs. These models are also expected to provide accurate predictions of long-term behavior and help in the development of strategies for reservoir improvement and operation. Two approaches were discussed. The discrete fracture approach is based on a random fracture network subject to prescribed statistical properties of the fracture set. It is used to simulate steady state fluid flow and solute transport. The other approach used the continuum approximation. This type of model is appropriate when the reservoir consists of many interconnected fractures, as is the case at Fenton Hill.

  3. Simulation of water transport in heated rock salt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schlich, M.; Jockwer, N.

    1986-01-01

    This paper summarizes computer simulation studies on water transport in German rock salt. Based on JOCKWERS experimental investigations on water content and water liberation, the object of these studies was to select a water transport model, that matches the water inflow which was measured in some heater experiments in the Asse Salt Mine. The main result is, that an evaporation front model, with Knudsen-type vapor transport combined with fluid transport by thermal expansion of the adsorbed water layers in the non evaporated zone, showed the best agreement with experimental evidence.

  4. PANS turbulence model: investigation of computational and physical closure issues in flow past a circular cylinder 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reyes, Dasia Ann

    2009-05-15

    -Stokes (RANS) method. Preliminary investigations of PANS show promising re-sults but there still exist computational and physical issues that must be addressed.This study investigates the performance of the PANS method for ow past acylinder at a Reynolds number...

  5. Decadal variability in the northeast Pacific in a physical-ecosystem model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maine, University of

    the lower trophic levels of the food web and if so by what means. The physical component is an ocean general in late winter, did not penetrate as deep in the central GOA. As a result, more phytoplankton remained that resulted in basin-wide changes in ocean temper- atures, currents, and mixed layer depth [e.g., Miller et al

  6. The effects of lithology and initial fault angle in physical models of fault-propagation folds 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McLain, Christopher Thomas

    2001-01-01

    with a weak brittle layer that deforms by faulting and fracturing (dried pottery clay simulates an interbedded siliciclastic unit). The models were deformed in a triaxial deformation rig at confining pressure of 50 Mpa at room temperature. Each model...

  7. Chemical and Physical Properties of Nanomaterials for Model Catalytic Systems and Smart Polymer Membranes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skiles, Stephanie Lyn

    2014-10-24

    . These systems can be developed and tested using model catalyst systems. Herein, two model systems were investigated: a supported cobalt nanoparticle catalyst and a bimetallic palladium-copper system. In the cobalt system, the smallest particles are oxidized...

  8. Physics and Consciousness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patricio Perez

    1995-10-17

    Some contributions of physics towards the understanding of consciousness are described. As recent relevant models, associative memory neural networks are mentioned. It is shown that consciousness and quantum physics share some properties. Two existing quantum models are discussed.

  9. A physical model of the photo- and radiation-induced degradation of ytterbium-doped silica optical fibres

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mady, Franck Duchez, Jean-Bernard Mebrouk, Yasmine Benabdesselam, Mourad

    2014-10-21

    We propose a model to describe the photo- or/and the radiation-induced darkening of ytterbium-doped silica optical fibers. This model accounts for the well-established experimental features of photo-darkening. Degradation behaviors predicted for fibers pumped in harsh environments are also fully confirmed by experimental data reported in the work by Duchez et al. (this proceeding), which gives a detailed characterization of the interplay between the effects of the pump and those of a superimposed ionizing irradiation (actual operation conditions in space-based applications for instance). In particular, dependences of the darkening build-up on the pump power, the total ionizing dose and the dose rate are all correctly reproduced. The presented model is a ‘sufficient’ one, including the minimal physical ingredients required to reproduce experimental features. Refinements could be proposed to improve, e.g., quantitative kinetics.

  10. Towards a physics-based modelling of the electro-mechanical coupling in EAPs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noy Cohen; Andreas Menzel; Gal deBotton

    2015-02-03

    Due to the increasing number of industrial applications of electro-active polymers (EAPs), there is a growing need for electromechanical models which accurately capture their behavior. To this end, we compare the predicted behavior of EAPs undergoing homogenous deformations according to three electromechanical models. The first model is a continuum based model composed of the mechanical Gent model and a linear relationship between the electric field and the polarization. The electrical and the mechanical responses according to the second model are based on the polymer microstructure, whereas the third model incorporates a neo-Hookean mechanical response and a microstructural based long-chains model for the electrical behavior. In the microstructural motivated models the integration from the microscopic to the macroscopic levels is accomplished by the micro-sphere technique. Four types of homogeneous boundary conditions are considered and the behaviors determined according to the three models are compared. The differences between the predictions of the models are discussed, highlighting the need for an in-depth investigation of the relations between the structure and the behaviors of the EAPs at microscopic level and their overall macroscopic response.

  11. arXiv:1408.2487v2[physics.ao-ph]22Aug2014 Ising model for melt ponds on Arctic sea ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golden, Kenneth M.

    arXiv:1408.2487v2[physics.ao-ph]22Aug2014 Ising model for melt ponds on Arctic sea ice Yi-Ping Ma,1 of water on the ice surface. Recent observations show an onset of pond complexity at a critical area modeling, we introduce a two dimensional Ising model for pond evolution which incorporates ice

  12. CGILS: Results from the First Phase of an International Project to Understand the Physical Mechanisms of Low Cloud Feedbacks in Single Column Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Minghua; Bretherton, Christopher S.; Blossey, Peter; Austin, Phillip A.; Bacmeister, J.; Bony, Sandrine; Brient, Florent; Cheedela, Suvarchal K.; Cheng, Anning; Del Genio, Anthony D.; De Roode, Stephan R.; Endo , Satoshi; Franklin, Charmaine N.; Golaz, Jean-Christophe; Hannay, Cecile; Heus, Thijs; Isotta, Francesco A.; Jean-Louis, Dufresne; Kang, In-Sik; Kawai, Hideaki; Koehler, M.; Larson, Vincent E.; Liu, Yangang; Lock, Adrian; Lohmann, U.; Khairoutdinov, Marat; Molod, Andrea M.; Neggers, Roel; Rasch, Philip J.; Sandu, Irina; Senkbeil, Ryan; Siebesma, A. P.; Siegenthaler-Le Drian, Colombe; Stevens, Bjorn; Suarez, Max; Xu, Kuan-Man; Von Salzen, Knut; Webb, Mark; Wolf, Audrey; Zhao, M.

    2013-12-26

    Large Eddy Models (LES) and Single Column Models (SCM) are used in a surrogate climate change 101 to investigate the physical mechanism of low cloud feedbacks in climate models. Enhanced surface-102 driven boundary layer turbulence and shallow convection in a warmer climate are found to be 103 dominant mechanisms in SCMs.

  13. Probing New Physics Models of Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay with SuperNEMO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Arnold; C. Augier; J. Baker; A. S. Barabash; A. Basharina-Freshville; M. Bongrand; V. Brudanin; A. J. Caffrey; S. Cebrián; A. Chapon; E. Chauveau; Th. Dafni; F. F. Deppisch; J. Diaz; D. Durand; V. Egorov; J. J. Evans; R. Flack; K-I. Fushima; I. García Irastorza; X. Garrido; H. Gómez; B. Guillon; A. Holin; K. Holy; J. J. Horkley; Ph. Hubert; C. Hugon; F. J. Iguaz; N. Ishihara; C. M. Jackson; S. Jullian; M. Kauer; O. Kochetov; S. I. Konovalov; V. Kovalenko; T. Lamhamdi; K. Lang; G. Lutter; G. Luzón; F. Mamedov; Ch. Marquet; F. Mauger; F. Monrabal; A. Nachab; I. Nasteva; I. Nemchenok; C. H. Nguyen; M. Nomachi; F. Nova; H. Ohsumi; R. B. Pahlka; F. Perrot; F. Piquemal; P. P. Povinec; B. Richards; J. S. Ricol; C. L. Riddle; A. Rodríguez; R. Saakyan; X. Sarazin; J. K. Sedgbeer; L. Serra; Yu. Shitov; L. Simard; F. Šimkovic; S. Söldner-Rembold; I. Štekl; C. S. Sutton; Y. Tamagawa; J. Thomas; V. Timkin; V. Tretyak; Vl. I. Tretyak; V. I. Umatov; I. A. Vanyushin; R. Vasiliev; V. Vasiliev; V. Vorobel; D. Waters; N. Yahlali; A. Žukauskas

    2010-11-23

    The possibility to probe new physics scenarios of light Majorana neutrino exchange and right-handed currents at the planned next generation neutrinoless double beta decay experiment SuperNEMO is discussed. Its ability to study different isotopes and track the outgoing electrons provides the means to discriminate different underlying mechanisms for the neutrinoless double beta decay by measuring the decay half-life and the electron angular and energy distributions.

  14. Search for physics beyond the standard model in events with two leptons, jets, and missing transverse momentum in pp collisions at ?s = 8 TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apyan, Aram

    A search is presented for physics beyond the standard model in final states with two opposite-sign same-flavor leptons, jets, and missing transverse momentum. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 19.4 ...

  15. A WIMS-NESTLE reactor physics model for an RBMK reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perry, R.T. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Meriwether, G.H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-08-01

    This work describes the static neutronic calculations made for a three-dimensional model of an RBMK (Russian) reactor. Future work will involve the use of this neutronic model and a thermal-hydraulic model in coupled calculations. The lattice code, WIMS-D, was used to obtain the cross sections for the static neutronic calculations. The static reactor neutronic calculations were made with NESTLE, a three-dimensional nodal diffusion code. The methods used to establish an RBMK reactor model for use in these codes are discussed, and the cross sections calculated are given.

  16. Flavor physics and CP violation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gino Isidori

    2013-02-04

    Lectures on flavor physics presented at the 2012 CERN HEP Summer School. Content: 1) flavor physics within the Standard Model, 2) phenomenology of B and D decays, 3) flavor physics beyond the Standard Model.

  17. Introduction to the techniques of the fractional calculus to investigate some models of the mathematical physics (in Portuguese)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabio G. Rodrigues; Edmundo C. Oliveira

    2015-09-08

    In this paper, we resort to the Laplace transform method in order to show its efficiency when approaching some types of fractional differential equations. In particular, we present some applications of such methods when applied to possible generalizations of certain physical problems in linear viscoelasticity and harmonic oscillators, proving that fractional calculus is well suited for the modelling and solving of problems usually treated by ordinary integer calculus, with the promissing advantages of being able to provide more accurate theoretical predictions to fit with experimental data. OBS: Article in portuguese accepted for publication at RBEF (Revista Brasileira de Ensino de F\\'isica).

