Sample records for rock composition mineral

  1. 2.20 Properties of Rocks and Minerals -Magnetic Properties of Rocks and Minerals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    2.20 Properties of Rocks and Minerals - Magnetic Properties of Rocks and Minerals R. J. Harrison, R 621 622 623 623 579 #12;580 Magnetic Properties of Rocks and Minerals 2.20.5.3 2.20.5.4 2, and are present in all types of rocks, sediments, and soils. These minerals retain a memory of the geomagnetic

  2. PTYS 109 LAB EXPLORATION AND DISCOVERY IN PLANETARY SCIENCE ROCKS AND MINERALS 133

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Barbara Anne

    PTYS 109 LAB EXPLORATION AND DISCOVERY IN PLANETARY SCIENCE ROCKS AND MINERALS 133 Rocks and Minerals I. OBJECTIVES One of the many ways to study Earth is by examining the rocks that make up its types of rocks and minerals; · determine the formation and the history of each rock and mineral; · infer

  3. Assessment of industrial minerals and rocks in the controlled area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Castor, S.B. [Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology, Reno, NV (United States); Lock, D.E. [Mackay School of Mines, Reno, NV (United States)

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Yucca Mountain in Nye County, Nevada, is a potential site for a permanent repository for high-level nuclear waste in Miocene ash flow tuff. The Yucca Mountain controlled area occupies approximately 98 km{sup 2} that includes the potential repository site. The Yucca Mountain controlled area is located within the southwestern Nevada volcanic field, a large area of Miocene volcanism that includes at least four major calderas or cauldrons. It is sited on a remnant of a Neogene volcanic plateau that was centered around the Timber Mountain caldera complex. The Yucca Mountain region contains many occurrences of valuable or potentially valuable industrial minerals, including deposits with past or current production of construction aggregate, borate minerals, clay, building stone, fluorspar, silicate, and zeolites. The existence of these deposits in the region and the occurrence of certain mineral materials at Yucca Mountain, indicate that the controlled area may have potential for industrial mineral and rock deposits. Consideration of the industrial mineral potential within the Yucca Mountain controlled area is mainly based on petrographic and lithologic studies of samples from drill holes in Yucca Mountain. Clay minerals, zeolites, fluorite, and barite, as minerals that are produced economically in Nevada, have been identified in samples from drill holes in Yucca Mountain.

  4. Relative Dating and Classification of Minerals and Rocks Based on Statistical Calculations Related to Their Potential Energy Index

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Labushev, Mikhail M

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Index of proportionality of atomic weights of chemical elements is proposed for determining the relative age of minerals and rocks. Their chemical analysis results serve to be initial data for calculations. For rocks of different composition the index is considered to be classification value as well. Crystal lattice energy change in minerals and their associations can be measured by the index value change, thus contributing to the solution of important practical problems. There was determined the effect of more rapid increase of potential energy of limestone with relatively low lattice energy as compared with the others.

  5. Rock, Mineral, Coal, Oil, and Gas Resources on State Lands (Montana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This chapter authorizes and regulates prospecting permits and mining leases for the exploration and development of rock, mineral, oil, coal, and gas resources on state lands.

  6. ILLITE-SMECTITE MIXED-LAYER MINERALS IN HYDROTHERMAL ALTERATION OF VOLCANIC ROCKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 ILLITE-SMECTITE MIXED-LAYER MINERALS IN HYDROTHERMAL ALTERATION OF VOLCANIC ROCKS: I. ONE-layer minerals The person to whom correspondence and page proofs should be sent: Atsuyuki Inoue Department-00107011,version1-5Dec2007 Author manuscript, published in "Clays and Clay Minerals 53 (2005) 423-439" DOI

  7. ILLITE-SMECTITE MIXED-LAYER MINERALS IN HYDROTHERMAL ALTERATION OF VOLCANIC ROCKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 ILLITE-SMECTITE MIXED-LAYER MINERALS IN HYDROTHERMAL ALTERATION OF VOLCANIC ROCKS: II. ONE-D HRTEM structure images of hydrothermal I-S mixed-layer minerals The person to whom correspondence manuscript, published in "Clays and Clay Minerals 53 (2005) 440-451" DOI : 10.1346/CCMN.2005.0530502 hal

  8. Application Of Fluid Inclusion And Rock-Gas Analysis In Mineral...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Gas Analysis In Mineral Exploration Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Application Of Fluid Inclusion And Rock-Gas Analysis In...

  9. Mineral and Rock Physics [MR] MR21B MCW:Level 1 Tuesday 0800h

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Downs, Robert T.

