Sample records for rock enrichment facility

  1. EIS-0471: Areva Eagle Rock Enrichment Facility in Bonneville...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1: Areva Eagle Rock Enrichment Facility in Bonneville County, ID EIS-0471: Areva Eagle Rock Enrichment Facility in Bonneville County, ID May 20, 2011 EIS-0471: Final Environmental...

  2. EIS-0471: Department of Energy Loan Guarantee to Support Proposed Eagle Rock Enrichment Facility in Bonneville County, Idaho

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS evaluates the environmental impacts of construction, operation, and decommissioning of the proposed Eagle Rock Enrichment Facility (EREF), a gas centrifuge uranium enrichment facility to be located in a rural area in western Bonneville County, Idaho. (DOE adopted this EIS issued by NRC on 04/13/2007.)

  3. Toxic Substances Control Act Uranium Enrichment Federal Facility...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Toxic Substances Control Act Uranium Enrichment Federal Facility Compliance Agreement Toxic Substances Control Act Uranium Enrichment Federal Facility Compliance Agreement Toxic...

  4. Highly Enriched Uranium Materials Facility, Major Design Changes...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Highly Enriched Uranium Materials Facility, Major Design Changes Late...Lessons Learned Report, NNSA, Dec 2010 Highly Enriched Uranium Materials Facility, Major Design Changes...

  5. Eagle Rock Geothermal Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489 No revision| Open Jump to:(RES-AEI) |Rock Geothermal Facility

  6. CRAD, Training- Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a January 2005 assessment of the Training Program at the Y-12 - Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility.

  7. CRAD, Management- Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a January 2005 assessment of Management program at the Y-12 - Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility.

  8. Conversion and Blending Facility highly enriched uranium to low enriched uranium as metal. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The mission of this Conversion and Blending Facility (CBF) will be to blend surplus HEU metal and alloy with depleted uranium metal to produce an LEU product. The primary emphasis of this blending operation will be to destroy the weapons capability of large, surplus stockpiles of HEU. The blended LEU product can only be made weapons capable again by the uranium enrichment process. The blended LEU will be produced as a waste suitable for storage or disposal.

  9. Conversion and Blending Facility Highly enriched uranium to low enriched uranium as uranium hexafluoride. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the Conversion and Blending Facility (CBF) which will have two missions: (1) convert surplus HEU materials to pure HEU UF{sub 6} and a (2) blend the pure HEU UF{sub 6} with diluent UF{sub 6} to produce LWR grade LEU-UF{sub 6}. The primary emphasis of this blending be to destroy the weapons capability of large, surplus stockpiles of HEU. The blended LEU product can only be made weapons capable again by the uranium enrichment process. The chemical and isotopic concentrations of the blended LEU product will be held within the specifications required for LWR fuel. The blended LEU product will be offered to the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC) to be sold as feed material to the commercial nuclear industry.

  10. Conversion and Blending Facility highly enriched uranium to low enriched uranium as oxide. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This Conversion and Blending Facility (CBF) will have two missions: (1) convert HEU materials into pure HEU oxide and (2) blend the pure HEU oxide with depleted and natural uranium oxide to produce an LWR grade LEU product. The primary emphasis of this blending operation will be to destroy the weapons capability of large, surplus stockpiles of HEU. The blended LEU product can only be made weapons capable again by the uranium enrichment process. To the extent practical, the chemical and isotopic concentrations of blended LEU product will be held within the specifications required for LWR fuel. Such blended LEU product will be offered to the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC) to be sold as feed material to the commercial nuclear industry. Otherwise, blended LEU will be produced as a waste suitable for storage or disposal.

  11. New Prototype Safeguards Technology Offers Improved Confidence and Automation for Uranium Enrichment Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brim, Cornelia P.

    2013-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    An important requirement for the international safeguards community is the ability to determine the enrichment level of uranium in gas centrifuge enrichment plants and nuclear fuel fabrication facilities. This is essential to ensure that countries with nuclear nonproliferation commitments, such as States Party to the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty, are adhering to their obligations. However, current technologies to verify the uranium enrichment level in gas centrifuge enrichment plants or nuclear fuel fabrication facilities are technically challenging and resource-intensive. NNSA’s Office of Nonproliferation and International Security (NIS) supports the development, testing, and evaluation of future systems that will strengthen and sustain U.S. safeguards and security capabilities—in this case, by automating the monitoring of uranium enrichment in the entire inventory of a fuel fabrication facility. One such system is HEVA—hybrid enrichment verification array. This prototype was developed to provide an automated, nondestructive assay verification technology for uranium hexafluoride (UF6) cylinders at enrichment plants.

  12. New Prototype Safeguards Technology Offers Improved Confidence and Automation for Uranium Enrichment Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brim, Cornelia P.

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An important requirement for the international safeguards community is the ability to determine the enrichment level of uranium in gas centrifuge enrichment plants and nuclear fuel fabrication facilities. This is essential to ensure that countries with nuclear nonproliferation commitments, such as States Party to the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty, are adhering to their obligations. However, current technologies to verify the uranium enrichment level in gas centrifuge enrichment plants or nuclear fuel fabrication facilities are technically challenging and resource-intensive. NNSA’s Office of Nonproliferation and International Security (NIS) supports the development, testing, and evaluation of future systems that will strengthen and sustain U.S. safeguards and security capabilities—in this case, by automating the monitoring of uranium enrichment in the entire inventory of a fuel fabrication facility. One such system is HEVA—hybrid enrichment verification array. This prototype was developed to provide an automated, nondestructive assay verification technology for uranium hexafluoride (UF6) cylinders at enrichment plants.

  13. Report of Survey of Oak Ridge Isotope Enrichment (Calutron) Facility Building 9204-3

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of this document is to report the results of a survey conducted at the Isotope Enrichment Facility (IEF, Calutron, Building 9204-3) on the Y-12 Plant property at the Oak Ridge Site. The...

  14. Environmental monitoring for detection of uranium enrichment operations: Comparison of LEU and HEU facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hembree, D.M. Jr.; Carter, J.A.; Ross, H.H.

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1994, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) initiated an ambitious program of worldwide field trials to evaluate the utility of environmental monitoring for safeguards. Part of this program involved two extensive United States field trials conducted at the large uranium enrichment facilities. The Paducah operation involves a large low-enriched uranium (LEU) gaseous diffusion plant while the Portsmouth facilities include a large gaseous diffusion plant that has produced both LEU and high-enriched uranium (HEU) as well as an LEU centrifuge facility. As a result of the Energy Policy Act of 1992, management of the uranium enrichment operations was assumed by the US Enrichment Corporation (USEC). The facilities are operated under contract by Martin Marietta Utility Services. Martin Marietta Energy Systems manages the environmental restoration and waste management programs at Portsmouth and Paducah for DOE. These field trials were conducted. Samples included swipes from inside and outside process buildings, vegetation and soil samples taken from locations up to 8 km from main sites, and hydrologic samples taken on the sites and at varying distances from the sites. Analytical results from bulk analysis were obtained using high abundance sensitivity thermal ionization mm spectrometers (TIMS). Uranium isotopics altered from the normal background percentages were found for all the sample types listed above, even on vegetation 5 km from one of the enrichment facilities. The results from these field trials demonstrate that dilution by natural background uranium does not remove from environmental samples the distinctive signatures that are characteristic of enrichment operations. Data from swipe samples taken within the enrichment facilities were particularly revealing. Particulate analysis of these swipes provided a detailed ``history`` of both facilities, including the assays of the end product and tails for both facilities.

  15. CRAD, Radiological Controls- Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a January 2005 assessment of the Radiation Protection Program at the Y-12 - Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility.

  16. CRAD, Emergency Management- Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a January 2005 assessment of Emergency Management program at the Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility.

  17. CRAD, Criticality Safety- Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a January 2005 assessment of the Criticality Safety program at the Y-12 - Enriched Uranium Facility.

  18. CRAD, Environmental Protection- Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a January 2005 assessment of Environmental Compliance program at the Y-12 - Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility.

  19. CRAD, Conduct of Operations- Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a January, 2005 assessment of Conduct of Operations program at the Y-12 - Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility.

  20. CRAD, DOE Oversight- Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a DOE independent oversight assessment of the Y-12 Site Office's programs for oversight of its contractors at the Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility.

  1. CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health- Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a January 2005 assessment of Industrial Safety and Industrial Health programs at the Y-12 - Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility.

  2. CRAD, Safety Basis- Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a January 2005 assessment of the Safety Basis at the Y-12 - Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility.

  3. Search for underground openings for in situ test facilities in crystalline rock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wollenberg, H.A.; Strisower, B.; Corrigan, D.J.; Graf, A.N.; O'Brien, M.T.; Pratt, H.; Board, M.; Hustrulid, W.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With a few exceptions, crystalline rocks in this study were limited to plutonic rocks and medium to high-grade metamorphic rocks. Nearly 1700 underground mines, possibly occurring in crystalline rock, were initially identified. Application of criteria resulted in the identification of 60 potential sites. Within this number, 26 mines and 4 civil works were identified as having potential in that they fulfilled the criteria. Thirty other mines may have similar potential. Most of the mines identified are near the contact between a pluton and older sedimentary, volcanic and metamorphic rocks. However, some mines and the civil works are well within plutonic or metamorphic rock masses. Civil works, notably underground galleries associated with pumped storage hydroelectric facilities, are generally located in tectonically stable regions, in relatively homogeneous crystalline rock bodies. A program is recommended which would identify one or more sites where a concordance exists between geologic setting, company amenability, accessibility and facilities to conduct in situ tests in crystalline rock.

  4. Conversion and Blending Facility highly enriched uranium to low enriched uranium as uranyl nitrate hexahydrate. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This Conversion and Blending Facility (CBF) will have two missions: (1) convert HEU materials to pure HEU uranyl nitrate (UNH) and (2) blend pure HEU UNH with depleted and natural UNH to produce HEU UNH crystals. The primary emphasis of this blending operation will be to destroy the weapons capability of large, surplus stockpiles of HEU. The blended LEU product can only be made weapons capable again by the uranium enrichment process. To the extent practical, the chemical and isotopic concentrations of blended LEU product will be held within the specifications required for LWR fuel. Such blended LEU product will be offered to the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC) to be sold as feed material to the commercial nuclear industry. Otherwise, blended LEU Will be produced as a waste suitable for storage or disposal.

  5. Highly Enriched Uranium Materials Facility | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh School football High SchoolBundles to LivingPortalHighly Enriched

  6. FEMO, A FLOW AND ENRICHMENT MONITOR FOR VERIFYING COMPLIANCE WITH INTERNATIONAL SAFEGUARDS REQUIREMENTS AT A GAS CENTRIFUGE ENRICHMENT FACILITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gunning, John E [ORNL; Laughter, Mark D [ORNL; March-Leuba, Jose A [ORNL

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A number of countries have received construction licenses or are contemplating the construction of large-capacity gas centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEPs). The capability to independently verify nuclear material flows is a key component of international safeguards approaches, and the IAEA does not currently have an approved method to continuously monitor the mass flow of 235U in uranium hexafluoride (UF6) gas streams. Oak Ridge National Laboratory is investigating the development of a flow and enrichment monitor, or FEMO, based on an existing blend-down monitoring system (BDMS). The BDMS was designed to continuously monitor both 235U mass flow and enrichment of UF6 streams at the low pressures similar to those which exists at GCEPs. BDMSs have been installed at three sites-the first unit has operated successfully in an unattended environment for approximately 10 years. To be acceptable to GCEP operators, it is essential that the instrument be installed and maintained without interrupting operations. A means to continuously verify flow as is proposed by FEMO will likely be needed to monitor safeguards at large-capacity plants. This will enable the safeguards effectiveness that currently exists at smaller plants to be maintained at the larger facilities and also has the potential to reduce labor costs associated with inspections at current and future plants. This paper describes the FEMO design requirements, operating capabilities, and development work required before field demonstration.

  7. Use of Savannah River Site facilities for blend down of highly enriched uranium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bickford, W.E.; McKibben, J.M.

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Westinghouse Savannah River Company was asked to assess the use of existing Savannah River Site (SRS) facilities for the conversion of highly enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU). The purpose was to eliminate the weapons potential for such material. Blending HEU with existing supplies of depleted uranium (DU) would produce material with less than 5% U-235 content for use in commercial nuclear reactors. The request indicated that as much as 500 to 1,000 MT of HEU would be available for conversion over a 20-year period. Existing facilities at the SRS are capable of producing LEU in the form of uranium trioxide (UO{sub 3}) powder, uranyl nitrate [UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}] solution, or metal. Additional processing, and additional facilities, would be required to convert the LEU to uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2}) or uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 3}), the normal inputs for commercial fuel fabrication. This study`s scope does not include the cost for new conversion facilities. However, the low estimated cost per kilogram of blending HEU to LEU in SRS facilities indicates that even with fees for any additional conversion to UO{sub 2} or UF{sub 6}, blend-down would still provide a product significantly below the spot market price for LEU from traditional enrichment services. The body of the report develops a number of possible facility/process combinations for SRS. The primary conclusion of this study is that SRS has facilities available that are capable of satisfying the goals of a national program to blend HEU to below 5% U-235. This preliminary assessment concludes that several facility/process options appear cost-effective. Finally, SRS is a secure DOE site with all requisite security and safeguard programs, personnel skills, nuclear criticality safety controls, accountability programs, and supporting infrastructure to handle large quantities of special nuclear materials (SNM).

  8. Linear Accelerator Facility, Kildee Hall aluminum, brick, concrete, rock, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mayfield, John

    and demonstration facility for the irradiation of food and non-food materials. It is primarily used for the reduction or elimination of bacteria from foods and feed. Interior Garden is an environmental installation) are examples of the types of foodstuff that is irradiated in the Linear Accelerator Facility. The table has

  9. Safeguards by design - industry engagement for new uranium enrichment facilities in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Demuth, Scott F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Grice, Thomas [NRC; Lockwood, Dunbar [DOE/NA-243

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Nonproliferation and International Security (NA-24) has initiated a Safeguards by Design (SBD) effort to encourage the incorporation of international (IAEA) safeguards features early in the design phase of a new nuclear facility in order to avoid the need to redesign or retrofit the facility at a later date. The main goals of Safeguards by Design are to (1) make the implementation of international safeguards at new civil nuclear facilities more effective and efficient, (2) avoid costly and time-consuming re-design work or retrofits at such facilities and (3) design such facilities in a way that makes proliferation as technically difficult, as time-consuming, and as detectable as possible. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has recently hosted efforts to facilitate the use of Safeguards by Design for new uranium enrichment facilities currently being planned for construction in the U.S. While SBD is not a NRC requirement, the NRC is aiding the implementation of SBD by coordinating discussions between DOE's NA-24 and industry's facility design teams. More specifically, during their normal course of licensing discussions the NRC has offered industry the opportunity to engage with NA-24 regarding SBD.

  10. Third International Meeting on Next Generation Safeguards:Safeguards-by-Design at Enrichment Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Long, Jon D. [Y-12 National Security Complex] [Y-12 National Security Complex; McGinnis, Brent R [ORNL] [ORNL; Morgan, James B [ORNL] [ORNL; Whitaker, Michael [ORNL] [ORNL; Lockwood, Mr. Dunbar [U.S. Department of Energy, NNSA] [U.S. Department of Energy, NNSA; Shipwash, Jacqueline L [ORNL] [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Third International Meeting on Next Generation Safeguards (NGS3) was hosted by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)/National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) Office of Nonproliferation and International Security (NIS) in Washington, D.C. on 14-15 December 2010; this meeting focused on the Safeguards-by-Design (SBD) concept. There were approximately 100 participants from 13 countries, comprised of safeguards policy and technical experts from government and industry. Representatives also were present from the Brazilian-Argentine Agency for Accounting and Control of Nuclear Materials (ABACC), the European Atomic Energy Agency (Euratom), and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The primary objective of this meeting was to exchange views and provide recommendations on implementation of the SBD concept for four specific nuclear fuel cycle facility types: gas centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEPs), GEN III and GEN IV reactors, aqueous reprocessing plants, and mixed oxide fuel fabrication facilities. The general and facility-specific SBD documents generated from the four working groups, which were circulated for comment among working group participants, are intended to provide a substantive contribution to the IAEA's efforts to publish SBD guidance for these specific types of nuclear facilities in the near future. The IAEA has described the SBD concept as an approach in which 'international safeguards are fully integrated into the design process of a new nuclear facility from the initial planning through design, construction, operation, and decommissioning.' As part of the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI), the DOE is working to establish SBD as a global norm through DOE laboratory studies, international workshops, engagement with industry and the IAEA, and setting an example through its use in new nuclear facilities in the United States. This paper describes the discussion topics and final recommendations of the Enrichment Facilities Working Group. The working group participants were tasked with providing recommendations for facility operators and designers, while promoting the IAEA's objectives of: (1) avoiding costly and time-consuming redesign work or retrofits of new nuclear facilities and (2) providing for more effective and efficient implementation of international safeguards.

  11. Free Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) Data from the Duke Forest FACE Facility

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    DOE has conducted trace gas enrichment experiments since the mid 1990s. The FACE Data Management System is a central repository and archive for Free-Air Carbon Dioxide Enrichment (FACE) data, as well as for the related open-top chamber (OTC) experiments. FACE Data Management System is located at DOEĆs Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC). While the data from the various FACE sites, each one a unique user facility, are centralized at CDIAC, each of the FACE sites presents its own view of its activities and information. For that reason, DOE Data Explorer users are advised to see both the central repository at http://public.ornl.gov/face/index.shtml and the individual home pages of each site. The Duke University FACE website actually presents information on several FACE experiments. The Forest-Atmosphere Carbon Transfer and Storage (FACTS-I) facility is located in the Blackwood Division of the Duke Forest. It consists of four free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) plots that provide elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration and four plots that provide ambient CO2 control. The system has been in operation since June, 1994 in the prototype plot, and since August, 1996 in the three additional plots. The prototype plot and its reference were halved with a barrier inserted in the soil in 1998 to conduct, together with five additional plot pairs, CO2 X soil nutrient enrichment experiments. The rest of the plots were partitioned in early 2005 and incorporated into the CO2 X nutrient experiment. To increase statistical power, four additional ambient plots were established in January, 2005, halved, and one half of each fertilized. [copied from http://face.env.duke.edu/description.cfm] The Duke FACE home page makes information available from both completed and ongoing projects, provides a searchable database of publications and presentations, and data, images, and links to related websites.

  12. Methods for nondestructive assay holdup measurements in shutdown uranium enrichment facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hagenauer, R.C.; Mayer, R.L. II.

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurement surveys of uranium holdup using nondestructive assay (NDA) techniques are being conducted for shutdown gaseous diffusion facilities at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site (formerly the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant). When in operation, these facilities processed UF{sub 6} with enrichments ranging from 0.2 to 93 wt % {sup 235}U. Following final shutdown of all process facilities, NDA surveys were initiated to provide process holdup data for the planning and implementation of decontamination and decommissioning activities. A three-step process is used to locate and quantify deposits: (1) high-resolution gamma-ray measurements are performed to generally define the relative abundances of radioisotopes present, (2) sizable deposits are identified using gamma-ray scanning methods, and (3) the deposits are quantified using neutron measurement methods. Following initial quantitative measurements, deposit sizes are calculated; high-resolution gamma-ray measurements are then performed on the items containing large deposits. The quantitative estimates for the large deposits are refined on the basis of these measurements. Facility management is using the results of the survey to support a variety of activities including isolation and removal of large deposits; performing health, safety, and environmental analyses; and improving facility nuclear material control and accountability records. 3 refs., 1 tab.

  13. Free Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) Research Data from the Nevada Desert FACE Facility (NDFF)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    DOE has conducted trace gas enrichment experiments since the mid 1990s. The FACE Data Management System is a central repository and archive for Free-Air Carbon Dioxide Enrichment (FACE) data, as well as for the related open-top chamber (OTC) experiments. FACE Data Management System is located at the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC). While the data from the various FACE sites, each one a unique user facility, are centralized at CDIAC, each of the FACE sites presents its own view of its activities and information. For that reason, DOE Data Explorer users are advised to see both the central repository at http://public.ornl.gov/face/index.shtml and the individual home pages of each site. NDFF whole-ecosystem manipulation is a flagship experiment of the Terrestrial Carbon Process (TCP) research program of the US Dept. of Energy. It is also a core project of the International Geosphere-Biosphere Program (IGBP) and a contribution to the US Global Change Research Program. The NDFF was developed in conjunction with the National Science Foundation (NSF) and DOE-EPSCoR programs. FACE (Free-Air-Carbon dioxide-Enrichment) technology allows researchers to elevate the carbon dioxide level in large study plots while minimizing ecosystem disturbance. At the NDFF the concentration of CO2 was elevated by 50 percent above the present atmospheric levels in three plots in the Mojave Desert ecosystem, while six other plots remained at the current level. This experimental design provided a large area in which integrated teams of scientists could describe and quantify processes regulating carbon, nutrient, and water balances in desert ecosystems.

  14. Natural phenomena hazards evaluation of equipment and piping of Gaseous Diffusion Plant Uranium Enrichment Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singhal, M.K.; Kincaid, J.H.; Hammond, C.R.; Stockdale, B.I.; Walls, J.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Technical Programs and Services; Brock, W.R.; Denton, D.R. [Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In support of the Gaseous Diffusion Plant Safety Analysis Report Upgrade program (GDP SARUP), a natural phenomena hazards evaluation was performed for the main process equipment and piping in the uranium enrichment buildings at Paducah and Portsmouth gaseous diffusion plants. In order to reduce the cost of rigorous analyses, the evaluation methodology utilized a graded approach based on an experience data base collected by SQUG/EPRI that contains information on the performance of industrial equipment and piping during past earthquakes. This method consisted of a screening walkthrough of the facility in combination with the use of engineering judgment and simple calculations. By using these screenings combined with evaluations that contain decreasing conservatism, reductions in the time and cost of the analyses were significant. A team of experienced seismic engineers who were trained in the use of the DOE SQUG/EPRI Walkdown Screening Material was essential to the success of this natural phenomena hazards evaluation.

  15. Safeguards Guidance for Designers of Commercial Nuclear Facilities – International Safeguards Requirements for Uranium Enrichment Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Philip Casey Durst; Scott DeMuth; Brent McGinnis; Michael Whitaker; James Morgan

    2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For the past two years, the United States National Nuclear Security Administration, Office of International Regimes and Agreements (NA-243), has sponsored the Safeguards-by-Design Project, through which it is hoped new nuclear facilities will be designed and constructed worldwide more amenable to nuclear safeguards. In the course of this project it was recognized that commercial designer/builders of nuclear facilities are not always aware of, or understand, the relevant domestic and international safeguards requirements, especially the latter as implemented by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). To help commercial designer/builders better understand these requirements, a report was prepared by the Safeguards-by-Design Project Team that articulated and interpreted the international nuclear safeguards requirements for the initial case of uranium enrichment plants. The following paper summarizes the subject report, the specific requirements, where they originate, and the implications for design and construction. It also briefly summarizes the established best design and operating practices that designer/builder/operators have implemented for currently meeting these requirements. In preparing the subject report, it is recognized that the best practices are continually evolving as the designer/builder/operators and IAEA consider even more effective and efficient means for meeting the safeguards requirements and objectives.

  16. SEARCH FOR UNDERGROUND OPENINGS FOR IN SITU TEST FACILITIES IN CRYSTALLINE ROCK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wallenberg, H.A.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to complie and correlate rock properties and preliminaryProject Table 1. Rock properties and project characteristicsof Information Rock properties - Bad Creek area Exhibit 1.

  17. Rocks

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand Requirements RecentlyElectronicResources ResourcesRobust, High-ThroughputRocks Rocks

  18. EIS-0471: Areva Eagle Rock Enrichment Facility in Bonneville County, ID |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised FindingDepartmentDepartment of Energy Notice8:Department of Energy

  19. Safeguards Guidance Document for Designers of Commercial Nuclear Facilities: International Nuclear Safeguards Requirements and Practices For Uranium Enrichment Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Bean; Casey Durst

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is the second in a series of guidelines on international safeguards requirements and practices, prepared expressly for the designers of nuclear facilities. The first document in this series is the description of generic international nuclear safeguards requirements pertaining to all types of facilities. These requirements should be understood and considered at the earliest stages of facility design as part of a new process called “Safeguards-by-Design.” This will help eliminate the costly retrofit of facilities that has occurred in the past to accommodate nuclear safeguards verification activities. The following summarizes the requirements for international nuclear safeguards implementation at enrichment plants, prepared under the Safeguards by Design project, and funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Office of NA-243. The purpose of this is to provide designers of nuclear facilities around the world with a simplified set of design requirements and the most common practices for meeting them. The foundation for these requirements is the international safeguards agreement between the country and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), pursuant to the Treaty on the Non-proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT). Relevant safeguards requirements are also cited from the Safeguards Criteria for inspecting enrichment plants, found in the IAEA Safeguards Manual, Part SMC-8. IAEA definitions and terms are based on the IAEA Safeguards Glossary, published in 2002. The most current specification for safeguards measurement accuracy is found in the IAEA document STR-327, “International Target Values 2000 for Measurement Uncertainties in Safeguarding Nuclear Materials,” published in 2001. For this guide to be easier for the designer to use, the requirements have been restated in plainer language per expert interpretation using the source documents noted. The safeguards agreement is fundamentally a legal document. As such, it is written in a legalese that is understood by specialists in international law and treaties, but not by most outside of this field, including designers of nuclear facilities. For this reason, many of the requirements have been simplified and restated. However, in all cases, the relevant source document and passage is noted so that readers may trace the requirement to the source. This is a helpful living guide, since some of these requirements are subject to revision over time. More importantly, the practices by which the requirements are met are continuously modernized by the IAEA and nuclear facility operators to improve not only the effectiveness of international nuclear safeguards, but also the efficiency. As these improvements are made, the following guidelines should be updated and revised accordingly.

  20. Spatial correction factors for YALINA Booster facility loaded with medium and low enriched fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Talamo, A.; Gohar, Y. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Bournos, V.; Fokov, Y.; Kiyavitskaya, H.; Routkovskaya, C. [Joint Inst. for Power and Nuclear Research-Sosny, 99 Academician A.K.Krasin Str, Minsk 220109 (Belarus)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Bell and Glasstone spatial correction factor is used in analyses of subcritical assemblies to correct the experimental reactivity as function of the detector position. Besides the detector position, several other parameters affect the correction factor: the energy weighting function of the detector, the detector size, the energy-angle distribution of source neutrons, and the reactivity of the subcritical assembly. This work focuses on the dependency of the correction factor on the detector material and it investigates the YALINA Booster subcritical assembly loaded with medium (36%) and low (10%) enriched fuels. (authors)

  1. Keeping Environmental Enrichment Enriching

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuczaj, Stan; Lacinak, Thad; Fad, Otto; Trone, Marie; Solangi, Moby; Ramos, Joana

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    nature: Environmental enrichment for captive animals (pp.nature: Environmental enrichment for captive animals (pp.G. (1999). Environmental enrichment for laboratory rodents:

  2. A versatile facility for laboratory studies of viscoelastic and poroelastic behaviour of rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, Ian [Research School of Earth Sciences, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia); Schijns, Heather; Schmitt, Douglas R. [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2J1 (Canada); Mu Junjie; Delmenico, Alison [Department of Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia)

    2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Novel laboratory equipment has been modified to allow both torsional and flexural oscillation measurements at sub-microstrain amplitudes, thereby providing seismic-frequency constraints on both the shear and compressional wave properties of cylindrical rock specimens within the linear regime. The new flexural mode capability has been tested on experimental assemblies containing fused silica control specimens. Close consistency between the experimental data and the results of numerical modelling with both finite-difference and finite-element methods demonstrates the viability of the new technique. The capability to perform such measurements under conditions of independently controlled confining and pore-fluid pressure, with emerging strategies for distinguishing between local (squirt) and global (specimen-wide) fluid flow, will have particular application to the study of frequency-dependent seismic properties expected of cracked and fluid-saturated rocks of the Earth's upper crust.

  3. Y-12 uranium storage facility?a Ťdream come true?

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ranks and actually provides the first impedance for the just finished highly enriched uranium storage facility. Recently the Highly Enriched Uranium Material Facility was...

  4. Rock Art

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huyge, Dirk

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The archaeology of early Egypt: Social transformations inAlexander 1938 Rock-drawings of southern Upper Egypt. Vol.1. London: The Egypt Exploration Society. 1939 Rock-drawings

  5. New generation enrichment monitoring technology for gas centrifuge enrichment plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ianakiev, Kiril D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Alexandrov, Boian S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Boyer, Brian D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hill, Thomas R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Macarthur, Duncan W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Marks, Thomas [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Moss, Calvin E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sheppard, Gregory A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swinhoe, Martyn T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The continuous enrichment monitor, developed and fielded in the 1990s by the International Atomic Energy Agency, provided a go-no-go capability to distinguish between UF{sub 6} containing low enriched (approximately 4% {sup 235}U) and highly enriched (above 20% {sup 235}U) uranium. This instrument used the 22-keV line from a {sup 109}Cd source as a transmission source to achieve a high sensitivity to the UF{sub 6} gas absorption. The 1.27-yr half-life required that the source be periodically replaced and the instrument recalibrated. The instrument's functionality and accuracy were limited by the fact that measured gas density and gas pressure were treated as confidential facility information. The modern safeguarding of a gas centrifuge enrichment plant producing low-enriched UF{sub 6} product aims toward a more quantitative flow and enrichment monitoring concept that sets new standards for accuracy stability, and confidence. An instrument must be accurate enough to detect the diversion of a significant quantity of material, have virtually zero false alarms, and protect the operator's proprietary process information. We discuss a new concept for advanced gas enrichment assay measurement technology. This design concept eliminates the need for the periodic replacement of a radioactive source as well as the need for maintenance by experts. Some initial experimental results will be presented.

  6. NNSA Authorizes Start-Up of Highly Enriched Uranium Materials...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Authorizes Start-Up of Highly Enriched Uranium Materials Facility at Y-12 | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the...

  7. The photosynthetic acclimation response of Lolium perenne to four years growth in a free-air CO{sub 2} enrichment (FACE) facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Creasey, R. [Univ. of Essex (United Kingdom)

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, the photosynthetic responses of field grown Lolium perenne to ambient (354 {mu}mol mol{sup -1}) and elevated (600 {mu}mol mol{sup -1}) C{sub a} were measured. The experiment utilized the FACE facility at Eschikon, Switzerland; here the L. Perenne swards had been grown at two nitrogen treatments, with six cuts per year, for 4 years. The study revealed a significant decrease in Rubisco activity (Vcmax) in the low nitrogen FACE plots; this is consistent with the theories of source-sink imbalance resulting in feedback inhibition and down-regulation. Such negative acclimation was not wholly supported by diurnal investigations which revealed an average stimulation of 53.38% and 52.78% in the low and high nitrogen, respectively. However, light response curves and AI investigations also suggested down-regulation, especially in the low nitrogen. SI is expected to decrease in response to elevated C{sub a}, if any change is seen. This was indeed observed in the high nitrogen plots but for the low nitrogen a significant increase was found. Conclusions drawn from this project center around the implications of negative acclimation to future crop productivity. For instance, inter-specific differences in response to elevated C{sub a} may result in ecosystem changes and new management techniques may be necessary. However, real predictions cannot be made from leaf level studies alone as these may not represent the overall changes at the whole plant level.

  8. Licensed fuel facility status report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joy, D.; Brown, C.

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NRC is committed to the periodic publication of licensed fuel facilities inventory difference data, following agency review of the information and completion of any related NRC investigations. Information in this report includes inventory difference data for active fuel fabrication facilities possessing more than one effective kilogram of high enriched uranium, low enriched uranium, plutonium, or uranium-233.

  9. Centrifuge enrichment plants. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the design, control, monitoring, and safety of centrifuge enrichment plants. Power supplies, enrichment plant safeguards, facility design, cascade heater test loops to monitor the enrichment process, inspection strategies, and the socioeconomic effects of centrifuge enrichment plants are examined. Radioactive waste disposal problems are considered. (Contains a minimum of 172 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  10. Centrifuge enrichment plants. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the design, control, monitoring, and safety of centrifuge enrichment plants. Power supplies, enrichment plant safeguards, facility design, cascade heater test loops to monitor the enrichment process, inspection strategies, and the socioeconomic effects of centrifuge enrichment plants are examined. Radioactive waste disposal problems are considered. (Contains a minimum of 171 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  11. Q00906010024 rock check dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    00906010024 rock check dam Q00906010025 rock check dam Q00906010021 rock check dam Q00906010022 rock check dam Q00906010027 rock check dam Q00906010026 rock check dam Q00906010018 rock check dam Q00906010023 rock check dam Q00906010011 rock check dam Q00906010008 rock check dam Q00906010007 rock check dam Q

  12. Uncertainty clouds uranium enrichment corporation's plans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lane, E.

    1993-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    An expected windfall to the US Treasury from the sale of the Energy Dept.'s commercial fuel enrichment facilities may evaporate in the next few weeks when the Clinton administration submits its fiscal 1994 budget proposal to Congress, according to congressional and administration officials. Under the Energy Policy Act of 1992, DOE is required to lease two uranium enrichment facilities, Portsmouth, Ohio, and Paducah, KY., to the government-owned US Enrichment Corp. (USEC) by July 1. Estimates by OMB and Treasury indicate a potential yearly payoff of $300 million from the government-owned company's sale of fuel for commercial reactors. Those two facilities use a process of gaseous diffusion to enrich uranium to about 3 percent for use as fuel in commercial power plants. DOE has contracts through at least 1996 to provide about 12 million separative work units (SWUs) yearly to US utilities and others world-wide. But under an agreement signed between the US and Russia last August, at least 10 metric tons, or 1.5 million SWUs, of low-enriched uranium (LEU) blended down from Russia warheads is expected to be delivered to the US starting in 1994. It could be sold at $50 to $60 per SWU, far below what DOE currently charges for its SWUs - $135 per SWU for 70 percent of the contract price and $90 per SWU for the remaining 30 percent.

  13. Assuaging Nuclear Energy Risks: The Angarsk International Uranium Enrichment Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myers, Astasia [Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA and MonAme Scientific Research Center, Ulaanbaatar (Mongolia)

    2011-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The recent nuclear renaissance has motivated many countries, especially developing nations, to plan and build nuclear power reactors. However, domestic low enriched uranium demands may trigger nations to construct indigenous enrichment facilities, which could be redirected to fabricate high enriched uranium for nuclear weapons. The potential advantages of establishing multinational uranium enrichment sites are numerous including increased low enrichment uranium access with decreased nuclear proliferation risks. While multinational nuclear initiatives have been discussed, Russia is the first nation to actualize this concept with their Angarsk International Uranium Enrichment Center (IUEC). This paper provides an overview of the historical and modern context of the multinational nuclear fuel cycle as well as the evolution of Russia's IUEC, which exemplifies how international fuel cycle cooperation is an alternative to domestic facilities.

  14. Stable Isotope Enrichment Capabilities at ORNL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Egle, Brian [ORNL; Aaron, W Scott [ORNL; Hart, Kevin J [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the US Department of Energy Nuclear Physics Program have built a high-resolution Electromagnetic Isotope Separator (EMIS) as a prototype for reestablishing a US based enrichment capability for stable isotopes. ORNL has over 60 years of experience providing enriched stable isotopes and related technical services to the international accelerator target community, as well as medical, research, industrial, national security, and other communities. ORNL is investigating the combined use of electromagnetic and gas centrifuge isotope separation technologies to provide research quantities (milligram to several kilograms) of enriched stable isotopes. In preparation for implementing a larger scale production facility, a 10 mA high-resolution EMIS prototype has been built and tested. Initial testing of the device has simultaneously collected greater than 98% enriched samples of all the molybdenum isotopes from natural abundance feedstock.

  15. U. S. forms uranium enrichment corporation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seltzer, R.

    1993-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    After almost 40 years of operation, the federal government is withdrawing from the uranium enrichment business. On July 1, the Department of Energy turned over to a new government-owned entity--the US Enrichment Corp. (USEC)--both the DOE enrichment plants at Paducah, Ky., and Portsmouth, Ohio, and domestic and international marketing of enriched uranium from them. Pushed by the inability of DOE's enrichment operations to meet foreign competition, Congress established USEC under the National Energy Policy Act of 1992, envisioning the new corporation as the first step to full privatization. With gross revenues of $1.5 billion in fiscal 1992, USEC would rank 275th on the Fortune 500 list of top US companies. USEC will lease from DOE the Paducah and Portsmouth facilities, built in the early 1950s, which use the gaseous diffusion process for uranium enrichment. USEC's stock is held by the US Treasury, to which it will pay annual dividends. Martin Marietta Energy Systems, which has operated Paducah since 1984 and Portsmouth since 1986 for DOE, will continue to operate both plants for USEC. Closing one of the two facilities will be studied, especially in light of a 40% world surplus of capacity over demand. USEC also will consider other nuclear-fuel-related ventures. USEC will produce only low-enriched uranium, not weapons-grade material. Indeed, USEC will implement a contract now being completed under which the US will purchase weapons-grade uranium from dismantled Russian nuclear weapons and convert it into low-enriched uranium for power reactor fuel.

  16. Centrifuge enrichment plants. January 1970-October 1988 (Citations from the NTIS data base). Report for January 1970-October 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This bibliography contains citations concerning the design, control, monitoring, and safety of centrifuge enrichment plants. Power supplies, enrichment plant safeguards, facility design, cascade heater test loops to monitor the enrichment process, inspection strategies, and the socio-economic effects of centrifuge enrichment plants are examined. Radioactive waste disposal problems are briefly considered. (Contains 151 citations fully indexed and including a title list.)