  18. Economic predictions for heat mining : a review and analysis of hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal energy technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tester, Jefferson W.

    1990-01-01

    The main objectives of this study were first, to review and analyze several economic assessments of Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal energy systems, and second, to reformulate an economic model for HDR with revised cost components.

  19. PHYSICAL REVIEW E 85, 041136 (2012) Jamming and pattern formation in models of segregation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKane, Alan

    2012-01-01

    2012; published 24 April 2012) We investigate the Schelling model of social segregation, formulated to be derived. Analysis of these equations reveals a jamming transition in the regime of low-vacancy density Schelling proposed a simple model of social segregation in which agents of two different types are placed

  20. Proceedings of the 51st Anniversary Conference of KSME PHYSICAL MODELING OF ATMOSPHERIC FLOW

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Bruce

    a model house in a small wind tunnel to measure wind pressure against the model. Since then, many attempts over tall buildings. The temperature differences within the atmospheric boundary layer affect both wind is discussed with special emphasis on wind-tunnel simulation techniques. The governing equations of motion

  1. ChemCam rock laser for Mars Science Laboratory "Curiosity"

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Wiens, Roger

    2014-08-12

    Los Alamos has a long history of space-related instruments, tied primarily to its role in defense-related treaty verification. Space-based detectors have helped determine the differences between signals from lightning bolts and potential nuclear explosions. LANL-developed gamma-ray detection instruments first revealed the existence of what we now know as gamma-ray bursts, an exciting area of astrophysical research. And the use of LANL instruments on varied space missions continues with such products as the ChemCam rock laser for NASA, shown here. The Engineering Model of the ChemCam Mars Science Laboratory rover instrument arrived at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory on February 6, 2008. The Flight Model was shipped in August, 2010 for installation on the rover at JPL. ChemCam will use imaging and laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) to determine rock and soil compositions on Mars, up to 9 meters from the rover. The engineering model is being integrated into the rover test bed for the development and testing of the rover software. The actual flight model components were concurrently assembled at Los Alamos and in Toulouse, France. The Mars Science Laboratory is scheduled to launch in 2011. Animations courtesy of JPL/NASA.

  2. Fluid substitution in rocks saturated with viscoelastic fluids Dina Makarynska1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Jyoti Behura3 , and Mike Batzle4 ABSTRACT Heavy oils have high densities and extremely high viscosities sands.We model the viscoelastic properties of a heavy- oil-saturated rock sample using CPA and a measured frequency- dependent complex shear modulus of the heavy oil. Comparison of modeled results

  3. A PHYSICS-BASED SOFTWARE FRAMEWORK FOR SUN-EARTH CONNECTION MODELING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stout, Quentin F.

    . The SWMF is a structured collection of software building blocks to develop components for Sun-Earth system modeling, to couple them, and to assemble them into applications. A component is created from the user

  4. Wear 252 (2002) 322331 A physically-based abrasive wear model for composite materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritchie, Robert

    2002-01-01

    brushes, cylinder liners, ar- tificial joints, and helicopter blades. Indeed, compared to monolithic-body (pin-on-drum) abrasive wear tests performed on a model aluminum particulate-reinforced epoxy

  5. Physics based model for online fault detection in autonomous cryogenic loading system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kashani, Ali; Ponizhovskaya, Ekaterina; Luchinsky, Dmitry; Smelyanskiy, Vadim; Patterson-Hine, Anna; Sass, Jared; Brown, Barbara

    2014-01-29

    We report the progress in the development of the chilldown model for a rapid cryogenic loading system developed at NASA-Kennedy Space Center. The nontrivial characteristic feature of the analyzed chilldown regime is its active control by dump valves. The two-phase flow model of the chilldown is approximated as one-dimensional homogeneous fluid flow with no slip condition for the interphase velocity. The model is built using commercial SINDA/FLUINT software. The results of numerical predictions are in good agreement with the experimental time traces. The obtained results pave the way to the application of the SINDA/FLUINT model as a verification tool for the design and algorithm development required for autonomous loading operation.

  6. Model Aided Observational Study of Physical Processes in Fresh Water Reservoirs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al Senafi, Fahad

    2012-10-19

    Profiler, and an Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter from which shear stress, turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rates, and turbulence kinetic energy were computed using several methods. Numerical model experiments, forced by the surface heat and momentum fluxes...

  7. From scale properties of physical amplitudes to a predictive formulation of the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Battistel, O. A. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, 97119-900 Santa Maria, Rio Grande do Sul (Brazil); Dallabona, G. [Departamento de Ciencias Exatas, Universidade Federal de Lavras, Cx. Postal 37, 37200-000, Lavras, Minas Gerais (Brazil)

    2009-10-15

    The predictive power of the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model is considered in the light of a novel strategy to handle the divergences typical of perturbative calculations. The referred calculational strategy eliminates unphysical dependencies on the arbitrary choices for the routing of internal momenta and symmetry violating terms. In the present work we extend a previous one on the same issue by including vector interactions and performing the discussion in a more general context: the role of scale arbitrariness for the consistency of the calculations is considered. We show that the imposition of arbitrary scale independence for the consistent regularized amplitudes lead to additional properties for the irreducible divergent objects. These properties allow us to parametrize the remaining freedom in terms of a unique constant where resides all the arbitrariness involved. By searching for the best value for the arbitrary parameter we find a critical condition for the existence of an acceptable physical value for the dynamically generated quark mass. Such critical condition fixes the remaining arbitrariness turning the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio into a predictive model in the sense that its phenomenological consequences do not depend on possible choices made in intermediary steps. Numerical results are obtained for physical quantities like the vector and axial-vector masses and their coupling constants as genuine predictions.

  8. Multidiscipline Modeling in Materials and Structures Multi-physics modeling and simulations of reactive melt infiltration process used

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grujicic, Mica

    of reactive melt infiltration process used in fabrication of ceramic-matrix composites (CMCs) Mica Grujicic in fabrication of ceramic-matrix composites (CMCs)", Multidiscipline Modeling in Materials and Structures, Vol used in fabrication of ceramic-matrix composites (CMCs) Mica Grujicic, Rohan Galgalikar, S. Ramaswami

  9. Rock melting tool with annealer section

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bussod, Gilles Y. (Santa Fe, NM); Dick, Aaron J. (Oakland, CA); Cort, George E. (Montrose, CO)

    1998-01-01

    A rock melting penetrator is provided with an afterbody that rapidly cools a molten geological structure formed around the melting tip of the penetrator to the glass transition temperature for the surrounding molten glass-like material. An annealing afterbody then cools the glass slowly from the glass transition temperature through the annealing temperature range to form a solid self-supporting glass casing. This allows thermally induced strains to relax by viscous deformations as the molten glass cools and prevents fracturing of the resulting glass liner. The quality of the glass lining is improved, along with its ability to provide a rigid impermeable casing in unstable rock formations.

  10. Simulated evolution of fractures and fracture networks subject to thermal cooling: A coupled discrete element and heat conduction model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Hai; Plummer, Mitchell; Podgorney, Robert

    2013-02-01

    Advancement of EGS requires improved prediction of fracture development and growth during reservoir stimulation and long-term operation. This, in turn, requires better understanding of the dynamics of the strongly coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical (THM) processes within fractured rocks. We have developed a physically based rock deformation and fracture propagation simulator by using a quasi-static discrete element model (DEM) to model mechanical rock deformation and fracture propagation induced by thermal stress and fluid pressure changes. We also developed a network model to simulate fluid flow and heat transport in both fractures and porous rock. In this paper, we describe results of simulations in which the DEM model and network flow & heat transport model are coupled together to provide realistic simulation of the changes of apertures and permeability of fractures and fracture networks induced by thermal cooling and fluid pressure changes within fractures. Various processes, such as Stokes flow in low velocity pores, convection-dominated heat transport in fractures, heat exchange between fluid-filled fractures and solid rock, heat conduction through low-permeability matrices and associated mechanical deformations are all incorporated into the coupled model. The effects of confining stresses, developing thermal stress and injection pressure on the permeability evolution of fracture and fracture networks are systematically investigated. Results are summarized in terms of implications for the development and evolution of fracture distribution during hydrofracturing and thermal stimulation for EGS.

  11. Outlook on the Higgs particles, masses and physical bounds in the Two Higgs-Doublet Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. R. Juarez W.; D. Morales C.; P. Kielanowski

    2012-01-17

    The Higgs sector of models beyond the standard model requires special attention and study, since through them, a natural explanation can be offered to current questions such as the big differences in the values of the masses of the quarks (hierarchy of masses), the possible generation of flavor changing neutral currents (inspired by the evidence about the oscillations of neutrinos), besides the possibility that some models, with more complicated symmetries than those of the standard model, have a non standard low energy limit. The simplest extension of the standard model known as the two-Higgs-doublet-model (2HDM) involves a second Higgs doublet. The 2HDM predicts the existence of five scalar particles: three neutral ($A^{0}$), ($h^{0}$, $H^{0}$) and two charged ($H^{\\pm}$). The purpose of this work is to determine in a natural and easy way the mass eigenstates and masses of these five particles, in terms of the parameters $\\lambda_{i}$ introduced in the minimal extended Higgs sector potential that preserves the CP symmetry. We discuss several cases of Higgs mixings and the one in which two neutral states are degenerate. As the values of the quartic interactions between the scalar doublets are not theoretically determined, it is of great interest to explore and constrain their values, therefore we analize the stability and triviality bounds using the Lagrange multipliers method and numerically solving the renormalization group equations. Through the former results one can establish the region of validity of the model under several circumstances considered in the literature.

  12. An experimental investigation of leading edge vortical flow about a delta wing during wing rock 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nelson, Michael Denis

    1991-01-01

    moment coefficient in water and wind tunnel. , Fig. 4 Wing rock time history for et=40' (No initial breakdown). . . . . . , , , Fig, 5 Spanwise and normal vortex positions at x/c = 0. 95 (et=30'). . . . . . . Fig. 6 Free-to-roll test apparatus. Fig. 7... G 2 4 6 2 10 12 14 16 18 2G T)HE (aac. ) Fig. 4 Wing rock time history for a=40' (No initial breakdown). ' 5 quantified with respect to roll angle at the 95% chord station of the modeL Their model was mounted on a free-to-roll air bearing...