    Mineral and Rock Physics [MR] MR21B MCW:Level 1 Tuesday 0800h Structural Refinement Studies Kunz, Advanced Light Source MR21B-0018 The Crystal Structure of Diopside at Pressure to 10 Gpa tetrahedra and M1 octahedra to try and understand the observed changes in pyroxenes with changing P, T, and x

  10. SIZE COMPOSITION AND GROWTH OF YOUNG ROCK CRAB, CANCER IRRORATUS, ON A ROCKY BEACH IN MAINE!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Because rock crab is a valuable commercial species as well as an important food source of lobsters (EnnisSIZE COMPOSITION AND GROWTH OF YOUNG ROCK CRAB, CANCER IRRORATUS, ON A ROCKY BEACH IN MAINE! JAY S KROUSE' ABSTRACT Monthly hand collections of small rock crab, Cancer irrorallls, were made from

  11. Lab 2: Mineral Lab notes. Minerals are inorganic, solid, naturally occurring substances that have a characteristic chemical compositions,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, X. Rong

    a characteristic chemical compositions, distinctive physical properties, and crystalline structures. Chemical is silicon dioxide SiO2; the mineral galena is an ore of lead, and its chemical formula is PbS, a lead sulfide; and the mineral calcite, which is used as an antacid and in fertilizers, is calcium carbonate Ca

  12. amphibolite rock-weathering activity: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Formalization -- 12;DFT Nowak, Robert 51 Krivaja Konjuh Ophiolite Complex in Bosnia and Herzegovina Addition to Study on Mineral Composition of Metamorphic Rocks CiteSeer...

  13. Monthly variation in crude protein, fibre fractions and mineral composition of paragrass (Brachiaria mutica (Forsk)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Monthly variation in crude protein, fibre fractions and mineral composition of paragrass variation in crude protein, fibre fractions and mineral composition of forages collected in the pastures. The samples were dried, ground and analysed for crude protein (CP), neutral detergent fibre (NDF), acid

  14. Quantitative determination of mineral composition by powder x-ray diffraction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pawloski, G.A.

    1984-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    An external standard intensity ratio method is used for quantitatively determining mineralogic compositions of samples by x-ray diffraction. The method uses ratios of x-ray intensity peaks from a single run. Constants are previously determined for each mineral which is to be quantitatively measured. Ratios of the highest intensity peak of each mineral to be quantified in the sample and the highest intensity peak of a reference mineral contained in the sample are used to calculate sample composition.

  15. TERRESTRIAL ROCK VARNISH: A KEY TO UNDERSTANDING THE SURFACE COMPOSITION OF MARS. J. G. Ward1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirkland, Laurel

    TERRESTRIAL ROCK VARNISH: A KEY TO UNDERSTANDING THE SURFACE COMPOSITION OF MARS. J. G. Ward1 , L produces a strong spectral band contrast. This also gives varnish its shiny appearance. On Earth rock varnish may have a microbial origin [3]. Clays are transported from an external source and deposited

  16. Improved microstructure of cement-based composites through the addition of rock wool particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Wei-Ting [Dept. of Civil Engineering, National Ilan University, Ilan 26047, Taiwan (China); Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Atomic Energy Council, Taoyuan 32546, Taiwan (China); Cheng, An, E-mail: ancheng@niu.edu.tw [Dept. of Civil Engineering, National Ilan University, Ilan 26047, Taiwan (China); Huang, Ran; Zou, Si-Yu [Dept. of Harbor and River Engineering, National Taiwan Ocean University, Keelung 20224, Taiwan (China)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Rock wool is an inorganic fibrous substance produced by steam blasting and cooling molten glass. As with other industrial by-products, rock wool particles can be used as cementitious materials or ultra fine fillers in cement-based composites. This study investigated the microstructure of mortar specimens produced with cement-based composites that include various forms of rock wool particles. It conducted compressive strength testing, rapid chloride penetration tests, X-ray diffraction analysis, thermo-gravimetric analysis, and scanning electronic microscopy to evaluate the macro- and micro-properties of the cement-based composites. Test results indicate that inclusion of rock wool particles in composites improved compressive strength and reduced chloride ion penetration at the age of 91 days due to the reduction of calcium hydroxide content. Microscopic analysis confirms that the use of rock wool particles contributed to the formation of a denser, more compact microstructure within the hardened paste. In addition, X-ray diffraction analysis shows few changes in formation of pozzolanic reaction products and no new hydrations are formed with incorporating rock wool particles. - Highlights: • We report the microstructural characterization of cement-based composites. • Different mixes produced with various rock wool particles have been tested. • The influence of different mixes on macro and micro properties has been discussed. • The macro properties are included compressive strength and permeability. • XRD and SEM observations confirm the pozzolanic reaction in the resulting pastes.

  17. Mineral hints at bright blue rocks deep in the Earth 12 March 2014 Last updated at 21:16 ET | By Simon Redfern Science writer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Machel, Hans

    Mineral hints at bright blue rocks deep in the Earth 12 March 2014 Last updated at 21:16 ET | By Simon Redfern Science writer Minerals preserved in diamond have revealed hints of the bright blue and back, which it has." Blue planet Prof Joseph Smyth of the University of Colorado has spent many

  18. Rocks

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand Requirements RecentlyElectronicResources ResourcesRobust, High-ThroughputRocks Rocks

  19. Uranium mineralization along a fault plane in tertiary sedimentary rocks in the McLean 5 Mine, Live Oak Conty, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bomber, Brenda Jean

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    URAN1IUM MINERALIZATION ALONG A FAULT PLANE IN TERTIARY SEDIMENTARY ROCKS IN THE MCLEAN 5 MINE, LIVE OAK COUNTY, TEXAS A Thesis by BRENDA JEAN BOMBER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment... as to sty1e and content by: Chairman of Committee Member Memb r H o De artment December 1980 ABSTRACT Uranium Mineralization along a Fault Plane in Tertiary Sedimentary Rocks in the McLean 5 Mine, Live Oak County, Texas. (December 1980) Brenda Jean...

