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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rock composition mineral" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Stable-Isotope Studies Of Rocks And Secondary Minerals In A Vapor-Dominated  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Stable-Isotope Studies Of Rocks And Secondary Minerals In A Vapor-Dominated Stable-Isotope Studies Of Rocks And Secondary Minerals In A Vapor-Dominated Hydrothermal System At The Geysers, Sonoma County, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Stable-Isotope Studies Of Rocks And Secondary Minerals In A Vapor-Dominated Hydrothermal System At The Geysers, Sonoma County, California Details Activities (5) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Geysers, a vapor-dominated hydrothermal system, is developed in host rock of the Franciscan Formation, which contains veins of quartz and calcite whose Δ18O values record the temperatures and isotopic compositions of fluids prevailing during at least two different episodes of rock-fluid interaction. The first episode took place at about 200°C, during which marine silica and carbonate apparently interacted with ocean

2

Stable-Isotope Studies Of Rocks And Secondary Minerals In A Vapor...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Stable-Isotope Studies Of Rocks And Secondary Minerals In A Vapor-Dominated Hydrothermal System At The Geysers, Sonoma County, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL...

3

Rock, Mineral, Coal, Oil, and Gas Resources on State Lands (Montana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This chapter authorizes and regulates prospecting permits and mining leases for the exploration and development of rock, mineral, oil, coal, and gas resources on state lands.

4

Uranium mineralization in fluorine-enriched volcanic rocks  

SciTech Connect

Several uranium and other lithophile element deposits are located within or adjacent to small middle to late Cenozoic, fluorine-rich rhyolitic dome complexes. Examples studied include Spor Mountain, Utah (Be-U-F), the Honeycomb Hills, Utah (Be-U), the Wah Wah Mountains, Utah (U-F), and the Black Range-Sierra Cuchillo, New Mexico (Sn-Be-W-F). The formation of these and similar deposits begins with the emplacement of a rhyolitic magma, enriched in lithophile metals and complexing fluorine, that rises to a shallow crustal level, where its roof zone may become further enriched in volatiles and the ore elements. During initial explosive volcanic activity, aprons of lithicrich tuffs are erupted around the vents. These early pyroclastic deposits commonly host the mineralization, due to their initial enrichment in the lithophile elements, their permeability, and the reactivity of their foreign lithic inclusions (particularly carbonate rocks). The pyroclastics are capped and preserved by thick topaz rhyolite domes and flows that can serve as a source of heat and of additional quantities of ore elements. Devitrification, vapor-phase crystallization, or fumarolic alteration may free the ore elements from the glassy matrix and place them in a form readily leached by percolating meteoric waters. Heat from the rhyolitic sheets drives such waters through the system, generally into and up the vents and out through the early tuffs. Secondary alteration zones (K-feldspar, sericite, silica, clays, fluorite, carbonate, and zeolites) and economic mineral concentrations may form in response to this low temperature (less than 200 C) circulation. After cooling, meteoric water continues to migrate through the system, modifying the distribution and concentration of the ore elements (especially uranium).

Burt, D.M.; Sheridan, M.F.; Bikun, J.; Christiansen, E.; Correa, B.; Murphy, B.; Self, S.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Electrical conductivity of minerals and rocks Shun-ichiro Karato1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Electrical conductivity of minerals and rocks Shun-ichiro Karato1 and Duojun Wang1,2 1 : Yale-Blackwell #12;2 SUMMARY Electrical conductivity of most minerals is sensitive to hydrogen (water) content, temperature, major element chemistry and oxygen fugacity. The influence of these parameters on electrical

6

Abbreviations for names of rock-forming minerals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...varies from 1-5 letters and uses lowercase throughout. The Kretz...capitalization), but in many cases use different symbols for the same...that some petrologists have uses for these mineral names. In...awaruite G Ax axinite GROUP Bab babingtonite G Bdy baddeleyite G Brt barite...

Donna L. Whitney; Bernard W. Evans

7

Mineralization Kinetics: A Constant Composition Approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...physiological pH. The precipitation of sparingly soluble salts from their supersaturated solutions finds application...ofterrestrial ecosystems (excepting tundra and alpine meadow, desert scrub, and rock, ice, and sand) exceed those ofmarine ecosystems...

M. B. TOMSON; G. H. NANCOLLAS

1978-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

8

Mineral and Rock Physics [MR] MR21B MCW:Level 1 Tuesday 0800h  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mineral and Rock Physics [MR] MR21B MCW:Level 1 Tuesday 0800h Structural Refinement Studies Kunz, Advanced Light Source MR21B-0018 The Crystal Structure of Diopside at Pressure to 10 Gpa tetrahedra and M1 octahedra to try and understand the observed changes in pyroxenes with changing P, T, and x

Downs, Robert T.

9

Electrical anisotropy of mineralized and non mineralized rocks T.J. Katsube, M.E. Best*, and Jones, A.G., Geological Survey of Canada  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PP 10.2 Electrical anisotropy of mineralized and non mineralized rocks T.J. Katsube, M.E. Best*, and Jones, A.G., Geological Survey of Canada Summary Significant electrical resistivity anisotropy, up to 1 to understand the electrical mechanisms involved in such anisotropic processes in order to provide information

Jones, Alan G.

10

Quantitative determination of mineral composition by powder x-ray diffraction  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An external standard intensity ratio method is used for quantitatively determining mineralogic compositions of samples by x-ray diffraction. The method uses ratios of x-ray intensity peaks from a single run. Constants are previously determined for each mineral which is to be quantitatively measured. Ratios of the highest intensity peak of each mineral to be quantified in the sample and the highest intensity peak of a reference mineral contained in the sample are used to calculate sample composition.

Pawloski, G.A.

1984-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

11

Composition and method for self-assembly and mineralization of peptide-amphiphiles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to a composition useful for making homogeneously mineralized self assembled peptide-amphiphile nanofibers and nanofiber gels. The composition is generally a solution comprised of a positively or negatively charged peptide-amphiphile and a like signed ion from the mineral. Mixing this solution with a second solution containing a dissolved counter-ion of the mineral and/or a second oppositely charged peptide amphiphile, results in the rapid self assembly of the peptide-amphiphiles into a nanofiber gel and templated mineralization of the ions. Templated mineralization of the initially dissolved mineral cations and anions in the mixture occurs with preferential orientation of the mineral crystals along the fiber surfaces within the nanofiber gel. One advantage of the present invention is that it results in homogenous growth of the mineral throughout the nanofiber gel. Another advantage of the present invention is that the nanofiber gel formation and mineralization reactions occur in a single mixing step and under substantially neutral or physiological pH conditions. These homogeneous nanostructured composite materials are useful for medical applications especially the regeneration of damaged bone in mammals. This invention is directed to the synthesis of peptide-amphiphiles with more than one amphiphilic moment and to supramolecular compositions comprised of such multi-dimensional peptide-amphiphiles. Supramolecular compositions can be formed by self assembly of multi-dimensional peptide-amphiphiles by mixing them with a solution comprising a monovalent cation.

Stupp, Samuel I. (Chicago, IL); Beniash, Elia (Newton, MA); Hartgerink, Jeffrey D. (Pearland, TX)

2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

12

Gamma-ray absorption and chemical composition of neovolcanic rocks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Gamma-ray absorption coefficients ? Cs 137 for a set of 49 neovolcanic rocks from the Bohemian Massif were measured; their values varied in the range from 0.2092 cm?1 to 0.2464 c...

V?ra Va?kov; Vladimr Krop?ek; Reviewer J. Buben

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Rock Lab Analysis | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rock Lab Analysis Rock Lab Analysis Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Rock Lab Analysis Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Lab Analysis Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Rock Lab Analysis Parent Exploration Technique: Lab Analysis Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Core and cuttings analysis is done to define lithology. Water rock interaction. Can determine detailed information about rock composition and morphology. Density of different lithologic units. Rapid and unambiguous identification of unknown minerals.[1] Stratigraphic/Structural: Core analysis can locate faults or fracture networks. Oriented core can give additional important information on anisotropy. Historic structure and deformation of land.

14

Application Of Fluid Inclusion And Rock-Gas Analysis In Mineral...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

mineral surfaces by heating. The most abundant of these gases, besides H2O, are usually CO2, CH4, CO and N2. We have used a gas chromatograph to analyze these gases in fluid...

15

Minerals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This article presents a short review of the physical, chemical, and crystallographic properties of cave minerals. In addition, their general modes of occurrence and genesis under various cave settings are discussed. To suit the needs of any particular reader, nearly 30 of the most common cave mineral species are described, providing the necessary backdrop for everyone eager to know more about cave mineralogy. Keywords cave minerals; speleothems; karst

Bogdan P. Onac

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Variation in mineral composition of coal during enrichment and coking  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The parameters I b and B b used in developing an optimal coking-batch composition are determined from data on ... of the ash in Donetsk Basin and other coal. It is found that, when...

M. L. Ulanovskii; A. N. Likhenko

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

An integrated experimental and numerical study: Developing a reaction transport model that couples chemical reactions of mineral dissolution/precipitation with spatial and temporal flow variations in CO2/brine/rock systems  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Project objectives: Generate and characterize mineral dissolution/precipitation reactions in supercritical CO2/brine/rock systems under pressure-temperature-chemistry conditions resembling CO2injection into EGS. Characterize three-dimensional spatial and temporal distributions of rock structures subject to mineral dissolution/precipitation processes by X-ray tomography, SEM imaging, and Microprobe analysis.

18

Mineral bone composition and some elements of calcium metabolism in magnesium-deficient growing rats  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mineral bone composition and some elements of calcium metabolism in magnesium-deficient growing-Chomponelle, Theix, 63110 Beaumont, France. Summary. (1) Magnesium deficiency was induced in Sprague-Dawley male rats of deprivation. (3) The leg bones were fragmented as shown in figure 1. Their magnesium content had decreased

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

19

Understanding Through-Composition in Post-Rock, Math-Metal, and other Post-Millennial Rock Genres  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since the dawn of experimental rocks second coming in the new millennium, experimental artists have begun distancing themselves from Top-40 artists through formal structures that eschew recapitulatory verse/chorus ...

Osborn, Brad

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Strontium Isotopic Composition of Paleozoic Carbonate Rocks in the Nevada Test Site Vicinity, Clark, Lincoln, and Nye Counties, Nevada and Inyo County, California.  

SciTech Connect

Ground water moving through permeable Paleozoic carbonate rocks represents the most likely pathway for migration of radioactive contaminants from nuclear weapons testing at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. The strontium isotopic composition (87Sr/86Sr) of ground water offers a useful means of testing hydrochemical models of regional flow involving advection and reaction. However, reaction models require knowledge of 87Sr/86Sr data for carbonate rock in the Nevada Test Site vicinity, which is scarce. To fill this data gap, samples of core or cuttings were selected from 22 boreholes at depth intervals from which water samples had been obtained previously around the Nevada Test Site at Yucca Flat, Frenchman Flat, Rainier Mesa, and Mercury Valley. Dilute acid leachates of these samples were analyzed for a suite of major- and trace-element concentrations (MgO, CaO, SiO2, Al2O3, MnO, Rb, Sr, Th, and U) as well as for 87Sr/86Sr. Also presented are unpublished analyses of 114 Paleozoic carbonate samples from outcrops, road cuts, or underground sites in the Funeral Mountains, Bare Mountain, Striped Hills, Specter Range, Spring Mountains, and ranges east of the Nevada Test Site measured in the early 1990's. These data originally were collected to evaluate the potential for economic mineral deposition at the potential high-level radioactive waste repository site at Yucca Mountain and adjacent areas (Peterman and others, 1994). Samples were analyzed for a suite of trace elements (Rb, Sr, Zr, Ba, La, and Ce) in bulk-rock powders, and 87Sr/86Sr in partial digestions of carbonate rock using dilute acid or total digestions of silicate-rich rocks. Pre-Tertiary core samples from two boreholes in the central or western part of the Nevada Test Site also were analyzed. Data are presented in tables and summarized in graphs; however, no attempt is made to interpret results with respect to ground-water flow paths in this report. Present-day 87Sr/86Sr values are compared to values for Paleozoic seawater present at the time of deposition. Many of the samples have 87Sr/86Sr compositions that remain relatively unmodified from expected seawater values. However, rocks underlying the northern Nevada Test Site as well as rocks exposed at Bare Mountain commonly have elevated 87Sr/86Sr values derived from post-depositional addition of radiogenic Sr most likely from fluids circulating through rubidium-rich Paleozoic strata or Precambrian basement rocks.

James B. Paces; Zell E. Peterman; Kiyoto Futa; Thomas A. Oliver; and Brian D. Marshall.

2007-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rock composition mineral" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Inorganic composition of fine particles in mixed mineral dustpollution plumes observed from airborne measurements during ACE-Asia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the atmosphere (2419, 2427); 0345 Atmospheric Composition and Structure: Pollution--urban and regional (0305Inorganic composition of fine particles in mixed mineral dust­pollution plumes observed from of Earth and Atmospheric Science, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia, USA G. R. Carmichael

Weber, Rodney

22

Chemical and isotopic composition of water from thermal and mineral springs of Washington  

SciTech Connect

Waters from the thermal springs of Washington range in chemical composition from dilute Na-HCO/sub 3/ to moderately saline CO/sub 2/-charged Na-HCO/sub 3/-Cl type waters. St. Martin's Hot Spring which discharges a slightly saline Na-Cl water, is the notable exception. The dilute Na-HCO/sub 3/ waters are generally associated with granitic intrusions; the warm to hot CO/sub 2/-charged waters issue on or near the large stratovolcanoes. The dilute waters have oxygen-isotopic compositions that indicate relatively little water-rock exchange. The CO/sub 2/-charged waters are usually more enriched in oxygen-18 due to more extensive water-rock reaction. The carbon-13 in the CO/sub 2/-charged thermal waters is more depleted (-10 to -12 %) than in the cold CO/sub 2/-charged soda springs (-2 to -8%) which are also scattered throughout the Cascades. The hot and cold CO/sub 2/-charged waters are supersaturated with respect to CaCO/sub 3/, but only the hot springs are actively depositing CaCO/sub 3/. Baker, Gamma, Sulphur, and Ohanapecosh hot springs seem to be associated with thermal aquifers of more than 100/sup 0/C. As these springs occur as individual springs or in small clusters, the respective aquifers are probably of restricted size.

Mariner, R.H.; Presser, T.S.; Evans, W.C.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Development and evaluation of a thermodynamic dataset for phases of interest in CO2 mineral sequestration in basaltic rocks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

evaluation of a thermodynamic dataset for phases of interestKeywords: Thermodynamic dataset CO2water basaltABSTRACT A thermodynamic dataset describing 36 mineral

Aradottir, E.S.P.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Plutonic rocks of intermediate composition on Gran Canaria: the missing link of the bimodal volcanic rock suite  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Analysis of abundant plutonic fragments in the voluminous Miocene rhyoliticbasaltic composite ignimbrite P1, the initial felsic cooling unit overlying the basaltic shield on Gran Canaria, helps to solve the prob...

B. Freundt-Malecha

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE MINERAL COMPOSITION OF SPELEOTHEMS AND MINERALIZATION OF BRECCIA PIPES: EVIDENCE FROM CORKSCREW CAVE, ARIZONA, USA  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of minerals (i.e., hornesite, talmessite, carnotite, tyuyamunite, claudetite...de mineraux (i.e., hornesite, talmessite, carnotite, tyuyamunite, claudetite...hornesite, Mg3(AsO4)28H2O, and talmessite Ca2Mg(AsO4)22H2O. After subtracting...

Bogdan P. Onac; John W. Hess; William B. White

26

Can Rock-Eval pyrolysis assess the biogeochemical composition of organic matter during peatification?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as a screening tool to investigate soil organic matter (SOM) chemistry and vulnerability. In order to test the validity of Rock-Eval as an indicator of SOM chemistry and of OM transformations, we compared classical Rock-Eval-derived parameters (Total Organic Carbon - TOC, Hydrogen Index - HI and Oxygen Index - OI

Boyer, Edmond

27

Developing the ability to model acid-rock interactions and mineral dissolution during the RMA stimulation test performed at the Soultz-sous-Forts EGS site, France  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Soultz Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) reservoir's response to chemical stimulation is assessed by numerical simulation of coupled thermo-hydraulic-chemical processes. To assess chemical interactions between host rocks and a mixture of \\{HCl\\} and HF as well as its potential effects on the Soultz EGS reservoir, new modelling efforts using the FRACHEM code have been initiated. This article presents the model calibration and results. Simulations consider realistic conditions with available data sets from the EGS system at Soultz. Results indicate that the predicted amount of fracture sealing minerals dissolved by injection of a mixture of acids Regular Mud Acid (RMA) was consistent with the estimated amount from the test performed on GPK4 well at Soultz EGS site. Consequently reservoir porosity and permeability can be enhanced especially near the injection well by acidizing treatment.

Sandrine Portier; Franois D. Vuataz

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Lower mantle composition and temperature from mineral physics and thermodynamic modelling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Equations of state, Rev. Mineral. Geochem., 41...Mg,Fe)O, Am. Mineral., 84, 272-276...thermal expansion of lime periclase corundum...7(4), 1-7. Green D.H. , Ringwood A.E., 1963. Mineral assemblages in a model......

E. Mattern; J. Matas; Y. Ricard; J. Bass

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Plutonic and metamorphic xenoliths from the Cascada Tuff, Chihuahua, Mexico, as evidence indicating the composition of the basement rocks beneath the Sierra Madre Occidental  

SciTech Connect

The Sierra Madre Occidental of western Mexico is composed dominantly of Mid-Tertiary felsic and subordinate mafic volcanic rocks with only sparse outcrops of non-volcanic rocks. There are widely scattered but small exposure of plutonic rocks but regionally metamorphosed rocks are not known to occur in the Sierra. To this date the only known area where plutonic and metamorphic xenoliths have been found is near the village of Basaseachic in western Chihuahua where thick outcrops of the Cascada Tuff occur. The xenoliths are the only known occurrence of regionally metamorphosed rocks for a distance of about 400 km between exposures of Precambrian rocks to the west in Sonora and the east in central Chihuahua. Non-volcanic xenoliths from a few cm to about one meter in diameter occur most abundantly in the upper portions of the Cascada Tuff. They can be divided into four main groups in decreasing order of abundance as follows: (1) coarse-grained phaneritic felsic igneous rocks; (2) cataclastically deformed plutonic rocks; (3) fine-grained phaneritic, mafic to intermediate igneous rocks; and (4) low-grade schistose, gneissic, and non-foliated metamorphic rocks. The lithological composition of the xenoliths is grossly similar to that described for Precambrian metamorphic and plutonic rocks from northern Mexico and the southwestern US.

Duex, T.W.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Mineral composition and microstructure of brucite from the Kul'dursk deposits  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A complex investigation was made of the substance composition of commercial brucite raw materials at the Kul'dursk deposits. ... established the polymineral composition of the varities of brucite and the assessor...

V. A. Perepelitsyn; T. I. Boriskova; . K. Shtern; Yu. M. Galkin

31

Lead, zinc, and strontium in limestone cap rock from Tatum salt dome, Mississippi  

SciTech Connect

Limestone cap rock at Tatum salt dome, Mississippi, contains disseminated pyrite, sphalerite, and galena, and disseminated to massive amounts of strontianite (SrCO/sub 3/) and celestite (SrSO/sub 4/). Sulfide minerals are locally present in bitumen-rich areas of the upper, massive portion of the limestone cap rock, whereas strontium minerals are disseminated throughout this zone. However, sulfide and strontium minerals are most abundant in the lower banded portion of the limestone cap rock, which consists of alternating subhorizontal light and dark-colored bands. The dark bands are composed of calcite of variable grain size, sulfides, quartz, dolomite, albite, and up to 1% bitumen that apparently formed by the biodegradation of crude oil. Lighter bands are composed of variable amounts of coarsely crystalline, euhedral calcite, strontianite, and celestite resulting in strontium (Sr) contents of up to 30% locally. Banded limestone cap rock at Tatum dome formed at the top of the actively dissolving anhydrite zone by a combination of sulfate reduction and oxidation of liquid hydrocarbons by bacteria to cause the precipitation of calcite and sulfide minerals and the accumulation of insoluble residue from the anhydrite (quartz, albite, dolomite). Lead and zinc in the sulfide minerals could have been derived from the dissolving anhydrite, but the abundance of Sr minerals present requires an external source. Present-day oil field brines in central Mississippi contain up to 3000 ppm Sr, and basin brines of similar composition apparently contributed Sr to the cap-rock environment during formation.

Saunders, J.A.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Tertiary Volcanic Rocks, Mogollon-Datil Province, New Mexico, and Surrounding Region: K-Ar Dates, Patterns of Eruption, and Periods of Mineralization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...poor run. Intrudes Spears and Hells Mesa Formations (nos. 2, 3, 4, 5...Correlation uncertain Caps Hells Mesa and younger rocks in type section...Los Pi os Mountains, and North Chupadera Mesa, Valencia, Torrance, and Socorro...

33

Rare Earth Element sorption by basaltic rock: experimental data and modeling results using the "Generalised Composite approach".  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rare Earth Element sorption by basaltic rock: experimental data and modeling results using Email address : emmanuel.tertre@univ-poitiers.fr Keywords: sorption, lanthanides, basalt, surface.1016/j.gca.2007.12.015 #12;Abstract Sorption of the 14 Rare Earth Elements (REE) by basaltic rock

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

34

Synthesis of supported carbon nanotubes in mineralized silica...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

supported carbon nanotubes in mineralized silica-wood composites. Synthesis of supported carbon nanotubes in mineralized silica-wood composites. Abstract: Multiwall carbon...

35

New Geophysical Technique for Mineral Exploration and Mineral Discrimination Based on Electromagnetic Methods  

SciTech Connect

The research during the first two years of the project was focused on developing the foundations of a new geophysical technique for mineral exploration and mineral discrimination, based on electromagnetic (EM) methods. The developed new technique is based on examining the spectral induced polarization effects in electromagnetic data using effective-medium theory and advanced methods of 3-D modeling and inversion. The analysis of IP phenomena is usually based on models with frequency dependent complex conductivity distribution. In this project, we have developed a rigorous physical/mathematical model of heterogeneous conductive media based on the effective-medium approach. The new generalized effective-medium theory of IP effect (GEMTIP) provides a unified mathematical method to study heterogeneity, multi-phase structure, and polarizability of rocks. The geoelectrical parameters of a new composite conductivity model are determined by the intrinsic petrophysical and geometrical characteristics of composite media: mineralization and/or fluid content of rocks, matrix composition, porosity, anisotropy, and polarizability of formations. The new GEMTIP model of multi-phase conductive media provides a quantitative tool for evaluation of the type of mineralization, and the volume content of different minerals using electromagnetic data. We have developed a 3-D EM-IP modeling algorithm using the integral equation (IE) method. Our IE forward modeling software is based on the contraction IE method, which improves the convergence rate of the iterative solvers. This code can handle various types of sources and receivers to compute the effect of a complex resistivity model. We have demonstrated that the generalized effective-medium theory of induced polarization (GEMTIP) in combination with the IE forward modeling method can be used for rock-scale forward modeling from grain-scale parameters. The numerical modeling study clearly demonstrates how the various complex resistivity models manifest differently in the observed EM data. These modeling studies lay a background for future development of the IP inversion method, directed at determining the electrical conductivity and the intrinsic chargeability distributions, as well as the other parameters of the relaxation model simultaneously. The new technology introduced in this project can be used for the discrimination between uneconomic mineral deposits and the location of zones of economic mineralization and geothermal resources.

Michael S. Zhdanov

2009-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

36

Anisotropic yielding of rocks at high temperatures and pressures; Annual Progress Report, 1988-1989  

SciTech Connect

The experimental results we have obtained on Four-Mile gneiss have demonstrated that the yield behavior of quartzo-feldspathic rocks containing only a small percentage (10%) of mica can be markedly anisotropic, provided the mica minerals exhibit a strong crystallographic preferred orientation. Samples of gneiss oriented such that resolved shear stresses on the foliation plane are large are considerably weaker than granites of similar grain size and composition, and this weakness is attributed to enhanced nucleation of microcracks in quartz and feldspar adjacent to mica grains that are suitably oriented for slip. We expect the yield behavior of rocks containing a higher proportion of phyllosilicates to be influenced by the strongly anisotropic nature of these minerals as well, although the strengths, temperature and pressure dependencies, and flow-controlling mechanisms in such rocks may be significantly different.

Kronenberg, A.K.; Russell, J.E.; Carter, N.L.

1989-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

37

Rock Sampling At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

geologically mapped the target area, obtained rock samples for age dating and mineral chemistry, performed gravity and magnetic surveys, and integrated these results to identify...

38

Ore mineralization in naphtides and problems of its genesis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The paper presents several examples of metalliferous naphtide mineralization hosted in sedimentary and magmatic rocks and discusses different models of their origin. Geological, geochemical, experimental, and ...

V. S. Zubkov; E. A. Razvozzhaeva

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Comparison and analysis of reservoir rocks and related clays  

SciTech Connect

A series of instrumental and chemical analyses was made on sedimentary rocks to determine the surface chemical properties of sedimentry rocks and the physical characteristic of the pores. A scanning electron microscope (SEM) with energy dispersive X-ray analytic capability was used to study the morphology of the samples, surface mineral composition and type and location of clays, and to obtain a qualitative estimate of the pore sizes. A centrifuge was used to determine the pore size distributions which are correlated with SEM observations. An atomic absorption spectrophotometer equipped with an inductively coupled plasma for complete spectral analysis was used to obtain analyses of the rocks, clays, and effluents from ion exchange tests. Two of the results are as follows: (1) Sweetwater gas sands have a bimodal pore size distribution composed of pores with a mean diameter of 0.2 microns which is attributed to intergranular spaces and cracks in the expanded laborboratory sample but which will be close under the pressure of the overburden formations, and these Sweetwater sands have a distribution of pores at 2 microns which are solution vugs rather than intergranular porosity since the sand grains are completely packed together with the cementing material due to the high overburden pressures; and (2) Ion-exchange capacities of two rocks were 5.3 meq/kg and 18.0 meq/kg, and the surface areas were 0.9 m/sup 2//g and 2.30 m/sup 2//g, respectively, even though each had almost identical mineral composition, clay type and quantity, and permeability. 7 references, 12 figures, 3 tables.

Crocker, M.E.; Donaldson, E.C.; Marchin, L.M.

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Calibrating the ChemCam LIBS for Carbonate Minerals on Mars  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

The ChemCam instrument suite on board the NASA Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover includes the first LIBS instrument for extraterrestrial applications. Here we examine carbonate minerals in a simulated martian environment using the LIDS technique in order to better understand the in situ signature of these materials on Mars. Both chemical composition and rock type are determined using multivariate analysis (MVA) techniques. Composition is confirmed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques. Our initial results suggest that ChemCam can recognize and differentiate between carbonate materials on Mars.

Wiens, Roger C.; Clegg, Samuel M.; Ollila, Ann M.; Barefield, James E.; Lanza, Nina; Newsom, Horton E.

2009-00-00T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rock composition mineral" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

White Rock  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Furnished house for rent in rural White Rock Bright and sunny Ideal for a young family Safe neighborhood 10 min drive to LANL 1300 per month, basic utilities included 1180 sq ft....

42

Rock magnetism  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The past three decades have witnessed a new paradigm, the plate tectonics paradigm, in Earth sciences. The record of the Earth's magnetic field stored in rocks played a major role in the establishment of this par...

Ronald T. Merrill

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Rock Sampling At Mt Ranier Area (Frank, 1995) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mt Ranier Area (Frank, 1995) Mt Ranier Area (Frank, 1995) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Rock Sampling At Mt Ranier Area (Frank, 1995) Exploration Activity Details Location Mt Ranier Area Exploration Technique Rock Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes This paper relies primarily on minerals, gases, and water found in surficial deposits to construct a conceptual model for Mount Rainier that considers the following factors: - Locations of hydrothermal leakage at the surface; - Structures that provide permeable paths of fluid egress to the surface; - Amount of excess heat discharge; - Composition of surficial thermal fluids; - Composition, guided by mineralogy, of subsurface thermal fluids. Analytical data used as a basis for the model are from samples

44

Lab 1 Mineral Utility Lab notes The physical world is made up of a vast number of different minerals. Later on in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lake City, Utah which removes 225,000 metric tons of rock a day, 20% of which is ore. Quarries: Sand quarries. Rocks like granite and marble are used as decorative rocks on the outside of buildings, or even of removing a mineral from its ore. Quarried rocks may simply need crushing, grinding, and sizing before use

Li, X. Rong

45

EMSL - minerals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

minerals en Physical Properties of Ambient and Laboratory-Generated Secondary Organic Aerosol. http:www.emsl.pnl.govemslwebpublicationsphysical-properties-ambient-and-laborato...

46

RIETVELD REFINEMENT OF REAL STRUCTURE PARAMETERS OF DISORDERED CLAY MINERALS IN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-conventional hydrocarbons in Germany) Germany's potential for shale oil and shale gas NIKO seal gas-rich shale shale: sedimentary rock which contains quartz, carbonates and clay minerals #12;clay minerals in shales quartz

Magee, Joseph W.

47

Fluid-Rock Interaction in Geothermal Energy Recovery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Reaction of aqueous fluids with minerals of geothermal energy reservoir rocks produces both secondary solid phases ... for these effects. Heat production from chemical energy is possible in relevant amounts, but ...

E. Althaus

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

The Effect of Heterogeneity on Matrix Acidizing of Carbonate Rocks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In matrix acidizing, the goal is to dissolve minerals in the rock to increase well productivity. This is accomplished by injecting an application-specific solution of acid into the formation at a pressure between the pore pressure and fracture...

Keys, Ryan S.

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

49

Secondary minerals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Th e various processes acting upon ore assemblages in the near surface environment result in the formation of new minerals either via replacement or precipitation. Within this context these are referred to as ...

Roger Taylor

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Soil Minerals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Soil Minerals Soil Minerals Nature Bulletin No. 707 March 2, 1963 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor SOIL MINERALS We all depend upon the land Our food is obtained from plants and animals -- bread and meat, potatoes and fish, fruit and eggs and milk and the rest of it. Our livestock feed on plants and plant products such as grass and grain. Plants, by means of their root systems, take moisture and nutrients from the soils on which they grow. Their food values, for us or for animals that furnish us food, depend upon the available nutrients in those soils. Soils contain solids, water and air. The solids, the bulk of a soil -- except in purely organic types such as peat and muck -- are mostly mineral materials. Ordinarily they also contain some organic material: decayed and decaying remains of plants and animals.

51

Mining and Minerals Policy Act of 1970 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and Minerals Policy Act of 1970 and Minerals Policy Act of 1970 Jump to: navigation, search Statute Name Mining and Minerals Policy Act of 1970 Year 1970 Url Actof1970.jpg Description An amendment to the Mineral Leasing Act References Mining and Minerals Policy Act of 1970[1] The Mining and Minerals Policy Act of 1970 (30 U.S.C. § 21 et seq.) - An amendment to the Mineral Leasing Act, this statute encompasses both hard rock mining and oil and gas and established modern federal policy regarding mineral resources in the United States. The Act articulates a national interest to foster and encourage private enterprise while mitigating adverse environmental impacts. References ↑ "Mining and Minerals Policy Act of 1970" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Mining_and_Minerals_Policy_Act_of_1970&oldid=334610"

52

Carbonation Mechanism of Reservoir Rock by Supercritical Carbon...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the carbonation reaction mechanisms between supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) and reservoir rocks consisting of different mineralogical compositions in aqueous and...

53

JOM: Journal of the Minerals, Metals, and Materials Society, 2012, Vol. 62, Issue 10, pp. 1148-1157 Thermal expansion of carbon nanofiber reinforced multiscale polymer composites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Hollow ceramic particle filled polymer matrix composites, called syntactic foams, have also shown nanofibers (CNFs) on the thermal expansion behavior of epoxy matrix composites and hollow particle filled. The experimental measurements show that with 10 wt.% CNF the composite has about 11.6% lower CTE than the matrix

Gupta, Nikhil

54

KING FAHD UNIVERSITY OF PETROLEUM & MINERALS Dhahran, Saudi Arabia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. INTRODUCTION 1 1.1 The nature of petroleum 1 1.2 The petroleum reservoir 1 1.3 Significance of rock properties.4 Resisitivity log 25 Chapter 6. ROCK PERMEABILITY 28 6.1 Definition 28 6.2 Differential form of Darcy's law 29 6KING FAHD UNIVERSITY OF PETROLEUM & MINERALS Dhahran, Saudi Arabia Basic Properties of Reservoir

Abu-Khamsin, Sidqi

55

A List of Kansas Minerals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that mineral occurs. I t i s a i found associated with A n g l e s i t e t I t i s reported from Cherokee county. C e l e s t i t e (720). Orthorhombic, composition strontium sulphate Sr S0*j. This mineral has been found q u i t e s p a r i n g l y i n...Master Th e s i s Geology Grov e r , C h a r l e s H. 1895 L i s t of Kansas m i n e r a l s * A l i s t of Kansas Minerals with "brief notes on the^cr^stjalogr&phio (form, chemical composition, and the p r i n c i p a l l o c a l i t i e s f...

Grover, Charles H.

1895-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Potential of Mineral Uptake Efficiency by Some Apple Rootstocks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1999. Drought tolerance of apple rootstocks: Production andwater relations of five apple rootstocks. Acta Horticultureon Mineral Composition of Apple Leaves. J. Am. Soc. Hort.

Amiri, Mohammad E; Fallahi, Esmail

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Effect of feldspar concentrate on the chemical resistance of acid-resistant materials prepared on the basis of argillaceous materials of different chemical and mineral composition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Research shows that introduction of feldspar concentrate into the composition of ceramic mixes improves mullite crystallization, and this promotes an increase in the acid resistance of refractory materials. An in...

E. S. Abdrakhimova

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Rock magnetism of remagnetized carbonate rocks: another look  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and significance of magnetism in sedimentary rocks. Journal1997. Rock Magnetism. zdemir, O Dunlop, D. J. & Oon July 30, 2013 ROCK MAGNETISM: REMAGNETIZED CARBONATES

Jackson, M.; Swanson-Hysell, N. L

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Effect of application of fluidized bed combustion residue to reclaimed mine pastures on forage yield, composition, animal performance, and mineral status  

SciTech Connect

Reclaimed surface mined soils in Appalachia are typically infertile and must be amended for optimum vegetative growth. Fluidized bed combustion residue (FBCR) has high levels of Ca, S, Zn, Fe, and Al, and 50% of the neutralizing capacity of limestone. Three treatments were applied to three capacity of limestone. Three treatments were applied to three replicated 0.81 ha reclaimed mine pastures: (A) control (no amendment), (B) 6760 kg FBCR/ha, and (C) 3380 kg limestone/ha. Based on forage availability, six steers were rotationally grazed on pastures receiving each treatment. Steers were weighed and blood samples collected at 14-d intervals and all animals were sacrificed for tissue sampling at the end of the 114-d trial. B and C increased soil pH above control levels. Forage yield and steer gain were not significantly affected by treatment. Forage samples collected during the trial indicated that B and C amendments elevated forage ash, Ca, Mg, S, Cu, and Ca:P ratio and depressed cellulose and NDF. The forage sampled the following spring was lower in hemicellulose, Zn, Mn and Ni; and higher in ash, Ca, S, the Ca:P ratio in the B and C pastures. Mean serum mineral levels of steers were not affected by pasture treatment. The blood packed cell volume was higher in cattle grazing pastures. Liver levels of Fe, Mn, Ni, and Na and bile levels of Mn were depressed in cattle grazing B and C and serum was at deficiency levels and was not detectable in bile, regardless of treatment. Kidney levels of Ca, Mg and P were higher, hair Zn was higher, rib Cr and long bone Cd levels were lower in animals grazing the pastures. This study suggests that FBCR amendment enhances nutrient quality of forage and minerals status of animals at least as well as limestone application to acidic reclaimed mine pastures.

Smedley, K.O.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Advanced Research Power Program--CO2 Mineral Sequestration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sequestration Sequestration Robert Romanosky National Energy Technology Laboratory Mineral Carbonation Workshop August 8, 2001 Advanced Research Power Program Descriptor - include initials, /org#/date Mineral Sequestration Research Research effort seeks to refine and validate a promising CO 2 sequestration technology option, mineral sequestration also known as mineral carbonation Descriptor - include initials, /org#/date What is Mineral Carbonation * Reaction of CO 2 with Mg or Ca containing minerals to form carbonates * Lowest energy state of carbon is a carbonate and not CO 2 * Occurs naturally in nature as weathering of rock * Already proven on large scale - Carbonate formation linked to formation of the early atmosphere Descriptor - include initials, /org#/date Advantages of Mineral Carbonation

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rock composition mineral" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Stable isotope systematics and fluid inclusion studies in the CuAu Visconde deposit, Carajs Mineral Province, Brazil: implications for fluid source generation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The CuAu Visconde deposit is located in the Carajs Mineral Province (CMP), northern Brazil, near the contact between the ca. 2.76Ga metavolcano-sedimentary rocks of the Itacaiunas Supergroup rocks and the ~...

Antonia Railine da Costa Silva; Raimundo Netuno Nobre Villas

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Petrologic and stable isotopic evidence for reaction-enhanced fluid flow during metamorphism of Precambrian-Cambrian sedimentary rocks, Lone Mountain, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Upper Precambrian to Cambrian sedimentary rocks, regionally metamorphosed during the Mesozoic to produce marbles and calc-silicate rocks, were contact metamorphosed at the end of the Cretaceous by the Lone Mountain granitic pluton. Mineral assemblages within the calc-silicates were in equilibrium with H[sub 2]O-rich fluids, while the marbles were in equilibrium with more CO[sub 2]-rich fluids. Mineralogical variation between two different calc-silicate lithologies is the result of differences in bulk rock chemical composition, which also results in differences in isotopic composition between the calc-silicate lithologies. delta O-18 and delta C-13 values show differences of greater than 6 and 4 per mil respectively across lithologic boundaries between interlayered calc-silicates and between interlayered marbles and calc-silicates. The absence of any systematic variation between delta O-18 and delta C-13 values in the calc-silicates suggests that isotopic variation due to decarbonation reactions was limited. The differences in mineralogy and isotopic composition indicate that permeability was enhanced by reaction, permitting the focused flow of fluid through the calc-silicates. Calculated mass balance variations in delta O-18 based on reaction space analysis and Rayleigh decarbonation cannot explain the observed variations of delta O-18, requiring infiltration of externally derived fluids, while the delta C-13 compositions in the calc-silicates can be explained by Rayleigh decarbonation alone.

Richards, I.J.; Labotka, T.C. (Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Geochemical Sciences)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

A Forecast of Composition of Coal Wastes and of their Directions of Utilization During Explorations in Coal Deposits in the Ussr  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

SUMMARY The production methods used In the USSR as well as the investigations of the composition, technological properties and wastes reserves from mining operations, coal preparation and coal utilization at the process of deposits surveying have been considered in the report. The principles and specifications, used for the evaluation of associated with coal materials, mineral components and rare elements, contained in solid fuels including the methods for investigation of the elements, hazardous for the environment, have been presented. The directions and specifications (norms) for the utilization of overburden sands and gravel, clays, carbonates and other rocks, coaly rocks of internal ripping material, coal preparation wastes, ashes and slags have been considered.

V.R. Kler; M. Ya. Shpirt

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Reconnaissance geological and mineral resource map of northern Sierra Madre Occidental, Mexico  

SciTech Connect

The northern Sierra Madre Occidental (SMO) map (scale 1:500,000) comprises 305,000 km/sup 2/ in the states of Chihuahau and Sonora. The centrally-located plateau section is divided into an upper, predominantly rhyolitic sequence, overlying an andesite-rich interval, directly correlatable with Tertiary volcanic units in central and southern SMO, respectively (Clark, 1983; 1984). Precambrian rocks occur in both flanks of SMO, either in the subsurface or surface exposures. They are succeeded by Early and Late Paleozoic sedimentary strata in Sonora and by a more discontinuous sequence in western Chihuahua. Mesozoic strata are dominated by Cretaceous carbonate sequences in central Chihuahua, and by late Triassic - Early Jurassic continental and Jurassic magmatic arc deposits in Sonora. Late Mesozoic - Early Cenozoic batholiths were emplaced in numerous localities in Sonora, whereas only isolated granitoid stocks are exposed in Chihuahua. Widespread lavas of basaltic composition are Late Tertiary to Quaternary in age. Late Cenozoic unconsolidated clastic deposits fill basins and constitute the coastal plain on the west. The main mineralizing epoch occurred in Late Cretaceous - Early Tertiary time, is aligned in northwesterly-trending belts and included numerous porphyry (Cu-Mo) deposits, scattered contact metasomatic (Cu-W) ores and a fissure-vein (Ag-Au) assemblage in the western margin; a (Pb-Zn-Ag) assemblage in fissure-veins and manto-chimney deposits, manganese and volcanogenic uranium ores in the eastern flank. Important industrial minerals and rocks include graphite, fluorspar and building materials.