  13. ChemCam Rock Laser for the Mars Science Laboratory

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    LANL

    2009-09-01

    Los Alamos has a long history of space-related instr... Los Alamos has a long history of space-related instruments, tied primarily to its role in defense-related treaty verification. Space-based detectors have helped determine the differences between signals from lightning bolts and potential nuclear explosions. LANL-developed gamma-ray detection instruments first revealed the existence of what we now know as gamma-ray bursts, an exciting area of astrophysical research. And the use of LANL instruments on varied space missions continues with such products as the ChemCam rock laser for NASA, shown here. The Engineering Model of the ChemCam Mars Science Laboratory rover instrument arrived at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory on February 6, 2008. ChemCam will use imaging and laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) to determine rock and soil compositions on Mars, up to 9 meters from the rover. The engineering model is being integrated into the rover test bed for the development and testing of the rover software. The actual flight model components are concurrently being assembled at Los Alamos and in Toulouse, France, and will be delivered to JPL in July. The Mars Science Laboratory is scheduled to launch in 2009. Animations courtesy of JPL/NASA.

  14. Statistical Mechanics of Two-dimensional Foams: Physical Foundations of the Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marc Durand

    2015-07-16

    In a recent series of papers [1--3], a statistical model that accounts for correlations between topological and geometrical properties of a two-dimensional shuffled foam has been proposed and compared with experimental and numerical data. Here, the various assumptions on which the model is based are exposed and justified: the equiprobability hypothesis of the foam configurations is argued. The range of correlations between bubbles is discussed, and the mean field approximation that is used in the model is detailed. The two self-consistency equations associated with this mean field description can be interpreted as the conservation laws of number of sides and bubble curvature, respectively. Finally, the use of a "Grand-Canonical" description, in which the foam constitutes a reservoir of sides and curvature, is justified.

  15. Predicting stress-induced velocity anisotropy in rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mavko, G.; Mukerji, T.; Godfrey, N. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Rock Physics Lab.] [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Rock Physics Lab.

    1995-07-01

    A simple transformation, using measured isotropic V{sub P} and V{sub S} versus hydrostatic pressure, is presented for predicting stress-induced seismic velocity anisotropy in rocks. The compliant, crack-like portions of the pore space are characterized by generalized compressional and shear compliances that are estimated form the isotropic V{sub P} and V{sub S}. The physical assumption that the compliant porosity is crack-like means that the pressure dependence of the generalized compliances is governed primarily by normal tractions resolved across cracks and defects. This allows the measured pressure dependence to be mapped form the hydrostatic stress state to any applied nonhydrostatic stress. Predicted P- and S-wave velocities agree reasonably well with uniaxial stress data for Barre Granite and Massillon Sandstone. While it is mechanically similar to methods based on idealized ellipsoidal cracks, the approach is relatively independent of any assumed crack geometry and is not limited to small crack densities.

  16. PHYSICAL REVIEW C 77, 064308 (2008) Effective shell model Hamiltonians from density functional theory: Quadrupolar and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertsch George F.

    2008-01-01

    ), and the configuration-interaction shell-model (CISM) approach [2]. SCMF theories are often cast in terms of an energy. Such parametrizations are usually based on the zero-range Skyrme force [3] or on the Gogny interaction [4]. The CISM effective CISM interactions can sometimes be traced back to the bare nucleon-nucleon interaction

  17. FINITE ELEMENT MODELS OF THE TONGUE AND VELUM FOR A PHYSICAL UNDERSTANDING OF SLEEP APNEA SYNDROME

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Payan, Yohan

    midsagittal radiography of a patient. The tongue model integrates the main extrinsic and intrinsic muscles that are responsible for tongue deformations and displacements inside the mouth (genioglossus, hyoglossus, styloglossus, verticalis, longitudinalis) The lingual and velar deformations induced by muscle activations and by airflow

  18. PHYSICAL REVIEW B 86, 035148 (2012) Microscopic model of Purcell enhancement in hyperbolic metamaterials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01

    metamaterials Alexander N. Poddubny,1,2 Pavel A. Belov,1,3 Pavel Ginzburg,4 Anatoly V. Zayats,4 and Yuri S in metamaterials with the hyperbolic dispersion modeled as a cubic lattice of anisotropic resonant dipoles. We insights into the rapidly developing field of hyperbolic metamaterials. DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevB.86

  19. A PHYSICS-BASED SOFTWARE FRAMEWORK FOR SUN-EARTH CONNECTION MODELING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stout, Quentin F.

    . The solar wind transfers significant mass, momentum and energy to the magnetosphere, ionosphere, and upper several more components (for example Solar Energetic Particles and Radiation Belt). It can also on the power grids used by millions of households. As an illustrative example of modeling multiple domains

  20. Sliding Mode Control for Uncertain Thermal SOFC Models with Physical Actuator Constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Damm, Werner

    Mathematical models for the dynamics of high-temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs) can be subdivided in the preheating unit and in the inlet elements of the fuel cell stack module. If the above-mentioned sliding mode differential equations (ODEs). In [3] and [4], interval- based global optimization routines accounting

  1. Neutrino mass and oscillation as probes of physics beyond the Standard Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khalil, S

    2000-01-01

    We present a review of the present status of the problem of neutrino masses and mixing including a survey of theoretical motivations and models, experimental searches and implications of recently appeared solar and atmospheric neutrino data, which strongly indicate nonzero neutrino masses and mixing angles.

  2. A Generic Timing Model for Cyber-Physical Florian Kluge, Mike Gerdes, Florian Haas, Theo Ungerer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ungerer, Theo

    , for example, the crank shaft in a combustion engine. Certain angu- larities of the crank shaft raise of the crank shaft and changes over time. Specialised real-time task models, e.g. [5,6], are able to map

  3. Effective versus ion thermal temperatures in the Weizmann Ne Z-pinch: Modeling and stagnation physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zarnitsky, Yuri

    Effective versus ion thermal temperatures in the Weizmann Ne Z-pinch: Modeling and stagnation of Technology, Haifa, Israel 5 National Security Technologies, LLC, Las Vegas, Nevada 89144, USA (Received 23 thermal and effective temperatures is investigated through simulations of the Ne gas puff z-pinch reported

  4. Quantum phase transitions in transverse field spin models: from statistical physics to quantum information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amit Dutta; Gabriel Aeppli; Bikas K. Chakrabarti; Uma Divakaran; Thomas F. Rosenbaum; Diptiman Sen

    2015-06-09

    We review quantum phase transitions of spin systems in transverse magnetic fields taking the examples of the spin-1/2 Ising and XY models in a transverse field. Beginning with an overview of quantum phase transitions, we introduce a number of model Hamiltonians. We provide exact solutions in one spatial dimension connecting them to conformal field theoretical studies. We also discuss Kitaev models and some other exactly solvable spin systems. Studies of quantum phase transitions in the presence of quenched randomness and with frustrating interactions are presented in detail. We discuss novel phenomena like Griffiths-McCoy singularities. We then turn to more recent topics like information theoretic measures of the quantum phase transitions in these models such as concurrence, entanglement entropy, quantum discord and quantum fidelity. We then focus on non-equilibrium dynamics of a variety of transverse field systems across quantum critical points and lines. After mentioning rapid quenching studies, we dwell on slow dynamics and discuss the Kibble-Zurek scaling for the defect density following a quench across critical points and its modifications for quenching across critical lines, gapless regions and multicritical points. Topics like the role of different quenching schemes, local quenching, quenching of models with random interactions and quenching of a spin chain coupled to a heat bath are touched upon. The connection between non-equilibrium dynamics and quantum information theoretic measures is presented at some length. We indicate the connection between Kibble-Zurek scaling and adiabatic evolution of a state as well as the application of adiabatic dynamics as a tool of a quantum optimization technique known as quantum annealing. The final section is dedicated to a detailed discussion on recent experimental studies of transverse Ising-like systems.

  5. LASER SCANNING TECHNOLOGY FOR ROCK ENGINEERING APPLICATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LASER SCANNING TECHNOLOGY FOR ROCK ENGINEERING APPLICATIONS Thorsten Schulz Institute of Geodesy or on the excavation surface. The use of laser scanners enables one to cope with practical constraints encountered surfaces regardless of the lighting conditions. Therefore, laser scanners have the potential to be employed

  6. Storage capacity in hot dry rock reservoirs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, Donald W. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1997-01-01

    A method of extracting thermal energy, in a cyclic manner, from geologic strata which may be termed hot dry rock. A reservoir comprised of hot fractured rock is established and water or other liquid is passed through the reservoir. The water is heated by the hot rock, recovered from the reservoir, cooled by extraction of heat by means of heat exchange apparatus on the surface, and then re-injected into the reservoir to be heated again. Water is added to the reservoir by means of an injection well and recovered from the reservoir by means of a production well. Water is continuously provided to the reservoir and continuously withdrawn from the reservoir at two different flow rates, a base rate and a peak rate. Increasing water flow from the base rate to the peak rate is accomplished by rapidly decreasing backpressure at the outlet of the production well in order to meet periodic needs for amounts of thermal energy greater than a baseload amount, such as to generate additional electric power to meet peak demands. The rate of flow of water provided to the hot dry rock reservoir is maintained at a value effective to prevent depletion of the liquid

  7. Storage capacity in hot dry rock reservoirs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, D.W.

    1997-11-11

    A method is described for extracting thermal energy, in a cyclic manner, from geologic strata which may be termed hot dry rock. A reservoir comprised of hot fractured rock is established and water or other liquid is passed through the reservoir. The water is heated by the hot rock, recovered from the reservoir, cooled by extraction of heat by means of heat exchange apparatus on the surface, and then re-injected into the reservoir to be heated again. Water is added to the reservoir by means of an injection well and recovered from the reservoir by means of a production well. Water is continuously provided to the reservoir and continuously withdrawn from the reservoir at two different flow rates, a base rate and a peak rate. Increasing water flow from the base rate to the peak rate is accomplished by rapidly decreasing backpressure at the outlet of the production well in order to meet periodic needs for amounts of thermal energy greater than a baseload amount, such as to generate additional electric power to meet peak demands. The rate of flow of water provided to the hot dry rock reservoir is maintained at a value effective to prevent depletion of the liquid inventory of the reservoir. 4 figs.