  20. Uranium mineralization along a fault plane in tertiary sedimentary rocks in the McLean 5 Mine, Live Oak Conty, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bomber, Brenda Jean

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and the fact that uranium occurs in leucoxene but not the sulfides suggest that sulfidization occurred before uranium mineralization. Initial uranium precipitation took place in secondary titanium minerals as well as in mud clasts and in altered volcanic... rock fragments. This was followed by uranium precipitation along grain boundaries in the Oakville sandstone, especially near the fault, where the calcite cement had been removed due to increased permea- bility and constant low pH conditions...

  1. Quantitative mineralogical composition of complex mineral wastes - Contribution of the Rietveld method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahieux, P.-Y. [Universite de Toulouse, UPS, INSA, LMDC (Laboratoire Materiaux et Durabilite des Constructions), 135, Avenue de Rangueil, F-31 077 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France); Aubert, J.-E., E-mail: aubert@insa-toulouse.f [Universite de Toulouse, UPS, INSA, LMDC (Laboratoire Materiaux et Durabilite des Constructions), 135, Avenue de Rangueil, F-31 077 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France); Cyr, M.; Coutand, M.; Husson, B. [Universite de Toulouse, UPS, INSA, LMDC (Laboratoire Materiaux et Durabilite des Constructions), 135, Avenue de Rangueil, F-31 077 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France)

    2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the work presented in this paper is the quantitative determination of the mineral composition of two complex mineral wastes: a sewage sludge ash (SSA) and a municipal solid waste incineration fly ash (MSWIFA). The mineral compositions were determined by two different methods: the first based on calculation using the qualitative mineralogical composition of the waste combined with physicochemical analyses; the second the Rietveld method, which uses only X-ray diffraction patterns. The results obtained are coherent, showing that it is possible to quantify the mineral compositions of complex mineral waste with such methods. The apparent simplicity of the Rietveld method (due principally to the availability of software packages implementing the method) facilitates its use. However, care should be taken since the crystal structure analysis based on powder diffraction data needs experience and a thorough understanding of crystallography. So the use of another, complementary, method such as the first one used in this study, may sometimes be needed to confirm the results.

  2. An integrated experimental and numerical study: Developing a reaction transport model that couples chemical reactions of mineral dissolution/precipitation with spatial and temporal flow variations in CO2/brine/rock systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project objectives: Generate and characterize mineral dissolution/precipitation reactions in supercritical CO2/brine/rock systems under pressure-temperature-chemistry conditions resembling CO2injection into EGS. Characterize three-dimensional spatial and temporal distributions of rock structures subject to mineral dissolution/precipitation processes by X-ray tomography, SEM imaging, and Microprobe analysis.

  3. Predicting carbonate mineral precipitation/dissolution events during progressive diagenesis of clastic rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Surdam, R.C.; MacGowan, D.B.; Dunn, T.L. (Univ. of Wyoming, Laramie (United States)); Moraes, M. (Petrobras (Brazil))

    1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is an observable, regular progression of early and late carbonate cements that is separated by carbonate mineral dissolution in many sandstones during progressive burial and diagenesis. The distribution of early cements is a function of incipient hydration of framework grains, sulfate reduction, and bacterial methanogenesis. These early cements typically precipitate from the sediment water interace to burial depths corresponding to about 80C. The distribution of late carbonate cements is a function of the relationship of organic acid anions, aluminosilicate reactions and CO{sub 2} in formation waters. Elevated PCO{sub 2} in a fluid where the pH is buffered by organic acid anions or aluminosilicates results in precipitation of a late carbonate cement (typically ferroan); these late carbonate cements generally form over the temperature interval of 100-130C. The late and early carbonate cement events are separated in time by a period of carbonate mineral dissolution or nonprecipitation. This dissolution is related to the increase in concentration of carboxylic acid anions resulting from the thermocatalytic cracking of oxygen-bearing functional groups from kerogen and/or redox reactions involving kerogen. Examples of the importance of early carbonate cementation/decementation to hydrocarbon reservoirs include the Campos basin of Brazil and the U.S. Gulf Coast. An example of late carbonate cementation/decementation includes the Norphlet Formation. This observed sequence of cementation and decementation can be modeled, and the modeling results can be used to predict enhanced porosity in the subsurface.

  4. Strontium Isotopic Composition of Paleozoic Carbonate Rocks in the Nevada Test Site Vicinity, Clark, Lincoln, and Nye Counties, Nevada and Inyo County, California.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James B. Paces; Zell E. Peterman; Kiyoto Futa; Thomas A. Oliver; and Brian D. Marshall.