Clark, K.F.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Coso Geothermal Area (1984) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Analysis- Rock At Coso Geothermal Area (1984) Analysis- Rock At Coso Geothermal Area (1984) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Coso Geothermal Area (1984) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Rock Activity Date 1984 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis To analyze evidence for crustal interaction and compositional zonation in the source regions of Pleistocene basaltic and rhyolitic magmas of the Coso volcanic field Notes The isotopic compositions of Pb and Sr in Pleistocene basalt, high-silica rhyolite, and andesitic inclusions in rhyolite of the Coso volcanic field indicate that these rocks were derived from different levels of compositionally zoned magmatic systems. The two earliest rhyolites probably

66

Effects of tunneling on groundwater flow and swelling of clay-sulfate rocks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

[1] Swelling of clay-sulfate rocks is a major threat in tunneling. It is triggered by the transformation of the sulfate mineral anhydrite into gypsum as a result of water inflow in anhydrite-containing layers after tunnel ...

Butscher, Christoph

67

Underground radio technology saves miners and emergency response personnel  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Underground radio technology saves miners and emergency response Underground radio technology saves miners and emergency response personnel Underground radio technology saves miners and emergency response personnel Founded through LANL, Vital Alert Technologies, Inc. (Vital Alert) has launched a wireless, two-way real-time voice communication system that is effective through 1,000+ feet of solid rock. April 3, 2012 Vital Alert's C1000 mine and tunnel radios use magnetic induction, advanced digital communications techniques and ultra-low frequency transmission to wirelessly provide reliable 2-way voice, text, or data links through rock strata and other solid media. Vital Alert's C1000 mine and tunnel radios use magnetic induction, advanced digital communications techniques and ultra-low frequency transmission to wirelessly provide reliable 2-way voice, text, or data links through rock

68

Cement, Ceramics, and Composites  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cement and its applications as concrete (a composite of cement and aggregate) are known throughout the world. The most common cement used today is Portland, named after the gray rock of Portland, Eng...

O. V. Roussak; H. D. Gesser

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Cement, Ceramics, and Composites  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cement and its applications as concrete (a composite of cement and aggregate) is known throughout the world. The most common cement used today is Portland, named after the grey rock of Portland, Engl...

H. D. Gesser

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Carbonation Mechanism of Reservoir Rock by Supercritical Carbon Dioxide  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Project Objectives: Elucidate comprehensively the carbonation reaction mechanisms between supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) and reservoir rocks consisting of different mineralogical compositions in aqueous and non-aqueous environments at temperatures of up to 250C, and to develop chemical modeling of CO2-reservior rock interactions.

71

Asphaltene Deposition in Carbonate Rocks: Experimental Investigation and Numerical Simulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Asphaltene Deposition in Carbonate Rocks: Experimental Investigation and Numerical Simulation ... Interfacial tension (IFT) as one of the main properties for efficient CO2 flooding planning in oil reservoirs depends strongly on pressure, temperature, and composition of the reservoir fluids. ...

Shahin Kord; Rohaldin Miri; Shahab Ayatollahi; Mehdi Escrochi

2012-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

72

Predictive GIS model for potential mapping of Cu, Pb, Zn mineralization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The geologic features indicative of Cu, Pb, Zn mineral deposits in a area are fractures (structure), and host rock sediments. Datasets used include Cu, Pb, Zn deposit points record, geological data, remote sensin...

Tarik B. Benomar Ph. D.; Bian Fuling

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Adsorption of methane and carbon dioxide on gas shale and pure mineral samples  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract We have measured methane and carbon dioxide adsorption isotherms at 40C on gas shale samples from the Barnett, Eagle Ford, Marcellus and Montney reservoirs. Carbon dioxide isotherms were included to assess its potential for preferential adsorption, with implications for its use as a fracturing fluid and/or storage in depleted shale reservoirs. To better understand how the individual mineral constituents that comprise shales contribute to adsorption, measurements were made on samples of pure carbon, illite and kaolinite as well. We were able to successfully fit all adsorption data for both gases in accordance with a Langmuir isotherm model. Our results show carbon dioxide to have approximately 23 times the adsorptive capacity of methane in both the pure mineral constituents and actual shale samples. In addition to obvious microstructural and compositional differences between real rocks and pure minerals, we hypothesize that water adsorption plays an important role in regulating surface area availability for other molecules to adsorb. The resultant volumetric swelling strain was also measured as a function of pressure/adsorption. We observe both clay and pure carbon to swell an amount that is approximately linearly proportional to the amount of adsorption.

Robert Heller; Mark Zoback

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Rock Alteration and Mineral Transformations for Nuclear Waste Management  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Technical Paper / Argonne National Laboratory Specialists Workshop on Basic Research Needs for Nuclear Waste Management / Radioactive Waste

Philip A. Helmke

75

Rock Magnetism To-Day  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... ROCK magnetism is that branch of geophysics that deals with the origin of magnetization in rocks and ... that deals with the origin of magnetization in rocks and its stability. Workers in rock magnetism are also interested in the phenomenon of self-reversal, that is, a rock acquiring ...

SUBIR K. BANERJEE

1966-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

76

Session: Hard Rock Penetration  

SciTech Connect

This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of five presentations: ''Hard Rock Penetration - Summary'' by George P. Tennyson, Jr.; ''Overview - Hard Rock Penetration'' by James C. Dunn; ''An Overview of Acoustic Telemetry'' by Douglas S. Drumheller; ''Lost Circulation Technology Development Status'' by David A. Glowka; ''Downhole Memory-Logging Tools'' by Peter Lysne.

Tennyson, George P. Jr.; Dunn, James C.; Drumheller, Douglas S.; Glowka, David A.; Lysne, Peter

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Collecting Fluorescent Minerals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Good fluorescent mineral collections are the result of constant study and diligent search for superior material. As in the development of mineral collections generally, purchase and trade provide rewarding ave...

Manuel Robbins

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Epithermal Gold Mineralization and a Geothermal Resource at Blue Mountain,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Epithermal Gold Mineralization and a Geothermal Resource at Blue Mountain, Epithermal Gold Mineralization and a Geothermal Resource at Blue Mountain, Humboldt County, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Epithermal Gold Mineralization and a Geothermal Resource at Blue Mountain, Humboldt County, Nevada Abstract Shallow exploration drilling on the west flank of Blue Mountain discovered sub economic gold mineralization and a spatially associated active geothermal system. The gold mineralization is an unusual example of an acid sulfate type epithermal system developed in pre Tertiary sedimentary host rocks. The geothermal system is largely unexplored but is unusual in that surface manifestation s typically associated with active geothermal system are not present. Authors Andrew J. Parr and Timothy J. Percival

79

INTRODUCTION The oxygen isotopic compositions of minerals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- perature and aridity is not so well understood. Because the middle Holocene was a period of elevated solar of the Gulf of Mexico, Pacific, andArctic air masses (Bryson, 1966; Fig. 1). Gulf of Mexico air sup- plies of Mexico air masses and its precipitation is isotopically more negative than gulf moisture (e.g., typically

González, Luis A.

80

Biodegradable synthetic bone composites  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention provides for a biodegradable synthetic bone composition comprising a biodegradable hydrogel polymer scaffold comprising a plurality of hydrolytically unstable linkages, and an inorganic component; such as a biodegradable poly(hydroxyethylmethacrylate)/hydroxyapatite (pHEMA/HA) hydrogel composite possessing mineral content approximately that of human bone.

Liu, Gao; Zhao, Dacheng; Saiz, Eduardo; Tomsia, Antoni P.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rock composition mineral" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

SEISMIC AND ROCK PHYSICS DIAGNOSTICS OF MULTISCALE RESERVOIR TEXTURES  

SciTech Connect

As part of our study on ''Relationships between seismic properties and rock microstructure'', we have (1) Studied relationships between velocity and permeability. (2) Used independent experimental methods to measure the elastic moduli of clay minerals as functions of pressure and saturation. (3) Applied different statistical methods for characterizing heterogeneity and textures from scanning acoustic microscope (SAM) images of shale microstructures. (4) Analyzed the directional dependence of velocity and attenuation in different reservoir rocks (5) Compared Vp measured under hydrostatic and non-hydrostatic stress conditions in sands. (6) Studied stratification as a source of intrinsic anisotropy in sediments using Vp and statistical methods for characterizing textures in sands.

Gary Mavko

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Microfractures in rocks from two geothermal areas | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Microfractures in rocks from two geothermal areas Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Microfractures in rocks from two geothermal areas Details Activities (2) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: Core samples from the Dunes, California, and Raft River, Idaho, geothermal areas show diagenesis superimposed on episodic fracturing and fracture sealing. The minerals that fill fractures show significant temporal variations. Sealed fractures can act as barriers to fluid flow. Sealed fractures often mark boundaries between regions of significantly

83

Longwave thermal infrared spectral variability in individual rocks  

SciTech Connect

A hyperspectral imaging spectrometer measuring in the longwave thermal infrared (7.6-11.6 {micro}m) with a spatial resolution less than 4 mm was used in the field to observe the variability of emissivity spectra within individual rocks. The rocks were obtained commercially, were on the order of 20 cm in size and were selected to have distinct spectral features: they include alabaster (gypsum), soapstone (steatite with talc), obsidian (volcanic glass), norite (plagioclase and orthopyroxene), and 'jasper' (silica with iron oxides). The advantages of using an imaging spectrometer to spectrally characterize these rocks are apparent. Large spectral variations were observed within individual rocks that may be attributed to roughness, surface geometry, and compositional variation. Non-imaging spectrometers would normally miss these variations as would small samples used in laboratory measurements, spatially averaged spectra can miss the optimum spectra for identification materials and spatially localized components of the rock can be obscured.

Balick, Lee K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gillespie, Alan [UN. WASHINGTON; French, Andrew [USDA-ARS; Danilina, Iryna [UN. WASHINGTON

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

CONFORMATIONAL EFFECTS OF ADSORBED POLYMER ON THE SWELLING BEHAVIOR OF ENGINEERED CLAY MINERALS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...on many factors such as mineral composition, grain size, aggregate size...exchange capacity, and chemical composition and concentration of the bulk...release of potassium nitrate as agrochemical. Carbohydrate Polymers , 53...

Sungho Kim; Michael A. Motyka; Angelica M. Palomino; Nikolas J. Podraza

85

Mineral Deformation at Earth's Core-Mantle Boundary  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mineral Deformation at Earth's Core-Mantle Boundary Print Mineral Deformation at Earth's Core-Mantle Boundary Print Earth is a dynamic planet in which convection takes place on the scale of thousands of kilometers. Because Earth is mostly solid (except for its liquid-iron outer core), this convection causes deformation of solid rocks by plastic flow. At the core-mantle boundary (CMB), 2900 km deep, seismologists have discovered that seismic waves travel faster in certain directions. This seismic anisotropy appears to be related to the deformation of the constituent minerals. To understand the deformation mechanisms of mineral phases at this depth, researchers from Yale and UC Berkeley re-created the ultrahigh pressures of the deep Earth at ALS Beamline 12.2.2 while conducting in situ x-ray diffraction experiments to probe changes in crystal orientations.

86

Mineral Deformation at Earth's Core-Mantle Boundary  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mineral Deformation at Earth's Core-Mantle Boundary Print Mineral Deformation at Earth's Core-Mantle Boundary Print Earth is a dynamic planet in which convection takes place on the scale of thousands of kilometers. Because Earth is mostly solid (except for its liquid-iron outer core), this convection causes deformation of solid rocks by plastic flow. At the core-mantle boundary (CMB), 2900 km deep, seismologists have discovered that seismic waves travel faster in certain directions. This seismic anisotropy appears to be related to the deformation of the constituent minerals. To understand the deformation mechanisms of mineral phases at this depth, researchers from Yale and UC Berkeley re-created the ultrahigh pressures of the deep Earth at ALS Beamline 12.2.2 while conducting in situ x-ray diffraction experiments to probe changes in crystal orientations.

87

Geology and Mineral Deposits of Churchill County, Nevada | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geology and Mineral Deposits of Churchill County, Nevada Geology and Mineral Deposits of Churchill County, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Geology and Mineral Deposits of Churchill County, Nevada Abstract Churchill County, in west-central Nevada, is an area of varied topography and geology that has had a rather small total mineral production. The western part of the county is dominated by the broad low valley of the Carson Sink, which is underlain by deposits of Lake Lahontan. The bordering mountain ranges to the west and south are of low relief and underlain largely by Tertiary volcanic and sedimentary units. Pre-Tertiary rocks are extensively exposed east of the Carson Sink in the Stillwater Range, Clan Alpine Mountains, Augusta Mountains, and New Pass Mountains. The eastern

88

Mineral Deformation at Earth's Core-Mantle Boundary  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mineral Deformation at Earth's Core-Mantle Boundary Print Mineral Deformation at Earth's Core-Mantle Boundary Print Earth is a dynamic planet in which convection takes place on the scale of thousands of kilometers. Because Earth is mostly solid (except for its liquid-iron outer core), this convection causes deformation of solid rocks by plastic flow. At the core-mantle boundary (CMB), 2900 km deep, seismologists have discovered that seismic waves travel faster in certain directions. This seismic anisotropy appears to be related to the deformation of the constituent minerals. To understand the deformation mechanisms of mineral phases at this depth, researchers from Yale and UC Berkeley re-created the ultrahigh pressures of the deep Earth at ALS Beamline 12.2.2 while conducting in situ x-ray diffraction experiments to probe changes in crystal orientations.

89

Zeolitization Of Intracaldera Sediments And Rhyolitic Rocks In The 1.25 Ma  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Zeolitization Of Intracaldera Sediments And Rhyolitic Rocks In The 1.25 Ma Zeolitization Of Intracaldera Sediments And Rhyolitic Rocks In The 1.25 Ma Lake Of Valles Caldera, New Mexico, Usa Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Zeolitization Of Intracaldera Sediments And Rhyolitic Rocks In The 1.25 Ma Lake Of Valles Caldera, New Mexico, USA Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Quantitative X-ray diffraction analysis of about 80 rhyolite and associated lacustrine rocks has characterized previously unrecognized zeolitic alteration throughout the Valles caldera resurgent dome. The alteration assemblage consists primarily of smectite-clinoptilolite-mordenite-silica, which replaces groundmass and fills voids, especially in the tuffs and lacustrine rocks. Original rock textures are routinely preserved. Mineralization typically extends to

90

Water-Rock interaction in the Long Valley Caldera (USA)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Water-rock interactions within the main thermal aquifer in the Long Valley Caldera are evaluated using water chemistry data from a new suite of samples. The results reflect the impact of increased geothermal production and major CO2 loss, which appears to drive calcite precipitation in the aquifer. The study provides qualitative information on the rates of mineral reactions and the response times of chemical geothermometers to declining temperatures.

W.C. Evans; S. Hurwitz; D. Bergfeld; J. Lewicki; M.A. Huebner; C.F. Williams; S.T. Brown

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Carbonation Mechanism of Reservoir Rock by Supercritical Carbon Dioxide  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Carbonation Mechanism of Reservoir Rock by Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Carbonation Mechanism of Reservoir Rock by Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Geothermal Lab Call Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Carbonation Mechanism of Reservoir Rock by Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Project Type / Topic 1 Laboratory Call for Submission of Applications for Research, Development and Analysis of Geothermal Technologies Project Type / Topic 2 Supercritical Carbon Dioxide / Reservoir Rock Chemical Interactions Project Description Supercritical CO2 is currently becoming a more common fluid for extracting volatile oil and fragrance compounds from various raw materials that are used in perfumery. Furthermore, its use as a heat transmission fluid is very attractive because of the greater uptake capability of heat from hot reservoir rock, compared with that of water. However, one concern was the reactivity of CO2 with clay and rock minerals in aqueous and non-aqueous environments. So if this reaction leads to the formation of water-soluble carbonates, such formation could be detrimental to the integrity of wellbore infrastructure.

92

Clay mineral evolution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...and largely preserved) rock record of Mars. The successful landing of NASAs Curiosity rover in Gale Crater, coupled with observations...chondritic meteorites. In A.M. Davis, Ed., Meteorites, Comets, and Planets, 1, 201-246. Treatise on Geochemistry...

Robert M. Hazen; Dimitri A. Sverjensky; David Azzolini; David L. Bish; Stephen C. Elmore; Linda Hinnov; Ralph E. Milliken

93

Microwave assisted hard rock cutting  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for the sequential fracturing and cutting of subsurface volume of hard rock (102) in the strata (101) of a mining environment (100) by subjecting the volume of rock to a beam (25) of microwave energy to fracture the subsurface volume of rock by differential expansion; and , then bringing the cutting edge (52) of a piece of conventional mining machinery (50) into contact with the fractured rock (102).

Lindroth, David P. (Apple Valley, MN); Morrell, Roger J. (Bloomington, MN); Blair, James R. (Inver Grove Heights, MN)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

LimeAluminaSilica processing incorporating minerals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The use of naturally occurring minerals to enhance the physical and mechanical properties of industrial ceramics such as alumina is an attractive alternative to synthetic materials due to cost, chemical stability and availability. Two systems, have been chosen for investigation, aluminakyanite to produce an aluminamullite composite and aluminawollastonite to produce a lime aluminosilicate. Wet processing conditions were optimised using pH/rheology and microelectrophoresis techniques followed by slip casting. The resulting green compacts were subjected to a variety of sintering regimes to produce the desired composites. Sintered products were characterised by techniques such as electron probe microanalysis, hardness tests and toughness determinations. Results are discussed, both in terms of enhanced properties realised (toughness, wear resistance, dielectric), and with respect to the viability of using natural minerals in this application.

R.H Bryden; D.G Goski; W.F Caley

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Predicting the transport properties of sedimentary rocks from microstructure  

SciTech Connect

Understanding transport properties of sedimentary rocks, including permeability, relative permeability, and electrical conductivity, is of great importance for petroleum engineering, waste isolation, environmental restoration, and other applications. These transport properties axe controlled to a great extent by the pore structure. How pore geometry, topology, and the physics and chemistry of mineral-fluid and fluid-fluid interactions affect the flow of fluids through consolidated/partially consolidated porous media are investigated analytically and experimentally. Hydraulic and electrical conductivity of sedimentary rocks are predicted from the microscopic geometry of the pore space. Cross-sectional areas and perimeters of individual pores are estimated from two-dimensional scanning electron microscope (SEM) photomicrographs of rock sections. Results, using Berea, Boise, Massilon, and Saint-Gilles sandstones show close agreement between the predicted and measured permeabilities. Good to fair agreement is found in the case of electrical conductivity. In particular, good agreement is found for a poorly cemented rock such as Saint-Gilles sandstone, whereas the agreement is not very good for well-cemented rocks. The possible reasons for this are investigated. The surface conductance contribution of clay minerals to the overall electrical conductivity is assessed. The effect of partial hydrocarbon saturation on overall rock conductivity, and on the Archie saturation exponent, is discussed. The region of validity of the well-known Kozeny-Carman permeability formulae for consolidated porous media and their relationship to the microscopic spatial variations of channel dimensions are established. It is found that the permeabilities predicted by the Kozeny-Carman equations are valid within a factor of three of the observed values methods.

Schlueter, E.M.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Uranium occurrence in igneous rocks of the central Davis Mountains, west Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is local? sv ized in fewer sites with higher concentrations than in fine-grained rocks. In glasses, uranium is homogeneously dis tributed. Crystalline rocks are uranium-depleted by as much as 30 percent in comparison to glasses of similar composition.... This suggests that uranium is lost during alteration because it is concentrated at grain boundaries in crystalline rocks, where it is accessible to altering solutions. Uranium depletion also occurs in air-fall tuffs because of their permeability. Alteration...

Schaftenaar, Wendy Elizabeth

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

97

Mineralogic and isotopic constraints on the origin of strontium-rich cap rock, Tatum Dome, Mississippi, U.S.A.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The limestone portion of the salt dome cap rock at Tatum dome, Mississippi, is composed of an upper massive zone and a lower banded zone. The upper zone consists of equigranular fine-crystalline calcite with veinlets and disseminations of carbonaceous matter associated with minor amounts of detrital and authigenic quartz, sulfides and Sr minerals. The lower zone is composed of alternating light and dark calcite bands. The dark bands are composed of fine-grained and peloidal calcite, quartz, bitumen and disseminated sulfide minerals. The lighter bands consist of variable proportions of generally coarse-crystalline euhedral calcite, celestite and strontianite resulting in Sr contents of up to 30% locally. Solubility data for celestite, strontianite, calcite and anhydrite suggest that a decrease in temperature favors the replacement of Ca minerals by Sr minerals, which is consistent with the observed mineral textures and paragenesis. However, the source of cap rock Sr is difficult to determine. Anhydrite at Tatum dome contains 800 ppm Sr, but the abundance of Sr minerals in the limestone cap rock and the 87Sr86Sr ratios of limestone cap rock minerals require a Sr source other than local anhydrite. Sr released by the replacement of anhydrite by calcite is capable of producing a molar ratio of celestite to calcite of only ? 0.001, yet locally this ratio is ? 3. A likely source of additional Sr is oilfield brines, such as those in central Mississippi that contain up to 3000 ppm Sr along with significant Pb and Zn. Episodic introduction of brines into the cap rock in combination with the action of sulfate-reducing bacteria probably caused the sequential production of the dark bands. The lighter bands probably reflect introduction of a later Sr-enriched fluid or evolution of the original fluid in combination with changes in the chemical parameters controlling mineral precipitation. Calcite was replaced by Sr minerals during this later Sr-rich event.

James A. Saunders; James D. Prikryl; Harry H. Posey

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Photo of the Week: Laser Beats Rock | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Laser Beats Rock Laser Beats Rock Photo of the Week: Laser Beats Rock April 8, 2013 - 5:28pm Addthis On August 5, 2012, the Curiosity rover touched down on the surface of Mars. The ChemCam instrument package, developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory, is a device mounted on the Mars Curiosity rover that uses two remote sensing instruments: the Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectrometer (LIBS) and a Remote Micro-Imager (RMI). The LIBS fires a powerful laser that determines chemical compositions of rock and soil samples, while the RMI takes photos of the samples within the rover's vicinity. In this photo, the ChemCam is being prepared in the clean room prior to the launch of NASA's Mars Science Laboratory mission. Learn more about the ChemCam. | Photo courtesy of Los Alamos National Laboratory.

99

Isotope Geochemistry Of Minerals And Fluids From Newberry Volcano, Oregon |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotope Geochemistry Of Minerals And Fluids From Newberry Volcano, Oregon Isotope Geochemistry Of Minerals And Fluids From Newberry Volcano, Oregon Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Isotope Geochemistry Of Minerals And Fluids From Newberry Volcano, Oregon Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Isotopic compositions were determined for hydrothermal quartz, calcite, and siderite from core samples of the Newberry 2 drill hole, Oregon. The Δ15O values for these minerals decrease with increasing temperatures. The values indicate that these hydrothermal minerals precipitated in isotopic equilibrium with water currently present in the reservoirs. The Δ18O values of quartz and calcite from the andesite and basalt flows (700-932 m) have isotopic values which require that the equilibrated water Δ18O values increase slightly (- 11.3 to -9.2‰) with

100

MINERAL COUNTY COMMISSIONERS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Board of Board of MINERAL COUNTY COMMISSIONERS Telephone: 702-945-2446 Fax: 702-945-0706 P.O. Box 4150 Hawthorne, Nevada 89415 JACKIE WALLIS, Chairman GOVERNING BOARD FOR THE TOWNS OF DAN DILLARD, Vice Chairman HAWTHORNE, LUNING AND MINA BOB LYBARGER, Member LIQUOR BOARD GAMING BOARD U.S. Department of Energy Office of General Counsel, GC-52 1000 Independence Ave. S.W. Washington, DC 20585 Dear Sirs: Attached are the comments for modification of the Price-Anderson Act Notice of Inquiry(NOI) provided to the Board of Mineral County Commissioners, in a letter dated January

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rock composition mineral" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Rock Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rock Sampling Rock Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Rock Sampling Details Activities (13) Areas (13) Regions (1) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Field Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock samples are used to define lithology. Field and lab analyses can be used to measure the chemical and isotopic constituents of rock samples. Stratigraphic/Structural: Provides information about the time and environment which formed a particular geologic unit. Microscopic rock textures can be used to estimate the history of stress and strain, and/or faulting. Hydrological: Isotope geochemistry can reveal fluid circulation of a geothermal system.

102

Overview - Hard Rock Penetration  

SciTech Connect

The Hard Rock Penetration program is developing technology to reduce the costs of drilling and completing geothermal wells. Current projects include: lost circulation control, rock penetration mechanics, instrumentation, and industry/DOE cost shared projects of the Geothermal Drilling Organization. Last year, a number of accomplishments were achieved in each of these areas. A new flow meter being developed to accurately measure drilling fluid outflow was tested extensively during Long Valley drilling. Results show that this meter is rugged, reliable, and can provide useful measurements of small differences in fluid inflow and outflow rates. By providing early indications of fluid gain or loss, improved control of blow-out and lost circulation problems during geothermal drilling can be expected. In the area of downhole tools for lost circulation control, the concept of a downhole injector for injecting a two-component, fast-setting cementitious mud was developed. DOE filed a patent application for this concept during FY 91. The design criteria for a high-temperature potassium, uranium, thorium logging tool featuring a downhole data storage computer were established, and a request for proposals was submitted to tool development companies. The fundamental theory of acoustic telemetry in drill strings was significantly advanced through field experimentation and analysis. A new understanding of energy loss mechanisms was developed.

Dunn, James C.

1992-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

103

Overview: Hard Rock Penetration  

SciTech Connect

The Hard Rock Penetration program is developing technology to reduce the costs of drilling and completing geothermal wells. Current projects include: lost circulation control, rock penetration mechanics, instrumentation, and industry/DOE cost shared projects of the Geothermal Drilling organization. Last year, a number of accomplishments were achieved in each of these areas. A new flow meter being developed to accurately measure drilling fluid outflow was tested extensively during Long Valley drilling. Results show that this meter is rugged, reliable, and can provide useful measurements of small differences in fluid inflow and outflow rates. By providing early indications of fluid gain or loss, improved control of blow-out and lost circulation problems during geothermal drilling can be expected. In the area of downhole tools for lost circulation control, the concept of a downhole injector for injecting a two-component, fast-setting cementitious mud was developed. DOE filed a patent application for this concept during FY 91. The design criteria for a high-temperature potassium, uranium, thorium logging tool featuring a downhole data storage computer were established, and a request for proposals was submitted to tool development companies. The fundamental theory of acoustic telemetry in drill strings was significantly advanced through field experimentation and analysis. A new understanding of energy loss mechanisms was developed.

Dunn, J.C.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Rock Properties Model  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this model report is to document the Rock Properties Model version 3.1 with regard to input data, model methods, assumptions, uncertainties and limitations of model results, and qualification status of the model. The report also documents the differences between the current and previous versions and validation of the model. The rock properties model provides mean matrix and lithophysae porosity, and the cross-correlated mean bulk density as direct input to the ''Saturated Zone Flow and Transport Model Abstraction'', MDL-NBS-HS-000021, REV 02 (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170042]). The constraints, caveats, and limitations associated with this model are discussed in Section 6.6 and 8.2. Model validation accomplished by corroboration with data not cited as direct input is discussed in Section 7. The revision of this model report was performed as part of activities being conducted under the ''Technical Work Plan for: The Integrated Site Model, Revision 05'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169635]). The purpose of this revision is to bring the report up to current procedural requirements and address the Regulatory Integration Team evaluation comments. The work plan describes the scope, objectives, tasks, methodology, and procedures for this process.

C. Lum

2004-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

105

CO2 Mineral Sequestration Studies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sequestration Studies Sequestration Studies Introduction, Issues and Plans Philip Goldberg National Energy Technology Laboratory Workshop on CO 2 Sequestration with Minerals August 8, 2001 Mineral Sequestration Program Research effort seeks to refine and validate a promising CO 2 sequestration technology option, mineral sequestration also known as mineral carbonation Goals: * Understand the fundamental mechanisms involved in mineral carbonation * Generate data to support process development * Operate continuous, integrated small-scale process unit to support design Current Partnerships In order to effectively develop Mineral Sequestration, a multi-laboratory Working Group was formed in the Summer of 1998, participants include: * Albany Research Center * Arizona State University * Los Alamos National Laboratory

106

From detrital heritage to diagenetic transformations, the message of clay minerals contained within shales of the Palaeoproterozoic Francevillian basin (Gabon)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Unmetamorphosed and undeformed marine siliciclastics rocks of the FB, FC and FD of the Francevillian series (Gabon) were deposited in an epicontinental basin. Clay minerals found in black shale, siltstone and sandstone are dominantly illite and chlorite except in two levels of the FB formation, which contain smectite-rich randomly ordered mixed layers. Their survival in a 2.1Ga old sedimentary series is not related to the abundance of organic matter (total organic carbon or TOC), nor redox conditions at the time of deposition as indicated by the Fe speciation (FeHR/FeT and FePy/FeHR ratios). Rather it results from an incomplete illitization reaction that reflects potassium deficiency. The K2O/Al2O3 ratio of shale, siltstone and sandstone vary along the series, and appear to conserve the signature of the original chemical composition of the rocks. K-feldspars which are present in the FC and FD formations are missing in the FB formation. Consequently, the smectite layers do not appear to be inherited from a detrital input in the basin but must be considered as representative of an intermediate stage of the illitization reaction reached during diagenesis.

Lauriss Ngombi-Pemba; Abderrazak El Albani; Alain Meunier; Olivier Grauby; Franois Gauthier-Lafaye

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Capabilities for measuring physical and chemical properties of rocks at high pressure  

SciTech Connect

The Experimental Geophysics Group of the Earth Sciences Department at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has experimental equipment that measures a variety of physical properties and phase equilibria and kinetics on rocks and minerals at extreme pressures (to 500 GPa) and temperatures (from 10 to 2800 K). These experimental capabilities are described in this report in terms of published results, photographs, and schematic diagrams.

Durham, W.B. (comp.)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

PRESSURE TRANSIENT ANALYSIS FOR COMPOSITE SYSTEMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SGP-TR-117 PRESSURE TRANSIENT ANALYSIS FOR COMPOSITE SYSTEMS Ani1 Kumar Ambastha October 1988 my graduate studies. #12;f #12;ABSTRACT A composite reservoir model is used to analyze well. A composite reservoir is made up of two or more regions. Each region has its own rock and fluid properties

Stanford University

109

Engineering and Mineral Resources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

News ????????????????? ® College of Engineering and Mineral Resources Winter 2008 table of contents. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 wvCROSSROADS DepartmentofCivilandEnvironmentalEngineering Civil engineering exchange program and environmental engineering with a focus in transportation will have the opportunity to study abroad as part

Mohaghegh, Shahab

110

Minerals, Microbes, and Remediation:  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Stucki 2006), they can buffer the redox conditions...minerals in a defined buffer or medium, mostly at...evolution of clay-based buffer properties in underground...Implications for bentonite as backfill material in the disposal...Lagaly, BGK Theng (eds) Handbook of Clay Science. Elsevier...

Hailiang Dong

111

KaolinA most diverse rock in genesis, texture, physical properties, and uses  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...or sedimentary deposits in Brazil, Czechoslovakia, West and...composition confirmed by energy-dispersive analysis: Keller...alunite has been detected, using energy dispersive analyses with electron...Diaspore A depleted, non-renewable mineral resource of Mis- souri...

112

Calcination and pyroprocessing of mineral fines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

ABSTRACT During the past 40 years we have witnessed an interesting development in technologies for calcination and pyroprocessing of fine-grained material. This has led to the gas suspension principles now being widely used in the cement industry and in chemical processing systems for solids. The present paper deals with the dilute-phase systems and summarises the developments over the past 10 years illustrating the importance of raw material properties and product specifications in the selection and design of GSC systems. Methods for the characterisation of raw materials, such as crushed rock, flotation concentrates and hydrates, are illustrated with examples from industrial plants operating on dolomite, limestone and alumina hydrate. KEY WORDS GSC Gas Suspension Calcination Lime, Dolime, Alumina, Minerals Processing

E.A. Neubert

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Mineral Rights and Proceeds (Nebraska)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This section contains provisions which determine when mineral rights are presumed to be abandoned by property owners.

114

Reply to comments by L.J. Cabri on "Changes in sulfides and platinum-group minerals with the degree of alteration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is not applicable for our purpose. In our studies, the mass balance calculation is secondary to the petrogenetic) and Ni deposits, we carried out our mass balance calculations using whole-rock analy- ses combined-012-0423-6 #12;use the whole-rock analyses for mass balance calculations because sulfide minerals make up a small

Long, Bernard

115

Backfill composition for secondary barriers in nuclear waste repositories  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A backfill composition for sorbing and retaining hazardous elements of nuclear wastes comprises 50 to 70% by weight of quartz, 10 to 30% by weight of montmorillonite, 1 to 10% by weight of phosphate mineral, 1 to 10% by weight of ferrous mineral, 1 to 10% by weight of sulfate mineral and 1 to 10% by weight of attapulgite.

Beall, G.W.; Allard, B.M.

1980-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

116

A Review Of Water Contents Of Nominally Anhydrous Natural Minerals In The  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

A Review Of Water Contents Of Nominally Anhydrous Natural Minerals In The A Review Of Water Contents Of Nominally Anhydrous Natural Minerals In The Mantles Of Earth, Mars And The Moon Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Review Of Water Contents Of Nominally Anhydrous Natural Minerals In The Mantles Of Earth, Mars And The Moon Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Olivine, pyroxene and garnet are nominally anhydrous but can accommodate tens to hundreds of parts per million (ppm) H2O or "water" in the form of protons incorporated in defects in their mineral structure. This review concerns the amount of water in nominally anhydrous minerals from mantle and mantle-derived rocks: peridotites, eclogites, megacrysts, basalts and kimberlites. Trends between internal and external parameters

117

4.4 Nanoscale: Mineral Weathering Boundary RI Dorn, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, USA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of more intense dissolution are seen as pits on the scale of micrometers. Heavy metal scavenging Iron and manganese oxides and hydroxides scavenge heavy metals such as zinc, copper, and lead. High in mineral weathering, silt production, rock coating behavior, geochemical pollution, thermal weathering from

Dorn, Ron

118

Mixed-Valence Minerals of Iron and Titanium: Correlations of Structural, Mssbauer and Electronic Spectral Data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A large cariety of mixed-valence silicate and oxide minerals occur in rocks from the Earth, Moon and Meteorites, They frequently contain Fe2+ -Fe3+, Ti3+ -Ti4+ and Fe2+ -Ti4+ assemblages and often display anomalo...

Roger G. Burns; D. A. Nolet; K. M. Parkin; C. A. McCammon

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Ion beam analyses of radionuclide migration in heterogeneous rocks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The migration of radionuclides (RN) in the environment is a topic of general interest for its implications on public health and it is an issue for the long-term safety studies of deep geological repositories (DGR) for high-level radioactive waste. The role played by colloids on RN migration is also of great concern. Diffusion and sorption are fundamental mechanisms controlling RN migration in rocks and many experimental approaches are applied to determine transport parameters for low sorbing RN in homogeneous rocks. However it is difficult to obtain relevant data for high sorbing RN or colloids for which diffusion lengths are extremely short or within heterogeneous rocks where transport might be different in different minerals. The ion beam techniques Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) and micro-Particle Induced X-Ray Emission (?PIXE) rarely applied in the field were selected for their micro-analytical potential to study RN diffusion and surface retention within heterogeneous rocks. Main achievements obtained during last 12 years are highlighted.

Valentino Rigato

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Life Under Rocks Grade Level: First  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Procedure: Find a small and large rock (rock should be on a solid surface and not sunk in sand or muck

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rock composition mineral" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis of the bone mineral content in human trabecular bone: A comparison with ICPES and neutron activation analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To evaluate the accuracy of bone mineral composition determination by electron microprobe analysis (EDX) the measurements have been compared to instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) and chemical anal...

K. kesson; M. D. Grynpas; R. G. V. Hancock; R. Odselius

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Shotgun cartridge rock breaker  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A rock breaker uses shotgun cartridges or other firearm ammunition as the explosive charge at the bottom of a drilled borehole. The breaker includes a heavy steel rod or bar, a gun with a firing chamber for the ammunition which screws onto the rod, a long firing pin running through a central passage in the rod, and a firing trigger mechanism at the external end of the bar which strikes the firing pin to fire the cartridge within the borehole. A tubular sleeve surround the main body of the rod and includes slits the end to allow it to expand. The rod has a conical taper at the internal end against which the end of the sleeve expands when the sleeve is forced along the rod toward the taper by a nut threaded onto the external end of the rod. As the sleeve end expands, it pushes against the borehole and holds the explosive gasses within, and also prevents the breaker from flying out of the borehole. The trigger mechanism includes a hammer with a slot and a hole for accepting a drawbar or drawpin which, when pulled by a long cord, allows the cartridge to be fired from a remote location.

Ruzzi, Peter L. (Eagan, NM); Morrell, Roger J. (Bloomington, MN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Mineral Sequestration Utilizing Industrial By-Products, Residues, and Minerals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

J. Fauth and Yee Soong J. Fauth and Yee Soong U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Pittsburgh PA, 15236-0940 Mineral Sequestration Workshop National Energy Technology Laboratory August 8, 2001 Mineral Sequestration Utilizing Industrial By-Products, Residues, and Minerals Mineral Sequestration Workshop, U.S. Department of Energy, NETL, August 8, 2001 Overview * Introduction - Objective - Goals - NETL Facilities * Effect of Solution Chemistry on Carbonation Efficiency - Buffered Solution + NaCl - Buffered Solution + MEA * Effect of Pretreatment on Carbonation Efficiency - Thermal Treatments - Chemical Treatments * Carbonation Reaction with Ultramafic Minerals - Serpentine - Olivine Mineral Sequestration Workshop, U.S. Department of Energy, NETL, August 8, 2001 Overview * Carbonation Reaction with Industrial By-products

124

Post Rock | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rock Rock Jump to: navigation, search Name Post Rock Facility Post Rock Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Wind Capital Group Developer Wind Capital Group Energy Purchaser Westar Energy Location Ellsworth KS Coordinates 38.87269233°, -98.33059788° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.87269233,"lon":-98.33059788,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

125

Rock Density | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Rock Density Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Rock Density Details Activities (2) Areas (2) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Lab Analysis Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Rock Lab Analysis Parent Exploration Technique: Rock Lab Analysis Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Density of different lithologic units. Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Thermal: Cost Information Low-End Estimate (USD): 10.001,000 centUSD 0.01 kUSD 1.0e-5 MUSD 1.0e-8 TUSD / sample

126

CONSERVATION OF MINERALS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...In one field a billion feet of gas are being...after the operations close down...coal and oil and iron...increase in cost through unnecessarily...appear that domestic industries...for mineral production was more...have reduced costs of mining...nearly all fields. The record...efficiency, lower costs and higher...Control of Production: However...exploitation of oil under unrestrained...are: (1) Operation of oil wells with improper gas-oil ratios...inefficient equipment, resulting...

C. K. LEITH

1935-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

127

Potential for tunneling based on rock and soil melting. Abstracts  

SciTech Connect

The rock-melting drill was invented at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory in 1960. Electrically heated, laboratory-scale drills were subsequently shown to penetrate igneous rocks at usefully high rates, with moderate power consumptions. The development of compact nuclear reactors and of heat pipes now makes possible the extension of this technology to much larger melting penetrators, potentially capable of producing holes up to several meters in diameter and several tens of kilometers long or deep. Development of a rapid, versatile, economical method of boring large, long shafts and tunnels offers solutions to many of man's most urgent ecological, scientific, raw-materials, and energy-supply problems. A melting method appears to be the most promising and flexible means of producing such holes. It is relatively insensitive to the composition, hardness, structure, and temperature of the rock, and offers the possibilities of producing self-supporting, glass-lined holes in almost any formation and (using a technique called lithofracturing) of eliminating the debris-removal problem by forcing molten rock into cracks created in the bore wall. Large rock-melting penetrators, called Electric Subterrenes or Nuclear Subterrenes according to the energy source used, are discussed in this report, together with problems anticipated in their development. It is concluded that this development is within the grasp of present technology.

Rowley, J.C.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

A-type granites and related rocks: Petrogenesis and classification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The problems of identification of A-type granitoids are analyzed. These rocks occur in different geodynamic settings. Owing to their mantle nature, they show distinct REE specialization. These are acid intrusive rocks, whose volcanic products are of crucial scientific and practical significance. However, neither the great number of proposed classification schemes and diagrams, including those based on expensive analytical data, nor hot scientific discussions of their identification and the ambiguity of the term A-granitoids helped to determine their classification features in full measure. A principally new discriminant diagram is proposed for the classification of igneous A-type rocks, based on the analysis of earlier obtained results and the petrochemical composition of these rocks. A comparative analysis of subdivision of granites and related felsic volcanic rocks (SiO2>67wt.%), based on the ternary (Na2O+K2O)Fe2O3*נ5(CaO+MgO)נ5 and other widely applied diagrams, has shown the advantage of the proposed discriminant diagram for the classification of A-type granitoids from different geodynamic settings.