  8. Transfer of hot dry rock technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, M.C.

    1985-11-01

    The Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development Program has focused worldwide attention on the facts that natural heat in the upper part of the earth's crust is an essentially inexhaustible energy resource which is accessible almost everywhere, and that practical means now exist to extract useful heat from the hot rock and bring it to the earth's surface for beneficial use. The Hot Dry Rock Program has successfully constructed and operated a prototype hot, dry rock energy system that produced heat at the temperatures and rates required for large-scale space heating and many other direct uses of heat. The Program is now in the final stages of constructing a larger, hotter system potentially capable of satisfying the energy requirements of a small, commercial, electrical-generating power plant. To create and understand the behavior of such system, it has been necessary to develop or support the development of a wide variety of equipment, instruments, techniques, and analyses. Much of this innovative technology has already been transferred to the private sector and to other research and development programs, and more is continuously being made available as its usefulness is demonstrated. This report describes some of these developments and indicates where this new technology is being used or can be useful to industry, engineering, and science.

  9. Simulation of the Beating Heart Based on Physically Modeling aDeformable Balloon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rohmer, Damien; Sitek, Arkadiusz; Gullberg, Grant T.

    2006-07-18

    The motion of the beating heart is complex and createsartifacts in SPECT and x-ray CT images. Phantoms such as the JaszczakDynamic Cardiac Phantom are used to simulate cardiac motion forevaluationof acquisition and data processing protocols used for cardiacimaging. Two concentric elastic membranes filled with water are connectedto tubing and pump apparatus for creating fluid flow in and out of theinner volume to simulate motion of the heart. In the present report, themovement of two concentric balloons is solved numerically in order tocreate a computer simulation of the motion of the moving membranes in theJaszczak Dynamic Cardiac Phantom. A system of differential equations,based on the physical properties, determine the motion. Two methods aretested for solving the system of differential equations. The results ofboth methods are similar providing a final shape that does not convergeto a trivial circular profile. Finally,a tomographic imaging simulationis performed by acquiring static projections of the moving shape andreconstructing the result to observe motion artifacts. Two cases aretaken into account: in one case each projection angle is sampled for ashort time interval and the other case is sampled for a longer timeinterval. The longer sampling acquisition shows a clear improvement indecreasing the tomographic streaking artifacts.

  10. SEARCH FOR UNDERGROUND OPENINGS FOR IN SITU TEST FACILITIES IN CRYSTALLINE ROCK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wallenberg, H.A.

    2010-01-01

    of the precambrian crystalline rocks, Park and Jeffersonmap 1-413. 1965, The crystalline rocks of South Carolina,TEST FACILITIES IN CRYSTALLINE ROCK Harold A. Wollenberg,

  11. Simulation of water-rock interaction in the Yellowstone geothermal system using TOUGHREACT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dobson, Patrick F.; Salah, Sonia; Spycher, Nicolas; Sonnenthal, Eric L.

    2003-04-28

    The Yellowstone geothermal system provides an ideal opportunity to test the ability of reactive transport models to simulate the chemical and hydrological effects of water-rock interaction. Previous studies of the Yellowstone geothermal system have characterized water-rock interaction through analysis of rocks and fluids obtained from both surface and downhole samples. Fluid chemistry, rock mineralogy, permeability, porosity, and thermal data obtained from the Y-8 borehole in Upper Geyser Basin were used to constrain a series of reactive transport simulations of the Yellowstone geothermal system using TOUGHREACT. Three distinct stratigraphic units were encountered in the 153.4 m deep Y-8 drill core: volcaniclastic sandstone, perlitic rhyolitic lava, and nonwelded pumiceous tuff. The main alteration phases identified in the Y-8 core samples include clay minerals, zeolites, silica polymorphs, adularia, and calcite. Temperatures observed in the Y-8 borehole increase with depth from sub-boiling conditions at the surface to a maximum of 169.8 C at a depth of 104.1 m, with near-isothermal conditions persisting down to the well bottom. 1-D models of the Y-8 core hole were constructed to simulate the observed alteration mineral assemblage given the initial rock mineralogy and observed fluid chemistry and temperatures. Preliminary simulations involving the perlitic rhyolitic lava unit are consistent with the observed alteration of rhyolitic glass to form celadonite.

  12. Simulation of water-rock interaction in the yellowstone geothermal system using TOUGHREACT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dobson, P.F.; Salah, S.; Spycher, N.; Sonnenthal, E.

    2003-04-28

    The Yellowstone geothermal system provides an ideal opportunity to test the ability of reactive transport models to accurately simulate water-rock interaction. Previous studies of the Yellowstone geothermal system have characterized water-rock interaction through analysis of rocks and fluids obtained from both surface and downhole samples. Fluid chemistry, rock mineralogy, permeability, porosity, and thermal data obtained from the Y-8 borehole in Upper Geyser Basin were used to constrain a series of reactive transport simulations of the Yellowstone geothermal system using TOUGHREACT. Three distinct stratigraphic units were encountered in the 153.4 m deep Y-8 drill core: volcaniclastic sandstone, perlitic rhyolitic lava, and nonwelded pumiceous tuff. The main alteration phases identified in the Y-8 core samples include clay minerals, zeolites, silica polymorphs, adularia, and calcite. Temperatures observed in the Y-8 borehole increase with depth from sub-boiling conditions at the surface to a maximum of 169.8 C at a depth of 104.1 m, with near-isothermal conditions persisting down to the well bottom. 1-D models of the Y-8 core hole were constructed to determine if TOUGHREACT could accurately predict the observed alteration mineral assemblage given the initial rock mineralogy and observed fluid chemistry and temperatures. Preliminary simulations involving the perlitic rhyolitic lava unit are consistent with the observed alteration of rhyolitic glass to form celadonite.

  13. Using Van Manen's model to assess levels of reflectivity among preservice physical education teachers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ballard, Kristy Kay

    2006-10-30

    of the lesson, what should be changed, and was the content covered important to the students? Zeichner and Liston (1987) also identified four levels of reflective thought in their model. The first level is factual, where the teacher focuses on facts... are introduced to and involved in activities such as dialogue journals, developing a philosophy of education, and ?thinking outside the box.? In the second stage, students are involved in developing lesson plans for particular content areas. After...

  14. Ground movements due to excavation in clay: physical and analytical models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lam, Sze Yue

    2010-11-16

    submitted in whole or part for consideration for any other degree, diploma or other qualification to this University or any other institution, except where cited specifically. This dissertation contains no more than 65,000 words, inclusive... measured in a triaxial apparatus with local strain measurement and by using bender elements to record seismic wave speeds. Results of the model tests including wall deformation profiles and ground movements for excavations with different excavation...

  15. The Physics of Water Masers observable with ALMA and SOFIA: Model Predictions for Evolved Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, M D; Richards, A M S; Humphreys, E M L; Sobolev, A M; Yates, J A

    2015-01-01

    We present the results of models that were designed to study all possible water maser transitions in the frequency range 0-1.91THz, with particular emphasis on maser transitions that may be generated in evolved-star envelopes and observed with the ALMA and SOFIA telescopes. We used tens of thousands of radiative transfer models of both spin species of H2O, spanning a considerable parameter space in number density, kinetic temperature and dust temperature. Results, in the form of maser optical depths, have been summarized in a master table, Table 6. Maser transitions identified in these models were grouped according to loci of inverted regions in the density/kinetic temperature plane, a property clearly related to the dominant mode of pumping. A more detailed study of the effect of dust temperature on maser optical depth enabled us to divide the maser transitions into three groups: those with both collisional and radiative pumping schemes (22,96,209,321,325,395,941 and 1486\\,GHz), a much larger set that are pr...

  16. Influence of Lithophysal Geometry on the Uniaxial Compression of Tuff-Like Rock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rigby, Douglas B.

    2007-06-13

    A large portion of the rock of the high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain contains lithophysae or voids. These voids have a significant detrimental effect on the engineering properties of the rock mass and its performance. The lithophysae were formed at the time of volcanic deposition by pockets of gas trapped within the compressing and cooling pyroclastic flow material. Lithophysae vary by size, shape, and spatial frequency of occurrence. Due to the difficulties of testing actual lithophysal rock, the current mechanical property data set is limited and the numerical models of lithophysal rock are not well validated. The purpose of this task was to experimentally quantify the effect of void geometry in the mechanical compression of cubes of analog lithophysal-like rock. In this research the mechanical properties of the analog rock were systematically studied by examining various patterns of voids based on variables consisting of hole shape, size, and geometrical distribution. Each specified hole pattern was cast into 6 by 6 by 6-in. Hydro-StoneTB® specimens (produced in triplicate) and then tested under uniaxial compression. Solid Hydro-StoneTB® specimens exhibited similar mechanical properties to those estimated for rock mass solid specimens of Topopah Spring tuff. The results indicated that the compressive strength and Young’s Modulus values decrease with increasing specimen void porosity. The modulus and strength with void porosity relationships are essentially linear over the 5 to 20 percent void porosity range. When zero void porosity (solid specimen) results are added, exponential functions do not provide a good fit to the data due to a significant sensitivity of strength and modulus to the presence of macro-sized voids. From solid specimens there is roughly a 60 percent drop in strength with about 7 percent void porosity, increasing to an 80 percent drop at about 20 percent void porosity. The percent change in modulus from the solid specimen value is roughly 30 and 45 percent at 7 and 19 percent void porosity, respectively. A bilinear model gives a much better fit to the observed experimental data. Shape of hole appears to be significant for strength, but not for Young’s Modulus. Size of hole (at similar values of porosity) does not effect modulus values, but there may be a correlation with strength (smaller hole specimens are slightly stronger). Overall, the results help to validate the Yucca Mountain numerical model of lithophysal rock, but there are also some differences that should be looked into and explained. Hydro-Stone TB® specimens give mechanical strength results that are about one rock mass category lower than is expected based on their lithophysal porosity.

  17. Spheroidal and torsional modes of quasistatic shear oscillations in the solid globe models of nuclear physics and pulsar astrophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Bastrukov; H-K. Chang; S. Misicu; I. Molodtsova; D. Podgainy

    2007-08-15

    The past three decades of investigation on nuclear physics and pulsar astrophysics have seen gradual recognition that elastodynamic approach to the continuum mechanics of nuclear matter provides proper account of macroscopic motions of degenerate Fermi-matter constituting interior of the nuclear material objects, the densest of all known today. This paper focuses on one theoretical issue of this development which is concerned with oscillatory behavior of a viscoelastic solid globe in the regime of quasistatic, force-free, non-compressional oscillations less investigated in the literature compared to oscillations in the regime of standing shear waves. We show that in this case the problem of computing frequency and lifetime of spheroidal and torsional modes of non-radial shear vibrations damped by viscosity can be unambiguously resolved by working from the energy balance equation and taking advantage of the Rayleigh's variational method. The efficiency of this method is demonstrated by solid globe models of nuclear physics and pulsar astrophysics dealing with oscillations of a spherical mass of a viscoelastic Fermi-solid with homogeneous and non-homogeneous profiles of the bulk density, the shear modulus, and the shear viscosity.