    2007-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Ground water moving through permeable Paleozoic carbonate rocks represents the most likely pathway for migration of radioactive contaminants from nuclear weapons testing at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. The strontium isotopic composition (87Sr/86Sr) of ground water offers a useful means of testing hydrochemical models of regional flow involving advection and reaction. However, reaction models require knowledge of 87Sr/86Sr data for carbonate rock in the Nevada Test Site vicinity, which is scarce. To fill this data gap, samples of core or cuttings were selected from 22 boreholes at depth intervals from which water samples had been obtained previously around the Nevada Test Site at Yucca Flat, Frenchman Flat, Rainier Mesa, and Mercury Valley. Dilute acid leachates of these samples were analyzed for a suite of major- and trace-element concentrations (MgO, CaO, SiO2, Al2O3, MnO, Rb, Sr, Th, and U) as well as for 87Sr/86Sr. Also presented are unpublished analyses of 114 Paleozoic carbonate samples from outcrops, road cuts, or underground sites in the Funeral Mountains, Bare Mountain, Striped Hills, Specter Range, Spring Mountains, and ranges east of the Nevada Test Site measured in the early 1990's. These data originally were collected to evaluate the potential for economic mineral deposition at the potential high-level radioactive waste repository site at Yucca Mountain and adjacent areas (Peterman and others, 1994). Samples were analyzed for a suite of trace elements (Rb, Sr, Zr, Ba, La, and Ce) in bulk-rock powders, and 87Sr/86Sr in partial digestions of carbonate rock using dilute acid or total digestions of silicate-rich rocks. Pre-Tertiary core samples from two boreholes in the central or western part of the Nevada Test Site also were analyzed. Data are presented in tables and summarized in graphs; however, no attempt is made to interpret results with respect to ground-water flow paths in this report. Present-day 87Sr/86Sr values are compared to values for Paleozoic seawater present at the time of deposition. Many of the samples have 87Sr/86Sr compositions that remain relatively unmodified from expected seawater values. However, rocks underlying the northern Nevada Test Site as well as rocks exposed at Bare Mountain commonly have elevated 87Sr/86Sr values derived from post-depositional addition of radiogenic Sr most likely from fluids circulating through rubidium-rich Paleozoic strata or Precambrian basement rocks.

  5. Contr. Mineral. and Petrol. 12, 223--244 (1966) Staurolite-Quartzite Bands in Kyanite Quartzite at Big Rock,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Cin-Ty Aeolus

    1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Contr. Mineral. and Petrol. 12, 223--244 (1966) Staurolite-Quartzite Bands in Kyanite Quartzite. Mineral.and Petrol., Vol.12 16 #12;224 W. SoH~Y~ and G. A. CHI~ER: Introduction In August 1958 one

  6. Pore-scale study of dissolution-induced changes in hydrologic properties of rocks with binary minerals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Li; Viswanathan, Hari S; Tao, Wenquan

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A pore-scale numerical model for reactive transport processes based on the Lattice Boltzmann method is used to study the dissolution-induced changes in hydrologic properties of a fractured medium and a porous medium. The solid phase of both media consists of two minerals, and a structure reconstruction method called quartet structure generation set is employed to generate the distributions of both minerals. Emphasis is put on the effects of undissolved minerals on the changes of permeability and porosity under different Peclet and Damkohler numbers. The simulation results show porous layers formed by the undissolved mineral remain behind the dissolution reaction front. Due to the large flow resistance in these porous layers, the permeability increases very slowly or even remains at a small value although the porosity increases by a large amount. Besides, due to the heterogeneous characteristic of the dissolution, the chemical, mechanical and hydraulic apertures are very different from each other. Further, sim...

  7. Geophysical technique for mineral exploration and discrimination based on electromagnetic methods and associated systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhdanov; Michael S. (Salt Lake City, UT)

    2008-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Mineral exploration needs a reliable method to distinguish between uneconomic mineral deposits and economic mineralization. A method and system includes a geophysical technique for subsurface material characterization, mineral exploration and mineral discrimination. The technique introduced in this invention detects induced polarization effects in electromagnetic data and uses remote geophysical observations to determine the parameters of an effective conductivity relaxation model using a composite analytical multi-phase model of the rock formations. The conductivity relaxation model and analytical model can be used to determine parameters related by analytical expressions to the physical characteristics of the microstructure of the rocks and minerals. These parameters are ultimately used for the discrimination of different components in underground formations, and in this way provide an ability to distinguish between uneconomic mineral deposits and zones of economic mineralization using geophysical remote sensing technology.