A.V. Grebennikov

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

GEOL 103 Writing Assignment 3. Sedimentary Rocks Name _______________________  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.g., kaolinite), halite (rock salt), gypsum, occasionally micas (muscovite, biotite). Sed rocks can also contain

Kirby, Carl S.

130

Minerals Technologies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Place: Bethlehem, PA Website: http:www.mineralstechnologie References: Minerals Technologies1 Information About Partnership with NREL Partnership with NREL Yes Partnership Type...

131

Isotopic Analysis- Rock | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis- Rock Isotopic Analysis- Rock Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Isotopic Analysis- Rock Details Activities (13) Areas (11) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Lab Analysis Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Rock Lab Analysis Parent Exploration Technique: Rock Lab Analysis Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Water rock interaction Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Thermal: Dictionary.png Isotopic Analysis- Rock: Isotopes are atoms of the same element that have different numbers of neutrons. An isotopic analysis looks at a particular isotopic element(s) in a given system, while the conditions which increase/decrease the number of neutrons are well understood and measurable.

132

Evolutionary selection of enzymatically synthesized semiconductors from biomimetic mineralization vesicles  

SciTech Connect

The way nature evolves and sculpts materials using proteins inspires new approaches to materials engineering but is still not completely understood. Here, we present a cell-free synthetic biological platform to advance studies of biologically synthesized solid-state materials. This platform is capable of simultaneously exerting many of the hierarchical levels of control found in natural biomineralization, including genetic, chemical, spatial, structural, and morphological control, while supporting the evolutionary selection of new mineralizing proteins and the corresponding genetically encoded materials that they produce. DNA-directed protein expression and enzymatic mineralization occur on polystyrene microbeads in water-in-oil emulsions, yielding synthetic surrogates of biomineralizing cells that are then screened by flow sorting, with light-scattering signals used to sort the resulting mineralized composites differentially. We demonstrate the utility of this platform by evolutionarily selecting newly identified silicateins, biomineralizing enzymes previously identified from the silica skeleton of a marine sponge, for enzyme variants capable of synthesizing silicon dioxide (silica) or titanium dioxide (titania) composites. Mineral composites of intermediate strength are preferentially selected to remain intact for identification during cell sorting, and then to collapse postsorting to expose the encoding genes for enzymatic DNA amplification. Some of the newly selected silicatein variants catalyze the formation of crystalline silicates, whereas the parent silicateins lack this ability. The demonstrated bioengineered route to previously undescribed materials introduces in vitro enzyme selection as a viable strategy for mimicking genetic evolution of materials as it occurs in nature.

Bawazer, Lukmaan A.; Izumi, Michi; Kolodin, Dmitriy; Neilson, James R.; Schwenzer, Birgit; Morse, Daniel E. (UCSB)

2012-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

133

Excavation Damaged Zones In Rock Salt Formations  

SciTech Connect

Salt formations have long been proposed as potential host rocks for nuclear waste disposal. After the operational phase of a repository the openings, e.g., boreholes, galleries, and chambers, have to be sealed in order to avoid the release of radionuclides into the biosphere. For optimising the sealing techniques knowledge about the excavation damaged zones (EDZ) around these openings is essential. In the frame of a project performed between 2004 and 2007, investigations of the EDZ evolution were performed in the Stassfurt halite of the Asse salt mine in northern Germany. Three test locations were prepared in the floor of an almost 20 year old gallery on the 800-m level of the Asse mine: (1) the drift floor as existing, (2) the new drift floor shortly after removing of a layer of about 1 m thickness of the floor with a continuous miner, (3) the new drift floor 2 years after cutting off the 1-m layer. Subject of investigation were the diffusive and advective gas transport and the advective brine transport very close to the opening. Spreading of the brine was tracked by geo-electric monitoring in order to gain information about permeability anisotropy. Results obtained showed that EDZ cut-off is a useful method to improve sealing effectiveness when constructing technical barriers. (authors)

Jockwer, N.; Wieczorek, K. [Gesellschaft fur Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) mbH, Braunschweig (Germany)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Formation of brucite and cronstedtite-bearing mineral assemblages on Ceres  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Dwarf planet Ceres is the largest body in the main asteroid belt with a rocky surface and uncertain internal structure. Spectra of Ceres in near- and mid-infrared wavelengths are consistent with the occurrence of brucite, Mg-bearing carbonates, and an Fe-rich phyllosilicate cronstedtite. Spectra of 10 Hygiea and 324 Bamberga imply similar compositions. Here, we considered stabilities of these minerals to constrain their origin. Cronstedtite is most stable at the temperature of ?0C at moderately oxidizing aqueous conditions and at high water/rock ratios. Although cronstedtite could form on planetesimals, the apparent lack of serpentine may indicate its formation by Ceres temporary surface solutions. Brucite forms at a low activity of dissolved SiO2, at a low fugacity of CO2, and at highly alkaline pH. Brucite and cronstedtite do not form together and may not form deep in the Ceres interior. The absence of Mg serpentine from Ceres surface materials and the unlikely occurrence of very olivine-rich rocks do not indicate a formation of brucite through serpentinization of such rocks. Brucite could form by transient near-surface fluids which do not equilibrate with silicates. Temporary fluids could deposit Mg carbonates before, after, or together with brucite at near-surface conditions that favor CO2 degassing. Regardless of Ceres internal structure, internal thermal and aqueous processes may not affect cold near-surface layers. Percolation of interior fluids is not consistent with the lack of detection of low-solubility salts. However, impacts of ice-rich targets during the Late Heavy Bombardment could account for transient aqueous environments and unusual surface mineralogies of Ceres, Hygiea, and Bamberga. Brucite and Mg carbonates could have formed through hydration and carbonation of MgO evaporated from silicates. Apparently abundant carbonates may indicate an ample impact oxidation of organic matter, and the occurrence of brucite with cronstedtite may reflect turbulent and disequilibrium environments. Clay-like homogeneous surface materials on Ceres could be gravitationally sorted deposits of impact clouds.

Mikhail Yu. Zolotov

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

NETL Mineral Carbonation Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Overview Overview Mineral Carbonation Workshop August 8, 2001 Carl O. Bauer, Associate Laboratory Director Descriptor - include initials, /org#/date We Are: * One of DOE's 15 national laboratories * Government owned and operated * Sites in Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia * Over 1,100 federal and support contractor employees * FY01 budget of $774 million July 2001 Descriptor - include initials, /org#/date Sites in Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Oklahoma Morgantown, WV Pittsburgh, PA Tulsa, OK Descriptor - include initials, /org#/date Our Mission * Resolve the environmental, supply, and reliability constraints of producing and using fossil resources to provide Americans with a stronger economy, healthier environment, and more secure future * Support development and deployment of environmental technologies that reduce

136

Special Mineral Properties And Related Structures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The specific properties detected in definite minerals are the function of mineral structures. The properties are useful in identification of these minerals and have important applications in various fields.

Swapna Mukherjee

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

The thermal conductivity of rock under hydrothermal conditions: measurements and applications  

SciTech Connect

The thermal conductivities of most major rock-forming minerals vary with both temperature and confining pressure, leading to substantial changes in the thermal properties of some rocks at the high temperatures characteristic of geothermal systems. In areas with large geothermal gradients, the successful use of near-surface heat flow measurements to predict temperatures at depth depends upon accurate corrections for varying thermal conductivity. Previous measurements of the thermal conductivity of dry rock samples as a function of temperature were inadequate for porous rocks and susceptible to thermal cracking effects in nonporous rocks. We have developed an instrument for measuring the thermal conductivity of water-saturated rocks at temperatures from 20 to 350 C and confining pressures up to 100 MPa. A transient line-source of heat is applied through a needle probe centered within the rock sample, which in turn is enclosed within a heated pressure vessel with independent controls on pore and confining pressure. Application of this technique to samples of Franciscan graywacke from The Geysers reveals a significant change in thermal conductivity with temperature. At reservoir-equivalent temperatures of 250 C, the conductivity of the graywacke decreases by approximately 25% relative to the room temperature value. Where heat flow is constant with depth within the caprock overlying the reservoir, this reduction in conductivity with temperature leads to a corresponding increase in the geothermal gradient. Consequently, reservoir temperature are encountered at depths significantly shallower than those predicted by assuming a constant temperature gradient with depth. We have derived general equations for estimating the thermal conductivity of most metamorphic and igneous rocks and some sedimentary rocks at elevated temperature from knowledge of the room temperature thermal conductivity. Application of these equations to geothermal exploration should improve estimates of subsurface temperatures derived from heat flow measurements.

Williams, Colin F.; Sass, John H.

1996-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

138

Synthesis and Characterization of Polystyrene-Encapsulated Laponite Composites via Miniemulsion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

polymerization; nanocomposites Introduction Polymer-nanoclay composite materials have attracted con- siderable without using the nanoclay. The nanoscale phyllosilicate platelets are derived from natural clay minerals

Wang, Zhong L.

139

Analysis of mineral trapping for CO{sub 2} disposal in deep aquifers  

SciTech Connect

CO{sub 2} disposal into deep aquifers has been suggested as a potential means whereby atmospheric emissions of greenhouse gases may be reduced. However, our knowledge of the geohydrology, geochemistry, geophysics, and geomechanics of CO{sub 2} disposal must be refined if this technology is to be implemented safely, efficiently, and predictably. As a prelude to a fully coupled treatment of physical and chemical effects of CO{sub 2} injection, we have analyzed the impact of CO{sub 2} immobilization through carbonate precipitation. A survey of all major classes of rock-forming minerals, whose alteration would lead to carbonate precipitation, indicated that very few minerals are present in sufficient quantities in aquifer host rocks to permit significant sequestration of CO{sub 2}. We performed batch reaction modeling of the geochemical evolution of three different aquifer mineralogies in the presence of CO{sub 2} at high pressure. Our modeling considered (1) redox processes that could be important in deep subsurface environments, (2) the presence of organic matter, (3) the kinetics of chemical interactions between the host rock minerals and the aqueous phase, and (4) CO{sub 2} solubility dependence on pressure, temperature and salinity of the system. The geochemical evolution under both natural background and CO{sub 2} injection conditions was evaluated. In addition, changes in porosity were monitored during the simulations. Results indicate that CO{sub 2} sequestration by matrix minerals varies considerably with rock type. Under favorable conditions the amount of CO{sub 2} that may be sequestered by precipitation of secondary carbonates is comparable with and can be larger than the effect of CO{sub 2} dissolution in pore waters. The precipitation of ankerite and siderite is sensitive to the rate of reduction of ferric mineral precursors such as glauconite, which in turn is dependent on the reactivity of associated organic material. The accumulation of carbonates in the rock matrix and induced rock mineral alteration due to the presence of dissolved CO{sub 2} lead to a considerable decrease in porosity. The numerical experiments described here provide useful insight into sequestration mechanisms, and their controlling geochemical conditions and parameters.

Xu, Tianfu; Apps, John A.; Pruess, Karsten

2001-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

140

Multiphase Sequestration Geochemistry: Model for Mineral Carbonation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for Mineral Carbonation. Abstract: Carbonation of formation minerals converts low viscosity supercritical CO2 injected into deep saline reservoirs for geologic sequestration...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rock composition mineral" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Investigation of Mineral Transformations in Wet Supercritical...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mineral Transformations in Wet Supercritical CO2 by Electron Microscopy. Investigation of Mineral Transformations in Wet Supercritical CO2 by Electron Microscopy. Abstract: The...

142

PARKER-HEADGATE ROCK & PARKER-GILA  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PARKER-HEADGATE ROCK & PARKER-GILA 161-kV TRANSMISSION LINE Cross Arm Repair and Helicopter Staging Areas Figure 1. Project Location Project Location j PARKER-HEADGATE ROCK &...

143

Ionium Dating of Igneous Rocks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...1967009371 Local fractionation of uranium and thorium, between minerals...solidification by use of ionium and uranium. Results on samples of granite...Pollution Control, U.S. Public Health Service, Cincinnati, Ohio...solidification by use of ionium and uranium. Results on sam-ples of...

Kunihiko Kigoshi

1967-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

144

Color Tables for Mineral Identification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Fluorescent color can be a useful guide to mineral identification, and in some cases, it is the quickest and least expensive means. In the mines at Franklin and Ogdensburg, New Jersey, a portable battery opera...

Manuel Robbins

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Mssbauer Spectroscopy of Silicate Minerals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Silicate minerals are the commonest accessible materials on Earth. Thanks to the strong affinity of silicon for oxygen and the low density of the resulting oxides (3 g/cm3) compared with the average global densit...

J. M. D. Coey

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Rock Sampling At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski, Et Al., San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Rock Sampling At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location San Francisco Volcanic Field Area Exploration Technique Rock Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Northern Arizona University has re-assessed the existing exploration data, geologically mapped the target area, obtained rock samples for age dating and mineral chemistry, performed gravity and magnetic surveys, and integrated these results to identify potential drilling targets and sites. Further work may occur in 2004 or 2005. References N. R. Warpinski, A. R. Sattler, R. Fortuna, D. A. Sanchez, J.

147

Coke mineral transformations in the experimental blast furnace  

SciTech Connect

Blast furnace efficiency may be improved by optimizing coke reactivity. Some but not all forms of mineral matter in the coke modify its reactivity, but changes in mineral matter that occur within coke while in the blast furnace have not been fully quantified. To determine changes in mineral matter forms in the blast furnace, coke samples from a dissection study in the LKAB experimental blast furnace (EBF) were characterized using SEM/EDS analysis, EPMA (microprobe), and low-temperature ashing/quantitative XRD analysis. Variations in alkali concentration, particularly potassium, dominated the compositional changes. At high concentrations of potassium, the mineral matter was largely potassium-bearing but even more potassium was diffused throughout the coke and not associated with mineral matter. There was little difference in potassium concentration between the core and surface of the coke pieces, suggesting that potassium diffused rapidly through the whole coke. Iron, calcium, silicon, and aluminum concentrations were relatively constant in comparison, although the mineralogy of all elements changed significantly with changing temperature. 23 refs., 20 figs., 9 tabs.

Kelli Kazuberns; Sushil Gupta; Mihaela Grigore; David French; Richard Sakurovs; Mats Hallin; Bo Lindblom; Veena Sahajwalla [University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW (Australia). Cooperative Research Centre for Coal in Sustainable Development (CCSD)

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

148

Minerals leached into drinking water from rubber stoppers  

SciTech Connect

Drinking water and its delivery system are potential sources of variation in animal research. Concern arose that rubber stoppers used to cork water bottles might be a source of some nutritionally required minerals which could leach into drinking water. Six types of stoppers, each having different compositions, were cleaned with stainless-steel sipper tubes inserted into them and attached to polypropylene bottles filled with either deionized water (pH 4.5) or acidified-deionized water (pH 2.5). After six days of contact, water levels of copper, magnesium, iron, manganese, zinc, chromium, and selenium were determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy. Additionally, three of the stopper types were analyzed for mineral content. Minerals were present in both stoppers and drinking water. Acidified-deionized water generally leached minerals from the stoppers than did deionized water. The black stopper which is commonly used in animal facilities contained and leached measurable levels of some minerals, but it still can be recommended for typical animal husbandry uses, although other types of stoppers would be more suitable for specific nutritional and toxicologic studies.

Kennedy, B.W.; Beal, T.S. (Carbohydrate Nutrition Laboratory, Beltsville Human Nutrition Research Center, MD (United States))

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Rock magnetism of remagnetized carbonate rocks: another look MIKE JACKSON* & NICHOLAS L. SWANSON-HYSELL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rock magnetism of remagnetized carbonate rocks: another look MIKE JACKSON* & NICHOLAS L. SWANSON-HYSELL Institute for Rock Magnetism, Winchell School of Earth Sciences, University of Minnesota, Minnesota, US, dominantly in the super- paramagnetic and stable single-domain size range, also give rise to distinctive rock-magnetic

Swanson-Hysell, Nicholas

150

Geochemistry of hydrothermal fluids from Axial Seamount Hydrothermal Emissions Study vent field, Juan de Fuca Ridge: Subseafloor boiling and subsequent fluid-rock interaction  

SciTech Connect

Hydrothermal fluids collected from the ASHES vent field in 1986, 1987, and 1988 exhibit a very wide range of chemical composition over a small area ({approximately} 60 m in diameter). Compositions range from a 300C, gas-enriched (285 mmol/kg CO{sub 2}), low-chlorinity ({approximately} 33% of seawater) fluid to a 328C, relatively gas-depleted (50 mmol/kg CO{sub 2}), high-chlorinity ({approximately} 116% of seawater) fluid. The entire range of measured compositions at ASHES is best explained by a single hydrothermal fluid undergoing phase separation while rising through the ocean crust, followed by partial segregation of the vapor and brine phases. Other mechanisms proposed to produce chlorinity variations in hydrothermal fluids (precipitation/dissolution of a chloride-bearing mineral or crustal hydration) cannot produce the covariation of chlorinity and gas content observed at ASHES. There is good argument of the measured fluid compositions generated by a simple model of phase separation, in which gases are partitioned according to Henry's law and all salt remains in the liquid phase. Significant enrichments in silica, lithium and boron in the low-chlorinity fluids over levels predicted by the model are attributed to fluid-rock interaction in the upflow zone. Depletions in iron and calcium suggest that these elements have been removed by iron-sulfide and anhydrite precipitation at some time in the history of the low-chlorinity fluids. The distribution of low- and high-chlorinity venting is consistent with mechanisms of phase segregation based on differential buoyancy or relative permeability. The relatively shallow depth of the seafloor (1,540 m) and the observed chemistry of ASHES fluids are consistent with phase separation in the sub-critical or near-critical region.

Butterfield, D.A.; McDuff, R.E.; Lilley, M.D. (Univ. of Washington, Seattle (United States)); Massoth, G.J. (NOAA, Seattle, WA (United States)); Lupton, J.E. (Univ. of California, Santa Barbara (United States))

1990-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

151

Grain-scale thermoelastic stresses and spatiotemporal temperature gradients on airless bodies, implications for rock breakdown  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermomechanical processes such as fatigue and shock have been suggested to cause and contribute to rock breakdown on Earth, and on other planetary bodies, particularly airless bodies in the inner solar system. In this study, we modeled grain-scale stresses induced by diurnal temperature variations on simple microstructures made of pyroxene and plagioclase on various solar system bodies. We found that a heterogeneous microstructure on the Moon experiences peak tensile stresses on the order of 100 MPa. The stresses induced are controlled by the coefficient of thermal expansion and Young's modulus of the mineral constituents, and the average stress within the microstructure is determined by relative volume of each mineral. Amplification of stresses occurs at surface-parallel boundaries between adjacent mineral grains and at the tips of pore spaces. We also found that microscopic spatial and temporal surface temperature gradients do not correlate with high stresses, making them inappropriate proxies for investig...

Molaro, Jamie L; Langer, Steve A

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Improved process control through real-time measurement of mineral content  

SciTech Connect

In a highly collaborative research and development project with mining and university partners, sensors and data-analysis tools are being developed for rock-mass characterization and real-time measurement of mineral content. Determining mineralogy prior to mucking in an open-pit mine is important for routing the material to the appropriate processing stream. A possible alternative to lab assay of dust and cuttings obtained from drill holes is continuous on-line sampling and real-time x-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopy. Results presented demonstrate that statistical analyses combined with XRF data can be employed to identify minerals and, possibly, different rock types. The objective is to create a detailed three-dimensional mineralogical map in real time that would improve downstream process efficiency.

Turler, Daniel; Karaca, Murat; Davis, William B.; Giauque, Robert D.; Hopkins, Deborah

2001-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

153

Chapter 15 Mineral Resources and the Environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the materials. Responses to limited availability #12; Find more resources Find a substitute Recycle whatChapter 15 Mineral Resources and the Environment #12;Minerals found in a typical office #12; Mineral resources, human population, and modern society Resources and reserves Availability of mineral

Pan, Feifei

154

Dispersivity as an oil reservoir rock characteristic  

SciTech Connect

The main objective of this research project is to establish dispersivity, {alpha}{sub d}, as an oil reservoir rock characteristic and to use this reservoir rock property to enhance crude oil recovery. A second objective is to compare the dispersion coefficient and the dispersivity of various reservoir rocks with other rock characteristics such as: porosity, permeability, capillary pressure, and relative permeability. The dispersivity of a rock was identified by measuring the physical mixing of two miscible fluids, one displacing the other in a porous medium. 119 refs., 27 figs., 12 tabs.

Menzie, D.E.; Dutta, S.

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Predicting the transport properties of sedimentary rocks from microgeometry  

SciTech Connect

We investigate through analysis and experiment how pore geometry, topology, and the physics and chemistry of mineral-fluid and fluid-fluid interactions affect the flow of fluids through consolidated/partially consolidated porous media. Our approach is to measure fluid permeability and electrical conductivity of rock samples using single and multiple fluid phases that can be frozen in place (wetting and nonwetting) over a range of pore pressures. These experiments are analyzed in terms of the microphysics and microchemistry of the processes involved to provide a theoretical basis for the macroscopic constitutive relationships between fluid-flow and geophysical properties that we develop. The purpose of these experiments and their analyses is to advance the understanding of the mechanisms and factors that control fluid transport in porous media. This understanding is important in characterizing porous media properties and heterogeneities before simulating and monitoring the progress of complex flow processes at the field scale in permeable media.

Schlueter, E.M.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Predicting the transport properties of sedimentary rocks from microgeometry  

SciTech Connect

The author investigates through analysis and experiment how pore geometry, topology, and the physics and chemistry of mineral-fluid and fluid-fluid interactions affect the flow of fluids through consolidated/partially consolidated porous media. The approach is to measure fluid permeability and electrical conductivity of rock samples using single and multiple fluid phases that can be frozen in place (wetting and nonwetting) over a range of pore pressures. These experiments are analyzed in terms of the microphysics and microchemistry of the processes involved to provide a theoretical basis for the macroscopic constitutive relationships between fluid-flow and geophysical properties that the authors develop. The purpose of these experiments and their analyses is to advance the understanding of the mechanisms and factors that control fluid transport in porous media. This understanding is important in characterizing porous media properties and heterogeneities before simulating and monitoring the progress of complex flow processes at the field scale in permeable media.

Schlueter, E.M.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

CRYSTAL CHEMISTRY OF HYDROUS MINERALS  

SciTech Connect

Hydrogen has long been appreciated for its role in geological processes of the Earth's crust. However, its role in Earth's deep interior has been neglected in most geophysical thinking. Yet it is now believed that most of our planet's hydrogen may be locked up in high pressure phases of hydrous silicate minerals within the Earth's mantle. This rocky interior (approximately 7/8 of Earth's volume) is conjectured to contain 1-2 orders of magnitude more water than the more obvious oceans (the ''hydrosphere'') and atmosphere. This project is aimed at using the capability of neutron scattering from hydrogen to study the crystal chemistry and stability of hydrogen-bearing minerals at high pressures and temperatures. At the most basic level this is a study of the atomic position and hydrogen bond itself. We have conducted experimental runs on hydrous minerals under high pressure and high temperature conditions. The crystallographic structure of hydrous minerals at extreme conditions and its structural stability, and hydrogen bond at high P-T conditions are the fundamental questions to be addressed. The behavior of the hydrous minerals in the deep interior of the Earth has been discussed.

Y. ZHAO; ET AL

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Influence of rock mass fracturing on the net penetration rates of hard rock \\{TBMs\\}  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Penetration rates during excavation using hard rock tunnel boring machines (TBMs) are significantly influenced by the degree of fracturing of the rock mass. In the NTNU prediction model for hard rock TBM performance and costs, the rock mass fracturing factor (ks) is used to include the influence of rock mass fractures. The rock mass fracturing factor depends on the degree of fracturing, fracture type, fracture spacing, and the angle between fracture systems and the tunnel axis. In order to validate the relationship between the degree of fracturing and the net penetration rate of hard rock TBMs, field work has been carried out, consisting of geological back-mapping and analysis of performance data from a TBM tunnel. The rock mass influence on hard rock TBM performance prediction is taken into account in the NTNU model. Different correlations between net penetration rate and the fracturing factor (ks) have been identified for a variety of ks values.

F.J. Macias; P.D. Jakobsen; Y. Seo; A. Bruland

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Mechanical defradation of Emplacement Drifts at Yucca Mountain- A Modeling Case Study. Part I: Nonlithophysal Rock  

SciTech Connect

This paper outlines rock mechanics investigations associated with mechanical degradation of planned emplacement drifts at Yucca Mountain, which is the designated site for the proposed U.S. high-level nuclear waste repository. The factors leading to drift degradation include stresses from the overburden, stresses induced by the heat released from the emplaced waste, stresses due to seismically related ground motions, and time-dependent strength degradation. The welded tuff emplacement horizon consists of two groups of rock with distinct engineering properties: nonlithophysal units and lithophysal units, based on the relative proportion of lithophysal cavities. The term 'lithophysal' refers to hollow, bubble like cavities in volcanic rock that are surrounded by a porous rim formed by fine-grained alkali feldspar, quartz, and other minerals. Lithophysae are typically a few centimeters to a few decimeters in diameter. Part I of the paper concentrates on the generally hard, strong, and fractured nonlithophysal rock. The degradation behavior of the tunnels in the nonlithophysal rock is controlled by the occurrence of keyblocks. A statistically equivalent fracture model was generated based on extensive underground fracture mapping data from the Exploratory Studies Facility at Yucca Mountain. Three-dimensional distinct block analyses, generated with the fracture patterns randomly selected from the fracture model, were developed with the consideration of in situ, thermal, and seismic loads. In this study, field data, laboratory data, and numerical analyses are well integrated to provide a solution for the unique problem of modeling drift degradation.

M. Lin; D. Kicker; B. Damjanac; M. Board; M. Karakouzian

2006-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

160

Chapter 5 - Coal Composition and Reservoir Characterization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Coal consists of organic and mineral matter. Fixed carbon from organic matter measures the energy output of coal during combustion. Mineral matter determines how coal responds to combustion and affects reservoir porosity and permeability. Minerals infill pores, cleats, or fractures and replace the organic composition of coal. Organic composition is grouped into maceral association as microlithotypes and macrolithotypes, the latter for megascopic field descriptions (e.g. coal cores and mine face). Coal composition controls reservoir properties such as gas adsorption capacity, gas content, porosity, and permeability. Permeability is important to gas transport from coal matrix pores to the production well. Coal permeability is a function of the width, length, and height of cleats or fractures as well as the aperture, spacing, frequency or density, and connectivity of cleats or fractures. Coal cleats or fractures formed during burial, compaction, and coalification (endogenetic) and after coalification during deformation, uplift, and erosion of the basin of deposition.

Romeo M. Flores

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rock composition mineral" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

2018 MAX-C/EXOMARS MISSION: THE ORLEANS MARS-ANALOGUE ROCK COLLECTION FOR INSTRUMENT TESTING. N. Bost1,2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Svalbard (Norway) with carbonate concretions in vesi- cules, and hydrothermal calcareous exhalite crusts) Hydrothermal carbonate (exhalite on the Svalbard basalt). Methods : Textural and compositional information nontronite. Some of the rocks have been subjected to hydrothermal alteration (silicifica- tion) and some

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

162

Analysis of Mineral Trapping for CO2 Disposal in Deep Aquifers  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Reactive Geochemical Transport Simulation to Study Mineral Trapping Reactive Geochemical Transport Simulation to Study Mineral Trapping for CO 2 Disposal in Deep Saline Arenaceous Aquifers Tianfu Xu, John A. Apps, and Karsten Pruess Earth Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA Abstract. A reactive fluid flow and geochemical transport numerical model for evaluating long-term CO 2 disposal in deep aquifers has been developed. Using this model, we performed a number of sensitivity simulations under CO 2 injection conditions for a commonly encountered Gulf Coast sediment to analyze the impact of CO 2 immobilization through carbonate precipitation. Geochemical models are needed because alteration of the predominant host rock aluminosilicate minerals is very slow and is not

163

GEOLOGY AND MINERAL PARAGENESIS STUDY WITHIN THE COSO-EGS PROJECT | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MINERAL PARAGENESIS STUDY WITHIN THE COSO-EGS PROJECT MINERAL PARAGENESIS STUDY WITHIN THE COSO-EGS PROJECT Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: GEOLOGY AND MINERAL PARAGENESIS STUDY WITHIN THE COSO-EGS PROJECT Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Coso Geothermal Field is a large, high temperature system located in California on the western edge of the Basin and Range province. The East Flank of this field is currently under study as a DOE-funded Enhanced Geothermal Systems project. The reservoir rocks generally consist of a complex, interfingering sequence of diorite, granodiorite, and granite. The diorites show weak to strong alteration representing multiple hydrothermal events. The work described here was undertaken to evaluate the geology and thermal history of the East Flank, in order to better

164

Big Bang Day : Physics Rocks  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Is particle physics the new rock 'n' roll? The fundamental questions about the nature of the universe that particle physics hopes to answer have attracted the attention of some very high profile and unusual fans. Alan Alda, Ben Miller, Eddie Izzard, Dara O'Briain and John Barrowman all have interests in this branch of physics. Brian Cox - CERN physicist, and former member of 90's band D:Ream, tracks down some very well known celebrity enthusiasts and takes a light-hearted look at why this subject can appeal to all of us.

None

2011-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

165

Paradox of Peroxy Defects and Positive Holes in Rocks Part II: Outflow of Electric Currents from Stressed Rocks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Understanding the electrical properties of rocks is of fundamental interest. We report on currents generated when stresses are applied. Loading the center of gabbro tiles, 30x30x0.9 cm$^3$, across a 5 cm diameter piston, leads to positive currents flowing from the center to the unstressed edges. Changing the constant rate of loading over 5 orders of magnitude from 0.2 kPa/s to 20 MPa/s produces positive currents, which start to flow already at low stress levels, <5 MPa. The currents increase as long as stresses increase. At constant load they flow for hours, days, even weeks and months, slowly decreasing with time. When stresses are removed, they rapidly disappear but can be made to reappear upon reloading. These currents are consistent with the stress-activation of peroxy defects, such as O$_3$Si-OO-SiO$_3$, in the matrix of rock-forming minerals. The peroxy break-up leads to positive holes h$^{\\bullet}$, i.e. electronic states associated with O$^-$ in a matrix of O$^{2-}$, plus electrons, e'. Propagating...

Scoville, John; Freund, Friedemann

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Mineral County Secondary Data Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

prevalence (Heart Attack) 4.0% 4.1% 6.0% All Sites Cancer 466.5 455.5 543.2 1 Community Health Data, MT2 1. Cancer 2. Heart Disease 3. Unintentional Injuries**, CLRD*, Cerebrovascular Disease 1. Cancer 2. Heart Disease 3.CLRD* 1. Heart Disease 2. Cancer 3. CLRD* #12; Mineral County

Maxwell, Bruce D.

167

THE INTERNATIONAL RELATIONSHIP OF MINERALS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...ap-plied to China. Assuming that China may yet become a homogeneous...If they agree in refusing to export mineral products to those countries...learned, it is easier to stop exports than to prevent imports: the customs' officer is more...

Thomas Holland

1929-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

168

Institute for Mineral and Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The University of Adelaide is unique within Australia for its strong research and teaching groups in geology fields of research are: · Earth Sciences ­ geology; geochemistry; geo-sequestration; geophysics to 10 per cent per annum while other minerals such as uranium and rare earth elements will become

169

Rock Energy Cooperative (Illinois) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Cooperative (Illinois) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Rock Energy Cooperative Place: Illinois References: EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File220101 EIA...

170

LOW TEMPERATURE GEOTHERMAL MINERAL RECOVERY PROGRAM 02/11/2014...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

LOW TEMPERATURE GEOTHERMAL MINERAL RECOVERY PROGRAM 02112014 LOW TEMPERATURE GEOTHERMAL MINERAL RECOVERY PROGRAM 02112014 mineral-webinar.pdf More Documents & Publications LOW...

171

Mineral Transformation and Biomass Accumulation Associated With  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mineral Transformation and Biomass Accumulation Associated With Uranium Bioremediation at Rifle transformation and biomass accumulation, both of which can alter the flow field and potentially bioremediation to understand the biogeochemical processes and to quantify the biomass and mineral transformation/ accumulation

Hubbard, Susan

172

Remote Sensing of Soils, Minerals, and Geomorphology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

,Remote Sensing of Soils, Minerals, and GeomorphologyMinerals, and Geomorphology · Soil is unconsolidated material). ·· SoilSoil is unconsolidated material at the surface of the Earth thatis unconsolidated material

173

Minerals Associated with Biofilms Occurring on Exposed Rock in a Granitic Underground Research Laboratory  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...biofilm (ED). (A) Borehole 130; (B) ventilation...similar to those found in borehole 130 were also seen...originally been used for drilling and construction activities...floor, so when the borehole was excavated it provided...B-polyhydroxybutyrate (identified by large size and by C and 0...

D. Ann Brown; D. Choudari Kamineni; Jerzy A. Sawicki; Terry J. Beveridge

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Eagle Rock Geothermal Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Eagle Rock Geothermal Facility Eagle Rock Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Eagle Rock Geothermal Facility General Information Name Eagle Rock Geothermal Facility Facility Eagle Rock Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Location The Geysers, California Coordinates 38.826770222484°, -122.80002593994° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.826770222484,"lon":-122.80002593994,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

175

Definition: Rock Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sampling Sampling Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Rock Sampling Systematic rock sampling can be used to characterize a geothermal reservoir. The physical and chemical properties of rock samples provide important information for determining whether a power generation or heat utilization facility can be developed. Some general rock properties can be measured by visual inspection, but detailed properties require laboratory techniques. View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition A core sample is a cylindrical section of (usually) a naturally occurring substance. Most core samples are obtained by drilling with special drills into the substance, for example sediment or rock, with a hollow steel tube called a core drill. The hole made for the core sample is called the "core hole". A variety of core samplers exist to sample

176

Reduction of jarosite by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and secondary mineralization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Jarosite is a common mineral in a variety of environments formed by the oxidation of iron sulfide normally accompanying with the generation of acid mine drainage (AMD) in mining areas or acid rock drainages (ARD) in many localities. Decomposition of jarosite by dissimilatory iron reducing bacteria (DIRB) influences the mobility of many heavy metals generally accommodated in natural jarosite. This study examined the anaerobic reduction of synthesized jarosite by Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1, a typical facultative bacteria. The release of ferrous and ferric ion, as well as sulfate and potassium, in the inoculated experimental group lasting 80 days is much higher than that in abiotic control groups. The detection of bicarbonate and acetate in experimental solution further confirms the mechanism of microbial reduction of jarosite, in which lactate acts as the electron donor. The produced ferrous iron stimulates the subsequent secondary mineralization, leading to precipitation and transformation of various iron-containing minerals. Green rust and goethite are the intermediate minerals of the microbial reduction process under anoxic conditions, and the end products include magnetite and siderite. In aerobic environments, goethite, magnetite and siderite were also detected, but the contents were relatively lower. While in abiotic experiments, only goethite has been detected as a product. Thus, the microbial reduction and subsequent mineral transformation can remarkably influence the geochemical cycling of iron and sulfur in supergene environments, as well as the mobility of heavy metals commonly accommodated in jarosite.

Ouyang Bingjie; Lu Xiancai; Liu Huan; Li Juan; Zhu Tingting; Zhu Xiangyu; Lu Jianjun; Wang Rucheng

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Rock Sampling At U.S. West Region (Krohn, Et Al., 1993) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

U.S. West Region (Krohn, Et Al., 1993) U.S. West Region (Krohn, Et Al., 1993) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Rock Sampling At U.S. West Region (Krohn, Et Al., 1993) Exploration Activity Details Location U.S. West Region Exploration Technique Rock Sampling Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Over 30 disseminated gold or hot-spring deposits in the western U.S. were sampled for ammonium-bearing minerals during field reconnaissance studies (Figs. l and 2). Wholerock samples, approximately 3 cm across, were collected from primarily feldspathic or argillaceous lithologies and measured on a laboratory near-infrared spectrometer (Krohn and Altaner, 1987). References M. Dennis Krohn, Carol Kendall, John R. Evans, Terry L. Fries (1993)

178

Rock Sampling At The Needles Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2005) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

The Needles Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2005) The Needles Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Rock Sampling At The Needles Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location The Needles Area Exploration Technique Rock Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Over 2000 km2 of 5-m resolution Hymap hyperspectral data was acquired in 2004. Subsequent image processing and data analysis has identified reflectance spectra for alunite, kaolinite/halloysite, illite, gypsum, vegetation, and carbonate. A portable spectrometer is being used for in situ validation, along with laboratory measurements and x-ray diffraction analyses of samples collected in teh field. We are in the process of producing and validating mineral maps that will be used to narrow the scope

179

Nano-mechanical properties of individual mineralized collagen fibrils from bone tissue  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...research-article Research articles 1004 25 27 131 Nano-mechanical properties of individual mineralized...phenomenological model is used to describe the fibril nano-mechanical behaviour. biomechanics...materials. Bone is structurally a composite as nano-fibres of CFs act as a template for the...

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Slick Rock Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Soil & Groundwater Master Reports Slick Rock - Old North Continent Slick Rock - Union Carbide More Documents & Publications South Valley Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rock composition mineral" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Method for obtaining gelled hydrocarbon compositions, the compositions according to said method and their application in the hydraulic fracturing of underground formations  

SciTech Connect

The invention relates to a method for obtaining gelled hydrocarbon compositions, and their application in the hydraulic fracturing of rocks. The gelling method according to the invention uses as an activator a partially neutralized aluminum acid salt.

Daccord, G.; Lemanczyk, R.; Vercaemer, C.

1985-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

182

Utilization of coal-associated minerals. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Under contract number DE-AS21-77ET10533 with the US-DOE several methods of utilizing coal associated by-products were examined for potential commercial use. Such use could transform a costly waste disposal situation into new materials for further use and could provide incentive for the adoption of new coal utilization processes. Several utilization processes appear to have merit and are recommended for further study. Each process is discussed separately in the text of this report. Common coal cleaning processes were also examined to determine the effect of such processes on the composition of by-products. Data obtained in this portion of the research effort are reported in the Appendix. Information of this type is required before utilization processes can be considered. A knowledge of the mineral composition of these materials is also required before even simple disposal methods can be considered.

Slonaker, J. F.; Akers, D. J.; Alderman, J. K.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field Investigations Of In Situ Geochemical Behavior Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field Investigations Of In Situ Geochemical Behavior Details Activities (5) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: Two hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal energy reservoirs have been created by hydraulic fracturing of Precambrian granitic rock between two wells on the west flank of the Valles Caldera in the Jemez Mountains of northern New Mexico. Heat is extracted by injecting water into one well,

184

Rock of Ages | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of Ages of Ages Jump to: navigation, search Name Rock of Ages Facility Rock of Ages Sector Wind energy Facility Type Small Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Rock of Ages Energy Purchaser Rock of Ages Location Graniteville VT Coordinates 44.14668574°, -72.48180896° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.14668574,"lon":-72.48180896,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

185

Definition: Isotopic Analysis- Rock | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis- Rock Isotopic Analysis- Rock Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Isotopic Analysis- Rock Isotopes are atoms of the same element that have different numbers of neutrons. An isotopic analysis looks at a particular isotopic element(s) in a given system, while the conditions which increase/decrease the number of neutrons are well understood and measurable.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition References ↑ http://wwwrcamnl.wr.usgs.gov/isoig/isopubs/itchch2.html Ret LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. rieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Isotopic_Analysis-_Rock&oldid=687702" Category: Definitions What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties

186

Thermophysical properties of the Po Basin rocks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......7 per cent. 4.2.2 Anisotropic rocks Anisotropy of shales, silty shales and siltstones...dolomites). Horizons of shales, silty shales and siltstones are present...the presence of thermally anisotropic sheet silicates, note that......

V. Pasquale; G. Gola; P. Chiozzi; M. Verdoya

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Winner: Hot Rocks | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers (EERE)

a catch. Only a couple of EGS projects have ever produced power, and those are in Germany and France, where the rock is considerably more pliant than Australia's granite...

188

Silicate Production and Availability for Mineral Carbonation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

(2, 3) Through mineral carbonation, the weathering of silicate minerals on land and the precipitation of carbonates in oceans is a natural negative feedback mechanism that stabilizes the Earths climate over geological time scales. ... The existence of Greek specifications of RCA, the European ones will come much later, will help Olympic Games 2004 to be as "green" as possible. ... The minerals calcite, feldspar, lime and periclase are present in ashes derived from Polish coal and/or woodchips. ...

P. Renforth; C.-L. Washbourne; J. Taylder; D. A. C. Manning

2011-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

189

Parageneses and Crystal Chemistry of Arsenic Minerals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...minerals identified in this paragenesis. Talmessite, annabergite, kottigite, hornesite...sainfeldite/ fluckite, villyaellenite, talmessite, annabergite, kottigite, parasymplesite...conichalcite, mimetite, olivenite, talmessite and yukonite (Dietrich 1960; Smolyaninova...