  18. Project Reports for Standing Rock Sioux Tribe- 2012 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Standing Rock Sioux Tribe (SRST) will perform a feasibility study and associated tasks over the course of two years on sites within the exterior boundaries of the Standing Rock Sioux...

  19. Inversion of seismic attributes for petrophysical parameters and rock facies 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shahraeeni, Mohammad Sadegh

    2011-01-01

    Prediction of rock and fluid properties such as porosity, clay content, and water saturation is essential for exploration and development of hydrocarbon reservoirs. Rock and fluid property maps obtained from such predictions ...

  20. 2.20 Properties of Rocks and Minerals -Magnetic Properties of Rocks and Minerals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    Scale Exchange Interactions and Magnetic Structure in Fe-Bearing Oxides Atomistic Simulations2.20 Properties of Rocks and Minerals - Magnetic Properties of Rocks and Minerals R. J. Harrison, R.20.5.1.3 2.20.5.2 2.20.5.2.1 2.20.5.2.2 2.20.5.2.3 2.20.5.2.4 Introduction Magnetism at the Atomic Length

  1. Economic and Physical Modeling of Land Use in GCAM 3.0 and an Application to Agricultural Productivity, Land, and Terrestrial Carbon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wise, Marshall A.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Kyle, G. Page; Luckow, Patrick; Edmonds, James A.

    2014-09-01

    We explore the impact of changes in agricultural productivity on global land use and terrestrial carbon using the new agriculture and land use modeling approach developed for Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM) version 3.0. This approach models economic land use decisions with regional, physical, and technological specificity while maintaining economic and physical integration with the rest of the GCAM model. Physical land characteristics and quantities are tracked explicitly, and crop production practices are modeled discretely to facilitate coupling with physical models. Economic land allocation is modeled with non-linear functions in a market equilibrium rather than through a constrained optimization. In this paper, we explore three scenarios of future agriculture productivity in all regions of the globe over this century, ranging from a high growth to a zero growth level. The higher productivity growth scenario leads to lower crop prices, increased production of crops in developing nations, preservation of global forested lands and lower terrestrial carbon emissions. The scenario with no productivity improvement results in higher crop prices, an expansion of crop production in the developed world, loss of forested lands globally, and higher terrestrial carbon emissions.

  2. Physical model construction for electrical anisotropy of single crystal zinc oxide micro/nanobelt using finite element method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Guangbin [The Higher Educational Key Laboratory for Measuring and Control Technology and Instrumentations of Heilongjiang Province, Harbin University of Science and Technology, Harbin 150080 (China); Tang, Chaolong [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Center for Materials for Information Technology (MINT), University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Alabama 35487 (United States); Song, Jinhui, E-mail: jhsong@eng.ua.edu, E-mail: wqlu@cigit.ac.cn [The Higher Educational Key Laboratory for Measuring and Control Technology and Instrumentations of Heilongjiang Province, Harbin University of Science and Technology, Harbin 150080 (China); Chongqing Institute of Green and Intelligent Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chongqing 400714 (China); Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Center for Materials for Information Technology (MINT), University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Alabama 35487 (United States); Lu, Wenqiang, E-mail: jhsong@eng.ua.edu, E-mail: wqlu@cigit.ac.cn [Chongqing Institute of Green and Intelligent Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chongqing 400714 (China)

    2014-04-14

    Based on conductivity characterization of single crystal zinc oxide (ZnO) micro/nanobelt (MB/NB), we further investigate the physical mechanism of nonlinear intrinsic resistance-length characteristic using finite element method. By taking the same parameters used in experiment, a model of nonlinear anisotropic resistance change with single crystal MB/NB has been deduced, which matched the experiment characterization well. The nonlinear resistance-length comes from the different electron moving speed in various crystal planes. As the direct outcome, crystallography of the anisotropic semiconducting MB/NB has been identified, which could serve as a simple but effective method to identify crystal growth direction of single crystal semiconducting or conductive nanomaterial.

  3. Modeling of coupled heat transfer and reactive transport processes in porous media: Application to seepage studies at Yucca Mountain, Nevad a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhopadhyay, S.; Sonnenthal, E.L.; Spycher, N.

    2008-01-01

    Fractured Rock of Yucca Mountain, Nevada: Heterogeneity andfractured rocks of Yucca Mountain have been extensivelyHydrothermal Flow at Yucca Mountain, Part I: Modeling and

  4. A Framework for Modeling Cyber-Physical Switching Attacks in Smart Grid 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Shan; Mashayekh, Salman; Kundur, Deepa; Zourntos, Takis; Butler-Purry, Karen

    2014-01-02

    - gency response,’’ in Proc. Summer Comput. Simul. Conf., Jul. 2007, pp. 1230–1237. [3] B. Rozel, M. Viziteu, R. Caire, N. Hadjsaid, and J.-P. Rognon, ‘‘Towards a common model for studying critical infrastructure interdependencies,’’ in Proc. IEEE Power.... IEEE Power Syst. Conf. Exposit., Mar. 2009, pp. 1–6. [5] J. Stamp, A. McIntyre, and B. Ricardson, ‘‘Reliability impacts from cyber attack on electric power systems,’’ in Proc. IEEE Power Syst. Conf. Exposit., Mar. 2009, pp. 1–8. [6] S. Sheng, W. L. Chan...

  5. Physical Dust Models for the Extinction toward Supernova 2014J in M82

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Jian; Li, Aigen; Li, Jun; Wang, Xiaofeng

    2015-01-01

    Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) are powerful cosmological "standardizable candles" and the most precise distance indicators. However, a limiting factor in their use for precision cosmology rests on our ability to correct for the dust extinction toward them. SN 2014J in the starburst galaxy M82, the closest detected SN~Ia in three decades, provides unparalleled opportunities to study the dust extinction toward an SN Ia. In order to derive the extinction as a function of wavelength, we model the color excesses toward SN 2014J, which are observationally derived over a wide wavelength range in terms of dust models consisting of a mixture of silicate and graphite. The resulting extinction laws steeply rise toward the far ultraviolet, even steeper than that of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). We infer a visual extinction of $A_V \\approx 1.9~\\rm mag$, a reddening of $E(B-V)\\approx1.1~ \\rm mag$, and a total-to-selective extinction ratio of $R_V \\approx 1.7$, consistent with that previously derived from photometric, spec...

  6. Modeling of Some Physical Properties of Zirconium Alloys for Nuclear Applications in Support of UFD Campaign

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael V. Glazoff

    2013-08-01

    Zirconium-based alloys Zircaloy-2 and Zircaloy-4 are widely used in the nuclear industry as cladding materials for light water reactor (LWR) fuels. These materials display a very good combination of properties such as low neutron absorption, creep behavior, stress-corrosion cracking resistance, reduced hydrogen uptake, corrosion and/or oxidation, especially in the case of Zircaloy-4. However, over the last couple of years, in the post-Fukushima Daiichi world, energetic efforts have been undertaken to improve fuel clad oxidation resistance during off-normal temperature excursions. Efforts have also been made to improve upon the already achieved levels of mechanical behavior and reduce hydrogen uptake. In order to facilitate the development of such novel materials, it is very important to achieve not only engineering control, but also a scientific understanding of the underlying material degradation mechanisms, both in working conditions and in storage of used nuclear fuel. This report strives to contribute to these efforts by constructing the thermodynamic models of both alloys; constructing of the respective phase diagrams, and oxidation mechanisms. A special emphasis was placed upon the role of zirconium suboxides in hydrogen uptake reduction and the atomic mechanisms of oxidation. To that end, computational thermodynamics calculations were conducted concurrently with first-principles atomistic modeling.

  7. Physics 630 Statistical Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kioussis, Nicholas

    strongly the issue of problem solving and understanding of the main concepts in Statistical PhysicsPhysics 630 Statistical Physics Spring 2005 Logistics Lecture Room: 1100 (Science I, 1st floor (Supplement) Introduction to Modern Statistical Mechanics, by David Chandler, Oxford Objectives This course

  8. Modeling the Physical and Biochemical Influence of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Plant Discharges into their Adjacent Waters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PAT GRANDELLI, P.E.; GREG ROCHELEAU; JOHN HAMRICK, Ph.D.; MATT CHURCH, Ph.D.; BRIAN POWELL, Ph.D.

    2012-09-29

    This paper describes the modeling work by Makai Ocean Engineering, Inc. to simulate the biochemical effects of of the nutrient-enhanced seawater plumes that are discharged by one or several 100 megawatt OTEC plants. The modeling is needed to properly design OTEC plants that can operate sustainably with acceptably low biological impact. In order to quantify the effect of discharge configuration and phytoplankton response, Makai Ocean Engineering implemented a biological and physical model for the waters surrounding O`ahu, Hawai`i, using the EPA-approved Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code (EFDC). Each EFDC grid cell was approximately 1 square kilometer by 20 meters deep, and used a time step of three hours. The biological model was set up to simulate the biochemical response for three classes of organisms: Picoplankton (< 2 um) such as prochlorococccus, nanoplankton (2-20 um), and microplankton (> 20 um) e.g., diatoms. The dynamic biological phytoplankton model was calibrated using chemical and biological data collected for the Hawaii Ocean Time Series (HOTS) project. Peer review of the biological modeling was performed. The physical oceanography model uses boundary conditions from a surrounding Hawai'i Regional Ocean Model, (ROM) operated by the University of Hawai`i and the National Atmospheric and Oceanic Administration. The ROM provided tides, basin scale circulation, mesoscale variability, and atmospheric forcing into the edges of the EFDC computational domain. This model is the most accurate and sophisticated Hawai'ian Regional Ocean Model presently available, assimilating real-time oceanographic observations, as well as model calibration based upon temperature, current and salinity data collected during 2010 near the simulated OTEC site. The ROM program manager peer-reviewed Makai's implementation of the ROM output into our EFDC model. The supporting oceanographic data was collected for a Naval Facilities Engineering Command / Makai project. Results: The model was run for a 100 MW OTEC Plant consisting of four separate ducts, discharging a total combined flow rate of 420 m3/s of warm water and 320 m3/s of cold water in a mixed discharge at 70 meters deep. Each duct was assumed to have a discharge port diameter of 10.5m producing a downward discharge velocity of about 2.18 m/s. The natural system, as measured in the HOTS program, has an average concentration of 10-15 mgC/m3. To calibrate the biological model, we first ran the model with no OTEC plant and varied biological parameters until the simulated data was a good match to the HOTS observations. This modeling showed that phytoplankton concentration were patchy and highly dynamic. The patchiness was a good match with the data variability observed within the HOTS data sets. We then ran the model with simulated OTEC intake and discharge flows and associated nutrients. Directly under the OTEC plant, the near-field plume has an average terminal depth of 172 meters, with a volumetric dilution of 13:1. The average terminal plume temperature was 19.8oC. Nitrate concentrations are 1 to 2 umol/kg above ambient. The advecting plume then further dilutes to less than 1 umol/kg above ambient within a few kilometers downstream, while remaining at depth. Because this terminal near-field plume is well below the 1% light limited depths (~120m), no immediate biological utilization of the nutrients occurs. As the nitrate is advected and dispersed downstream, a fraction of the deep ocean nutrients (< 0.5 umol/kg perturbation) mix upward where they are utilized by the ambient phytoplankton population. This occurs approximately twenty-five kilometers downstream from the plant at 110 - 70 meters depth. For pico-phytoplankton, modeling results indicate that this nutrient perturbation causes a phytoplankton perturbation of approximately 1 mgC/m3 (~10% of average ambient concentrations) that covers an area 10x5 km in size at the 70 to 90m depth. Thus, the perturbations are well within the natural variability of the system, generally corresponding to a 10 to 15% increase above the a