  17. Glycoprotein Enrichment Resin User Manual

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lebendiker, Mario

    Glycoprotein Enrichment Resin User Manual Cat. No. 635647 PT4050-1 (PR912675) Published 14 January Laboratories, Inc. Version No. PR912675 ATakara Bio Company 2 Glycoprotein Enrichment Resin User Manual I.................................................................................................4 IV. Glycoprotein Enrichment

  18. V00306010057 rock check dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ¬« ¬« ¬« ¬« ¬« XY! 16-020 16-030(c) 16-026(l) 16-028(c) 16-026(l) V00306010057 rock check dam V00306010012 rock check dam V00306010040 rock check dam V00306010039 rock check dam V00306010058 rock check dam V00306010064 rock check dam V00306010061 rock check dam V00306010062 rock check dam V00306010063

  19. Centrifuge enrichment plants. (Latest citations from the NTIS data base). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the design, control, monitoring, and safety of centrifuge enrichment plants. Power supplies, enrichment plant safeguards, facility design, cascade heater test loops to monitor the enrichment process, inspection strategies, and the socioeconomic effects of centrifuge enrichment plants are examined. Radioactive waste disposal problems are briefly considered. (Contains a minimum of 169 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  20. Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant Safeguards System Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elayat, H A; O'Connell, W J; Boyer, B D

    2006-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is interested in developing tools and methods for potential U.S. use in designing and evaluating safeguards systems used in enrichment facilities. This research focuses on analyzing the effectiveness of the safeguards in protecting against the range of safeguards concerns for enrichment plants, including diversion of attractive material and unauthorized modes of use. We developed an Extend simulation model for a generic medium-sized centrifuge enrichment plant. We modeled the material flow in normal operation, plant operational upset modes, and selected diversion scenarios, for selected safeguards systems. Simulation modeling is used to analyze both authorized and unauthorized use of a plant and the flow of safeguards information. Simulation tracks the movement of materials and isotopes, identifies the signatures of unauthorized use, tracks the flow and compilation of safeguards data, and evaluates the effectiveness of the safeguards system in detecting misuse signatures. The simulation model developed could be of use to the International Atomic Energy Agency IAEA, enabling the IAEA to observe and draw conclusions that uranium enrichment facilities are being used only within authorized limits for peaceful uses of nuclear energy. It will evaluate improved approaches to nonproliferation concerns, facilitating deployment of enhanced and cost-effective safeguards systems for an important part of the nuclear power fuel cycle.

  1. Metal enrichment processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Schindler; A. Diaferio

    2008-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    There are many processes that can transport gas from the galaxies to their environment and enrich the environment in this way with metals. These metal enrichment processes have a large influence on the evolution of both the galaxies and their environment. Various processes can contribute to the gas transfer: ram-pressure stripping, galactic winds, AGN outflows, galaxy-galaxy interactions and others. We review their observational evidence, corresponding simulations, their efficiencies, and their time scales as far as they are known to date. It seems that all processes can contribute to the enrichment. There is not a single process that always dominates the enrichment, because the efficiencies of the processes vary strongly with galaxy and environmental properties.

  2. TECH REPORT Enrichment analysis of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chait, Brian T.

    TECH REPORT Enrichment analysis of phosphorylated proteins as a tool for probing of relatively abundant proteins2,3. Therefore, for effective proteome analysis it becomes critical to enrich substrates can be greatly enhanced by enriching the sample of phosphorylated proteins. Although enrichment

  3. Laser and gas centrifuge enrichment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heinonen, Olli [Senior Fellow, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School, Cambridge, Massachusetts (United States)

    2014-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Principles of uranium isotope enrichment using various laser and gas centrifuge techniques are briefly discussed. Examples on production of high enriched uranium are given. Concerns regarding the possibility of using low end technologies to produce weapons grade uranium are explained. Based on current assessments commercial enrichment services are able to cover the global needs of enriched uranium in the foreseeable future.

  4. Rock magnetism of remagnetized carbonate rocks: another look

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, M.; Swanson-Hysell, N. L

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and significance of magnetism in sedimentary rocks. Journal1997. Rock Magnetism. ¨ zdemir, O Dunlop, D. J. & Oon July 30, 2013 ROCK MAGNETISM: REMAGNETIZED CARBONATES

  5. V01406010015 rock check dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    XY! ¬« ¬« V01406010015 rock check dam V01406010014 rock check dam V01406010013 rock check dam 1501403010012 earthen berm V01403010008 earthen berm V01406010003 rock check dam V01406010004 rock check dam V01406010010 rock check dam V01406010011 rock check dam 15-0651 15-0307 15-0588 15-0532 15-0575 stormdrain 7160

  6. Enrichment Assay Methods for a UF6 Cylinder Verification Station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Leon E.; Jordan, David V.; Misner, Alex C.; Mace, Emily K.; Orton, Christopher R.

    2010-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) inspectors currently perform periodic inspections at uranium enrichment plants to verify UF6 cylinder enrichment declarations. Measurements are typically performed with handheld high-resolution sensors on a sampling of cylinders taken to be representative of the facility’s entire cylinder inventory. These enrichment assay methods interrogate only a small fraction of the total cylinder volume, and are time-consuming and expensive to execute for inspectors. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is developing an unattended measurement system capable of automated enrichment measurements over the full volume of Type 30B and Type 48 cylinders. This Integrated Cylinder Verification System (ICVS) could be located at key measurement points to positively identify each cylinder, measure its mass and enrichment, store the collected data in a secure database, and maintain continuity of knowledge on measured cylinders until IAEA inspector arrival. The focus of this paper is the development of nondestructive assay (NDA) methods that combine “traditional” enrichment signatures (e.g. 185-keV emission from U-235) and more-penetrating “non-traditional” signatures (e.g. high-energy neutron-induced gamma rays spawned primarily from U-234 alpha emission) collected by medium-resolution gamma-ray spectrometers (i.e. sodium iodide or lanthanum bromide). The potential of these NDA methods for the automated assay of feed, tail and product cylinders is explored through MCNP modeling and with field measurements on a cylinder population ranging from 0.2% to 5% in U-235 enrichment.

  7. Hot dry rock venture risks investigation:

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study assesses a promising resource in central Utah as the potential site of a future commerical hot dry rock (HDR) facility for generating electricity. The results indicate that, if the HDR reservoir productivity equals expectations based on preliminary results from research projects to date, a 50 MWe HDR power facility at Roosevelt Hot Springs could generate power at cost competitive with coal-fired plants. However, it is imperative that the assumed productivity be demonstrated before funds are committed for a commercial facility. 72 refs., 39 figs., 38 tabs.

  8. Enrichment short courses and special

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enrichment short courses and special events specially developed for folks 50 and better. Look better way to spend your summer than expanding your knowledge and enriching your life with an Osher

  9. T00406010008 rock check dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    XY! ¬« T00406010008 rock check dam T00406010009 rock check dam T00406010010 rock check dam T00406010011 rock check dam T-SMA-2.85 0.344 Acres 35-014(g) 35-016(n) T00406010005 rock check dam T00406010006 rock check dam T00403090004 curb T00402040007 established vegetation, green hatch area 7200 7200 7180

  10. The Enriched Xenon Observatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dolinski, M. J. [Stanford University Physics Department, 382 Via Pueblo Mall, Stanford, CA 94305-4060 (United States)

    2009-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The Enriched Xenon Observatory (EXO) experiment will search for neutrinoless double beta decay of {sup 136}Xe. The EXO Collaboration is actively pursuing both liquid-phase and gas-phase Xe detector technologies with scalability to the ton-scale. The search for neutrinoless double beta decay of {sup 136}Xe is especially attractive because of the possibility of tagging the resulting Ba daughter ion, eliminating all sources of background other than the two neutrino decay mode. EXO-200, the first phase of the project, is a liquid Xe time projection chamber with 200 kg of Xe enriched to 80% in {sup 136}Xe. EXO-200, which does not include Ba-tagging, will begin taking data in 2009, with two-year sensitivity to the half-life for neutrinoless double beta decay of 6.4x10{sup 25} years. This corresponds to an effective Majorana neutrino mass of 0.13 to 0.19 eV.

  11. Student science enrichment training program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sandhu, S.S.

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a report on the Student Science Enrichment Training Program, with special emphasis on chemical and computer science fields. The residential summer session was held at the campus of Claflin College, Orangeburg, SC, for six weeks during 1993 summer, to run concomitantly with the college`s summer school. Fifty participants selected for this program, included high school sophomores, juniors and seniors. The students came from rural South Carolina and adjoining states which, presently, have limited science and computer science facilities. The program focused on high ability minority students, with high potential for science engineering and mathematical careers. The major objective was to increase the pool of well qualified college entering minority students who would elect to go into science, engineering and mathematical careers. The Division of Natural Sciences and Mathematics and engineering at Claflin College received major benefits from this program as it helped them to expand the Departments of Chemistry, Engineering, Mathematics and Computer Science as a result of additional enrollment. It also established an expanded pool of well qualified minority science and mathematics graduates, which were recruited by the federal agencies and private corporations, visiting Claflin College Campus. Department of Energy`s relationship with Claflin College increased the public awareness of energy related job opportunities in the public and private sectors.

  12. Engineering analysis of low enriched uranium fuel using improved zirconium hydride cross sections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Candalino, Robert Wilcox

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    lifetime as the current high enriched uranium fuel and stay within the thermal and safety limits for the facility. It was also determined that the control rod worths and the temperature coefficient of reactivity would provide sufficient negative reactivity...

  13. J00206010020 rock check dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    XY! J00206010020 rock check dam J00206010023 rock check dam 09-009 09-009 09-009 PJ-SMA-2 0.901 Acres J00206010021 rock check dam J00206010019 rock check dam J00206010014 rock check dam J00203010007 Smith DATE: 14-November-2014 REVISION NUMBER: 8 XY! IP sampler location Berm Channel/swale Check dam

  14. W02106010008 rock check dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W-SMA-14.1 5.169 Acres W02106010008 rock check dam W02106010009 rock check dam W02106010010 rock check dam W02106010011 rock check dam W02106010012 rock check dam W02103010018 earthen berm W02103010016 dam Established vegetation Seed and mulch Sediment trap/basin Gabion Cap SWMU boundary SMA drainage

  15. Thermal breeder fuel enrichment zoning

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Capossela, Harry J. (Schenectady, NY); Dwyer, Joseph R. (Albany, NY); Luce, Robert G. (Schenectady, NY); McCoy, Daniel F. (Latham, NY); Merriman, Floyd C. (Rotterdam, NY)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for improving the performance of a thermal breeder reactor having regions of higher than average moderator concentration are disclosed. The fuel modules of the reactor core contain at least two different types of fuel elements, a high enrichment fuel element and a low enrichment fuel element. The two types of fuel elements are arranged in the fuel module with the low enrichment fuel elements located between the high moderator regions and the high enrichment fuel elements. Preferably, shim rods made of a fertile material are provided in selective regions for controlling the reactivity of the reactor by movement of the shim rods into and out of the reactor core. The moderation of neutrons adjacent the high enrichment fuel elements is preferably minimized as by reducing the spacing of the high enrichment fuel elements and/or using a moderator having a reduced moderating effect.

  16. Chapter Eight Rock Varnish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dorn, Ron

    ) Coating Description Carbonate skin Coating composed primarily of carbonate, usually calcium carbonate; the agent may be manganese, sulphate, carbonate, silica, iron, oxalate, organisms, or anthropogenic Dust, cyanobacteria, algae Nitrate crust Potassium and calcium nitrate coatings on rocks, often in caves and rock

  17. Measurements of Low-Enriched Uranium Holdup.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belian, A. P. (Anthony P.); Reilly, T. D. (T. Douglas); Russo, P. A. (Phyllis A.); Tobin, S. J. (Stephen J.)

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A recent effort determined uranium holdup at a large fuel fabrication facility abroad where low enriched ({approx} 3%) uranium (LEU) oxide feeds the pellet manufacturing process. Measurements taken with both high- and low-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry systems include extensive data for the ventilation and vacuum systems. Equipment dimensions and the corresponding holdup deposit masses are large for LEU. Because deposits are infinitely thick to the 186 keV gamma ray in many locations in an LEU environment, measurements of both the 186 and 1001 keV gamma-rays were required, and self-attenuation was significant at 1001 keV in many cases. These wide-dynamic-range measruements used short count times, portable scintillator detectors, and portable MCAs. Because equipment is elevated above floor levels, most measurements were made with detectors mounted on extended telescoping poles. One of the main goals of this effort was to demonstrate and validate methods for measurement and quantitative analysis of LEU holdup using low-resolution detectors and the Generalized Geometry Holdup (GGH) techniques. The current GGH approach is applied elsewhere for holdup measurements of plutonium and high-enriched uranium. The recent experience is directly applicable to holdup measruements at LEU facilities such as the Paducah and Portmouth gaseous diffusion enrichment plants and elsewhere, including LEU sites where D and D is active. This report discusses the measurement methodology, calibration of the measurement equipment, measurement control, analysis of the data, and the global and local assay results including random and systematic uncertainties. It includes field-validation exercises (multiple calibrated systems that perform measruements on the same extended equipment) as well as quantitative validation results obtained on reference materials assembled to emulate the deposits in an extended vacuum line that was also measured by these techniques. The paper examines the differences in assay results between the low-resolution system using the GGH method and the high-resolution system utilizing the commercially available ISOCS analysis method.

  18. Incident at the Rock Pile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birgfeld, Doug

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At the off limit rock pile At a Portland school Where theDoug. “Incident at the Rock Pile” http://escholarship.org/Doug. “Incident at the Rock Pile” http://escholarship.org/

  19. Manufactured caverns in carbonate rock

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bruce, David A.; Falta, Ronald W.; Castle, James W.; Murdoch, Lawrence C.

    2007-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a process for manufacturing underground caverns suitable in one embodiment for storage of large volumes of gaseous or liquid materials. The method is an acid dissolution process that can be utilized to form caverns in carbonate rock formations. The caverns can be used to store large quantities of materials near transportation facilities or destination markets. The caverns can be used for storage of materials including fossil fuels, such as natural gas, refined products formed from fossil fuels, or waste materials, such as hazardous waste materials. The caverns can also be utilized for applications involving human access such as recreation or research. The method can also be utilized to form calcium chloride as a by-product of the cavern formation process.

  20. A Robust Infrastructure Design for Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant Unattended Online Enrichment Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Younkin, James R [ORNL; Rowe, Nathan C [ORNL; Garner, James R [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An online enrichment monitor (OLEM) is being developed to continuously measure the relative isotopic composition of UF6 in the unit header pipes of a gas centrifuge enrichment plant (GCEP). From a safeguards perspective, OLEM will provide early detection of a facility being misused for production of highly enriched uranium. OLEM may also reduce the number of samples collected for destructive assay and if coupled with load cell monitoring can provide isotope mass balance verification. The OLEM design includes power and network connections for continuous monitoring of the UF6 enrichment and state of health of the instrument. Monitoring the enrichment on all header pipes at a typical GCEP could require OLEM detectors on each of the product, tails, and feed header pipes. If there are eight process units, up to 24 detectors may be required at a modern GCEP. Distant locations, harsh industrial environments, and safeguards continuity of knowledge requirements all place certain demands on the network robustness and power reliability. This paper describes the infrastructure and architecture of an OLEM system based on OLEM collection nodes on the unit header pipes and power and network support nodes for groupings of the collection nodes. A redundant, self-healing communications network, distributed backup power, and a secure communications methodology. Two candidate technologies being considered for secure communications are the Object Linking and Embedding for Process Control Unified Architecture cross-platform, service-oriented architecture model for process control communications and the emerging IAEA Real-time And INtegrated STream-Oriented Remote Monitoring (RAINSTORM) framework to provide the common secure communication infrastructure for remote, unattended monitoring systems. The proposed infrastructure design offers modular, commercial components, plug-and-play extensibility for GCEP deployments, and is intended to meet the guidelines and requirements for unattended and remotely monitored safeguards systems.

  1. LANSCE | Facilities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LINAC Outreach Affiliations Visiting LANSCE Facilities Isotope Production Facility Lujan Neutron Scattering Center MaRIE Proton Radiography Ultracold Neutrons Weapons Neutron...

  2. Pragmatically enriching and 1 Children's enrichments of conjunctive sentences in context

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Institut des Sciences Cognitives, CNRS

    Pragmatically enriching and 1 Children's enrichments of conjunctive sentences in context Ira Noveck Rutgers University Lewis Bott Cardiff University RUNNING HEAD: Pragmatically enriching and #12;Pragmatically enriching and 2 Abstract An utterance conjoining two propositions with and often conveys more

  3. Generic Enrichment Plan Enrichment plans exist to promote the psychological well-being of laboratory animals.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandettini, Peter A.

    Generic Enrichment Plan Enrichment plans exist to promote the psychological well An integrated approach to behavioral management should include: 1) Environmental Enrichment a) Elements of enrichment b) Implementation processes 2) Behavioral Management a) Identifying and treating animals

  4. An Optically Stimulated Luminescence Uranium Enrichment Monitor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Steven D.; Tanner, Jennifer E.; Simmons, Kevin L.; Conrady, Matthew M.; Benz, Jacob M.; Greenfield, Bryce A.

    2010-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has pioneered the use of Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) technology for use in personnel dosimetry and high dose radiation processing dosimetry. PNNL has developed and patented an alumina-based OSL dosimeter that is being used by the majority of medical X-ray and imaging technicians worldwide. PNNL has conceived of using OSL technology to passively measure the level of UF6 enrichment by attaching the prototype OSL monitor to pipes containing UF6 gas within an enrichment facility. The prototype OSL UF6 monitor utilizes a two-element approach with the first element open and unfiltered to measure both the low energy and high energy gammas from the UF6, while the second element utilizes a 3-mm thick tungsten filter to eliminate the low energy gammas and pass only the high energy gammas from the UF6. By placing a control monitor in the room away from the UF6 pipes and other ionizing radiation sources, the control readings can be subtracted from the UF6 pipe monitor measurements. The ratio of the shielded to the unshielded net measurements provides a means to estimate the level of uranium enrichment. PNNL has replaced the commercially available MicroStar alumina-based dosimeter elements with a composite of polyethylene plastic, high-Z glass powder, and BaFBr:Eu OSL phosphor powder at various concentrations. The high-Z glass was added in an attempt to raise the average “Z” of the composite dosimeter and increase the response. Additionally, since BaFBr:Eu OSL phosphor is optimally excited and emits light at different wavelengths compared to alumina, the commercially available MicroStar reader was modified for reading BaFBr:Eu in a parallel effort to increase reader sensitivity. PNNL will present the design and performance of our novel OSL uranium enrichment monitor based on a combination of laboratory and UF6 test loop measurements. PNNL will also report on the optimization effort to achieve the highest possible performance from both the OSL enrichment monitor and the new custom OSL reader modified for this application. This project has been supported by the US Department of Energy’s National Nuclear Security Administration’s Office of Dismantlement and Transparency (DOE/NNSA/NA-241).

  5. Graduate Senate Professional Enrichment Grant Application System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    Graduate Senate Professional Enrichment Grant Application System (PEGAS) Committee Rules a Frequently Asked Questions section on the Professional Enrichment Grant Application Service (PEGAS) webpage outlining common questions on Professional Enrichment Grants (PEG) applications. Rule II. Committee

  6. A framework for nuclear facility safeguard evaluation using probabilistic methods and expert elicitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iamsumang, Chonlagarn

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the advancement of the next generation of nuclear fuel cycle facilities, concerns of the effectiveness of nuclear facility safeguards have been increasing due to the inclusion of highly enriched material and reprocessing ...

  7. Facility Microgrids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ye, Z.; Walling, R.; Miller, N.; Du, P.; Nelson, K.

    2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Microgrids are receiving a considerable interest from the power industry, partly because their business and technical structure shows promise as a means of taking full advantage of distributed generation. This report investigates three issues associated with facility microgrids: (1) Multiple-distributed generation facility microgrids' unintentional islanding protection, (2) Facility microgrids' response to bulk grid disturbances, and (3) Facility microgrids' intentional islanding.

  8. High-purity, isotopically enriched bulk silicon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Russia. The stated isotope enrichments are summarized inenrichments >99% have been achieved for each isotope andthe enrichment is highest, are presented. isotope at. % nat.

  9. Disposition of Surplus Highly Enriched Uranium

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of Surplus Highly Enriched Uranium Environmental Impact Statement kternationd Atomic Energy Agency Idaho Nationrd Engineering Laborato low-enriched uranium low-level waste...

  10. Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund's...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund's Fiscal Year 2008 and 2007 Financial Statement Audit, OAS-FS-10-05 Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and...

  11. Enrichment Assay Methods Development for the Integrated Cylinder Verification System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Leon E.; Misner, Alex C.; Hatchell, Brian K.; Curtis, Michael M.

    2009-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) inspectors currently perform periodic inspections at uranium enrichment plants to verify UF6 cylinder enrichment declarations. Measurements are typically performed with handheld high-resolution sensors on a sampling of cylinders taken to be representative of the facility's entire product-cylinder inventory. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is developing a concept to automate the verification of enrichment plant cylinders to enable 100 percent product-cylinder verification and potentially, mass-balance calculations on the facility as a whole (by also measuring feed and tails cylinders). The Integrated Cylinder Verification System (ICVS) could be located at key measurement points to positively identify each cylinder, measure its mass and enrichment, store the collected data in a secure database, and maintain continuity of knowledge on measured cylinders until IAEA inspector arrival. The three main objectives of this FY09 project are summarized here and described in more detail in the report: (1) Develop a preliminary design for a prototype NDA system, (2) Refine PNNL's MCNP models of the NDA system, and (3) Procure and test key pulse-processing components. Progress against these tasks to date, and next steps, are discussed.

  12. Uranium enrichment decontamination and decommissioning fund

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the most challenging issues facing the Department of Energy`s Office of Environmental Management is the cleanup of the three gaseous diffusion plants. In October 1992, Congress passed the Energy Policy Act of 1992 and established the Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund to accomplish this task. This mission is being undertaken in an environmentally and financially responsible way by: devising cost-effective technical solutions; producing realistic life-cycle cost estimates, based on practical assumptions and thorough analysis; generating coherent long-term plans which are based on risk assessments, land use, and input from stakeholders; and, showing near-term progress in the cleanup of the gaseous diffusion facilities at Oak Ridge.

  13. Highly Enriched Uranium Materials Facility, Major Design Changes

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently20,000 RussianBy: Thomas P. D'Agostino,GlenLearning andDesign

  14. Lessons Learned Construction of the National Enrichment Facility

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presenter: Stephen Cowne, Director, Quality & Regulatory Affairs, Louisiana Energy Services Track 9-9

  15. DOE Signs Advanced Enrichment Technology License and Facility Lease |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613PortsmouthBartlesvilleAbout »DepartmentLaboratory | DepartmentCoal Plant in Florida

  16. Toxic Substances Control Act Uranium Enrichment Federal Facility Compliance

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2, 2015 - JanuaryTankToledo, Ohio, Data DashboardTools forConstruction

  17. Toxic Substances Control Act Uranium Enrichment Federal Facility Compliance

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23,EnergyChicopeeTechnologyfact sheet summarizesof Energy TheForAgreement |

  18. Influence of Neutron Enrichment on Disintegration Modes of Compound Nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Bonnet; J. P. Wieleczko; A. Chbihi; J. D. Frankland; J. Moisan; F. Rejmund; J. Gomez del Campo; A. Galindo-Uribarri; D. Shapira; M. La Commara; B. Martin. D. Pierroutsakou; M. Romoli; E. Rosato; G. Spadaccini. M. Vigilante; S. Barlini; R. Bougault; N. Le Neindre; M. Parlog; B. Tamain; C. Beck; B. Borderie; M. F. Rivet; R. Dayras; L. Nalpas; G. De Angelis; T. Glodariou; V. Kravchuk; Ph. Lautesse; A. D. Onofrio; R. Roy

    2008-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Cross sections, kinetic energy and angular distributions of fragments with charge 6$\\le$Z$\\le$28 emitted in 78,82Kr+40C at 5.5 MeV/A reactions were measured at the GANIL facility using the INDRA apparatus. This experiment aims to investigate the influence of the neutron enrichment on the decay mechanism of excited nuclei. Data are discussed in comparison with predictions of transition state and Hauser-Feshbach models.

  19. Unattended Environmental Sampling and Laser-based Enrichment Assay for Detection of Undeclared HEU Production in Enrichment Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anheier, Norman C.; Bushaw, Bruce A.

    2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear power is enjoying rapid growth as government energy policies and public demand shift toward carbon neutral energy production. Accompanying the growth in nuclear power is the requirement for increased nuclear fuel production, including a significant expansion in uranium enrichment capacity. Essential to the success of the nuclear energy renaissance is the development and implementation of sustainable, proliferation-resistant nuclear power generation. Unauthorized production of highly enriched uranium (HEU) remains the primary proliferation concern for modern gaseous centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEPs). While to date there has been no indication of declared, safeguarded GCEPs producing HEU, the massive separative work unit (SWU) processing power of modern GCEPs presents a significant latent risk of nuclear breakout and suggests the need for more timely detection of potential facility misuse. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is developing an unattended safeguards instrument, combining continuous aerosol particulate collection with uranium isotope assay, to provide timely HEU detection within a GCEP. This approach is based on laser vaporization of aerosol particulates, followed by laser spectroscopy to characterize the uranium enrichment level. We demonstrate enrichment assay, with relative isotope abundance uncertainty <5%, on individual micron-sized particles that are trace components within a mixture ‘background’ particles

  20. Enrichment Strategies Rodents in the Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandettini, Peter A.

    Enrichment Strategies for Rodents in the Laboratory Endorsed by ARAC - 9/8/04 #12 of environmental enrichment on laboratory rats and mice. The development of enrichment programs for non the scientific community. A proactive, systematic, and consistent approach addressing enrichment programs for all

  1. The Landscape of Klamath Basin Rock Art

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David, Robert James

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the Lines: Ethnographic Sources and Rock Art Interpretationwhen applying these sources toward rock art interpretation.information source for developing rock art interpretations.

  2. Licensed fuel facility status report. Inventory difference data, July 1, 1991--June 30, 1992: Volume 12

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joy, D.; Brown, C.

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NRC is committed to the periodic publication of licensed fuel facilities inventory difference data, following agency review of the information and completion of any related NRC investigations. Information in this report includes inventory difference data for active fuel fabrication facilities possessing more than one effective kilogram of high enriched uranium, low enriched uranium, plutonium, or uranium-233.

  3. Licensed fuel facility status report: Inventory difference data, July 1, 1990--June 30, 1991. Volume 11

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NRC is committed to the periodic publication of licensed fuel facilities inventory difference data, following agency review of the information and completion of any related NRC investigations. Information in this report includes inventory difference data for active fuel fabrication facilities possessing more than one effective kilogram of high enriched uranium, low enriched uranium, plutonium, or uranium-233.

  4. Software Engineer RockAuto www.RockAuto.com

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liblit, Ben

    Software Engineer ­ RockAuto www.RockAuto.com Position Description Software is the foundation · Familiarity with open-source development technologies like PHP, Perl, JavaScript and C (Linux system Lane, Madison, WI 53719) Why RockAuto? Strategic and tactical impact. We're an e-commerce company

  5. Facility Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1996-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Establishes facility safety requirements related to: nuclear safety design, criticality safety, fire protection and natural phenomena hazards mitigation.

  6. Facility Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1995-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Establishes facility safety requirements related to: nuclear safety design, criticality safety, fire protection and natural phenomena hazards mitigation.

  7. Observational Tests of Intergalactic Enrichment Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anthony Aguirre; Joop Schaye

    2005-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We summarize recent results assessing the carbon and silicon abundances of the intergalactic medium (IGM) using the `pixel optical depth' technique. We briefly discuss the implications of these results for models of intergalactic enrichment, focusing on distinguishing `early' z >> 4 enrichment by the first generations of stars and objects from `late' enrichment by 2 enrichment, and draw qualitative implications for the general picture of intergalactic enrichment at z > 2.

  8. Microwave assisted hard rock cutting

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lindroth, David P. (Apple Valley, MN); Morrell, Roger J. (Bloomington, MN); Blair, James R. (Inver Grove Heights, MN)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for the sequential fracturing and cutting of subsurface volume of hard rock (102) in the strata (101) of a mining environment (100) by subjecting the volume of rock to a beam (25) of microwave energy to fracture the subsurface volume of rock by differential expansion; and , then bringing the cutting edge (52) of a piece of conventional mining machinery (50) into contact with the fractured rock (102).

  9. Enrichment of light hydrocarbon mixture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yang; Dali (Los Alamos, NM); Devlin, David (Santa Fe, NM); Barbero, Robert S. (Santa Cruz, NM); Carrera, Martin E. (Naperville, IL); Colling, Craig W. (Warrenville, IL)

    2010-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Light hydrocarbon enrichment is accomplished using a vertically oriented distillation column having a plurality of vertically oriented, nonselective micro/mesoporous hollow fibers. Vapor having, for example, both propylene and propane is sent upward through the distillation column in between the hollow fibers. Vapor exits neat the top of the column and is condensed to form a liquid phase that is directed back downward through the lumen of the hollow fibers. As vapor continues to ascend and liquid continues to countercurrently descend, the liquid at the bottom of the column becomes enriched in a higher boiling point, light hydrocarbon (propane, for example) and the vapor at the top becomes enriched in a lower boiling point light hydrocarbon (propylene, for example). The hollow fiber becomes wetted with liquid during the process.

  10. Enrichment of light hydrocarbon mixture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yang, Dali (Los Alamos, NM); Devlin, David (Santa Fe, NM); Barbero, Robert S. (Santa Cruz, NM); Carrera, Martin E. (Naperville, IL); Colling, Craig W. (Warrenville, IL)

    2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Light hydrocarbon enrichment is accomplished using a vertically oriented distillation column having a plurality of vertically oriented, nonselective micro/mesoporous hollow fibers. Vapor having, for example, both propylene and propane is sent upward through the distillation column in between the hollow fibers. Vapor exits neat the top of the column and is condensed to form a liquid phase that is directed back downward through the lumen of the hollow fibers. As vapor continues to ascend and liquid continues to countercurrently descend, the liquid at the bottom of the column becomes enriched in a higher boiling point, light hydrocarbon (propane, for example) and the vapor at the top becomes enriched in a lower boiling point light hydrocarbon (propylene, for example). The hollow fiber becomes wetted with liquid during the process.

  11. Anisotropic Outflows and IGM Enrichment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hugo Martel; Matthew M. Pieri; Cedric Grenon

    2006-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We have designed an analytical model for the evolution of anisotropic galactic outflows. These outflows follow the path of least resistance, and thus travel preferentially into low-density regions, away from cosmological structures where galaxies form. We show that anisotropic outflows can significantly enrich low-density systems with metals.

  12. Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, M.C.; Hendron, R.H.; Murphy, H.D.; Wilson, M.G.

    1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During Fiscal Year 1987, emphasis in the Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development Program was on preparations for a Long-Term Flow Test'' of the Phase II'' or Engineering'' hot dry rock energy system at Fenton Hill, New Mexico. A successful 30-day flow test of the system during FY86 indicated that such a system would produce heat at a temperature and rate that could support operation of a commercial electrical power plant. However, it did not answer certain questions basic to the economics of long-term operation, including the rate of depletion of the thermal reservoir, the rate of water loss from the system, and the possibility of operating problems during extended continuous operation. Preparations for a one-year flow test of the system to answer these and more fundamental questions concerning hot dry rock systems were made in FY87: design of the required surface facilities; procurement and installation of some of their components; development and testing of slimline logging tools for use through small-diameter production tubing; research on temperature-sensitive reactive chemical tracers to monitor thermal depletion of the reservoir; and computer simulations of the 30-day test, extended to modeling the planned Long-Term Flow Test. 45 refs., 34 figs., 5 tabs.

  13. Reduced-Enrichment Research and Test Reactor Program: Environmental assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The principal program objective and principal part of the proposed action is to improve the proliferation resistance of nuclear fuels used in research and test reactors by providing the technical means (through technical development, design, and testing) for reducing the uranium enrichment requirements of these fuels to substantially less than the 90 to 93% enrichment currently used. Operator acceptance of the reduced-enrichment-uranium (REU) fuel alternative will require minimizing of reactor performance reduction, fuel cycle cost increases, the number of new safety and licensing issues raised, and reactor and facility modifications. The other part of the proposed action is to assure the capability for commercial production and supply of REU fuel for use both in the US and abroad. The RERTR Program scope is limited to generic design studies, technical support to reactor operating organizations in preparing for conversions to REU fuels, fuel development, fuel demonstrations, and technical support for commercialization of REU fuels. This environmental assessment addresses the environmental consequences of RERTR Program activities and of specific conversions of typical reactors (the Ford Nuclear Reactor and one or two other to-be-designated demonstrations) to REU-fuel cycles, including domestic and international shipments of enriched uranium pertinent to the conduct of RERTR Program activities.

  14. Selective enrichment of a methanol-utilizing consortium using pulp & paper mill waste streams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregory R. Mockos; William A. Smith; Frank J. Loge; David N. Thompson

    2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Efficient utilization of carbon inputs is critical to the economic viability of the current forest products sector. Input carbon losses occur in various locations within a pulp mill, including losses as volatile organics and wastewater . Opportunities exist to capture this carbon in the form of value-added products such as biodegradable polymers. Waste activated sludge from a pulp mill wastewater facility was enriched for 80 days for a methanol-utilizing consortium with the goal of using this consortium to produce biopolymers from methanol-rich pulp mill waste streams. Five enrichment conditions were utilized: three high-methanol streams from the kraft mill foul condensate system, one methanol-amended stream from the mill wastewater plant, and one methanol-only enrichment. Enrichment reactors were operated aerobically in sequencing batch mode at neutral pH and 25°C with a hydraulic residence time and a solids retention time of four days. Non-enriched waste activated sludge did not consume methanol or reduce chemical oxygen demand. With enrichment, however, the chemical oxygen demand reduction over 24 hour feed/decant cycles ranged from 79 to 89 %, and methanol concentrations dropped below method detection limits. Neither the non-enriched waste activated sludge nor any of the enrichment cultures accumulated polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) under conditions of nitrogen sufficiency. Similarly, the non-enriched waste activated sludge did not accumulate PHAs under nitrogen limited conditions. By contrast, enriched cultures accumulated PHAs to nearly 14% on a dry weight basis under nitrogen limited conditions. This indicates that selectively-enriched pulp mill waste activated sludge can serve as an inoculum for PHA production from methanol-rich pulp mill effluents.

  15. Simulation of transportation of low enriched uranium solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hope, E.P.; Ades, M.J.

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A simulation of the transportation by truck of low enriched uranium solutions has been completed for NEPA purposes at the Savannah River Site. The analysis involves three distinct source terms, and establishes the radiological risks of shipment to three possible destinations. Additionally, loading accidents were analyzed to determine the radiological consequences of mishaps during handling and delivery. Source terms were developed from laboratory measurements of chemical samples from low enriched uranium feed materials being stored at SRS facilities, and from manufacturer data on transport containers. The transportation simulations were accomplished over the INTERNET using the DOE TRANSNET system at Sandia National Laboratory. The HIGHWAY 3.3 code was used to analyze routing scenarios, and the RADTRAN 4 code was used to analyze incident free and accident risks of transporting radiological materials. Loading accidents were assessed using the Savannah River Site AXAIR89Q and RELEASE 2 codes.

  16. Facility Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2005-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This Order establishes facility and programmatic safety requirements for Department of Energy facilities, which includes nuclear and explosives safety design criteria, fire protection, criticality safety, natural phenomena hazards mitigation, and the System Engineer Program. Cancels DOE O 420.1A. DOE O 420.1B Chg 1 issued 4-19-10.

  17. Stable carbon and nitrogen isotope enrichment in primate tissues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crowley, Brooke E.; Carter, Melinda L.; Karpanty, Sarah M.; Zihlman, Adrienne L.; Koch, Paul L.; Dominy, Nathaniel J.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    carbon and nitrogen isotope enrichment in primate tissuesfactor (a) and isotope enrichment values (e), which provideisotope values from different modern primate tissues. Additionally, using these mean apparent enrichment

  18. Stable carbon and nitrogen isotope enrichment in primate tissues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crowley, Brooke E.; Carter, Melinda L.; Karpanty, Sarah M.; Zihlman, Adrienne L.; Koch, Paul L.; Dominy, Nathaniel J.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and nitrogen isotope enrichment in primate tissues Brooke E.and nitrogen apparent enrichment (e*) values ± one standardexplored the apparent enrichment (e*) between bone collagen

  19. THE THEORY OF URANIUM ENRICHMENT BY THE GAS CENTRIFUGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olander, Donald R.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1979) in "Uranium Enrichment", S. Villani, Ed. , Springer-E. (1973) "Uranium Enrichment by Gas Centrifuge" Mills andTHE THEORY OF URANIUM ENRICHMENT BY THE GAS CENTRIFUGE

  20. Office of Environmental Management uranium enrichment decontamination and decommissioning fund financial statements. September 30, 1994 and 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marwick, P.

    1994-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Energy Policy Act of 1992 (Act) transferred the uranium enrichment enterprise to the United States Enrichment Corporation as of July 1, 1993. However, the Act requires the Department of Energy to retain ownership and responsibility for the costs of environmental cleanup resulting from the Government`s operation of the three gaseous diffusion facilities located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee; Paducah, Kentucky; and Portsmouth, Ohio (diffusion facilities). The Act established the Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund (D&D Fund) to: Pay for the costs of decontamination and decommissioning at the diffusion facilities; Pay the annual costs for remedial action at the diffusion facilities to the extent that the amount in the Fund is sufficient; and Reimburse uranium/thorium licensees for the costs of decontamination, decommissioning, reclamation, and other remedial actions which are incident to sales to the Government.