  8. Clinoptilolite and associated authigenic minerals in Miocene tuffaceous rocks in the Goose Creek Basin, Cassia County, Idaho

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brownfield, M.E.; Hildebrand, R.T.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Miocene tuffaceous fluviolacustrine deposits in the southeastern part of the Goose Creek basin contain a variety of authigenic minerals, including clinoptilolite, smectite, pyrite, gypsum, and calcite. Clinoptilolite is the primary mineral in the diagenetically altered rhyolitic vitric tuffs in the study area. These zeolitic tuffs locally attain thicknesses of as much as 30 meters. Examinations of samples of the altered tuff beds using the scanning electron microscope reveal that the clinoptilolite usually occurs as clean, well-formed tabular crystals about 0.005 mm across in a matrix of smectite. Prismatic clinoptilolite crystals, as much as 0.06 mm long, are present in the larger vugs. During the Miocene, thick beds of air-fall rhyolitic vitric volcanic ash accumulated in the Goose Creek basin in a coalescing fluviolacustrine depositional setting. In the southeastern part of the basin, the volcanic ash was deposited in a lacustrine fan delta, where it was partly reworked and interbedded with sandstone and siltstone. Diagenetic alteration of the ash beds proceeded in an open hydrologic system. Solution and hydrolysis by ground water initially altered the glass shards to form smectite and silica gel. Clinoptilolite subsequently precipitated on the altered shard surfaces. The paragenesis of pyrite, gypsum, and calcite in the zeolitic tuffs is uncertain.

  9. Iron and Steel Phosphate Rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    Mica Molybdenum Nickel Nitrogen Peat Perlite Phosphate Rock Platinum Potash Pumice Quartz Crystal Rare . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 190 Appendix C--A Resource/Reserve Classification for Minerals

  10. The effects of texture and composition on the mechanical behavior of experimentally deformed carbonate rocks 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hugman, Robert Harvey Harold

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    behavior in unconfined tests and large increases in ultimate strength with increases in confining pressure to 100 MPa (Fig. 1, a, e). These "crystalline" rocks are moderately ductile to ductile at 100 MPa confining pressure. A degree of work hardening... Limestone (67 0 microcrystalline carbonate), and Madison H61-16 Lime- stone (54 $ micrite) are included in this category (Fig. 1, b, d, f), All these rocks are strong in unconfined tests, and stronger at 50 and 100 MPa confining pressure then Yule Marble...

  11. Hunchback Shelter: A Fremont Lithic Production Site in the Mineral Mountains of Eastern Utah

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greubel, Rand A.; Andrews, Bradford W.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mineral Mountains or Black Rock sources (Talbot et al. 2000:Canyon, and Black Rock obsidian source areas. occupations

  12. Mineral Scavenger Hunt 1. CONTRIBUTOR'S NAME: Johnny MacLean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brewer, Carol

    Mineral Scavenger Hunt 1. CONTRIBUTOR'S NAME: Johnny MacLean 2. NAME OF INQUIRY: Mineral Scavenger from minerals? What are some objects in the classroom that come from minerals? What minerals did these objects come from? b. Ecological Theme(s): Minerals are the building blocks of rocks. Rocks

  13. Assessing the mechanical microstructure of shale by nanoindentation : the link between mineral composition and mechanical properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bobko, Christopher Philip, 1981-

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Shale is a multi-phase, multi-scale sedimentary rock that makes up 75% of the earth's sedimentary basins and is especially critical in petroleum engineering applications. At macroscopic scales, shales possess a diverse set ...

  14. Magnetite composition in Ni-Cu-PGE deposits worldwide: application to mineral exploration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    = 61) by laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma- mass spectrometry. The composition of all primary

  15. THE ORIGIN OF FERROAN ANORTHOSITES AND RETHINKING LUNAR DOGMA: ION PROBE TRACE-ELEMENT ANALYSES OF MINERALS IN APOLLO 15 ROCKS --G.A. Snyder1, C. Floss2, and L.A.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OF MINERALS IN APOLLO 15 ROCKS -- G.A. Snyder1, C. Floss2, and L.A. Taylor1; 1Planetary Geosciences Institute for plagioclase and pyroxene from four ferroan anorthosites from the Hadley-Appenine region of the Moon (Apollo 15 with the formation of FANs in a LMO [2]. Trace- and minor-element contents in FANs from the Apollo 16 landing site

  16. LUNAR MINERALS James Papike, Lawrence Taylor, and Steven Simon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    LUNAR MINERALS James Papike, Lawrence Taylor, and Steven Simon The lunar rocks described--make it easy to distinguish them from terrestrial rocks. However, the minerals that make up lunar rocks are (with a few notable exceptions) minerals that are also found on Earth. Both lunar and terrestrial rocks

  17. Effect of basic slag addition on soil properties, growth and leaf mineral composition of beans in a Cu-contaminated soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Effect of basic slag addition on soil properties, growth and leaf mineral composition of beans in contaminated soils. The BS effects on soil pH, soil conductivity, growth and chemical composition of beans were Contamination 19, 2 (2010) 174 - 187" #12;2 the Cu-contaminated soil promoted bean growth with the lowest foliar

  18. Nature Macmillan Publishers Ltd 1997 of composition, temperature, oxygen fugacity and pressure on their redox states. Contrib. Mineral.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dominey, Peter F.

    on their redox states. Contrib. Mineral. Petrol. 108, 82­92 (1991). 22. Eggler, D. H. & Lorand, J. P. Sulfides

  19. Synthesis of supported carbon nanotubes in mineralized silica...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    supported carbon nanotubes in mineralized silica-wood composites. Synthesis of supported carbon nanotubes in mineralized silica-wood composites. Abstract: Multiwall carbon...