  9. Physics modeling support for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-09-30

    There are two major sections to this report. The first section of the report is an executive summary of the work done this year. For each task, the major results are condensed for the reader's convenience. The major result of each memo, report or presentation is summarized briefly in this section. The second section of the report is a collection of appendices containing reports, memos, and presentations written this year. Here, the interested reader can investigate any topic discussed in the summary in more detail. The documentation is presented in chronological order, and we would like to note that the content of later documents may supercede that of earlier ones. The summaries are divided into sections, corresponding to the tasks outlined in the original proposal for the work. These sections are: MUMAK code development and application; Alfven wave stability problem; TETRA systems code development and application; lower hybrid heating and current drive; and advanced blanket modeling.

  10. Limits on Neutrinophilic Two-Higgs-Doublet Models from Flavor Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enrico Bertuzzo; Yuber F. Perez G.; Olcyr Sumensari; Renata Zukanovich Funchal

    2015-10-14

    We derive stringent limits on neutrinophilic two-Higgs-doublet models from low-energy observables after the discovery of the Higgs boson and of the mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$. These decays can constrain the plane spanned by $m_{H^\\pm}$, the mass of the new charged Higgs, and $v_2$, the vacuum expectation value of the new neutrinophilic scalar doublet. Lepton flavor conserving decays are not able to set meaningful bounds, since they depend strongly on the unknown neutrino absolute mass scale. On the other hand, loop induced lepton flavor violating decays, such as $\\mu \\to e \\gamma$, $\\mu \\to 3 e $ or $\\mu \\to e$ in nuclei are currently responsable for the best limits today. If $v_2 \\lesssim 1 \\, (0.1)$ eV we get $m_{H^\\pm} \\gtrsim 250 \\, (2500)$ GeV at 90% CL. In the foreseen future these limits can improve by at least a factor of 100.

  11. Limits on Neutrinophilic Two-Higgs-Doublet Models from Flavor Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertuzzo, Enrico; Sumensari, Olcyr; Funchal, Renata Zukanovich

    2015-01-01

    We derive stringent limits on neutrinophilic two-Higgs-doublet models from low-energy observables after the discovery of the Higgs boson and of the mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$. These decays can constrain the plane spanned by $m_{H^\\pm}$, the mass of the new charged Higgs, and $v_2$, the vacuum expectation value of the new neutrinophilic scalar doublet. Lepton flavor conserving decays are not able to set meaningful bounds, since they depend strongly on the unknown neutrino absolute mass scale. On the other hand, loop induced lepton flavor violating decays, such as $\\mu \\to e \\gamma$, $\\mu \\to 3 e $ or $\\mu \\to e$ in nuclei are currently responsable for the best limits today. If $v_2 \\lesssim 1 \\, (0.1)$ eV we get $m_{H^\\pm} \\gtrsim 250 \\, (2500)$ GeV at 90% CL. In the foreseen future these limits can improve by at least a factor of 100.

  12. Constraining the Physics of AM Canum Venaticorum Systems with the Accretion Disk Instability Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cannizzo, John K

    2015-01-01

    Recent work by Levitan et al has expanded the long-term photometric database for AM CVn stars. In particular, their outburst properties are well-correlated with orbital period, and allow constraints to be placed on the secular mass transfer rate between secondary and primary if one adopts the disk instability model for the outbursts. We use the observed range of outbursting behavior for AM CVn systems as a function of orbital period to place a constraint on mass transfer rate versus orbital period P. We infer a rate ~5 x 10^{-9} Msun/yr (P/1000 s)^{-5.2}. We show the functional form so obtained is consistent with the recurrence time-orbital period relation found by Levitan et al using a simple theory for the recurrence time. Also, we predict their steep dependence of outburst duration on orbital period will flatten considerably once the longer orbital period systems have more complete observations.

  13. Physical Origin of Density Dependent Force of the Skyrme Type within the Quark Meson Coupling Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pierre Guichon; Hrayr Matevosyan; N. Sandulescu; Anthony Thomas

    2006-03-17

    A density dependent, effective nucleon-nucleon force of the Skyrme type is derived from the quark-meson coupling model--a self-consistent, relativistic quark level description of nuclear matter. This new formulation requires no assumption that the mean scalar field is small and hence constitutes a significant advance over earlier work. The similarity of the effective interaction to the widely used SkM* force encourages us to apply it to a wide range of nuclear problems, beginning with the binding energies and charge distributions of doubly magic nuclei. Finding impressive results in this conventional arena, we apply the same effective interaction, within the Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov approach, to the properties of nuclei far from stability. The resulting two neutron drip lines and shell quenching are quite satisfactory. Finally, we apply the relativistic formulation to the properties of dense nuclear matter in anticipation of future application to the properties of neutron stars.

  14. Physical control oriented model of large scale refrigerators to synthesize advanced control schemes. Design, validation, and first control results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonne, François; Bonnay, Patrick [INAC, SBT, UMR-E 9004 CEA/UJF-Grenoble, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble (France); Alamir, Mazen [Gipsa-Lab, Control Systems Department, CNRS-University of Grenoble, 11, rue des Mathématiques, BP 46, 38402 Saint Martin d'Hères (France)

    2014-01-29

    In this paper, a physical method to obtain control-oriented dynamical models of large scale cryogenic refrigerators is proposed, in order to synthesize model-based advanced control schemes. These schemes aim to replace classical user experience designed approaches usually based on many independent PI controllers. This is particularly useful in the case where cryoplants are submitted to large pulsed thermal loads, expected to take place in the cryogenic cooling systems of future fusion reactors such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) or the Japan Torus-60 Super Advanced Fusion Experiment (JT-60SA). Advanced control schemes lead to a better perturbation immunity and rejection, to offer a safer utilization of cryoplants. The paper gives details on how basic components used in the field of large scale helium refrigeration (especially those present on the 400W @1.8K helium test facility at CEA-Grenoble) are modeled and assembled to obtain the complete dynamic description of controllable subsystems of the refrigerator (controllable subsystems are namely the Joule-Thompson Cycle, the Brayton Cycle, the Liquid Nitrogen Precooling Unit and the Warm Compression Station). The complete 400W @1.8K (in the 400W @4.4K configuration) helium test facility model is then validated against experimental data and the optimal control of both the Joule-Thompson valve and the turbine valve is proposed, to stabilize the plant under highly variable thermals loads. This work is partially supported through the European Fusion Development Agreement (EFDA) Goal Oriented Training Program, task agreement WP10-GOT-GIRO.

  15. Nonlinear damage rheology and wave resonance in rocks V. Lyakhovsky1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ampuero, Jean Paul

    1 Nonlinear damage rheology and wave resonance in rocks V. Lyakhovsky1 , Y. Hamiel1 , P. Ampuero2 of damaged materials with theoretical analyses and numerical simulations based on a nonlinear continuum damage model. Quasi-static simulations of damage accumulation under cyclic load reproduce the laboratory

  16. Geochemical, UPb zircon, and Nd isotope investigations of the Neoproterozoic Ghawjah Metavolcanic rocks, Northwestern Saudi Arabia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stern, Robert J.

    -Ichi Kimura b , Martin J. Whitehouse c , Sumit K. Mukherjee d , Peter R. Johnson e , William R. Griffin positive Nd (+5.4 to +8.2) and a mean model age of 0.71 Ga. Ghawjah volcanic rocks are similar

  17. Constitutive Theory for Velocity Dispersion in Rock with Dual Porosity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, H F; Berryman, J G

    2002-03-28

    The high frequency behavior of the bulk modulus of fluid-saturated rock can be obtained from a double-porosity constitutive model, which is a direct conceptual extension of Biot's (1941) constitutive equations and which provides additional stiffening due to unrelaxed induced pore pressures in the soft porosity phase. Modeling the stiffening of the shear modulus at high frequency requires an effective medium average over the unequal induced pore pressures in cracks of different orientations. The implicit assumptions are that pore fluid equilibration does not occur between cracks of different orientations and between cracks and porous matrix. The correspondence between the constitutive equations of Berryman and Wang (1995) and Mavko and Jizba (1991) is explicitly noted.

  18. Unifying Chemical and Physical Principles for Oxide Superconductivity Based on an Anionic Charge Order Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oesterreicher, H.

    2001-05-01

    Subperoxidic O{sub 2}{sup 3-} charge ordering presents a satisfying basis for a quantitative, conceptually realistic, and unifying understanding of cuprate superconductors. The activity of O{sup -} manifests itself in a variety of ways including a universal T{sub c} scaling with O{sup -} per total O, or more generally, in the subperoxide radical concentration. Also, a characteristic crystal chemistry of O{sup -} placement is indicated. As an example, trends to preferential O{sup -} occupation of the apical sites are correlated with c axis and T{sub c} decreases providing a new crystallographic interpretation of the overdoping question. Generally, subperoxides can be created on overoxidation or through various modes of self doping through lattice pressure-related factors. Accordingly, the role of peranion formation is seen as a most general chemical principle for ameliorating stacking mismatch through electronic liquefaction under internal stress . Cases are discussed (e.g., YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 6.5}) where the tension on cooling can result in stratified self-doping steps. A variety of experiments indicating charge order properties, such as stripes and slow charge propagation, are interpreted on the anionic model. Subperoxidic pair formation and charge ordering energetics are discussed. Concepts are further generalized for other cases (e.g., carbides or nitrides) of anionic metallicity and superconductivity. Common aspects are mobile, paired charge orders of radicals coupled through bond polarizations.