  1. Augmented Shelf: Digital Enrichment of Library Shelves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reiterer, Harald

    Augmented Shelf: Digital Enrichment of Library Shelves Eike Kleiner1 , Benjamin Schäfer2;Augmented Shelf: Digital Enrichment of Library Shelves 2 yon 2007) and Augmented Reality (Azuma 1997) a prototype1 was designed which supports users browsing the physical shelves enriched with digital functions

  2. SHORT COMMUNICATION Chiral Enrichment of Serine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clemmer, David E.

    SHORT COMMUNICATION Chiral Enrichment of Serine via Formation, Dissociation, and Soft University, Bloomington, Indiana, USA Chiral enrichment of serine is achieved in experiments that involve of chirally-enriched octameric cluster ions and their dissociation, viz. Ser1 3 Ser8 3 Ser1, allows serine

  3. How Did the IGM Become Enriched?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anthony Aguirre; Joop Schaye

    2006-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The enrichment of the intergalactic medium with heavy elements is a process that lies at the nexus of poorly-understood aspects of physical cosmology. We review current understanding of the processes that may remove metals from galaxies, the basic predictions of these models, the key observational constraints on enrichment, and how intergalactic enrichment may be used to test cosmological simulations.

  4. Rock Bands/Rock Brands: Mediation and Musical Performance in Post-liberalization Bangalore

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coventry, Chloe Louise

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    these recorded sources important rock pedagogical tools inwere a primary source of western rock music for young fans,Nevertheless, a source of funding for rock music performance

  5. Honors Enrichment Contracts Faculty View Page 1 Honors Enrichment Contracts Faculty View

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Honors Enrichment Contracts ­ Faculty View Page 1 Honors Enrichment Contracts ­ Faculty View INITIAL APPROVAL #12;Honors Enrichment Contracts ­ Faculty View Page 2 Summary This document contains information about how to make initial and final decisions on Honors Enrichment Contracts submitted by honors

  6. Bottle Rock Power Corporation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Power Plant and Steamfield during suspended operations of the geothermal facility in accordance). That Order was extended to DWR and that extension expired on 26 April 2001. On 30 May 2001, the CEC approved for calendar years 2001, 2002, and 2003. The BRPC has also submitted the requisite annual reports for those

  7. Rock Properties Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. Lum

    2004-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this model report is to document the Rock Properties Model version 3.1 with regard to input data, model methods, assumptions, uncertainties and limitations of model results, and qualification status of the model. The report also documents the differences between the current and previous versions and validation of the model. The rock properties model provides mean matrix and lithophysae porosity, and the cross-correlated mean bulk density as direct input to the ''Saturated Zone Flow and Transport Model Abstraction'', MDL-NBS-HS-000021, REV 02 (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170042]). The constraints, caveats, and limitations associated with this model are discussed in Section 6.6 and 8.2. Model validation accomplished by corroboration with data not cited as direct input is discussed in Section 7. The revision of this model report was performed as part of activities being conducted under the ''Technical Work Plan for: The Integrated Site Model, Revision 05'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169635]). The purpose of this revision is to bring the report up to current procedural requirements and address the Regulatory Integration Team evaluation comments. The work plan describes the scope, objectives, tasks, methodology, and procedures for this process.

  8. Iron and Steel Phosphate Rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    Lime Lithium Magnesium Manganese Mercury Mica Molybdenum Nickel Nitrogen Peat Perlite Phosphate Rock . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 194 Appendix C--Resource/Reserve Definitions . . . . . . 195 Commodities: Abrasives (Manufactured

  9. Iron and Steel Phosphate Rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    Mica Molybdenum Nickel Nitrogen Peat Perlite Phosphate Rock Platinum Potash Pumice Quartz Crystal Rare . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 190 Appendix C--A Resource/Reserve Classification for Minerals

  10. Criteria for the safe storage of enriched uranium at the Y-12 Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cox, S.O.

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Uranium storage practices at US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities have evolved over a period spanning five decades of programmatic work in support of the nuclear deterrent mission. During this period, the Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee has served as the principal enriched uranium facility for fabrication, chemical processing, metallurgical processing and storage. Recent curtailment of new nuclear weapons production and stockpile reduction has created significant amounts of enriched uranium available as a strategic resource which must be properly and safely stored. This standard specifies criteria associated with the safe storage of enriched uranium at the Y-12 Plant. Because programmatic needs, compliance regulations and desirable materials of construction change with time, it is recommended that these standards be reviewed and amended periodically to ensure that they continue to serve their intended purpose.

  11. 2013 Huayu Enrichment Scholarship 1 Educational Division, TECO in Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shoubridge, Eric

    2013 Huayu Enrichment Scholarship 1 Educational Division, TECO in Canada 2013 Huayu Enrichment Scholarship PURPOSE Huayu Enrichment Scholarship is executed in accordance with "Ministry of Education Huayu Enrichment Scholarship (HES) International Student Directions" (see Appendix 1

  12. Facility Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2002-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    To establish facility safety requirements for the Department of Energy, including National Nuclear Security Administration. Cancels DOE O 420.1. Canceled by DOE O 420.1B.

  13. Facility Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2005-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The order establishes facility and programmatic safety requirements for nuclear and explosives safety design criteria, fire protection, criticality safety, natural phenomena hazards (NPH) mitigation, and the System Engineer Program.Chg 1 incorporates the use of DOE-STD-1189-2008, Integration of Safety into the Design Process, mandatory for Hazard Category 1, 2 and 3 nuclear facilities. Cancels DOE O 420.1A.

  14. Facility Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2013-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    DOE-STD-1104 contains the Department's method and criteria for reviewing and approving nuclear facility's documented safety analysis (DSA). This review and approval formally document the basis for DOE, concluding that a facility can be operated safely in a manner that adequately protects workers, the public, and the environment. Therefore, it is appropriate to formally require implementation of the review methodology and criteria contained in DOE-STD-1104.

  15. Facility Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2000-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this Order is to establish facility safety requirements related to: nuclear safety design, criticality safety, fire protection and natural phenomena hazards mitigation. The Order has Change 1 dated 11-16-95, Change 2 dated 10-24-96, and the latest Change 3 dated 11-22-00 incorporated. The latest change satisfies a commitment made to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) in response to DNFSB recommendation 97-2, Criticality Safety.

  16. Chemical Enrichment at High Redshifts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snigdha Das; Pushpa Khare

    1998-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We have tried to understand the recent observations related to metallicity in Ly $\\alpha$ forest clouds in the framework of the two component model suggested by Chiba & Nath (1997). We find that even if the mini-halos were chemically enriched by an earlier generation of stars, to have [C/H] $\\simeq$ -2.5, the number of C IV lines with column density $>10^{12} cm^{-2}$, contributed by the mini-halos, at the redshift of 3, would be only about 10% of the total number of lines, for a chemical enrichment rate of $(1+z)^{-3}$ in the galaxies. Recently reported absence of heavy element lines associated with most of the Ly $\\alpha$ lines with H I column density between $10^{13.5} cm^{-2}$ and $10^{14} cm^{-2}$ by Lu et al (1998), if correct, gives an upper limit on [C/H]=-3.7, not only in the mini-halos, but also in the outer parts of galactic halos. This is consistent with the results of numerical simulations, according to which, the chemical elements associated with the Ly $\\alpha$ clouds are formed in situ in clouds, rather than in an earlier generation of stars. However, the mean value of $7 \\times 10^{-3}$ for the column density ratio of C IV and H I, determined by Cowie and Songaila (1998) for low Lyman alpha optical depths, implies an abundance of [C/H] =-2.5 in mini-halos as well as in most of the region in galactic halos, presumably enriched by an earlier generation of stars. The redshift and column density distribution of C IV has been shown to be in reasonable agreement with the observations.

  17. Iron and Steel Phosphate Rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    Phosphate Rock Platinum Potash Pumice Quartz Crystal Rare Earths Rhenium Rubidium Salt Sand and Gravel Graphite Peat Sulfur Beryllium Gypsum Perlite Talc Bismuth Hafnium Phosphate Rock Tantalum Boron Helium on the USGS--the Federal source for science about the Earth, its natural and living resources, natural hazards

  18. High Purity Germanium Gamma-PHA Assay of Uranium in Scrap Cans for 321-M Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salaymeh, S.R.

    2002-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The Analytical Development Section of SRTC was requested by the Facilities Disposition Division to determine the holdup of enriched uranium in the 321-M facility as part of an overall deactivation project of the facility. This report includes a description of two efficiency calibration configurations and also the results of the assay. A description of the quality control checks is included as well.

  19. Proceedings of the scientific visit on crystalline rock repository development.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mariner, Paul E.; Hardin, Ernest L.; Miksova, Jitka [RAWRA, Czech Republic

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A scientific visit on Crystalline Rock Repository Development was held in the Czech Republic on September 24-27, 2012. The visit was hosted by the Czech Radioactive Waste Repository Authority (RAWRA), co-hosted by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), and supported by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The purpose of the visit was to promote technical information exchange between participants from countries engaged in the investigation and exploration of crystalline rock for the eventual construction of nuclear waste repositories. The visit was designed especially for participants of countries that have recently commenced (or recommenced) national repository programmes in crystalline host rock formations. Discussion topics included repository programme development, site screening and selection, site characterization, disposal concepts in crystalline host rock, regulatory frameworks, and safety assessment methodology. Interest was surveyed in establishing a %E2%80%9Cclub,%E2%80%9D the mission of which would be to identify and address the various technical challenges that confront the disposal of radioactive waste in crystalline rock environments. The idea of a second scientific visit to be held one year later in another host country received popular support. The visit concluded with a trip to the countryside south of Prague where participants were treated to a tour of the laboratory and underground facilities of the Josef Regional Underground Research Centre.

  20. Oil and Gas CDT Bots in Rocks: Intelligent Rock Deformation for Fault Rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henderson, Gideon

    Heriot-Watt University, Institute of Petroleum Engineering Supervisory Team · Dr Helen Lewis, Heriot://www.pet.hw.ac.uk/staff-directory/jimsomerville.htm Key Words Nano/Micro sensors; faults; fault zones; geomechanics; rock mechanics; rock deformation-deformed equivalent, a different lab-deformed example and a geomechanical simulation of a fault zone showing permanent

  1. Safety Evaluation Report for the Claiborne Enrichment Center, Homer, Louisiana (Docket No. 70-3070)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff review and safety evaluation of the Louisiana Energy Services, L.P. (LES, the applicant) application for a license to possess and use byproduct, source, and special nuclear material and to enrich natural uranium to a maximum of 5 percent U-235 by the gas centrifuge process. The plant, to be known as the Claiborne Enrichment Center (CEC), would be constructed near the town of Homer in Claiborne Parish, Louisiana. At full production in a given year, the plant will receive approximately 4,700 tonnes of feed UF{sub 6} and produce 870 tonnes of low-enriched UF{sub 6}, and 3,830 tonnes of depleted UF{sub 6} tails. Facility construction, operation, and decommissioning are expected to last 5, 30, and 7 years, respectively. The objective of the review is to evaluate the potential adverse impacts of operation of the facility on worker and public health and safety under both normal operating and accident conditions. The review also considers the management organization, administrative programs, and financial qualifications provided to assure safe design and operation of the facility. The NRC staff concludes that the applicant`s descriptions, specifications, and analyses provide an adequate basis for safety review of facility operations and that construction and operation of the facility does not pose an undue risk to public health and safety.

  2. Preliminary validation of rock mass models by comparison to laboratory frictional sliding experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sobolik, S.R.; Miller, J.D.

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP) is studying Yucca Mountain in southwestern Nevada as a potential site for a high-level nuclear waste repository. Site characterization will be facilitated by the construction of an Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF). The ESF and potential repository will be excavated from both nonwelded and welded ashflow tuff with varying rock quality (degree of welding, rock mass strength, etc.) and fault and fracture characteristics. Design concerns for the construction of these facilities include the integrity of the structure during underground testing operations and, if it occurs, the emplacement and storage of high-level nuclear waste which could increase the local temperatures in the underground rock mass to as high as 300{degrees}C. Because of the associated issues regarding personnel and long-term environmental safety, sophisticated jointed rock mass models will be required to provide a high degree of confidence for decisions regarding the design, site characterization, and licensing of such facilities. The objective of the work documented in this report is to perform code validation calculations for three rock-mass computer models. The three rock-mass computer models used for this report are the discrete element code UDEC, Version 1.82; and the finite element continuum joint models JAC2D Version 5.10 and JAS3D Version 1.1. The rock mass behavior predicted by the models are compared to the results of laboratory experiments on layered polycarbonate (Lexan) and granite plate experiments. These experiments examine the rock mass behavior of well-defined jointed rock structures or models of jointed structures under uniaxial and biaxial loading. The laboratory environment allows control over the boundary conditions, material properties, and quality and quantity of the data obtained.

  3. Office of Environmental Management Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund financial statements, September 30, 1995 and 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The Energy Policy Act of 1992 (Act) requires the Department of Energy to retain ownership and responsibility for the costs of environmental cleanup resulting from the Government`s operation of the three gaseous diffusion facilities located at the K-25 site in Oak Ridge, Tennessee; Paducah, Kentucky; and Portsmouth, Ohio. The Act transferred the uranium enrichment enterprise to the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC) as of July 1, 1993, and established the Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund (D&D Fund) to: Pay for the costs of decontamination and decommissioning at the diffusion facilities; pay the annual costs for remedial action at the diffusion facilities to the extent that the amount in the Fund is sufficient; and reimburse uranium/thorium licensees for the costs of decontamination, decommissioning, reclamation, and other remedial actions which are incident to sales to the Government.

  4. Shotgun cartridge rock breaker

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ruzzi, Peter L. (Eagan, NM); Morrell, Roger J. (Bloomington, MN)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A rock breaker uses shotgun cartridges or other firearm ammunition as the explosive charge at the bottom of a drilled borehole. The breaker includes a heavy steel rod or bar, a gun with a firing chamber for the ammunition which screws onto the rod, a long firing pin running through a central passage in the rod, and a firing trigger mechanism at the external end of the bar which strikes the firing pin to fire the cartridge within the borehole. A tubular sleeve surround the main body of the rod and includes slits the end to allow it to expand. The rod has a conical taper at the internal end against which the end of the sleeve expands when the sleeve is forced along the rod toward the taper by a nut threaded onto the external end of the rod. As the sleeve end expands, it pushes against the borehole and holds the explosive gasses within, and also prevents the breaker from flying out of the borehole. The trigger mechanism includes a hammer with a slot and a hole for accepting a drawbar or drawpin which, when pulled by a long cord, allows the cartridge to be fired from a remote location.

  5. MECHANICAL DEGRADATION OF EMPLACEMENT DRIFTS AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN - A CASE STUDY IN ROCK MECHANICS, PART 1: NONLITHOPHYSAL ROCK, PART 2: LITHOPHYSAL ROCK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. Lin, D. Kicker, B. Damjanac, M. Board, and M. Karakouzian

    2006-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper outlines rock mechanics investigations associated with mechanical degradation of planned emplacement drifts at Yucca Mountain, which is the designated site for a US high-level nuclear waste repository. The factors leading to drift degradation include stresses from the overburden, stresses induced by the heat released from the emplaced waste, stresses due to seismically related ground motions, and time-dependent strength degradation. The welded tuff emplacement horizon consists of two groups of rock with distinct engineering properties: nonlithophysal units and lithophysal units, based on the relative proportion of lithophysal cavities. Part I of the paper concentrates on the generally hard, strong, and fractured nonlithophysal rock. The degradation behavior of the tunnels in the nonlithophysal rock is controlled by the occurrence of keyblocks. A statistically equivalent fracture model was generated based on extensive underground fracture mapping data from the Exploratory Studies Facility at Yucca Mountain. Three-dimensional distinct block analyses, generated with the fracture patterns randomly selected from the fracture model, were developed with the consideration of in situ, thermal, seismic loads. In this study, field data, laboratory data, and numerical analyses are well integrated to provide a solution for the unique problem of modeling drift degradation throughout the regulatory period for repository performance.

  6. Facility Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1995-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Establishes facility safety requirements related to: nuclear safety design, criticality safety, fire protection and natural phenomena hazards mitigation. Cancels DOE 5480.7A, DOE 5480.24, DOE 5480.28 and Division 13 of DOE 6430.1A. Canceled by DOE O 420.1A.

  7. Facility Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2012-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The Order establishes facility and programmatic safety requirements for DOE and NNSA for nuclear safety design criteria, fire protection, criticality safety, natural phenomena hazards (NPH) mitigation, and System Engineer Program. Cancels DOE O 420.1B, DOE G 420.1-2 and DOE G 420.1-3.

  8. Strength of transversely isotropic rocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pei, Jianyong, 1975-

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis proposes a new Anisotropic Matsuoka-Nakai (AMN) criterion to characterize the failure of transversely isotropic rocks under true triaxial stress states. One major obstacle in formulating an anisotropic criterion ...

  9. Y-12 uranium storage facility?a Ťdream come true,? part 2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Last week we introduced Shirley Cox and began a two-part series on her career at Y-12 leading up to the recommendation that the Highly Enriched Uranium Materials Facility be...

  10. Fuel-cycle facilities: preliminary safety and environmental information document. Volume VII

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Information is presented concerning the mining and milling of uranium and thorium; uranium hexafluoride conversion; enrichment; fuel fabrication; reprocessing; storage options; waste disposal options; transportation; heavy-water-production facilities; and international fuel service centers.

  11. Design of an Unattended Environmental Aerosol Sampling and Analysis System for Gaseous Centrifuge Enrichment Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anheier, Norman C.; Munley, John T.; Alexander, M. L.

    2011-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The resources of the IAEA continue to be challenged by the rapid, worldwide expansion of nuclear energy production. Gaseous centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEPs) represent an especially formidable dilemma to the application of safeguard measures, as the size and enrichment capacity of GCEPs continue to escalate. During the early part of the 1990's, the IAEA began to lay the foundation to strengthen and make cost-effective its future safeguard regime. Measures under Part II of 'Programme 93+2' specifically sanctioned access to nuclear fuel production facilities and environmental sampling by IAEA inspectors. Today, the Additional Protocol grants inspection and environmental sample collection authority to IAEA inspectors at GCEPs during announced and low frequency unannounced (LFUA) inspections. During inspections, IAEA inspectors collect environmental swipe samples that are then shipped offsite to an analytical laboratory for enrichment assay. This approach has proven to be an effective deterrence to GCEP misuse, but this method has never achieved the timeliness of detection goals set forth by IAEA. Furthermore it is questionable whether the IAEA will have the resources to even maintain pace with the expansive production capacity of the modern GCEP, let alone improve the timeliness in reaching current safeguards conclusions. New safeguards propositions, outside of familiar mainstream safeguard measures, may therefore be required that counteract the changing landscape of nuclear energy fuel production. A new concept is proposed that offers rapid, cost effective GCEP misuse detection, without increasing LFUA inspection access or introducing intrusive access demands on GCEP operations. Our approach is based on continuous onsite aerosol collection and laser enrichment analysis. This approach mitigates many of the constraints imposed by the LFUA protocol, reduces the demand for onsite sample collection and offsite analysis, and overcomes current limitations associated with the in-facility misuse detection devices. Onsite environmental sample collection offers the ability to collect fleeting uranium hexafluoride emissions before they are lost to the ventilation system or before they disperse throughout the facility, to become deposited onto surfaces that are contaminated with background and historical production material. Onsite aerosol sample collection, combined with enrichment analysis, provides the unique ability to quickly detect stepwise enrichment level changes within the facility, leading to a significant strengthening of facility misuse deterence. We report in this paper our study of several GCEP environmental sample release scenarios and simulation results of a newly designed aerosol collection and particle capture system that is fully integrated with the Laser Ablation, Absorbance Ratio Spectrometry (LAARS) uranium particle enrichment analysis instrument that was developed at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

  12. Rock physics at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rock physics refers to the study of static and dynamic chemical and physical properties of rocks and to phenomenological investigations of rocks reacting to man-made forces such as stress waves and fluid injection. A bibliography of rock physics references written by LASL staff members is given. Listing is by surname of first author. (RWR)

  13. Enrichment of the Intracluster Medium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Thomas

    1998-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The relevance of galaxies of different luminosity and mass for the chemical enrichment of the intracluster medium (ICM) is analysed. For this purpose, I adopt the composite luminosity function of cluster galaxies from Trentham (1998), which exhibits a significant rise at the very faint end. The model - adopting a universal Salpeter IMF - is calibrated on reproducing the M_Fe/L_tot, M_Fe/M_*, and alpha/Fe ratios observed in clusters. Although the contribution to total luminosity and ICM metals peaks around L* galaxies (M* approx -20), faint objects with M_B>-18 still provide at least 30 per cent of the metals present in the ICM. In consistency with the solar alpha/Fe ratios determined by {ASCA}, the model predicts that 60 per cent of the ICM iron comes from Type Ia supernovae. The predicted slope of the relation between intracluster gas mass and cluster luminosity emerges shallower than the observed one, indicating that the fraction of primordial gas increases with cluster richness.

  14. Method for isotope enrichment by photoinduced chemiionization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dubrin, James W. (Walnut Creek, CA)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Isotope enrichment, particularly .sup.235 U enrichment, is achieved by irradiating an isotopically mixed vapor feed with radiant energy at a wavelength or wavelengths chosen to selectively excite the species containing a desired isotope to a predetermined energy level. The vapor feed if simultaneously reacted with an atomic or molecular reactant species capable of preferentially transforming the excited species into an ionic product by a chemiionization reaction. The ionic product, enriched in the desired isotope, is electrostatically or electromagnetically extracted from the reaction system.

  15. Mobile Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > The EnergyCenterDioxide Capture inFacility AMF Information Science

  16. Facility Representatives

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,OfficeEnd ofEvaluations in Covered Facilities | Department of Energy

  17. Facility Representatives

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,OfficeEnd ofEvaluations in Covered Facilities | Department of Energy063-2011

  18. Facility Status

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist. Category UC-lFederalFYRANDOM DRUG TESTING The requirementFacility

  19. Isotope Enrichment Detection by Laser Ablation - Dual Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anheier, Norman C.; Bushaw, Bruce A.

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The rapid global expansion of nuclear energy is motivating the expedited development of new safeguards technology to mitigate potential proliferation threats arising from monitoring gaps within the uranium enrichment process. Current onsite enrichment level monitoring methods are limited by poor sensitivity and accuracy performance. Offsite analysis has better performance, but this approach requires onsite hand sampling followed by time-consuming and costly post analysis. These limitations make it extremely difficult to implement comprehensive safeguards accounting measures that can effectively counter enrichment facility misuse. In addition, uranium enrichment by modern centrifugation leads to a significant proliferation threat, since the centrifuge cascades can quickly produce a significant quantity of highly enriched uranium (HEU). The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is developing an engineered safeguards approach having continuous aerosol particulate collection and uranium isotope analysis to provide timely detection of HEU production in a low enriched uranium facility. This approach is based on laser vaporization of aerosol particulate samples, followed by wavelength tuned laser diode spectroscopy, to characterize the 235U/238U isotopic ratio by subtle differences in atomic absorption wavelengths arising from differences in each isotope’s nuclear mass, volume, and spin (hyperfine structure for 235U). Environmental sampling media is introduced into a small, reduced pressure chamber, where a focused pulsed laser vaporizes a 10 to 20-µm sample diameter. The ejected plasma forms a plume of atomic vapor. A plume for a sample containing uranium has atoms of the 235U and 238U isotopes present. Tunable diode lasers are directed through the plume to selectively excite each isotope and their presence is detected by monitoring absorbance signals on a shot-to-shot basis. Single-shot detection sensitivity approaching the femtogram range and abundance uncertainty less than 10% have been demonstrated with measurements on surrogate materials. In this paper we present measurement results on samples containing background materials (e.g., dust, minerals, soils) laced with micron-sized target particles having isotopic ratios ranging from 1 to 50%.

  20. Power Systems Development Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Southern Company Services

    2004-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses Test Campaign TC15 of the Kellogg Brown & Root, Inc. (KBR) Transport Gasifier train with a Siemens Power Generation, Inc. (SPG) particle filter system at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) located in Wilsonville, Alabama. The Transport Gasifier is an advanced circulating fluidized-bed reactor designed to operate as either a combustor or gasifier using a particulate control device (PCD). While operating as a gasifier, either air or oxygen can be used as the oxidant. Test run TC15 began on April 19, 2004, with the startup of the main air compressor and the lighting of the gasifier startup burner. The Transport Gasifier was shutdown on April 29, 2004, accumulating 200 hours of operation using Powder River Basin (PRB) subbituminous coal. About 91 hours of the test run occurred during oxygen-blown operations. Another 6 hours of the test run was in enriched-air mode. The remainder of the test run, approximately 103 hours, took place during air-blown operations. The highest operating temperature in the gasifier mixing zone mostly varied from 1,800 to 1,850 F. The gasifier exit pressure ran between 200 and 230 psig during air-blown operations and between 110 and 150 psig in oxygen-enhanced air operations.

  1. Oxygen-Enriched Combustion for Military Diesel Engine Generators...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Oxygen-Enriched Combustion for Military Diesel Engine Generators Oxygen-Enriched Combustion for Military Diesel Engine Generators Substantial increases in brake power and...

  2. A Segmented, Enriched N-type Germanium Detector for Neutrinoless...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Publications A Segmented, Enriched N-type Germanium Detector for Neutrinoless Double Beta-Decay Experiments. A Segmented, Enriched N-type Germanium Detector for Neutrinoless...

  3. N-Terminal Enrichment: Developing a Protocol to Detect Specific...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Terminal Enrichment: Developing a Protocol to Detect Specific Proteolytic Fragments. N-Terminal Enrichment: Developing a Protocol to Detect Specific Proteolytic Fragments....

  4. A Segmented, Enriched N-type Germanium Detector for Neutrinoless...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Segmented, Enriched N-type Germanium Detector for Neutrinoless Double Beta-Decay Experiments. A Segmented, Enriched N-type Germanium Detector for Neutrinoless Double Beta-Decay...

  5. A Method for Selective Enrichment and Analysis of Nitrotyrosine...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Method for Selective Enrichment and Analysis of Nitrotyrosine-Containing Peptides in Complex Proteome Samples. A Method for Selective Enrichment and Analysis of...

  6. Disposition of Surplus Highly Enriched Uranium

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    four alternatives that would eliminate the weapons-usability of HEU by blending it with depleted uranium, natural uranium, or low-enriched uranium (LEU) to create LEU, either as...

  7. LISSAT Analysis of a Generic Centrifuge Enrichment Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lambert, H; Elayat, H A; O?Connell, W J; Szytel, L; Dreicer, M

    2007-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is interested in developing tools and methods for use in designing and evaluating safeguards systems for current and future plants in the nuclear power fuel cycle. The DOE is engaging several DOE National Laboratories in efforts applied to safeguards for chemical conversion plants and gaseous centrifuge enrichment plants. As part of the development, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has developed an integrated safeguards system analysis tool (LISSAT). This tool provides modeling and analysis of facility and safeguards operations, generation of diversion paths, and evaluation of safeguards system effectiveness. The constituent elements of diversion scenarios, including material extraction and concealment measures, are structured using directed graphs (digraphs) and fault trees. Statistical analysis evaluates the effectiveness of measurement verification plans and randomly timed inspections. Time domain simulations analyze significant scenarios, especially those involving alternate time ordering of events or issues of timeliness. Such simulations can provide additional information to the fault tree analysis and can help identify the range of normal operations and, by extension, identify additional plant operational signatures of diversions. LISSAT analyses can be used to compare the diversion-detection probabilities for individual safeguards technologies and to inform overall strategy implementations for present and future plants. Additionally, LISSAT can be the basis for a rigorous cost-effectiveness analysis of safeguards and design options. This paper will describe the results of a LISSAT analysis of a generic centrifuge enrichment plant. The paper will describe the diversion scenarios analyzed and the effectiveness of various safeguards systems alternatives.

  8. Reconstruction of Sedimentary Rock Based on Mechanical Properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jin, Guodong; Patzek, Tad W.; Silin, Dmitry B.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the veri?cation of rock mechanical properties. The dynamicis white. IV. ROCK MECHANICAL PROPERTIES FIG. 9: Cementationextracting meaningful rock transport properties from these

  9. Fast facility spent-fuel and waste assay instrument. [Fluorinel Dissolution and Fuel Storage (FAST) Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eccleston, G.W.; Johnson, S.S.; Menlove, H.O.; Van Lyssel, T.; Black, D.; Carlson, B.; Decker, L.; Echo, M.W.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A delayed-neutron assay instrument was installed in the Fluorinel Dissolution and Fuel Storage Facility at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The dual-assay instrument is designed to measure both spent fuel and waste solids that are produced from fuel processing. A set of waste standards, fabricated by Los Alamos using uranium supplied by Exxon Nuclear Idaho Company, was used to calibrate the small-sample assay region of the instrument. Performance testing was completed before installation of the instrument to determine the effects of uranium enrichment, hydrogenous materials, and neutron poisons on assays. The unit was designed to measure high-enriched uranium samples in the presence of large neutron backgrounds. Measurements indicate that the system can assay low-enriched uranium samples with moderate backgrounds if calibrated with proper standards.

  10. Determination of the 235U Mass and Enrichment within Small UF6 Cylinders via a Neutron Coincidence Well Counting System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McElroy, Robert Dennis [ORNL; Croft, Dr. Stephen [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Young, Brian M [Canberra Industries, Inc., Meriden, CT; Venkataraman, Ram [Canberra Industries, Inc., Meriden, CT

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The construction of three new uranium enrichment facilities in the United States has sparked renewed interest in the development and enhancement of methods to determine the enrichment and fissile mass content of UF6 cylinders. We describe the design and examine the expected performance of a UF6 bottle counter developed for the assay of Type 5A cylinders. The counter, as designed and subsequently constructed, is a tall passive neutron well counter with a clam-shell configuration and graphite end plugs operated in fast neutron mode. Factory performance against expectation is described. The relatively high detection efficiency and effectively 4 detection geometry provide a near-ideal measurement configuration, making the UF6 bottle counter a valuable tool for the evaluation of the neutron coincidence approach to UF6 cylinder assay. The impacts of non-uniform filling, voids, enrichment, and mixed enrichments are examined

  11. Iron and Steel Phosphate Rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    Kyanite Lead Lime Lithium Magnesium Manganese Mercury Mica Molybdenum Nickel Nitrogen Peat Perlite Graphite Peat Sulfur Beryllium Gypsum Perlite Talc Bismuth Hafnium Phosphate Rock Tantalum Boron Helium information on the USGS--the Federal source for science about the Earth, its natural and living resources

  12. Lichen: the challenge for rock art conservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dandridge, Debra Elaine

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This study investigates the effects that lichens have on rock surfaces in which ancient rock art (petroglyphs and pictographs) may be found. The study area includes four sites in the United States: one quartzite site in southwest Minnesota, two...

  13. Detection of illicit HEU production in gaseous centrifuge enrichment plants using neutron counting techniques on product cylinders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freeman, Corey R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Geist, William H [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Innovative and novel safeguards approaches are needed for nuclear energy to meet global energy needs without the threat of nuclear weapons proliferation. Part of these efforts will include creating verification techniques that can monitor uranium enrichment facilities for illicit production of highly-enriched uranium (HEU). Passive nondestructive assay (NDA) techniques will be critical in preventing illicit HEU production because NDA offers the possibility of continuous and unattended monitoring capabilities with limited impact on facility operations. Gaseous centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEP) are commonly used to produce low-enriched uranium (LEU) for reactor fuel. In a GCEP, gaseous UF{sub 6} spins at high velocities in centrifuges to separate the molecules containing {sup 238}U from those containing the lighter {sup 235}U. Unfortunately, the process for creating LEU is inherently the same as HEU, creating a proliferation concern. Insuring that GCEPs are producing declared enrichments poses many difficult challenges. In a GCEP, large cascade halls operating thousands of centrifuges work together to enrich the uranium which makes effective monitoring of the cascade hall economically prohibitive and invasive to plant operations. However, the enriched uranium exiting the cascade hall fills product cylinders where the UF{sub 6} gas sublimes and condenses for easier storage and transportation. These product cylinders hold large quantities of enriched uranium, offering a strong signal for NDA measurement. Neutrons have a large penetrability through materials making their use advantageous compared to gamma techniques where the signal is easily attenuated. One proposed technique for detecting HEU production in a GCEP is using neutron coincidence counting at the product cylinder take off stations. This paper discusses findings from Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX) code simulations that examine the feasibility of such a detector.

  14. Decommissioning the UHTREX Reactor Facility at Los Alamos, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salazar, M.; Elder, J.

    1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ultra-High Temperature Reactor Experiment (UHTREX) facility was constructed in the late 1960s to advance high-temperature and gas-cooled reactor technology. The 3-MW reactor was graphite moderated and helium cooled and used 93% enriched uranium as its fuel. The reactor was run for approximately one year and was shut down in February 1970. The decommissioning of the facility involved removing the reactor and its associated components. This document details planning for the decommissioning operations which included characterizing the facility, estimating the costs of decommissioning, preparing environmental documentation, establishing a system to track costs and work progress, and preplanning to correct health and safety concerns in the facility. Work to decommission the facility began in 1988 and was completed in September 1990 at a cost of $2.9 million. The facility was released to Department of Energy for other uses in its Los Alamos program.

  15. EIS-0084: Incineration Facility for Radioactively Contaminated PCBs and Other Wastes, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Uranium Enrichment and Assessment prepared this statement to assess the environmental impacts of the construction and operation of the proposed Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant, an incineration facility to dispose of radioactively contaminated polychlorinated biophenyls, as well as combustible waste from the Paducah, Portsmouth and Oak Ridge facilities.

  16. Enrichment Determination of Uranium in Shielded Configurations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crye, Jason Michael [ORNL] [ORNL; Hall, Howard L [ORNL] [ORNL; McConchie, Seth M [ORNL] [ORNL; Mihalczo, John T [ORNL] [ORNL; Pena, Kirsten E [ORNL] [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The determination of the enrichment of uranium is required in many safeguards and security applications. Typical methods of determining the enrichment rely on detecting the 186 keV gamma ray emitted by {sup 235}U. In some applications, the uranium is surrounded by external shields, and removal of the shields is undesirable. In these situations, methods relying on the detection of the 186 keV gamma fail because the gamma ray is shielded easily. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has previously measured the enrichment of shielded uranium metal using active neutron interrogation. The method consists of measuring the time distribution of fast neutrons from induced fissions with large plastic scintillator detectors. To determine the enrichment, the measurements are compared to a calibration surface that is created from Monte Carlo simulations where the enrichment in the models is varied. In previous measurements, the geometry was always known. ORNL is extending this method to situations where the geometry and materials present are not known in advance. In the new method, the interrogating neutrons are both time and directionally tagged, and an array of small plastic scintillators measures the uncollided interrogating neutrons. Therefore, the attenuation through the item along many different paths is known. By applying image reconstruction techniques, an image of the item is created which shows the position-dependent attenuation. The image permits estimating the geometry and materials present, and these estimates are used as input for the Monte Carlo simulations. As before, simulations predict the time distribution of induced fission neutrons for different enrichments. Matching the measured time distribution to the closest prediction from the simulations provides an estimate of the enrichment. This presentation discusses the method and provides results from recent simulations that show the importance of knowing the geometry and materials from the imaging system.

  17. ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT ROCK ISLAND DAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT ROCK ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON, 1959 :y .iiJA/i-3ri ^' WUUUi. ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT - ROCK ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON, 1959 by Paul D. Zimmer, Clifton and observations 10 Summary 13 #12;#12;ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT - ROCK ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON

  18. ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT ROCK ISLAND DAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    42) ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT ROCK ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON 1961 Marine Biological. McKeman, Director ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT - ROCK ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON, 1961--Fisheries No. 421 Washington, D. C. April 1962 #12;Rock Island Dam, Columbia River, Washington ii #12;CONTENTS

  19. Annual Fish Passage Report -Rock Island Dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Annual Fish Passage Report - Rock Island Dam Columbia River, Washington, 1965 By Paul D. Zimmer L. McKeman, Director Annual Fish Passage Report - Rock Island Dam Columbia River, Washington, 1965;#12;Annual Fish Passage Report - Rock Island Dam Columbia River, Washington, 1965 By PAUL D. ZIMMER, Fishery

  20. Introduction 1.1 Why study rocks?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Cin-Ty Aeolus

    2 Chapter 1 Introduction 1.1 Why study rocks? I am a petrologist and I study rocks. Petrology and modification of certain types of rocks. On one level, petrology involves the art of identifying and classifying. This is of course the reverse of the historical development of petrology. I have chosen this approach because all

  1. Hot dry rock energy: Hot dry rock geothermal development program. Progress report. Fiscal year 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salazar, J.; Brown, M. [eds.

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Extended flow testing at the Fenton Hill Hot Dry Rock (HDR) test facility concluded in Fiscal Year 1993 with the completion of Phase 2 of the long-term flow test (LTFT) program. As is reported in detail in this report, the second phase of the LTFT, although only 55 days in duration, confirmed in every way the encouraging test results of the 112-day Phase I LTFT carried out in Fiscal Year 1992. Interim flow testing was conducted early in FY 1993 during the period between the two LTFT segments. In addition, two brief tests involving operation of the reservoir on a cyclic schedule were run at the end of the Phase 2 LTFT. These interim and cyclic tests provided an opportunity to conduct evaluations and field demonstrations of several reservoir engineering concepts that can now be applied to significantly increase the productivity of HDR systems. The Fenton Hill HDR test facility was shut down and brought into standby status during the last part of FY 1993. Unfortunately, the world`s largest, deepest, and most productive HDR reservoir has gone essentially unused since that time.