Juraj Majzlan; Petr Drahota; Michal Filippi

190

altered sedimentary rocks: Topics by E-print Network  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the sulfides suggest that sulfidization occurred before uranium mineralization. Initial uranium precipitation took place in secondary titanium minerals as well as in mud clasts...

191

ChemCam rock laser for Mars Science Laboratory "Curiosity"  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Los Alamos has a long history of space-related instruments, tied primarily to its role in defense-related treaty verification. Space-based detectors have helped determine the differences between signals from lightning bolts and potential nuclear explosions. LANL-developed gamma-ray detection instruments first revealed the existence of what we now know as gamma-ray bursts, an exciting area of astrophysical research. And the use of LANL instruments on varied space missions continues with such products as the ChemCam rock laser for NASA, shown here. The Engineering Model of the ChemCam Mars Science Laboratory rover instrument arrived at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory on February 6, 2008. The Flight Model was shipped in August, 2010 for installation on the rover at JPL. ChemCam will use imaging and laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) to determine rock and soil compositions on Mars, up to 9 meters from the rover. The engineering model is being integrated into the rover test bed for the development and testing of the rover software. The actual flight model components were concurrently assembled at Los Alamos and in Toulouse, France. The Mars Science Laboratory is scheduled to launch in 2011. Animations courtesy of JPL/NASA.

Wiens, Roger

2014-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

192

A LANL Scientist's Dream Takes Off to Zap Rocks on Mars  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Roger Wiens, with a team of 40 people at Los Alamos National Laboratory and the collaboration of the French space institute IRAP, created ChemCam, a laser spectrometer and telescope device aboard the Curiosity rover. ChemCam will blast rocks from as far as 7 meters, vaporize bits of their surfaces, and spectroscopically determine their chemical composition, aiding in the search for life on Mars, and making this scientist's boyhood dream a reality.

Wiens, Roger

2012-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

193

Development of Chemical Model to Predict the Interactions between Supercritical CO2and Fluid, and Rocks in EGS Reservoirs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This project will develop a chemical model, based on existing models and databases, that is capable of simulating chemical reactions between supercritical (SC) CO2 and Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) reservoir rocks of various compositions in aqueous, non-aqueous and 2-phase environments.

194

Adsorption of VOCs from the Gas Phase to Different Minerals and a Mineral Mixture  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Adsorption of VOCs from the Gas Phase to Different Minerals and a Mineral Mixture ... Here adsorption to three well-defined minerals (hematite, corundum, and lime) was studied by a chromatographic method. ... (39)?Suzuki, S.; Green, P. G.; Bumgarner, R. E.; Dasgupta, S.; Goddard, W. A.; Blake, G. A. Science 1992, 257, 942?945. ...

Kai-Uwe Goss; Steven J. Eisenreich

1996-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

195

Viscosity Problems in Igneous Rocks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The earth's magma a siliceous melt which is believed to underlie the entire solid crust of the earth is in all probability a highly viscous liquid. Wherever molten lava is observed in motion either in craters of volcanoes (Kilauea Mauna Loa Hawaii) or as disastrous flows which descend volcanic mountains (Vesuvius Mount Aetna etc.) or in the vicinity of volcanic fissures (Laki Eldgja rift Iceland) it behaves like a liquid of appreciable viscosity; the degree of viscosity however varies depending on the proportion of admixed gases and water vapor and the chemical composition of the lava. Lavas rich in silica are highly viscous (rhyolite dacite) while those rich in iron and magnesium (basalt andesite) are more fluid. The viscosity of every lava flow increases until the melt slowly freezes because of the chilling effect of the surface temperatures on the earth.

Robert Balk

1932-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Energy and Mineral Development in Indian Country  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Rocky Mountain Mineral Law Foundation is hosting the Special Institute on Energy and Mineral Development in Indian Country. This two-day conference will cover laws, policies, and practices regarding natural resources development in Indian Country and how they've evolved in the recent years.

197

Mineral Soils as Carriers for Rhizobium Inoculants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...looked healthier and greener than the uninoculated...example, when peat-lime pelleted clover seeds...rhizobia survive better in mineral soil-based inoculant...inoculated plants were greener and looked healthier...ENVIRON. MICROBIOL. MINERAL SOILS AS CARRIERS FOR...

W.-L. Chao; Martin Alexander

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

The Crystal Chemistry of Sulfate Minerals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...arsenate and phosphate minerals, and is the basis of the minerals of the brandtite, Ca2[Mn2+(AsO4)2(H2O)2], talmessite, Ca2[Mg(AsO4)2(H2O)2], and fairfieldite, Ca2[Mn2+ (PO4)2(H2O)2], groups (Hawthorne 1985a). Krausite...

Frank C. Hawthorne; Sergey V. Krivovichev; Peter C. Burns

199

The Crystal Chemistry of the Phosphate Minerals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Crystallogr B33:3449-3452 Catti M, Ferraris G, Ivaldi G (1977c) Hydrogen bondng in the crystalline state. Structure of talmessite, Ca2(Mg,Co)(AsO4)2 2H2O, and crystal chemistry of related minerals. Bull Mineral 100:230-236 Catti M, Ferraris...

Danielle M.C. Huminicki; Frank C. Hawthorne

200

Nevada Division of Minerals | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nevada Division of Minerals Nevada Division of Minerals Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Nevada Division of Minerals Name Nevada Division of Minerals Address 400 W. King St. #106 Place Carson City, Nevada Zip 89703 Website http://minerals.state.nv.us/ Coordinates 39.16409°, -119.7699779° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.16409,"lon":-119.7699779,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rock composition mineral" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Electrode compositions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrode composition is described for use as an electrode in a non-aqueous battery system. The electrode composition contains an electrically active powder in a solid polymer and, as a dispersant, a C{sub 8}-C{sub 15} alkyl capped oligomer of a hexanoic acid that is electrochemically inert at 2.5--4.5 volts.

Block, J.; Fan, X.

1998-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

202

Mineral associations in coal and their transformation during gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The principle aim of this investigation was to determine the effect that minerals and mineral associations in dense medium coal fractions have on the ash fusion temperature (AFT) of coal, where the mineral matter...

F. B. Waanders; A. Govender

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Documentation and evaluation of Mssbauer data for minerals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

More than 2,500 Mssbauer spectroscopic studies on minerals have been published since 1960. These papers contain approximately 8,000 sets of Mssbauer mineral data on at least 400 different minerals. This info...

John G. Stevens; Airat Khasanov; J. William Miller; Herman Pollak

204

Rock-brine chemical interactions. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The results of experimental interaction of powdered volcanic rock with aqueous solutions are presented at temperatures from 200 to 400/sup 0/C, 500 to 1000 bars fluid pressure, with reaction durations of approximately 30 days under controlled laboratory conditions. The aim of this research is to develop data on the kinetics and equilibria of rock solution interactions that will provide insight into the complex geochemical processes attending geothermal reservoir development, stimulation, and reinjection. The research was done in the Stanford Hydrothermal Lab using gold cell equipment of the Dickson design. This equipment inverts the solution rock mixture several times a minute to ensure thorough mixing. Solution samples were periodically withdrawn without interruption of the experimental conditions. The data from these experiments suggests a path dependent series of reactions by which geothermal fluids might evolve from meteoric or magmatic sources.

Not Available

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Category:Little Rock, AR | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AR AR Jump to: navigation, search Go Back to PV Economics By Location Media in category "Little Rock, AR" The following 16 files are in this category, out of 16 total. SVFullServiceRestaurant Little Rock AR Entergy Arkansas Inc.png SVFullServiceRestauran... 71 KB SVHospital Little Rock AR Entergy Arkansas Inc.png SVHospital Little Rock... 69 KB SVLargeHotel Little Rock AR Entergy Arkansas Inc.png SVLargeHotel Little Ro... 70 KB SVLargeOffice Little Rock AR Entergy Arkansas Inc.png SVLargeOffice Little R... 71 KB SVMediumOffice Little Rock AR Entergy Arkansas Inc.png SVMediumOffice Little ... 68 KB SVMidriseApartment Little Rock AR Entergy Arkansas Inc.png SVMidriseApartment Lit... 70 KB SVOutPatient Little Rock AR Entergy Arkansas Inc.png SVOutPatient Little Ro...

206

Ordovician petroleum source rocks and aspects of hydrocarbon generation in Canadian portion of Williston basin  

SciTech Connect

Accumulation of rich petroleum source rocks - starved bituminous mudrocks in both the Winnipeg Formation (Middle Ordovician) and Bighorn Group (Upper Ordovician) - is controlled by cyclical deepening events with a frequency of approximately 2 m.y. Tectonics control both this frequency and the location of starved subbasins of source rock accumulation. Deepening cycles initiated starvation of offshore portions of the inner detrital and medial carbonate facies belts. Persistence of starved offshore settings was aided by marginal onlap and strandline migration in the inner detrital facies belt, and by low carbonate productivity in the medial carbonate facies belt. Low carbonate productivity was accompanied by high rates of planktonic productivity. Periodic anoxia, as a consequence of high rates of planktonic organic productivity accompanying wind-driven equatorial upwellings, is the preferred mechanism for suppressing carbonate productivity within the epeiric sea. The planktonic, although problematic, form Gloecapsamorpha prisca Zalesskey 1917 is the main contributing organism to source rock alginites. A long-ranging alga (Cambrian to Silurian), it forms kukersites in Middle and Upper Ordovician rocks of the Williston basin as a consequence of environmental controls - starvation and periodic anoxia. Source rocks composed of this organic matter type generate oils of distinctive composition at relatively high levels of thermal maturity (transformation ratio = 10% at 0.78% R/sub o/). In the Canadian portion of the Williston basin, such levels of thermal maturity occur at present depths greater than 2950 m within a region of geothermal gradient anomalies associated with the Nesson anticline. Approximately 193 million bbl (30.7 x 10/sup 6/ m/sup 3/) of oil has been expelled into secondary migration pathways from thermally mature source rocks in the Canadian portion of the basin.

Osadetz, K.G.; Snowdon, L.R.

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Determining Individual Mineral Contributions To U(VI) Adsorption...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Individual Mineral Contributions To U(VI) Adsorption In A Contaminated Aquifer Sediment: A Fluorescence Spectroscopy Determining Individual Mineral Contributions To U(VI)...

208

V-215: NetworkMiner Directory Traversal and Insecure Library...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

5: NetworkMiner Directory Traversal and Insecure Library Loading Vulnerabilities V-215: NetworkMiner Directory Traversal and Insecure Library Loading Vulnerabilities August 9, 2013...

209

Mineral Recovery Creates Revenue Stream for Geothermal Energy...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Mineral Recovery Creates Revenue Stream for Geothermal Energy Development Mineral Recovery Creates Revenue Stream for Geothermal Energy Development January 21, 2014 - 12:00am...

210

ITP Mining: Mining Industry of the Future Mineral Processing...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of the Future Mineral Processing Technology Roadmap ITP Mining: Mining Industry of the Future Mineral Processing Technology Roadmap mptroadmap.pdf More Documents & Publications ITP...

211

Biotic and abiotic pathways of phosphorus cycling in minerals...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and abiotic pathways of phosphorus cycling in minerals and sediments: insights from oxygen isotopes in phosphate. Biotic and abiotic pathways of phosphorus cycling in minerals...

212

Mineral Salt: A Source of Costly Energy?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...chemically precipitated rocks conversion economics energy sources evaporites pollution...principle, any reversible process of desalination can generate power in re-verse (that...salination). One of the most efficient desalination processes de-veloped is vapor compression...

W. GARY WILLIAMS

1979-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

213

Rim Rock Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rim Rock Wind Farm Rim Rock Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Rim Rock Wind Farm Facility Rim Rock Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NaturEner Developer NaturEner Energy Purchaser San Diego Gas & Electric Location Glacier and Toole Counties MT Coordinates 48.779564°, -112.061291° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":48.779564,"lon":-112.061291,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

214

Storage capacity in hot dry rock reservoirs  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of extracting thermal energy, in a cyclic manner, from geologic strata which may be termed hot dry rock. A reservoir comprised of hot fractured rock is established and water or other liquid is passed through the reservoir. The water is heated by the hot rock, recovered from the reservoir, cooled by extraction of heat by means of heat exchange apparatus on the surface, and then re-injected into the reservoir to be heated again. Water is added to the reservoir by means of an injection well and recovered from the reservoir by means of a production well. Water is continuously provided to the reservoir and continuously withdrawn from the reservoir at two different flow rates, a base rate and a peak rate. Increasing water flow from the base rate to the peak rate is accomplished by rapidly decreasing backpressure at the outlet of the production well in order to meet periodic needs for amounts of thermal energy greater than a baseload amount, such as to generate additional electric power to meet peak demands. The rate of flow of water provided to the hot dry rock reservoir is maintained at a value effective to prevent depletion of the liquid

Brown, Donald W. (Los Alamos, NM)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Thermophysical properties of the Po Basin rocks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......W.E., AAPG, Memoir 1. Hadgu T. , Clinton C.L., Bean J.E., 2007. Determination of heat capacity of Yucca Mountain stratigraphic layer, Int. J. Rock Mech. Min. Sci., 44, 1022-1034. Hamilton E. , 1976. Variations of density......

V. Pasquale; G. Gola; P. Chiozzi; M. Verdoya

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Hot-dry-rock geothermal resource 1980  

SciTech Connect

The work performed on hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal resource evaluation, site characterization, and geophysical exploration techniques is summarized. The work was done by region (Far West, Pacific Northwest, Southwest, Rocky Mountain States, Midcontinent, and Eastern) and limited to the conterminous US.

Heiken, G.; Goff, F.; Cremer, G. (ed.)

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

E-Print Network 3.0 - archean metavolcanic rocks Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(Krner, 1985). However, the tectonic setting and age of metavolcanic rocks in Egypt are poorly... metavolcanic rocks. Metavolcanic rocks in Egypt were described by...

218

Hydride compositions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed are a composition for use in storing hydrogen and a method for making the composition. The composition comprises a mixture of two or more hydrides, each hydride having a different series of hydrogen sorption isotherms that contribute to the overall isotherms of the mixture. The hydrides are chosen so that the isotherms of the mixture have regions wherein the H equilibrium pressure increases with increasing hydrogen, preferably linearly. The isotherms of the mixture can be adjusted by selecting hydrides with different isotherms and by varying the amounts of the individual hydrides, or both. Preferably, the mixture is made up of hydrides that have isotherms with substantially flat plateaus and in nearly equimolar amounts. The composition is activated by degassing, exposing to H, and then heating below the softening temperature of any of the constituents. When the composition is used to store hydrogen, its hydrogen content can be found simply by measuring P{sub H}{sub 2} and determining H/M from the isothermic function of the composition.

Lee, Myung, W.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Hydride compositions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A composition for use in storing hydrogen, and a method for making the composition. The composition comprises a mixture of two or more hydrides, each hydride having a different series of hydrogen sorption isotherms that contribute to the overall isotherms of the mixture. The hydrides are chosen so that the isotherms of the mixture have regions wherein the hydrogen equilibrium pressure increases with increasing hydrogen, preferably linearly. The isotherms of the mixture can be adjusted by selecting hydrides with different isotherms and by varying the amounts of the individual hydrides, or both. Preferably, the mixture is made up of hydrides that have isotherms with substantially flat plateaus and in nearly equimolar amounts. The composition is activated by degassing, exposing to hydrogen and then heating at a temperature below the softening temperature of any of the. constituents so that their chemical and structural integrity is preserved. When the composition is used to store hydrogen, its hydrogen content can be found simply by measuring P.sub.H.sbsb.2 and determining H/M from the isothermic function of the composition.

Lee, Myung W. (North Augusta, SC)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

MINERALIZATION OF RADIOACTIVE WASTES BY FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMING (FBSR): COMPARISONS TO VITREOUS WASTE FORMS, AND PERTINENT DURABILITY TESTING  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested to generate a document for the Washington State Department of Ecology and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency that would cover the following topics: (1) A description of the mineral structures produced by Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) of Hanford type Low Activity Waste (LAW including LAWR which is LAW melter recycle waste) waste, especially the cage structured minerals and how they are formed. (2) How the cage structured minerals contain some contaminants, while others become part of the mineral structure (Note that all contaminants become part of the mineral structure and this will be described in the subsequent sections of this report). (3) Possible contaminant release mechanisms from the mineral structures. (4) Appropriate analyses to evaluate these release mechanisms. (5) Why the appropriate analyses are comparable to the existing Hanford glass dataset. In order to discuss the mineral structures and how they bond contaminants a brief description of the structures of both mineral (ceramic) and vitreous waste forms will be given to show their similarities. By demonstrating the similarities of mineral and vitreous waste forms on atomic level, the contaminant release mechanisms of the crystalline (mineral) and amorphous (glass) waste forms can be compared. This will then logically lead to the discussion of why many of the analyses used to evaluate vitreous waste forms and glass-ceramics (also known as glass composite materials) are appropriate for determining the release mechanisms of LAW/LAWR mineral waste forms and how the durability data on LAW/LAWR mineral waste forms relate to the durability data for LAW/LAWR glasses. The text will discuss the LAW mineral waste form made by FBSR. The nanoscale mechanism by which the minerals form will be also be described in the text. The appropriate analyses to evaluate contaminant release mechanisms will be discussed, as will the FBSR test results to date and how they compare to testing performed on LAW glasses. Other details about vitreous waste form durability and impacts of REDuction/OXidation (REDOX) on durability are given in Appendix A. Details about the FBSR process, various pilot scale demonstrations, and applications are given in Appendix B. Details describing all the different leach tests that need to be used jointly to determine the leaching mechanisms of a waste form are given in Appendix C. Cautions regarding the way in which the waste form surface area is measured and in the choice of leachant buffers (if used) are given in Appendix D.

Jantzen, C

2008-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rock composition mineral" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

The role of reaction affinity and secondary minerals in regulating chemical weathering rates at the Santa Cruz Soil Chronosequence, California  

SciTech Connect

In order to explore the reasons for the apparent discrepancy between laboratory and field weathering rates and to determine the extent to which weathering rates are controlled by the approach to thermodynamic equilibrium, secondary mineral precipitation and flow rates, a multicomponent reactive transport model (CrunchFlow) was used to interpret soil profile development and mineral precipitation and dissolution rates at the 226 ka marine terrace chronosequence near Santa Cruz, CA. Aqueous compositions, fluid chemistry, transport, and mineral abundances are well characterized (White et al., 2008, GCA) and were used to constrain the reaction rates for the weathering and precipitating minerals in the reactive transport modeling. When primary mineral weathering rates are calculated with either of two experimentally determined rate constants, the nonlinear, parallel rate law formulation of Hellmann and Tisser and [2006] or the aluminum inhibition model proposed by Oelkers et al. [1994], modeling results are consistent with field-scale observations when independently constrained clay precipitation rates are accounted for. Experimental and field rates, therefore, can be reconciled at the Santa Cruz site. Observed maximum clay abundances in the argillic horizons occur at the depth and time where the reaction fronts of the primary minerals overlap. The modeling indicates that the argillic horizon at Santa Cruz can be explained almost entirely by weathering of primary minerals and in situ clay precipitation accompanied by undersaturation of kaolinite at the top of the profile. The rate constant for kaolinite precipitation was also determined based on model simulations of mineral abundances and dissolved Al, SiO{sub 2}(aq) and pH in pore waters. Changes in the rate of kaolinite precipitation or the flow rate do not affect the gradient of the primary mineral weathering profiles, but instead control the rate of propagation of the primary mineral weathering fronts and thus total mass removed from the weathering profile. Our analysis suggests that secondary clay precipitation is as important as aqueous transport in governing the amount of dissolution that occurs within a profile because clay minerals exert a strong control over the reaction affinity of the dissolving primary minerals. The modeling also indicates that the weathering advance rate and the total mass of mineral dissolved is controlled by the thermodynamic saturation of the primary dissolving phases plagioclase and K-feldspar, as is evident from the difference in propagation rates of the reaction fronts for the two minerals despite their very similar kinetic rate laws.

Maher, K.; Steefel, C. I.; White, A.F.; Stonestrom, D.A.

2009-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

222

Fixation of Radionuclides in Soil and Minerals by Heating  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Four mineral materials (a quartz sand, a feldspar sand, a calcitic limestone, and one soil from the DOE Hanford reservation (see Supporting Information, Table SI-1, for elemental compositions and descriptions)) were investigated after spiking with one of four radionuclides (85Sr, 134Cs, 57Co, and depleted U); leachability tests of these spiked materials were performed after thermal treatments up to 1200 C using the detailed 15-step sequential extraction protocol (18). ... Previously, a similar relationship was observed following heating of naturally 90Sr -contaminated field soil from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge Reservation within a similar range of submelting tempera tures (15) which observations were merely documented in this obscure programmatic report because we were unaware, at the time, of any mechanistic interpretation for the effect and failed to recognize its now clear implication for remediation technology; those observations (reproduced in the Supporting Information, Figure SI-31) should allay skeptical concerns that the immobilization effects reported herein result from some artifact of the isotopic spiking technique or sample preparations. ... Detailed descriptions of the gamma spectroscopic assay techniques and the sequential extraction procedures along with the elemental analyses of the mineral materials (Table SI-1) used throughout this investigation; sequential extraction graphs for 134Cs, 85Sr, 57Co, and U from quartz, feldspar, calcite, and the Hanford soil (Figures SI-1 through SI-16); preheating and reheating extraction results for 134Cs, 85Sr, and 57Co from the Hanford soil (Figures SI-17?SI-19); sequential extraction results for intermediate temperature treatments for all four isotopes in the Hanford soil (Figures SI-20?SI-23); sequential extract pHs for quartz, feldspar, limestone, and Hanford soil (Figures SI-24?SI-27); mineral weight retention after extrac tions (Table SI-2), radioisotope distribution following preheating and reheating of Hanford soil (Table SI-3), sequential extraction summaries (Table SI-4 and SI-5), and 90Sr leach ability from Oak Ridge soil following thermal treatment (Figure SI-28). ...

Brian P. Spalding

2001-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

223

Clay Minerals as Catalysts and Adsorbents  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... largely devoted to a discussion on the use of clay minerals as catalysts and industrial adsorbents ; in the later part of the afternoon some general papers Were also given. ...

D. M. C. MACEWAN

1948-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

224

Sustainable growth and valuation of mineral reserves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The annual change in the value of an in-ground mineral is equal to the increase or decrease of inventories ("reserves"), multiplied by the market value of a reserve unit. The limited shrinking resource base does not exist. ...

Adelman, Morris Albert

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Oil, Gas, and Metallic Minerals (Iowa)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Operators of oil, gas, and metallic mineral exploration and production operations are required to obtain a drilling permit from the Iowa Department of Natural Resources and file specific forms with...

226

Engineered yeast for enhanced CO2 mineralization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work, a biologically catalysed CO2 mineralization process for the capture of CO2 from point sources was designed, constructed at a laboratory scale, and, using standard chemical process scale-up protocols, was ...

Barbero, Roberto Juan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Mineral Leases by Political Subdivisions (Texas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This legislation authorizes local political subdivisions to lease lands they own for the development of mineral interests, including coal and lignite. A public hearing process is required prior to...

228

Mineral Springs of Alaska | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Mineral Springs of Alaska Abstract Geologists and engineers of the United States Geological Survey, who for a number...

229

Rock deterioration in the Royal Tomb of Seti I, Valley of the Kings, Luxor, Egypt  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A comparison of present tomb conditions of the Royal Tomb of Seti I in the Valley of the Kings with Burton's photographs (19211928) reveals that the rock structure and tomb decoration have undergone severe deterioration. In fact, several other Royal Tombs in the Valley of the Kings have shown similar decay features. Most of the Royal Tombs in the Valley of the Kings and the West Valley were excavated into the marls of the middle and lower part of Member I, the lowermost unit of the Thebes Formation. However, several tombs penetrate into the underlying interbedded shales and marls of the Esna Formation. All of them show severe, irreversible rock structure deterioration originating from swelling and shrinkage. Since the burial of Seti I, 3300years ago, water and debris from flash floods had minor impacts on wall decoration of the uppermost chambers and on wall structure in the lower chambers. Historic flooding since the discovery of the tomb has caused major destruction of walls and pillars by repeated swelling and shrinkage of the shale. Moreover, accelerated humidity changes over the past 70years have contributed to increasing deterioration of the rock structure. Rock mechanic analyses were done on samples from the tomb of Seti I in order to understand the propelling mechanism of deterioration. Marls and limestones of the Thebes Formation are predominantly composed of calcite, with 1040% clay minerals and minor amounts of quartz and anhydrite. Sepiolite and palygorskite are the dominant clay minerals in the Thebes Formation, with subordinate amounts of kaolinite and illite/smectite mixed layers. The shales of the Esna Formation contain more than 70% clay minerals, which are composed of illite/smectite mixed layers, with high swelling capacity, kaolinite and subordinate palygorskite and sepiolite. The marls of the lower Thebes Formation showed dry compressive strength values between 48MPa (7000psi) and 78MPa (11300psi) before violent failure, with a maximum elastic deformation of 0.40.5%. The Esna Shale samples had maximum stress loads of 60MPa (8500psi) and 74MPa (10800psi) with a maximum deformation of more than 2%. The deformation character changed with increasing pressure from an elastic to an inelastic mode. Long-term swell tests on Esna Shale samples revealed an enormous water absorption and swelling capacity. Swell heaving is between 50 and 80%, most of which takes place within the first hour. The swell pressure exceeds 5MPa (700psi) and 13MPa (1900psi) with a deformation of 1.5 and 3.3%, respectively. The swell pressure increases to its maximum over a period of 712days. The rock tests showed that the swell pressure capacity of the Esna shales might exceed the strength of the brittle and highly jointed marls of Member I, into which most of the tombs are hewn. The swell and water intake tests demonstrated that water absorption of the Esna shales is immediate. Mineralogical analyses showed that mixed-layer clay minerals are able to release enormous pressure, which may be compensated through ductile deformation by the shales or may result in brittle failure of the marls.

Raphael A.J. Wst; James McLane

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

DXRD (Dynamic X-Ray Diffraction) studies of oil shale mineral reactions  

SciTech Connect

With the advent of second generation, above-ground oil shale processes, retorted shale is likely to be combusted at temperatures between 1000{degree}K and 1200{degree}K. At these temperatures the mineral matrix of the shale will undergo a variety of chemical reactions including carbonate decomposition, sulfation and recombination reactions to form silicates. This complex set of reactions can be very important to the optimum design of a retorted shale combustor. For example the net heat of combustion is very dependent on these reactions since the carbonate mineral decomposition reactions are highly endothermic and some of the silication reactions only mildly endothermic. In addition, the combusted shale (ash) will have to be disposed and revegetated and the environmental consequences of this process will be highly dependent on the mineral composition of the ash. The degree to which the mineral reactions influence these considerations will depend on the time-temperature history to which the shale is exposed. Thus it is important to have a knowledge of the kinetics of these reactions. Previous attempts to study these kinetics have been made at Lawrence Livermore Laboratories and in our own laboratory. However, these studies all employed TGA techniques and, since there is usually more than one reaction occurring simultaneously, there is no way to distinguish between competing reactions. What is described here is the application of a new technique - Dynamic X-Ray Diffraction (DXRD), which has been successfully applied to studies of oil shale mineral reactions under typical retorted shale combustion conditions.

Helling, K.A.; Thomson, W.J.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Does roughening of rock-fluid-rock interfaces emerge from a stress-induced instability?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Non-planar solid-fluid-solid interfaces under stress are very common in many industrial and natural materials. For example, in the Earths crust, many rough and wavy interfaces can be observed in rocks in a wi...

E. Bonnetier; C. Misbah; F. Renard; R. Toussaint

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Modeling of crack initiation, propagation and coalescence in rocks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural or artificial fracturing of rock plays a very important role in geologic processes and for engineered structures in and on rock. Fracturing is associated with crack initiation, propagation and coalescence, which ...

Gonalves da Silva, Bruno Miguel

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Patterns of coal workers' pneumoconiosis in Appalachian former coal miners  

SciTech Connect

To aid in diagnostic chest film interpretation of coal workers' pneumoconiosis, a composite profile of common radiologic patterns was developed in 98 Appalachian former coal miners who were diagnosed as having coal miner's pneumoconiosis and who applied for black lung benefits. The mean age was 61 years, with a lifetime coal mine dust exposure of 18.7 years. Results showed that chest radiographs of coal workers' simple pneumoconiosis contained small irregular linear opacities more frequently (47%) than small rounded opacities. Sparse profusion of all small opacities was the rule. Small opacities involved two out of six lung zones simultaneously 39% of the time while other combinations occurred less frequently. Lower zones were involved more frequently than upper ones. Thickened pleura occurred in 18% of radiographs. Other frequent radiographic abnormalities were parenchymal calcifications (19%), marked emphysema (12%), and inactive tuberculosis (12%). Calcification of the aortic knob, a degenerative process reflecting age, occurred in 9%. Only one instance of complicated coal workers' pneumoconiosis (progressive massive fibrosis) was encountered (0.7%). Many of the descriptive features of coal workers' pneumoconiosis noted in the literature were not observed in this study. Only one instance of complicated pneumoconiosis was encountered.43 references.

Young, R.C. Jr.; Rachal, R.E.; Carr, P.G.; Press, H.C. (College of Pharmacy, Xavier University of Louisiana, New Orleans (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Mineral royalties : a preview of the development of Mineral Royalty legislation in South Africa.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? A dynamic shift in the ownership, management and development of the countrys mineral heritage took place after the inauguration of the new political dispensation (more)

Van der Zwan, Pieter

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

VancouverParksville White RockNew Westminster  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Courtenay VancouverParksville Abbotsford White RockNew Westminster Squamish Chilliwack Port McNeill Powell

236

Interpreting the Sedimentary Rocks at ____________________ Step 1: Describe the texture and composition of the clastic (detrital) rocks.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, shale, siltstone None or lamination; evidence for soil development Plant rootlets; coaly seams plant Offshore/shelf siltstone; sandstone interbeds possible Common bioturbation s that require normal marine

Frank, Tracy D.

237

Rock mechanics activities at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect

The application of rock mechanics at nuclear waste repositories is a true multidisciplinary effort. A description and historical summary of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is presented. Rock mechanics programs at the WIPP are outlined, and the current rock mechanics modeling philosophy of the Westinghouse Waste Isolation Division is discussed.

Francke, C. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Carlsbad, NM (United States); Saeb, S. [International Technology Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

238

Low-Temperature Mineral Recovery Program FOA Selections  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Energy Department's geothermal technologies office awarded nine projects in low-temperature and mineral recovery.

239

Phosphorescent compositions, methods of making the compositions, and methods of using the compositions  

SciTech Connect

Compositions, methods of making compositions, materials including compositions, crayons including compositions, paint including compositions, ink including compositions, waxes including compositions, polymers including compositions, vesicles including the compositions, methods of making each, and the like are disclosed.

Jia, Weiyi; Wang, Xiaojun; Jia, George D.; Lewis, Linda; Yen, Laurel C.

2014-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

240

Yemen Ministry of Oil and Minerals | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Yemen Ministry of Oil and Minerals Yemen Ministry of Oil and Minerals Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Yemen Ministry of Oil and Minerals Country Yemen Name Yemen Ministry of Oil and Minerals Website http://www.mom.gov.ye/en/ References Yemen Ministry of Oil and Minerals Website[1] The Yemen Ministry of Oil and Minerals Website contains some content in English. Associated Organizations Yemeni Company for Oil-Product Distribution Petroleum Exploration and Production Authority Safr Company for Scouting Production Operations Organization of Oil Scouting Aden Refinery Company Yemen Company for Oil Refining Yemen Investments Company for Oil & Mineral Geological Land Survey & Mineral Wealth Organization References ↑ "Yemen Ministry of Oil and Minerals Website" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Yemen_Ministry_of_Oil_and_Minerals&oldid=334954"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rock composition mineral" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Composition and Reactions of Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles Print Wednesday, 29 June 2005 00:00 Microscopic aerosol particles in the atmosphere contain carbonaceous components from mineral dust and combustion emissions released from around the world. How long these tiny particles remain in the atmosphere can have a huge impact on the global climate. Measurements based on high-resolution scanning transmission x-ray images obtained at the ALS have revealed chemical reactions on and in atmospheric aerosol particles that caused particle growth while changing organic composition by 13 to 24% per day, an oxidation rate significantly slower than is currently used in atmospheric models. Since oxidation has a strong effect on particle lifetime in the atmosphere, these results will help climate scientists refine the computer models used to predict climate change.

242

Rock River Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind Farm Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Rock River Wind Farm Facility Rock River Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Shell Wind Energy Developer SeaWest Energy Purchaser PacifiCorp Location Arlington and Carbon Counties WY Coordinates 41.6996°, -107.003° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.6996,"lon":-107.003,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

243

A Phased Array Approach to Rock Blasting  

SciTech Connect

A series of laboratory-scale simultaneous two-hole shots was performed in a rock simulant (mortar) to record the shock wave interference patterns produced in the material. The purpose of the project as a whole was to evaluate the usefulness of phased array techniques of blast design, using new high-precision delay technology. Despite high-speed photography, however, we were unable to detect the passage of the shock waves through the samples to determine how well they matched the expected interaction geometry. The follow-up mine-scale tests were therefore not conducted. Nevertheless, pattern analysis of the vectors that would be formed by positive interference of the shockwaves from multiple charges in an ideal continuous, homogeneous, isotropic medium indicate the potential for powerful control of blast design, given precise characterization of the target rock mass.

Leslie Gertsch; Jason Baird

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

A rock engraving made by Neanderthals in Gibraltar  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Nomenclature of the apatite supergroup minerals . Eur J Mineral 22 ( 2 ): 163 179 . 40 Marin-Arroyo...featured in the assemblage: grey-green, black...surfaces of the fine-grained lime-dolostone of...

Joaqun Rodrguez-Vidal; Francesco dErrico; Francisco Giles Pacheco; Ruth Blasco; Jordi Rosell; Richard P. Jennings; Alain Queffelec; Geraldine Finlayson; Darren A. Fa; Jos Mara Gutirrez Lpez; Jos S. Carrin; Juan Jos Negro; Stewart Finlayson; Lus M. Cceres; Marco A. Bernal; Santiago Fernndez Jimnez; Clive Finlayson

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Evaluation of Used Fuel Disposition in Clay-Bearing Rock  

SciTech Connect

Radioactive waste disposal in shale/argillite rock formations has been widely considered given its desirable isolation properties (low permeability), geochemically reduced conditions, anomalous groundwater pressures, and widespread geologic occurrence. Clay/shale rock formations are characterized by their high content of clay minerals such as smectites and illites where diffusive transport and chemisorption phenomena predominate. These, in addition to low permeability, are key attributes of shale to impede radionuclide mobility. Shale host-media has been comprehensively studied in international nuclear waste repository programs as part of underground research laboratories (URLs) programs in Switzerland, France, Belgium, and Japan. These investigations, in some cases a decade or more long, have produced a large but fundamental body of information spanning from site characterization data (geological, hydrogeological, geochemical, geomechanical) to controlled experiments on the engineered barrier system (EBS) (barrier clay and seals materials). Evaluation of nuclear waste disposal in shale formations in the USA was conducted in the late 70s and mid 80s. Most of these studies evaluated the potential for shale to host a nuclear waste repository but not at the programmatic level of URLs in international repository programs. This report covers various R&D work and capabilities relevant to disposal of heat-generating nuclear waste in shale/argillite media. Integration and cross-fertilization of these capabilities will be utilized in the development and implementation of the shale/argillite reference case planned for FY15. Disposal R&D activities under the UFDC in the past few years have produced state-of-the-art modeling capabilities for coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical (THMC), used fuel degradation (source term), and thermodynamic modeling and database development to evaluate generic disposal concepts. The THMC models have been developed for shale repository leveraging in large part on the information garnered in URLs and laboratory data to test and demonstrate model prediction capability and to accurately represent behavior of the EBS and the natural (barrier) system (NS). In addition, experimental work to improve our understanding of clay barrier interactions and TM couplings at high temperatures are key to evaluate thermal effects as a result of relatively high heat loads from waste and the extent of sacrificial zones in the EBS. To assess the latter, experiments and modeling approaches have provided important information on the stability and fate of barrier materials under high heat loads. This information is central to the assessment of thermal limits and the implementation of the reference case when constraining EBS properties and the repository layout (e.g., waste package and drift spacing). This report is comprised of various parts, each one describing various R&D activities applicable to shale/argillite media. For example, progress made on modeling and experimental approaches to analyze physical and chemical interactions affecting clay in the EBS, NS, and used nuclear fuel (source term) in support of R&D objectives. It also describes the development of a reference case for shale/argillite media. The accomplishments of these activities are summarized as follows: ? Development of a reference case for shale/argillite; ? Investigation of Reactive Transport and Coupled THM Processes in EBS: FY14; ? Update on Experimental Activities on Buffer/Backfill Interactions at elevated Pressure and Temperature; ? Thermodynamic Database Development: Evaluation Strategy, Modeling Tools, First-Principles Modeling of Clay, and Sorption Database Assessment; ? ANL Mixed Potential Model For Used Fuel Degradation: Application to Argillite and Crystalline Rock Environments.

Carlos F. Jov Coln; Philippe F. Weck; David H. Sassani; Liange Zheng; Jonny Rutqvist; Carl I. Steefel; Kunhwi Kim; Seiji Nakagawa; James Houseworth; Jens Birkholzer; Florie A. Caporuscio; Michael Cheshire; Michael S. Rearick; Mary K. McCarney; Mavrik Zavarin; Ana Benedicto; Annie B. Kersting; Mark Sutton; James Jerden; Kurt E. Frey; Jacqueline M. Copple; William Ebert

2014-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

246

One Weird Trick to Stop Selfish Miners: Fresh Bitcoins, A Solution for the Honest Miner.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One Weird Trick to Stop Selfish Miners: Fresh Bitcoins, A Solution for the Honest Miner. Ethan Heilman Boston University heilman@bu.edu Abstract--A recent result in Bitcoin is the selfish mining incentive-compatible and harmful to Bitcoin. In this paper we introduce a new defense against selfish mining

247

Sustainable Water Management in the Minerals Industry 1 SUSTAINABLE WATER MANAGEMENT IN THE MINERALS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sustainable Water Management in the Minerals Industry 1 SUSTAINABLE WATER MANAGEMENT IN THE MINERALS INDUSTRY Bill Whiten1, Mark McGuinness2, Sayed Hoseini3 The problem of managing a storage dam interest. It arises in the provision of water for Queensland coal mines, where additional water

McGuinness, Mark

248

Geology, geochemistry, and geochronology of volcanic rocks between Cuauhtemoc and La Junta, central Chihuahua, Mexico  

SciTech Connect

The 1200 km/sup 2/ area of this study straddles the boundary between the Sierra Madre Occidental and Basin and Range physiographic provinces and contains three north-northwest trending, block-faulted mountain ranges. The stratigraphy includes a 200 m thick sequence of ash-flow tuffs with subordinate mafic flows that either overlie or are interlayered with the ash-flow tuffs. This sequence overlies an approximately equal thickness of rhyolitic to dacitic flows and tuffs. At the base of the section occurs a distinctly different and thinner (about 50 m thick) sequence of flows, tuffs, and volcaniclastic sediments that is more nearly intermediate in average composition. The volcanic rocks of this study are primarily mafic and felsic with a bimodal distribution of Rb, Sr, and SiO/sub 2/ concentrations and other chemical parameters. The two modes have similar and overlapping ranges of initial /sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr ratios. Trace-element and major-element data generally support magmatic fractional crystallization as an important mechanism within each mode. Chemical trends within mafic rocks can be generated by 20 to 40% fractional crystallization of plagioclase and clinopyroxene (70:30 mixture). However, the formation of rhyolite or dacite from mafic rock requires implausible amounts of fractional crystallization of any proposed phenocryst assemblage, and thus the felsic rocks do not appear to be related to the mafic rocks by this mechanism. Most rhyolites of this study can form from dacitic liquid by 10 to 40% fractional crystallization of plagioclase and alkali feldspar (60:40 mixture).

Duex, T.W.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Gage for measuring displacements in rock samples  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gage for measuring diametral displacement within a rock sample for use in a rock mechanics laboratory and in the field, comprises a support ring housing a linear variable differential transformer, a mounting screw, and a leaf spring. The mounting screw is adjustable and defines a first point of contact with the rock sample. The leaf spring has opposite ends fixed to the inner periphery of the mounting ring. An intermediate portion of the leaf spring projecting radially inward from the ring is formed with a dimple defining a second point of contact with the sample. The first and second points of contact are diametrically opposed to each other. The LVDT is mounted in the ring with its axis parallel to the line of measurement and its core rod received in the dimple of the leaf spring. Any change in the length of the line between the first and second support points is directly communicated to the LVDT. The leaf spring is rigid to completely support lateral forces so that the LVDT is free of all load for improved precision.