  20. A highly conspicuous mineralized composite photonic architecture in the translucent shell of the blue-rayed limpet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Ling

    Many species rely on diverse selections of entirely organic photonic structures for the manipulation of light and the display of striking colours. Here we report the discovery of a mineralized hierarchical photonic ...

  1. Design of tabular excavations in foliated rock: an integrated numerical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to the mineralized zone (development openings), extracting the ore from the surrounding host rock (stopes. The first stage in the design process is the characterization of the rock mass using both in situ of the mining process, requiring that the rock mass stability, both within the orebody and in the rock adjacent

  2. Mixture Theories for Rock Properties James G. Berryman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mixture Theories for Rock Properties James G. Berryman Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory by Batchelor [3], Hale [41], Hashin [42], Torquato [95], and Willis [110] are also recommended. 1.1. Rocks Are Inhomogeneous Materials A rock is a naturally occurring mixture of minerals. Rocks are normally inhomogeneous

  3. SEISMIC AND ROCK PHYSICS DIAGNOSTICS OF MULTISCALE RESERVOIR TEXTURES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Mavko

    2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of our study on ''Relationships between seismic properties and rock microstructure'', we have studied (1) Elastic properties of clay minerals using Pulse Transmission experiments. We show measurements of elastic moduli and strain in clay minerals.

  4. Carbonation Mechanism of Reservoir Rock by Supercritical Carbon...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Task 3: Mechanical behaviors of carbonated minerals. - Task 4: Modeling of CO2- reservoir rock interactions. - Task 5: Preparation of report covering the four tasks previous task,...

  5. Does variation in mineral composition alter the short-wave light scattering properties of desert dust aerosol?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oxford, University of

    retrievals of mineral dust aerosol from space by visible and near-infrared radiometers. Errors in aerosol depth in deserts and the surrounding regions during periods of high wind. Long range transport of desert particles into the air [6] (wind alone does not have sufficient energy to remove particles from the surface

  6. Chemical composition of dust storms in Beijing and implications for the mixing of mineral aerosol with pollution aerosol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with pollution aerosol on the pathway Yele Sun,1 Guoshun Zhuang,1,2,3 Ying Wang,1 Xiujuan Zhao,1,4 Jie Li,5 Zifa direction could be seen as the ``polluted'' pathway and the north-northwesterly direction as the relatively ``less-polluted'' one. Dust storms not only delivered large amounts of mineral elements but also carried

  7. Rock Art

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huyge, Dirk

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The archaeology of early Egypt: Social transformations inAlexander 1938 Rock-drawings of southern Upper Egypt. Vol.1. London: The Egypt Exploration Society. 1939 Rock-drawings

  8. Stable isotopes of authigenic minerals in variably-saturated fractured tuff

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weber, D.S.; Evans, D.D.

    1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Identifying stable isotope variation and mineralogical changes in fractured rock may help establish the history of climatic and geomorphological processes that might affect the isolation properties of a waste repository site. This study examines the use of the stable isotope ratios of oxygen ({sup 18}O/{sup 16}O) and carbon ({sup 13}C/{sup 12}C) in authigenic minerals as hydrogeochemical tools tracing low-temperature rock-water interaction in variably-saturated fractured stuff. Isotopic compositions of fracture-filling and rock matrix minerals in the Apache Leap tuff, near Superior, Arizona were concordant with geothermal temperatures and in equilibrium with water isotopically similar to present-day meteoric water and groundwater. Oxygen and carbon isotope ratios of fracture-filling, in unsaturated fractured tuff, displayed an isotopic gradient believed to result from near-surface isotopic enrichment due to evaporation rather than the effects of rock-water interaction. Oxygen isotope ratios of rock matrix opal samples exhibited an isotopic gradient believed to result from, leaching and reprecipitation of silica at depth. Methods and results can be used to further define primary flowpaths and the movement of water in variably-saturated fractured rock. 71 refs., 23 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Metamorphic Rocks, Processes, and Resources Metamorphic rocks are rocks changed from one form to another by intense heat, intense pressure,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, X. Rong

    important ­ Rising temperature causes water to be released from unstable minerals ­ Hot water very reactive refers to the temperature and pressure under which a rock was metamorphosed, considered low grade or high ­ If range exceeded, new mineral structures result ­ If temperature gets high enough, melting will occur

  10. Alkali gabbronorite, ultra-KREEPy melt rock and the diverse suite of clasts in North Ray crater feldspathic fragmental breccia 67975

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindstrom, M.M.