  2. Rock magnetism of remagnetized carbonate rocks: another look MIKE JACKSON* & NICHOLAS L. SWANSON-HYSELL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swanson-Hysell, Nicholas

    Rock magnetism of remagnetized carbonate rocks: another look MIKE JACKSON* & NICHOLAS L. SWANSON-HYSELL Institute for Rock Magnetism, Winchell School of Earth Sciences, University of Minnesota, Minnesota, US, dominantly in the super- paramagnetic and stable single-domain size range, also give rise to distinctive rock-magnetic

  3. Water Rock Interaction [WRI 14] Chemical weathering of granitic rocks: experimental approach and Pb-Li

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    of water/rock interactions both in terms of source and extent of weathering, by measuring major and traceWater Rock Interaction [WRI 14] Chemical weathering of granitic rocks: experimental approach and Pb, France Abstract In order to characterize water/rock interactions of granite, we performed laboratory

  4. Analysis of rock-fall and rock-fall avalanche seismograms in the French Alps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    the source rock slope (Figure 1), the falling mass strikes the talus slope and breaks up and/or bounces1 Analysis of rock-fall and rock-fall avalanche seismograms in the French Alps J. Deparis, D reviews seismograms from 10 rock-fall events recorded between 1992 and 2001 by the permanent seismological

  5. 2.20 Properties of Rocks and Minerals -Magnetic Properties of Rocks and Minerals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    2.20 Properties of Rocks and Minerals - Magnetic Properties of Rocks and Minerals R. J. Harrison, R 621 622 623 623 579 #12;580 Magnetic Properties of Rocks and Minerals 2.20.5.3 2.20.5.4 2, and are present in all types of rocks, sediments, and soils. These minerals retain a memory of the geomagnetic

  6. 37The Oldest Lunar Rocks Apollo astronauts recovered over 840 pounds of lunar rocks, and during

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    37The Oldest Lunar Rocks Apollo astronauts recovered over 840 pounds of lunar rocks, and during applied to the different rock samples. Location Mission Rock Type Age (Myr) Mare Tranquillitatis Apollo-11 Basalt 3,500 Oceanus Procellarum Apollo-12 Basalt 3,200 Fra Mauro Formation Apollo-14 Basalt 4,150 Apollo

  7. Enrichment of Heavy Metals in Sediment Resulting from Soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quinton, John

    agrochemicals has enriched sediment metal concentrations to toxic levels which breach many accepted standards

  8. Reproducing kernel element method Part III: Generalized enrichment and applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Shaofan

    Reproducing kernel element method Part III: Generalized enrichment and applications Hongsheng Lu enrichment is proposed to construct the global partition polynomials or to enrich global partition polynomial. This is accomplished by either multiplying enrichment functions with the original global partition poly- nomials

  9. A Robust and Flexible Design for GCEP Unattended Online Enrichment Monitoring: An OLEM Collection Node Network

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Younkin, James R [ORNL] [ORNL; March-Leuba, Jose A [ORNL] [ORNL; Garner, James R [ORNL] [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oak Ridge National Laoratory (ORNL) has engineered an on-line enrichment monitor (OLEM) to continuously measure U-235 emissions from the UF6 gas flowing through a unit header pipe of a gas centrifuge enrichment plant (GCEP) as a component of the International Atomic Energy Agency s (IAEA) new generation of technology to support enrichment plant safeguards1. In contrast to other enrichment monitoring approaches, OLEM calibrates and corrects for the pressure and temperature dependent UF6 gas-density without external radiation sources by using the inherent unit header pipe pressure dynamics and combining U-235 gamma-ray spectrometery using a shielded NaI detector with gas pressure and temperature data near the spectrum measurement point to obtain the enrichment of the gas as a function of time. From a safeguards perspective, OLEM can provide early detection of a GCEP being misused for production of highly enriched uranium, but would not detect directly the isolation and use of a cascade within the production unit to produce HEU. OLEM may also reduce the number of samples collected for destructive assay and, if coupled with load cell monitoring, could support isotope mass balance verification and unattended cylinder verification. The earlier paper presented OLEM as one component along with shared load cells and unattended cylinder verification, in the IAEA emering toolbox for unattended instruments at GCEPs1 and described the OLEM concept and how previous modeling studies and field measurements helped confirm the viability of a passive on-line enrichment monitor for meeting IAEA objectives and to support the development of performance targets. Phase I of the United States Support Program (USSP) OLEM project completed a preliminary hardware, software and communications design; phase II will build and test field prototypes in controlled laboratory settings and then at an operational facility. That paper also discussed many of the OLEM collection node commercial off the shelf (COTS) components and summarized the OLEM collection node data security provisions. This paper will discuss a secure and redundant network of OLEM collection nodes, auxiliary detection units and supporting junction boxes distributed throughout a facility for monitoring enrichment on product, feed and tails unit header pipes; the purpose and capability of the built-in Electronic Optical Sealing System (EOSS) network gateway; and a network approach for obtaining reliable and authenticated pressure measurements.

  10. Relative Permeability of Fractured Rock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark D. Habana

    2002-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Contemporary understanding of multiphase flow through fractures is limited. Different studies using synthetic fractures and various fluids have yielded different relative permeability-saturation relations. This study aimed to extend the understanding of multiphase flow by conducting nitrogen-water relative permeability experiments on a naturally-fractured rock from The Geysers geothermal field. The steady-state approach was used. However, steady state was achieved only at the endpoint saturations. Several difficulties were encountered that are attributed to phase interference and changes in fracture aperture and surface roughness, along with fracture propagation/initiation. Absolute permeabilities were determined using nitrogen and water. The permeability values obtained change with the number of load cycles. Determining the absolute permeability of a core is especially important in a fractured rock. The rock may change as asperities are destroyed and fractures propagate or st rain harden as the net stresses vary. Pressure spikes occurred in water a solute permeability experiments. Conceptual models of an elastic fracture network can explain the pressure spike behavior. At the endpoint saturations the water relative permeabilities obtained are much less than the nitrogen gas relative permeabilities. Saturations were determined by weighing and by resistivity calculations. The resistivity-saturation relationship developed for the core gave saturation values that differ by 5% from the value determined by weighing. Further work is required to complete the relative permeability curve. The steady-state experimental approach encountered difficulties due to phase interference and fracture change. Steady state may not be reached until an impractical length of time. Thus, unsteady-state methods should be pursued. In unsteady-state experiments the challenge will be in quantifying rock fracture change in addition to fluid flow changes.

  11. Signatures and Methods for the Automated Nondestructive Assay of UF6 Cylinders at Uranium Enrichment Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Leon E.; Mace, Emily K.; Misner, Alex C.; Shaver, Mark W.

    2010-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) inspectors currently perform periodic inspections at uranium enrichment plants to verify UF6 cylinder enrichment declarations. Measurements are typically performed with handheld high-resolution sensors on a sampling of cylinders taken to be representative of the facility’s entire cylinder inventory. These measurements are time-consuming, expensive, and assay only a small fraction of the total cylinder volume. An automated nondestructive assay system capable of providing enrichment measurements over the full volume of the cylinder could improve upon current verification practices in terms of manpower and assay accuracy. Such a station would use sensors that can be operated in an unattended mode at an industrial facility: medium-resolution scintillators for gamma-ray spectroscopy (e.g., NaI(Tl)) and moderated He-3 neutron detectors. This sensor combination allows the exploitation of additional, more-penetrating signatures beyond the traditional 185-keV emission from U-235: neutrons produced from F-19(?,n) reactions (spawned primarily from U 234 alpha emission) and high-energy gamma rays (extending up to 8 MeV) induced by neutrons interacting in the steel cylinder. This paper describes a study of these non-traditional signatures for the purposes of cylinder enrichment verification. The signatures and the radiation sensors designed to collect them are described, as are proof-of-principle cylinder measurements and analyses. Key sources of systematic uncertainty in the non-traditional signatures are discussed, and the potential benefits of utilizing these non-traditional signatures, in concert with an automated form of the traditional 185-keV-based assay, are discussed.

  12. Protected Polycrystalline Diamond Compact Bits For Hard Rock Drilling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Lee Cardenas

    2000-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Two bits were designed. One bit was fabricated and tested at Terra-Tek's Drilling Research Laboratory. Fabrication of the second bit was not completed due to complications in fabrication and meeting scheduled test dates at the test facility. A conical bit was tested in a Carthage Marble (compressive strength 14,500 psi) and Sierra White Granite (compressive strength 28,200 psi). During the testing, Hydraulic Horsepower, Bit Weight, Rotation Rate, were varied for the Conical Bit, a Varel Tricone Bit and Varel PDC bit. The Conical Bi did cut rock at a reasonable rate in both rocks. Beneficial effects from the near and through cutter water nozzles were not evident in the marble due to test conditions and were not conclusive in the granite due to test conditions. At atmospheric drilling, the Conical Bit's penetration rate was as good as the standard PDC bit and better than the Tricone Bit. Torque requirements for the Conical Bit were higher than that required for the Standard Bits. Spudding the conical bit into the rock required some care to avoid overloading the nose cutters. The nose design should be evaluated to improve the bit's spudding characteristics.

  13. Double contingency controls in the pit disassembly and conversion facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christensen, L. (Lowell); Brady-Raap, M. (Michaele)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Pit Disassembly and Conversion Facility (PDCF) will be built and operated at DOE'S Savannah River Site (SRS) in South Carolina. The facility will process over three metric tons of plutonium per year. There will be a significant amount of special nuclear material (SNM) moving through the various processing modules in the facility, and this will obviously require well-designed engineering controls to prevent criticality accidents. The PDCF control system will interlock glovebox entry doors closed if the correct amount of SNM has not been removed from the exit enclosure. These same engineering controls will also be used to verify that only plutonium goes to plutonium processing gloveboxes, enriched uranium goes to enriched uranium processing, and that neither goes into non-SNM processing gloveboxes.

  14. Status of gadolinium enrichment technology at LLNL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haynam, C.; Comaskey, B.; Conway, J.; Eggert, J.; Glaser, J.; Ng, E.; Paisner, J.; Solarz, R.; Worden, E.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method based on,polarization selectivity and three step laser photoionization is presented for separation of the odd isotopes of gadolinium. Measurements of the spectroscopic parameters needed to quantify the excitation pathway are discussed. Model results are presented for the efficiency of photoionization. The vapor properties of electron beam vaporized gadolinium are presented which show dramatic cooling during the expansion of the hot dense vapor into a vacuum. This results in a significant increase in the efficiency of conversion of natural feed into enriched product in the AVLIS process. Production of enriched gadolinium for use in commercial power reactors appears to be economically viable using technology in use at LLNL.

  15. from Isotope Production Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cancer-fighting treatment gets boost from Isotope Production Facility April 13, 2012 Isotope Production Facility produces cancer-fighting actinium 2:32 Isotope cancer treatment...

  16. Fuel Fabrication Facility

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Construction of the Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility Construction of the Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility November 2005 May 2007 June 2008 May 2012...

  17. Nuclear-fuel-cycle facility deployment and price generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andress, D.A.

    1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The enrichment process and how it is to be modeled in the International Nuclear Model (INM) is described. The details of enrichment production, planning, unit price generation, demand estimation and ordering are examined. The enrichment process from both the producer's and the utility's point of view is analyzed. The enrichment separative-work-unit (SWU) contracts are also discussed. The relationship of the enrichment process with other sectors of the nuclear fuel cycle, expecially uranium mining and milling is considered. There are portions of the enrichment process that are not completely understood at the present time. These areas, which require further study, will be pinpointed in the following discussion. In many cases, e.g., the advent of SMU brokerage activities, the answers will emerge only in time. In other cases, e.g., political trends, uncertainties will always remain. It is possible to cast the uncertainties in a probabilistic framework, but this is beyond the scope of this report. INM, a comprehensive model of the international nuclear industry, simulates the market decision process based on current and future price expectations under a broad range of scenario specifications. INM determines the proper reactor mix as well as the planning, operation, and unit price generation of the attendant nuclear fuel cycle facilities. The level of detail of many of the enrichment activities presented in this report, e.g., the enrichment contracts, is too fine to be incorporated into INM. Nevertheless, they are presented in a form that is ammendable to modeling. The reasons for this are two-fold. First, it shows the level of complexity that would be required to model the entire system. Second, it presents the structural framework for a detailed, stand-alone enrichment model.

  18. Status Report on the Passive Neutron Enrichment Meter (PNEM) for UF6 Cylinder Assay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Karen A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swinhoe, Martyn T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Menlove, Howard O. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Marlow, Johnna B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The Passive Neutron Enrichment Meter (PNEM) is a nondestructive assay (NDA) system being developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). It was designed to determine {sup 235}U mass and enrichment of uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) in product, feed, and tails cylinders (i.e., 30B and 48Y cylinders). These cylinders are found in the nuclear fuel cycle at uranium conversion, enrichment, and fuel fabrication facilities. The PNEM is a {sup 3}He-based neutron detection system that consists of two briefcase-sized detector pods. A photograph of the system during characterization at LANL is shown in Fig. 1. Several signatures are currently being studied to determine the most effective measurement and data reduction technique for unfolding {sup 235}U mass and enrichment. The system collects total neutron and coincidence data for both bare and cadmium-covered detector pods. The measurement concept grew out of the success of the Uranium Cylinder Assay System (UCAS), which is an operator system at Rokkasho Enrichment Plant (REP) that uses total neutron counting to determine {sup 235}U mass in UF{sub 6} cylinders. The PNEM system was designed with higher efficiency than the UCAS in order to add coincidence counting functionality for the enrichment determination. A photograph of the UCAS with a 48Y cylinder at REP is shown in Fig. 2, and the calibration measurement data for 30B product and 48Y feed and tails cylinders is shown in Fig. 3. The data was collected in a low-background environment, meaning there is very little scatter in the data. The PNEM measurement concept was first presented at the 2010 Institute of Nuclear Materials Management (INMM) Annual Meeting. The physics design and uncertainty analysis were presented at the 2010 International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Safeguards Symposium, and the mechanical and electrical designs and characterization measurements were published in the ESARDA Bulletin in 2011.

  19. Environmental assessment: Transfer of normal and low-enriched uranium billets to the United Kingdom, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under the auspices of an agreement between the U.S. and the United Kingdom, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has an opportunity to transfer approximately 710,000 kilograms (1,562,000 pounds) of unneeded normal and low-enriched uranium (LEU) to the United Kingdom; thus, reducing long-term surveillance and maintenance burdens at the Hanford Site. The material, in the form of billets, is controlled by DOE`s Defense Programs, and is presently stored as surplus material in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site. The United Kingdom has expressed a need for the billets. The surplus uranium billets are currently stored in wooden shipping containers in secured facilities in the 300 Area at the Hanford Site (the 303-B and 303-G storage facilities). There are 482 billets at an enrichment level (based on uranium-235 content) of 0.71 weight-percent. This enrichment level is normal uranium; that is, uranium having 0.711 as the percentage by weight of uranium-235 as occurring in nature. There are 3,242 billets at an enrichment level of 0.95 weight-percent (i.e., low-enriched uranium). This inventory represents a total of approximately 532 curies. The facilities are routinely monitored. The dose rate on contact of a uranium billet is approximately 8 millirem per hour. The dose rate on contact of a wooden shipping container containing 4 billets is approximately 4 millirem per hour. The dose rate at the exterior of the storage facilities is indistinguishable from background levels.

  20. Guide to research facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Guide provides information on facilities at US Department of Energy (DOE) and other government laboratories that focus on research and development of energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies. These laboratories have opened these facilities to outside users within the scientific community to encourage cooperation between the laboratories and the private sector. The Guide features two types of facilities: designated user facilities and other research facilities. Designated user facilities are one-of-a-kind DOE facilities that are staffed by personnel with unparalleled expertise and that contain sophisticated equipment. Other research facilities are facilities at DOE and other government laboratories that provide sophisticated equipment, testing areas, or processes that may not be available at private facilities. Each facility listing includes the name and phone number of someone you can call for more information.

  1. Method for laser induced isotope enrichment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pronko, Peter P.; Vanrompay, Paul A.; Zhang, Zhiyu

    2004-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods for separating isotopes or chemical species of an element and causing enrichment of a desired isotope or chemical species of an element utilizing laser ablation plasmas to modify or fabricate a material containing such isotopes or chemical species are provided. This invention may be used for a wide variety of materials which contain elements having different isotopes or chemical species.

  2. Starbursts and their contribution to metal enrichment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kunth Daniel

    2007-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    I review the properties of starburst galaxies, compare the properties of the local ones with more distant starburts and examine their role in the metal enrichment of the interstellar medium and the intergalactic-intracluster medium. Metallicity is not an arrow of time and contrary to current belief metal rich galaxies can also be found at high redshift.

  3. Hot Dry Rock; Geothermal Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The commercial utilization of geothermal energy forms the basis of the largest renewable energy industry in the world. More than 5000 Mw of electrical power are currently in production from approximately 210 plants and 10 000 Mw thermal are used in direct use processes. The majority of these systems are located in the well defined geothermal generally associated with crustal plate boundaries or hot spots. The essential requirements of high subsurface temperature with huge volumes of exploitable fluids, coupled to environmental and market factors, limit the choice of suitable sites significantly. The Hot Dry Rock (HDR) concept at any depth originally offered a dream of unlimited expansion for the geothermal industry by relaxing the location constraints by drilling deep enough to reach adequate temperatures. Now, after 20 years intensive work by international teams and expenditures of more than $250 million, it is vital to review the position of HDR in relation to the established geothermal industry. The HDR resource is merely a body of rock at elevated temperatures with insufficient fluids in place to enable the heat to be extracted without the need for injection wells. All of the major field experiments in HDR have shown that the natural fracture systems form the heat transfer surfaces and that it is these fractures that must be for geothermal systems producing from naturally fractured formations provide a basis for directing the forthcoming but, equally, they require accepting significant location constraints on HDR for the time being. This paper presents a model HDR system designed for commercial operations in the UK and uses production data from hydrothermal systems in Japan and the USA to demonstrate the reservoir performance requirements for viable operations. It is shown that these characteristics are not likely to be achieved in host rocks without stimulation processes. However, the long term goal of artificial geothermal systems developed by systematic engineering procedures at depth may still be attained if high temperature sites with extensive fracturing are developed or exploited. [DJE -2005

  4. A Resolution of the Paradox of Enrichment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Z. C. Feng; Y. Charles Li

    2013-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The paradox of enrichment was observed by M. Rosenzweig in a class of predator-prey models. Two of the parameters in the models are crucial for the paradox. These two parameters are the prey's carrying capacity and prey's half-saturation for predation. Intuitively, increasing the carrying capacity due to enrichment of the prey's environment should lead to a more stable predator-prey system. Analytically, it turns out that increasing the carrying capacity always leads to an unstable predator-prey system that is susceptible to extinction from environmental random perturbations. This is the so-called paradox of enrichment. Our resolution here rests upon a closer investigation on a dimensionless number $H$ formed from the carrying capacity and the prey's half-saturation. By recasting the models into dimensionless forms, the models are in fact governed by a few dimensionless numbers including $H$. The effects of the two parameters: carrying capacity and half-saturation are incorporated into the number $H$. In fact, increasing the carrying capacity is equivalent (i.e. has the same effect on $H$) to decreasing the half-saturation which implies more aggressive predation. Since there is no paradox between more aggressive predation and instability of the predator-prey system, the paradox of enrichment is resolved. We also further explore spatially dependent models for which the phase space is infinite dimensional. The spatially independent limit cycle which is generated by a Hopf bifurcation from an unstable steady state, is linearly stable in the infinite dimensional phase space. Numerical simulations indicate that the basin of attraction of the limit cycle is riddled. This shows that spatial perturbations can sometimes (neither always nor never) remove the paradox of enrichment near the limit cycle!

  5. Supernova Enrichment of Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Chris Fragile; Stephen D. Murray; Peter Anninos; Douglas N. C. Lin

    2003-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    (Abridged) Many dwarf galaxies exhibit sub-Solar metallicities, with some star-to-star variation, despite often containing multiple generations of stars. The total metal content in these systems is much less than expected from the heavy element production of massive stars in each episode of star formation. Such a deficiency implies that a substantial fraction of the enriched material has been lost from these small galaxies. Mass ejection from dwarf galaxies may have important consequences for the evolution of the intergalactic medium and for the evolution of massive galaxies, which themselves may have formed via the merger of smaller systems. We report here the results of three-dimensional simulations of the evolution of supernova-enriched gas within dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSph's), with the aim of determining the retention efficiency of supernova ejecta. We consider two galaxy models, selected to represent opposite ends of the dSph sequence. For each model galaxy we investigate a number of scenarios, ranging from a single supernova in smooth gas distributions to more complex multiple supernovae in highly disturbed gas distributions. The results of these investigations suggest that, for low star-formation efficiencies, it is difficult to completely expel the enriched material from the galaxy. Most of the enriched gas is, however, lost from the core of the galaxy following multiple supernovae, especially if the interstellar medium is already highly disturbed by processes such as photo-ionization and stellar winds. If subsequent star formation occurs predominantly within the core where most of the residual gas is concentrated, then these results could explain the poor self-enrichment efficiency observed in dwarf galaxies.

  6. Big Bang Day : Physics Rocks

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Is particle physics the new rock 'n' roll? The fundamental questions about the nature of the universe that particle physics hopes to answer have attracted the attention of some very high profile and unusual fans. Alan Alda, Ben Miller, Eddie Izzard, Dara O'Briain and John Barrowman all have interests in this branch of physics. Brian Cox - CERN physicist, and former member of 90's band D:Ream, tracks down some very well known celebrity enthusiasts and takes a light-hearted look at why this subject can appeal to all of us.

  7. Future Fixed Target Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melnitchouk, Wolodymyr

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We review plans for future fixed target lepton- and hadron-scattering facilities, including the 12 GeV upgraded CEBAF accelerator at Jefferson Lab, neutrino beam facilities at Fermilab, and the antiproton PANDA facility at FAIR. We also briefly review recent theoretical developments which will aid in the interpretation of the data expected from these facilities.

  8. From the Lab to the real world : sources of error in UF {sub 6} gas enrichment monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lombardi, Marcie L.

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Safeguarding uranium enrichment facilities is a serious concern for the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Safeguards methods have changed over the years, most recently switching to an improved safeguards model that calls for new technologies to help keep up with the increasing size and complexity of today’s gas centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEPs). One of the primary goals of the IAEA is to detect the production of uranium at levels greater than those an enrichment facility may have declared. In order to accomplish this goal, new enrichment monitors need to be as accurate as possible. This dissertation will look at the Advanced Enrichment Monitor (AEM), a new enrichment monitor designed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Specifically explored are various factors that could potentially contribute to errors in a final enrichment determination delivered by the AEM. There are many factors that can cause errors in the determination of uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) gas enrichment, especially during the period when the enrichment is being measured in an operating GCEP. To measure enrichment using the AEM, a passive 186-keV (kiloelectronvolt) measurement is used to determine the {sup 235}U content in the gas, and a transmission measurement or a gas pressure reading is used to determine the total uranium content. A transmission spectrum is generated using an x-ray tube and a “notch” filter. In this dissertation, changes that could occur in the detection efficiency and the transmission errors that could result from variations in pipe-wall thickness will be explored. Additional factors that could contribute to errors in enrichment measurement will also be examined, including changes in the gas pressure, ambient and UF{sub 6} temperature, instrumental errors, and the effects of uranium deposits on the inside of the pipe walls will be considered. The sensitivity of the enrichment calculation to these various parameters will then be evaluated. Previously, UF{sub 6} gas enrichment monitors have required empty pipe measurements to accurately determine the pipe attenuation (the pipe attenuation is typically much larger than the attenuation in the gas). This dissertation reports on a method for determining the thickness of a pipe in a GCEP when obtaining an empty pipe measurement may not be feasible. This dissertation studies each of the components that may add to the final error in the enrichment measurement, and the factors that were taken into account to mitigate these issues are also detailed and tested. The use of an x-ray generator as a transmission source and the attending stability issues are addressed. Both analytical calculations and experimental measurements have been used. For completeness, some real-world analysis results from the URENCO Capenhurst enrichment plant have been included, where the final enrichment error has remained well below 1% for approximately two months.

  9. Laboratory characterization of rock joints

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hsiung, S.M.; Kana, D.D.; Ahola, M.P.; Chowdhury, A.H.; Ghosh, A. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States). Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A laboratory characterization of the Apache Leap tuff joints under cyclic pseudostatic and dynamic loads has been undertaken to obtain a better understanding of dynamic joint shear behavior and to generate a complete data set that can be used for validation of existing rock-joint models. Study has indicated that available methods for determining joint roughness coefficient (JRC) significantly underestimate the roughness coefficient of the Apache Leap tuff joints, that will lead to an underestimation of the joint shear strength. The results of the direct shear tests have indicated that both under cyclic pseudostatic and dynamic loadings the joint resistance upon reverse shearing is smaller than that of forward shearing and the joint dilation resulting from forward shearing recovers during reverse shearing. Within the range of variation of shearing velocity used in these tests, the shearing velocity effect on rock-joint behavior seems to be minor, and no noticeable effect on the peak joint shear strength and the joint shear strength for the reverse shearing is observed.

  10. The Landscape of Klamath Basin Rock Art

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David, Robert James

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I incorporate results from the XRF and projectile pointRay Fluorescence (hereafter, XRF) to help affiliate rock artstudies or reports in which XRF analysis have been done.

  11. Geochemical relationships of petroleum in Mesozoic reservoirs to carbonate source rocks of Jurassic Smackover Formation, southwestern Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Claypool, G.E.; Mancini, E.A.

    1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Algal carbonate mudstones of the Jurassic Smackover Formation are the main source rocks for oil and condensate in Mesozoic reservoir rocks in southwestern Alabama. This interpretation is based on geochemical analyses of oils, condensates, and organic matter in selected samples of shale (Norphlet Formation, Haynesville Formation, Trinity Group, Tuscaloosa Group) and carbonate (Smackover Formation) rocks. Potential and probable oil source rocks are present in the Tuscaloosa Group and Smackover Formation, respectively. Extractable organic matter from Smackover carbonates has molecular and isotopic similarities to Jurassic oil. Although the Jurassic oils and condensates in southwestern Alabama have genetic similarities, they show significant compositional variations due to differences in thermal maturity and organic facies/lithofacies. Organic facies reflect different depositional conditions for source rocks in the various basins. The Mississippi Interior Salt basin was characterized by more continuous marine to hypersaline conditions, whereas the Manila and Conecuh embayments periodically had lower salnity and greater input of clastic debris and terrestrial organic matter. Petroleum and organic matter in Jurassic rocks of southwestern Alabama show a range of thermal transformations. The gas content of hydrocarbons in reservoirs increases with increasing depth and temperature. In some reservoirs where the temperature is above 266/degrees/F(130/degrees/C), gas-condensate is enriched in isotopically heavy sulfur, apparently derived from thermochemical reduction of Jurassic evaporite sulfate. This process also resulted in increase H/sub 2/S and CO in the gas, and depletion of saturated hydrocarbons in the condensate liquids.

  12. Rock Bands/Rock Brands: Mediation and Musical Performance in Post-liberalization Bangalore

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coventry, Chloe Louise

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    as in its modes of fandom, production and dissemination. Inaspects of rock music fandom: America had everything a youngthe beginnings of rock music fandom in India, even while, as

  13. Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field Investigations Of In Situ Geochemical Behavior Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  14. Preparation and characterisation of isotopically enriched Ta$_2$O$_5$ targets for nuclear astrophysics studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Caciolli; D. A. Scott; A. Di Leva; A. Formicola; M. Aliotta; M. Anders; A. Bellini; D. Bemmerer; C. Broggini; M. Campeggio; P. Corvisiero; R. Depalo; Z. Elekes; Zs. Fülöp; G. Gervino; A. Guglielmetti; C. Gustavino; Gy. Gyürky; G. Imbriani; M. Junker; M. Marta; R. Menegazzo; E. Napolitani; P. Prati; V. Rigato; V. Roca; C. Rolfs; C. Rossi Alvarez; E. Somorjai; C. Salvo; O. Straniero; F. Strieder; T. Szücs; F. Terrasi; H. P. Trautvetter; D. Trezzi

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The direct measurement of reaction cross sections at astrophysical energies often requires the use of solid targets of known thickness, isotopic composition, and stoichiometry that are able to withstand high beam currents for extended periods of time. Here, we report on the production and characterisation of isotopically enriched Ta$_2$O$_5$ targets for the study of proton-induced reactions at the Laboratory for Underground Nuclear Astrophysics facility of the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso. The targets were prepared by anodisation of tantalum backings in enriched water (up to 66% in $^{17}$O and up to 96% in $^{18}$O). Special care was devoted to minimising the presence of any contaminants that could induce unwanted background reactions with the beam in the energy region of astrophysical interest. Results from target characterisation measurements are reported, and the conclusions for proton capture measurements with these targets are drawn.

  15. Preparation and characterisation of isotopically enriched Ta$_2$O$_5$ targets for nuclear astrophysics studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caciolli, A; Di Leva, A; Formicola, A; Aliotta, M; Anders, M; Bellini, A; Bemmerer, D; Broggini, C; Campeggio, M; Corvisiero, P; Depalo, R; Elekes, Z; Fülöp, Zs; Gervino, G; Guglielmetti, A; Gustavino, C; Gyürky, Gy; Imbriani, G; Junker, M; Marta, M; Menegazzo, R; Napolitani, E; Prati, P; Rigato, V; Roca, V; Rolfs, C; Alvarez, C Rossi; Somorjai, E; Salvo, C; Straniero, O; Strieder, F; Szücs, T; Terrasi, F; Trautvetter, H P; Trezzi, D

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The direct measurement of reaction cross sections at astrophysical energies often requires the use of solid targets of known thickness, isotopic composition, and stoichiometry that are able to withstand high beam currents for extended periods of time. Here, we report on the production and characterisation of isotopically enriched Ta$_2$O$_5$ targets for the study of proton-induced reactions at the Laboratory for Underground Nuclear Astrophysics facility of the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso. The targets were prepared by anodisation of tantalum backings in enriched water (up to 66% in $^{17}$O and up to 96% in $^{18}$O). Special care was devoted to minimising the presence of any contaminants that could induce unwanted background reactions with the beam in the energy region of astrophysical interest. Results from target characterisation measurements are reported, and the conclusions for proton capture measurements with these targets are drawn.

  16. Enrichment of By-Product Materials from Steel Pickling Acid Regeneration Plants (TRP 9942)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu Swan, Delta Ferrites LLC

    2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A new process for manufacturing an enriched, iron-based product (strontium hexaferrite) in existing steel pickling acid regeneration facilities was evaluated. Process enhancements and equipment additions were made to an existing acid regeneration plant to develop and demonstrate (via pilot scale testing and partial-capacity production trials) the viability of a patented method to produce strontium-based compounds that, when mixed with steel pickling acid and roasted, would result in a strontium hexaferrite powder precursor which could then be subjected to further heat treatment in an atmosphere that promotes rapid, relatively low-temperature formation of discrete strontium hexaferrite magnetic domains yielding an enriched iron-based product, strontium hexaferrite, that can be used in manufacturing hard ferrite magnets.

  17. The Economics of Oxygen Enriched Air Production Via Membranes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gollan, A.; Kleper, M. H.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oxygen enriched air combustion is a recognized approach to energy conservation. Conventional methods of producing oxygen enriched air: Pressure Swing Adsorption and Cryogenics, are energy-intensive and expensive. In this paper the economics of using...

  18. Paducah and Portsmouth Off-Specification Enriched and Normal...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Enriched and Normal UF 6 Inventory 1 3B refers to a 30B cylinder size and 4A refers to a 48A size cylinder. Table 1 PORTS Enriched Inventory Container ID Sample Transfer Gross lbs...

  19. Enriching personal information management with document interaction histories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitton, Mary C.

    Enriching personal information management with document interaction histories by Karl Gyllstrom;Abstract KARL GYLLSTROM: Enriching personal information management with document interaction histories. (Under the direction of David Stotts.) Personal information management is increasingly challenging

  20. CenterPoint The Center for Academic Enrichment & Outreach Newsletter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hemmers, Oliver

    CenterPoint March 2010 The Center for Academic Enrichment & Outreach Newsletter ONLINE ARTICLES and outreach and the executive director for The Center for Academic Enrichment and Outreach (The Center

  1. CenterPoint The Center for Academic Enrichment & Outreach Newsletter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hemmers, Oliver

    CenterPoint April 2011 The Center for Academic Enrichment & Outreach Newsletter ONLINE ARTICLES's Center for Academic Enrichment and Outreach (The Center) and funded by competitive grants from the U

  2. Certification of U.S. instrumentation in Russian nuclear processing facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D.H. Powell; J.N. Sumner

    2000-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Agreements between the United States (U.S.) and the Russian Federation (R.F.) require the down-blending of highly enriched uranium (HEU) from dismantled Russian Federation nuclear weapons. The Blend Down Monitoring System (BDMS) was jointly developed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to continuously monitor the enrichments and flow rates in the HEU blending operations at the R.F. facilities. A significant requirement of the implementation of the BDMS equipment in R.F. facilities concerned the certification of the BDMS equipment for use in a Russian nuclear facility. This paper discusses the certification of the BDMS for installation in R.F. facilities, and summarizes the lessons learned from the process that can be applied to the installation of other U.S. equipment in Russian nuclear facilities.

  3. Metal Enrichment in the Intra-Cluster Medium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sabine Schindler

    2006-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The enrichment of the Intra-Cluster Medium (ICM) with heavy elements is reviewed. There is now good observational evidence for enrichment including abundance ratios and metallicity distributions. Various processes involved in the enrichment process -- ram-pressure stripping, galactic winds, galaxy-galaxy interactions, AGN outflows and intra-cluster supernovae -- are described. Simulations of the ICM evolution taking into account metal enrichment are presented.

  4. Nitrous Oxide Nitrification and Denitrification 15N Enrichment Factors from Amazon Forest Soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    M. Wahlen. 1997. Stable isotope enrichment in stratosphericthat we know the isotope enrichment factors for nitri?cationmethod for measuring N isotope enrichment factors for nitri?

  5. Robotic Enrichment Processing of Roche 454 Titanium Emlusion PCR at the DOE Joint Genome Institute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton, Matthew

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Robotic Enrichment Processing of Roche 454 Titanium EmulsionLaboratory Abstract Enrichment of emulsion PCR product isergonomic demands of the 454 enrichment process. The robot

  6. High-solids enrichment of thermophilic microbial communities and their enzymes on bioenergy feedstocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reddy, A. P.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High-solids enrichment of thermophilic microbial communities5, upon four successive enrichments on switchgrass. Overall,the first and second enrichments increased 4-fold for

  7. SNP-based pathway enrichment analysis for genome-wide association studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SNP: applying gene set enrichment analysis to SNP data fromdetection of pathway enrichment in genome-wide associational. : SNP-based pathway enrichment analysis for genome-wide

  8. Nitrous Oxide Nitrification and Denitrification 15N Enrichment Factors from Amazon Forest Soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1997. Stable isotope enrichment in stratospheric nitrouson the apparent enrichment factors and the isotopologue ?differentiated in this manner. Enrichments in 18 O have been

  9. Enrichment, isolation and characterization of fungi tolerant to 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singer, S.W.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Enrichment, isolation and characterization of fungi tolerantMethods and Results: Enrichment experiments performed usingisolates from these enrichments were capable of growing in a

  10. Uranium enrichment export control guide: Gaseous diffusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document was prepared to serve as a guide for export control officials in their interpretation, understanding, and implementation of export laws that relate to the Zangger International Trigger List for gaseous diffusion uranium enrichment process components, equipment, and materials. Particular emphasis is focused on items that are especially designed or prepared since export controls are required for these by States that are party to the International Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty.

  11. ECOLOGY AND POPULATION BIOLOGY Enhanced Carbon Enrichment in Parasitoids (Hymenoptera)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosenheim, Jay A.

    (2): 205Đ213 (2005) ABSTRACT By considering the magnitude of isotope enrichment associated with trophicŢcult. Several recent reviews have estimated that consumers become enriched in the heavy nitrogen isotope that consumers become enriched in the heavy carbon isotope between 0.4 and 0.5 per trophic transfer. Although

  12. Predation, Enrichment, and Phytoplankton Community Structure Michael Lynch; Joseph Shapiro

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lynch, Michael

    Predation, Enrichment, and Phytoplankton Community Structure Michael Lynch; Joseph Shapiro@jstor.org. http://www.jstor.org Thu Aug 30 11:57:16 2007 #12;Predation, enrichment, and phytoplankton community and enrichment to the Pleasant Pond phytoplankton community was examined through a series of enclosure

  13. CARBON ENRICHMENT IN RESIDUAL AUSTENITE DURING MARTENSITIC TRANSFORMATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    179 CARBON ENRICHMENT IN RESIDUAL AUSTENITE DURING MARTENSITIC TRANSFORMATION S. W. Ooi1 , Y. R, retained austenite, autotempering and low carbon steel. Abstract Carbon enrichment of austenite and carbide enrich with carbon [9-11] and there has been recent work to exploit this process in the design of `quench

  14. TRAINING PENGUINS TO INTERACT WITH ENRICHMENT ITEMS FOR LASTING EFFECTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Timberlake, William D.

    TRAINING PENGUINS TO INTERACT WITH ENRICHMENT ITEMS FOR LASTING EFFECTS Eduardo J. Fernandez decades, zoo have begun to focus more on the use of enrichment to promote the "well-being" of their animals, (Markowitz & Aday, 1998). One purpose of enrichment is to promote more naturalistic behaviors

  15. College Enrichment Program(CEP) New Student Orientation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Mexico, University of

    College Enrichment Program(CEP) New Student Orientation Summer 2011 In the Division of Student Affairs #12;2 Table of Contents UNM Phone Numbers 3 Welcome Letter 4 What is the College Enrichment Welcome Back BBQ 14 Campus Map 15 #12;3 UNM Phone Numbers College Enrichment Program 277-5321 Admissions

  16. Research Report Sensory experience determines enrichment-induced plasticity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kilgard, Michael P.