Holcomb, David J. (Albuquerque, NM); McNamee, Michael J. (Albuquerque, NM)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Mineral and Fuel Extraction: Health Consequences  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Activities associated with mining and fuel extraction may present a range of potential health risks for nearby communities. The environmental legacy of mining and fuel extraction is extensive, with millions of active and abandoned mines globally. Evaluation of community risks from mineral and fuel extraction is often a complex task, given the variety of products produced, multiple potential exposure contexts, routes of contact, and health impacts. Adverse health outcomes that may arise from mineral-related processes include release of toxicants such as metals, metalloids, and mineral dusts, and indirect effects such as the increased potential of vectorborne disease. The ongoing processing and end-use of minerals also produce gas emissions (such as carbon dioxide and sulfur dioxide), often on a large scale. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are substances of particular concern arising from conventional crude oil and coal extraction, oil sands/shales wastes, and tailings water, and are classified as either proven or suspected carcinogens. The geotechnical and structural aspects of mine sites must also be considered, including the risk of major hazardous events such as release of tailings dam contents. Indirect or delayed effects of mineral and fuel extraction include those that act to affect community health through contamination or disruption of water supplies and food sources (e.g., crops). As with many industries, the balance between risks and benefits of mining must be carefully calibrated.

A. Cook; R.B. Finkelman; A. Fourie

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Transformation Composition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proc. AGTIVE'99, to appear in LNCS Graph Transformation Modules and their Composition ? Frank,knirsch,kreo,kuskeg@informatik.uni-bremen.de Abstract. In this paper, we investigate the notion of transformation modules as a structuring principle. Based on the notion of transformation units, a concept that allows to specify binary relations on graphs

Drewes, Frank

252

Category:Rock Lab Analysis | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Category Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Category:Rock Lab Analysis Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Rock Lab Analysis page? For detailed information on exploration techniques, click here. Category:Rock Lab Analysis Add.png Add a new Rock Lab Analysis Technique Pages in category "Rock Lab Analysis" The following 9 pages are in this category, out of 9 total. C Core Analysis Cuttings Analysis I Isotopic Analysis- Rock O Over Core Stress P Paleomagnetic Measurements Petrography Analysis R Rock Density X X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF)

253

TWO-DIMENSIONAL MODELING OF LASER SPALLATION DRILLING OF ROCKS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DIMENSIONAL MODELING OF LASER SPALLATION DRILLING OF ROCKS DIMENSIONAL MODELING OF LASER SPALLATION DRILLING OF ROCKS P532 Zhiyue Xu, Yuichiro Yamashita 1 , and Claude B. Reed Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439, USA 1 Now with Kyushu University, Japan Abstract High power lasers can weaken, spall, melt and vaporize natural earth materials with thermal spallation being the most energy efficient rock removal mechanism. Laser rock spallation is a very complex phenomenon that depends on many factors. Computer numerical modeling would provides great tool to understand the fundamental of this complex phenomenon, which is crucial to the success of its applications. Complexity of modeling laser rock spallation is due to: 1) rock is a porous media, to which traditional theories of heat transfer and rock mechanics can not be directly

254

Plutonium Oxidation and Subsequent Reduction by Mn (IV) Minerals  

SciTech Connect

Plutonium sorbed to rock tuff was preferentially associated with manganese oxides. On tuff and synthetic pyrolusite (Mn{sup IV}O{sub 2}), Pu(IV) or Pu(V) was initially oxidized, but over time Pu(IV) became the predominant oxidation state of sorbed Pu. Reduction of Pu(V/VI), even on non-oxidizing surfaces, is proposed to result from a lower Gibbs free energy of the hydrolyzed Pu(IV) surface species versus that of the Pu(V) or Pu(VI) surface species. This work suggests that despite initial oxidation of sorbed Pu by oxidizing surfaces to more soluble forms, the less mobile form of Pu, Pu(IV), will dominate Pu solid phase speciation during long term geologic storage. The safe design of a radioactive waste or spent nuclear fuel geologic repository requires a risk assessment of radionuclides that may potentially be released into the surrounding environment. Geochemical knowledge of the radionuclide and the surrounding environment is required for predicting subsurface fate and transport. Although difficult even in simple systems, this task grows increasingly complicated for constituents, like Pu, that exhibit complex environmental chemistries. The environmental behavior of Pu can be influenced by complexation, precipitation, adsorption, colloid formation, and oxidation/reduction (redox) reactions (1-3). To predict the environmental mobility of Pu, the most important of these factors is Pu oxidation state. This is because Pu(IV) is generally 2 to 3 orders of magnitude less mobile than Pu(V) in most environments (4). Further complicating matters, Pu commonly exists simultaneously in several oxidation states (5, 6). Choppin (7) reported Pu may exist as Pu(IV), Pu(V), or Pu(VI) oxic natural groundwaters. It is generally accepted that plutonium associated with suspended particulate matter is predominantly Pu(IV) (8-10), whereas Pu in the aqueous phase is predominantly Pu(V) (2, 11-13). The influence of the character of Mn-containing minerals expected to be found in subsurface repository environments on Pu oxidation state distributions has been the subject of much recent research. Kenney-Kennicutt and Morse (14), Duff et al. (15), and Morgenstern and Choppin (16) observed oxidation of Pu facilitated by Mn(IV)-bearing minerals. Conversely, Shaughnessy et al. (17) used X-ray Absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) to show reduction of Pu(VI) by hausmannite (Mn{sup II}Mn{sub 2}{sup III}O{sub 4}) and manganite ({gamma}-Mn{sup III}OOH) and Kersting et al., (18) observed reduction of Pu(VI) by pyrolusite (Mn{sup IV}O{sub 2}). In this paper, we attempt to reconcile the apparently conflicting datasets by showing that Mn-bearing minerals can indeed oxidize Pu, however, if the oxidized species remains on the solid phase, the oxidation step competes with the formation of Pu(IV) that becomes the predominant solid phase Pu species with time. The experimental approach we took was to conduct longer term (approximately two years later) oxidation state analyses on the Pu sorbed to Yucca Mountain tuff (initial analysis reported by Duff et al., (15)) and measure the time-dependant changes in the oxidation state distribution of Pu in the presence of the Mn mineral pyrolusite.

KAPLAN, DANIEL

2005-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

255

ROCK PROPERTIES MODEL ANALYSIS MODEL REPORT  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Analysis and Model Report (AMR) is to document Rock Properties Model (RPM) 3.1 with regard to input data, model methods, assumptions, uncertainties and limitations of model results, and qualification status of the model. The report also documents the differences between the current and previous versions and validation of the model. The rock properties models are intended principally for use as input to numerical physical-process modeling, such as of ground-water flow and/or radionuclide transport. The constraints, caveats, and limitations associated with this model are discussed in the appropriate text sections that follow. This work was conducted in accordance with the following planning documents: WA-0344, ''3-D Rock Properties Modeling for FY 1998'' (SNL 1997, WA-0358), ''3-D Rock Properties Modeling for FY 1999'' (SNL 1999), and the technical development plan, Rock Properties Model Version 3.1, (CRWMS M&O 1999c). The Interim Change Notice (ICNs), ICN 02 and ICN 03, of this AMR were prepared as part of activities being conducted under the Technical Work Plan, TWP-NBS-GS-000003, ''Technical Work Plan for the Integrated Site Model, Process Model Report, Revision 01'' (CRWMS M&O 2000b). The purpose of ICN 03 is to record changes in data input status due to data qualification and verification activities. These work plans describe the scope, objectives, tasks, methodology, and implementing procedures for model construction. The constraints, caveats, and limitations associated with this model are discussed in the appropriate text sections that follow. The work scope for this activity consists of the following: (1) Conversion of the input data (laboratory measured porosity data, x-ray diffraction mineralogy, petrophysical calculations of bound water, and petrophysical calculations of porosity) for each borehole into stratigraphic coordinates; (2) Re-sampling and merging of data sets; (3) Development of geostatistical simulations of porosity; (4) Generation of derivative property models via linear coregionalization with porosity; (5) Post-processing of the simulated models to impart desired secondary geologic attributes and to create summary and uncertainty models; and (6) Conversion of the models into real-world coordinates. The conversion to real world coordinates is performed as part of the integration of the RPM into the Integrated Site Model (ISM) 3.1; this activity is not part of the current analysis. The ISM provides a consistent volumetric portrayal of the rock layers, rock properties, and mineralogy of the Yucca Mountain site and consists of three components: (1) Geologic Framework Model (GFM); (2) RPM, which is the subject of this AMR; and (3) Mineralogic Model. The interrelationship of the three components of the ISM and their interface with downstream uses are illustrated in Figure 1. Figure 2 shows the geographic boundaries of the RPM and other component models of the ISM.

Clinton Lum

2002-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

256

CO2 Mineral Sequestration Studies in US  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mineral Sequestration Studies in US Mineral Sequestration Studies in US Philip Goldberg 1 , Zhong-Ying Chen 2 , William O'Connor 3 , Richard Walters 3 , and Hans Ziock 4 1 National Energy Technology Laboratory, P.O. Box 10940, Pittsburgh, PA 15236, goldberg@netl.doe.gov, (412)386-5806 2 Science Applications International Corporation, 1710 Goodridge Dr. McLean, VA, zhong- ying.chen@saic.com, (703)676-7328 3 Albany Research Center, Albany, OR oconner@arc.doe.gov, walters@alrc.doe, (541)967-5834 4 Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM, ksl@lanl.gov, ziock@lanl.gov, (505)667- 7265 Abstract Carbon sequestration by reacting naturally occurring Mg and Ca containing minerals with CO 2 to form carbonates has many unique advantages. Most notably is the fact that carbonates have a lower energy state than CO

257

Investigations on the thermal and flexural properties of plain weave carbon/epoxy-nanoclay composites by hand-layup technique  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The matrix of carbon fiber/SC-15 epoxy composites was modified with Nanomer I-28E nanoclay, a surface modified montmorillonite mineral, to ... and thermomechanical loading. Different weight percentages of nanoclay

F. H. Chowdhury; M. V. Hosur; S. Jeelani

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Quantitative assessment of alkali-reactive aggregate mineral content through XRD using polished sections as a supplementary tool to RILEM AAR-1 (petrographic method)  

SciTech Connect

The mineral content of 5 aggregate samples from 4 different countries, including reactive and non-reactive aggregate types, was assessed quantitatively by X-ray diffraction (XRD) using polished sections. Additionally, electron probe microanalyzer (EPMA) mapping and cathodoluminescence (CL) were used to characterize the opal-CT identified in one of the aggregate samples. Critical review of results from polished sections against traditionally powdered specimen has demonstrated that for fine-grained rocks without preferred orientation the assessment of mineral content by XRD using polished sections may represent an advantage over traditional powder specimens. Comparison of data on mineral content and silica speciation with expansion data from PARTNER project confirmed that the presence of opal-CT plays an important role in the reactivity of one of the studied aggregates. Used as a complementary tool to RILEM AAR-1, the methodology suggested in this paper has the potential to improve the strength of the petrographic method.

Castro, Nelia, E-mail: nelia.castro@ntnu.no [Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Department of Geology and Mineral Resources Engineering, Sem Saelands vei 1, N-7491 Trondheim (Norway)] [Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Department of Geology and Mineral Resources Engineering, Sem Saelands vei 1, N-7491 Trondheim (Norway); Sorensen, Bjorn E. [Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Department of Geology and Mineral Resources Engineering, Sem Saelands vei 1, N-7491 Trondheim (Norway)] [Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Department of Geology and Mineral Resources Engineering, Sem Saelands vei 1, N-7491 Trondheim (Norway); Broekmans, Maarten A.T.M. [Geological Survey of Norway, Department of Industrial Minerals and Metals, PO Box 6315 Sluppen, N-7491 Trondheim (Norway)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

259

Constructing modal mineralogy from geochemical composition: A geometric-Bayesian approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Modal mineralogical composition is known to carry more information than major element geochemistry, though the latter is far easier to determine in the lab. Constructing mineral compositions from geochemistry can be seen as a typical end-member problem, ... Keywords: CIPW norm, Convex hull, Endmember, Normative mineralogy, Unmixing

R. Tolosana-Delgado; H. von Eynatten; V. Karius

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Eur. J. Mineral. 2008, 20, 375385  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

below and above mantle, indicative of high- and low- temperature (resp.) hydrothermal seawater processing of the protoliths prior to subduction. The Nyurbinskaya pipe of Yakutia, a newly developed of olivine-bearing rocks during diamond recovery crushing and processing (e.g. Sobolev et al., 1984

Perfect, Ed

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261

Significance of Secondary Porosity in Interpreting Sandstone Composition  

SciTech Connect

Secondary porosity resulting from dissolution of unstable framework grains such as feldspar and rock fragments (including chert) is common in sandstones. Extensive dissolution of framework grains may result in misinterpreting the original composition of a sandstone and, hence, in misinterpreting its provenance. To avoid these problems, secondary porosity caused by grain dissolution must be recognized. Sandstone composition may be properly evaluated by including the dissolved portion of a framework grain as a grain, rather than as porosity, while point counting. This should be useful in interpreting original composition of sandstones and in paleogeographic reconstruction of prospect areas.

Shanmugam, G.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Size distribution functions for rock fragments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The capacity of 17 functions to represent the size distribution of fragmented rock is assessed on 1234 data sets of screened fragments from blasted and crushed rock of different origins, of sizes ranging from 0.002 to 2000mm. The functions evaluated are Weibull, Grady, log-normal, log-logistic and Gilvarry, in their plain, re-scaled and bi-component forms, and also the Swebrec distribution and its bi-component extension. In terms of determination coefficient, the Weibull is the best two-parameter function for describing rock fragments, with a median R2 of 0.9886. Among re-scaled, three-parameter distributions, Swebrec and Weibull lead with median R2 values of 0.9976 and 0.9975, respectively. Weibull and Swebrec distributions tie again as best bi-component, with median R2 of 0.9993. Re-scaling generally reduces the unexplained variance by a factor of about four with respect to the plain function; bi-components further reduce this unexplained variance by a factor of about two to three. Size-prediction errors are calculated in four zones: coarse, central, fines and very fines. Expected and maximum errors in the different ranges are discussed. The extended Swebrec is the best fitting function across the whole passing range for most types of data. Bimodal Weibull and Grady distributions follow, except for the coarse range, where re-scaled forms are preferable. Considering the extra difficulty in fitting a five-parameter function with respect to a three-parameter one, re-scaled functions are the best choice if data do not extend far below 20% passing. If the focus is on the fine range, some re-scaled distributions may still do (Weibull, Swebrec and Grady, with maximum errors of 1520% at 8% passing), but serious consideration should be given to bi-component distributions, especially extended Swebrec, bimodal Weibull and bimodal Grady.

Jos A. Sanchidrin; Finn Ouchterlony; Pablo Segarra; Peter Moser

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

GPC behavior of metalloporphyrins from rock extract  

SciTech Connect

Nickel and vanadyl porphyrins present in rock extract from the vicinity of petroleum deposit in the Persian Gulf area were isolated by the combination of adsurption chromatography on silica gel and GPC on styrene-divinylbenzene copolymer. In order to study the GPC behavior of these metalloporphyrins, chromatographic fractions were collected and analyzed by UV/VIS absorption spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. The number of carbon atoms present in the porphine substituents and the different geometry of nickel and vanadyl ions in the molecule of metalloporphyrins were found to be the main factors influencing the GPC separation of these complexes. This chromatographic technique provided an effective separation of nickel from vanadylporphyrins.

Sebor, G.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Failure of Mineralized Collagen Microfibrils Using Finite Element Simulation Coupled to Mechanical Quasi-brittle Damage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bone is a multiscale heterogeneous materiel of which principal function is to support the body structure and to resist mechanical loading and fractures. Bone strength does not depend only on the quantity and quality of bone which is characterized by the geometry and the shape of bones but also on the mechanical proprieties of its compounds, which have a significant influence on its deformation and failure. This work aim to use a 3D nano-scale finite element model coupled to the concept of quasi-brittle damage with the behaviour law isotropic elasticity to investigate the fracture behaviour of composite materiel collagen-mineral (mineralized collagen microfibril). Fracture stress-number of cross-links and damping capacity-number of cross-links curves were obtained under tensile loading conditions at different densities of the mineral phase. The obtained results show that number of cross-links as well as the density of mineral has an important influence on the strength of microfibrils which in turn clarify the ...

Barkaoui, Abdelwahed; Hambli, Ridha; 10.1016/j.proeng.2011.04.526

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Property:MineralManager | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MineralManager MineralManager Jump to: navigation, search Property Name MineralManager Property Type Page Pages using the property "MineralManager" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) B BLM-NV-WN-ES-08-01-1310, NV-020-08-01 + BLM + C CA-017-05-051 + BLM + CA-170-02-15 + BLM + CA-650-2005-086 + BLM + CA-670-2010-107 + BLM + CA-670-2010-CX + BLM + D DOE-EA-1733 + California + DOE-EA-1759 + Naknek Electric Association + DOE-EA-1849 + BLM + DOE-EIS-0298 + BLM + DOI-BLM-CA-C050-2009-0005-EA + BLM + DOI-BLM-CA-EA-2002-??? + BLM + DOI-BLM-CA-ES-2013-002+1793-EIS + BLM +, BLM + DOI-BLM-ID-220-2009-EA-3709 + BLM + DOI-BLM-ID-B010-2010-0083-CX + BLM + DOI-BLM-ID-I020-2012-0017-CX + BLM + DOI-BLM-ID-T020-2012-0003-CX + BLM + DOI-BLM-NM-L000-2012-0020-DNA + BLM +

266

Minerals Extraction and Processing: New Developments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Department of the Interior, Salt Lake City, Utah. Before his...Department of the Interior, Salt Lake City, Utah. Before his...minerals are the solution mining of salt (31) and potash (32), the...by in-place leaching at its Palangana Dome property in Duval County...

Joe B. Rosenbaum

1976-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

267

Phosphate Imposed Limitations on Biological Reduction and Alteration of Ferrihydrite Mineralization  

SciTech Connect

Biogeochemical transformation (inclusive of dissolution) of iron (hydr)oxides resulting from dissimilatory reduction has a pronounced impact on the fate and transport of nutrients and contaminants in subsurface environments. Despite the reactivity noted for pristine (unreacted) minerals, iron (hydr)oxides within native environments will likely have a different reactivity owing in part to changes in surface composition. Accordingly, here we explore the impact of surface modifications induced by phosphate adsorption on ferrihydrite reduction by Shewanella putrefaciens under static and advective flow conditions. Alterations in surface reactivity induced by phosphate adsorption change the extent, nearly linearly, and pathway of iron biomineralization. Magnetite is the most appreciable mineralization product while minor amounts of vivianite and green rust-like phases are formed in systems having high aqueous concentrations of phosphate, ferrous iron, and biogenic bicarbonate. Goethite and lepidocrocite, characteristic biomineralization products at low ferrous-iron concentrations, are inhibited in the presence of adsorbed phosphate. Considering deviations in reactivity of iron (hydr)oxides with changes in surface composition is important for deciphering mineralization pathways under native conditions and predicting reactive characteristics.

Borch, Thomas; Masue, Yoko; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Fendorf, Scott

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

The world supply/demand outlook for minerals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Mining and agriculture are the fundamental industries that convert natural resources into useable forms. Mining and modern agriculture are inextricably interlinked because modern agriculture is heavily dependent upon the use of machinery power and fertilizers ? all of which are mineral based products and in some applications mineral and agricultural products are mutually substitutable. Steel production is common denominator for assessing demand for many minerals and in the last 21/2 decades world steel production has grown at an annual rate of about 51/2%. Currently the United States uses about 4 billion tons ? 40 000 pounds per person ? of new mineral supplies each year about equally divided between the mineral fuels and other mineral materials. The value of energy and processed materials of mineral origin used in the U.S. is estimated to exceed $270 billion per year. Rising world population coupled with aspirations for higher living standards points to steadily increasing world demand for mineral materials. Studies by the U.S. Bureau of Mines show that the ratio of recoverable world mineral reserves to cumulate demand over the next few decades is satisfactory for most mineral materials. However if world mineral production is to keep pace with demand there must be increased efforts to find mine beneficiate process and recycle mineral materials and there must also exist politico?economic climates that encourage long?term mineral development while also making appropriate provisions for humanitarian and envronmental concerns.

John D. Morgan Jr.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

TOWARDS AFFECTIVE ALGORITHMIC COMPOSITION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TOWARDS AFFECTIVE ALGORITHMIC COMPOSITION Duncan Williams* , Alexis Kirke* , Eduardo Reck Miranda are driving an emerging field: affective algorithmic composition. Strate- gies for algorithmic composition within the last decade) implementing systems for algorithmic composition with the intention of targeting

Miranda, Eduardo Reck

270

12.001 Introduction to Geology, Spring 2008  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This undergraduate level course presents a basic study in geology. It introduces major minerals and rock types, rock-forming processes, and time scales; temperatures, pressures, compositions, structure of the Earth, and ...

Elkins-Tanton, Lindy

271

The System Forsterite-Diopside-Akermanite-Leucite  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The four essential minerals of many potassium-rich mafic and ultramafic rocks are leucite, augite, olivine, and melilite. The bulk composition of these rocks thus lies within the phase volume of forsterite-diopsi...

Dr. Alok K. Gupta; Professor Dr. Kenzo Yagi

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Study of Acid Response of Qatar Carbonate Rocks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

STUDY OF ACID RESPONSE OF QATAR CARBONATE ROCKS A Thesis by ZHAOHONG WANG Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... December 2011 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering Study of Acid Response of Qatar Carbonate Rocks Copyright 2011 Zhaohong Wang STUDY OF ACID RESPONSE OF QATAR CARBONATE ROCKS A Thesis...

Wang, Zhaohong

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

273

United States National Waste Terminal Storage argillaceous rock studies  

SciTech Connect

The past and present argillaceous rock studies for the US National Waste Terminal Storage Program consist of: (1) evaluation of the geological characteristics of several widespread argillaceous formations in the United States; (2) laboratory studies of the physical and chemical properties of selected argillaceous rock samples; and (3) two full-scale in situ surface heater experiments that simulate the emplacement of heat-generating radioactive waste in argillaceous rock.

Brunton, G.D.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Rock mechanics contributions from defense programs  

SciTech Connect

An attempt is made at illustrating the many contributions to rock mechanics from US defense programs, over the past 30-plus years. Large advances have been achieved in the technology-base area covering instrumentation, material properties, physical modeling, constitutive relations and numerical simulations. In the applications field, much progress has been made in understanding and being able to predict rock mass behavior related to underground explosions, cratering, projectile penetration, and defense nuclear waste storage. All these activities stand on their own merit as benefits to national security. But their impact is even broader, because they have found widespread applications in the non-defense sector; to name a few: the prediction of the response of underground structures to major earthquakes, the physics of the earth`s interior at great depths, instrumentation for monitoring mine blasting, thermo-mechanical instrumentation useful for civilian nuclear waste repositories, dynamic properties of earthquake faults, and transient large-strain numerical modeling of geological processes, such as diapirism. There is not pretense that this summary is exhaustive. It is meant to highlight success stories representative of DOE and DOD geotechnical activities, and to point to remaining challenges.

Heuze, F.E.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Rock types, pore types, and hydrocarbon exploration  

SciTech Connect

A proposed exploration-oriented method of classifying porosity in sedimentary rocks is based on microscopic examination cores or cuttings. Factors include geometry, size, abundance, and connectivity of the pores. The porosity classification is predictive of key petrophysical characteristics: porosity-permeability relationships, capillary pressures, and (less certainly) relative permeabilities. For instance, intercrystalline macroporosity typically is associated with high permeability for a given porosity, low capillarity, and favorable relative permeabilities. This is found to be true whether this porosity type occurs in a sucrosic dolomite or in a sandstone with pervasive quartz overgrowths. This predictive method was applied in three Rocky Mountain oil plays. Subtle pore throat traps could be recognized in the J sandstone (Cretaceous) in the Denver basin of Colorado by means of porosity permeability plotting. Variations in hydrocarbon productivity from a Teapot Formation (Cretaceous) field in the Powder River basin of Wyoming were related to porosity types and microfacies; the relationships were applied to exploration. Rock and porosity typing in the Red River Formation (Ordovician) reconciled apparent inconsistencies between drill-stem test, log, and mud-log data from a Williston basin wildcat. The well was reevaluated and completed successfully, resulting in a new field discovery. In each of these three examples, petrophysics was fundamental for proper evaluation of wildcat wells and exploration plays.

Coalson, E.B.; Hartmann, D.J.; Thomas, J.B.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Mineral Recovery Creates Revenue Stream for Geothermal Energy Development  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Find out more about Notice to Issue Financial Opportunity Announcement on "Low-Temperature Mineral Recovery Program," a targeted GTO initiative focused on strategic mineral extraction as a path to optimize the value stream of low-to-moderate-tempe

277

Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles Print Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles Print Microscopic aerosol particles in the atmosphere contain carbonaceous components from mineral dust and combustion emissions released from around the world. How long these tiny particles remain in the atmosphere can have a huge impact on the global climate. Measurements based on high-resolution scanning transmission x-ray images obtained at the ALS have revealed chemical reactions on and in atmospheric aerosol particles that caused particle growth while changing organic composition by 13 to 24% per day, an oxidation rate significantly slower than is currently used in atmospheric models. Since oxidation has a strong effect on particle lifetime in the atmosphere, these results will help climate scientists refine the computer models used to predict climate change.

278

Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles Print Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles Print Microscopic aerosol particles in the atmosphere contain carbonaceous components from mineral dust and combustion emissions released from around the world. How long these tiny particles remain in the atmosphere can have a huge impact on the global climate. Measurements based on high-resolution scanning transmission x-ray images obtained at the ALS have revealed chemical reactions on and in atmospheric aerosol particles that caused particle growth while changing organic composition by 13 to 24% per day, an oxidation rate significantly slower than is currently used in atmospheric models. Since oxidation has a strong effect on particle lifetime in the atmosphere, these results will help climate scientists refine the computer models used to predict climate change.

279

Seepage into drifts in unsaturated fractured rock at Yucca Mountain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fractured Rock at Yucca Mountain Jens Birkholzer, Guomin Lrepository site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as it is locatedclimate conditions at Yucca Mountain. The numerical study is

Birkholzer, Jens; Li, Guomin; Tsang, Chin-Fu; Tsang, Yvonne

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Active control of underground stresses through rock pressurization  

SciTech Connect

To significantly increase the stability of underground excavations while exploiting the full advantages of confined rock strength, methods must be developed to actively control the distribution of stresses near the excavation. This US Bureau of Mines study examines theoretical and practical aspects of rock pressurization, an active stress control concept that induces compressive stress in the wall rock through repeated hydraulic fracturing with a settable fluid. Numerical analyses performed by incorporating the rock pressurization concept into a variety of boundary-element models indicate that rock pressurization has the potential to improve underground excavation stability in three ways: (1) by relocating stress concentrations away from the weak opening surface to stronger, confined wall rock; (2) by inducing additional stresses in a biaxial stress field to reduce the difference between the principal stress components near the surface of the opening, and (3) by counteracting the tensile stresses induced in the rock around internally loaded openings. Practical aspects of the rock pressurization concept were investigated through a series of hydraulic fracturing experiments. The use of sulfur as a settable fluid for hydraulic fracturing was demonstrated, although problems related to sulfur viscosity suggest that other molten materials, such as wax, may be better suited to practical field application of the rock pressurization concept.

Vandergrift, T.L.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rock composition mineral" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Scientists Pass Solid Particles Through Rock in DOE-Sponsored...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

rock fractures in the laboratory. This technology has the potential for mapping fracture systems in detail and aid in determining reservoir characteristics. This research was...

282

Reconstruction of Sedimentary Rock Based on Mechanical Properties  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Diagenesis transforms an unconsolidated loose sed- imentOur emphasis is on unconsolidated sand and sandstone. Thesedi- mentary rock: unconsolidated sand and sandstone. The

Jin, Guodong; Patzek, Tad W.; Silin, Dmitry B.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Evaluation Of Used Fuel Disposition In Clay-Bearing Rock  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Radioactive waste disposal in shale/argillite rock formations has been widely considered given its desirable isolation properties, e.g., low permeability, potential geochemically reduced conditions...

284

Hard Rock Miners` Phthisis in 19th and Early 20th Century Britain: From Diagnosis to Compensation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

constitutional findings such as gout, eczema, psoriasis ora diathesis. 171 In fact, gout, eczema and albuminuria areof nylon hose. Very likely gout was common in his carriage

Mintz, Fredric

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Deer, W. A., Howie, R. A. & Zussman, J. 2001. Rock Forming Minerals. Volume 4A. Framework Silicates: Feldspars:  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...given to obscure gem materials, which are not in the standard com-prehensive mineralogical compendia. One can find that angelite is a name applied to anhydrite of bluish-grey colour used as an ornamental stone; Transvaal jade is a fine-grained, light...

P. E. Champness

286

Mineralization associated with scale and altered rock and pipe fragments from the Berlin geothermal field, El Salvador;  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

control precipitation of gold and silver in geothermal wells can be used to model directly the formation

Long, Bernard

287

Hard Rock Miners` Phthisis in 19th and Early 20th Century Britain: From Diagnosis to Compensation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

workers to the same disease; quarries and metalliferous andd XXXIV. p. 4. Although the Quarry Committee had concludedNo. 12). (1898). Mines and Quarries: Reports of Joseph S.

Mintz, Fredric

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Carbon Sequestration via Mineral Carbonation: Overview and Assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Carbon Sequestration via Mineral Carbonation: Overview and Assessment 14 March 2002 Howard Herzog overview and assessment of carbon sequestration by mineral carbonation (referred to as "mineral sequestration R&D. The first is that carbonates have a lower energy state than CO2. Therefore, at least

289

SKARN GOLD MINERALIZATION AT THE GEODO MINE, SOUTH KOREA  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Communications SKARN GOLD MINERALIZATION AT THE GEODO MINE, SOUTH KOREA Eui-Jun Kim 1 Maeng-Eon Park 2 Noel C. White 3 Corresponding...Skarn gold mineralization at the Geodo Mine, South Korea Kim Eui-Jun Author Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources...

Eui-Jun Kim; Maeng-Eon Park; Noel C. White

290

Manganese oxide minerals: Crystal structures and economic and environmental significance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...ability to remove the green tint imparted by iron...are the predominant ore minerals in most of todays commercially...as coatings on other mineral grains. Mn is highly...pH, organic matter, lime, and phosphate on heavy...28). The major Mn minerals reported in soils are...

Jeffrey E. Post

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Mineral balances, including in drinking water, estimated for Merced County dairy herds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of daily mineral intake, drinking-water mineral contributionND Total daily intake, including minerals in drinking water.mineral contents in drinking water and daily drinking-water

Castillo, Alejandro R Dr.; Santos, Jose Eduardo P.; Tabone, Tom J.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Rock Rapids Municipal Utility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rapids Municipal Utility Rapids Municipal Utility Jump to: navigation, search Name Rock Rapids Municipal Utility Place Iowa Utility Id 16206 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial Power (Single-Phase) Commercial Commercial Power (Three-Phase) Commercial Residential Power Residential Average Rates Residential: $0.0807/kWh Commercial: $0.0633/kWh Industrial: $0.0899/kWh

293

LOW TEMPERATURE GEOTHERMAL MINERAL RECOVERY PROGRAM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This targeted initiative focuses on critical mineral extraction as a path to optimize the value stream of low-to-moderate temperature resources. The FOA aims to promote the advancement of thermal energy processes capable of converting geothermal heat sources into power, in conjunction with the development or exploitation of technologies capable of capturing, concentrating, and/or purifying valuable materials contained within geothermal brines to economically extract resources that can provide additional revenue streams to geothermal operators.

294

Mineral Supplementation of Beef Cows in Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-526 deficiencies, were frequently found. Sulfur (>.3 percent) and iron (>250 PPM) levels were often high in diets which are antagonistic to copper and sele- nium utilization. Molybdenum, a well-known copper antago- nist, was not extremely high... their genetic poten- tial. Generally, a good job with protein and energy sup- plementation is practiced, but trace mineral nutrition hasn?t kept pace. 3. In cattle, sheep and humans, genetics can greatly influ- ence copper requirements and susceptibility...

Herd, Dennis B.

1997-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

295

Bone Mineral Density in Women with Depression  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...illness and the normal women were individually matched for age, body-mass index, and menstrual status; women with many of the risk factors associated with decreased bone mineral density were excluded; dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry was used to measure bone density at the spine, hip, and radius; and bone... Major depression is a complex disorder reflecting genetic, developmental, and environmental factors. Although its pathophysiology is not clearly understood, depression is associated with hypothalamic dysfunction specifically, hypercortisolism, the ...

Michelson D.; Stratakis C.; Hill L.

1996-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

296

international journal of rock mechanics and mining sciences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Original Research, New Developments and Case Studies in Rock Mechanics and Rock .... Prior to submitting your paper, please follow the instructions given below. ... Permission of the Publisher is required for resale or distribution ..... The Digital Object Identifier (DOI) may be used to cite and link to electronic documents.

297

SEISMIC AND ROCK PHYSICS DIAGNOSTICS OF MULTISCALE RESERVOIR TEXTURES  

SciTech Connect

As part of our study on ''Relationships between seismic properties and rock microstructure'', we have studied (1) Effects of pore texture on porosity, permeability, and sonic velocity. We show how a relation can be found between porosity, permeability, and velocity by separating the formations of rocks with similar pore textures.

Gary Mavko

2003-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

298

GEOS898 History on the Rocks Assignment 2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

can be broken down into four major rock groups (i.e. Clastic, biogenic, organic, chemical Flow chart for identifying sedimentary rocks (most text books have this or can be found on line) Acid, distribution of layers and chemistry. It is worthwhile for the teacher to spend about 10 minutes reviewing

Frank, Tracy D.

299

Determining inert content in coal dust/rock dust mixture  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for determining the inert content of a coal dust and rock dust mixture uses a transparent window pressed against the mixture. An infrared light beam is directed through the window such that a portion of the infrared light beam is reflected from the mixture. The concentration of the reflected light is detected and a signal indicative of the reflected light is generated. A normalized value for the generated signal is determined according to the relationship .phi.=(log i.sub.c `log i.sub.co) / (log i.sub.c100 -log i.sub.co) where i.sub.co =measured signal at 0% rock dust i.sub.c100 =measured signal at 100% rock dust i.sub.c =measured signal of the mixture. This normalized value is then correlated to a predetermined relationship of .phi. to rock dust percentage to determine the rock dust content of the mixture. The rock dust content is displayed where the percentage is between 30 and 100%, and an indication of out-of-range is displayed where the rock dust percent is less than 30%. Preferably, the rock dust percentage (RD%) is calculated from the predetermined relationship RD%=100+30 log .phi.. where the dust mixture initially includes moisture, the dust mixture is dried before measuring by use of 8 to 12 mesh molecular-sieves which are shaken with the dust mixture and subsequently screened from the dust mixture.

Sapko, Michael J. (Finleyville, PA); Ward, Jr., Jack A. (Oakmont, PA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Fluid Migration During Ice/Rock Planetesimal Differentiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/water reaction, which will depend on the rate at which water can be segregated from a melting ice/rock core. For the liquid water phase to migrate toward the surface, the denser rock phase must compact. The primary question that this thesis will answer is how...

Raney, Robert 1987-

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rock composition mineral" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings: Slick Rock sites, Slick Rock, Colorado  

SciTech Connect

Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah, Inc., has reevaluated the Slick Rock sites in order to revise the October 1977 engineering radioactive uranium mill tailings at Slick Rock, Colorado. This engineering assessment has included the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigations of site hydrology and meteorology, and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas released from the 387,000 tons of tailings at the Slick Rock sites constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation also are factors. The five alternative actions presented in this engineering assessment include millsite decontamination with the addition of 3 m of stabilization cover material, consolidation of the piles, and removal of the tailings to remote disposal sites and decontamination of the tailings sites. Cost estimates for the five options range from about $6,800,000 for stabilization in-place, to about $11,000,000 for disposal at a distance of about 6.5 mi. Three principal alternatives for the reprocessing of the Slick Rock tailings were examined: heap leaching; treatment at an existing mill; and reprocessing at a new conventional mill constructed for tailings reprocessing. The cost of the uranium recovered would be over $800/lb of U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ whether by conventional or heap leach plant processes. The spot market price for uranium was $25/lb early in 1981. Therefore, reprocessing the tailings for uranium recovery is not economically attractive at present, nor for the foreseeable future.

none,

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Indian Mineral Development Act of 1982 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mineral Development Act of 1982 Mineral Development Act of 1982 Jump to: navigation, search Statute Name Indian Mineral Development Act Year 1982 Url IndianDevelopment1982.jpg Description Provides for tribes to enter into energy development agreements with DOI approval References Indian Mineral Development Act of 1982[1] Bureau of Indian Affairs[2] The Indian Mineral Development Act of 1982 (IMDA) 25 U.S.C. Secs. 2101-2108 was enacted to provide Indian tribes with flexibilty in the development and sale of mineral resources. S.Rep. No. 97-472, 97th Cong.2d Sess. 2 (1982). Foremost among the beneficial effects of IMDA was the opportunity for Indian tribes to enter into joint venture agreements with mineral developers. The contractual relationships permitted by IMDA were designed to meet two objectives: First, to further the policy of self-determination

303

Relations Of Ammonium Minerals At Several Hydrothermal Systems In The  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Relations Of Ammonium Minerals At Several Hydrothermal Systems In The Relations Of Ammonium Minerals At Several Hydrothermal Systems In The Western Us Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Relations Of Ammonium Minerals At Several Hydrothermal Systems In The Western Us Details Activities (5) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Ammonium bound to silicate and sulfate minerals has recently been located at several major hydrothermal systems in the western U.S. utilizing newly-discovered near-infrared spectral properties. Knowledge of the origin and mineralogic relations of ammonium minerals at known hydrothermal systems is critical for the proper interpretation of remote sensing data and for testing of possible links to mineralization. Submicroscopic analysis of ammonium minerals from two mercury- and gold-bearing

304

Radiation defects and energy storage in natural polycrystalline rock salt. Results of an in-situ test in the Permian rock salt of the Asse  

SciTech Connect

Radiation damage development and the corresponding energy storage in pure undeformed single crystals have frequently been studied in laboratory experiments, however little is known of irradiation experiments on natural rock salt (polycrystalline, deformed and impure) under geological conditions. The relevance of these parameters to the defect formation was revealed by a joint United States/Federal Republic of Germany in-situ test in the Asse Mine. Natural rock salt was heated and irradiated using Co-60 sources. Calculations of the amount of halite expected to be decomposed by radiolysis during the experiment were performed using the 1985 version of the Jain-Lidiard model. Qualitative agreement between theory and analyses was found for all the performed analyses. Quantitative and qualitative deviations of the natural samples behaviour from that of single undeformed crystals were observed and attributed to the influence of sulfatic admixtures, polycrystallinity and strain on radiation damage development and anneal. Special chemical methods, such as iodometric titration and uv-visible spectroscopy were applied in order to measure the hypochlorite ion, which forms in irradiated salt. Composite samples located closet to the Co-60 source averaged 0,4 micromoles neutral chlorine atoms per gram salt, a factor of two more than from other positions. Uv-vis analyses revealed more than a factor of ten greater neutral chlorine concentrations in coloured halite. Similarly, optical absorption measurements indicated a factor of ten difference in sodium metal colloid concentrations.