    1984-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Lunar breccia 67975 is a feldspathic fragmental breccia from North Ray crater, Apollo 16. It contains clasts of alkali gabbronorite and ultra-KREEPy mafic fragment-laden melt breccias, which are unique among Apollo 16 samples. Both are alkali- and iron-rich rocks with moderate to high REE concentrations. They more strongly resemble Apollo 14 gabbronorites and alkali anorthosites and KREEP-rich rocks than they do other Apollo 16 samples. The other clasts in 67975 are the ferroan anorthosites, feldspathic melt rocks, and magnesian granulites, which are typical of other feldspathic fragmental breccias. Examination of bulk and mineral compositions of other breccias and melt rocks suggests that alkali gabbronorite may be a minor component in other North Ray crater breccias and feldspathic melt rocks. This implies that alkali gabbronorite was a fairly early (4.0 b.y.) crustal component in the North Ray crater region.

  11. Rock Classification in Organic Shale Based on Petrophysical and Elastic Rock Properties Calculated from Well Logs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aranibar Fernandez, Alvaro A

    2015-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    classification method was then applied to the field examples from the Haynesville shale and Woodford shales for rock classification. The estimates of porosity, TOC, bulk modulus, shear modulus, and volumetric concentrations of minerals were obtained...

  12. Calibrating the ChemCam LIBS for carbonate minerals on Mars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiens, Roger C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Clegg, Samuel M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ollila, Ann M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Barefield, James E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lanza, Nina [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Newsom, Horton E [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ChemCam instrument suite on board the NASA Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover includes the first LIBS instrument for extraterrestrial applications. Here we examine carbonate minerals in a simulated martian environment using the LIDS technique in order to better understand the in situ signature of these materials on Mars. Both chemical composition and rock type are determined using multivariate analysis (MVA) techniques. Composition is confirmed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques. Our initial results suggest that ChemCam can recognize and differentiate between carbonate materials on Mars.

  13. Mineral content analysis of atmospheric dust using hyperspectral information from space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kostinski, Alex

    Mineral content analysis of atmospheric dust using hyperspectral information from space A one of the world's largest sources of atmospheric mineral dust. Mineral composition optical properties, and mineral deposition to Amazon forests. In this study we examine hyperspectral

  14. New Mexico Bureau Mines and Mineral

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunbar, Nelia W.

    Number22 - 1999 New Mexico Bureau of Mines and Mineral Resources a division of Nei~, Mexico Tech forsandblasting five times! ThisIssue Earth Briefs-Better age estimates on some New Mexico volcanic rocks Have You) NewMexico's Most Wanted Minera Is (pageT) Magnification of microscopic miner- als and glass (page 8

  15. Mineralization of Carbon Dioxide: Literature Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Romanov, V; Soong, Y; Carney, C; Rush, G; Nielsen, B; O'Connor, W

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CCS research has been focused on CO2 storage in geologic formations, with many potential risks. An alternative to conventional geologic storage is carbon mineralization, where CO2 is reacted with metal cations to form carbonate minerals. Mineralization methods can be broadly divided into two categories: in situ and ex situ. In situ mineralization, or mineral trapping, is a component of underground geologic sequestration, in which a portion of the injected CO2 reacts with alkaline rock present in the target formation to form solid carbonate species. In ex situ mineralization, the carbonation reaction occurs above ground, within a separate reactor or industrial process. This literature review is meant to provide an update on the current status of research on CO2 mineralization. 2

  16. RIETVELD REFINEMENT OF REAL STRUCTURE PARAMETERS OF DISORDERED CLAY MINERALS IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magee, Joseph W.

    -conventional hydrocarbons in Germany) Germany's potential for shale oil and shale gas NIKO seal gas-rich shale shale: sedimentary rock which contains quartz, carbonates and clay minerals #12;clay minerals in shales quartz

  17. Q00906010024 rock check dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    00906010024 rock check dam Q00906010025 rock check dam Q00906010021 rock check dam Q00906010022 rock check dam Q00906010027 rock check dam Q00906010026 rock check dam Q00906010018 rock check dam Q00906010023 rock check dam Q00906010011 rock check dam Q00906010008 rock check dam Q00906010007 rock check dam Q

  18. The Effect of Heterogeneity on Matrix Acidizing of Carbonate Rocks 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keys, Ryan S.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    In matrix acidizing, the goal is to dissolve minerals in the rock to increase well productivity. This is accomplished by injecting an application-specific solution of acid into the formation at a pressure between the pore ...

  19. JOM: Journal of the Minerals, Metals, and Materials Society, 2012, Vol. 62, Issue 10, pp. 1148-1157 Thermal expansion of carbon nanofiber reinforced multiscale polymer composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Nikhil

    -1157 Thermal expansion of carbon nanofiber reinforced multiscale polymer composites Ronald Poveda, Sriniket. Keywords: Polymer matrix composite; nanocomposite; carbon nanofibers; thermal properties; coefficient materials. Therefore, understanding the trends observed in the CTE of composites with respect

  20. Clay Minerals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mueller, Karl T.; Sanders, Rebecca L.; Washton, Nancy M.