    Research Report Sensory experience determines enrichment-induced plasticity in rat auditory cortex in an enriched environment increases response strength and paired-pulse depression in the auditory cortex.L., Kilgard, M.P., 2004. Environmental enrichment improves response strength, threshold, selectivity

  17. Larry H. & Gail Miller Enrichment Scholarship Fall 2015 Application Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feschotte, Cedric

    Larry H. & Gail Miller Enrichment Scholarship Fall 2015 Application Information The University benefits and enriches the educational experiences of all students, faculty and staff. Thus the U strives/leadership service. The Miller Enrichment Scholarship award may include any or all of the following benefits: Full

  18. Evaluating mechanisms of nutrient depletion and 13 C enrichment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sigman, Daniel M.

    Evaluating mechanisms of nutrient depletion and 13 C enrichment in the intermediate-depth Atlantic to evaluate competing hypotheses for the cause of observed nutrient depletion and 13 C enrichment isotopic equilibration at low temperatures (i.e., 13C enrichment). Although this export adds nutrients

  19. ENVIRONMENTAL ENRICHMENT REDUCES THE MNEMONIC AND NEURAL BENEFITS OF ESTROGEN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frick, Karyn M.

    ENVIRONMENTAL ENRICHMENT REDUCES THE MNEMONIC AND NEURAL BENEFITS OF ESTROGEN J. E. GRESACKa AND K response to estrogen. Female mice were raised in standard (SC) or enriched (EC) condi- tions from weaning protein synaptophysin and of brain- derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) were measured. Enrich- ment effects

  20. Chemical Enrichment from Massive Stars in Starbursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henry A. Kobulnicky

    1999-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The warm ionized gas in low-mass, metal-poor starforming galaxies is chemically homogeneous despite the prevalence of large H II regions which contain hundreds of evolved massive stars, supernovae, and Wolf-Rayet stars with chemically-enriched winds. Galaxies with large Wolf-Rayet star content are chemically indistinguishable from other vigorously star-forming galaxies. Furthermore, no significant localized chemical fluctuations are present in the vicinity of young star clusters, despite large expected chemical yields of massive stars. An ad-hoc fine-tuning of the release, dispersal and mixing of the massive star ejecta could give rise to the observed homogeneity, but a more probable explanation is that fresh ejecta from massive stars reside in a hard-to-observe hot or cold phase. In any case, the observed chemical homogeneity indicates that heavy elements which have already mixed with the warm interstellar medium (thus accessible to optical spectroscopy) are homogeneously dispersed over scales exceeding 1 kpc. Mixing of fresh ejecta with the surrounding warm ISM apparently requires longer than the lifetimes of typical H II regions (>10^7 yrs). The lack of observed localized chemical enrichments is consistent with a scenario whereby freshly-synthesized metals from massive stars are expelled into the halos of galaxies in a hot, 10^6 K phase by supernova-driven winds before they cool and ``rain'' back down upon the galaxy, creating gradual enrichments on spatial scales >1 kpc.

  1. Self-enrichment in Omega Centauri

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Ikuta; N. Arimoto

    1999-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The origin of abundance spreads observed in omega Centauri is studied in the context of the self-enrichment scenario. Five chemical evolution models are constructed and are compared with empirical metallicity distribution of $\\omega$ Cen. After a series of simulations, it is found that neither of closed-box, outflow, nor infall models can reproduce the empirical metallicity distribution of omega Cen, while a modified outflow model with a bimodal initial mass function (IMF) gives a metallicity distribution that fits closely to the empirical ones. In the modified outflow model, long-lived stars are assumed to form after the first explosion of type II supernovae (SNII) in a proto-cloud. The modified outflow model involves gas infall at the very first chemical evolution. Thus we conclude that self-enrichment causes the abundance dispersion in omega Cen. A success of the outflow model with the bimodal IMF implies that low mass stars in a globular cluster (GC) should have formed in the gas already enriched by the first generation of SNII. This scenario, originally proposed by Cayrel (1986), can explain a lack of globular clusters with [Fe/H] > -2.2 in the Milky Way Galaxy.

  2. CRAD, Facility Safety- Nuclear Facility Safety Basis

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) that can be used for assessment of a contractor's Nuclear Facility Safety Basis.

  3. Texas Facilities Commission's Facility Management Strategic Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramirez, J. A.

    , Texas, November 17 - 19, 2009 Facility Strategic Plan ?High Performance Building Approach ? Envelope ? Load Reduction ? (Re)Design ? Advanced Tactics ?Building Automation ? Sub-metering ? Controls ?Commissioning ? Assessment ? Continuous ?Facility... International Conference for Enhanced Building Operations, Austin, Texas, November 17 - 19, 2009 Commissioning Assessment ?30 buildings ?CC Opportunities ?O&M Improvements ?Energy/Capital Improvement Opportunities ?Quick Payback Implementation ?Levering DM...

  4. WAVE GENERATIONS FROM CONFINED EXPLOSIONS IN ROCKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, Sarah T.

    WAVE GENERATIONS FROM CONFINED EXPLOSIONS IN ROCKS C. L. Liu and Thomas J. Ahrens Seismological Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 In order to record P- and S-waves on the interactions between incident P- and SV-waves and free-surfaces of rocks. The relations between particle

  5. Rheology of rock glaciers: a preliminary assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giardino, J.R.; Vitek, J.D.; Hoskins, E.R.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Movement of rock debris under the influence of gravity, i.e., mass movement, generates a range of phenomena from soil creep, through solifluction,debris flows and rock glaciers to rock falls. Whereas the resultant forms of these phenomena are different, common elements in the mechanics of movement are utilized in the basic interpretation of the processes of formation. Measurements of morphologic variables provide data for deductive analyses of processes that operate too slowly to observe or for processes that generated relict phenomena. External and internal characteristics or rock glacier morphometry and measured rates of motion serve as the basis for the development of a rheological model to explain phenomena classified as rock glaciers. A rock glacier in the Sangre de Cristo Mountains of Southern Colorado, which exhibits a large number of ridges and furrows and lichen bare fronts of lobes, suggests present day movement. A strain-net established on the surface provides evidence of movement characteristics. These data plus morphologic and fabric data suggest two rheological models to explain the flow of this rock glacier. Model one is based upon perfect plastic flow and model two is based upon stratified fluid movement with viscosity changing with depth. These models permit a better understanding of the movement mechanics and demonstrate that catastrophic events and slow creep contribute to the morphologic characteristics of this rock glacier.

  6. Damage and plastic deformation of reservoir rocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ze'ev, Reches

    Damage and plastic deformation of reservoir rocks: Part 1. Damage fracturing Seth Busetti, Kyran mechanics, fluid flow in fractured reservoirs, and geomechanics in nonconventional reservoirs. Kyran Mish finite deformation of reservoir rocks. We present an at- tempt to eliminate the main limitations

  7. ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT ROCK ISLAND DAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT ROCK ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON 1960 . SPECIAL SCIENTIFIC ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON, 1960 by Paul D. Zimmer and Clifton C. Davidson United States Fish This annual report of fishway operations at Rock Island Dam in 1960 is dedicated to the memory of co

  8. ROCK ELASTIC PROPERTIES: DEPENDENCE ON MICROSTRUCTURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ROCK ELASTIC PROPERTIES: DEPENDENCE ON MICROSTRUCTURE James G. Berryman and Patricia A. Berge Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory P. O. Box 808 L­202 Livermore, CA 94551­9900 #12; ROCK ELASTIC PROPERTIES: DEPENDENCE ON MICROSTRUCTURE James G. Berryman and Patricia A. Berge Lawrence Livermore National

  9. Specific energy for pulsed laser rock drilling.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Z.; Reed, C. B.; Kornecki, G.; Gahan, B. C.; Parker, R. A.; Batarseh, S.; Graves, R. M.; Figueroa, H.; Skinner, N.; Technology Development

    2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Application of advanced high power laser technology to oil and gas well drilling has been attracting significant research interests recently among research institutes, petroleum industries, and universities. Potential laser or laser-aided oil and gas well drilling has many advantages over the conventional rotary drilling, such as high penetration rate, reduction or elimination of tripping, casing, and bit costs, and enhanced well control, perforating and side-tracking capabilities. The energy required to remove a unit volume of rock, namely the specific energy (SE), is a critical rock property data that can be used to determine both the technical and economic feasibility of laser oil and gas well drilling. When a high power laser beam is applied on a rock, it can remove the rock by thermal spallation, melting, or vaporization depending on the applied laser energy and the way the energy is applied. The most efficient rock removal mechanism would be the one that requires the minimum energy to remove a unit volume of rock. Samples of sandstone, shale, and limestone were prepared for laser beam interaction with a 1.6 kW pulsed Nd:yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser beam to determine how the beam size, power, repetition rate, pulse width, exposure time and energy can affect the amount of energy transferred to the rock for the purposes of spallation, melting, and vaporization. The purpose of the laser rock interaction experiment was to determine the optimal parameters required to remove a maximum rock volume from the samples while minimizing energy input. Absorption of radiant energy from the laser beam gives rise to the thermal energy transfer required for the destruction and removal of the rock matrix. Results from the tests indicate that each rock type has a set of optimal laser parameters to minimize specific energy (SE) values as observed in a set of linear track and spot tests. As absorbed energy outpaces heat diffusion by the rock matrix, local temperatures can rise to the melting points of the minerals and quickly increase observed SE values. Tests also clearly identified the spallation and melting zones for shale samples while changing the laser power. The lowest SE values are obtained in the spalling zone just prior to the onset of mineral melt. The laser thermally spalled and saw mechanically cut rocks show similarity of surface microstructure. The study also found that increasing beam repetition rate within the same material removal mechanism would increase the material removal rate, which is believed due to an increase of maximum temperature, thermal cycling frequency, and intensity of laser-driven shock wave within the rock.

  10. Determination of Rock Mass Modulus Using the Plate Loading Method at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finley, R.E.; George, J.T.; Riggins, M.

    1999-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A suite of plate loading tests has recently been conducted by Sandia National Laboratories at the Exploratory Studies Facility at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Fielding of these in situ tests as well as other approaches undertaken for the determination of rock mass modulus are described. The various methodologies are evaluated and their data compared. Calculation by existing empirical methods and numerical modeling are compared to each other as well as to field data.

  11. High Accuracy U-235 Enrichment Verification Station for Low Enriched Uranium Alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lillard, C. R.; Hayward, J. P.; Williamson, M. R.

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The Y-12 National Security Complex is playing a role in the U.S. High Performance Research Reactor (USHPRR) Conversion program sponsored by the U.S. National Nuclear Security Administration's Office of Global Threat Reduction. The USHPRR program has a goal of converting remaining U.S. reactors that continue to use highly enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. The USHPRR program is currently developing a LEU Uranium-Molybdenum (U-Mo) monolithic fuel for use in the U.S. high performance research reactors.Y-12 is supporting both the fuel development and fuel fabrication efforts by fabricating low enriched U-Mo foils from its own source material for irradiation experiments and for optimizing the fabrication process in support of scaling up the process to a commercial production scale. Once the new fuel is qualified, Y-12 will produce and ship U-Mo coupons with verified 19.75% +0.2% - 0.3% U-235 enrichment to be fabricated into fuel elements for the USHPRRs. Considering this small enrichment tolerance and the transition into HEU being set strictly at 20% U-235, a characterization system with a measurement uncertainty of less than or equal to 0.1% in enrichment is desired to support customer requirements and minimize production costs. Typical uncertainty for most available characterization systems today is approximately 1-5%; therefore, a specialized system must be developed which results in a reduced measurement uncertainty. A potential system using a High-Purity Germanium (HPGe) detector has been procured, and tests have been conducted to verify its capabilities with regards to the requirements. Using four U-Mo enrichment standards fabricated with complete isotopic and chemical characterization, infinite thickness and peak-ratio enrichment measurement methods have been considered for use. As a result of inhomogeneity within the U-Mo samples, FRAM, an isotopic analysis software, has been selected for initial testing. A systematic approach towards observing effects on FRAM's enrichment analysis has been conducted with regards to count and dead time.

  12. Low-enriched uranium holdup measurements in Kazakhstan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barham, M.A.; Ceo, R.N.; Smith, S.E. [Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, TN (United States)] [and others

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantification of the residual nuclear material remaining in process equipment has long been a challenge to those who work with nuclear material accounting systems. Fortunately, nuclear material has spontaneous radiation emissions that can be measured. If gamma-ray measurements can be made, it is easy to determine what isotope a deposit contains. Unfortunately, it can be quite difficult to relate this measured signal to an estimate of the mass of the nuclear deposit. Typically, the measurement expert must work with incomplete or inadequate information to determine a quantitative result. Simplified analysis models, the distribution of the nuclear material, any intervening attenuation, background(s), and the source-to-detector distance(s) can have significant impacts on the quantitative result. This presentation discusses the application of a generalized-geometry holdup model to the low-enriched uranium fuel pellet fabrication plant in Ust-Kamenogorsk, Kazakhstan. Preliminary results will be presented. Software tools have been developed to assist the facility operators in performing and documenting the measurements. Operator feedback has been used to improve the user interfaces.

  13. New Measures to Safeguard Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitaker, Jr., James [ORNL; Garner, James R [ORNL; Whitaker, Michael [ORNL; Lockwood, Dunbar [U.S. Department of Energy, NNSA; Gilligan, Kimberly V [ORNL; Younkin, James R [ORNL; Hooper, David A [ORNL; Henkel, James J [ORNL; Krichinsky, Alan M [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plants (GCEPs) increase in separative work unit (SWU) capacity, the current International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) model safeguards approach needs to be strengthened. New measures to increase the effectiveness of the safeguards approach are being investigated that will be mutually beneficial to the facility operators and the IAEA. One of the key concepts being studied for application at future GCEPs is embracing joint use equipment for process monitoring of load cells at feed and withdrawal (F/W) stations. A mock F/W system was built at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to generate and collect F/W data from an analogous system. The ORNL system has been used to collect data representing several realistic normal process and off-normal (including diversion) scenarios. Emphasis is placed on the novelty of the analysis of data from the sensors as well as the ability to build information out of raw data, which facilitates a more effective and efficient verification process. This paper will provide a progress report on recent accomplishments and next steps.

  14. Final Environmental Impact Statement for the construction and operation of Claiborne Enrichment Center, Homer, Louisiana (Docket No. 70-3070)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zeitoun, A. [Science Applications International Corp., Germantown, MD (United States)

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This two-volume Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) was prepared by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in accordance with regulation 10 CFR Part 51, which implements the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). Volume 1 contains the assessment of the potential environmental impacts for licensing the construction and operation of a proposed gaseous centrifuge enrichment facility to be built in Claiborne Parish, Louisiana, by Louisiana Energy Services, LP. (LES). The proposed facility would have a production capacity of about 866 metric tons annually of up to 5 weight percent enriched UF{sub 6}, using a proven centrifuge technology. Included in the assessment are construction, both normal operations and potential accidents (internal and external events), and the eventual decontamination and decommissioning (D&D)- of the site. Issues addressed include the purpose and need for the facility, the alternatives to the proposed action, potential disposition of the tails, the site selection process, and environmental justice. The NRC staff concludes that the facility can be constructed and operated with small and acceptable impacts on the public and the environment. The FEIS supports issuance of a license to the applicant, Louisiana Energy Services, to authorize construction and operation of the proposed facility.

  15. FRACTURE DETECTION IN CRYSTALLINE ROCK USING ULTRASONIC SHEAR WAVES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waters, K.H.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the piezoelectric source plate and the rock surface. With aThe S^j sources were bonded to the rock surface with a fast-^ source plate was epoxied in position on the rock specimen.

  16. Technology Transitions Facilities Database

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The types of R&D facilities at the DOE Laboratories available to the public typically fall into three broad classes depending on the mode of access: Designated User Facilities, Shared R&D...

  17. Mechanical defradation of Emplacement Drifts at Yucca Mountain- A Modeling Case Study. Part I: Nonlithophysal Rock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. Lin; D. Kicker; B. Damjanac; M. Board; M. Karakouzian

    2006-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper outlines rock mechanics investigations associated with mechanical degradation of planned emplacement drifts at Yucca Mountain, which is the designated site for the proposed U.S. high-level nuclear waste repository. The factors leading to drift degradation include stresses from the overburden, stresses induced by the heat released from the emplaced waste, stresses due to seismically related ground motions, and time-dependent strength degradation. The welded tuff emplacement horizon consists of two groups of rock with distinct engineering properties: nonlithophysal units and lithophysal units, based on the relative proportion of lithophysal cavities. The term 'lithophysal' refers to hollow, bubble like cavities in volcanic rock that are surrounded by a porous rim formed by fine-grained alkali feldspar, quartz, and other minerals. Lithophysae are typically a few centimeters to a few decimeters in diameter. Part I of the paper concentrates on the generally hard, strong, and fractured nonlithophysal rock. The degradation behavior of the tunnels in the nonlithophysal rock is controlled by the occurrence of keyblocks. A statistically equivalent fracture model was generated based on extensive underground fracture mapping data from the Exploratory Studies Facility at Yucca Mountain. Three-dimensional distinct block analyses, generated with the fracture patterns randomly selected from the fracture model, were developed with the consideration of in situ, thermal, and seismic loads. In this study, field data, laboratory data, and numerical analyses are well integrated to provide a solution for the unique problem of modeling drift degradation.

  18. Measurement of the enrichment of uranium in the pipework of a gas centrifuge enrichment plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Packer, T.W.; Lees, E.W.; Close, D.; Nixon, K.V.; Pratt, J.C.; Strittmatter, R.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US and UK have been separately working on the development of a NDA instrument to determine the enrichment of gaseous UF/sub 6/ at low pressures in cascade header pipework in line with the conclusions of the Hexapartite Safeguards Project viz. the instrument is capable of making a ''go/no go'' decision of whether the enrichment is less than/greater than 20%. Recently, there has been a series of very useful technical exchanges of ideas and information between the two countries. This has led to a technical formulation for such an instrumentation based on ..gamma..-ray spectrometry which, although plant-specific in certain features, nevertheless is based on the same physical principles. Experimental results from commercially operating enrichment plants are very encouraging and indicate that a complete measurement including set up time on the pipe should be attainable in about 30 minutes when measuring pipes of diameter around 110 mm. 5 refs., 4 figs.

  19. Enhancing Staging Capabilities at the Device Assembly Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kanning, R. A.; Long, R. G.; Garcia, B. O.; Williams, V. D.

    2013-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The radioactive material limits allowed by the Documented Safety Analysis (DSA) at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) Device Assembly Facility (DAF) can support larger quantities than the floor space will accommodate. In order to maximize the full staging bunker capability, National Security Technologies, LLC, (NSTec) is developing a plan to take advantage of these high inventory limits and evaluate staging options such as shelves, racks, and mezzanines. This plan will investigate cost and evaluate U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex-wide alternatives used at other sites (Highly Enriched Uranium Manufacturing Facility, Pantex, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, etc.) that addressed similar situations.

  20. altered granitic rock: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    22 Everglades National Park Groundwater wells Surface water monitoring locations Rock mining locations 12 Demers, Nora Egan 211 Nova Scotia Rock Garden Club Membership...

  1. Regional Geology: GIS Database for Alternative Host Rocks and...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Regional Geology: GIS Database for Alternative Host Rocks and Potential Siting Guidelines Regional Geology: GIS Database for Alternative Host Rocks and Potential Siting Guidelines...

  2. aspo hard rock: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bayesian estimation of rock mass boundary conditions with applications to the AECL underground research laboratory F. Tonon*,1 conditions for rock mass models is...

  3. antarctic rocks colonized: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bayesian estimation of rock mass boundary conditions with applications to the AECL underground research laboratory F. Tonon*,1 conditions for rock mass models is...

  4. algonquin class rocks: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bayesian estimation of rock mass boundary conditions with applications to the AECL underground research laboratory F. Tonon*,1 conditions for rock mass models is...

  5. acidic crystalline rock: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bayesian estimation of rock mass boundary conditions with applications to the AECL underground research laboratory F. Tonon*,1 conditions for rock mass models is...

  6. aphanitic melt rocks: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bayesian estimation of rock mass boundary conditions with applications to the AECL underground research laboratory F. Tonon*,1 conditions for rock mass models is...

  7. aespoe hard rock: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bayesian estimation of rock mass boundary conditions with applications to the AECL underground research laboratory F. Tonon*,1 conditions for rock mass models is...

  8. Stress and fault rock controls on fault zone hydrology, Coso...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    rock controls on fault zone hydrology, Coso geothermal field, CA Abstract In crystalline rock of the Coso Geothermal Field, CA, fractures are the primary source of permeability....

  9. Simulations of Cosmic Chemical Enrichment with Hypernova

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiaki Kobayashi

    2006-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We simulate cosmic chemical enrichment with a hydrodynamical model including supernova and hypernova feedback. We find that the majority of stars in present-day massive galaxies formed in much smaller galaxies at high redshifts, despite their late assembly times. The hypernova feedback drives galactic outflows efficiently in low mass galaxies, and these winds eject heavy elements into the intergalactic medium. The ejected baryon fraction is larger for less massive galaxies, correlates well with stellar metallicity. The observed mass-metallicity relation is well reproduced as a result of the mass-dependent galactic winds. We also predict the cosmic supernova and gamma-ray burst rate histories.

  10. The Enrichment of the Intracluster Medium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brad K. Gibson; Francesca Matteucci

    1996-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The enrichment of the intracluster medium (ICM) of galaxy clusters, within the framework of the supernovae-driven wind model for elliptical galaxies, has been considered under two extreme assumptions regarding the binding energy-mass-radius relations. Unless the binding energy at the time of wind commencement, for a given galactic mass, was a factor of approximately five lower than that predicted by the present-day relation, at most 20% of the ICM gas could have originated within the cluster ellipticals themselves, the remainder being of primordial origin.

  11. Rock bed behavior and reverse thermosiphon effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perry, J.E.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two rock beds, in the Mark Jones and Doug Balcomb houses, have been instrumented, monitored, and analyzed. Observed experimental operation has been compared with, or explained by, theoretical predictions. The latter are based on one-dimensional finite-difference computer calculation of rock bed charging and discharging, with fixed or variable inputs of air flow rate and temperature. Both rock beds exhibit appreciable loss of stored heat caused by lack of backdraft dampers or incomplete closure of such dampers. These topics are discussed, and some improvements that might be made in future installations are noted.

  12. Commercial potential of natural gas storage in lined rock caverns (LRC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The geologic conditions in many regions of the United States will not permit the development of economical high-deliverability gas storage in salt caverns. These regions include the entire Eastern Seaboard; several northern states, notably Minnesota and Wisconsin; many of the Rocky Mountain States; and most of the Pacific Northwest. In late 1997, the United States Department of Energy (USDOE) Federal Energy Technology Center engaged Sofregaz US to investigate the commercialization potential of natural gas storage in Lined Rock Caverns (LRC). Sofregaz US teamed with Gaz de France and Sydkraft, who had formed a consortium, called LRC, to perform the study for the USDOE. Underground storage of natural gas is generally achieved in depleted oil and gas fields, aquifers, and solution-mined salt caverns. These storage technologies require specific geologic conditions. Unlined rock caverns have been used for decades to store hydrocarbons - mostly liquids such as crude oil, butane, and propane. The maximum operating pressure in unlined rock caverns is limited, since the host rock is never entirely impervious. The LRC technology allows a significant increase in the maximum operating pressure over the unlined storage cavern concept, since the gas in storage is completely contained with an impervious liner. The LRC technology has been under development in Sweden by Sydkraft since 1987. The development process has included extensive technical studies, laboratory testing, field tests, and most recently includes a storage facility being constructed in southern Sweden (Skallen). The LRC development effort has shown that the concept is technically and economically viable. The Skallen storage facility will have a rock cover of 115 meters (375 feet), a storage volume of 40,000 cubic meters (250,000 petroleum barrels), and a maximum operating pressure of 20 MPa (2,900 psi). There is a potential for commercialization of the LRC technology in the United States. Two regions were studied in some detail - the Northeast and the Southeast. The investment cost for an LRC facility in the Northeast is approximately $182 million and $343 million for a 2.6-billion cubic foot (bcf) working gas facility and a 5.2-bcf working gas storage facility, respectively. The relatively high investment cost is a strong function of the cost of labor in the Northeast. The labor union-related rules and requirements in the Northeast result in much higher underground construction costs than might result in Sweden, for example. The LRC technology gas storage service is compared to other alternative technologies. The LRC technology gas storage service was found to be competitive with other alternative technologies for a variety of market scenarios.

  13. Metal Enrichment in the Early Galactic Halo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Ikuta; N. Arimoto

    1999-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    An early history of metal enrichment in the Galactic halo is studied. We investigate chemical inhomogeneity by using a stochastic chemical evolution model. The model confronts with metallicity distribution function of long-lived halo stars which is found to be a clue to obtain the best model prescriptions. We find that the star formation in the halo virtually terminated by around 1 Gyr and that the halo has never been chemically homogeneous in its star formation history. This conclusion does not depend whether mass loss from the halo is taken into account or not. Observed ratios of alpha-elements with respect to iron do not show scatters on a [alpha/Fe]-[Fe/H] plane, but this does not imply that interstellar matter in the halo was homogeneous because a chemical evolution path on this diagram is degenerate in the star formation rate. On the other hand, apparent spread of [Sr/Fe] ratio among metal-poor halo stars does not reflect an inhomogeneous metal enrichment, instead it is due to a sharp increase in a production rate of strontium that is probably synthesised in slightly less massive stars than progenitor of iron-producing SNII.

  14. Economic and Non-proliferation Policy Considerations of Uranium Enrichment in Brazil and Argentina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Short, Steven M.; Phillips, Jon R.; Weimar, Mark R.; Mahy, Heidi A.

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The nuclear development programs of both Argentina and Brazil have, since the 1970s, been premised on the desire for self-sufficiency and assurance of nuclear fuel supply. While military rivalry and mutual distrust led to nuclear weapons related development programs in the 1970s and 1980s, both countries have since terminated these programs. Furthermore, the governments of both countries have pledged their commitment to exclusively non-explosive use of nuclear energy and have signed the Non Proliferation Treaty (NPT). Utilizing rights provided for under the NPT, both Argentina and Brazil have nuclear fuel production facilities, with the notable exception of enrichment plants, that provide much of the current indigenous fuel requirements for their nuclear power plants. However, both countries are actively developing enrichment capability to fill this gap. The purpose of this report is to assess the economic basis and non-proliferation policy considerations for indigenous enrichment capability within the context of their desired self-sufficiency and to evaluate possible United States Government policy options.

  15. Small Power Production Facilities (Montana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    For the purpose of these regulations, a small power production facility is defined as a facility that:...

  16. Design considerations for instrumentation to monitor the enrichment of gaseous UF{sub 6}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Close, D.A.

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The measurement of the enrichment of gaseous UF{sub 6} presents unique measurement problems. The well-known uranium enrichment meter is not applicable. For solid samples of uranium, including metal, and oxide and fluoride compounds, the infinite thickness is {approximately}1 cm. Gaseous UF{sub 6}, at a pressure of tens of Torr, has an infinite thickness on the order of 350 m. This is a physically and operationally unrealistic situation for an operating facility. Pipe dimensions and composition also strongly influence the applicable measurement technique. Fundamentally, the definition of enrichment is the ratio of {sup 235}U to total uranium. The amount of {sup 235}U is determined by measuring the intensity of the 185.7-keV gamma ray from the decay of {sup 235}U. There are two methods that have been implemented to determine the amount of total uranium in the gas: X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and gamma-ray transmission. The technique used to measure the amount of total uranium is dependent on the pressure of the gas in the header pipe. The transmission measurement is applicable for higher pressures, generally pressures {lt}40 Torr. The XRF measurement can be used for pressures greater than a few Torr. An XRF measurement at pressures lower than a few Torr becomes very difficult. Two other constraints strongly influence the implementation of the measurement technique--pipe diameter and material composition. These two techniques have been implemented. The XRF technique is an approved measurement by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) for inspections at gaseous centrifuge facilities. The XRF technique has also been implemented at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant for the IAEA verification experiment during the period December 1997 to October 1998 to verify the downblending of US highly enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU). The transmission technique was originally developed to verify the downblending of Russian HEU to LEU. This instrument was demonstrated at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant from April 1998 to July 1998 and installed at the Urals Electrochemical Integrated Plant, Novouralsk, Russia, during January 1999.

  17. Rock Slopes from Mechanics to Decision Making

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Einstein, Herbert H.

    Rock slope instabilities are discussed in the context of decision making for risk assessment and management. Hence, the state of the slope and possible failure mechanism need to be defined first. This is done with geometrical ...

  18. First Rocks from Outside the Solar System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Westphal, Andrew

    2014-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Andrew Westphal presents his findings in examining the first rocks from outside the solar system at our '8 Big Ideas' Science at the Theater event on October 8th, 2014, in Oakland, California.

  19. Determination of mechanical properties of reservoir rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barnett, Ashley

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus, experimental procedure, and methodology have been developed to determine the mechanical response of reservoir rock. The apparatus is capable of subjecting cylindrical core specimens to triaxial stress states and temperatures...

  20. Feedback and metal enrichment in cosmological SPH simulations I. A model for chemical enrichment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Scannapieco; P. B. Tissera; S. D. M. White; V. Springel

    2006-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss a model for treating chemical enrichment by SNII and SNIa explosions in simulations of cosmological structure formation. Our model includes metal-dependent radiative cooling and star formation in dense collapsed gas clumps. Metals are returned into the diffuse interstellar medium by star particles using a local SPH smoothing kernel. A variety of chemical abundance patterns in enriched gas arise in our treatment owing to the different yields and lifetimes of SNII and SNIa progenitor stars. In the case of SNII chemical production, we adopt metal-dependent yields. Because of the sensitive dependence of cooling rates on metallicity, enrichment of galactic haloes with metals can in principle significantly alter subsequent gas infall and the build up of the stellar components. Indeed, in simulations of isolated galaxies we find that a consistent treatment of metal-dependent cooling produces 25% more stars outside the central region than simulations with a primordial cooling function. In the highly-enriched central regions, the evolution of baryons is however not affected by metal cooling, because here the gas is always dense enough to cool. A similar situation is found in cosmological simulations because we include no strong feedback processes which could spread metals over large distances and mix them into unenriched diffuse gas. We demonstrate this explicitly with test simulations which adopt super-solar cooling functions leading to large changes both in the stellar mass and in the metal distributions. We also find that the impact of metallicity on the star formation histories of galaxies may depend on their particular evolutionary history. Our results hence emphasise the importance of feedback processes for interpreting the cosmic metal enrichment.

  1. Using Process Load Cell Information for IAEA Safeguards at Enrichment Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laughter, Mark D [ORNL; Whitaker, J Michael [ORNL; Howell, John [University of Glasgow

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Uranium enrichment service providers are expanding existing enrichment plants and constructing new facilities to meet demands resulting from the shutdown of gaseous diffusion plants, the completion of the U.S.-Russia highly enriched uranium downblending program, and the projected global renaissance in nuclear power. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) conducts verification inspections at safeguarded facilities to provide assurance that signatory States comply with their treaty obligations to use nuclear materials only for peaceful purposes. Continuous, unattended monitoring of load cells in UF{sub 6} feed/withdrawal stations can provide safeguards-relevant process information to make existing safeguards approaches more efficient and effective and enable novel safeguards concepts such as information-driven inspections. The IAEA has indicated that process load cell monitoring will play a central role in future safeguards approaches for large-scale gas centrifuge enrichment plants. This presentation will discuss previous work and future plans related to continuous load cell monitoring, including: (1) algorithms for automated analysis of load cell data, including filtering methods to determine significant weights and eliminate irrelevant impulses; (2) development of metrics for declaration verification and off-normal operation detection ('cylinder counting,' near-real-time mass balancing, F/P/T ratios, etc.); (3) requirements to specify what potentially sensitive data is safeguards relevant, at what point the IAEA gains on-site custody of the data, and what portion of that data can be transmitted off-site; (4) authentication, secure on-site storage, and secure transmission of load cell data; (5) data processing and remote monitoring schemes to control access to sensitive and proprietary information; (6) integration of process load cell data in a layered safeguards approach with cross-check verification; (7) process mock-ups constructed to provide simulated load cell data; (8) hardware and software implementation for process load cell data collection; (9) costs associated with unattended monitoring of load cells (for both operator and inspector) weighed against the potential benefits of having access to such data; (10) results from field tests of load cell data collection systems in operating facilities; and (11) use of unattended load cell data to increase efficiency of on-site inspection schedules and activities.

  2. Stress-induced transverse isotropy in rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwartz, L.M.; Murphy, W.F. III [Schlumberger-Doll Research Center, Ridgefield, CT (United States); Berryman, J.G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The application of uniaxial pressure can induce elastic anisotropy in otherwise isotropic rock. We consider models based on two very different rock classes, granites and weakly consolidated granular systems. We show that these models share common underlying assumptions, that they lead to similar qualitative behavior, and that both provide a microscopic basis for elliptical anisotropy. In the granular case, we make experimentally verifiable predictions regarding the horizontally propagating modes based on the measured behavior of the vertical modes.

  3. Heat release analysis of oxygen-enriched diesel combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Assanis, D.; Karvounis, E. (Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States)); Sekar, R.; Marr, W. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States))

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A heat release correlation for oxygen-enriched diesel combustion is being developed through heat release analysis of cylinder pressure data from a single-cylinder diesel engine operating under various levels of oxygen enrichment. Results show that standard combustion correlations available in the literature do not accurately describe oxygen-enriched diesel combustion. A novel functional form is therefore proposed, which is shown to reproduce measured heat release profiles closely, under different operating conditions and levels of oxygen enrichment. The mathematical complexity of the associated curve-fitting problem is maintained at the same level of difficulty as for standard correlations. When the novel correlation is incorporated into a computer simulation of diesel engine operation with oxygen enrichment, the latter predicts pressure traces in excellent agreement with measured pressure data. This demonstrates the potential of the proposed combustion simulation to guide the application of oxygen-enriched technology successfully to a variety of multicylinder diesel systems.

  4. Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan determinations for the 600 Area facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nickels, J.M.

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document determines the need for Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans for Westinghouse Hanford Company's 600 Area facilities on the Hanford Site. The Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan determinations were prepared in accordance with A Guide For Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans (WHC 1991). Five major Westinghouse Hanford Company facilities in the 600 Area were evaluated: the Purge Water Storage Facility, 212-N, -P, and -R Facilities, the 616 Facility, and the 213-J K Storage Vaults. Of the five major facilities evaluated in the 600 Area, none will require preparation of a Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan.

  5. Toxic Substances Control Act Uranium Enrichment Federal Facilities Compliance Agreement, February 20, 1992

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2Uranium Transferon theTed DonatEnergy Electric Thomas L. McCall, Jr.

  6. Toxic Substances Control Act Uranium Enrichment Federal Facilities Compliance Agreement, February 20, 1992

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2Uranium Transferon theTed DonatEnergy Electric Thomas L. McCall, Jr. Thomas

  7. Toxic Substances Control Act Uranium Enrichment Federal Facilities Compliance Agreement, February 20, 1992 Summary

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2Uranium Transferon theTed DonatEnergy Electric Thomas L. McCall, Jr.

  8. Toxic Substances Control Act Uranium Enrichment Federal Facilities Compliance Agreement, February 20, 1992 Summary

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2Uranium Transferon theTed DonatEnergy Electric Thomas L. McCall, Jr.Toxic

  9. NNSA Authorizes Start-Up of Highly Enriched Uranium Materials Facility at

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved:AdministrationAnalysis andB -Reports |Y-12 | National Nuclear

  10. Design of tabular excavations in foliated rock: an integrated numerical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to the mineralized zone (development openings), extracting the ore from the surrounding host rock (stopes. The first stage in the design process is the characterization of the rock mass using both in situ of the mining process, requiring that the rock mass stability, both within the orebody and in the rock adjacent

  11. Mixture Theories for Rock Properties James G. Berryman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mixture Theories for Rock Properties James G. Berryman Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory by Batchelor [3], Hale [41], Hashin [42], Torquato [95], and Willis [110] are also recommended. 1.1. Rocks Are Inhomogeneous Materials A rock is a naturally occurring mixture of minerals. Rocks are normally inhomogeneous

  12. Enriched Stable Isotope Materials and Chemistry | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Chemistry SHARE Enriched Stable Isotope Materials and Chemistry Reductiondistillation of calcium-48 metal valued at over 900,000. An inventory of 2,300 batches of...

  13. activity enantiomerically enriched: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Li-enrichment. Doppler imaging was applied to recover the surface temperature distribution of DI Psc in two subsequent rotational cycles using the individual mapping lines Ca...

  14. NNSA and Kazakhstan Complete Operation to Eliminate Highly Enriched...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Kazakhstan Complete Operation to Eliminate Highly Enriched Uranium | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the...

  15. Enrichment of Functional Redox Reactive Proteins and Identification...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Redox Reactive Proteins and Identification by Mass Spectrometry Results in Several Terminal Fe(III) Enrichment of Functional Redox Reactive Proteins and Identification by Mass...

  16. US, Kazakhstan Cooperate to Eliminate Highly Enriched Uranium...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    of 36 kilograms (approximately 80 pounds) of highly enriched uranium (HEU) spent fuel from the Institute of Nuclear Physics (INP) in Almaty, Kazakhstan. The HEU was...

  17. Improved Methods for the Enrichment and Analysis of Glycated...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of tissue proteins has important implications in the development of complications of diabetes mellitus. Herein we report improved methods for the enrichment and analysis of...

  18. Jefferson Lab seeks applicants for summer, science teacher enrichment...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    seeks applicants for summer, science teacher enrichment program February 26, 2003 Calling all middle school teachers who instruct science classes. Jefferson Lab would like to help...

  19. News Media invited to interview JLab summer, science enrichment...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2003 Education Poster Session News Media invited to interview JLab summer, science enrichment program participants; cover closing Poster Session July 28, 2004 Newport News, VA. -...

  20. Jefferson Lab Seeks Applicants for Science Teacher Enrichment...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Seeks Applicants for Science Teacher Enrichment Program March 14, 2001 Calling all middle school teachers who instruct science classes. Jefferson Lab would like to help you refresh...