  19. Physics of Primordial Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxim Yu. Khlopov

    2003-09-25

    The physical basis of the modern cosmological inflationary models with baryosynthesis and nonbaryonic dark matter and energy implies such predictions of particle theory, that, in turn, apply to cosmology for their test. It makes physics of early Universe ambiguous and particle model dependent. The study of modern cosmology is inevitably linked with the probe for the new physics, underlying it. The particle model dependent phenomena, such as unstable dark matter, primordial black holes, strong primordial inhomogeneities, can play important role in revealing the true physical cosmology. Such phenomena, having serious physical grounds and leading to new nontrivial cosmological scenarious, should be taken into account in the data analysis of observational cosmology.

  20. A Phased Array Approach to Rock Blasting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leslie Gertsch; Jason Baird

    2006-07-01

    A series of laboratory-scale simultaneous two-hole shots was performed in a rock simulant (mortar) to record the shock wave interference patterns produced in the material. The purpose of the project as a whole was to evaluate the usefulness of phased array techniques of blast design, using new high-precision delay technology. Despite high-speed photography, however, we were unable to detect the passage of the shock waves through the samples to determine how well they matched the expected interaction geometry. The follow-up mine-scale tests were therefore not conducted. Nevertheless, pattern analysis of the vectors that would be formed by positive interference of the shockwaves from multiple charges in an ideal continuous, homogeneous, isotropic medium indicate the potential for powerful control of blast design, given precise characterization of the target rock mass.

  1. Big Rock Point severe accident management strategies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brogan, B.A. [Consumers Power Co., Charlevoix, MI (United States); Gabor, J.R. [Dames and Moore, Westmont, IL (United States)

    1996-07-01

    December 1994, the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) issued guidance relative to the formal industry position on Severe Accident Management (SAM) approved by the NEI Strategic Issues Advisory Committee on November 4, 1994. This paper summarizes how Big Rock Point (BRP) has and continues to address SAM strategies. The historical accounting portion of this presentation includes a description of how the following projects identified and defined the current Big Rock Point SAM strategies: the 1981 Level 3 Probabilistic Risk Assessment performance; the development of the Plant Specific Technical Guidelines from which the symptom oriented Emergency Operating Procedures (EOPs) were developed; the Control Room Design Review; and, the recent completion of the Individual Plant Evaluation (IPE). In addition to the historical presentation deliberation, this paper the present activities that continue to stress SAM strategies.

  2. Light-by-light scattering with intact protons at the LHC: from Standard Model to New Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sylvain Fichet; Gero von Gersdorff; Bruno Lenzi; Christophe Royon; Matthias Saimpert

    2015-01-15

    We discuss the discovery potential of light-by-light scattering at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), induced by the Standard Model (SM) and by new exotic charged particles. Our simulation relies on intact proton detection in the planned forward detectors of CMS and ATLAS. The full four-photon amplitudes generated by any electrically charged particles of spins $1/2$ and $1$, including the SM processes involving loops of leptons, quarks and $W$ bosons are implemented in the Forward Physics Monte Carlo generator. Our method provides model-independent bounds on massive charged particles, only parametrized by the spin, mass and "effective charge" $Q_{\\rm eff}$ of the new particle. We find that a new charged vector (fermion) with $Q_{\\rm eff}=4$ can be discovered up to $m=700~\\rm GeV$ ($m=370~\\rm GeV$) with an integrated luminosity of $300~\\rm fb^{-1}$ at the LHC. We also discuss the sensitivities to neutral particles such as a strongly-interacting heavy dilaton and warped Kaluza-Klein gravitons, whose effects could be discovered for masses in the multi-TeV range.

  3. Modeling brine-rock interactions in an enhanced geothermal system deep fractured reservoir at Soultz-Sous-Forets (France): a joint approach using two geochemical codes: frachem and toughreact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andre, Laurent; Spycher, Nicolas; Xu, Tianfu; Vuataz, Francois-D.; Pruess, Karsten.

    2006-01-01

    geothermal systems (EGS). Proceedings 31 th Workshop onenhanced geothermal systems (EGS) to forecast the long-termdeveloped to investigate EGS, were applied to model the same

  4. A Physically Based Framework for Modelling the Organic Fractionation of Sea Spray Aerosol from Bubble Film Langmuir Equilibria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burrows, Susannah M.; Ogunro, O.; Frossard, Amanda; Russell, Lynn M.; Rasch, Philip J.; Elliott, S.

    2014-12-19

    The presence of a large fraction of organic matter in primary sea spray aerosol (SSA) can strongly affect its cloud condensation nuclei activity and interactions with marine clouds. Global climate models require new parameterizations of the SSA composition in order to improve the representation of these processes. Existing proposals for such a parameterization use remotely-sensed chlorophyll-a concentrations as a proxy for the biogenic contribution to the aerosol. However, both observations and theoretical considerations suggest that existing relationships with chlorophyll-a, derived from observations at only a few locations, may not be representative for all ocean regions. We introduce a novel framework for parameterizing the fractionation of marine organic matter into SSA based on a competitive Langmuir adsorption equilibrium at bubble surfaces. Marine organic matter is partitioned into classes with differing molecular weights, surface excesses, and Langmuir adsorption parameters. The classes include a lipid-like mixture associated with labile dissolved organic carbon (DOC), a polysaccharide-like mixture associated primarily with semi-labile DOC, a protein-like mixture with concentrations intermediate between lipids and polysaccharides, a processed mixture associated with recalcitrant surface DOC, and a deep abyssal humic-like mixture. Box model calculations have been performed for several cases of organic adsorption to illustrate the underlying concepts. We then apply the framework to output from a global marine biogeochemistry model, by partitioning total dissolved organic carbon into several classes of macromolecule. Each class is represented by model compounds with physical and chemical properties based on existing laboratory data. This allows us to globally map the predicted organic mass fraction of the nascent submicron sea spray aerosol. Predicted relationships between chlorophyll-\\textit{a} and organic fraction are similar to existing empirical parameterizations, but can vary between biologically productive and non-productive regions, and seasonally within a given region. Major uncertainties include the bubble film thickness at bursting and the variability of organic surfactant activity in the ocean, which is poorly constrained. In addition, marine colloids and cooperative adsorption of polysaccharides may make important contributions to the aerosol, but are not included here. This organic fractionation framework is an initial step towards a closer linking of ocean biogeochemistry and aerosol chemical composition in Earth system models. Future work should focus on improving constraints on model parameters through new laboratory experiments or through empirical fitting to observed relationships in the real ocean and atmosphere, as well as on atmospheric implications of the variable composition of organic matter in sea spray.

  5. Rock Chalk Report, January 9, 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-09

    to both Baseball and Softball) on sale now! Season Tickets starting as low as $50! Earn two Williams Education Fund Priority Points per sport when you buy Baseball and Softball season tickets! Spirit Squad The University... of Kansas Spirit Squad The KU Cheer Squad and Rock Chalk Dancers will perform their National Competition routines on January 13 @ 4PM & 6PM! This event will be prior to their departure for Orlando to compete in the UCA/UDA College Nationals. This event...

  6. Hydrothermally Deposited Rock | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy Resources JumpNewTexas:Hydrothermally Deposited Rock Jump to: navigation,

  7. Rock Lab Analysis | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/ColoradoRemsenburg-Speonk, NewMichigan: Energy Resources Jump to:Rock

  8. Rock, Wisconsin: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/ColoradoRemsenburg-Speonk, NewMichigan: Energy Resources JumpMtSampling Jump to:Rock,

  9. Effects of heterogeneity and friction on the deformation and strength of rock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nihei, K.T.; Myer, L.R.; Liu, Z.; Cook, N.G.W. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Kemeny, J.M. [Univ., of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). Dept. of Mineralogy and Geological Engineering

    1994-03-01

    Experimental observations of the evolution of damage in rocks during compressive loading indicate that macroscopic failure occurs predominantly by extensile crack growth parallel or subparallel to the maximum principal stress. Extensile microcracks initiate at grain boundaries and open pores by a variety of micromechanical processes which may include grain bending, Brazilian type fracture and grain boundary sliding. Microstructural heterogeneity in grain size, strength and shape determines the magnitude of the local tensile stresses which produce extensile microcracking and the stability with which these microcracks coalesce to form macrocracks. Friction at grain boundaries and between the surfaces of microcracks reduces the strain energy available for extensile crack growth and increases the stability of microcrack growth. In clastic rocks, frictional forces may improve the conditions for extensile microcrack growth by constraining the amount of sliding and rotation of individual grains. Micromechanical models are used to investigate the effects of heterogeneity and friction on the deformation and strength of crystalline and clastic rocks.