Gies, H.; Rothfuchs, T. [Institut fuer Tieflagerung, Braunschweig (Germany); Celma, A.G.; Haas, J.B.M. de [Netherlands Energy Research Foundation, Petten (Netherlands); Pederson, L. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

305

Property:HostRockLithology | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

HostRockLithology HostRockLithology Jump to: navigation, search Property Name HostRockLithology Property Type String Description Condensed description of the lithology of the reservoir rock. This is a property of type Page. Subproperties This property has the following 14 subproperties: B Beowawe Hot Springs Geothermal Area Brady Hot Springs Geothermal Area C Chena Geothermal Area D Desert Peak Geothermal Area G Geysers Geothermal Area H Heber Geothermal Area L Lightning Dock Geothermal Area R Raft River Geothermal Area Roosevelt Hot Springs Geothermal Area S Salton Sea Geothermal Area Steamboat Springs Geothermal Area S cont. Stillwater Geothermal Area V Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal Area W Wabuska Hot Springs Geothermal Area Pages using the property "HostRockLithology"

306

Drilling Large Diameter Holes in Rocks Using Multiple Laser Beams  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Drilling Large Diameter Holes in Rocks Using Multiple Laser Beams (504) Drilling Large Diameter Holes in Rocks Using Multiple Laser Beams (504) Richard Parker,. Parker Geoscience Consulting, LLC, Arvada, Colorado, USA; Zhiyue Xu and Claude Reed, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois, USA; Ramona Graves, Department of Petroleum Engineering, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Colorado, USA; Brian Gahan and Samih Batarseh, Gas Technology Institute, Des Plaines, Illinois, USA ABSTRACT Studies on drilling petroleum reservoir rocks with lasers show that modern infrared lasers have the capability to spall (thermally fragment), melt and vaporize natural earth materials with the thermal spallation being the most efficient rock removal mechanism. Although laser irradiance as low as 1000 W/cm 2 is sufficient to spall rock, firing the

307

Property:HostRockAge | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

HostRockAge HostRockAge Jump to: navigation, search Property Name HostRockAge Property Type String Description Describes the age of the reservoir rock by epoch, era, or period per available data. This is a property of type Page. Subproperties This property has the following 10 subproperties: B Beowawe Hot Springs Geothermal Area Brady Hot Springs Geothermal Area C Chena Geothermal Area D Desert Peak Geothermal Area G Geysers Geothermal Area R Raft River Geothermal Area Roosevelt Hot Springs Geothermal Area S Salton Sea Geothermal Area Steamboat Springs Geothermal Area W Wabuska Hot Springs Geothermal Area Pages using the property "HostRockAge" Showing 11 pages using this property. A Amedee Geothermal Area + Mesozoic + B Blue Mountain Geothermal Area + Triassic + C Coso Geothermal Area + Mesozoic +

308

Electrical Conductivity of Soils and Rocks | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Electrical Conductivity of Soils and Rocks Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Electrical Conductivity of Soils and Rocks Author J.D. McNeill Organization Geonics Limited Published Geonics Limited, 1980 Report Number TN-5 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Electrical Conductivity of Soils and Rocks Citation J.D. McNeill (Geonics Limited). 1980. Electrical Conductivity of Soils and Rocks. TN-5 Edition. ?: Geonics Limited. Report No.: TN-5. Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Electrical_Conductivity_of_Soils_and_Rocks&oldid=695344"

309

Rock Density At Alum Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rock Density At Alum Area (DOE GTP) Rock Density At Alum Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Rock Density At Alum Geothermal Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Alum Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Rock Density Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References (1 January 2011) GTP ARRA Spreadsheet Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Rock_Density_At_Alum_Area_(DOE_GTP)&oldid=402985" Categories: Exploration Activities DOE Funded Activities ARRA Funded Activities What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties About us Disclaimers Energy blogs Linked Data Developer services OpenEI partners with a broad range of international organizations to grow

310

Rock Sampling At Coso Geothermal Area (1995) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Rock Sampling At Coso Geothermal Area (1995) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Rock Sampling At Coso Geothermal Area (1995) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Rock Sampling Activity Date 1995 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geologic controls on the geometry of the upwelling plume were investigated using petrographic and analytical analyses of reservoir rock and vein material. References Lutz, S.J.; Moore, J.N. ; Copp, J.F. (1 June 1995) Lithology and alteration mineralogy of reservoir rocks at Coso Geothermal Area,

311

Property:CapRockLithology | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CapRockLithology CapRockLithology Jump to: navigation, search Property Name CapRockLithology Property Type String Description Condensed description of the lithology of the cap rock. Subproperties This property has the following 6 subproperties: B Beowawe Hot Springs Geothermal Area Brady Hot Springs Geothermal Area D Desert Peak Geothermal Area E East Mesa Geothermal Area H Heber Geothermal Area S Salton Sea Geothermal Area Pages using the property "CapRockLithology" Showing 6 pages using this property. A Amedee Geothermal Area + volcanic; lacustrine sediments + B Blue Mountain Geothermal Area + Hydrothermal alteration layer + G Geysers Geothermal Area + Hydrothermal alteration layer + K Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area + Overlapping a'a' and pahoehoe flows + L Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area + Metasedimentary Landslide Block; Hydrothermal Alteration Layer +

312

Rock Hill Utilities - Water Heater and Heat Pump Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rock Hill Utilities - Water Heater and Heat Pump Rebate Program Rock Hill Utilities - Water Heater and Heat Pump Rebate Program Rock Hill Utilities - Water Heater and Heat Pump Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Program Info State South Carolina Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Water Heater: up to $275 Heat Pump Replacement: $400 Provider Rock Hill Utilities Through the SmartChoice program, Rock Hill Utilities offers rebates for water heater and heat pump replacements. Information on financing for heat pumps can also be found on the web site listed above. If both the water heater and heat pump are purchased then the customer may qualify for the Great Rate program. The Great Rate program will add a 25% discount to a

313

Constitutive relationships for elastic deformation of clay rock: Data Analysis  

SciTech Connect

Geological repositories have been considered a feasible option worldwide for storing high-level nuclear waste. Clay rock is one of the rock types under consideration for such purposes, because of its favorable features to prevent radionuclide transport from the repository. Coupled hydromechanical processes have an important impact on the performance of a clay repository, and establishing constitutive relationships for modeling such processes are essential. In this study, we propose several constitutive relationships for elastic deformation in indurated clay rocks based on three recently developed concepts. First, when applying Hooke's law in clay rocks, true strain (rock volume change divided by the current rock volume), rather than engineering strain (rock volume change divided by unstressed rock volume), should be used, except when the degree of deformation is very small. In the latter case, the two strains will be practically identical. Second, because of its inherent heterogeneity, clay rock can be divided into two parts, a hard part and a soft part, with the hard part subject to a relatively small degree of deformation compared with the soft part. Third, for swelling rock like clay, effective stress needs to be generalized to include an additional term resulting from the swelling process. To evaluate our theoretical development, we analyze uniaxial test data for core samples of Opalinus clay and laboratory measurements of single fractures within macro-cracked Callovo-Oxfordian argillite samples subject to both confinement and water reduced swelling. The results from this evaluation indicate that our constitutive relationships can adequately represent the data and explain the related observations.

Liu, H.H.; Rutqvist, J.; Birkholzer, J.T.

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

314

Changes in Bone Mineral, Lean Body Mass and Fat Content as Measured by Dual Energy X-ray Absorptiometry: A Longitudinal Study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Bone mineral density (BMD) and soft tissue composition were measured by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) 34 years apart in 273 men and women aged 2390. We found different rates of BMD loss in differen...

M. K. Karlsson; K. J. Obrant; B. E. Nilsson; O. Johnell

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Oil composition variation and reservoir continuity: Unity field, Sudan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A suite of oils from stacked reservoirs in the Unity Field in Sudan has been analyzed by various geochemical techniques for molecular information to elucidate the geological processes which cause variations in oil composition and their resulting oil fingerprints in different reservoir units. Analyses of these highly paraffinic oils indicate that the chromatographic fingerprint variations are due to differences in the abundances of saturated compounds, including branched and cyclic alkanes. Neither aromatics nor NSO compounds have any significant effect on the observed fingerprint variations. This association of saturates, instead of aromatics and NSO compounds, with the fingerprint variations precludes rock-fluid interactions as a cause of the variations. Biomarker analyses show that variations in thermal maturity and organic facies of the source rock are responsible for the fingerprint variations. Thermal maturity increases with the depth of the reservoir, suggesting a multiple-charge process for the oils to fill these reservoirs over an extended period of time. Apparently the source rock generated and expelled progressively more mature oils and little mixing occurred during migration. Thus, knowledge of oil compositional variations from one reservoir to another, organic facies variation and source rock maturity combined with tectonic history may help explain charging and timing of oil emplacement.

R.J. Hwang; A.S. Ahmed; J.M. Moldowan

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Carbon dioxide sequestration by aqueous mineral carbonation of magnesium silicate minerals  

SciTech Connect

The dramatic increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide since the Industrial Revolution has caused concerns about global warming. Fossil-fuel-fired power plants contribute approximately one third of the total human-caused emissions of carbon dioxide. Increased efficiency of these power plants will have a large impact on carbon dioxide emissions, but additional measures will be needed to slow or stop the projected increase in the concentration of atmospheric carbon dioxide. By accelerating the naturally occurring carbonation of magnesium silicate minerals it is possible to sequester carbon dioxide in the geologically stable mineral magnesite (MgCO3). The carbonation of two classes of magnesium silicate minerals, olivine (Mg2SiO4) and serpentine (Mg3Si2O5(OH)4), was investigated in an aqueous process. The slow natural geologic process that converts both of these minerals to magnesite can be accelerated by increasing the surface area, increasing the activity of carbon dioxide in the solution, introducing imperfections into the crystal lattice by high-energy attrition grinding, and in the case of serpentine, by thermally activating the mineral by removing the chemically bound water. The effect of temperature is complex because it affects both the solubility of carbon dioxide and the rate of mineral dissolution in opposing fashions. Thus an optimum temperature for carbonation of olivine is approximately 185 degrees C and 155 degrees C for serpentine. This paper will elucidate the interaction of these variables and use kinetic studies to propose a process for the sequestration of the carbon dioxide.

Gerdemann, Stephen J.; Dahlin, David C.; O'Connor, William K.; Penner, Larry R.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Rock alteration in alkaline cement waters over 15 years and its relevance to the geological disposal of nuclear waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The interaction of groundwater with cement in a geological disposal facility (GDF) for intermediate level radioactive waste will produce a high pH leachate plume. Such a plume may alter the physical and chemical properties of the GDF host rock. However, the geochemical and mineralogical processes which may occur in such systems over timescales relevant for geological disposal remain unclear. This study has extended the timescale for laboratory experiments and shown that, after 15years two distinct phases of reaction may occur during alteration of a dolomite-rich rock at high pH. In these experiments the dissolution of primary silicate minerals and the formation of secondary calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) phases containing varying amounts of aluminium and potassium (C(A)(K)SH) during the early stages of reaction (up to 15months) have been superseded as the systems have evolved. After 15years significant dedolomitisation (MgCa(CO3)2+2OH??Mg(OH)2+CaCO3+CO32?(aq)) has led to the formation of magnesium silicates, such as saponite and talc, containing variable amounts of aluminium and potassium (Mg(Al)(K)silicates), and calcite at the expense of the early-formed C(A)(K)SH phases. This occured in high pH solutions representative of two different periods of cement leachate evolution with little difference in the alteration processes in either a KOH and NaOH or a Ca(OH)2 dominated solution but a greater extent of alteration in the higher pH KOH/NaOH leachate. The high pH alteration of the rock over 15years also increased the rocks sorption capacity for U(VI). The results of this study provide a detailed insight into the longer term reactions occurring during the interaction of cement leachate and dolomite-rich rock in the geosphere. These processes have the potential to impact on radionuclide transport from a geodisposal facility and are therefore important in underpinning any safety case for geological disposal.

Elizabeth B.A. Moyce; Christopher Rochelle; Katherine Morris; Antoni E. Milodowski; Xiaohui Chen; Steve Thornton; Joe S. Small; Samuel Shaw

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Mineral revenues: the 1983 report on receipts from Federal and Indian leases with summary data from 1920 to 1983  

SciTech Connect

Tables and figures abound for: mineral revenue management in 1983; offshore federal mineral revenues; onshore federal mineral revenues; Indian mineral revenues; distribution of federal and Indian mineral revenues; plus appended lease management data. (PSB)

Not Available

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Mineralogy, petrology and whole-rock chemistry of selected mechanical test samples of Yucca Mountain tuffs; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project  

SciTech Connect

Petrologic, bulk chemical and mineralogic data are presented for 19 samples of tuffaceous rocks from core holes UE-25a{number_sign}1, USW G-1, USW GU-3, and USW G-4 at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The suite of samples contains a wide variety of petrologic types, including zeolitized, glassy, and devitrified tuffs. Data include hand sample and thin section descriptions (with modal analyses for which uncertainties are estimated), and major element analyses with uncertainty estimates. No uncertainties were estimated for qualitative mineral identifications by X-ray diffraction. 5 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

Connolly, J.R. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Evaluation of Five Sedimentary Rocks Other Than Salt for Geologic Repository Siting Purposes  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE), in order to increase the diversity of rock types under consideration by the geologic disposal program, initiated the Sedimary ROck Program (SERP), whose immediate objectiv eis to evaluate five types of secimdnary rock - sandstone, chalk, carbonate rocks (limestone and dolostone), anhydrock, and shale - to determine the potential for siting a geologic repository. The evaluation of these five rock types, together with the ongoing salt studies, effectively results in the consideration of all types of relatively impermeable sedimentary rock for repository purposes. The results of this evaluation are expressed in terms of a ranking of the five rock types with respect to their potential to serve as a geologic repository host rock. This comparative evaluation was conducted on a non-site-specific basis, by use of generic information together with rock evaluation criteria (RECs) derived from the DOE siting guidelines for geologic repositories (CFR 1984). An information base relevant to rock evaluation using these RECs was developed in hydrology, geochemistry, rock characteristics (rock occurrences, thermal response, rock mechanics), natural resources, and rock dissolution. Evaluation against postclosure and preclosure RECs yielded a ranking of the five subject rocks with respect to their potential as repository host rocks. Shale was determined to be the most preferred of the five rock types, with sandstone a distant second, the carbonate rocks and anhydrock a more distant third, and chalk a relatively close fourth.

Croff, A.G.; Lomenick, T.F.; Lowrie, R.S.; Stow, S.H.

2003-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rock composition mineral" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

E-Print Network 3.0 - aspo hard rock Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

60 Merguerian, Charles; and Ozdemir, Levent, 2003, Rock Mass Properties and Hard Rock TBM Penetration Rate Investigations, Queens Tunnel Complex, NYC Water Tunnel 3, Stage 2: p....

322

A STATISTICAL FRACTURE MECHANICS APPROACH TO THE STRENGTH OF BRITTLE ROCK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to evaluate subcritical crack growth, many of the rubberoccurred indicating negligible subcritical crack growth.Subcritical crack growth can occur in many rocks and rock-

Ratigan, J.L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Roadmap to the Project: Uranium Miners Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE Roadmap DOE Roadmap Experiments List Oral Histories Records Series Descriptions Overview Documents Declassified Documents Project Events ACHRE Report Uranium Miners Resources Building Public Trust Department of Defense Report FINAL REPORT OF THE RADIATION EXPOSURE COMPENSATION ACT COMMITTEE SUBMITTED TO THE HUMAN RADIATION INTERAGENCY WORKING GROUP JULY, 1996 CONTENTS Executive Summary Proposed Amendments to the Statute Recommended Modifications to the Department of Justice Regulations Introduction Issues Relating to Compensation for Lung Cancer Statutory and Regulatory Framework for Compensation Fairness of the Present Statutory Compensation Criteria Alternative Compensation Criteria Description of the Relative Risk Model Used to Derive Proposed Alternative Criteria, and Model Parameters

324

Miners and Medicine: West Virginia Memoirs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...first 80 years of this century, 19,826 men and boys died in mine accidents. This story has not been told sufficiently strongly to awaken the conscience of our nation. Miners and Medicine is a little disorganized, but it is a very readable account of health care in the coal camps. The first half vividly... The history of coal mining is rife with greed, inhumanity, and incredible danger. Sweatshops, exploitation of child labor, absentee ownership of highly profitable industries, and destruction of native culture were all phenomena of the Industrial ...

Point W.

1994-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

325

Application of Mineral Exploration Models and GIS to Generate Mineral Potential Maps as Input for Optimum Land-Use Planning in the Philippines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The inherent problems of classifying or inventorying potential mineral resources (as opposed to known mineral resources) pose specific challenges. In this paper, the application of a conceptual mineral exploratio...

Emmanuel John M. Carranza; Jerrysal C. Mangaoang; Martin Hale

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Thermally Speciated Mercury in Mineral Exploration | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thermally Speciated Mercury in Mineral Exploration Thermally Speciated Mercury in Mineral Exploration Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Thermally Speciated Mercury in Mineral Exploration Abstract Abstract unavailable. Author S.C. Smith Conference IGES; Dublin, CA; 2003/09/01 Published IGES, 2003 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Citation S.C. Smith. 2003. Thermally Speciated Mercury in Mineral Exploration. In: Programs & Abstracts: Soil and Regolith Geochemistry in the Search for Mineral Deposits. IGES; 2003/09/01; Dublin, CA. Dublin, CA: IGES; p. 78 Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Thermally_Speciated_Mercury_in_Mineral_Exploration&oldid=681717" Categories: References Geothermal References

329

Radioactive Mineral Occurences in Nevada | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Radioactive Mineral Occurences in Nevada Radioactive Mineral Occurences in Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Radioactive Mineral Occurences in Nevada Abstract Abstract unavailable. Author Larry J. Garside Organization Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology Published Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology, 1973 Report Number Open File Report 94-2 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Radioactive Mineral Occurences in Nevada Citation Larry J. Garside (Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology). 1973. Radioactive Mineral Occurences in Nevada. Reno, NV: Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology. Report No.: Open File Report 94-2. Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Radioactive_Mineral_Occurences_in_Nevada&oldid=690513"

330

Mineral Test Hole Regulatory Act (Tennessee) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mineral Test Hole Regulatory Act (Tennessee) Mineral Test Hole Regulatory Act (Tennessee) Mineral Test Hole Regulatory Act (Tennessee) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Developer Fuel Distributor Industrial Installer/Contractor Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Utility Program Info State Tennessee Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Tennessee Department Of Environment and Conservation The Mineral Hole Regulatory Act is applicable to any person (individual, corporation, company, association, joint venture, partnership, receiver, trustee, guardian, executor, administrator, personal representative or private organization of any kind) who wishes to drill a mineral test hole (any hole in excess of one hundred (100) feet drilled during the exploration for minerals but shall exclude auger drilling in surficial or

331

Degradation of Dome Cutting Minerals in Hanford Waste - 13100  

SciTech Connect

At the Hanford Tank Farms, recent changes in retrieval technology require cutting new risers in several single-shell tanks. The Hanford Tank Farm Operator is using water jet technology with abrasive silicate minerals such as garnet or olivine to cut through the concrete and rebar dome. The abrasiveness of these minerals, which become part of the high-level waste stream, may enhance the erosion of waste processing equipment. However, garnet and olivine are not thermodynamically stable in Hanford waste, slowly degrading over time. How likely these materials are to dissolve completely in the waste before the waste is processed in the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant can be evaluated using theoretical analysis for olivine and collected direct experimental evidence for garnet. Based on an extensive literature study, a large number of primary silicates decompose into sodalite and cancrinite when exposed to Hanford waste. Given sufficient time, the sodalite also degrades into cancrinite. Even though cancrinite has not been directly added to any Hanford tanks during process times, it is the most common silicate observed in current Hanford waste. By analogy, olivine and garnet are expected to ultimately also decompose into cancrinite. Garnet used in a concrete cutting demonstration was immersed in a simulated supernate representing the estimated composition of the liquid retrieving waste from Hanford tank 241-C-107 at both ambient and elevated temperatures. This simulant was amended with extra NaOH to determine if adding caustic would help enhance the degradation rate of garnet. The results showed that the garnet degradation rate was highest at the highest NaOH concentration and temperature. At the end of 12 weeks, however, the garnet grains were mostly intact, even when immersed in 2 molar NaOH at 80 deg. C. Cancrinite was identified as the degradation product on the surface of the garnet grains. In the case of olivine, the rate of degradation in the high-pH regimes of a waste tank is expected to depend on two main parameters: carbonate is expected to slow olivine degradation rates, whereas hydroxide is expected to enhance olivine dissolution rates. Which of these two competing dissolution drivers will have a larger impact on the dissolution rate in the specific environment of a waste tank is currently not identifiable. In general, cancrinite is much smaller and less hard than either olivine or garnet, so would be expected to be less erosive to processing equipment. Complete degradation of either garnet or olivine prior to being processed at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant cannot be confirmed, however. (authors)

Reynolds, Jacob G.; Cooke, Gary A.; Huber, Heinz J. [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC, P.O. Box 850, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)] [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC, P.O. Box 850, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Degradation of dome cutting minerals in Hanford waste  

SciTech Connect

At the Hanford Tank Farms, recent changes in retrieval technology require cutting new risers in several single-shell tanks. The Hanford Tank Farm Operator is using water jet technology with abrasive silicate minerals such as garnet or olivine to cut through the concrete and rebar dome. The abrasiveness of these minerals, which become part of the high-level waste stream, may enhance the erosion of waste processing equipment. However, garnet and olivine are not thermodynamically stable in Hanford waste, slowly degrading over time. How likely these materials are to dissolve completely in the waste before the waste is processed in the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant can be evaluated using theoretical analysis for olivine and collected direct experimental evidence for garnet. Based on an extensive literature study, a large number of primary silicates decompose into sodalite and cancrinite when exposed to Hanford waste. Given sufficient time, the sodalite also degrades into cancrinite. Even though cancrinite has not been directly added to any Hanford tanks during process times, it is the most common silicate observed in current Hanford waste. By analogy, olivine and garnet are expected to ultimately also decompose into cancrinite. Garnet used in a concrete cutting demonstration was immersed in a simulated supernate representing the estimated composition of the liquid retrieving waste from Hanford tank 241-C-107 at both ambient and elevated temperatures. This simulant was amended with extra NaOH to determine if adding caustic would help enhance the degradation rate of garnet. The results showed that the garnet degradation rate was highest at the highest NaOH concentration and temperature. At the end of 12 weeks, however, the garnet grains were mostly intact, even when immersed in 2 molar NaOH at 80 deg C. Cancrinite was identified as the degradation product on the surface of the garnet grains. In the case of olivine, the rate of degradation in the high-pH regimes of a waste tank is expected to depend on two main parameters: carbonate is expected to slow olivine degradation rates, whereas hydroxide is expected to enhance olivine dissolution rates. Which of these two competing dissolution drivers will have a larger impact on the dissolution rate in the specific environment of a waste tank is currently not identifiable. In general, cancrinite is much smaller and less hard than either olivine or garnet, so would be expected to be less erosive to processing equipment. Complete degradation of either garnet or olivine prior to being processed at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant cannot be confirmed, however.

Reynolds, Jacob G.; Huber, Heinz J.; Cooke, Gary A.

2013-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

333

Lunar Crust: Structure and Composition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...anorthositic rocks. The apparent...VELOCITY IN LOW POROSITY ROCKS, EARTH AND...long fanciful reservoir of oxy-genated...is present. Permeability to water might...terrestrial ig-neous rocks with about 0.5 percent porosity have demonstrated...

M. N. Toksz; F. Press; K. Anderson; A. Dainty; G. Latham; M. Ewing; J. Dorman; D. Lammlein; G. Sutton; F. Duennebier; Y. Nakamura

1972-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

334

Roadmap to the Project: Uranium Miners Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY EXECUTIVE SUMMARY On October 15, 1990, Congress passed the Radiation Exposure Compensation Act of 1990 (RECA), which provided for compassionate payments to individuals who suffered from specified diseases presumably as a result of exposure to radiation in connection with the federal government's nuclear weapons testing program. Among those eligible for compensation under the Act are individuals who were employed in underground uranium mines in Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, Utah or Wyoming during the 1947 to 1971 time period, who were exposed to specified minimum levels of radon, and who contracted specified lung disorders. The Department of Justice administers the RECA through the Radiation Exposure Compensation Program (Program). The provisions of the RECA defining compensation for uranium miners have been characterized by critics as unfair and inconsistent with current scientific information. The regulations of the Department of Justice implementing the statute have also been criticized as being unnecessarily stringent and unreasonably burdensome. These criticisms were noted, and in some cases affirmed, by the President's Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Experiments, charged by the President to investigate the history of human radiation experimentation conducted by the federal government during the Cold War period. In its Final Report, issued on October 3, 1995, the Advisory Committee recommended, among other things, that the Administration review the provisions of RECA governing compensation for uranium miners and the implementing regulations to ensure that they are fair, consistent with current scientific evidence, and compatible with the objectives of the Act.

335

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Minerals: GHG Inventory...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

GHG Inventory Protocols Read the Industrial Minerals Association - North America (IMA-NA) Borates and Soda Ash Sections Greenhouse Gas Inventory Protocol (PDF 75 KB) Download...

336

Coop: 02-2011 COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND MINERAL RESOURCES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coop: 02-2011 COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND MINERAL RESOURCES COOPERATIVE EDUCATION PROGRAM STUDENT. DEPENDABILITY Reliable, prompt, trustworthy; meets obligations and follow directions. CREATIVITY Proposes ideas

Mohaghegh, Shahab

337

Reclamation of Land Used for Mineral Mining (Virginia)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This legislation aims to provide for the rehabilitation and conservation of land affected by the mining of minerals through proper planning, proper use of appropriate methods of mining,...

338

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Rock Island Arsenal - IL 09  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rock Island Arsenal - IL 09 Rock Island Arsenal - IL 09 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: ROCK ISLAND ARSENAL ( IL.09 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP - Referred to DOD Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Rock Island , Illinois IL.09-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 IL.09-2 Site Operations: Site located on a DOD facility and operated under AEC control. Exact nature or time period of operations not clear. No indication that radioactive materials were involved. Contract work with Albuquerque Operations office performed. IL.09-1 IL.09-2 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No Authority - Referred to DOD IL.09-2 Radioactive Materials Handled: None Indicated IL.09-2 Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: None Indicated Radiological Survey(s): None Indicated

339

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- WNI Split Rock Site - 043  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Split Rock Site - 043 Split Rock Site - 043 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: WNI Split Rock Site (043) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: The Western Nuclear, Inc. (WNI) Split Rock site is a Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Title II site located in Jeffrey City, Wyoming. UMTRA Title II sites are privately owned and operated sites that were active when the Uranium Mill Tailings Control Act was passed in 1978. The majority of the milling conducted at these sites was for private sale, but a portion was sold to the U.S. Government. After the owner completes U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission license termination, the Department of

340

Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Coso Geothermal Area (1997) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rock At Coso Geothermal Area (1997) Rock At Coso Geothermal Area (1997) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Coso Geothermal Area (1997) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Rock Activity Date 1997 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine a major lithospheric boundary Notes Sr and Nd isotope ratios of Miocene-Recent basalts in eastern California, when screened for crustal contamination, vary dramatically and indicate the presence of a major lithospheric boundary that is not obvious from surface geology. Isotope ratios from the Coso field form a bull's-eye pattern with very low 87Sr/86Sr (0.7033) centered just south of the geothermal area. The

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rock composition mineral" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Rock Sampling At Florida Mountains Area (Brookins, 1982) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Rock Sampling At Florida Mountains Area (Brookins, 1982) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Rock Sampling At Florida Mountains Area (Brookins, 1982) Exploration Activity Details Location Florida Mountains Area Exploration Technique Rock Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Radiogenic heat production analysis from U,Th,K concentrations. References D. G. Brookins (1982) Potassium, Uranium, Thorium Radiogenic Heat Contribution To Heat Flow In The Precambrian And Younger Silicic Rocks Of The Zuni And Florida Mountains, New Mexico (Usa)

342

On the energy range relation for fast muons in rock  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A discussion is given of the best estimate of various types of energy loss; the energy-range relation for muons in rock and water is then evaluated....?6 g?1 cm2 fractional nuclear energy losses respectively; w...

M. Mand; L. Ronchi

1952-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Upscaling of elastic properties of anisotropic sedimentary rocks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Data 2.1 Physical model of shale Shales are anisotropic rocks whose anisotropy is generally...Hudson J.A., 1994. Anisotropic effective-medium modeling of the elastic properties of shales, Geophysics, 59, 1570-1583......

Irina O. Bayuk; Mike Ammerman; Evgeni M. Chesnokov

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Mimbres rock art: a graphic legacy of cultural expression  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rock art abounds along the Mimbres River banks and drainage tributaries reflecting the rich cultural remains of the ancient Mimbres people. The Mimbres are a well established cultural group who lived in southwest New Mexico and northern Mexico from...

Tidemann, Kathryn

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

345

Experimental Study on Rock Deformation and Permeability Variation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The development of a petroleum reservoir would inevitably induce a rearrangement of the in-situ stress field. The rearrangement of the stress field would then bring about a deformation of the reservoir rock and a change of the permeability...

Ding, Jihui

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Acid Fracture and Fracture Conductivity Study of Field Rock Samples  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Acid fracturing is a well stimulation strategy designed to increase the productivity of a producing well. The parameters of acid fracturing and the effects of acid interaction on specific rock samples can be studied experimentally. Acid injection...

Underwood, Jarrod

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

347

Modeling of Seismic Signatures of Carbonate Rock Types  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbonate reservoirs of different rock types have wide ranges of porosity and permeability, creating zones with different reservoir quality and flow properties. This research addresses how seismic technology can be used to identify different...

Jan, Badr H.

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

348

Rock Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Goff, Et...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

pre-intrusive metavolcanic and metasedimentary rocks can have considerably higher Sr-isotope ratios (0.7061-0.7246 and 0.7090-0.7250, respectively). Hydrothermally altered...

349

Microsoft Word - CX_HatRockEquipmentDisposition.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

station taps PacifiCorp's McNary-Wallula 230-kilovolt (kV) line to serve BPA's Hat Rock Substation. PacifiCorp is in the process of rebuilding the switching station, including...

350

Mathematical model of a Hot Dry Rock system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......efficiency calculations, geothermal energy, Hot Dry Rock, multiple crack...is to estimate the amount of energy which may be produced by a geothermic power station. Heat capacity...provides a large resource of energy. To obtain the energy cold......

Norbert Heuer; Tassilo Kpper; Dirk Windelberg

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Hot rocks could help meet US energy needs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... -4 Hot rocks could help meet US energy needs LucyOdling-Smee Get more out of geothermal, experts advise. ... , experts advise.Geothermal energy takes advantage of heat naturally generated within the earth. Punchstock Nature energy focus ...

Lucy Odling-Smee

2007-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

352

Reservoir Investigations on the Hot Dry Rock Geothermal System...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Investigations on the Hot Dry Rock Geothermal System, Fenton Hill, New Mexico- Tracer Test Results Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference...

353

Hot Dry Rock Reservoir Engineering | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

hydraulically connect the wells. Water pumped down the injection well and through the fracture system is heated by contact with the hot rock and rises to the production well. This...

354

FREQUENCY DEPENDENT ELASTIC AND ANELASTIC PROPERTIES OF CLASTIC ROCKS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

was sequestered in a shallow saline aquifer where the vertical migration of the CO2 is controlled by shale changes in the compressibility of rocks. A large difference between the seismic and ultrasonic frequencies

355

Lithology and alteration mineralogy of reservoir rocks at Coso Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lithology and alteration mineralogy of reservoir rocks at Coso Geothermal Lithology and alteration mineralogy of reservoir rocks at Coso Geothermal Area, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Lithology and alteration mineralogy of reservoir rocks at Coso Geothermal Area, California Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Coso is one of several high-temperature geothermal systems associated with recent volcanic activity in the Basin and Range province. Chemical and fluid inclusion data demonstrate that production is from a narrow, asymmetric plume of thermal water that originates from a deep reservoir to the south and then flows laterally to the north. Geologic controls on the geometry of the upwelling plume were investigated using petrographic and analytical analyses of reservoir rock and vein material.

356

Zeolitization Of Intracaldera Sediments And Rhyolitic Rocks In...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sediments And Rhyolitic Rocks In The 1.25 Ma Lake Of Valles Caldera, New Mexico, Usa Abstract Quantitative X-ray diffraction analysis of about 80 rhyolite and associated...

357

Zeolitization Of Intracaldera Sediments And Rhyolitic Rocks In...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sediments And Rhyolitic Rocks In The 1.25 Ma Lake Of Valles Caldera, New Mexico, USA Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article:...

358

Rock climbing sub-worlds: a segmentation study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ROCK CLIMBING SUB-WORLDS: A SEGMENTATION STUDY A Thesis by BRANDON WAYNE RAPELJE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE August 2004 Major Subject: Recreation, Park & Tourism Sciences ROCK CLIMBING SUB-WORLDS: A SEGMENTATION STUDY A Thesis by BRANDON WAYNE RAPELJE Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment...

Rapelje, Brandon Wayne

2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

359

The effect of rock density in synthesizing seismic reflection records  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

was gained on the relative significance of rock densities in determining the reflection coefficient. The error which would be expected in the reflection coefficient at an interface when computed from the velocity inforsmtion only can be estimated from... was gained on the relative significance of rock densities in determining the reflection coefficient. The error which would be expected in the reflection coefficient at an interface when computed from the velocity inforsmtion only can be estimated from...

Morris, Gerald Brooks

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

360

Comparison of linear and nonlinear acoustic probing of rock salt  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COMPARISON OF LINEAR AND NONLINEAR ACOUSTIC PROBING OF ROCK SALT A Thesis by ALBERT MIN-HAO WANG Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AIIM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August... 1980 Major Subject: Geophysics COMPARISON OF LINEAR AND NONLINEAR ACOUSTIC PROBING OF ROCK SALT A Thesis by ALBERT MIN-HAO 'RANG Approved as to style and content by: l('-/c~k~&(. Chairman o Comm ' ee Member) Member / I Member Head...

Wang, Albert Min-Hao

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rock composition mineral" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Rock glacier monitoring with low-cost GPS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

moving stations on rock glacier Low-cost L1 GPS receivers (blox) Power source: solar panels Local data Rock glacier GPS antennaGPS antenna Solar panelSolar panel Box incl.Box incl. -GPS receiverData logger Instruments Solar panelSolar panel (24W, 12V, 50x50cm)(24W, 12V, 50x50cm) Costs per station: 2

362

Quantification of mineral matter in the Argonne Premium Coals using interactive Rietveld-based X-ray diffraction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The mineral matter in the eight reference North American coal samples of the Argonne Premium Coal series has been investigated on a quantitative basis using X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques. X-ray diffraction data obtained from electronic low-temperature (oxygenplasma) ash (LTA) residues, from ashes produced by heating the coals in air at 370C, and also from the raw coals themselves, were evaluated using an interactive data processing system (siroquant) based on Rietveld interpretation methods. The results from the three types of material (LTA, 370C ash and raw coal) were compared for each sample. This allowed the components present in the raw coals in crystalline form to be recognised separately from mineral artifacts produced, particularly in the low-rank coals, from interaction of organically associated elements (Ca, S, etc.) during the two ashing processes. After the allowance for the production of any artifacts, the quantitative mineral assemblages identified from XRD of the raw coals were found to be consistent, even for coals having a relatively low ash percentage (around 5%), with the results obtained from the respective mineral concentrates prepared by the ashing methods. The effects of heating the coal to 370C could also be distinguished, relative to the raw coal or the LTA, through changes in components such as pyrite and the clay minerals. Although some areas of uncertainty exist, particularly with magnesium in the low-rank coals, the calculated chemical compositions of the coal ash derived from the mineral mixtures identified for each coal were also found to be consistent with the results of direct chemical analysis of the respective coal ash materials.

Colin R. Ward; John C. Taylor; C.E. Matulis; L.S. Dale

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

The kerogen types and pyrolysis kinetics of several Chinese carbonate source rocks  

SciTech Connect

The kerogen types and pyrolysis kinetics of several Chinese carbonate source rocks are studied in this paper. Samples involved are from Proterozoic to Neogene, including marine and lacustrine environments. Their TOC range from 0.15% to 1.69%. The carbonate contents are more than 80% except the Paleozoic Pingliang marl, Shanganning Basin. The maturations range from immature to late stage of oil generation. The Green River calcareous shale and Ghareb marl, Jordan are included for comparison. The study of kerogen types is based on analyses of kerogens including: optical method, elemental analysis, infrared spectrum, rock eval pyrolysis, pyrolysis-gas chromatography, and C-13 Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectrometry. The results of the study shows that most of the kerogens studied belong to type 1 or sapropelic type 2 (2a), while the kerogens from Triassic Qinglong limestone (restricted by), Jiangsu and Neogene Guantao limestone (small fault lacustrine), Shandong belong to mixed type 2 (2b). The study of pyrolysis kinetics is based on standard Rock Eval information (5 C/min.), a two-stage first order reaction model and optimization method which has been confirmed to be a simple, practical and effective method by a previous study. The current study reveals that different kerogen types have their own kinetic characteristics. Generally, kinetics parameters of type 1 and type 2a kerogens are greater than those of type 2b. However, high-sulfur type 1 and type 2a kerogens, such as those from Ghareb marl, Jordan, and Proterozoic kerogen, North China have relatively low kinetics parameters. The study also shows that kerogens with similar hydrocarbon potential (HI) and elemental composition (atomic H/C, O/C) may have very different kinetic processes.

Zhang, Youcheng (Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Oceanography); Shisheng Hao (Petroleum Univ., Beijing (China). Dept. of Geosciences)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Hydrogeologic factors affecting cavern morphology within rocks of Mississippian age in northwestern Arkansas  

SciTech Connect

Cavern development within rocks of Mississippian age in northwestern Arkansas is associated with two Pleistocene erosional features, the Boston Mountains Plateau and the Springfield Plateau. Each plateau is characterized by a distinct stratigraphic sequence with unique lithologies. Cavern morphology (both cross-sectional and planimetric) in each plateau is the result of the complex interaction of numerous hydrogeologic factors. Four of the most dominant factors which affect cavern morphology appear to be: (1) composition and continuity of the confining units; (2) percentage of noncarbonate components in rocks of the cavern-forming interval; (3) nature and distribution of ground-water recharge to the cavern-forming interval; and (4) nature and distribution of fractures within the cavern-forming interval. Network maze patterns typically develop in the Pitkin Limestone, the formation in which most caverns form beneath the Boston Mountains Plateau. The Pitkin, a bioclastic limestone, is confined above by siltstones of the Cane Hill member of the Hale Formation and below by shales of the Fayetteville Formation. The maze pattern indicates that these caverns probably were formed by dissolution of the rock matrix by diffuse recharge moving vertically through leaky confining units. Single rooms are the dominant cavern morphology in the chert-dominated Boone Formation of the Springfield Plateau. Where the concentration of chert is greater than 50 percent, the Boone lacks structural integrity and fails to develop well-integrated conduit networks. Point recharge features in outcrop areas of the Boone Formation are not visible in most of the Springfield Plateau because the insoluble residuum masks the upper bedrock surface. Where the Boone Formation is less than 7 meters thick, surface karst features are more prevalent.

Fanning, B.J. (Univ. of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR (United States). Dept. of Geology); Brahana, J.V. (Univ. of Arkansas , Fayetteville, AR (United States). Geological Survey)

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Proceedings of the sixteenth international symposium on mine planning and equipment selection (MPES 2007) and the tenth international symposium on environmental issues and waste management in energy and mineral production (SWEMP 2007)  

SciTech Connect

Papers presented at MPES 2007 covered: coal mining and clean coal processing technologies; control, design and planning of surface and underground mines; drilling, blasting and excavation engineering; mining equipment selection; automation and information technology; maintenance and production management for mines and mining systems; health, safety and environment; cost effective methods of mine reclamation; mine closure and waste disposal; and rock mechanics and geotechnical issues. Papers from SWEMP 2007 discussed methods and technologies for assessing, minimizing and preventing environmental problems associated with mineral and energy production. Topics included environmental impacts of coal-fired power projects; emission control in thermal power plants; greenhouse gas abatement technologies; remediation of contaminated soil and groundwater; environmental issues in surface and underground mining of coal, minerals and ores; managing mine waste and mine water; and control of effluents from mineral processing, metallurgical and chemical plants.

Singhal, R.K.; Fytas, K.; Jongsiri, S.; Ge, Hao (eds.) [Universite Laval, Quebec, PQ (Canada)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Geotechnical Features of the Volcanic Rocks Related to the Arteara Rock Avalanche in Gran Canaria (Canary Islands, Spain)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Arteara rock avalanche is developed in the Fataga Group which is related to the first volcanic stage in the Gran Canaria Island (8.613.3 Ma)....

Martn Jess Rodrguez-Peces; Jorge Yepes Temio

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Microcracking in fibrous composites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are conducted on a unidirectional graphite fiber-reinforced epoxy in order to determine some aspects of nonlinear behavior, and the results of microcracking. The nature. of the microstructure of composites and the microcracking that occurs in composites... of microscopy samples. 53 21. Graphite composite surfaces, as received (top, 60X) and as prepared (bottom, 100X) ~ 56 22, Graphite composite surfaces after peeling (1000X). 58 23. Scotchply surfaces after peeling (1000X). 60 24. Graphite composite damaged...

Conrad, Nicholas

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

368

On Two-Phase Relative Permeability and Capillary Pressure of Rough-Walled Rock Fractures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Single Rock Joints", Licentiate Thesis, Lulea Universityof Technology, Lulea, Sweden. Heiba, A. A. , Sahimi, M. ,

Pruess ed, K.; Tsang, Y.W.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Black Lung: Dispute about Diagnosis of Miners" Ailment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...them, all residents of Appalachia and all suffering from pneumoconiosis-the...caused by years of inhaling coal dust-paid an unexpected...majority of doctors in the coal-mining areas are not on the miners' side. The coal miners have been done wrong...