  1. The Chemical Enrichment History of the Magellanic Clouds Field Populations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Carrera; C. Gallart; A. Aparicio; E. Costa; E. Hardy; R. A. Mendez; N. E. D. Noel; R. Zinn

    2008-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the results of our project devoted to study the chemical enrichment history of the field population in the Magellanic Clouds using Ca II triplet spectroscopy.

  2. ARM Mobile Facilities

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Orr, Brad; Coulter, Rich

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This video provides an overview of the ARM Mobile Facilities, two portable climate laboratories that can deploy anywhere in the world for campaigns of at least six months.

  3. DOE Designated Facilities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reactor** Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Joint Genome Institute - Production Genomics Facility (PGF)** (joint with LLNL, LANL, ORNL and PNNL) Advanced Light Source (ALS)...

  4. Accelerator Test Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Test Facility Vitaly Yakimenko October 6-7, 2010 ATF User meeting DOE HE, S. Vigdor, ALD - (Contact) T. Ludlam Chair, Physics Department V. Yakimenko Director ATF, Accelerator...

  5. ACCELERATOR TEST FACILITY

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LABORATORY PHYSICS DEPARTMENT Effective: 04012004 Page 1 of 2 Subject: Accelerator Test Facility - Linear Accelerator General Systems Guide Prepared by: Michael Zarcone...

  6. Carbon Fiber Technology Facility

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    The Carbon Fiber Technology Facility is relevant in proving the scale- up of low-cost carbon fiber precursor materials and advanced manufacturing technologies * Significant...

  7. Science and Technology Facility

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    IBRF Project Lessons Learned Report Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility Lessons Learned - Stage I Acquisition through Stage II Construction Completion August 2011 This...

  8. Programs & User Facilities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Facility Climate, Ocean, and Sea Ice Modeling (COSIM) Terrestrial Ecosystem and Climate Dynamics Fusion Energy Sciences Magnetic Fusion Experiments Plasma Surface...

  9. Facilities | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Some of the nation's most powerful and sophisticated facilities for energy research Argonne National Laboratory is home to some of the nation's most powerful and sophisticated...

  10. Existing Facilities Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The NYSERDA Existing Facilities program merges the former Peak Load Reduction and Enhanced Commercial and Industrial Performance programs. The new program offers a broad array of different...

  11. Facility Survey & Transfer

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As DOE facilities become excess, many that are radioactively and/or chemically contaminated will become candidate for transfer to DOE-EM for deactivation and decommissioning.

  12. Sandia National Laboratories: Facilities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    InstituteSandia Photovoltaic Systems Symposium On April 15, 2014, in Concentrating Solar Power, Distribution Grid Integration, Energy, Facilities, Grid Integration, News,...

  13. Process for preparing a chemical compound enriched in isotope content. [nitrogen 15-enriched nitric acid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Michaels, E.D.

    1981-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A process to prepare a chemical enriched in isotope content includes: a chemical exchange reaction between a first and second compound which yields an isotopically enriched first compound and an isotopically depleted second compound; the removal of a portion of the first compound as product and the removal of a portion of the second compound as spent material; the conversion of the remainder of the first compound to the second compound for reflux at the product end of the chemical exchange reaction region; the conversion of the remainder of the second compound to the first compound for reflux at the spent material end of the chemical exchange region; and the cycling of the additional chemicals produced by one conversion reaction to the other conversion reaction, for consumption therein. One of the conversion reactions is an oxidation reaction, and the energy that it yields is used to drive the other conversion reaction, a reduction. The reduction reaction is carried out in a solid polymer electrolyte electrolytic reactor. The overall process is energy efficient and yields no waste by-products. A particular embodiment of the process in the production of nitrogen-15-enriched nitric acid.

  14. MINERAL FACILITIES MAPPING PROJECT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbes, Fernando

    MINERAL FACILITIES MAPPING PROJECT Yadira Soto-Viruet Supervisor: David Menzie, Yolanda Fong-Sam Minerals Information Team (MIT) USGS Summer Internship 2009 U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Minerals Information Team (MIT): Annually reports on the minerals facilities of more than 180 countries

  15. A Materials Facilities Initiative -

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Materials Facilities Initiative - FMITS & MPEX D.L. Hillis and ORNL Team Fusion & Materials for Nuclear Systems Division July 10, 2014 #12;2 Materials Facilities Initiative JET ITER FNSF Fusion Reactor Challenges for materials: fluxes and fluence, temperatures 50 x divertor ion fluxes up to 100 x neutron

  16. Geophysical InversionFacility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, Douglas W.

    UBC Geophysical InversionFacility Modelling and Inversion of EMI data collected over magnetic soils of EMI data acquired at sites with magnetic soils · Geophysical Proveouts · Geonics EM63 Data · First model parameters: · Location · Orientation · Polarizabilities 4 #12;UBC Geophysical Inversion Facility

  17. Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemner, Ken

    Argonne Leadership Computing Facility Argonne Leadership Computing Facility 2010 ANNUAL REPORT S C I E N C E P O W E R E D B Y S U P E R C O M P U T I N G ANL-11/15 The Argonne Leadership Computing States Government nor any agency thereof, nor UChicago Argonne, LLC, nor any of their employees

  18. Emergency Facilities and Equipment

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume clarifies requirements of DOE O 151.1 to ensure that emergency facilities and equipment are considered as part of emergency management program and that activities conducted at these emergency facilities are fully integrated. Canceled by DOE G 151.1-4.

  19. Nanotechnology User Facility for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A National Nanotechnology User Facility for Industry Academia Government #12;The National Institute of Commerce's nanotechnology user facility. The CNST enables innovation by providing rapid access to the tools new measurement and fabrication methods in response to national nanotechnology needs. www

  20. Deep drilling technology for hot crystalline rock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowley, J.C.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal systems at the Fenton Hill, New Mexico site has required the drilling of four deep boreholes into hot, Precambrian granitic and metamorphic rocks. Thermal gradient holes, four observation wells 200 m (600 ft) deep, and an exploration core hole 800 m (2400 ft) deep guided the siting of the four deep boreholes. Results derived from the exploration core hole, GT-1 (Granite Test No. 1), were especially important in providing core from the granitic rock, and establishing the conductive thermal gradient and heat flow for the granitic basement rocks. Essential stratigraphic data and lost drilling-fluid zones were identified for the volcanic and sedimentary rocks above the contact with the crystalline basement. Using this information drilling strategies and well designs were then devised for the planning of the deeper wells. The four deep wells were drilled in pairs, the shallowest were planned and drilled to depths of 3 km in 1975 at a bottom-hole temperature of nearly 200/sup 0/C. These boreholes were followed by a pair of wells, completed in 1981, the deepest of which penetrated the Precambrian basement to a vertical depth of 4.39 km at a temperature of 320/sup 0/C.

  1. Metadata Enrichment Services for the Europeana Digital Library

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sebastiani, Fabrizio

    needs, thus allowing the tool to be effectively available to the multitude (2000+) of Europeana CPs. 1 to enrich the semantics of its own MRs prior to contributing them to Europeana. Different CPs are thus provenance. We view metadata enrichment as consisting of essentially two activities: clas- sification of MRs

  2. Anisotropic Outflows and Enrichment of the Intergalactic Medium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthew M. Pieri; Hugo Martel; Cedric Grenon

    2006-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed an analytical model for the evolution of anisotropic galactic outflows. These outflows follow the path of least resistance, and thus travel preferentially into low-density regions, away from cosmological structures where galaxies form. We show that anisotropic outflows can significantly enrich low-density systems, while reducing the enrichment of overdense regions.

  3. S. 2415: Title I may be cited as the Uranium Enrichment Act of 1990; Title II may be cited as the Uranium Security and Tailings Reclamation Act of 1989; and Title III may be cited as The Solar, Wind, Waste, and Geothermal Power Production Incentives Act of 1990, introduced in the Senate, One Hundred First Congress, Second Session, April 4, 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    S. 2415 (which started out as a bill to encourage solar and geothermal power generation) now would amend the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 to redirect uranium enrichment enterprises to further the national interest, respond to competitive market forces, and to ensure the nation's common defense and security. It would establish a United States Enrichment Corporation for the following purposes: to acquire feed materials, enriched uranium, and enrichment facilities; to operate these facilities; to market enriched uranium for governmental purposes and qualified domestic and foreign persons; to conduct research into uranium enrichment; and to operate as a profitable, self-financing, reliable corporation and in a manner consistent with the health and safety of the public. The bill describes powers and duties of the corporation; the organization, finance, and management; decontamination and decommissioning. The second part of the bill would ensure an adequate supply of domestic uranium for defense and power production; provide assistance to the domestic uranium industry; and establish, facilitate, and expedite a comprehensive system for financing reclamation and remedial action at active uranium and thorium processing sites. The third part of the bill would remove the size limitations on power production facilities now part of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978. Solar, wind, waste, or geothermal power facilities would no longer have to be less than 80 MW to qualify as a small power production facility.

  4. Clean-out and Reuse of GCEP Facilities at Portsmouth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Franz, William; Hickman, Mark [LATA/Parallax Portsmouth, LLC, 3930 U.S. Rt. 23 South, P.O. Box 855, Piketon, Ohio 45661 (United States); Wiehle, Kristi [U.S. Department of Energy, Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office, 3930 U.S. Rt. 23 South, P.O. Box 628, Piketon, Ohio 45661 (United States)

    2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    PORTS began operations in 1956 to enrich uranium for both civilian and military use. It operated under Goodyear Atomic Corporation and Lockheed-Martin as a government-owned contractor-operated facility until the formation of the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC) as a government corporation in 1993. In 1998, USEC was privatized as a publicly traded corporation. USEC leases the Portsmouth and Paducah GDPs from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Enrichment operations were terminated at Portsmouth in 2001, although USEC continues to lease and maintain the Portsmouth GDP in Cold Shutdown and conduct some DOE projects there. LPP found that removal of old equipment to allow reuse of a facility can present unexpected challenges. Classified components create significant logistics issues. In this case, teamwork and attention to detail by USEC, LATA/Parallax, and DOE resulted in solutions and success. Lessons learnt: - Transportation logistics are particularly important when shipping waste streams with special requirements. - Investment in extra equipment yields tangible benefits where other resources (cleared drivers) are scarce. - An early start to providing specially qualified drivers, in this case providing security clearances, is essential. Availability is limited, and the time required to qualify new drivers may be lengthy. - A dedicated communications station, rather than reliance on existing resources (shift superintendent), is invaluable.

  5. Magma simulation facility design considerations, capabilities, and operational considerations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wemple, R.P.

    1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The high-pressure, high temperature (60 Kpsi or 413.6 MPa/1600/sup 0/C) facility described is being used for molten rock (magma) experiments and metallurgical pressure bonding experiments. The unique design of the facility will accommodate samples as large as 10 cm dia. by 10 cm in height in an isothermal (+-4/sup 0/C at 1400/sup 0/C and 44 Kpsi or 303.3 MPa) cylindrical hot zone. The facility history, capabilities, and operational considerations are thoroughly discussed with appropriate illustrations. Since the system-contained energy while operating is approximately 1 x 10/sup 6/ ft-lbs (1.356 x 10/sup 6/ N-m) or 0.7 lbs (318 g) TNT equivalent, considerable discussion is related to hazards analysis and protection of the equipment and the operating personnel from damage caused by nonstandard conditions (interrupted H/sub 2/O flow, power outage, overpressure, etc.).

  6. Source rock maturation, San Juan sag

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gries, R.R.; Clayton, J.L.

    1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Kinetic modeling for thermal histories was simulated for seven wells in the San Juan sag honoring measured geochemical data. Wells in the area of Del Norte field (Sec. 9, T40N, R5E), where minor production has been established from an igneous sill reservoir, show that the Mancos Shale source rocks are in the mature oil generation window as a combined result of high regional heat flow and burial by approximately 2,700 m of Oligocene volcanic rocks. Maturation was relatively recent for this area and insignificant during Laramide subsidence. In the vicinity of Gramps field (Sec. 24, T33N, R2E) on the southwest flank of the San Juan sag, these same source rocks are exposed due to erosion of the volcanic cover but appear to have undergone a similar maturation history. At the north and south margins of the sag, two wells (Champlin 34A-13, Sec. 13, T35N, R4.5E; and Champlin 24A-1, Sec. 1, T44N, R5E) were analyzed and revealed that although the regional heat flow was probably similar to other wells, the depth of burial was insufficient to cause maturation (except where intruded by thick igneous sills that caused localized maturation). The Meridian Oil 23-17 South Fork well (Sec. 17, T39N, R4E) was drilled in a deeper part of the San Juan sag, and source rocks were intruded by numerous igneous sills creating a complex maturation history that includes overmature rocks in the lowermost Mancos Shale, possible CO{sub 2} generation from the calcareous Niobrara Member of the Mancos Shale, and mature source rocks in the upper Mancos Shale.

  7. Laboratory measurements of frictional slip on interfaces in a polycarbonate rock mass model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, S.R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Geomechanics Dept.

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The evaluation of the stability of the openings for the Exploratory Studies Facility and a potential repository for high-level nuclear waste at Yucca Mountain, Nevada will require computer codes capable of predicting slip on rock joints resulting from changes in thermal stresses. The geometrical method of analysis of moire fringe analysis was used to evaluate the magnitude and extent of frictional sliding in a layered polycarbonate rock mass model containing a circular hole. Slips were observed in confined zones around the hole and micron resolutions were obtained. Unpredicted and uncontrolled uniform slip of several interfaces in the model were observed giving considerable uncertainty in the boundary conditions of the model, perhaps making detailed comparison with numerical models impossible.

  8. Hot Dry Rock energy annual report fiscal year 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winchester, W.W. [ed.; Duchane, D.V.

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hot Dry Rock technology took a giant leap forward this year as the long-awaited long-term flow test (LTFT) of the Phase 2 HDR reservoir at Fenton Hill got underway. Energy was produced on a twenty-four hour a day basis for a continuous period of nearly four months of steady-state testing. Hot water was brought to the surface at 90--100 gallons per minute (gpm) with temperatures of 180{degrees}C (356{degrees}F) and higher. During that time, the HDR plant achieved an on-line record of 98.8%. Surface temperature measurements and temperature logging deep within the wellbore confirmed that no decline in the average temperature of fluid produced from the reservoir occurred. Tracer experiments indicated that flow paths within the reservoir were undergoing continuous change during the test. Remarkably, it appeared that longer flow paths carried a larger proportion of the flow as the test proceeded, while more direct fluid pathways disappeared or carried a significantly reduced flow. In sum, access to hot rock appeared to improve over the span of the test. Water losses during the test averaged 10--12% and showed a slow long-term decline. These results confirmed what had been previously discovered in static pressurization testing: Water consumption declines significantly during extended operation of an HDR reservoir. In combination with a recent demonstration by the Japanese that water losses can be greatly reduced by the proper placement of multiple production wells, the recent results at Fenton Hill have effectively demonstrated that excessive water consumption should not be an issue for a properly engineered HDR facility at a well chosen site.

  9. Hot Dry Rock energy annual report fiscal year 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duchane, D.V.; Winchester, W.W.

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hot Dry Rock technology took a giant leap forward this year as the long-awaited long-term flow test (LTFT) of the Phase II HDR reservoir at Fenton Hill got underway. Energy was produced on a twenty-four hour a day basis for a continuous period of nearly four months of steady-state testing. Hot water was brought to the surface at 90-100 gallons per minute (gpm) with temperatures of 180[degrees]C (356[degrees]F) and higher. During that time, the HDR plant achieved an on-line record of 98.8%. Surface temperature measurements and temperature logging deep within the wellbore confirmed that no decline in the average temperature of fluid produced from the reservoir occurred. Tracer experiments indicated that flow paths within the reservoir were undergoing continuous change during the test. Remarkably, it appeared that longer flow paths carried a larger proportion of the flow as the test proceeded, while more direct fluid pathways disappeared or carried a significantly reduced flow. In sum, access to hot rock appeared to improve over the span of the test. Water losses during the test averaged 10-12% and showed a slow long-term decline. These results confirmed what had been previously discovered in static pressurization testing: Water consumption declines significantly during extended operation of an HDR reservoir. In combination with a recent demonstration by the Japanese that water losses can be greatly reduced by the proper placement of multiple production wells, the recent results at Fenton Hill have effectively demonstrated that excessive water consumption should not be an issue for a properly engineered HDR facility at a well chosen site.

  10. Rock melting tool with annealer section

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bussod, Gilles Y. (Santa Fe, NM); Dick, Aaron J. (Oakland, CA); Cort, George E. (Montrose, CO)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A rock melting penetrator is provided with an afterbody that rapidly cools a molten geological structure formed around the melting tip of the penetrator to the glass transition temperature for the surrounding molten glass-like material. An annealing afterbody then cools the glass slowly from the glass transition temperature through the annealing temperature range to form a solid self-supporting glass casing. This allows thermally induced strains to relax by viscous deformations as the molten glass cools and prevents fracturing of the resulting glass liner. The quality of the glass lining is improved, along with its ability to provide a rigid impermeable casing in unstable rock formations.

  11. Oilfield rock bits: Are they a commodity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caldwell, R.

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses the quality of various types of rock drill bits and evaluates cost of these bits against service and performance to determine if bits should be viewed as a commodity when drilling a production or exploration well. Continuing advancements in materials technology, machining capabilities, hydraulics arrangements, bearing configuration, seal technology and cutter design continue to push the performance curve for oilfield rock bits. However, some very important advancements are patented, proprietary features of individual manufacturers. This paper reviews some of these design and performance features to help determine if they are worth the extra investment based on actual field drilling experience.

  12. Specific energy for laser removal of rocks.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Z.; Kornecki, G.; Reed, C. B.; Gahan, B. C.; Parker, R. A.; Batarseh, S.; Graves, R. M.

    2001-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Application of advanced high power laser technology into oil and gas well drilling has been attracting significant research interests recently among research institutes, petroleum industries, and universities. Potential laser or laser-aided oil and gas well drilling has many advantages over the conventional rotary drilling, such as high penetration rate, reduction or elimination of tripping, casing, and bit costs, and enhanced well control, perforating and side-tracking capabilities. The energy required to remove a unit volume of rock, namely the specific energy (SE), is a critical rock property data that can be used to determine both the technical and economic feasibility of laser oil and gas well drilling.

  13. ORIGIN OF LITHIUM ENRICHMENT IN K GIANTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, Yerra Bharat; Reddy, Bacham E. [Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Bengaluru 560034 (India); Lambert, David L. [McDonald Observatory, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)

    2011-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In this Letter, we report on a low-resolution spectroscopic survey for Li-rich K giants among 2000 low-mass (M {<=} 3 M{sub sun}) giants spanning the luminosity range from below to above the luminosity of the clump. Fifteen new Li-rich giants including four super Li-rich K giants (log {epsilon}(Li) {>=}3.2) were discovered. A significant finding is that there is a concentration of Li-rich K giants at the luminosity of the clump or red horizontal branch. This new finding is partly a consequence of the fact that our low-resolution survey is the first large survey to include giants well below and above the red giant branch (RGB) bump and clump locations in the H-R diagram. Origin of the lithium enrichment may be plausibly attributed to the conversion of {sup 3}He via {sup 7}Be to {sup 7}Li by the Cameron-Fowler mechanism but the location for the onset of the conversion is uncertain. Two possible opportunities to effect this conversion are discussed: the bump in the first ascent of the RGB and the He-core flash at the tip of the RGB. The finite luminosity spread of the Li-rich giants serves to reject the idea that Li enhancement is, in general, a consequence of a giant swallowing a large planet.

  14. Saturn's internal structure and carbon enrichment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olivier Mousis; Yann Alibert; Willy Benz

    2005-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We use the clathrate hydrate trapping theory to calculate the enrichments in O, N, S, Xe, Ar and Kr compared to solar in Saturn's atmosphere. For this, we calibrate our calculations using two different carbon abundance determinations that cover the domain of measurements published in the last decades: one derived from the NASA $Kuiper$ Airborne Observatory measurements and the other obtained from the Cassini spacecraft observations. We show that these two different carbon abundances imply quite a different minimum heavy element content for Saturn. Using the Kuiper Airborne Observatory measurement for calibration, the amount of ices accreted by Saturn is found to be consistent with current interior models of this planet. On the other hand, using the Cassini measurement for calibration leads to an ice content in the planet's envelope which is higher than the one derived from the interior models. In this latter case, reconciling the interior models with the amount of C measured by the Cassini spacecraft requires that significant differential sedimentation of water and volatile species have taken place in Saturn's interior during its lifetime.

  15. STAR Facility Tritium Accountancy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. J. Pawelko; J. P. Sharpe; B. J. Denny

    2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Safety and Tritium Applied Research (STAR) facility has been established to provide a laboratory infrastructure for the fusion community to study tritium science associated with the development of safe fusion energy and other technologies. STAR is a radiological facility with an administrative total tritium inventory limit of 1.5g (14,429 Ci) [1]. Research studies with moderate tritium quantities and various radionuclides are performed in STAR. Successful operation of the STAR facility requires the ability to receive, inventory, store, dispense tritium to experiments, and to dispose of tritiated waste while accurately monitoring the tritium inventory in the facility. This paper describes tritium accountancy in the STAR facility. A primary accountancy instrument is the tritium Storage and Assay System (SAS): a system designed to receive, assay, store, and dispense tritium to experiments. Presented are the methods used to calibrate and operate the SAS. Accountancy processes utilizing the Tritium Cleanup System (TCS), and the Stack Tritium Monitoring System (STMS) are also discussed. Also presented are the equations used to quantify the amount of tritium being received into the facility, transferred to experiments, and removed from the facility. Finally, the STAR tritium accountability database is discussed.

  16. STAR facility tritium accountancy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pawelko, R. J.; Sharpe, J. P.; Denny, B. J. [Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States)

    2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Safety and Tritium Applied Research (STAR) facility has been established to provide a laboratory infrastructure for the fusion community to study tritium science associated with the development of safe fusion energy and other technologies. STAR is a radiological facility with an administrative total tritium inventory limit of 1.5 g (14,429 Ci) [1]. Research studies with moderate tritium quantities and various radionuclides are performed in STAR. Successful operation of the STAR facility requires the ability to receive, inventory, store, dispense tritium to experiments, and to dispose of tritiated waste while accurately monitoring the tritium inventory in the facility. This paper describes tritium accountancy in the STAR facility. A primary accountancy instrument is the tritium Storage and Assay System (SAS): a system designed to receive, assay, store, and dispense tritium to experiments. Presented are the methods used to calibrate and operate the SAS. Accountancy processes utilizing the Tritium Cleanup System (TCS), and the Stack Tritium Monitoring System (STMS) are also discussed. Also presented are the equations used to quantify the amount of tritium being received into the facility, transferred to experiments, and removed from the facility. Finally, the STAR tritium accountability database is discussed. (authors)

  17. DOE/NNSA Facility Management Contracts Facility Owner Contractor

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    NNSA Facility Management Contracts Facility Owner Contractor Award Date End Date OptionsAward Term Ultimate Potential Expiration Date Contract FY Competed Parent Companies LLC...

  18. Test Facility Daniil Stolyarov, Accelerator Test Facility User...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Development of the Solid-State Laser System for the Accelerator Test Facility Daniil Stolyarov, Accelerator Test Facility User's Meeting April 3, 2009 Outline Motivation for...

  19. Isotopes facilities deactivation project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eversole, R.E.

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The production and distribution of radioisotopes for medical, scientific, and industrial applications has been a major activity at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) since the late 1940s. As the demand for many of these isotopes grew and their sale became profitable, the technology for the production of the isotopes was transferred to private industry, and thus, many of the production facilities at ORNL became underutilized. In 1989, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) instructed ORNL to identify and prepare various isotopes production facilities for safe shutdown. In response, ORNL identified 19 candidate facilities for shutdown and established the Isotopes Facilities Shutdown Program. In 1993, responsibility for the program was transitioned from the DOE Office of Nuclear Energy to the DOE Office of Environmental Management and Uranium Enrichment Operation`s Office of Facility Transition and Management. The program was retitled the Isotopes Facilities Deactivation Project (IFDP), and implementation responsibility was transferred from ORNL to the Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. (LMES), Environmental Restoration (ER) Program.

  20. Metamorphic Rocks, Processes, and Resources Metamorphic rocks are rocks changed from one form to another by intense heat, intense pressure,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, X. Rong

    important ­ Rising temperature causes water to be released from unstable minerals ­ Hot water very reactive refers to the temperature and pressure under which a rock was metamorphosed, considered low grade or high ­ If range exceeded, new mineral structures result ­ If temperature gets high enough, melting will occur

  1. Sandia Energy - About the Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Facility About the FacilityTara Camacho-Lopez2015-05-11T19:38:37+00:00 Test-Bed Wind Turbines Allow Facility Flexibility While Providing Reliable Data in Many Regimes SWiFT...

  2. DESIGN STUDY FOR A LOW-ENRICHED URANIUM CORE FOR THE HIGH FLUX ISOTOPE REACTOR, ANNUAL REPORT FOR FY 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cook, David Howard [ORNL; Freels, James D [ORNL; Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Jolly, Brian C [ORNL; Miller, James Henry [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL; Renfro, David G [ORNL; Sease, John D [ORNL; Pinkston, Daniel [ORNL

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents progress made during FY 2010 in studies of converting the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from high enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. Conversion from HEU to LEU will require a change in fuel form from uranium oxide to a uranium-molybdenum alloy. With axial and radial grading of the fuel foil and an increase in reactor power to 100 MW, calculations indicate that the HFIR can be operated with LEU fuel with no degradation in performance to users from the current level. Studies are reported of support to a thermal hydraulic test loop design, the implementation of finite element, thermal hydraulic analysis capability, and infrastructure tasks at HFIR to upgrade the facility for operation at 100 MW. A discussion of difficulties with preparing a fuel specification for the uranium-molybdenum alloy is provided. Continuing development in the definition of the fuel fabrication process is described.

  3. Facility effluent monitoring plan determinations for the 300 Area facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nickels, J.M.

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan determinations were conducted for the Westinghouse Hanford Company 300 Area facilities on the Hanford Site. These determinations have been prepared in accordance with A Guide For Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans. Sixteen Westinghouse Hanford Company facilities in the 300 Area were evaluated: 303 (A, B, C, E, F, G, J and K), 303 M, 306 E, 308, 309, 313, 333, 334 A, and the 340 Waste Handling Facility. The 303, 306, 313, 333, and 334 facilities Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan determinations were prepared by Columbia Energy and Environmental Services of Richland, Washington. The 340 Central Waste Complex determination was prepared by Bovay Northwest, Incorporated. The 308 and 309 facility determinations were prepared by Westinghouse Handford Company. Of the 16 facilities evaluated, 3 will require preparation of a Facility effluent Monitoring Plan: the 313 N Fuels Fabrication Support Building, 333 N Fuels fabrication Building, and the 340 Waste Handling Facility. 26 refs., 5 figs., 10 tabs.

  4. Esimation of field-scale thermal conductivities of unsaturated rocks from in-situ temperature data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhopadhyay, Sumit; Tsang, Yvonne W.; Birkholzer, Jens T.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    vicinity of the heat source, and rock temperature exceededand the dry rock near the heat source. The other differencesources, heat transfer takes place through the wet rock (see

  5. Seismic and Acoustic Investigations of Rock Fall Initiation, Processes, and Mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zimmer, Valerie Louise

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    systems  and  rock  fall  source  and  impact  areas,  it  meters  from  a  rock  fall  source  area.   The   success  possible  to  the  rock  fall  source  areas,   spacing  

  6. GEOTECHNICAL ASSESSMENT AND INSTRUMENTATION NEEDS FOR NUCLEAR WASTE ISOLATION IN CRYSTALLINE AND ARGILLACEOUS ROCKS SYMPOSIUM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    INSTRUMENTATION NEEDS FOR DETERMINING ROCK PROPERTIES..Acknowledgements • ROCK PROPERTIES Participant Listing.OF MODELING IN ROCK PROPERTIES EVALUATION AND APPLICATION. •

  7. Parameter estimation from flowing fluid temperature logging data in unsaturated fractured rock using multiphase inverse modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhopadhyay, S.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    have assumed the same rock properties for the entire packed-earlier, among the rock properties (permeability, porosity,However, these are not rock properties and are constrained

  8. Coupled thermohydromechanical analysis of a heater test in unsaturated clay and fractured rock at Kamaishi Mine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutqvist, J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Kamaishi mine. Laboratory rock property tests. Power reactor5.2 Near field rock properties and fiactire geometand hydraulic rock properties, and hydraulic conditions

  9. An Integrated Modeling Analysis of Unsaturated Flow Patterns in Fractured Rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yu-Shu; Lu, Guoping; Zhang, Keni; Pan, Lehua; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    because large contrasts in rock properties exist across thetransitional changes in rock properties argues that lateralthe distribution of rock properties within different units.

  10. On the relationship between stress and elastic strain for porous and fractured rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Hui-Hai

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the other associated rock properties. Important examples ofand/or hydraulic rock properties. We show that theand other rock mechanical/hydraulic properties, and these

  11. Nuclear Power Generating Facilities (Maine)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The first subchapter of the statute concerning Nuclear Power Generating Facilities provides for direct citizen participation in the decision to construct any nuclear power generating facility in...

  12. Pollution Control Facilities (South Carolina)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    For the purpose of this legislation, pollution control facilities are defined as any facilities designed for the elimination, mitigation or prevention of air or water pollution, including all...

  13. LANL | Physics | Trident Laser Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Discovery science at Trident Laser Facility Several important discoveries and first observations have been made at the Trident Laser Facility, a unique three-beam neodymium-glass...

  14. Hazardous Waste Facilities Siting (Connecticut)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations describe the siting and permitting process for hazardous waste facilities and reference rules for construction, operation, closure, and post-closure of these facilities.

  15. Sandia National Laboratories: SWIFT Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SWIFT Facility Characterizing Scaled Wind Farm Technology Facility Inflow On April 1, 2014, in Energy, News, News & Events, Partnership, Renewable Energy, Wind Energy The Scaled...

  16. User Facilities | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    User Facilities Advanced Photon Source Argonne Leadership Computing Facility Argonne Tandem Linear Accelerator System Center for Nanoscale Materials Transportation Research and...

  17. Trophic ecology of the invasive argentine ant: spatio-temporal variation in resource assimilation and isotopic enrichment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menke, Sean B.; Suarez, Andy V.; Tillberg, Chadwick V.; Chou, Cheng T.; Holway, David A.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    assimilation and isotopic enrichment Sean B. Menke • Andy V.determined nitrogen enrichment using a controlled laboratoryconsumer- diet d15N enrichment: a meta-analysis. Oecologia

  18. Near-surface enrichment of zooplankton over a shallow back reef: implications for coral reef food webs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alldredge, A. L.; King, J. M.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    0534-4 REPORT Near-surface enrichment of zooplankton over anear the bottom but no enrichment aloft. In Moorea, whereand mixing, zooplankton enrichment extended throughout the

  19. Cognitive Research with Dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) at Disney’s The Seas: A Program for Enrichment, Science, Education, and Conservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harley, Heidi E.; Fellner, Wendi; Stamper, M. Andy

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Second nature: Environmental enrichment for captive animals.The Seas: A Program for Enrichment, Science, Education, andin four main areas: enrichment, science, education, and

  20. Measurement of uranium enrichment by gamma spectroscopy: result of an experimental design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Gamma Spectrometry, uranium enrichment #12;PAPER Measurement of uranium enrichment by gamma spectroscopy: result of an experimental design Gamma spectroscopy is commonly used in nuclear safeguards to measure uranium enrichment. An experimental

  1. Evaluation of environmental-control technologies for commercial nuclear fuel-conversion (UF/sub 6/) facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perkins, B.L.

    1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At present in the United States, there are two commercial conversion facilities. These facilities process uranium concentrate into UF/sub 6/ for shipment to the enrichment facilities. One conversion facility uses a dry hydrofluor process, whereas the other facility uses a process known as the wet solvent extraction-fluorination process. Because of the different processes used in the two plants, waste characteristics, quantities, and treatment practices differ at each facility. Wastes and effluent streams contain impurities found in the concentrate (such as uranium daughters, vanadium, molybdenum, selenium, arsenic, and ammonia) and process chemicals used in the circuit (including fluorine, nitrogen, and hydrogen), as well as small quantities of uranium. Studies of suitable disposal options for the solid wastes and sludges generated at the facilities and the long-term effects of emissions to the ambient environment are needed. 30 figures, 34 tables.

  2. Cornell University Facilities Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manning, Sturt

    Description: The Large Animal Teaching Complex (LATC) will be a joint facility for the College of Veterinary or increase operating costs of the dairy barn; therefore, the College of Veterinary Medicine has agreed

  3. Photovoltaic Research Facilities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funds photovoltaic (PV) research and development (R&D) at its national laboratory facilities located throughout the country. To encourage further innovation,...

  4. NEW RENEWABLE FACILITIES PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    's electricity from renewable resources by 2010. The Guidebook outlines eligibility and legal requirementsCALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION ` NEW RENEWABLE FACILITIES PROGRAM GUIDEBOOK March 2007 CEC-300 Executive Director Heather Raitt Technical Director RENEWABLE ENERGY OFFICE CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION

  5. NETL - Fuel Reforming Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2013-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Research using NETL's Fuel Reforming Facilities explores catalytic issues inherent in fossil-energy related applications, including catalyst synthesis and characterization, reaction kinetics, catalyst activity and selectivity, catalyst deactivation, and stability.

  6. NETL - Fuel Reforming Facilities

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2014-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Research using NETL's Fuel Reforming Facilities explores catalytic issues inherent in fossil-energy related applications, including catalyst synthesis and characterization, reaction kinetics, catalyst activity and selectivity, catalyst deactivation, and stability.

  7. Liquidity facilities and signaling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arregui, Nicolás

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation studies the role of signaling concerns in discouraging access to liquidity facilities like the IMF contingent credit lines (CCL) and the Discount Window (DW). In Chapter 1, I analyze the introduction of ...

  8. Facilities Management Department Restructuring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mullins, Dyche

    ­ Zone 2 ­ Mission Bay/East Side: Includes Mission Bay, Mission Center Bldg, Buchanan Dental, Hunters Point, 654 Minnesota, Oyster Point 2. Recommendation that UCSF align all Facility Services and O

  9. Sandia National Laboratories: Facilities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Renewable Energy, SWIFT, Wind Energy One of the primary roles of Sandia's Scaled Wind Farm Technology (SWiFT) facility will be to conduct detailed experiments on turbine wakes...

  10. Hot-dry-rock geothermal resource 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heiken, G.; Goff, F.; Cremer, G. (ed.)

    1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The work performed on hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal resource evaluation, site characterization, and geophysical exploration techniques is summarized. The work was done by region (Far West, Pacific Northwest, Southwest, Rocky Mountain States, Midcontinent, and Eastern) and limited to the conterminous US.

  11. Storage capacity in hot dry rock reservoirs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, Donald W. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of extracting thermal energy, in a cyclic manner, from geologic strata which may be termed hot dry rock. A reservoir comprised of hot fractured rock is established and water or other liquid is passed through the reservoir. The water is heated by the hot rock, recovered from the reservoir, cooled by extraction of heat by means of heat exchange apparatus on the surface, and then re-injected into the reservoir to be heated again. Water is added to the reservoir by means of an injection well and recovered from the reservoir by means of a production well. Water is continuously provided to the reservoir and continuously withdrawn from the reservoir at two different flow rates, a base rate and a peak rate. Increasing water flow from the base rate to the peak rate is accomplished by rapidly decreasing backpressure at the outlet of the production well in order to meet periodic needs for amounts of thermal energy greater than a baseload amount, such as to generate additional electric power to meet peak demands. The rate of flow of water provided to the hot dry rock reservoir is maintained at a value effective to prevent depletion of the liquid

  12. Storage capacity in hot dry rock reservoirs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, D.W.

    1997-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is described for extracting thermal energy, in a cyclic manner, from geologic strata which may be termed hot dry rock. A reservoir comprised of hot fractured rock is established and water or other liquid is passed through the reservoir. The water is heated by the hot rock, recovered from the reservoir, cooled by extraction of heat by means of heat exchange apparatus on the surface, and then re-injected into the reservoir to be heated again. Water is added to the reservoir by means of an injection well and recovered from the reservoir by means of a production well. Water is continuously provided to the reservoir and continuously withdrawn from the reservoir at two different flow rates, a base rate and a peak rate. Increasing water flow from the base rate to the peak rate is accomplished by rapidly decreasing backpressure at the outlet of the production well in order to meet periodic needs for amounts of thermal energy greater than a baseload amount, such as to generate additional electric power to meet peak demands. The rate of flow of water provided to the hot dry rock reservoir is maintained at a value effective to prevent depletion of the liquid inventory of the reservoir. 4 figs.

  13. Damage and plastic deformation of reservoir rocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ze'ev, Reches

    Damage and plastic deformation of reservoir rocks: Part 2. Propagation of a hydraulic fracture Seth fracture and fault mechanics, fluid flow in fractured reservoirs, and geome- chanics in nonconventional the development of complex hydraulic fractures (HFs) that are commonly ob- served in the field and in experiments

  14. Transfer of hot dry rock technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, M.C.

    1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development Program has focused worldwide attention on the facts that natural heat in the upper part of the earth's crust is an essentially inexhaustible energy resource which is accessible almost everywhere, and that practical means now exist to extract useful heat from the hot rock and bring it to the earth's surface for beneficial use. The Hot Dry Rock Program has successfully constructed and operated a prototype hot, dry rock energy system that produced heat at the temperatures and rates required for large-scale space heating and many other direct uses of heat. The Program is now in the final stages of constructing a larger, hotter system potentially capable of satisfying the energy requirements of a small, commercial, electrical-generating power plant. To create and understand the behavior of such system, it has been necessary to develop or support the development of a wide variety of equipment, instruments, techniques, and analyses. Much of this innovative technology has already been transferred to the private sector and to other research and development programs, and more is continuously being made available as its usefulness is demonstrated. This report describes some of these developments and indicates where this new technology is being used or can be useful to industry, engineering, and science.