  10. The Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay, Physics beyond the Standard Model and the Neutrino Mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amand Faessler

    2012-03-16

    The Neutrinoless double beta Decay allows to determine the effectice Majorana electron neutrino mass. For this the following conditions have to be satisfied: (i) The neutrino must be a Majorana particle, i. e. identical to the antiparticle. (ii) The half life has to be measured. (iii)The transition matrix element must be reliably calculated. (iv) The leading mechanism must be the light Majorana neutrino exchange. The present contribution studies the accuracy with which one can calculate by different methods: (1) Quasi-Particle Random Phase Approach (QRPA), (2) the Shell Model (SM), (3) the (before the variation) angular momentum projected Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov method (PHFB)and the (4) Interacting Boson Approach (IBA). In the second part we investigate how to determine experimentally the leading mechanism for the Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay. Is it (a) the light Majorana neutrino exchange as one assumes to determine the effective Majorana neutrino mass, ist it the heavy left (b) or right handed (c) Majorana neutrino exchange allowed by left-right symmetric Grand Unified Theories (GUT's). Is it a mechanism due to Supersymmetry e.g. with gluino exchange and R-parity and lepton number violating terms. At the end we assume, that Klapdor et al. have indeed measured the Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay(, although contested,)and that the light Majorana neutrino exchange is the leading mechanism. With our matrix elements we obtain then an effective Majorana neutrino mass of: = 0.24 [eV], exp (pm) 0.02; theor. (pm) 0.01 [eV

  11. From Standard Model of particle physics to room-temperature superconductivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. E. Volovik

    2015-04-23

    Topological media are gapped or gapless fermionic systems, whose properties are protected by topology, and thus are robust to deformations of parameters of the system and generic. We discuss the class of gapless topological media, which contains the quantum vacuum of Standard Model in its symmetric phase, and condensed matter systems with zeroes in the energy spectrum, which form Fermi surfaces, Weyl and Dirac points, Dirac lines, Khodel-Shaginyan flat bands, etc. Some zeroes are topologically protected, being characterized by topological invariants, expressed in terms of Green's function. For stability of the others the ${\\bf p}$-space topology must be accompanied by symmetry. Vacua with Weyl points serve as a source of effective relativistic quantum fields emerging at low energy: chiral fermions, effective gauge fields and tetrad gravity emerge together in the vicinity of a Weyl point. The accompanying effects, such as chiral anomaly, electroweak baryo-production and chiral vortical effect, are expressed via the symmetry protected ${\\bf p}$-space invariants. The gapless topological media exhibit the bulk-surface and bulk-vortex correspondence: which in particular may lead to the flat band on the surface of the system or in the core of topological defects. The materials with flat band in bulk, on the surface or within the dislocations have singular density of states, which crucially influences the critical temperature of the superconducting transition in such media. While in all the known superconductors the transition temperature is exponentially suppressed as a function of the pairing interaction, in the flat band the transition temperature is proportional to the pairing interaction, and can be essentially higher. The ${\\bf p}$-space topology may give us the general recipe for search or artificial fabrication of the room-temperature superconductors.

  12. Gage for measuring displacements in rock samples

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holcomb, David J. (Albuquerque, NM); McNamee, Michael J. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1986-01-01

    A gage for measuring diametral displacement within a rock sample for use in a rock mechanics laboratory and in the field, comprises a support ring housing a linear variable differential transformer, a mounting screw, and a leaf spring. The mounting screw is adjustable and defines a first point of contact with the rock sample. The leaf spring has opposite ends fixed to the inner periphery of the mounting ring. An intermediate portion of the leaf spring projecting radially inward from the ring is formed with a dimple defining a second point of contact with the sample. The first and second points of contact are diametrically opposed to each other. The LVDT is mounted in the ring with its axis parallel to the line of measurement and its core rod received in the dimple of the leaf spring. Any change in the length of the line between the first and second support points is directly communicated to the LVDT. The leaf spring is rigid to completely support lateral forces so that the LVDT is free of all load for improved precision.

  13. Gage for measuring displacements in rock samples

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holcomb, D.J.; McNamee, M.J.

    1985-07-18

    A gage for measuring diametral displacement within a rock sample for use in a rock mechanics laboratory and in the field, comprises a support ring housing a linear variable differential transformer (LVDT), a mounting screw, and a leaf spring. The mounting screw is adjustable and defines a first point of contact with the rock sample. The leaf spring has opposite ends fixed to the inner periphery of the mounting ring. An intermediate portion of the leaf spring projecting radially inward from the ring is formed with a dimple defining a second point of contact with the sample. The first and second points of contact are diametrically opposed to each other. The LVDT is mounted in the ring with its axis parallel to the line of measurement and its core rod received in the dimple of the leaf spring. Any change in the length of the line between the first and second support points is directly communicated to the LVDT. The leaf spring is rigid to completely support lateral forces so that the LVDT is free of all load for improved precision.

  14. Fluid-Rock Characterization and Interactions in NMR Well Logging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George J. Hirasaki; Kishore K. Mohanty

    2005-09-05

    The objective of this report is to characterize the fluid properties and fluid-rock interactions that are needed for formation evaluation by NMR well logging. The advances made in the understanding of NMR fluid properties are summarized in a chapter written for an AAPG book on NMR well logging. This includes live oils, viscous oils, natural gas mixtures, and the relation between relaxation time and diffusivity. Oil based drilling fluids can have an adverse effect on NMR well logging if it alters the wettability of the formation. The effect of various surfactants on wettability and surface relaxivity are evaluated for silica sand. The relation between the relaxation time and diffusivity distinguishes the response of brine, oil, and gas in a NMR well log. A new NMR pulse sequence in the presence of a field gradient and a new inversion technique enables the T{sub 2} and diffusivity distributions to be displayed as a two-dimensional map. The objectives of pore morphology and rock characterization are to identify vug connectivity by using X-ray CT scan, and to improve NMR permeability correlation. Improved estimation of permeability from NMR response is possible by using estimated tortuosity as a parameter to interpolate between two existing permeability models.

  15. GEOTECHNICAL ASSESSMENT AND INSTRUMENTATION NEEDS FOR NUCLEAR WASTE ISOLATION IN CRYSTALLINE AND ARGILLACEOUS ROCKS SYMPOSIUM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01

    Characterization of Rock Masses Structural GeologicalCharacterization of Rock Masses . • • • • • • • • 5.2.1 Structural Geological

  16. Probing new physics with flavor physics (and probing flavor physics with new physics)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yosef Nir

    2007-08-14

    This is a written version of a series of lectures aimed at graduate students and postdoctoral fellows in particle theory/string theory/particle experiment familiar with the basics of the Standard Model. We begin with an overview of flavor physics and its implications for new physics. We emphasize the "new physics flavor puzzle". Then, we give four specific examples of flavor measurements and the lessons that have been (or can be) drawn from them: (i) Charm physics: lessons for supersymmetry from the upper bound on $\\Delta m_D$. (ii) Bottom physics: model independent lessons on the KM mechanism and on new physics in neutral B mixing from $S_{\\psi K_S}$. (iii) Top physics and beyond: testing minimal flavor violation at the LHC. (iv) Neutrino physics: interpreting the data on neutrino masses and mixing within flavor models.

  17. Assessing the CAM5 Physics Suite in the WRF-Chem Model: Implementation, Resolution Sensitivity, and a First Evaluation for a Regional Case Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, Po-Lun; Rasch, Philip J.; Fast, Jerome D.; Easter, Richard C.; Gustafson, William I.; Liu, Xiaohong; Ghan, Steven J.; Singh, Balwinder

    2014-05-06

    A suite of physical parameterizations (deep and shallow convection, turbulent boundary layer, aerosols, cloud microphysics, and cloud fraction) from the global climate model Community Atmosphere Model version 5.1 (CAM5) has been implemented in the regional model Weather Research and Forecasting with chemistry (WRF-Chem). A downscaling modeling framework with consistent physics has also been established in which both global and regional simulations use the same emissions and surface fluxes. The WRF-Chem model with the CAM5 physics suite is run at multiple horizontal resolutions over a domain encompassing the northern Pacific Ocean, northeast Asia, and northwest North America for April 2008 when the ARCTAS, ARCPAC, and ISDAC field campaigns took place. These simulations are evaluated against field campaign measurements, satellite retrievals, and ground-based observations, and are compared with simulations that use a set of common WRF-Chem Parameterizations. This manuscript describes the implementation of the CAM5 physics suite in WRF-Chem provides an overview of the modeling framework and an initial evaluation of the simulated meteorology, clouds, and aerosols, and quantifies the resolution dependence of the cloud and aerosol parameterizations. We demonstrate that some of the CAM5 biases, such as high estimates of cloud susceptibility to aerosols and the underestimation of aerosol concentrations in the Arctic, can be reduced simply by increasing horizontal resolution. We also show that the CAM5 physics suite performs similarly to a set of parameterizations commonly used in WRF-Chem, but produces higher ice and liquid water condensate amounts and near-surface black carbon concentration. Further evaluations that use other mesoscale model parameterizations and perform other case studies are needed to infer whether one parameterization consistently produces results more consistent with observations.

  18. Modeling brine-rock interactions in an enhanced geothermal system deep fractured reservoir at Soultz-Sous-Forets (France): a joint approach using two geochemical codes: frachem and toughreact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andre, Laurent; Spycher, Nicolas; Xu, Tianfu; Vuataz, Francois-D.; Pruess, Karsten.

    2006-01-01

    on the properties of the Soultz fractured reservoir.Conference, March 17-18, 2005, Soultz-sous-Forêts, France.Chemical Modelling at the Soultz-sous-Forêts HDR reservoir (

  19. Combining Multicomponent Seismic Attributes, New Rock Physics Models, and In Situ Data to Estimate Gas-Hydrate Concentrations in Deep-Water, Near-Seafloor Strata of the Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bureau of Economic Geology

    2009-04-30

    The Bureau of Economic Geology was contracted to develop technologies that demonstrate the value of multicomponent seismic technology for evaluating deep-water hydrates across the Green Canyon area of the Gulf of Mexico. This report describes the methodologies that were developed to create compressional (P-P) and converted-shear (P-SV) images of near-seafloor geology from four-component ocean-bottom-cable (4C OBC) seismic data and the procedures used to integrate P-P and P-SV seismic attributes with borehole calibration data to estimate hydrate concentration across two study areas spanning 16 and 25 lease blocks (or 144 and 225 square miles), respectively. Approximately 200 km of two-dimensional 4C OBC profiles were processed and analyzed over the course of the 3-year project. The strategies we developed to image near-seafloor geology with 4C OBC data are unique, and the paper describing our methodology was peer-recognized with a Best Paper Award by the Society of Exploration Geophysicists in the first year of the project (2006). Among the valuable research findings demonstrated in this report, the demonstrated ability to image deep-water near-seafloor geology with sub-meter resolution using a standard-frequency (10-200 Hz) air gun array on the sea surface and 4C sensors on the seafloor has been the accomplishment that has received the most accolades from professional peers. Our study found that hydrate is pervasive across the two study areas that were analyzed but exists at low concentrations. Although our joint inversion technique showed that in some limited areas, and in some geologic units across those small areas, hydrates occupied up to 40-percent of the sediment pore space, we found that when hydrate was present, hydrate concentration tended to occupy only 10-percent to 20-percent of the pore volume. We also found that hydrate concentration tended to be greater near the base of the hydrate stability zone than it was within the central part of the stability zone.

  20. DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS Physics 32100

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brinkmann, Peter

    DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS Syllabus Physics 32100 Modern Physics for Engineers Designation to one- electron atoms, atomic shell structure and periodic table; nuclear physics, relativity. Prerequisites: Prereq.: Physics 20800 or equivalent, Math 20300 or 20900 (elective for Engineering students