Joe Pichirallo

1971-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

370

Trans Boundary Transport of Pollutants by Atmospheric Mineral  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Trans Boundary Transport of Pollutants by Atmospheric Mineral Dust Y I G A L E R E L , * , U R I D, and solid constituents in the atmosphere (3-11). Uptake of pollutants by mineral dust has been shown Jerusalem, Israel The transport of anthropogenic pollution by desert dust in the Eastern Mediterranean

Einat, Aharonov

371

Carbon Mineralization: From Natural Analogues to Engineered Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Chisti Y (2007) Biodiesel from microalgae...mineral pretreatment process cost. U.S. Dep...S-J (2012b) Evaluation of factors affecting...Diopside. Int J Miner Process 61:273-288 Kalinkina...sequestration. Fuel Process Technol 86:1627-1645...Microalgae for biodiesel production and other...

Ian M. Power; Anna L. Harrison; Gregory M. Dipple; Siobhan A. Wilson; Peter B. Kelemen; Michael Hitch; Gordon Southam

372

MECHANICAL DEGRADATION OF EMPLACEMENT DRIFTS AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN - A CASE STUDY IN ROCK MECHANICS, PART 1: NONLITHOPHYSAL ROCK, PART 2: LITHOPHYSAL ROCK  

SciTech Connect

This paper outlines rock mechanics investigations associated with mechanical degradation of planned emplacement drifts at Yucca Mountain, which is the designated site for a US high-level nuclear waste repository. The factors leading to drift degradation include stresses from the overburden, stresses induced by the heat released from the emplaced waste, stresses due to seismically related ground motions, and time-dependent strength degradation. The welded tuff emplacement horizon consists of two groups of rock with distinct engineering properties: nonlithophysal units and lithophysal units, based on the relative proportion of lithophysal cavities. Part I of the paper concentrates on the generally hard, strong, and fractured nonlithophysal rock. The degradation behavior of the tunnels in the nonlithophysal rock is controlled by the occurrence of keyblocks. A statistically equivalent fracture model was generated based on extensive underground fracture mapping data from the Exploratory Studies Facility at Yucca Mountain. Three-dimensional distinct block analyses, generated with the fracture patterns randomly selected from the fracture model, were developed with the consideration of in situ, thermal, seismic loads. In this study, field data, laboratory data, and numerical analyses are well integrated to provide a solution for the unique problem of modeling drift degradation throughout the regulatory period for repository performance.

M. Lin, D. Kicker, B. Damjanac, M. Board, and M. Karakouzian

2006-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

373

Hydrothermal alteration mineral mapping using hyperspectral imagery in  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

alteration mineral mapping using hyperspectral imagery in alteration mineral mapping using hyperspectral imagery in Dixie Valley, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Hydrothermal alteration mineral mapping using hyperspectral imagery in Dixie Valley, Nevada Abstract Hyperspectral (HyMap) data was used to map the location ofoutcrops of high temperature, hydrothermally alterated minerals(including alunite, pyrophyllite, and hematite) along a 15 kmswath of the eastern front of the Stillwater Mountain Range inDixie Valley, Nevada. Analysis of this data set reveals that severaloutcrops of these altered minerals exist in the area, and thatone outcrop, roughly 1 square kilometer in area, shows abundanthigh temperature alteration. Structural analysis of the alteredregion using a

374

Mineral Leasing Act of 1920 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Leasing Act of 1920 Leasing Act of 1920 Jump to: navigation, search Statute Name Mineral Leasing Act of 1920 Year 1920 Url MineralLeasingAct.jpg Description The Mineral Leasing Act established the authority of the Secretary of the Interior to oversee oil and gas operations on federal land. References Federal Oil and Gas Statutes[1] Mineral Leasing Act of 1920 (30 U.S.C. § 181 et seq.) - The Mineral Leasing Act established the authority of the Secretary of the Interior to oversee oil and gas operations on federal land. "The Secretary of the Interior is authorized to prescribe necessary and proper rules and regulations and to do any and all things necessary to carry out and accomplish the purposes of this Act." 30 U.S.C. § 189 References ↑ "Federal Oil and Gas Statutes"

375

Oxygen And Carbon Isotope Ratios Of Hydrothermal Minerals From Yellowstone  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Oxygen And Carbon Isotope Ratios Of Hydrothermal Minerals From Yellowstone Oxygen And Carbon Isotope Ratios Of Hydrothermal Minerals From Yellowstone Drill Cores Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Oxygen And Carbon Isotope Ratios Of Hydrothermal Minerals From Yellowstone Drill Cores Details Activities (3) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Oxygen and carbon isotope ratios were measured for hydrothermal minerals (silica, clay and calcite) from fractures and vugs in altered rhyolite, located between 28 and 129 m below surface (in situ temperatures ranging from 81 to 199°C) in Yellowstone drill holes. The purpose of this study was to investigate the mechanism of formation of these minerals. The Δ18O values of the thirty-two analyzed silica samples (quartz, chalcedony, α-cristobalite, and β-cristobalite) range from -7.5 to +2.8‰. About one

376

Cementation process for minerals recovery from Salton Sea geothermal brines  

SciTech Connect

The potential for minerals recovery from a 1000-MWe combined geothermal power and minerals recovery plant in the Salton Sea is examined. While the possible value of minerals recovered would substantially exceed the revenue from power production, information is insufficient to carry out a detailed economic analysis. The recovery of precious metals - silver, gold, and platinum - is the most important factor in determining the economics of a minerals recovery plant; however, the precious metals content of the brines is not certain. Such a power plant could recover 14 to 31% of the US demand for manganese and substantial amounts of zinc and lead. Previous work on minerals extraction from Salton Sea brines is also reviewed and a new process, based on a fluidized-bed cementation reaction with metallic iron, is proposed. This process would recover the precious metals, lead, and tin present in the brines.

Maimoni, A.

1982-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

377

Minerals on Public Lands (Texas) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Minerals on Public Lands (Texas) Minerals on Public Lands (Texas) Minerals on Public Lands (Texas) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Investor-Owned Utility Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Program Info State Texas Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Texas General Land Office Any tract of land that belongs to the state, including islands, salt and freshwater lakes, bays, inlets, marshes, and reefs owned by the state within tidewater limits, the part of the Gulf of Mexico within the state's jurisdiction, unsold surveyed public school land, rivers and channels that belong to the state, and land sold with a reservation of minerals to the state are subject to prospect by any person for those minerals which are

378

2 INVESTIGATION OF CRUDE OIL/BRINE/ROCK INTERACTION 2.1 EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF CRUDE/BRINE/ROCK INTERACTION AT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INTERACTION AT RESERVOIR CONDITIONS 2.1.1 Introduction In the previous section, the fluid/rock interactions in this section and expand the understanding of the interactions of the Spraberry reservoir rock, oil and brine, brine displacement and rock wettability using low permeability Spraberry cores. A schematic

Schechter, David S.

379

1.4 PETROPHYSICS: Combined Rock and Fluid Character Integration of geological and petrophysical data allows development of a rock-fluid model for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the different rock types that comprise the subject reservoirs, marginal reservoirs and non-reservoir rocks). Analytical techniques used to develop this model include porosity-permeability analysis of core plug samples.4.2.2.1 Permeability determination with Nitrogen Flow Through Rock Type: Core plug samples of 1 in. and 1.5-in

Schechter, David S.

380

SIMS zircon UPb and molybdenite ReOs geochronology, Hf isotope, and whole-rock geochemistry of the Wunugetushan porphyry CuMo deposit and granitoids in NE China and their geological significance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The geodynamic setting of magmatic rocks and geodynamic mechanism of CuMoFeSnPbZnAg polymetallic mineralization in northeastern (NE) China are attracting increasing attention. This study explores these issues by providing SIMS zircon UPb dating, whole-rock geochemical, Hf isotopic data of magmatic rocks, and molybdenite ReOs dating exposed in the Wunugetushan porphyry CuMo deposit, NE China. This deposit is located in the western part of the Great Xing'an Range, on the southeastern margin of the MongolOkhotsk Orogenic Belt. Molybdenite ReOs and SIMS zircon UPb dating of the host monzogranitic porphyry and the wall rock of biotite granite in the Wunugetushan porphyry CuMo deposit indicate that the ore-formation, host porphyry, and wall rock-emplacement occurred at 180.52.0Ma, 180.41.4Ma, and 203.51.6Ma, respectively, and the mineralization of the Wunugetushan porphyry CuMo deposit occurred during the same period as that of the host monzogranitic porphyry. Geochemically, the Wunugetushan granitoids are characterized by strong LREE/HREE fractionation, and pronounced negative Nb, Ta, and Ti anomalies, with slightly negative Eu anomalies (Eu/Eu*=0.710.97) of the host monzogranitic porphyry and pronounced negative Eu anomalies (Eu/Eu*=0.290.32) of the wall rock of biotite granite. In situ Hf isotopic analyses of zircons from the host monzogranitic porphyry and the wall rock of biotite granite yielded ?Hf(t) values ranging from 0.5 to 8.2, and from ?6.9 to 5.9, respectively. The geochemical and isotopic data for the Wunugetushan granitoids imply that the primary magmas of the host monzogranitic porphyry could have originated by partial melting of a thickened lower crust, with input of mantle components, while the primary magmas of the wall rock of biotite granite could have been derived by partial melting of a thickened lower crust that mixed with ancient crustal materials. Based on the regional geological history, geochemistry of the Wunugetushan granitoids, and new isotopic age data, we suggest that the formation of the Wunugetushan porphyry CuMo deposit was possibly induced in the Early Jurassic during the period of the southeastward subduction of the MongolOkhotsk oceanic plate beneath the Erguna Massif.

Yinhong Wang; Chunbo Zhao; Fangfang Zhang; Jiajun Liu; Jianping Wang; Runmin Peng; Bin Liu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rock composition mineral" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Proceedings of the scientific visit on crystalline rock repository development.  

SciTech Connect

A scientific visit on Crystalline Rock Repository Development was held in the Czech Republic on September 24-27, 2012. The visit was hosted by the Czech Radioactive Waste Repository Authority (RAWRA), co-hosted by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), and supported by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The purpose of the visit was to promote technical information exchange between participants from countries engaged in the investigation and exploration of crystalline rock for the eventual construction of nuclear waste repositories. The visit was designed especially for participants of countries that have recently commenced (or recommenced) national repository programmes in crystalline host rock formations. Discussion topics included repository programme development, site screening and selection, site characterization, disposal concepts in crystalline host rock, regulatory frameworks, and safety assessment methodology. Interest was surveyed in establishing a %E2%80%9Cclub,%E2%80%9D the mission of which would be to identify and address the various technical challenges that confront the disposal of radioactive waste in crystalline rock environments. The idea of a second scientific visit to be held one year later in another host country received popular support. The visit concluded with a trip to the countryside south of Prague where participants were treated to a tour of the laboratory and underground facilities of the Josef Regional Underground Research Centre.

Mariner, Paul E.; Hardin, Ernest L.; Miksova, Jitka [RAWRA, Czech Republic

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

PARKER-HEADGATE ROCK & PARKER-GILA  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PARKER-HEADGATE ROCK & PARKER-GILA PARKER-HEADGATE ROCK & PARKER-GILA 161-kV TRANSMISSION LINE Cross Arm Repair and Helicopter Staging Areas Figure 1. Project Location Project Location j PARKER-HEADGATE ROCK & PARKER-GILA 161-kV TRANSMISSION LINE Cross Arm Repair and Helicopter Staging Areas Figure 2a. Project Area (North) Staging Area #4 Structure 3/5 Structure 3/6 Structure 3/4 Structure 3/7 Structure 3/5 Structure 3/6 PARKER-HEADGATE ROCK 161-kV TRANSMISSION LINE PARKER-GILA 161-kV TRANSMISSION LINE Structure 4/6 Legal Description N N 1:24000 scale 1:24000 scale Section Township Range 17 20 2 N 27 E 31 11 N 18 W 6 10 N USGS TOPO MAP: Cross Roads, Arizona-California USGS TOPO MAP: Cross Roads, Arizona-California PARKER-HEADGATE ROCK & PARKER-GILA 161-kV TRANSMISSION LINE Cross Arm Repair and Helicopter Staging Areas

383

Pyridine sorption to mineral surfaces: a fourier transform infrared spectroscopy study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by pyridine, to various mineral surfaces. Four minerals were used in this study: montmorillinite, kaolinite, iron oxide and silica gel. Conditions were varied by sorting pyridine to the minerals in both the gaseous and aqueous phase and by altering...

Graham, Robert Edward

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

384

Chemically Accelerated Carbon Mineralization: Chemical and Biological Catalytic Enhancement of Weathering of Silicate Minerals as Novel Carbon Capture and Storage  

SciTech Connect

IMPACCT Project: Columbia University is developing a process to pull CO2 out of the exhaust gas of coal-fired power plants and turn it into a solid that can be easily and safely transported, stored above ground, or integrated into value-added products (e.g. paper filler, plastic filler, construction materials, etc.). In nature, the reaction of CO2 with various minerals over long periods of time will yield a solid carbonatethis process is known as carbon mineralization. The use of carbon mineralization as a CO2 capture and storage method is limited by the speeds at which these minerals can be dissolved and CO2 can be hydrated. To facilitate this, Columbia University is using a unique process and a combination of chemical catalysts which increase the mineral dissolution rate, and the enzymatic catalyst carbonic anhydrase which speeds up the hydration of CO2.

None

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Lithotrophic iron-oxidizing bacteria produce organic stalks to control mineral growth: implications for biosignature formation  

SciTech Connect

Neutrophilic Fe-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) are often identified by their distinctive morphologies, such as the extracellular twisted ribbon-like stalks formed by Gallionella ferruginea or Mariprofundus ferrooxydans. Similar filaments preserved in silica are often identified as FeOB fossils in rocks. Although it is assumed that twisted iron stalks are indicative of FeOB, the stalk's metabolic role has not been established. To this end, we studied the marine FeOB M. ferrooxydans by light, X-ray and electron microscopy. Using time-lapse light microscopy, we observed cells excreting stalks during growth (averaging 2.2 {micro}m h(-1)). Scanning transmission X-ray microscopy and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy show that stalks are Fe(III)-rich, whereas cells are low in Fe. Transmission electron microscopy reveals that stalks are composed of several fibrils, which contain few-nanometer-sized iron oxyhydroxide crystals. Lepidocrocite crystals that nucleated on the fibril surface are much larger ({approx}100 nm), suggesting that mineral growth within fibrils is retarded, relative to sites surrounding fibrils. C and N 1s NEXAFS spectroscopy and fluorescence probing show that stalks primarily contain carboxyl-rich polysaccharides. On the basis of these results, we suggest a physiological model for Fe oxidation in which cells excrete oxidized Fe bound to organic polymers. These organic molecules retard mineral growth, preventing cell encrustation. This model describes an essential role for stalk formation in FeOB growth. We suggest that stalk-like morphologies observed in modern and ancient samples may be correlated confidently with the Fe-oxidizing metabolism as a robust biosignature.

Chan, Clara S; Fakra, Sirine C; Emerson, David; Fleming, Emily J; Edwards, Katrina J

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

MINERAL-SURFACTANT INTERACTIONS FOR MINIMUM REAGENTS PRECIPITATION AND ADSORPTION FOR IMPROVED OIL RECOVERY  

SciTech Connect

In this project, fundamental studies were conducted to understand the mechanism of the interactions between polymer/surfactant and minerals with the aim of minimizing chemical loss by adsorption. The effects of chemical molecular structure on critical solid/liquid interfacial properties such as adsorption, wettability and surface tension in mineral/surfactant systems were investigated. The final aim is to build a guideline to design optimal polymer/surfactant formula based on the understanding of adsorption and orientation of surfactants and their aggregates at solid/liquid interface. During this period, the adsorption of mixed system of n-dodecyl-{beta}-D-maltoside (DM) and dodecyl sulfonate (C{sub 12}SO{sub 3}Na) was studied. Along with these adsorption studies, changes in mineral wettability due to the adsorption were determined under relevant conditions. pH was found to play a critical role in controlling total adsorption and mineral wettability. Previous studies have suggested significant surfactant loss by adsorption at neutral pH. But at certain pH, bilayer was found at lower adsorption density, which is beneficial for enhanced oil recovery. Analytical ultracentrifuge technique was successfully employed to study the micellization of DM/C{sub 12}SO{sub 3}Na mixtures. Compositional changes of the aggregates in solution were observed when two species were mixed. Surfactant mixture micellization affects the conformation and orientation of adsorption layer at mineral/water interface and thus the wettability and as a result, the oil release efficiency of the chemical flooding processes. Three surfactants C{sub 12}SO{sub 3}, AOT and SLE3 and one polymer were selected into three different binary combinations. Equilibrium surface tension measurement revealed complexation of polymer/surfactant under different conditions. Except for one combination of SLE3/ PVCAP, complexation was observed. It is to be noted that such complexation is relevant to both interfacial properties such as adsorption and wettability as well as rheology. Higher activity of the polymer/surfactant complexes is beneficial for EOR.

P. Somasundaran

2005-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

387

Composite production riser assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The performance of a deep water composite production riser from a system perspective is presented, and its advantages are articulated through comparisons with a typical steel riser under identical service conditions. The composite riser joints...

Kim, Won Ki

2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

388

Heteroporphyrin nanotubes and composites  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Heteroporphyrin nanotubes, metal nanostructures, and metal/porphyrin-nanotube composite nanostructures formed using the nanotubes as photocatalysts and structural templates, and the methods for forming the nanotubes and composites.

Shelnutt, John A. (Tijeras, NM); Medforth, Craig J. (Winters, CA); Wang, Zhongchun (Albuquerque, NM)

2007-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

389

Flexible Composite Radiation Detector  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Flexible Composite Radiation Detector Flexible Composite Radiation Detector Flexible Composite Radiation Detector A flexible composite scintillator was prepared by mixing fast, bright, dense rare-earth doped powdered oxyorthosilicate (such as LSO:Ce, LSO:Sm, and GSO:Ce) scintillator with a polymer binder. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Flexible Composite Radiation Detector A flexible composite scintillator was prepared by mixing fast, bright, dense rare-earth doped powdered oxyorthosilicate (such as LSO:Ce, LSO:Sm, and GSO:Ce) scintillator with a polymer binder. The binder is transparent to the scintillator emission. The composite is seamless and can be made large and in a wide variety of shapes. Importantly, the composite can be tailored to emit light in a spectral region that matches the optimum

390

Mineral phases of green liquor dregs, slaker grits, lime mud and wood ash of a Kraft pulp and paper mill  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Four residues generated in a Kraft, pulp and paper plant, were characterized by X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XFA), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimmetric analysis (TG) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). A quantitative phase composition model, that accounts for the observed data and for the physico-chemical conditions of formation, was postulated for each material. Emphasis was given on the identification of the mineral components of each material. The green liquor dregs and the lime mud contain Calcite and Gipsite. The slaker grits contains Calcite, Portlandite, Pirssonite, Larnite and Brucite. The Calcite phase, present in the dregs and in the lime mud, has small amounts of magnesium replacing calcium. The wood ash contains Quartz as the major crystalline mineral phase.

Fernanda Machado Martins; Joaniel Munhoz Martins; Luiz Carlos Ferracin; Carlos Jorge da Cunha

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Effects Of Porosity And Mineral Composition On Cement Alteration During Geological Carbon Sequestration.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??With increasing concentrations of greenhouse gases such as CO2, it is likely that major climate change will occur by the end of the century if (more)

Brunet, Jean-patrick

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Black Rock III Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Black Rock III Geothermal Project Black Rock III Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Development Project: Black Rock III Geothermal Project Project Location Information Coordinates The following coordinate was not recognized: 33°19'59" N, 115°50'3 W.The following coordinate was not recognized: 33°19'59" N, 115°50'3 W. Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

393

Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Woldegabriel & Goff, 1992) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Woldegabriel & Goff, 1992) Exploration Activity Details Location Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Rock Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Useful for age determinations - not indicated is useful for exploration. References Giday WoldeGabriel, Fraser Goff (1992) K-Ar Dates Of Hydrothermal

394

3rd Rock Systems and Technologies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rock Systems and Technologies Rock Systems and Technologies Jump to: navigation, search Name 3rd Rock Systems and Technologies Place Burlingame, California Zip 94010 Sector Renewable Energy, Services Product Provides proven renewable energy technologies and consulting services to residential, commercial, and industrial clients. Coordinates 38.753055°, -95.834619° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.753055,"lon":-95.834619,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

395

AltaRock Energy Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AltaRock Energy Inc AltaRock Energy Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name AltaRock Energy Address 7900 E Green Lake Drive N Place Seattle, Washington Zip 98103 Sector Geothermal energy Product Creates geothermal energy reservoirs, develops geothermal facilities Website http://www.altarockenergy.com/ Coordinates 47.6855466°, -122.3364827° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47.6855466,"lon":-122.3364827,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

396

Chimney Rock Public Power Dist | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Chimney Rock Public Power Dist Chimney Rock Public Power Dist Jump to: navigation, search Name Chimney Rock Public Power Dist Place Nebraska Utility Id 3495 Utility Location Yes Ownership P NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png ELECTRIC THERMAL STORAGE Commercial GENERAL SEASONAL Commercial IRRIGATION SERVICE Single Phase Commercial IRRIGATION SERVICE Three Phase Commercial IRRIGATION STANDBY RATE, Single Phase Commercial IRRIGATION STANDBY RATE, Three Phase Commercial LARGE POWER SERVICE Commercial RESIDENTIAL SERVICE AND SEASONAL SERVICE Residential

397

City of Rock Hill, South Carolina (Utility Company) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rock Hill, South Carolina (Utility Company) Rock Hill, South Carolina (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name City of Rock Hill Place South Carolina Utility Id 16195 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SERC Activity Bundled Services Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png 175 Watt HPS lighting Lighting Economic Development Rate (Schedule EDR -1) Commercial Economic Development Rate (Schedule EDR -2) Industrial Flood Lighting Rate 1000 Watt HPS Lighting Flood Lighting Rate 400 Watt HPS Lighting General Service/ Non Demand (Schedule GS) Commercial General Service/Demand (Schedule GD) Industrial

398

Supercritical Carbon Dioxide / Reservoir Rock Chemical Interactions | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Supercritical Carbon Dioxide / Reservoir Rock Chemical Interactions Supercritical Carbon Dioxide / Reservoir Rock Chemical Interactions Jump to: navigation, search Geothermal Lab Call Projects for Supercritical Carbon Dioxide / Reservoir Rock Chemical Interactions Loading map... {"format":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"limit":200,"offset":0,"link":"all","sort":[""],"order":[],"headers":"show","mainlabel":"","intro":"","outro":"","searchlabel":"\u2026 further results","default":"","geoservice":"google","zoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","forceshow":true,"showtitle":true,"hidenamespace":false,"template":false,"title":"","label":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"locations":[{"text":"

399

Vibrational Damping of Composite Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the Damping of Composite Laminates, SPIE Proceedings onpublication to Journal of Composite Materials Biggerstaff,submitted for publication to Composites, Part A Biggerstaff,

Biggerstaff, Janet M.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

E-Print Network 3.0 - austrian mineral water Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

mines may affect air quality. As with water pollution, mines can contribute to air pollution... Chapter 15 Mineral Resources and the Environment 12;Minerals ... Source: Pan,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rock composition mineral" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

E-Print Network 3.0 - areal bone mineral Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(DXA)-derived areal bone mineral density (BMD) and reductions in vertebral fracture incidence... than the bone volume fraction (mineralized bone volumebulk volume).12...

402

E-Print Network 3.0 - affecting bone mineral Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of remodeling on the mineralization of bone... of therapies that reduce the risk of fracture, increase bone mineral density or change the biochemical markers... mass and...

403

E-Print Network 3.0 - activity bone mineral Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of remodeling on the mineralization of bone... of therapies that reduce the risk of fracture, increase bone mineral density or change the biochemical markers... mass and...

404

The Ultimate Mineral Resource SituationAn Optimistic View  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...ratio of 1600 years for known phosphate reserves and near-economic potential resources...that recovery from conventional ores, lignites, and phosphate rock can provide all...energy, molybdenum, and vana- dium from lignite. Copper represents a very different...

H. E. Goeller

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Integrating Steel Production with Mineral Carbon Sequestration  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of the project were (i) to develop a combination iron oxide production and carbon sequestration plant that will use serpentine ores as the source of iron and the extraction tailings as the storage element for CO2 disposal, (ii) the identification of locations within the US where this process may be implemented and (iii) to create a standardized process to characterize the serpentine deposits in terms of carbon disposal capacity and iron and steel production capacity. The first objective was not accomplished. The research failed to identify a technique to accelerate direct aqueous mineral carbonation, the limiting step in the integration of steel production and carbon sequestration. Objective (ii) was accomplished. It was found that the sequestration potential of the ultramafic resource surfaces in the US and Puerto Rico is approximately 4,647 Gt of CO2 or over 500 years of current US production of CO2. Lastly, a computer model was developed to investigate the impact of various system parameters (recoveries and efficiencies and capacities of different system components) and serpentinite quality as well as incorporation of CO2 from sources outside the steel industry.

Klaus Lackner; Paul Doby; Tuncel Yegulalp; Samuel Krevor; Christopher Graves

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Microtubule-templated biomimetic mineralization of lepidocrocite.  

SciTech Connect

Protein microtubules (MTs) 25 nm in diameter and tens of micrometers long have been used as templates for the biomimetic mineralization of FeOOH. Exposure of MTs to anaerobic aqueous solutions of Fe{sup 2+} buffered to neutral pH followed by aerial oxidation leads to the formation of iron oxide coated MTs. The iron oxide layer was found to grow via a two-step process: initially formed 10-30 nm thick coatings were found to be amorphous in structure and comprised of several iron-containing species. Further growth resulted in MTs coated with highly crystalline layers of lepidocrocite with a controllable thickness of up to 125 nm. On the micrometer size scale, these coated MTs were observed to form large, irregular bundles containing hundreds of individually coated MTs. Iron oxide grew selectively on the MT surface, a result of the highly charged MT surface that provided an interface favorable for iron oxide nucleation. This result illustrates that MTs can be used as scaffolds for the in-situ production of high-aspect-ratio inorganic nanowires.

Bunker, Bruce Conrad; Headley, Thomas Jeffrey; Tissot, Ralph George, Jr.; Boal, Andrew Kiskadden

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Quantitative room-temperature mineralization of airborne formaldehyde using  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Quantitative room-temperature mineralization of airborne formaldehyde using Quantitative room-temperature mineralization of airborne formaldehyde using manganese oxide catalysts Title Quantitative room-temperature mineralization of airborne formaldehyde using manganese oxide catalysts Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2011 Authors Sidheswaran, Meera A., Hugo Destaillats, Douglas P. Sullivan, Joern Larsen, and William J. Fisk Journal Applied Catalysis B - Environmental Issue 107 Pagination 34-41 Date Published 2011 Keywords commercial building ventilation & indoor environmental quality group, commercial building ventilation and indoor environmental quality group, energy analysis and environmental impacts department, indoor environment department, indoor environment group DOI 10.1016/j.apcatb.2011.06.032 Attachment Size

408

Ozone generation by rock fracture: Earthquake early warning?  

SciTech Connect

We report the production of up to 10 ppm ozone during crushing and grinding of typical terrestrial crust rocks in air, O{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} at atmospheric pressure, but not in helium or nitrogen. Ozone is formed by exoelectrons emitted by high electric fields, resulting from charge separation during fracture. The results suggest that ground level ozone produced by rock fracture, besides its potential health hazard, can be used for early warning in earthquakes and other catastrophes, such as landslides or land shifts in excavation tunnels and underground mines.

Baragiola, Raul A.; Dukes, Catherine A.; Hedges, Dawn [Engineering Physics, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904 (United States)

2011-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

409

Radionuclide Incorporation in Secondary Crystalline Minerals Resulting from Chemical Weathering of Selected Waste Glasses: Progress Report for Subtask 3d  

SciTech Connect

Experiments were conducted in fiscal year 1998 by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to evaluate potential incorporation of radionuclides in secondary mineral phases that form from weathering vitrified nuclear waste glasses. These experiments were conducted as part of the Immobilized Low- Activity Waste-Petiormance Assessment (ILAW-PA) to generate data on radionuclide mobilization and transport in a near-field enviromnent of disposed vitrified wastes. An initial experiment was conducted to identify the types of secondary minerals that form from two glass samples of differing compositions, LD6 and SRL202. Chemical weathering of LD6 glass at 90oC in contact with an aliquot of uncontaminated Hanford Site groundwater resulted in the formation of a Crystalline zeolitic mineral, phillipsite. In contrast similar chemical weathering of SRL202 glass at 90"C resulted in the formation of a microcrystalline smectitic mineral, nontronite. A second experiment was conducted at 90"C to assess the degree to which key radionuclides would be sequestered in the structure of secondary crystalline minerals; namely, phillipsite and nontronite. Chemical weathering of LD6 in contact with radionuclide-spiked Hanford Site groundwater indicated that substantial ilactions of the total activities were retained in the phillipsite structure. Similar chemical weathering of SRL202 at 90"C, also in contact with radionuclide-spiked Hanford Site groundwater, showed that significant fractions of the total activities were retained in the nontronite structure. These results have important implications regarding the radionuclide mobilization aspects of the ILAW-PA. Additional studies are required to confkm the results and to develop an improved under- standing of mechanisms of sequestration and attenuated release of radionuclides to help refine certain aspects of their mobilization.

SV Mattigod; DI Kaplan; VL LeGore; RD Orr; HT Schaef; JS Young

1998-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

410

A Novel Approach to Experimental Studies of Mineral Dissolution Kinetics  

SciTech Connect

Currently, DOE is conducting pilot CO{sub 2} injection tests to evaluate the concept of geological sequestration. One strategy that potentially enhances CO{sub 2} solubility and reduces the risk of CO{sub 2} leak back to the surface is dissolution of indigenous minerals in the geological formation and precipitation of secondary carbonate phases, which increases the brine pH and immobilizes CO{sub 2}. Clearly, the rates at which these dissolution and precipitation reactions occur directly determine the efficiency of this strategy. However, one of the fundamental problems in modern geochemistry is the persistent two to five orders of magnitude discrepancy between laboratory-measured and field derived feldspar dissolution rates. To date, there is no real guidance as to how to predict silicate reaction rates for use in quantitative models. Current models for assessment of geological carbon sequestration have generally opted to use laboratory rates, in spite of the dearth of such data for compositionally complex systems, and the persistent disconnect between lab and field applications. Therefore, a firm scientific basis for predicting silicate reaction kinetics in CO{sub 2} injected geological formations is urgently needed to assure the reliability of the geochemical models used for the assessments of carbon sequestration strategies. The funded experimental and theoretical study attempts to resolve this outstanding scientific issue by novel experimental design and theoretical interpretation to measure silicate dissolution rates and iron carbonate precipitation rates at conditions pertinent to geological carbon sequestration. In the first year of the project, we have successfully developed a sample preparation method and completed three batch feldspar dissolution experiments at 200 C and 300 bars. The changes of solution chemistry as dissolution experiments progressed were monitored with on-line sampling of the aqueous phase at the constant temperature and pressure. These data allow calculating overall apparent feldspar dissolution rates and secondary mineral precipitation rates as a function of saturation states. State-of-the-art atomic resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy, and electron microprobe was used to characterize the reactants (feldspars before experiments). We experimented with different sample preparation methods for TEM study, and found excellent images and chemical resolution with reactants, which shows promise of the technology and establishes the baseline for comparison with products (feldspars after the experiments). Preliminary electron microscopic characterization shows that the reacted feldspars have etch pits and are covered with secondary sheet silicate phases. Reaction-path geochemical modeling is used to interpret the experimental results. We have established the software and database, and are making great progress. Also during the first year, our education goal of graduate student training has been achieved. A Ph. D. student at Indiana University is progressing well in the degree program and has taken geochemical modeling, SEM, and TEM courses, which will facilitate research in the second and third year. A Ph. D. student at University of Minnesota is progressing well in conducting the experiments, and is near graduation. With the success of training of graduate students and excellent experimental data in the first year, we anticipate a more fruitful year in the second year.

Chen Zhu; William E. Seyfried

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Reactivity of iron-bearing minerals and CO2 sequestration: A multi-disciplinary experimental approach  

SciTech Connect

The reactivity of sandstones was studied under conditions relevant to the injection of supercritical carbon dioxide in the context of carbon geosequestration. The emphasis of the study was on the reactivity of iron-bearing minerals when exposed to supercritical CO2 (scCO2) and scCO2 with commingled aqueous solutions containing H2S and/or SO2. Flow through and batch experiments were conducted. Results indicate that sandstones, irrespective of their mineralogy, are not reactive when exposed to pure scCO2 or scCO2 with commingled aqueous solutions containing H2S and/or SO2 under conditions simulating the environment near the injection point (flow through experiments). However, sandstones are reactive under conditions simulating the edge of the injected CO2 plume or ahead of the plume (batch experiments). Sandstones containing hematite (red sandstone) are particularly reactive. The composition of the reaction products is strongly dependent on the composition of the aqueous phase. The presence of dissolved sulfide leads to the conversion of hematite into pyrite and siderite. The relative amount of the pyrite and siderite is influenced by the ionic strength of the solution. Little reactivity is observed when sulfite is present in the aqueous phase. Sandstones without hematite (grey sandstones) show little reactivity regardless of the solution composition.

Schoonen, Martin A. [Stony Brook University] (ORCID:0000000271331160)

2014-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

412

Geohydromechanical Processes in the Excavation Damaged Zone in Crystalline Rock, Rock Salt, and Indurated and Plastic Clays  

SciTech Connect

The creation of an excavation disturbed zone or excavation damaged zone is expected around all man-made openings in geologic formations. Macro- and micro-fracturing, and in general a redistribution of in situ stresses and rearrangement of rock structures, will occur in this zone, resulting in drastic changes of permeability to flow, mainly through the fractures and cracks induced by excavation. Such an EDZ may have significant implications for the operation and long-term performance of an underground nuclear waste repository. Various issues of concern need to be evaluated, such as processes creating fractures in the excavation damaged zone, the degree of permeability increase, and the potential for sealing or healing (with permeability reduction) in the zone. In recent years, efforts along these lines have been made for a potential repository in four rock types-crystalline rock, salt, indurated clay, and plastic clay-and these efforts have involved field, laboratory, and theoretical studies. The present work involves a synthesis of the ideas and issues that emerged from presentations and discussions on EDZ in these four rock types at a CLUSTER Conference and Workshop held in Luxembourg in November, 2003. First, definitions of excavation disturbed and excavation damaged zones are proposed. Then, an approach is suggested for the synthesis and intercomparison of geohydromechanical processes in the EDZ for the four rock types (crystalline rock, salt, indurated clay, and plastic clay). Comparison tables of relevant processes, associated factors, and modeling and testing techniques are developed. A discussion of the general state-of-the-art and outstanding issues are also presented. A substantial bibliography of relevant papers on the subject is supplied at the end of the paper.

Tsang, Chin-Fu; Bernier, Frederic; Davies, Christophe

2004-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

413

CARBON-CARBON COMPOSITE ALLCOMP Carbon-Carbon Composite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CARBON-CARBON COMPOSITE ALLCOMP Carbon-Carbon Composite · C-C supplied in two forms · T300: C-C composite containing continuous PAN T300 fibers · SWB: Chopped Fiber Composite containing SWB fibers Crush strength 4340 steel, carbon-carbon composite, and Carbon-Silicon Carbide composite were tested to examine

Rollins, Andrew M.

414

Stewart Mineral Springs Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mineral Springs Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Mineral Springs Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Stewart Mineral Springs Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Stewart Mineral Springs Sector Geothermal energy Type Pool and Spa Location Weed, California Coordinates 41.4226498°, -122.3861269° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

415

Hyperspectral Mineral Mapping For Geothermal Exploration On The...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and X-ray diffraction analyses of samples collected in the field. We are in the process of producing and validating mineral maps that will be used to narrow the scope of...

416

The Role of Mineral Carbonation in Carbon Capture  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A number of aqueous-phase-based indirect mineral carbonation studies have focused on enhancing the reactivity of Mg-silicates through the addition of weak acids and additives that increase silicate dissolution...

Prof. Jennifer Wilcox

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Carbon Mineralization: From Natural Analogues to Engineered Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...environments: A short review. Geomicrobiol J 20...Biodiesel Production. BioEnergy Res 1:20-43 Schlesinger...mineral carbonation: Literature review update 2005-2007...biomass feedstocks: Review analysis of the biochemistry...

Ian M. Power; Anna L. Harrison; Gregory M. Dipple; Siobhan A. Wilson; Peter B. Kelemen; Michael Hitch; Gordon Southam

418

2005 Minerals Yearbook U.S. Department of the Interior  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and installing energy efficient burners in the driers has rewarded SVM by increased efficiency and energy savings. These minerals were extracted primarily in California and Turkey and to a lesser extent in Argentina, Bolivia

419

U.S. Geological Survey China's Growing Appetite for Minerals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: Coal 45 1 Oil 4.7 6 Industrial minerals: Cement 42 1 Fluorspar 55 1 Rare earths 85 1 Metals: Aluminum Republic of Korea Thailand Other Asian Crisis 1997 #12;Production Flow for Cement #12;Country-Level Ou

420

Prospects for Offshore Mineral Mining Remain in Doubt  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Prospects for Offshore Mineral Mining Remain in Doubt ... Oil and gas exploration and exploitation offshore have been well established, and such sources are already supplying considerable quantities of energy and chemicals to the world economy. ...

JOSEPH HAGGIN

1988-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rock composition mineral" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Earth's most abundant mineral finally has a name | Argonne National...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of effort to find, identify and characterize a mineral that makes up 38 percent of the Earth. And in doing so, a team of scientists led by Oliver Tschauner, a mineralogist at the...

422

Mineral Deformation at Earth's Core-Mantle Boundary  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mineral Deformation at Earth's Core-Mantle Boundary Print Earth is a dynamic planet in which convection takes place on the scale of thousands of kilometers. Because Earth is mostly...

423

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Minerals: GHG Information  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

GHG Information Read the Industrial Minerals Association - North America (IMA-NA) 2011 Greenhouse Gas and Energy Survey Industry Summary for the period from 2000 to 2010 (PDF 16...

424

Mineralization of Surfactants by the Microbiota of Submerged Plant Detritus  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...potentially significant site for surfactant removal in detritus-rich...APPL. ENVIRON. MICROBIOL. SURFACTANT MINERALIZATION BY DETRITUS...community structure in subsurface soils. Ground Water 24:365-374...Arylsulfatase activity of soils. Soil Sci. Soc. Am. Proc...

Thomas W. Federle; Roy M. Ventullo

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Select Minerals and Potable Use of Reclaimed Wastewaters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The long-observed relationships of an influence of drinking water mineral content on heart-circulatory deaths are developed to indicate that sodium -- when present in sufficiently high concentrations -- may be detrimental to human health...

Wolf, H.

426

Principal physicochemical parameters of natural mineral-forming fluids  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The authors database (which includes data from more than 17500 publications on fluid and melt inclusions in minerals) was used to generalize information on the principal physicochemical parameters of natural ...

V. B. Naumov; V. A. Dorofeeva; O. F. Mironova

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Phosphate Minerals: Their Properties and General Modes of Occurrence  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This chapter presents a review of the physical, chemical and crystallographic properties of phosphate minerals, and discusses their general modes of occurrence. It provides the necessary backdrop to the subseq...

Jerome O. Nriagu

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Foote Mineral Co - PA 27  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Foote Mineral Co - PA 27 Foote Mineral Co - PA 27 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Foote Mineral Co. (PA.27 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Exton , Pennsylvania PA.27-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 PA.27-1 Site Operations: Processed rare earth, principally zirconium and monazite sand was processed on a pilot-plant scale. PA.27-2 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Limited quantity of material handled - Potential for contamination considered remote PA.27-1 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Zirconium, Possibly Uranium PA.27-1 PA.27-2 PA.27-3 Radiological Survey(s): None Indicated Site Status: Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Also see Documents Related to Foote Mineral Co.