  15. Radiocarbon dating of ancient rock paintings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ilger, W.A.; Hyman, M.; Rowe, M.W. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Southon, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1995-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents progress made on a technique for {sup 14}C dating pictographs. A low-temperature oxygen plasma is used coupled with high-vacuum technologies to selectively remove C-containing material in the paints without contamination from inorganic carbon from rock substrates or accretions.

  16. Life cycle assessment of a rock crusher

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Landfield, A.H.; Karra, V.

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nordberg, Inc., a capital equipment manufacturer, performed a Life Cycle Assessment study on its rock crusher to aid in making decisions on product design and energy improvements. Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) is a relatively new cutting edge environmental tool recently standardized by ISO that provides quantitative environmental and energy data on products or processes. This paper commences with a brief introduction to LCA and presents the system boundaries, modeling and assumptions for the rock crusher study. System boundaries include all life major cycle stages except manufacturing and assembly of the crusher. Results of the LCA show that over 99% of most of the flows into and out of the system may be attributed to the use phase of the rock crusher. Within the use phase itself, over 95% of each environmental inflow and outflow (with some exceptions) are attributed to electricity consumption, and not the replacement of spares/wears or lubricating oil over the lifetime of the crusher. Results tables and charts present selected environmental flows, including CO{sub 2} NOx, SOx, particulate matter, and energy consumption, for each of the rock crusher life cycle stages and the use phase. This paper aims to demonstrate the benefits of adopting a rigorous scientific approach to assess energy and environmental impacts over the life cycle of capital equipment. Nordberg has used these results to enhance its engineering efforts toward developing an even more energy efficient machine to further progress its vision of providing economic solutions to its customers by reducing the crusher operating (mainly electricity) costs.

  17. Strategies for Facilities Renewal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Good, R. L.

    psig * Plant or Service Air 90 psig * Starting Air for gas engines 220 psig * Instrument Air 80 psig * 02 - process * N2 high purity 4. Water production systems and distribution * Potable water (remote rural site) * Fire water (not treated) * Cooling... sewers 6. Fuel systems * Mixed fuel (both by-product and purchased methane) * Pipeline natural gas * Fuel oil 7. Maintenance and office facilities * Various maintenance/construction shops, stores, offices * Office facilities for technical...

  18. Mound facility physical characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tonne, W.R.; Alexander, B.M.; Cage, M.R.; Hase, E.H.; Schmidt, M.J.; Schneider, J.E.; Slusher, W.; Todd, J.E.

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a baseline physical characterization of Mound`s facilities as of September 1993. The baseline characterizations are to be used in the development of long-term future use strategy development for the Mound site. This document describes the current missions and alternative future use scenarios for each building. Current mission descriptions cover facility capabilities, physical resources required to support operations, current safety envelope and current status of facilities. Future use scenarios identify potential alternative future uses, facility modifications required for likely use, facility modifications of other uses, changes to safety envelope for the likely use, cleanup criteria for each future use scenario, and disposition of surplus equipment. This Introductory Chapter includes an Executive Summary that contains narrative on the Functional Unit Material Condition, Current Facility Status, Listing of Buildings, Space Plans, Summary of Maintenance Program and Repair Backlog, Environmental Restoration, and Decontamination and Decommissioning Programs. Under Section B, Site Description, is a brief listing of the Site PS Development, as well as Current Utility Sources. Section C contains Site Assumptions. A Maintenance Program Overview, as well as Current Deficiencies, is contained within the Maintenance Program Chapter.

  19. Rock Classification in Organic Shale Based on Petrophysical and Elastic Rock Properties Calculated from Well Logs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aranibar Fernandez, Alvaro A

    2015-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    classification method was then applied to the field examples from the Haynesville shale and Woodford shales for rock classification. The estimates of porosity, TOC, bulk modulus, shear modulus, and volumetric concentrations of minerals were obtained...

  20. Rock Bands/Rock Brands: Mediation and Musical Performance in Post-liberalization Bangalore

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coventry, Chloe Louise

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2009 PolyGram advertisement Coca-cola and MTV contest PepsiNokia, Pepsi, Seagrams, and Coca Cola sponsored rock showsGroup and Brigade Group, Coca-Cola, and the biotechnology

  1. FACTORS IN THE DESIGN OF A ROCK MECHANICS CENTRIFUGE FOR STRONG ROCK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, George B

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1 . Capacit i es of known centrifuges and v proposed SoftSolla I rock mechanics centrifuge r, ---------1~ --- dxB. , (1980), Geotechnical centrifuges for model studies and

  2. Isotope Enrichment Detection by Laser Ablation - Laser Absorption Spectrometry: Automated Environmental Sampling and Laser-Based Analysis for HEU Detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anheier, Norman C.; Bushaw, Bruce A.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The global expansion of nuclear power, and consequently the uranium enrichment industry, requires the development of new safeguards technology to mitigate proliferation risks. Current enrichment monitoring instruments exist that provide only yes/no detection of highly enriched uranium (HEU) production. More accurate accountancy measurements are typically restricted to gamma-ray and weight measurements taken in cylinder storage yards. Analysis of environmental and cylinder content samples have much higher effectiveness, but this approach requires onsite sampling, shipping, and time-consuming laboratory analysis and reporting. Given that large modern gaseous centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEPs) can quickly produce a significant quantity (SQ ) of HEU, these limitations in verification suggest the need for more timely detection of potential facility misuse. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is developing an unattended safeguards instrument concept, combining continuous aerosol particulate collection with uranium isotope assay, to provide timely analysis of enrichment levels within low enriched uranium facilities. This approach is based on laser vaporization of aerosol particulate samples, followed by wavelength tuned laser diode spectroscopy to characterize the uranium isotopic ratio through subtle differences in atomic absorption wavelengths. Environmental sampling (ES) media from an integrated aerosol collector is introduced into a small, reduced pressure chamber, where a focused pulsed laser vaporizes material from a 10 to 20-µm diameter spot of the surface of the sampling media. The plume of ejected material begins as high-temperature plasma that yields ions and atoms, as well as molecules and molecular ions. We concentrate on the plume of atomic vapor that remains after the plasma has expanded and then cooled by the surrounding cover gas. Tunable diode lasers are directed through this plume and each isotope is detected by monitoring absorbance signals on a shot-to-shot basis. The media is translated by a micron resolution scanning system, allowing the isotope analysis to cover the entire sample surface. We also report, to the best of our knowledge, the first demonstration of laser-based isotopic measurements on individual micron-sized particles that are minor target components in a much larger heterogeneous mix of ‘background’ particles. This composition is consistent with swipe and environmental aerosol samples typically collected for safeguards ES purposes. Single-shot detection sensitivity approaching the femtogram range and relative isotope abundance uncertainty better than 10% has been demonstrated using gadolinium isotopes as surrogate materials.

  3. Overview of conservation treatments applied to rock glyph archaeological sites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dandridge, Debra E

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rock glyphs, ubiquitously referred to as rock art, are often the most highly visible components of archaeological sites. Such artifacts, therefore, are most prone to deterioration and degradation from human caused and natural elements...

  4. Study of Acid Response of Qatar Carbonate Rocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhaohong

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    of understanding of Qatar carbonate especially Middle East carbonates and the abundance of Middle East carbonate reservoirs is the main motivation behind this study. This work is an experimental study to understand the acid response to Qatar rocks in rocks...

  5. Modeling of crack initiation, propagation and coalescence in rocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gonçalves da Silva, Bruno Miguel

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural or artificial fracturing of rock plays a very important role in geologic processes and for engineered structures in and on rock. Fracturing is associated with crack initiation, propagation and coalescence, which ...

  6. Inversion of seismic attributes for petrophysical parameters and rock facies 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shahraeeni, Mohammad Sadegh

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Prediction of rock and fluid properties such as porosity, clay content, and water saturation is essential for exploration and development of hydrocarbon reservoirs. Rock and fluid property maps obtained from such predictions ...

  7. THE RADIOLOGICAL RESEARCH ACCELERATOR FACILITY The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THE RADIOLOGICAL RESEARCH ACCELERATOR FACILITY 71 The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility the irradiated cells. Both the microbeam and the track segment facilities continue to be utilized in various investigations of this phenomenon. The single- particle microbeam facility provides precise control of the number

  8. THE RADIOLOGICAL RESEARCH ACCELERATOR FACILITY The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THE RADIOLOGICAL RESEARCH ACCELERATOR FACILITY 1 The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility for Radiological Research (CRR). Using the mi- crobeam facility, 10% of the cells were irradiated through particle beam as well as the first fo- cused microbeam in the new microbeam facility. · Another significant

  9. Facility Location with Hierarchical Facility Costs Zoya Svitkina #

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tardos, Ă?va

    Facility Location with Hierarchical Facility Costs Zoya Svitkina # â?? Eva Tardos + Abstract We consider the facility location problem with hierarchi­ cal facility costs, and give a (4 installation costs. Shmoys, Swamy and Levi [13] gave an approxi­ mation algorithm for a two­level version

  10. Realities of verifying the absence of highly enriched uranium (HEU) in gas centrifuge enrichment plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swindle, D.W.

    1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over a two and one-half year period beginning in 1981, representatives of six countries (United States, United Kingdom, Federal Republic of Germany, Australia, The Netherlands, and Japan) and the inspectorate organizations of the International Atomic Energy Agency and EURATOM developed and agreed to a technically sound approach for verifying the absence of highly enriched uranium (HEU) in gas centrifuge enrichment plants. This effort, known as the Hexapartite Safeguards Project (HSP), led to the first international concensus on techniques and requirements for effective verification of the absence of weapons-grade nuclear materials production. Since that agreement, research and development has continued on the radiation detection technology-based technique that technically confirms the HSP goal is achievable. However, the realities of achieving the HSP goal of effective technical verification have not yet been fully attained. Issues such as design and operating conditions unique to each gas centrifuge plant, concern about the potential for sensitive technology disclosures, and on-site support requirements have hindered full implementation and operator support of the HSP agreement. In future arms control treaties that may limit or monitor fissile material production, the negotiators must recognize and account for the realities and practicalities in verifying the absence of HEU production. This paper will describe the experiences and realities of trying to achieve the goal of developing and implementing an effective approach for verifying the absence of HEU production. 3 figs.

  11. Application of Condition-Based Monitoring Techniques for Remote Monitoring of a Simulated Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hooper, David A [ORNL; Henkel, James J [ORNL; Whitaker, Michael [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents research into the adaptation of monitoring techniques from maintainability and reliability (M&R) engineering for remote unattended monitoring of gas centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEPs) for international safeguards. Two categories of techniques are discussed: the sequential probability ratio test (SPRT) for diagnostic monitoring, and sequential Monte Carlo (SMC or, more commonly, particle filtering ) for prognostic monitoring. Development and testing of the application of condition-based monitoring (CBM) techniques was performed on the Oak Ridge Mock Feed and Withdrawal (F&W) facility as a proof of principle. CBM techniques have been extensively developed for M&R assessment of physical processes, such as manufacturing and power plants. These techniques are normally used to locate and diagnose the effects of mechanical degradation of equipment to aid in planning of maintenance and repair cycles. In a safeguards environment, however, the goal is not to identify mechanical deterioration, but to detect and diagnose (and potentially predict) attempts to circumvent normal, declared facility operations, such as through protracted diversion of enriched material. The CBM techniques are first explained from the traditional perspective of maintenance and reliability engineering. The adaptation of CBM techniques to inspector monitoring is then discussed, focusing on the unique challenges of decision-based effects rather than equipment degradation effects. These techniques are then applied to the Oak Ridge Mock F&W facility a water-based physical simulation of a material feed and withdrawal process used at enrichment plants that is used to develop and test online monitoring techniques for fully information-driven safeguards of GCEPs. Advantages and limitations of the CBM approach to online monitoring are discussed, as well as the potential challenges of adapting CBM concepts to safeguards applications.

  12. Triaxial creep measurements on rock salt from the Jennings dome, Louisiana, borehole LA-1, core {number_sign}8

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wawersik, W.R.; Zimmerer, D.J.

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tejas Power Company requested that facilities in the Rock Mechanics Laboratory at Sandia National Laboratories be used to assess the time-dependent properties of rock salt from the Jennings dome in Acadia Parish, Louisiana. Nominally 2.5-inch diameter slat core from borehole LA-1, core 8 (depth 3924.8 to 3837.8 ft; 1196.8--1197.1 m) was provided to accomplish two tasks: (1) Using the smallest possible number of experiments, evaluate the tendency of Jennings salt to undergo time-dependent deformation (creep) under constant applied stresses, and compare the creep of Jennings salt with creep data for rock salt from other locations. (2) Assess the applicability of published laboratory-derived creep properties for rock salt from several bedded and domal sites in finite element analyses concerning the design of new gas storage caverns in the Jennings dome. The characterization of Jennings salt followed the same strategy that was applied in earlier laboratory experiments on core from the Moss Bluff dome near Houston, Texas. This report summarizes the relevant details of five creep experiments on a sample from depth 3927.5 ft, the results obtained, and how these results compared with laboratory creep measurements gathered on rock salt from other locations including the West Hackberry, Bryan Mound and Moss Bluff domes. The report also considers the estimates of specific creep parameters commonly used in numerical engineering design analyses.

  13. Resin-assisted Enrichment of N-terminal Peptides for Characterizing...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Enrichment of N-terminal Peptides for Characterizing Proteolytic Processing. Resin-assisted Enrichment of N-terminal Peptides for Characterizing Proteolytic Processing. Abstract:...

  14. Enriched Background Isotope Study (EBIS) Litter reciprocal transplant studies to understand sources, transport and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Enriched Background Isotope Study (EBIS) Litter reciprocal transplant studies to understand were removed from this archived version.] #12;3 Enriched Background Isotope Study (EBIS): Litter

  15. Glycomimetic affinity-enrichment proteomics identifies partners for a clinically-utilized iminosugar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Ben G.

    Glycomimetic affinity-enrichment proteomics identifies partners for a clinically and utilize a natural product-derived glycomimetic iminosugar probe in a Glycomimetic Affinity-enrichment

  16. Resin-assisted enrichment of thios as a general strategy for...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    enrichment of thios as a general strategy for proteomic profiling of cysteine-based reversible modifications. Resin-assisted enrichment of thios as a general strategy for proteomic...

  17. Identification of Cross-Linked Peptides after Click-Based Enrichment...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cross-Linked Peptides after Click-Based Enrichment Using Sequential Collision-Induced Dissociation and Identification of Cross-Linked Peptides after Click-Based Enrichment Using...

  18. Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal Area (Phillips, 2004)...

  19. Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal Area (Ito & Tanaka, 1995)...

  20. Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Ito & Tanaka, 1995) Exploration...

  1. RUSSIAN-ORIGIN HIGHLY ENRICHED URANIUM SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL SHIPMENT FROM BULGARIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelly Cummins; Igor Bolshinsky; Ken Allen; Tihomir Apostolov; Ivaylo Dimitrov

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In July 2008, the Global Threat Reduction Initiative and the IRT 2000 research reactor in Sofia, Bulgaria, operated by the Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy (INRNE), safely shipped 6.4 kilograms of Russian origin highly enriched uranium (HEU) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) to the Russian Federation. The shipment, which resulted in the removal of all HEU from Bulgaria, was conducted by truck, barge, and rail modes of transport across two transit countries before reaching the final destination at the Production Association Mayak facility in Chelyabinsk, Russia. This paper describes the work, equipment, organizations, and approvals that were required to complete the spent fuel shipment and provides lessons learned that might assist other research reactor operators with their own spent nuclear fuel shipments.

  2. Recommendations for a Static Cosmic Ray Shield for Enriched Germanium Detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aguayo Navarrete, Estanislao; Orrell, John L.; Ankney, Austin S.; Berguson, Timothy J.

    2011-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides a detailed study of cost and materials that could be used to shield the detector material of the international Tonne-scale germanium neutrinoless double-beta decay experiment from hadronic particles from cosmic ray showers at the Earth's surface. This work was motivated by the need for a shield that minimizes activation of the enriched germanium during storage; in particular, when the detector material is being worked on at the detector manufacturer's facility. This work considers two options for shielding the detector material from cosmic ray particles. One option is to use a pre-existing structure already located near the detector manufacturer, such as Canberra Industries in Meriden, Connecticut. The other option is to build a shield onsite at a detector manufacturer's site. This paper presents a cost and efficiency analysis of such construction.

  3. atmospheric co2 enrichment: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Soil carbon sequestration in a pine forest after 9 years of atmospheric CO2 enrichment...

  4. air co2 enrichment: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    with increasing CO2 between ambient (1.0x California at Santa Cruz, University of 13 Soil carbon sequestration in a pine forest after 9 years of atmospheric CO2 enrichment...

  5. The uranium cylinder assay system for enrichment plant safeguards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Karen A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swinhoe, Martyn T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Marlow, Johnna B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Menlove, Howard O [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rael, Carlos D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Iwamoto, Tomonori [JNFL; Tamura, Takayuki [JNFL; Aiuchi, Syun [JNFL

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Safeguarding sensitive fuel cycle technology such as uranium enrichment is a critical component in preventing the spread of nuclear weapons. A useful tool for the nuclear materials accountancy of such a plant would be an instrument that measured the uranium content of UF{sub 6} cylinders. The Uranium Cylinder Assay System (UCAS) was designed for Japan Nuclear Fuel Limited (JNFL) for use in the Rokkasho Enrichment Plant in Japan for this purpose. It uses total neutron counting to determine uranium mass in UF{sub 6} cylinders given a known enrichment. This paper describes the design of UCAS, which includes features to allow for unattended operation. It can be used on 30B and 48Y cylinders to measure depleted, natural, and enriched uranium. It can also be used to assess the amount of uranium in decommissioned equipment and waste containers. Experimental measurements have been carried out in the laboratory and these are in good agreement with the Monte Carlo modeling results.

  6. Y-12 and the Ťsuper enriched Uranium 235?

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    "super enriched Uranium 235" Ken Bernander called me to say that he had read in the newspaper about the 100 milligrams of uranium oxide that is 99.999% U-235. He was chuckling when...

  7. anthropogenic uranium enrichments: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Websites Summary: Flats Plutonium and Uranium Weapons-Grade Plutonium Enriched Uranium Depleted Uranium Plutonium-238 0.01 - 0.05% Uranium-234 0.1 - 1.02% Uranium-234...

  8. A fast enriched FEM for Poisson equations involving interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huynh, Thanh Le Ngoc

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop a fast enriched finite element method for solving Poisson equations involving complex geometry interfaces by using regular Cartesian grids. The presence of interfaces is accounted for by developing suitable jump ...

  9. NREL: Energy Systems Integration Facility - Facility Design

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated CodesTransparency Visit | NationalWebmaster ToStaffCapabilities TheFacility

  10. Radiation Effects Facility - Facilities - Cyclotron Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeedingTechnicalPurchase, Delivery, andSmartRadiation Effects Facility

  11. Reactor Physics Measurements and Benchmark Specifications for Oak Ridge Highly Enriched Uranium Sphere (ORSphere)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    None

    2014-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    In the early 1970s Dr. John T. Mihalczo (team leader), J.J. Lynn, and J.R. Taylor performed experiments at the Oak Ridge Critical Experiments Facility (ORCEF) with highly enriched uranium (HEU) metal (called Oak Ridge Alloy or ORALLOY) in an effort to recreate GODIVA I results with greater accuracy than those performed at Los Alamos National Laboratory in the 1950s. The purpose of the Oak Ridge ORALLOY Sphere (ORSphere) experiments was to estimate the unreflected and unmoderated critical mass of an idealized sphere of uranium metal corrected to a density, purity, and enrichment such that it could be compared with the GODIVA I experiments. Additionally, various material reactivity worths, the surface material worth coefficient, the delayed neutron fraction, the prompt neutron decay constant, relative fission density, and relative neutron importance were all measured. The critical assembly, material reactivity worths, the surface material worth coefficient, and the delayed neutron fraction were all evaluated as benchmark experiment measurements. The reactor physics measurements are the focus of this paper; although for clarity the critical assembly benchmark specifications are briefly discussed.

  12. Reactor Physics Measurements and Benchmark Specifications for Oak Ridge Highly Enriched Uranium Sphere (ORSphere)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    None

    2014-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    In the early 1970s Dr. John T. Mihalczo (team leader), J.J. Lynn, and J.R. Taylor performed experiments at the Oak Ridge Critical Experiments Facility (ORCEF) with highly enriched uranium (HEU) metal (called Oak Ridge Alloy or ORALLOY) in an effort to recreate GODIVA I results with greater accuracy than those performed at Los Alamos National Laboratory in the 1950s. The purpose of the Oak Ridge ORALLOY Sphere (ORSphere) experiments was to estimate the unreflected and unmoderated critical mass of an idealized sphere of uranium metal corrected to a density, purity, and enrichment such that it could be compared with themore »GODIVA I experiments. Additionally, various material reactivity worths, the surface material worth coefficient, the delayed neutron fraction, the prompt neutron decay constant, relative fission density, and relative neutron importance were all measured. The critical assembly, material reactivity worths, the surface material worth coefficient, and the delayed neutron fraction were all evaluated as benchmark experiment measurements. The reactor physics measurements are the focus of this paper; although for clarity the critical assembly benchmark specifications are briefly discussed.« less

  13. A CONSTITUTIVE MODEL TO PREDICT THE HYDROMECHANICAL BEHAVIOUR OF ROCK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aubertin, Michel

    in the presence of water to better assess the stability of rock structures under many situations. The accurate conditions. A rock mass behaviour can also be influenced by the water flow and ensuing pore pressure. For example, a previously stable rock structure can become unstable with an increase of water pressure inside

  14. Sigma Xi, The Scientific Research Society Rock Varnish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dorn, Ron

    Sigma Xi, The Scientific Research Society Rock Varnish Author(s): Ronald I. Dorn Source: American;Rock Varnish Over thousandsofyears,a thincoatingofclay,cementedtorocksbymanganese and iron that appeared "smooth, black, and as ifcoated with plumbago." Indian legends explained that these rocks had been

  15. Technical Note Evaluation of mechanical rock properties using a Schmidt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ze'ev, Reches

    Technical Note Evaluation of mechanical rock properties using a Schmidt Hammer O. Katza, b, c, *, Z, 91904, Israel b Geological Survey of Israel, 30 Malkhe Yisrael St., Jerusalem, 95501, Israel c Rock of concrete hardness [1], and was later used to estimate rock strength [2,3]. It con- sists of a spring

  16. A NEW MODEL FOR PERFORMANCE PREDICTION OF HARD ROCK TBMS.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TBMs. The model uses information on the rock properties and cutting geometry to calculate TBM rate on data collected in the field and is merely a regression between machine parameters, rock properties is introduced to provide an estimate of disc cutting forces as a function of rock properties and the cutting

  17. Apollo Rock Reveals Moon Had Molten Core | Universe Additional Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weiss, Benjamin P.

    Apollo Rock Reveals Moon Had Molten Core | Universe Today Subscribe Podcast Home Additional Apollo Rock Reveals Moon Had Molten Core Written by Nancy Atkinson If you're new here, you may want to subscribe to my RSS feed. Thanks for visiting! Apollo Rock Reveals Moon Had Molten Core | Universe Today

  18. Development of a Safeguards Approach for a Small Graphite Moderated Reactor and Associated Fuel Cycle Facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rauch, Eric B.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    cycle is designed to meet. First, raw material must be processed into a suitable fuel. Depending on the type of reactor, the amount of 235U might have to be enriched to achieve a critical system. That uranium is then formed into a chemical... the obligations are assumed by Russia), People?s Republic of China, and France. The model proposed in INFCIRC-66/rev.2 provided the basic foundations used for the next quarter century. Eventually, uranium enrichment facilities were also 6 covered under...

  19. UNIVERSITY BOULEVARD FAU Research Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    Harriet L.Wilkes Honors College FAU Research Facility Expansion Satellite Utility Plant Chiller Lift

  20. ROCK PROPERTIES AND THEIR EFFECT ON THERMALLY-INDUCED DISPLACEMENTS AND STRESSES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, T.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of laboratory rock property measurements. ACKNOWLEDGEMENT10517 u>ve-'zz&\\--lo ROCK PROPERTIES AND THEIR EFFECT OHin values i for the rock properties for an 1n-s1tu rock mass

  1. GEOL 103 Writing Assignment 2. Rock Cycle 1. How do each of the three major rock types form? Include the source of the material and the rock-forming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, Carl S.

    ? Include the source of the material and the rock-forming process. · Igneous rocks form from the hiGEOL 103 Writing Assignment 2. Rock Cycle 1. How do each of the three major rock types form-temperature (650-1200 °C) melting of other rocks (ign. mmorphic, or sed), following by cooling, possibly

  2. Examination of the conversion of the U.S. submarine fleet from highly enriched uranium to low enriched uranium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCord, Cameron (Cameron Liam)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The nuclear reactors used by the U.S. Navy for submarine propulsion are currently fueled by highly enriched uranium (HEU), but HEU brings administrative and political challenges. This issue has been studied by the Navy ...

  3. GEOTECHNICAL ASSESSMENT AND INSTRUMENTATION NEEDS FOR NUCLEAR WASTE ISOLATION IN CRYSTALLINE AND ARGILLACEOUS ROCKS SYMPOSIUM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Characterization of Rock Masses Structural GeologicalCharacterization of Rock Masses . • • • • • • • • 5.2.1 Structural Geological

  4. Seismic and Acoustic Investigations of Rock Fall Initiation, Processes, and Mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zimmer, Valerie Louise

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Happy  Isles  and  the  1999  Glacier  Point  rock  falls,  there   was   an   attempt   to   monitor   rock   fall   in   Yosemite   Valley  

  5. A Phased Array Approach to Rock Blasting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leslie Gertsch; Jason Baird

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of laboratory-scale simultaneous two-hole shots was performed in a rock simulant (mortar) to record the shock wave interference patterns produced in the material. The purpose of the project as a whole was to evaluate the usefulness of phased array techniques of blast design, using new high-precision delay technology. Despite high-speed photography, however, we were unable to detect the passage of the shock waves through the samples to determine how well they matched the expected interaction geometry. The follow-up mine-scale tests were therefore not conducted. Nevertheless, pattern analysis of the vectors that would be formed by positive interference of the shockwaves from multiple charges in an ideal continuous, homogeneous, isotropic medium indicate the potential for powerful control of blast design, given precise characterization of the target rock mass.

  6. Low Pore Connectivity in Natural Rock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Qinhong; Ewing, Robert P.; Dultz, Stefan

    2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    As repositories for CO? and radioactive waste, as oil and gas reservoirs, and as contaminated sites needing remediation, rock formations play a central role in energy and environmental management. The connectivity of the rock's porespace strongly affects fluid flow and solute transport. This work examines pore connectivity and its implications for fluid flow and chemical transport. Three experimental approaches (imbibition, tracer concentration profiles, and imaging) were used in combination with network modeling. In the imbibition results, three types of imbibition slope [log (cumulative imbibition) vs. log (imbibition time)] were found: the classical 0.5, plus 0.26, and 0.26 transitioning to 0.5. The imbibition slope of 0.26 seen in Indiana sandstone, metagraywacke, and Barnett shale indicates low pore connectivity, in contrast to the slope of 0.5 seen in the well-connected Berea sandstone. In the tracer profile work, rocks exhibited different distances to the plateau porosity, consistent with the pore connectivity from the imbibition tests. Injection of a molten metal into connected pore spaces, followed by 2-D imaging of the solidified alloy in polished thin sections, allowed direct assessment of pore structure and lateral connection in the rock samples. Pore-scale network modeling gave results consistent with measurements, confirming pore connectivity as the underlying cause of both anomalous behaviors: imbibition slope not having the classical value of 0.5, and accessible porosity being a function of distance from the edge. A poorly connected porespace will exhibit anomalous behavior in fluid flow and chemical transport, such as a lower imbibition slope (in air–water system) and diffusion rate than expected from classical behavior.

  7. Rock Chalk Report, May 7, 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Trouble seeing something? view it online or To unsubscribe, click here or send an email to: unsubscribe- 87@pacmail.em.marketinghq.net. May 7, 2014 Rock Chalk Report The Official Newsletter of Kansas Athletics... an email to: unsubscribe-87@pacmail.em.marketinghq.net. © 2014, University of Kansas. The team names, logos and uniform designs are registered trademarks of the teams indicated. No logos, photographs or graphics in this email may be reproduced without...

  8. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006 [Facility News]SPARTICUSJune31, 2005 [Facility

  9. Facilities | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic Plan| Department of.pdf6-OPAMDepartment6 FY 2007FY 2014Facilities Facilities

  10. Facility Disposition Projects

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic Plan| Department of.pdf6-OPAMDepartment6 FY 2007FY 2014Facilities Facilities

  11. Facility Data Policy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental Assessments (EA)Budget » FY 2014Facilities FusionFacility Data Policy

  12. Gage for measuring displacements in rock samples

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holcomb, D.J.; McNamee, M.J.

    1985-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A gage for measuring diametral displacement within a rock sample for use in a rock mechanics laboratory and in the field, comprises a support ring housing a linear variable differential transformer (LVDT), a mounting screw, and a leaf spring. The mounting screw is adjustable and defines a first point of contact with the rock sample. The leaf spring has opposite ends fixed to the inner periphery of the mounting ring. An intermediate portion of the leaf spring projecting radially inward from the ring is formed with a dimple defining a second point of contact with the sample. The first and second points of contact are diametrically opposed to each other. The LVDT is mounted in the ring with its axis parallel to the line of measurement and its core rod received in the dimple of the leaf spring. Any change in the length of the line between the first and second support points is directly communicated to the LVDT. The leaf spring is rigid to completely support lateral forces so that the LVDT is free of all load for improved precision.

  13. Squirt flow in fully saturated rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dvorkin, J.; Mavko, G.; Nur, A. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Geophysics] [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Geophysics

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors estimate velocity/frequency dispersion and attenuation in fully saturated rocks by employing the squirt-flow mechanism of solid-fluid interaction. In this model, pore fluid is squeezed from thin soft cracks into the surrounding large pores. Information about the compliance of these soft cracks at low confining pressures is extracted from high-pressure velocity data. The frequency dependence of squirt-induced pressure in the soft cracks is linked with the porosity and permeability of the soft pore space, and the characteristic squirt-flow length. These unknown parameters are combined into one expression that is assumed to be a fundamental rock property that does not depend on frequency. The appropriate value of this expression for a given rock can be found by matching the authors theoretical predictions with the experimental measurements of attenuation or velocity. The low-frequency velocity limits, as given by their model, are identical to those predicted by Gassmann`s formula. The high-frequency limits may significant exceed those given by the Biot theory: the high-frequency frame bulk modulus is close to that measured at high confining pressure. They have applied their model to D`Euville Limestone, Navajo Sandstone, and Westerly Granite. The model realistically predicts the observed velocity/frequency dispersion, and attenuation.

  14. SEARCH FOR UNDERGROUND OPENINGS FOR IN SITU TEST FACILITIES IN CRYSTALLINE ROCK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wallenberg, H.A.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Uplifts, Rocky Mountain Association Geologists, 14th Field12, p. 67. Rocky Mountain Association of Geologists - 19601963, Rocky Mountain Association of Geologists, Denver. )

  15. SEARCH FOR UNDERGROUND OPENINGS FOR IN SITU TEST FACILITIES IN CRYSTALLINE ROCK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wallenberg, H.A.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the Philipsburg District, Granite County, Montana: U.S.Buddington, A.F. , 1959, Granite emplacement with specialthe Philipsburg District Granite County, Montana: U.S. Geol.

  16. SEARCH FOR UNDERGROUND OPENINGS FOR IN SITU TEST FACILITIES IN CRYSTALLINE ROCK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wallenberg, H.A.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    production capacity of approximately 325,000 tons of ore per year containing about 6 million pounds of recoverable tungsten.

  17. Generalized Modeling of Enrichment Cascades That Include Minor Isotopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weber, Charles F [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The monitoring of enrichment operations may require innovative analysis to allow for imperfect or missing data. The presence of minor isotopes may help or hurt - they can complicate a calculation or provide additional data to corroborate a calculation. However, they must be considered in a rigorous analysis, especially in cases involving reuse. This study considers matched-abundanceratio cascades that involve at least three isotopes and allows generalized input that does not require all feed assays or the enrichment factor to be specified. Calculations are based on the equations developed for the MSTAR code but are generalized to allow input of various combinations of assays, flows, and other cascade properties. Traditional cascade models have required specification of the enrichment factor, all feed assays, and the product and waste assays of the primary enriched component. The calculation would then produce the numbers of stages in the enriching and stripping sections and the remaining assays in waste and product streams. In cases where the enrichment factor or feed assays were not known, analysis was difficult or impossible. However, if other quantities are known (e.g., additional assays in waste or product streams), a reliable calculation is still possible with the new code, but such nonstandard input may introduce additional numerical difficulties into the calculation. Thus, the minimum input requirements for a stable solution are discussed, and a sample problem with a non-unique solution is described. Both heuristic and mathematically required guidelines are given to assist the application of cascade modeling to situations involving such non-standard input. As a result, this work provides both a calculational tool and specific guidance for evaluation of enrichment cascades in which traditional input data are either flawed or unknown. It is useful for cases involving minor isotopes, especially if the minor isotope assays are desired (or required) to be important contributors to the overall analysis.

  18. Merguerian, Charles; and Ozdemir, Levent, 2003, Rock Mass Properties and Hard Rock TBM Penetration Rate Investigations, Queens Tunnel Complex, NYC Water Tunnel #3, Stage 2: p.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merguerian, Charles

    Merguerian, Charles; and Ozdemir, Levent, 2003, Rock Mass Properties and Hard Rock TBM Penetration Properties and Hard Rock TBM Penetration Rate Investigations, Queens Tunnel Complex, NYC Water Tunnel #3 quantification that the rock mass exhibited an unusually high degree of toughness and rock directional properties

  19. Results from a "Proof-of-Concept" Demonstration of RF-Based Tracking of UF6 Cylinders during a Processing Operation at a Uranium Enrichment Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pickett, Chris A [ORNL] [ORNL; Kovacic, Donald N [ORNL] [ORNL; Whitaker, J Michael [ORNL] [ORNL; Younkin, James R [ORNL] [ORNL; Hines, Jairus B [ORNL] [ORNL; Laughter, Mark D [ORNL] [ORNL; Morgan, Jim [Innovative Solutions] [Innovative Solutions; Carrick, Bernie [USEC] [USEC; Boyer, Brian [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Whittle, K. [USEC] [USEC

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Approved industry-standard cylinders are used globally for processing, storing, and transporting uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) at uranium enrichment plants. To ensure that cylinder movements at enrichment facilities occur as declared, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) must conduct time-consuming periodic physical inspections to validate facility records, cylinder identity, and containment. By using a robust system design that includes the capability for real-time unattended monitoring (of cylinder movements), site-specific rules-based event detection algorithms, and the capability to integrate with other types of monitoring technologies, one can build a system that will improve overall inspector effectiveness. This type of monitoring system can provide timely detection of safeguard events that could be used to ensure more timely and appropriate responses by the IAEA. It also could reduce reliance on facility records and have the additional benefit of enhancing domestic safeguards at the installed facilities. This paper will discuss the installation and evaluation of a radio-frequency- (RF-) based cylinder tracking system that was installed at a United States Enrichment Corporation Centrifuge Facility. This system was installed primarily to evaluate the feasibility of using RF technology at a site and the operational durability of the components under harsh processing conditions. The installation included a basic system that is designed to support layering with other safeguard system technologies and that applies fundamental rules-based event processing methodologies. This paper will discuss the fundamental elements of the system design, the results from this site installation, and future efforts needed to make this technology ready for IAEA consideration.

  20. Optogalvanic isotope enrichment of Cu ions in Cu-Ne positive column discharges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kushner, Mark

    Optogalvanic isotope enrichment of Cu ions in Cu-Ne positive column discharges M. J. Kushner The isotopic enrichment of copper ions in a positive column Cu-Ne discharge using optogalvanic excitation the 63-amu isotope of copper is enriched relative to the neutral abundance. Enrichment as large as 10

  1. High-solids enrichment of thermophilic microbial communities and their enzymes on bioenergy feedstocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reddy, A. P.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    strain isolated from black liquor. Bioresource Technologyhave been enriched in black liquor samples from paper

  2. Origin of enriched ocean ridge basalts and implications for mantle dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langmuir, Charles H.

    Origin of enriched ocean ridge basalts and implications for mantle dynamics Kathleen E. Donnellya that a small proportion of basalt are enriched in incompatible elements (enriched mid-ocean ridge basalts, E-MORB) from the MARK area. It is apparent that enriched magma sources, not associated with hot spots

  3. How Enrichment Affects Exploration Trade-Offs in Rats: Implications for Welfare and Well-Being

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Champagne, Frances A.

    How Enrichment Affects Exploration Trade-Offs in Rats: Implications for Welfare and Well-being and animal welfare, we designed a novel test of exploration behavior. Environmentally and socially enriched, 20 animals remained in enriched housing (enrichment-maintenance) while 40 animals were re

  4. Pyroprocessing of Fast Flux Test Facility Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B.R. Westphal; G.L. Fredrickson; G.G. Galbreth; D. Vaden; M.D. Elliott; J.C. Price; E.M. Honeyfield; M.N. Patterson; L. A. Wurth

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Used nuclear fuel from the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) was recently transferred to the Idaho National Laboratory and processed by pyroprocessing in the Fuel Conditioning Facility. Approximately 213 kg of uranium from sodium-bonded metallic FFTF fuel was processed over a one year period with the equipment previously used for the processing of EBR-II used fuel. The peak burnup of the FFTF fuel ranged from 10 to 15 atom% for the 900+ chopped elements processed. Fifteen low-enriched uranium ingots were cast following the electrorefining and distillation operations to recover approximately 192 kg of uranium. A material balance on the primary fuel constituents, uranium and zirconium, during the FFTF campaign will be presented along with a brief description of operating parameters. Recoverable uranium during the pyroprocessing of FFTF nuclear fuel was greater than 95% while the purity of the final electrorefined uranium products exceeded 99%.

  5. Pyroprocessing of fast flux test facility nuclear fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Westphal, B.R.; Wurth, L.A.; Fredrickson, G.L.; Galbreth, G.G.; Vaden, D.; Elliott, M.D.; Price, J.C.; Honeyfield, E.M.; Patterson, M.N. [Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID, 83415 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Used nuclear fuel from the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) was recently transferred to the Idaho National Laboratory and processed by pyroprocessing in the Fuel Conditioning Facility. Approximately 213 kg of uranium from sodium-bonded metallic FFTF fuel was processed over a one year period with the equipment previously used for the processing of EBR-II used fuel. The peak burnup of the FFTF fuel ranged from 10 to 15 atom% for the 900+ chopped elements processed. Fifteen low-enriched uranium ingots were cast following the electrorefining and distillation operations to recover approximately 192 kg of uranium. A material balance on the primary fuel constituents, uranium and zirconium, during the FFTF campaign will be presented along with a brief description of operating parameters. Recoverable uranium during the pyroprocessing of FFTF nuclear fuel was greater than 95% while the purity of the final electro-refined uranium products exceeded 99%. (authors)

  6. FACILITIES INSTRUCTIONS, STANDARDS, & TECHNIQUES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    to the repair of hydraulic turbine runners and large pump impellers. Reclamation operates and maintains a wideFACILITIES INSTRUCTIONS, STANDARDS, & TECHNIQUES VOLUME 2-5 TURBINE REPAIR Internet Version variety of reaction and impulse turbines as well as axial flow, mixed flow, radial flow pumps and pump

  7. Facilities Management Field Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickman, Mark

    Facilities Management Field Services FieldStationsAnnualReport2006 #12;Cover Photo by Dr Mark Jermy coast #12; Introduction A very wet Steve Weaver emerges from the river. Ah, field work! The Government broadband, at least there is now an alternative to the telephone line. Electrical power spikes (and outages

  8. Graph algorithms experimentation facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sonom, Donald George

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DRAWADJMAT 2 ~e ~l 2. ~f ~2 2 ~t ~& [g H 2 O? Z Mwd a P d ed d Aid~a sae R 2-BE& T C dbms Fig. 2. External Algorithm Handler The facility is menu driven and implemented as a client to XAGE. Our implementation follows very closely the functionality...

  9. NEW RENEWABLE FACILITIES PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for and receive production incentives, referred to as supplemental energy payments (SEPs), from the New RenewableCALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION NEW RENEWABLE FACILITIES PROGRAM GUIDEBOOK APRIL 2006 CEC-300 Director Heather Raitt Technical Director Renewable Energy Program Drake Johnson Office Manager Renewable

  10. Nuclear material safeguards for enrichments plants: Part 4, Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant: Diversion scenarios and IAEA safeguards activities: Safeguards training course

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication is Part 4 of a safeguards training course in Nuclear Material Safeguards for enrichment plants. This part of the course deals with diversion scenarios and safeguards activities at gas centrifuge enrichment plants.

  11. Automated UF6 Cylinder Enrichment Assay: Status of the Hybrid Enrichment Verification Array (HEVA) Project: POTAS Phase II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jordan, David V.; Orton, Christopher R.; Mace, Emily K.; McDonald, Benjamin S.; Kulisek, Jonathan A.; Smith, Leon E.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) intends to automate the UF6 cylinder nondestructive assay (NDA) verification currently performed by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) at enrichment plants. PNNL is proposing the installation of a portal monitor at a key measurement point to positively identify each cylinder, measure its mass and enrichment, store the data along with operator inputs in a secure database, and maintain continuity of knowledge on measured cylinders until inspector arrival. This report summarizes the status of the research and development of an enrichment assay methodology supporting the cylinder verification concept. The enrichment assay approach exploits a hybrid of two passively-detected ionizing-radiation signatures: the traditional enrichment meter signature (186-keV photon peak area) and a non-traditional signature, manifested in the high-energy (3 to 8 MeV) gamma-ray continuum, generated by neutron emission from UF6. PNNL has designed, fabricated, and field-tested several prototype assay sensor packages in an effort to demonstrate proof-of-principle for the hybrid assay approach, quantify the expected assay precision for various categories of cylinder contents, and assess the potential for unsupervised deployment of the technology in a portal-monitor form factor. We refer to recent sensor-package prototypes as the Hybrid Enrichment Verification Array (HEVA). The report provides an overview of the assay signatures and summarizes the results of several HEVA field measurement campaigns on populations of Type 30B UF6 cylinders containing low-enriched uranium (LEU), natural uranium (NU), and depleted uranium (DU). Approaches to performance optimization of the assay technique via radiation transport modeling are briefly described, as are spectroscopic and data-analysis algorithms.

  12. Final Environmental Impact Statement for the construction and operation of Claiborne Enrichment Center, Homer, Louisiana (Docket No. 70-3-70). Volume 2, Public comments and NRC response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zeitoun, A. [Science Applications International Corp., Germantown, MD (United States)

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) (Volume 1), was prepared by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in accordance with regulation 10 CFR Part 51, which implements the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), to assess the potential environmental impacts for licensing the construction and operation of a proposed gaseous centrifuge enrichment facility to be built in Claiborne Parish, Louisiana by Louisiana Energy Services, L.P. (LES). The proposed facility would have a production capacity of about 866 metric tons annually of up to 5 weight percent enriched UF{sub 6}, using a proven centrifuge technology. Included in the assessment are co on, both normal operations and potential accidents (internal and external events), and the eventual decontamination and decommissioning of the site. In order to help assure that releases from the operation of the facility and potential impacts on the public are as low as reasonably achievable, an environmental monitoring program was developed by LES to detect significant changes in the background levels of uranium around the site. Other issues addressed include the purpose and need for the facility, the alternatives to the proposed action, potential disposition of the tails, the site selection process, and environmental justice. The NRC staff concludes that the facility can be constructed and operated with small and acceptable impacts on the public and the environment, and proposes to issue a license to the applicant, Louisiana Energy Services, to authorize construction and operation of the proposed facility. The letters in this Appendix have been divided into three sections. Section One contains letters to which the NRC responded by addressing specific comments. Section Two contains the letters that concerned the communities of Forest Grove and Center Springs. Section Three is composed of letters that required no response. These letters were generally in support of the facility.

  13. A study of a zone approach to IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency) safeguards: The low-enriched-uranium zone of a light-water-reactor fuel cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fishbone, L.G.; Higinbotham, W.A.

    1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At present the IAEA designs its safeguards approach with regard to each type of nuclear facility so that the safeguards activities and effort are essentially the same for a given type and size of nuclear facility wherever it may be located. Conclusions regarding a state are derived by combining the conclusions regarding the effectiveness of safeguards for the individual facilities within a state. In this study it was convenient to define three zones in a state with a closed light-water-reactor nuclear fuel cycle. Each zone contains those facilities or parts thereof which use or process nuclear materials of the same safeguards significance: low-enriched uranium, radioactive spent fuel, or recovered plutonium. The possibility that each zone might be treated as an extended material balance area for safeguards purposes is under investigation. The approach includes defining the relevant features of the facilities in the three zones and listing the safeguards activities which are now practiced. This study has focussed on the fresh-fuel zone, the several facilities of which use or process low-enriched uranium. At one extreme, flows and inventories would be verified at each material balance area. At the other extreme, the flows into and out of the zone and the inventory of the whole zone would be verified. There are a number of possible safeguards approaches which fall between the two extremes. The intention is to develop a rational approach which will make it possible to compare the technical effectiveness and the inspection effort for the facility-oriented approach, for the approach involving the zone as a material balance area, and for some reasonable intermediate safeguards approaches.

  14. Nano Research Facility Lab Safety Manual Nano Research Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subramanian, Venkat

    1 Nano Research Facility Lab Safety Manual Nano Research Facility: Weining Wang Office: Brauer---chemical, biological, or radiological. Notify the lab manager, Dr. Yujie Xiong at 5-4530. Eye Contact: Promptly flush

  15. Source rock evaluation, oil-source rock correlation, and kinetic modeling - San Juan Sag, CO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clayton, J.L. (Geological survey, Denver, CO (USA)); Gries, R.R.

    1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, oil and gas shows have been reported in Cretaceous and Tertiary rocks of the San Juan sag, and minor oil production was established from volcanic rocks (Kirby Petroleum 1 Jynnifer well, Sec. 9, T40N, R5E.). Potential source rocks present in the San Juan sag are the upper and lower (including the Niobrara Member) Mancos Shale (Upper Cretaceous). The combined upper and lower Mancos Shale is about 666 m thick and contains between about 0.5 and 5.5% organic carbon, although most values are between about 1.5 and 2.0%. The Niobrara Member of the lower Mancos Shale has the highest overall organic matter content in the section (organic carbon averages <2.0%). Pyrolysis and solvent extraction data (typically 2,000-6,000 and 1,000-4,000 ppm, respectively) indicate that the upper and lower Mancos Shale and the Niobrara Member are all good potential source rocks for oil and gas. Oil-source rock correlations using gas chromatography, mass spectrometry, and stable carbon isotope ratios indicate that the upper Mancos Shale is the most likely source for the oil produced from the 1 Jynnifer discovery well. The source of the oil produced from the nearby Gramps field is less certain, but may be the lower Mancos Shale or Niobrara Member. The hydrocarbon generation history of the San Juan sag is complex because of highly variable heat flow in the area caused by Oligocene volcanism. Sills have caused thermal alteration of organic matter in shales on a local scale, and larger volcanic bodies may have produced proportionality larger thermal effects. More regional heating by larger volcanic bodies is an important factor in the oil generation history of the area. The authors have constructed kinetic models at several locations in the area to estimate the timing and amount of hydrocarbon products generated from the source rocks. The main phase of oil and gas generation and expulsion occurred during the Oligocene.

  16. Approach to IAEA material-balance verification with intermittent inspection at the Portsmouth Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gordon, D.M.; Sanborn, J.B.

    1984-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes a potential approach by which the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) might verify the nuclear-material balance at the Portsmouth Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant (GCEP) for the circumstance in which the IAEA inspections occur on an intermittent basis. The verification approach is a variation of the standard IAEA attributes/variables measurement-verification method. This alternative approach is useful and applicable at the Portsmouth GCEP, which will ship all its product and tails UF/sub 6/ to United States facilities not eligible for IAEA safeguards. The paper reviews some of the relevant results of the Hexapartite Safeguards Project (HSP), describes the standard IAEA material-balance-verification approach for bulk-handling facilities, and provides the procedures to be followed in handling and processing UF/sub 6/ cylinders at the Portsmouth GCEP. The paper then discusses the assumptions made in the approach, and derives a formula for the probability with which the IAEA could detect the diversion of a significant quantity of uranium (75 kg of U-235 in depleted, normal, and low-enriched uranium) if this method were applied. The paper also provides numerical examples of IAEA detection probability should the operator divert uranium from the feed, product, or tails streams for the Portsmouth GCEP with a capacity of 1100 tonnes of separative work per year.

  17. Biomass Anaerobic Digestion Facilities and Biomass Gasification Facilities (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Indiana Department of Environmental Management requires permits before the construction or expansion of biomass anaerobic digestion or gasification facilities.

  18. ACOUSTICAL IMAGING AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF SOFT ROCK AND MARINE SEDIMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thurman E. Scott, Jr., Ph.D.; Younane Abousleiman, Ph.D.; Musharraf Zaman, Ph.D., P.E.

    2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mechanically weak formations, such as chalks, high porosity sandstones, and marine sediments, pose significant problems for oil and gas operators. Problems such as compaction, subsidence, and loss of permeability can affect reservoir production operations. For example, the unexpected subsidence of the Ekofisk chalk in the North Sea required over one billion dollars to re-engineer production facilities to account for losses created during that compaction (Sulak 1991). Another problem in weak formations is that of shallow water flows (SWF). Deep water drilling operations sometimes encounter cases where the marine sediments, at shallow depths just below the seafloor, begin to uncontrollably flow up and around the drill pipe. SWF problems created a loss of $150 million for the Ursa development project in the U.S. Gulf Coast SWF (Furlow 1998a,b; 1999a,b). The goal of this project is to provide a database on both the rock mechanical properties and the geophysical properties of weak rocks and sediments. These could be used by oil and gas companies to detect, evaluate, and alleviate potential production and drilling problems. The results will be useful in, for example, pre-drill detection of events such as SWF's by allowing a correlation of seismic data (such as hazard surveys) to rock mechanical properties. The data sets could also be useful for 4-D monitoring of the compaction and subsidence of an existing reservoir and imaging the zones of damage. During the second quarter of the project the research team has: (1) completed acoustic sensor construction, (2) conducted reconnaissance tests to map the deformational behaviors of the various rocks, (3) developed a sample assembly for the measurement of dynamic elastic and poroelastic parameters during triaxial testing, and (4) conducted a detailed review of the scientific literature and compiled a bibliography of that review. During the first quarter of the project the research team acquired several rock types for testing including: (a) Danian chalk, (b) Cordoba Cream limestone, (c) Indiana limestone, (d) Ekofisk chalk, (e) Oil Creek sandstone, (f) unconsolidated Oil Creek sand, and (g) unconsolidated Brazos river sand. During the second quarter experiments were begun on these rock types. A series of reconnaissance experiments have been carried out on all but the Ekofisk (for which there is a preliminary data set already inhouse). A series of triaxial tests have been conducted on the Danian chalk, the Cordoba Cream limestone, the Indiana limestone, and sand samples to make a preliminary determination of the deformational mechanisms present in these samples.

  19. Recovery of enriched stable isotopes in radionuclide production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Razbash, A.A.; Sevastyanov, Yu.G.; Polyakov, O.N.; Krasnov, N.N.; Konyakhin, N.A.; Tolstouhov, Yu.V.; Maklachkov, A.G. [Cyclotron Co. Ltd., Obninsk (Russian Federation)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The wide application of radionuclides in different fields of science and industry demanded an increase of their production. One of the ways to increase the radionuclide production on present cyclotrons is the use of the targets from enriched stable isotopes. This allows one to raise the productivity in some cases by two or more times and to increase radionuclidic purity. It should be noted, however, that enriched stable isotopes are very expensive. Therefore it is advisable to use such raw materials more than once. In the last ten years, The authors have used stable isotopes extensively for making of targets. Zinc-67 and zinc-68, cadmium-111 and cadmium-112, nickel-58, silver-109, thallium-203 have been employed for the production of gallium-67, indium-111, cobalt-57, cadmium-109 and thallium-201, respectively. The technique for the recovery of enriched stable isotopes has been developed. In this report the schemes of the recovering processes are presented.

  20. Electron spin decoherence in isotope-enriched silicon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wayne M. Witzel; Malcolm S. Carroll; Andrea Morello; Lukasz Cywinski; S. Das Sarma

    2010-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Silicon is promising for spin-based quantum computation because nuclear spins, a source of magnetic noise, may be eliminated through isotopic enrichment. Long spin decoherence times, $T_2$, have been measured in isotope-enriched silicon but come far short of the $T_2 = 2 T_1$ limit. The effect of nuclear spins on $T_2$ is well established. However, the effect of background electron spins from ever present residual phosphorus impurities in silicon can also produce significant decoherence. We study spin decoherence decay as a function of donor concentration, $^{29}$Si concentration, and temperature using cluster expansion techniques specifically adapted to the problem of a sparse dipolarly coupled electron spin bath. Our results agree with the existing experimental spin echo data in Si:P and establish the importance of background dopants as the ultimate decoherence mechanism in isotope-enriched silicon.

  1. Reduced enrichment for research and test reactors: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The international effort to develop new research reactor fuel materials and designs based on the use of low-enriched uranium, instead of highly-enriched uranium, has made much progress during the eight years since its inception. To foster direct communication and exchange of ideas among the specialist in this area, the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program, at the Argonne National Laboratory, sponsored this meeting as the ninth of a series which began in 1978. All previous meetings of this series are listed on the facing page. The focus of this meeting was on the LEU fuel demonstration which was in progress at the Oak Ridge Research (ORR) reactor, not far from where the meeting was held. The visit to the ORR, where a silicide LEU fuel with 4.8 g A/cm/sup 3/ was by then in routine use, illustrated how far work has progressed.

  2. Enrichment of the High-Redshift IGM by Galactic Winds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Aguirre; J. Schaye; L. Hernquist; D. Weinberg; N. Katz; J. Gardner

    2001-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses a semi-numerical method of investigating the enrichment of the intergalactic medium by galactic winds. We find that most galaxies at z >~ 3 should be driving winds, and that (if these winds are similar to those at low-z) these winds should escape to large distances. Our calculations -- which permit exploration of a large region of model parameter space -- indicate that the wind velocity, the mass of the wind-driving galaxies, the fraction of ambient material entrained, and the available time (between wind launch and the observed redshift) all affect wind propagation significantly; other physical effects can be important but are sub-dominant. We find that under reasonable assumptions, the enrichment by 3 enrichment is compatible with the intergalactic medium's detailed metal distribution or relative quiescence.

  3. Evaluation of a RF-Based Approach for Tracking UF6 Cylinders at a Uranium Enrichment Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pickett, Chris A [ORNL] [ORNL; Younkin, James R [ORNL] [ORNL; Kovacic, Donald N [ORNL] [ORNL; Laughter, Mark D [ORNL] [ORNL; Hines, Jairus B [ORNL] [ORNL; Boyer, Brian [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Martinez, B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Approved industry-standard cylinders are used globally to handle and store uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) feed, product, tails, and samples at uranium enrichment plants. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) relies on time-consuming physical inspections to verify operator declarations and detect possible diversion of UF{sub 6}. Development of a reliable, automated, and tamper-resistant system for near real-time tracking and monitoring UF{sub 6} cylinders (as they move within an enrichment facility) would greatly improve the inspector function. This type of system can reduce the risk of false or misreported cylinder tare weights, diversion of nuclear material, concealment of excess production, utilization of undeclared cylinders, and misrepresentation of the cylinders contents. This paper will describe a proof-of-concept approach that was designed to evaluate the feasibility of using radio frequency (RF)-based technologies to track individual UF{sub 6} cylinders throughout a portion of their life cycle, and thus demonstrate the potential for improved domestic accountability of materials, and a more effective and efficient method for application of site-level IAEA safeguards. The evaluation system incorporates RF-based identification devices (RFID) which provide a foundation for establishing a reliable, automated, and near real-time tracking system that can be set up to utilize site-specific, rules-based detection algorithms. This paper will report results from a proof-of-concept demonstration at a real enrichment facility that is specifically designed to evaluate both the feasibility of using RF to track cylinders and the durability of the RF equipment to survive the rigors of operational processing and handling. The paper also discusses methods for securely attaching RF devices and describes how the technology can effectively be layered with other safeguard systems and approaches to build a robust system for detecting cylinder diversion. Additionally, concepts for off-site tracking of cylinders are described.

  4. Defining the needs for gas centrifuge enrichment plants advanced safeguards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyer, Brian David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Erpenbeck, Heather H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Miller, Karen A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swinhoe, Martyn T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ianakiev, Kiril [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Marlow, Johnna B [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Current safeguards approaches used by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) at gas centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEPs) need enhancement in order to verify declared low-enriched (LEU) production, detect undeclared LEU production and detect highly enriched uranium (HEU) production with adequate detection probability using nondestructive assay (NDA) techniques. At present inspectors use attended systems, systems needing the presence of an inspector for operation, during inspections to verify the mass and {sup 235}U enrichment of declared UF{sub 6} containers used in the process of enrichment at GCEPs. In verifying declared LEU production, the inspectors also take samples for off-site destructive assay (DA) which provide accurate data, with 0.1% to 0.5% measurement uncertainty, on the enrichment of the UF{sub 6} feed, tails, and product. However, taking samples of UF{sub 6} for off-site analysis is a much more labor and resource intensive exercise for the operator and inspector. Furthermore, the operator must ship the samples off-site to the IAEA laboratory which delays the timeliness of results and interruptions to the continuity of knowledge (CofK) of the samples during their storage and transit. This paper contains an analysis of possible improvements in unattended and attended NDA systems such as process monitoring and possible on-site analysis of DA samples that could reduce the uncertainty of the inspector's measurements and provide more effective and efficient IAEA GCEPs safeguards. We also introduce examples advanced safeguards systems that could be assembled for unattended operation.

  5. Enrichment Zoning Options for the Small Nuclear Rocket Engine (SNRE)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruce G. Schnitzler; Stanley K. Borowski

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Advancement of U.S. scientific, security, and economic interests through a robust space exploration program requires high performance propulsion systems to support a variety of robotic and crewed missions beyond low Earth orbit. In NASA’s recent Mars Design Reference Architecture (DRA) 5.0 study (NASA-SP-2009-566, July 2009), nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) was again selected over chemical propulsion as the preferred in-space transportation system option because of its high thrust and high specific impulse (-900 s) capability, increased tolerance to payload mass growth and architecture changes, and lower total initial mass in low Earth orbit. An extensive nuclear thermal rocket technology development effort was conducted from 1955-1973 under the Rover/NERVA Program. The Small Nuclear Rocket Engine (SNRE) was the last engine design studied by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during the program. At the time, this engine was a state-of-the-art design incorporating lessons learned from the very successful technology development program. Past activities at the NASA Glenn Research Center have included development of highly detailed MCNP Monte Carlo transport models of the SNRE and other small engine designs. Preliminary core configurations typically employ fuel elements with fixed fuel composition and fissile material enrichment. Uniform fuel loadings result in undesirable radial power and temperature profiles in the engines. Engine performance can be improved by some combination of propellant flow control at the fuel element level and by varying the fuel composition. Enrichment zoning at the fuel element level with lower enrichments in the higher power elements at the core center and on the core periphery is particularly effective. Power flattening by enrichment zoning typically results in more uniform propellant exit temperatures and improved engine performance. For the SNRE, element enrichment zoning provided very flat radial power profiles with 551 of the 564 fuel elements within 1% of the average element power. Results for this and alternate enrichment zoning options for the SNRE are compared.

  6. The Caterpillar Coal Gasification Facility 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Welsh, J.; Coffeen, W. G., III

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is a review of one of America's premier coal gasification installations. The caterpillar coal gasification facility located in York, Pennsylvania is an award winning facility. The plant was recognized as the 'pace setter plant of the year...

  7. Facilities Automation and Energy Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jen, D. P.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Computerized facilities automation and energy management systems can be used to maintain high levels of facilities operations efficiencies. The monitoring capabilities provides the current equipment and process status, and the analysis...

  8. Biomass Feedstock National User Facility

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session 1B—Integration of Supply Chains I: Breaking Down Barriers Biomass Feedstock National User Facility Kevin L. Kenney, Director, Biomass Feedstock National User Facility, Idaho National Laboratory

  9. Basic characterization of highly enriched uranium by gamma spectrometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cong Tam Nguyen; Jozsef Zsigrai

    2005-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Gamma-spectrometric methods suitable for the characterization of highly enriched uranium samples encountered in illicit trafficking of nuclear materials are presented. In particular, procedures for determining the 234U, 235U, 238U, 232U and 236U contents and the age of highly enriched uranium are described. Consequently, the total uranium content and isotopic composition can be calculated. For determining the 238U and 232U contents a low background chamber was used. In addition, age dating of uranium was also performed using low-background spectrometry.

  10. Basic characterization of highly enriched uranium by gamma spectrometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nguyen, C T

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gamma-spectrometric methods suitable for the characterization of highly enriched uranium samples encountered in illicit trafficking of nuclear materials are presented. In particular, procedures for determining the 234U, 235U, 238U, 232U and 236U contents and the age of highly enriched uranium are described. Consequently, the total uranium content and isotopic composition can be calculated. For determining the 238U and 232U contents a low background chamber was used. In addition, age dating of uranium was also performed using low-background spectrometry.

  11. EIS-0240: Disposition of Surplus Highly Enriched Uranium

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department proposes to eliminate the proliferation threat of surplus highly enriched uranium (HEU) by blending it down to low enriched uranium (LEU), which is not weapons-usable. The EIS assesses the disposition of a nominal 200 metric tons of surplus HEU. The Preferred Alternative is, where practical, to blend the material for use as LEU and use overtime, in commercial nuclear reactor field to recover its economic value. Material that cannot be economically recovered would be blended to LEU for disposal as low-level radioactive waste.

  12. Enrichment of selected fatty acids in broiler tissues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yau, Jia-Chyi

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ENRICHMENT OF SELECTED FATTY ACIDS IN BROILER TISSUES A Thesis by JIA-CHYI YAU Submitted to the Office of Graduate Study of Texas A&M University in partial fullfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1990... Major Subject: Food Science and Technology ENRICHMENT OF SELECTED FATTY ACIDS IN BROILER TISSUES A Thesis by JIA-CHYI YAU Approved as to style and content by A. R. Sams (Chair of Comittee) C. A. Bailey (Member) J. T Eeet n (M mber) R. Creg...

  13. Adsorption of water vapor on reservoir rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Progress is reported on: adsorption of water vapor on reservoir rocks; theoretical investigation of adsorption; estimation of adsorption parameters from transient experiments; transient adsorption experiment -- salinity and noncondensible gas effects; the physics of injection of water into, transport and storage of fluids within, and production of vapor from geothermal reservoirs; injection optimization at the Geysers Geothermal Field; a model to test multiwell data interpretation for heterogeneous reservoirs; earth tide effects on downhole pressure measurements; and a finite-difference model for free surface gravity drainage well test analysis.

  14. Rock Energy Cooperative | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with form HistoryRistma AG Jump to: navigation, searchRochester Gas &JumpRock

  15. Rim Rock Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ | RoadmapRenewableGeothermalsourceOhio:RigbyRim Rock Wind

  16. ArchRock Corporation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcatAntrim County,Delhi (NCT),Arborview CapitalArchRock Corporation

  17. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Slick Rock

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling Corp -K Le BlondSantaWyomingSlick Rock Slick

  18. Rock Lab Analysis | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt Ltd Jump to: navigation,MazeOhio:Ohio: Energy ResourcesRock Lab Analysis Jump

  19. Rock, Wisconsin: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt Ltd Jump to: navigation,MazeOhio:Ohio: Energy Jump to: navigation, searchRock,

  20. Reed Reactor Facility Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frantz, Stephen G.

    2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the report of the operations, experiments, modifications, and other aspects of the Reed Reactor Facility for the year.

  1. CFTF | Carbon Fiber Technology Facility | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    BTRIC CNMS CSMB CFTF Working with CFTF HFIR MDF NTRC OLCF SNS Carbon Fiber Technology Facility Home | User Facilities | CFTF CFTF | Carbon Fiber Technology Facility SHARE Oak...

  2. CRAD, Nuclear Facility Construction - Structural Concrete, May...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    CRAD, Nuclear Facility Construction - Structural Concrete, May 29, 2009 CRAD, Nuclear Facility Construction - Structural Concrete, May 29, 2009 May 29, 2009 Nuclear Facility...

  3. Sensitivity analysis of GSI based mechanical characterization of rock mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ván, P

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, the rock mechanical and rock engineering designs and calculations are frequently based on Geological Strength Index (GSI) method, because it is the only system that provides a complete set of mechanical properties for design purpose. Both the failure criteria and the deformation moduli of the rock mass can be calculated with GSI based equations, which consists of the disturbance factor, as well. The aim of this paper is the sensitivity analysis of GSI and disturbance factor dependent equations that characterize the mechanical properties of rock masses. The survey of the GSI system is not our purpose. The results show that the rock mass strength calculated by the Hoek-Brown failure criteria and both the Hoek-Diederichs and modified Hoek-Diederichs deformation moduli are highly sensitive to changes of both the GSI and the D factor, hence their exact determination is important for the rock engineering design.

  4. THE RADIOLOGICAL RESEARCH ACCELERATOR FACILITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    175 THE RADIOLOGICAL RESEARCH ACCELERATOR FACILITY #12;176 #12;177 THE RADIOLOGICAL RESEARCH the microbeam and the track-segment facilities have been utilized in various investigations. Table 1 lists-segment facility. Samples are treated with graded doses of radical scavengers to observe changes in the cluster

  5. United States National Waste Terminal Storage argillaceous rock studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brunton, G.D.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The past and present argillaceous rock studies for the US National Waste Terminal Storage Program consist of: (1) evaluation of the geological characteristics of several widespread argillaceous formations in the United States; (2) laboratory studies of the physical and chemical properties of selected argillaceous rock samples; and (3) two full-scale in situ surface heater experiments that simulate the emplacement of heat-generating radioactive waste in argillaceous rock.

  6. High Purity Germanium Gamma-PHA Assay of Uranium Storage Pigs for 321-M Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dewberry, R.A.

    2001-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The Analytical Development Section of SRTC was requested by the Facilities Disposition Division (FDD) to determine the holdup of enriched uranium in the 321-M facility as part of an overall deactivation project of the facility. The 321-M facility was used to fabricate enriched uranium fuel assemblies, lithium-aluminum target tubes, neptunium assemblies, and miscellaneous components for the production reactors. The facility also includes the 324-M storage building and the passageway connecting it to 321-M. The results of the holdup assays are essential for determining compliance with the Solid Waste's Waste Acceptance Criteria, Material Control and Accountability, and to meet criticality safety controls. This report describes and documents the use of a portable HPGe detector and EG and G Dart system that contains a high voltage power supply, signal processing electronics, a personal computer with Gamma-Vision software, and space to store and manipulate multiple 4096-channel g-ray spectra to assay for 235U content in 268 uranium shipping and storage pigs. This report includes a description of three efficiency calibration configurations and also the results of the assay. A description of the quality control checks is included as well.

  7. United States Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management, Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decomissioning Fund financial statements, September 30, 1996 and 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Energy Policy Act of 1992 (Act) established the Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund (D and D Fund, or Fund) to pay the costs for decontamination and decommissioning three gaseous diffusion facilities located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee; Paducah, Kentucky; and Portsmouth, Ohio (diffusion facilities). The Act also authorized the Fund to pay remedial action costs associated with the Government`s operation of the facilities and to reimburse uranium and thorium licensees for the costs of decontamination, decommissioning, reclamation, and other remedial actions which are incident to sales to the Government. The report presents the results of the independent certified public accountants` audit of the D and D Fund financial statements as of September 30, 1996. The auditors have expressed an unqualified opinion on the 1996 statement of financial position and the related statements of operations and changes in net position and cash flows.

  8. FSAR fire accident analysis for a plutonium facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lam, K.

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) for a plutonium facility as required by DOE Orders 5480.23 and 5480.22 has recently been completed and approved. The facility processes and stores radionuclides such as Pu-238, Pu-239, enriched uranium, and to a lesser degree other actinides. This facility produces heat sources. DOE Order 5480.23 and DOE-STD-3009-94 require analysis of different types of accidents (operational accidents such as fires, explosions, spills, criticality events, and natural phenomena such as earthquakes). The accidents that were analyzed quantitatively, or the Evaluation Basis Accidents (EBAs), were selected based on a multi-step screening process that utilizes extensively the Hazards Analysis (HA) performed for the facility. In the HA, specific accident scenarios, with estimated frequency and consequences, were developed for each identified hazard associated with facility operations and activities. Analysis of the EBAs and comparison of their consequences to the evaluation guidelines established the safety envelope for the facility and identified the safety-class structures, systems, and components. This paper discusses the analysis of the fire EBA. This fire accident was analyzed in relatively great detail in the FSAR because of its potential off-site consequences are more severe compared to other events. In the following, a description of the scenario is first given, followed by a brief summary of the methodology for calculating the source term. Finally, the author discuss how a key parameter affecting the source term, the leakpath factor, was determined, which is the focus of this paper.

  9. INSIGHTS INTO PRE-ENRICHMENT OF STAR CLUSTERS AND SELF-ENRICHMENT OF DWARF GALAXIES FROM THEIR INTRINSIC METALLICITY DISPERSIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leaman, Ryan, E-mail: rleaman@uvic.ca [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC V8P 1A1 (Canada)

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Star clusters are known to have smaller intrinsic metallicity spreads than dwarf galaxies due to their shorter star formation timescales. Here we use individual spectroscopic [Fe/H] measurements of stars in 19 Local Group dwarf galaxies, 13 Galactic open clusters, and 49 globular clusters to show that star cluster and dwarf galaxy linear metallicity distributions are binomial in form, with all objects showing strong correlations between their mean linear metallicity Z-bar and intrinsic spread in metallicity {sigma}(Z){sup 2}. A plot of {sigma}(Z){sup 2} versus Z-bar shows that the correlated relationships are offset for the dwarf galaxies from the star clusters. The common binomial nature of these linear metallicity distributions can be explained with a simple inhomogeneous chemical evolution model, where the star cluster and dwarf galaxy behavior in the {sigma}(Z){sup 2}- Z-bar diagram is reproduced in terms of the number of enrichment events, covering fraction, and intrinsic size of the enriched regions. The inhomogeneity of the self-enrichment sets the slope for the observed dwarf galaxy {sigma}(Z){sup 2}- Z-bar correlation. The offset of the star cluster sequence from that of the dwarf galaxies is due to pre-enrichment, and the slope of the star cluster sequence represents the remnant signature of the self-enriched history of their host galaxies. The offset can be used to separate star clusters from dwarf galaxies without a priori knowledge of their luminosity or dynamical mass. The application of the inhomogeneous model to the {sigma}(Z){sup 2}- Z-bar relationship provides a numerical formalism to connect the self-enrichment and pre-enrichment between star clusters and dwarf galaxies using physically motivated chemical enrichment parameters. Therefore we suggest that the {sigma}(Z){sup 2}- Z-bar relationship can provide insight into what drives the efficiency of star formation and chemical evolution in galaxies, and is an important prediction for galaxy simulation models to reproduce.

  10. Velocity and attenuation in partially molten rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mavko, G.M.

    1980-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Interpretation of seismic velocity and attenuation in partially molten rocks has been limited, with few exceptions, to models that assume the melt to be distributed either as spheres or as thin films. However, other melt phase geometries, such as interconnected tubes along grain edges, might equally well account for seismic observations if there is a much larger fraction of melt. Seismic velocity and attenuation are estimated in rocks in which the melt phase has the tube geometry, and the results are compared with results expected for the more familiar film model under similar conditions. For a given melt fraction, tubes are found to give moduli intermediate between moduli for rigid spherical inclusions and compliant films. For example, in polycrystalline olivine at 20 kbar the model predicts a decrease in V/sub s/ of 10% and a decrease in V/sub p/ of 5% at 0.05 melt fraction, without considering inelastic relaxation. Shear attenuation appears to be dominated by viscous flow of melt between the tubes and/or films. For olivine the tube model predicts the increment of relaxation due to melt, ..delta mu../..mu.., to be 0.01 at 0.05 melt fraction. Relaxation of the bulk modulus is dominated by flow between melt pockets of different shape, heat flow, and solid-melt phase change. If melt is present, considerable bulk attenuation is expected, although the relaxation may be observable only at long periods, outside the seismic body wave band.

  11. The US Hot Dry Rock project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendron, R.H.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hot Dry Rock geothermal energy project began in the early 1970's with the objective of developing a technology to make economically available the large ubiquitous thermal energy of the upper earth crust. The program has been funded by the Department of Energy (and its predecessors) and for a few years with participation by West Germany and Japan. An energy reservoir was accessed by drilling and hydraulically fracturing in the precambrian basement rock outside the Valles Caldera of north-central New Mexico. Water was circulated through the reservoir (Phase I, 1978-1980) producing up to 5 MWt at 132/sup 0/C. A second (Phase II) reservoir has been established with a deeper pair of holes and an initial flow test completed producing about 10 MWt at 190/sup 0/C. These accomplishments have been supported and paralleled by developments in drilling, well completion and instrumentation hardware. Acoustic or microseismic fracture mapping and geochemistry studies in addition to hydraulic and thermal data contribute to reservoir analyses. Studies of some of the estimated 430,000 quads of HDR resources in the United States have been made with special attention focused on sites most advantageous for early development.

  12. archaean sedimentary rocks: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    situations, much more dependent on the properties of joints Aubertin, Michel 302 Rock Mining Operation Effects on Water Quality in the Everglades Biology and Medicine Websites...

  13. artificial rock fractures: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    drainage. ISRM 2003Technology roadmap for rock mechanics, South African Institute of Mining and Metallurgy, 2 Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: subsidence...

  14. archean supracrustal rocks: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    interesting than whales's research interests include sustainable transportation, life-cycle assessment, and the national security Zhang, Junshan 164 ELASTIC ROCK PROPERTIES OF...

  15. archean metavolcanic rocks: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    interesting than whales's research interests include sustainable transportation, life-cycle assessment, and the national security Zhang, Junshan 156 ELASTIC ROCK PROPERTIES OF...

  16. acid rock discharges: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    interesting than whales's research interests include sustainable transportation, life-cycle assessment, and the national security Zhang, Junshan 226 ELASTIC ROCK PROPERTIES OF...

  17. alkalic rock: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    interesting than whales's research interests include sustainable transportation, life-cycle assessment, and the national security Zhang, Junshan 120 ELASTIC ROCK PROPERTIES OF...

  18. Elastic properties of saturated porous rocks with aligned fractures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2003-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This unexpected result is caused by the wave-induced flow of fluids between pores and fractures. ..... For non-fractured rock setting fracture weaknesses. DN and ...

  19. average sedimentary rock: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    challenge of interpreting environmental tracer concentrations in fractured rock and carbonate aquifers Multidisciplinary Databases and Resources Websites Summary: are reported to...

  20. alum rock sulfur: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    -resolution carbon and sulfur isotope profiles from Early to Middle Ordovician carbonate rocks from the Argentine Investigation of isotopic compositions recorded in...