429

Indian Mineral Leasing Act of 1938 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Act of 1938 Act of 1938 Jump to: navigation, search Statute Name Indian Mineral Leasing Act Year 1938 Url IndianMineralLeasing1938.jpg Description Provides for leasing of minerals on tribal lands References IMLA[1] United States v. Navajo Nation[2] The Indian Mineral Leasing Act of 1938 (IMLA) provides that "[u]nallotted lands within any Indian reservation," or otherwise under federal jurisdiction, "may, with the approval of the Secretary [of the Interior (Secretary)] ... , be leased for mining purposes, by authority of the tribal council or other authorized spokesmen for such Indians." 25 U.S.C. § 396a. The Act aims to provide Indian tribes with a profitable source of revenue and to foster tribal self-determination by giving Indians a greater

430

Hyperspectral mineral mapping in support of geothermal exploration-  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

mineral mapping in support of geothermal exploration- mineral mapping in support of geothermal exploration- Examples from Long Valley Caldera, CA and Dixie Valley, NV, USA Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Hyperspectral mineral mapping in support of geothermal exploration- Examples from Long Valley Caldera, CA and Dixie Valley, NV, USA Abstract N/A Authors B. A. Martini, E. A. Silver, W. L. Pickles and P. A. Cocks Conference Geothermal Resources Council Annual Meeting; Morelia, Mexico; 2004 Published Geothermal Resources Council Annual Meeting;, 2004 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Hyperspectral mineral mapping in support of geothermal exploration- Examples from Long Valley Caldera, CA and Dixie Valley, NV, USA

431

Inducing Mineral Precipitation in Groundwater by Addition of Phosphate  

SciTech Connect

Induced precipitation of phosphate minerals to scavenge trace metals and radionuclides from groundwater is a potential remediation approach for contaminated aquifers. Phosphate minerals can sequester trace elements by primary mineral formation, solid solution formation and/or adsorption, and they are poorly soluble under many environmental conditions, making them attractive for long-term sustainable remediation. The success of such engineered schemes will depend on the particular mineral phases generated, their rates of formation, and their long term stability. The purpose of this study was to examine the precipitation of calcium phosphate minerals under conditions representative of a natural groundwater. Because microorganisms are present in groundwater, and because some proposed schemes for induced phosphate mineral precipitation rely on the stimulation of native groundwater populations, we also tested the effect of bacterial cells (initial densities of 105 and 107 ml-1) within the precipitation medium. We also tested the effect of a trace mixture of propionic, isovaleric, formic and butyric acids (total concentration 0.035 mM). The experiments showed that the general progression of mineral precipitation was similar under all of the conditions, with initial formation of amorphous calcium carbonate, and transformation to poorly crystalline hydroxyapatite (HAP) by the end of the week-long experiments. The presence of the bacterial cells appeared to delay precipitation, although by the end of 7 days the overall extent of precipitation was similar for all of the treatments. The stoichiometry of the final precipitates as well as results of Rietveld refinement of x-ray diffraction data indicated that the treatments including organic acids and bacterial cells resulted in increased distortion of the HAP crystal lattice, with the higher concentration of cells resulting in the greatest distortion. Uptake of Sr into the phosphate minerals was decreased in the treatments with cells and organic acids, compared to the control. The results of the experiments enable a greater understanding of the challenges associated with phosphate-based remediation schemes for contaminated environments.

Karen E. Wright; Yoshiko Fujita; Thomas Hartmann; Mark Conrad

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Structural characterization and vibrational spectroscopy of the arsenate mineral wendwilsonite  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this paper, we have investigated on the natural wendwilsonite mineral with the formulae Ca2(Mg,Co)(AsO4)2?2(H2O). Raman spectroscopy complimented with infrared spectroscopy has been used to determine the molecular structure of the wendwilsonite arsenate mineral. A comparison is made with the roselite mineral group with formula Ca2B(AsO4)2?2H2O (where B may be Co, Fe2+, Mg, Mn, Ni, Zn). The Raman spectra of the arsenate related to tetrahedral arsenate clusters with stretching region shows strong differences between that of wendwilsonite and the roselite arsenate minerals which is attributed to the cation substitution for calcium in the structure. The Raman arsenate (AsO4)3? stretching region shows strong differences between that of wendwilsonite and the roselite arsenate minerals which is attributed to the cation substitution for calcium in the structure. In the infrared spectra complexity exists of multiple to tetrahedral (AsO4)3? clusters with antisymmetric stretching vibrations observed indicating a reduction of the tetrahedral symmetry. This loss of degeneracy is also reflected in the bending modes. Strong Raman bands around 450cm?1 are assigned to ?4 bending modes. Multiple bands in the 350300cm?1 region assigned to ?2 bending modes provide evidence of symmetry reduction of the arsenate anion. Three broad bands for wendwilsonite found at 3332, 3119 and 3001cm?1 are assigned to OH stretching bands. By using a Libowitzky empirical equation, hydrogen bond distances of 2.65 and 2.75 are estimated. Vibrational spectra enable the molecular structure of the wendwilsonite mineral to be determined and whilst similarities exist in the spectral patterns with the roselite mineral group, sufficient differences exist to be able to determine the identification of the minerals.

Ray L. Frost; Ricardo Scholz; Andrs Lpez; Fernanda Maria Belotti; Yunfei Xi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Roth Rock Wind Power Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rock Wind Power Project Rock Wind Power Project Jump to: navigation, search Name Roth Rock Wind Power Project Facility Roth Rock Wind Power Project Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Gestamp Wind North America Developer Synergics Energy Purchaser Delmarva Power Location South of Red House MD Coordinates 39.30105°, -79.458032° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.30105,"lon":-79.458032,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

434

Lithostratigraphic Classification of Basement Rocks of the Wichita Province, Oklahoma  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Scale .bar = 5 nun; crossed nicols. (Sample WM-142 near Panther Creek, Wichita Mountains Wildlife Refuge.) 1-- t o be s...l i t i c rocks i n t h e Wichita province. f Q - The name Car.lton Rhyolite was f i r s t used by . Schoonover (19481...

Benjamin N. Powell; M. Charles Gilbert; Joseph F. Fischer

435

SEISMIC AND ROCK PHYSICS DIAGNOSTICS OF MULTISCALE RESERVOIR TEXTURES  

SciTech Connect

As part of our study on ''Relationships between seismic properties and rock microstructure'', we have studied (1) Methods for detection of stress-induced velocity anisotropy in sands. (2) We have initiated efforts for velocity upscaling to quantify long-wavelength and short-wavelength velocity behavior and the scale-dependent dispersion caused by sediment variability in different depositional environments.

Gary Mavko

2003-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

436

A NEW MODEL FOR PERFORMANCE PREDICTION OF HARD ROCK TBMS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

methods to accu- rately predict the penetration rate of a TBM in a given geology. These models are mainly, and the penetration rate. A good example of this is the Norwegian (NTH) hard rock diagnostic system and predictor penetration rate. This group of models 1.ResearchAssociakandGraduacStudentinMiningErrg.Dept. 2.Directorof

437

Dating and Context of Rock Engravings in Southern Africa  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...we have recorded in the Orange-Vaal Basin (9.7 percent hu-man and 64 percent...andesite (or Dwyka tillites And shales of Permian age) are three distinct bodies of alluvium...Riet Lowe, The Distribution of Pre-historic Rock Engravings and Paintings in 1212...

Karl W. Butzer; Gerhai J. Fock; Louis Scott; Robert Stuckenrath

1979-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

438

Columbia River Channel Improvement Project Rock Removal Blasting: Monitoring Plan  

SciTech Connect

This document provides a monitoring plan to evaluate take as outlined in the National Marine Fisheries Service 2002 Biological Opinion for underwater blasting to remove rock from the navigation channel for the Columbia River Channel Improvement Project. The plan was prepared by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Portland District.

Carlson, Thomas J.; Johnson, Gary E.

2010-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

439

A rock engraving made by Neanderthals in Gibraltar  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...u-bordeaux.fr/TIVMI/). The 3D video was created using Autodesk 3ds Max and Adobe Premiere Pro CC. A rock engraving made by...u-bordeaux.fr/TIVMI/). The 3D video was created using Autodesk 3ds Max and Adobe Premiere Pro CC. Movie S1 Other Supporting...

Joaqun Rodrguez-Vidal; Francesco dErrico; Francisco Giles Pacheco; Ruth Blasco; Jordi Rosell; Richard P. Jennings; Alain Queffelec; Geraldine Finlayson; Darren A. Fa; Jos Mara Gutirrez Lpez; Jos S. Carrin; Juan Jos Negro; Stewart Finlayson; Lus M. Cceres; Marco A. Bernal; Santiago Fernndez Jimnez; Clive Finlayson

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Aspects of rock physics in 4-D seismology  

SciTech Connect

In recent years, time-lapse 3-13 or 4-D seismology has been used to identify bypassed oil, to monitor steam and CO[sub 2] injection processes, and even to track the movement of the injected water. However, the feasibility of applying seismic technology to monitoring oil recovery processes and the ability to interpret the seismic results depend to a large extent on the understanding of the physics or seismic properties of the reservoir rocks and fluids. We have carried out several laboratory rock physics investigations on seismic properties of reservoir rocks in relation to oil recovery processes. Particularly, we found that seismic properties were dramatically affected by he injected steam in heavy oil sands, by the injected CO[sub 2] in carbonate rocks, and in some cases, by the injected water in light oil reservoir sands. In this paper, we present laboratory results of seismic properties of oil lands from several places in the world, including Indonesia, Canada, and of West Texas carbonates undergoing CO[sub 2] injection. We discuss the effects of reservoir geology, fluid properties, and recovery process on the seismic properties and how the laboratory results can be used in the feasibility studies and seismic interpretations. We also show examples of 4-D and cross-well seismic results from the Duri field, Indonesia, and from a West Texas carbonate field undergoing CO[sub 2] flooding.

Wang, Zhijing; Langan, R. (Chevron Petroleum Technology Co., La Habra, CA (United States)); Jenkins, S.; Bee, M.; Waite, M. (Caltex Pacific Indonesia, Rumbai (Indonesia))

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rock composition mineral" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Aspects of rock physics in 4-D seismology  

SciTech Connect

In recent years, time-lapse 3-13 or 4-D seismology has been used to identify bypassed oil, to monitor steam and CO{sub 2} injection processes, and even to track the movement of the injected water. However, the feasibility of applying seismic technology to monitoring oil recovery processes and the ability to interpret the seismic results depend to a large extent on the understanding of the physics or seismic properties of the reservoir rocks and fluids. We have carried out several laboratory rock physics investigations on seismic properties of reservoir rocks in relation to oil recovery processes. Particularly, we found that seismic properties were dramatically affected by he injected steam in heavy oil sands, by the injected CO{sub 2} in carbonate rocks, and in some cases, by the injected water in light oil reservoir sands. In this paper, we present laboratory results of seismic properties of oil lands from several places in the world, including Indonesia, Canada, and of West Texas carbonates undergoing CO{sub 2} injection. We discuss the effects of reservoir geology, fluid properties, and recovery process on the seismic properties and how the laboratory results can be used in the feasibility studies and seismic interpretations. We also show examples of 4-D and cross-well seismic results from the Duri field, Indonesia, and from a West Texas carbonate field undergoing CO{sub 2} flooding.

Wang, Zhijing; Langan, R. [Chevron Petroleum Technology Co., La Habra, CA (United States); Jenkins, S.; Bee, M.; Waite, M. [Caltex Pacific Indonesia, Rumbai (Indonesia)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

442

Investigation of a hydraulic impact a technology in rock breaking  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the environment such as fly rocks, air blast, noise pollution and toxic fumes. When blasting occurs close in mining industry. The impact process of a high speed piston on liquid water, previously introduced mining practice. From the technical point of view, although explosive method is powerful, it does

443

Process of breaking and rendering permeable a subterranean rock mass  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The process of the present invention involves the following steps: producing, as by hydrofracing, a substantially horizontal fracture in the subterranean rock mass to be processed; emplacing an explosive charge in the mass in spaced juxtaposed position to the fracture; enlarging the fracture to create a void space thereat, an initial lifting of the overburden, and to provide a free face juxtaposed to and arranged to cooperate with the emplaced explosive charge; and exploding the charge against the free face for fragmenting the rock and to distribute the space, thus providing fractured, pervious, rubble-ized rock in an enclosed subterranean chamber. Firing of the charge provides a further lifting of the overburden, an enlargement of the chamber and a larger void space to distribute throughout the rubble-ized rock within the chamber. In some forms of the invention an explosive charge is used to produce a transitory enlargement of the fracture, and the juxtaposed emplaced charge is fired during the critical period of enlargement of the fracture.

Lekas, Mitchell A. (Concord, CA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Fluid-Rock Interaction: A Reactive Transport Approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...fluid-rock interaction systems as well-mixed reactors was challenged and it was shown how an...Q, Lichtner PC, Zhang D (2007) An improved lattice Boltzmann model for multicomponent...Eric H. editor CNRS-Universite Paul Sabatier, Laboratoire de Mecanisme de Transfert...

Carl I. Steefel; Kate Maher

445

Rock-physics Models for Gas-hydrate Systems Associated  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rock-physics Models for Gas-hydrate Systems Associated with Unconsolidated Marine Sediments Diana associated with unconsolidated marine sediments. The goals are to predict gas-hydrate concentration from intercalated with unconsolidated sediments. We show that the geometrical details of how gas hy- drates

Texas at Austin, University of

446

Characterization of Geomechanical Poroelastic Parameters in Tight Rocks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In petroleum engineering and geophysics, it is often assumed that the rocks are completely rigid bodies with a totally interconnected pore space and that the fluid within the pores does not affect and are independent of the strains in the porous...

Chen Valdes, Clotilde Raquel

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

447

ROCK: A Robust Clustering Algorithm for Categorical Attributes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. For data with categorical attributes, our findings indicate that ROCK not only generates better quality The problem of data mining or knowledge discovery has become increasingly important in recent years the author was visiting Bell Laboratories. 1 #12;and Italian wine, Swiss cheese and Belgian chocolate

Pennsylvania, University of

448

1 INTRODUCTION Stressing brittle rocks leads to the development of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-dependent creep driven by stress corrosion and subcritical crack growth (Lockner, 1998). This creep strongly of fa- tigue and crack growth velocity function. The present experimental work was conducted at the Rock- uniform distributions of microfractures are related to fault nucleation and growth (Reches & Lockner, 1994

Ze'ev, Reches

449

MATLOC. Transient Non Lin Deformation in Fractured Rock  

SciTech Connect

MATLOC is a nonlinear, transient, two-dimensional (planer and axisymmetric), thermal stress, finite-element code designed to determine the deformation within a fractured rock mass. The mass is modeled as a nonlinear anistropic elastic material which can exhibit stress-dependent bi-linear locking behavior.

Boonlualohr, P.; Mustoe, G.; Williams, J.R.; Lester, B.H.; Huyakorn, P.S. [Geotrans Inc., (United States)

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Wave Generation from Explosions in Rock Cavities CANGLI LIU1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wave Generation from Explosions in Rock Cavities CANGLI LIU1 and THOMAS J. AHRENS1 Abstract Ð We have developed a measurement method to monitor P- and S-waves generated from laboratory diameter cavities. Stress waves generated by the explosions were recorded within a radius of 25 cm

Stewart, Sarah T.

451

Re-refining of waste mineral insulating oil by extraction with N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Extraction with N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) via the three-stage mixersettler operation was studied as possible process for re-refining of waste mineral insulating oil. The following extraction process parameters were investigated systematically in order to determine their optimum values: amount of water as co-solvent in NMP, extraction temperature and solvent/oil ratio. The process parameters and resulting oil chemical compositions were found to influence the electrical properties and the oxidation stability of the re-refined oil. The levels of aromatic, paraffinic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were determined using IR spectroscopy and HPLC, while other relevant chemical and electrical properties of waste and re-refined oil were determined according to IEC, ISO and ASTM standards. Extraction using NMP was found to be an adequate method for waste mineral insulating oil re-refining, according to the application properties of the re-refined oil. Moderate extraction temperature, 1% water in NMP and a low solvent/oil ratio (0.5) were determined to be the optimum process parameters.

Jelena Luki?; Aleksandar Orlovi?; Michael Spiteller; Jovan Jovanovi?; Dejan Skala

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Use of charge-selective membranes for electrodialytic desalination of mineralized drainage collector waters  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this work was to examine the possibility of desalination, without preliminary softening, of drainage collector waters of a medium degree mineralization, represented by a simulated solution of the same cation composition, with the use of single-charge-selective membranes. A cation-exchange membrane obtained by modification of the commercial MK-100 membrane with ethylenediamine (6), was used for this purpose. The modification was effected by treatment of the chlorosulfonated matrix with aqueous ethylenediamine solution at room temperature. The matrix, aminated on one side was then treated with concentrated NaOH solution to convert unreacted sulfonyl chloride groups into sulfo. The capacity of the modified MK-100M membrane for sulfo groups was 1.8 meq/g. The possibility of obtaining highly concentrated brines was examined at the same time.

Grebenyuk, V.D.; Veisov, B.K.; Chebotareva, R.D.; Braude, K.P.; Nefedova, G.Z.

1986-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

453

Elemental relationships in rock varnish as seen with SEM/EDX (scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive x-ray) elemental line profiling  

SciTech Connect

The heterogeneous nature of rock varnish requires a thorough survey of elemental and mineralogic compositions before relating chemical variability of rock varnish to past geochemical environments. Elemental relationships in rock varnish can be examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in conjunction with an elemental line profiling routine using semi-quantitative, energy dispersive x-ray (EDX) analysis. Results of SEM/EDX analysis suggest: variations in cation concentrations used in varnish cation ratio dating relate more specifically to variations in detritus within the varnish than to element mobility as defined by weathering indices; Mn concentration rather than Mn:Fe ratios may be a more appropriate indicator of paleoclimatic fluctuations; and the Mn-oxide phase existing in varnish is most likely a Ba-enriched phase rather than birnessite. Element line profiling offers great potential for gaining insights into geochemical processes affecting the deposition and diagenesis of rock varnish and for testing hypotheses relating to its chemical variability. 27 refs., 9 figs.

Raymond, R. Jr.; Reneau, S.L.; Harrington, C.D.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Palaeomagnetism and Potassium-Argon Ages of Volcanic Rocks of Ngorongoro Caldera, Tanzania  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Volcanic Rocks of Ngorongoro Caldera, Tanzania* * Publication authorized by the Director...south-west wall of Ngorongoro caldera, Tanzania. The lowest three lavas are normally...Volcanic Rocks of Ngorongoro Caldera, Tanzania* C. S. Gromme, T. A. Reilly, A......

C. S. Gromm; T. A. Reilly; A. E. Mussett; R. L. Hay

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

New techniques in rock mass classification: application to welded tuffs at the Nevada Yucca Mountain  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Many rock mass classification systems exist to assist the engineer in assessing the rock support requirements for underground design. On-going research in this area is directed at attempting to utilize the fracta...

R. J. Watters; J. R. Carr; D. M. Chuck

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Transport and seismoelectric properties of porous permeable rock : numerical modeling and laboratory measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this thesis is to better understand the transport and seismoelectric (SE) properties of porous permeable rock. Accurate information of rock transport properties, together with pore geometry, can aid us to ...

Zhan, Xin, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

E-Print Network 3.0 - acid volcano-plutonic rocks Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the first of a long string of bad jokes, and start looking at rocks. Get yer hiking boots ready. Purpose... will be placed on the field relationships of the various rock units...

458

Measurement of thermal properties of select intact and weathered granulites and their relationship to rock properties  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...in hard rock: Renewable Energy, 28 , no.-14...basalt samples in Egypt: Journal of Thermal...in hard rock: Renewable Energy, 28, no. 14...basalt samples in Egypt: Journal of Thermal...parameterization on surface energy fluxes and temperatures...

D. Ramakrishnan; Rishikesh Bharti; M. Nithya; K. N. Kusuma; K. D. Singh

459

Modeling of coupled thermodynamic and geomechanical performance of underground compressed air energy storage (CAES) in lined rock caverns  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Excavated Hard Rock Caverns. Pacific Northwest Laboratory,Lux, K.H. Design of salt caverns for the storage of naturalgas storage in unlined rock caverns. Int J Rock Mech Min Sc

Rutqvist, J.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Mixed Semiconductor Nanocrystal Compositions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mixed Semiconductor Nanocrystal Compositions Mixed Semiconductor Nanocrystal Compositions Mixed Semiconductor Nanocrystal Compositions Composition comprising one or more energy donors and one or more energy acceptors. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Mixed Semiconductor Nanocrystal Compositions Composition comprising one or more energy donors and one or more energy acceptors, wherein energy is transferred from the energy donor to the energy acceptor and wherein: the energy acceptor is a colloidal nanocrystal having a lower band gap energy than the energy donor; the energy donor and the energy acceptor are separated by a distance of 40 nm or less; wherein the average peak absorption energy of the acceptor is at least 20 meV greater than the average peak emission energy of the energy donor; and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rock composition mineral" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composites  

SciTech Connect

Fiber-reinforced ceramic composites demonstrate the high-temperature stability of ceramics--with an increased fracture toughness resulting from the fiber reinforcement of the composite. The material optimization performed under the continuous fiber ceramic composites (CFCC) included a series of systematic optimizations. The overall goals were to define the processing window, to increase the robustinous of the process, to increase process yield while reducing costs, and to define the complexity of parts that could be fabricated.

None

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Parametric Investigation of the Performance of Solar Heating Systems with Rock Bed Storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The performance of solar air collector domestic heating systems with rock bed storage, as obtained from theoretical analysis, is...

W. L. Dutre; J. Vanheelen

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Esimation of field-scale thermal conductivities of unsaturated rocks from in-situ temperature data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Properties in Hard Rock, Ph.D. Thesis, Lulea Universityof Technology, Lulea, Sweden. Kolditz, O. and C. Clauser, (

Mukhopadhyay, Sumit; Tsang, Yvonne W.; Birkholzer, Jens T.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Method of predicting the characteristics of a rock mass in hydrotechnical construction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

1. The proposed method makes it possible to predict the characteristics of a rock mass when designing rockfill a...

O. A. Pakhomov

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Composite Thermoelectric Devices  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Composite thermoelectric devices incorporating common conductors laminated between P- and N-type thermoelectric plates demonstrate internal ohmic loss reduction and enhanced performance

466

Composites of Carbon Nanotubes.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The purpose of this research was to study various methods of incorporation of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) with polymers for producing electrically conductive polystyrene composites. (more)

Tchoul, Maxim N.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Nanoclay Syntactic Foam Composites.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Syntactic foams are composite materials in which the matrix phase is reinforced with hollow particles called microballoons. They possess low moisture absorption, low thermal conductivity (more)

Peter, Sameer Leo

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

REDUCING RISK IN LOW-PERMEABILITY GAS FORMATIONS: UNDERSTANDING THE ROCK/FLUID CHARACTERISTICS OF ROCKY MOUNTAIN LARAMIDE BASINS  

SciTech Connect

An anomalous velocity model was constructed for the Wind River Basin (WRB) based on {approx}2000 mi of 2-D seismic data and 175 sonic logs, for a total of 132,000 velocity/depth profiles. Ten cross sections were constructed through the model coincident with known gas fields. In each cross section, an intense, anomalously slow velocity domain coincided with the gas-productive rock/fluid interval. The anomalous velocity model: (1) Easily isolates gas-charged rock/fluid systems characterized by anomalously slow velocities and water-rich rock/fluid systems characterized by normal velocities; and (2) Delineates the regional velocity inversion surface, which is characterized by steepening of the Ro/depth gradient, a significant increase in capillary displacement pressure, a significant change in formation water composition, and acceleration of the reaction rate of smectite-to-illite diagenesis in mixed-layer clays. Gas chimneys are observed as topographic highs on the regional velocity inversion surface. Beneath the surface are significant fluid-flow compartments, which have a gas-charge in the fluid phase and are isolated from meteoric water recharge. Water-rich domains may occur within regional gas-charged compartments, but are not being recharged from the meteoric water system (i.e., trapped water). The WRB is divided into at least two regionally prominent fluid-flow compartments separated by the velocity inversion surface: a water-dominated upper compartment likely under strong meteoric water drive and a gas-charged, anomalously pressured lower compartment. Judging from cross sections, numerous gas-charged subcompartments occur within the regional compartment. Their geometries and boundaries are controlled by faults and low-permeability rocks. Commercial gas production results when a reservoir interval characterized by enhanced porosity/permeability intersects one of these gas-charged subcompartments. The rock/fluid characteristics of the Rocky Mountain Laramide Basins (RMLB) described in this work determine the potential for significant, relatively unconventional, so-called ''basin-center'' hydrocarbon accumulations. If such accumulations occur, they will be characterized by the following critical attributes: (1) Location beneath a regional velocity inversion surface that typically is associated with low-permeability lithologies; (2) Anomalous pressure, both over- and underpressure, and when, less commonly, they appear to be normally pressured, they are not in contact with the meteoric water system; (3) A significant gas component in the regional multiphase fluid-flow system (water-gas-oil) that occurs beneath the regional velocity inversion surface; (4) Domains of intense gas charge (i.e., high gas saturation) within the regional multiphase fluid-flow system; (5) Compartmentalization of the rock/fluid system to a far greater extent beneath the regional velocity inversion surface than above it (i.e., convection of fluids across the regional velocity inversion surface is reduced or eliminated depending on the nature of the capillary properties of the low-permeability rocks associated with the inversion surface); (6) Commercial gas accumulations occurring at the intersection of reservoir intervals characterized by enhanced porosity and permeability and gas-charged domains; (7) Productive intersections of reservoir intervals and gas-charged domains, which are controlled by the structural, stratigraphic, and diagenetic elements affecting the rock/fluid system; and (8) No apparent meteoric water connection with the gas accumulations and gas columns up to several thousand feet in height. Because some of these critical attributes are not associated with conventional hydrocarbon accumulations, a new set of diagnostic tools are required in order to explore for and exploit these types of gas prospects efficiently and effectively. Some of these new diagnostic tools have been discussed in this report; other have been described elsewhere. In order to maximize risk reduction, it is recommended when exploring for these types of gas accu

Ronald C. Surdam

2003-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

469

Investigation on Microbial Dissolution of Uranium (VI) from Autunite Mineral - 13421  

SciTech Connect

Precipitating autunite minerals by polyphosphate injection was identified as a feasible remediation strategy for sequestering uranium in contaminated groundwater and soil in situ at the Hanford Site. Autunite stability under vadose and saturated zone environmental conditions can help to determine the long-term effectiveness of this remediation strategy. The Arthrobacter bacteria are one of the most common groups in soils and are found in large numbers in Hanford soil as well as other subsurface environments contaminated with radionuclides. Ubiquitous in subsurface microbial communities, these bacteria can play a significant role in the dissolution of minerals and the formation of secondary minerals. The main objective of this investigation was to study the bacterial interactions under oxidizing conditions with uranium (VI); study the potential role of bicarbonate, which is an integral complexing ligand for U(VI) and a major ion in groundwater compositions; and present data from autunite dissolution experiments using Arthrobacter strain G968, a less U(VI)-tolerant strain. Sterile 100 mL glass mixed reactors served as the major bioreactor for initial experimentation. These autunite-containing bioreactors were injected with bacterial cells after the autunite equilibrated with the media solution amended with 0 mM, 3 mM 5 mM and 10 mM concentrations of bicarbonate. G968 Arthrobacter cells in the amount of 10{sup 6} cells/mL were injected into the reactors after 27 days, giving time for the autunite to reach steady state. Abiotic non-carbonate controls were kept without bacterial inoculation to provide a control for the biotic samples. Samples of the solution were analyzed for dissolved U(VI) by means of kinetic phosphorescence analyzer KPA-11 (Chemcheck Instruments, Richland, WA). Analysis showed that as [HCO{sub 3}{sup -}] increases, a diminishing trend on the effect of bacteria on autunite leaching is observed. Viability of cells was conducted after 24 hours of cell incubation with the appropriate uranium and bicarbonate concentration treatment. As expected, the cells started to reduce after day 41 due to the nutritional exhaustion of the media. Moreover, viable bacteria accounted for more than 94% in the presence of 10 mM bicarbonate. Experiments showed that despite differences between the G975 and the G968 bacterial strains resistance to U(VI), in the presence of bicarbonate ions they are able to dissolute uranium from autunite mineral at the same capacity. The effect of both bacterial strains on autunite dissolution is reduced as the concentration of bicarbonate increases while the increase in soluble U(VI) concentration induced by G968 and G975 is dwarfed, for larger [HCO{sub 3}{sup -}]. (authors)

Sepulveda, Paola; Katsenovich, Yelena; Lagos, Leonel [Applied Research Center, Florida International University. 10555 West Flagler St. Suite 2100, Miami Fl 33175 (United States)] [Applied Research Center, Florida International University. 10555 West Flagler St. Suite 2100, Miami Fl 33175 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

We present two systems, reliable sockets (rocks) and reliable packets (racks), that provide transparent network connection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract We present two systems, reliable sockets (rocks) and reliable packets (racks of the connection changes IP address, with correct recovery of in-flight data. To allow rocks and racks Protocol that enables the remote detection of rocks and racks, or any other socket enhancement system

Miller, Barton P.

471

Fluid substitution in carbonate rocks based on the Gassmann equation and EshelbyWalsh theory  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Fluid substitution in carbonate rocks is more difficult than it is in clastic rocks for two reasons. Firstly, the rock physics modeling uncertainties in carbonate rocks, this is due to the difficulty of accurately acquiring the moduli of carbonate rocks' solid matrix because the experimental data on carbonate rocks have not been as thoroughly studied as silici-clastic sedimentary rocks. Secondly, due to the complex pore systems of carbonate rocks, it is very difficult to model pore geometry of carbonates, and hence hard to assess how the elastic properties change as fluid saturation changes based on the traditional Biot and Gassmann theories. In order to solve these problems, we present a new fluid substitution equation of carbonate rocks using the Gassmann equation and EshelbyWalsh theory (GEW) in this paper. Then, the specific procedures of how to calculate the moduli of carbonate rocks' solid matrix and how to measure the effect of pore geometry in fluid substitution based on the new fluid substation equation were illustrated by experimental testing about 12 carbonate rock samples in different fluid saturation scenarios and logging data. Finally, we further compared the new fluid substitution method with the conventional Gassmann fluid substitution based on the experimental data. The results verified that the new method is more accurate and reliable in the fluid substitution of complex carbonate rocks.

Quanxiong Feng; Lian Jiang; Mingquan Liu; Huan Wan; Li Chen; Wei Xiao

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

RoBOT: "Rocks Beneath Our Toes" An experiential learning opportunity in mineralogy and geochemistry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RoBOT: "Rocks Beneath Our Toes" An experiential learning opportunity in mineralogy Foundation What is RoBOT? The "Rocks Beneath Our Toes" or RoBOT Program began in 2006 with funding from high school RoBOT participants on a weekend field trip to collect and document rock samples

Baxter, Ethan F.

473

Compressional and shear velocities of dry and saturated jointed rock: a laboratory study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......classification of rock mass qualities, Geophys...shallow jointed rock, Int. J...a jointed sandstone, in Mechanical...fracture permeability, Int. J...microcrack porosity. By modelling...and steam reservoirs require...hot-dry-rock method are...evaluating the quality of large...and fluid permeability. Seismic...aperture or porosity. Moos...velocity in a sandstone is independent......

R. M. Stesky

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Reactive composite compositions and mat barriers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hazardous material storage area has a reactive multi-layer composite mat which lines an opening into which a reactive backfill and hazardous material are placed. A water-inhibiting cap may cover the hazardous material storage area. The reactive multi-layer composite mat has a backing onto which is placed an active layer which will neutralize or stabilize hazardous waste and a fronting layer so that the active layer is between the fronting and backing layers. The reactive backfill has a reactive agent which can stabilize or neutralize hazardous material and inhibit the movement of the hazardous material through the hazardous material storage area.

Langton, Christine A. (Aiken, SC); Narasimhan, Rajendran (Evans, GA); Karraker, David G. (Aiken, SC)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Impurities in rock-salt: consequences for the temperature increases at the disposal of high-level nuclear waste. [Kainite, Kieserite  

SciTech Connect

In part A the thermal properties of halite and the other materials occurring in rock-salt (the 'impurities') are collected. Except for sylvite (the specific heat of this salt is about 70% of the value for halite) all specific heats are larger than the specific heat of halite. The consequences for the temperature increases at the disposal of high-level nuclear waste in rock-salt are discussed for impurity concentrations of 1, 5, 10 and 15%. If the presence and distribution of the impurities are not taken into account, then - under the most unfavorable conditions - extra temperature increases of about 3% per cent impurity may occur. If, however, the geological composition and its geometry for the disposal region are known, the temperature increases can be calculated more accurately: they may or may not differ from those for pure halite. In part B the measurement of the thermal conductivity for four salts (kainite, kieserite, carnallite, and polyhalite) is described.

van den Broek, W.M.G.T.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Molybdenum disilicide matrix composite  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A composition consisting of an intermetallic compound, molybdenum disilicide, which is reinforced with VS silicon carbide whiskers dispersed throughout it and a method of making the reinforced composition. Use of the reinforcing material increases fracture toughness at low temperatures and strength at high temperatures, as compared to pure molybdenum disilicide.

Petrovic, John J. (Los Alamos, NM); Carter, David H. (Los Alamos, NM); Gac, Frank D. (Los Alamos, NM)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Molybdenum disilicide matrix composite  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A composition consisting of an intermetallic compound, molybdenum disilicide, which is reinforced with VS silicon carbide whiskers dispersed throughout it and a method of making the reinforced composition. Use of the reinforcing material increases fracture toughness at low temperatures and strength at high temperatures, as compared to pure molybdenum disilicide.

Petrovic, John J. (Los Alamos, NM); Carter, David H. (Los Alamos, NM); Gac, Frank D. (Los Alamos, NM)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Microsoft Word - CX-Wautoma-Rock Creek_WEB.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3, 2010 3, 2010 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Corinn Castro Project Manager - TELM-TPP-3 Proposed Action: Replace spacer dampers along the Wautoma-Rock Creek No. 1 500-kV Transmission Line. Budget Information: Work Order # 00234527 PP&A Project No.: PP&A 1507 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.3, Routine maintenance activities...for structures, rights-of-way, infrastructures such as roads, equipment...routine maintenance activities, corrective....are required to maintain... infrastructures...in a condition suitable for a facility to be used for its designed purpose. Location: Wautoma-Rock Creek No. 1 500-kV Transmission Line. The proposed project is

479

Picture Rocks, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Picture Rocks, Arizona: Energy Resources Picture Rocks, Arizona: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 32.3459069°, -111.2462146° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.3459069,"lon":-111.2462146,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

480

MHK Projects/Race Rocks Demonstration | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Race Rocks Demonstration Race Rocks Demonstration < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":48.2844,"lon":-123.531,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rock composition mineral" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Rock County, Minnesota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rock County, Minnesota: Energy Resources Rock County, Minnesota: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 43.6927003°, -96.3226072° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.6927003,"lon":-96.3226072,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

482

Microsoft Word - CX-Hat_Rock_Switch_14June2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7, 2013 7, 2013 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Glenn Russell Project Manager -TPCV-TPP-4 Proposed Action: Hat Rock Switching Station Replacement Project Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B4.6 Additions and modifications to transmission facilities Location: Umatilla County, Oregon Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to fund PacifiCorp's rebuild of BPA's Hat Rock Tap Switching Station, which is located within PacifiCorp's McNary-Wallula 230-kilovolt (kV) transmission line right-of-way (ROW). Rebuilding the switching station would include the replacement of sectionalizing switches, the grounding grid, and all signage. The approximately 0.5-acre yard would

483

Round Rock, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Round Rock, Texas: Energy Resources Round Rock, Texas: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 30.5082551°, -97.678896° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":30.5082551,"lon":-97.678896,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

484

Rock River LLC Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

River LLC Wind Farm River LLC Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search The Rock River LLC Wind Farm is in Carbon County, Wyoming. It consists of 50 turbines and has a total capacity of 50 MW. It is owned by Shell Wind Energy.[1] Based on assertions that the site is near Arlington, its approximate coordinates are 41.5946899°, -106.2083459°.[2] References ↑ http://www.wsgs.uwyo.edu/Topics/EnergyResources/wind.aspx ↑ http://www.thefreelibrary.com/Shell+WindEnergy+Acquires+Second+Wind+Farm+in+the+U.S.,+in+an...-a082345438 Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Rock_River_LLC_Wind_Farm&oldid=132230" Category: Wind Farms What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load)

485

Big Rock, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rock, Illinois: Energy Resources Rock, Illinois: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.7639181°, -88.5470219° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.7639181,"lon":-88.5470219,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

486

East Flat Rock, North Carolina: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flat Rock, North Carolina: Energy Resources Flat Rock, North Carolina: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 35.2801166°, -82.4220631° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.2801166,"lon":-82.4220631,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

487

West Valley Demonstration Project 10282 Rock Springs Road  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

West Valley Demonstration Project West Valley Demonstration Project 10282 Rock Springs Road West Valley, NY 141 71 -9799 Mr. Daniel W. Coyne President & General Manager CH2M HILL B&W West Valley, LLC West Valley Demonstration Project 10282 Rock Springs Road West Valley, NY 141 71 -9799 ATTENTION: J. D. Rendall, Regulatory Strategy, AC-EA SUBJECT: Environmental Checklist WVDP-20 12-0 1, " WVDP Reservoir Interconnecting Canal Maintenance Activities" REFERENCE: Letter WD:2012:0409 (357953), D. W. Coyne to R. W. Reffner, "CONTRACT NO. DE-EM000 1529, Section 5-3, Item 105, NEPA Documentation (Transmittal of Environmental Checklist WVDP-20 12-0 1, WVDP Reservoir Interconnecting Canal Maintenance Activities), Revision 1 ," dated July 24, 20 12 Dear Mr. Coyne:

488

A wellbore stability model for formations with anisotropic rock strengths  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Shale formations, due to the presence of laminations and weak planes, exhibit directional strength characteristics. In most conventional wellbore stability analyses, rock formations are typically assumed to have isotropic strength. This may cause erroneous results in anisotropic formations such as shales which show strength variations with changing loading directions with respect to the plane of weakness. Therefore a more complex wellbore stability model is required. We have developed such a model in which the anisotropic rock strength characteristic is incorporated. Applying this model to two case studies shows that shear failures occur either along or across the bedding planes depending on the relative orientation between the wellbore trajectories and the bedding planes. Additionally, the extent of failure region around the wellbore and the safe mud weights are significantly affected by the wellbore orientation with respect to the directions of bedding plane and in-situ stress field.

Hikweon Lee; See Hong Ong; Mohammed Azeemuddin; Harvey Goodman

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

WIPP air-intake shaft disturbed-rock zone study  

SciTech Connect

The disturbed-rock zone surrounding the air-intake shaft at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site was investigated to determine the extent and the permeability of the disturbed-rock zone as a function of radial distance from the 6.1 m diameter shaft, at different elevations within the Salado. Gas- and brine-permeability tests were performed in the bedded halite of the Salado formation at two levels within the air-intake shaft. The gas- and brine-permeability test results demonstrated that the radial distance to an undisturbed formation permeability of 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}21} m{sup 2} was less than 3.0 m.

Dale, T. [INTERA Inc., Austin, TX (United States); Hurtado, L.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Repository Isolation Systems Dept.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Thermal stress on bottom hole rock of gas drilling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Gas drilling has higher penetration than mud drilling. The greatest reason for this phenomenon with gas is that the gas is greatly cooled by expansion as it passes through the bit and thereby cools the bottom of the hole. The thermal stress at bottom-hole occurs during this process. The concept of thermal crushing of rocks is analysed in this study. The theoretical methods are developed to analyse thermal stresses and fragmentation induced by cooling of rock. Then, the numerical computation is conducted for the thermal stress equations with the numerical result simulated for the temperature field at the bottom hole to explain the reason of high drilling rates in gas drilling. Furthermore, an experiment was conducted to verify the theory. Therefore, the theories and simulated results in this paper have a guiding signification for best understand the technique and possibly to extend its economic advantage still further. [Received: September 23, 2011; Accepted: November 20, 2011

Shunji Yang; Gonghui Liu; Jun Li

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

North Little Rock, Arkansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Little Rock, Arkansas: Energy Resources Little Rock, Arkansas: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 34.769536°, -92.2670941° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.769536,"lon":-92.2670941,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

492

City of North Little Rock, Arkansas (Utility Company) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

North Little Rock North Little Rock Place Arkansas Utility Id 13718 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png HPS- 100 Watt Lighting HPS- 1000 Watt (Floodlights) Lighting HPS- 150 Watt Lighting HPS- 250 Watt Lighting HPS- 250 Watt (Floodlights) Lighting HPS- 400 Watt (Floodlights) Lighting LCTOU Industrial LGS Industrial LPS Industrial MH- 1000 Watt (Floodlights) Lighting

493

Window Rock, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rock, Arizona: Energy Resources Rock, Arizona: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 35.680573°, -109.0525929° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.680573,"lon":-109.0525929,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

494

Ocean Bluff-Brant Rock, Massachusetts: Energy Resources | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bluff-Brant Rock, Massachusetts: Energy Resources Bluff-Brant Rock, Massachusetts: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 42.1080418°, -70.6633175° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.1080418,"lon":-70.6633175,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

495

McKees Rocks, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

McKees Rocks, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources McKees Rocks, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 40.4656244°, -80.0656106° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.4656244,"lon":-80.0656106,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

496

Rough Rock, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rock, Arizona: Energy Resources Rock, Arizona: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 36.4072229°, -109.8728929° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":36.4072229,"lon":-109.8728929,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

497

Neutron Production from the Fracture of Piezoelectric Rocks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A theoretical explanation is provided for the experimental evidence that fracturing piezoelectric rocks produces neutrons. The elastic energy micro-crack production ultimately yields the macroscopic fracture. The mechanical energy is converted by the piezoelectric effect into electric field energy. The electric field energy decays via radio frequency (microwave) electric field oscillations. The radio frequency electric fields accelerate t