    2014-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Clay minerals are important components of the environment and are involved or implicated in processes such as the uptake of pollutants and the release of nutrients and as potential platforms for a number of chemical reactions. Owing to their small particle sizes (typically, on the order of microns or smaller) and mixing with a variety of other minerals and soil components, advanced characterization methods are needed to study their structures, dynamics, and reactivities. In this article, we describe the use of solid-state NMR methods to characterize the structures and chemistries of clay minerals. Early one-pulse magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR studies of 27Al and 29Si have now been enhanced and extended with new studies utilizing advanced methodologies (such as Multiple Quantum MAS) as well as studies of less-sensitive nuclei. In additional work, the issue of reactivity of clay minerals has been addressed, including studies of reactive surface area in the environment. Utilizations of NMR-sensitive nuclides within the clay minerals themselves, and in molecules that react with speci?c sites on the clay mineral surfaces, have aided in understanding the reactivity of these complex aluminosilicate systems.

  1. alum rock sulfur: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    -resolution carbon and sulfur isotope profiles from Early to Middle Ordovician carbonate rocks from the Argentine Investigation of isotopic compositions recorded in...

  2. Specific energy for pulsed laser rock drilling.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Z.; Reed, C. B.; Kornecki, G.; Gahan, B. C.; Parker, R. A.; Batarseh, S.; Graves, R. M.; Figueroa, H.; Skinner, N.; Technology Development

    2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Application of advanced high power laser technology to oil and gas well drilling has been attracting significant research interests recently among research institutes, petroleum industries, and universities. Potential laser or laser-aided oil and gas well drilling has many advantages over the conventional rotary drilling, such as high penetration rate, reduction or elimination of tripping, casing, and bit costs, and enhanced well control, perforating and side-tracking capabilities. The energy required to remove a unit volume of rock, namely the specific energy (SE), is a critical rock property data that can be used to determine both the technical and economic feasibility of laser oil and gas well drilling. When a high power laser beam is applied on a rock, it can remove the rock by thermal spallation, melting, or vaporization depending on the applied laser energy and the way the energy is applied. The most efficient rock removal mechanism would be the one that requires the minimum energy to remove a unit volume of rock. Samples of sandstone, shale, and limestone were prepared for laser beam interaction with a 1.6 kW pulsed Nd:yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser beam to determine how the beam size, power, repetition rate, pulse width, exposure time and energy can affect the amount of energy transferred to the rock for the purposes of spallation, melting, and vaporization. The purpose of the laser rock interaction experiment was to determine the optimal parameters required to remove a maximum rock volume from the samples while minimizing energy input. Absorption of radiant energy from the laser beam gives rise to the thermal energy transfer required for the destruction and removal of the rock matrix. Results from the tests indicate that each rock type has a set of optimal laser parameters to minimize specific energy (SE) values as observed in a set of linear track and spot tests. As absorbed energy outpaces heat diffusion by the rock matrix, local temperatures can rise to the melting points of the minerals and quickly increase observed SE values. Tests also clearly identified the spallation and melting zones for shale samples while changing the laser power. The lowest SE values are obtained in the spalling zone just prior to the onset of mineral melt. The laser thermally spalled and saw mechanically cut rocks show similarity of surface microstructure. The study also found that increasing beam repetition rate within the same material removal mechanism would increase the material removal rate, which is believed due to an increase of maximum temperature, thermal cycling frequency, and intensity of laser-driven shock wave within the rock.

  3. Role of minerals in formation of hydrocarbons during pyrolysis of organic matter - a material balance approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tannenbaum, E.; Huizinga, B.J.; Kaplan, I.R.

    1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Monterey Formation and Green River Formation kerogens (types II and I, respectively) were isolated, mixed with common sedimentary minerals, and pyrolyzed under dry and hydrous conditions for various times and temperatures. Analysis of all the pyrolyses products were conducted to perform a material balance and to infer reaction kinetics and mechanisms. Material balance of the pyrolyses products, in the presence and absence of minerals, reveals that the kerogen degradation results in the formation of bitumen rich in high molecular weight compounds in the initial stages, followed by additional cracking of kerogen and bitumen. However, amount and type of hydrocarbons in the pyrolyses products of kerogen in the presence of montmorillonite are markedly different from those produced by heating kerogen alone or with other minerals. The initial amounts of products in the presence of montmorillonite, and in particular the quantities of low molecular weight hydrocarbons, are higher than those in the presence of illite, calcite, and kerogen alone. The composition of these low molecular weight compounds is dominated by branched hydrocarbons, indicating catalytic cracking via carbonium ion mechanism, which is initiated on acidic sites of the clay. Composition differences are evident also in the distribution of n-alkanes and in the pristane/phytane ratio. The catalytic effect of montmorillonite, however, disappears in the presence of excess water. These differences may have important implications for the composition and quantities of petroleum generated from source rocks with different mineralogies.

  4. Heavy mineral distribution in stream sediment of Tapah area, Perak, Malaysia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sibon, Mahat Hj [Jabatan Mineral dan Geosains Malaysia, 40000 Shah Alam, Selangor, Malaysia and Program Geologi, Pusat Pengajian Sains Sekitaran dan Sumber Alam, Fakulti Sains dan Teknologi, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Jamil, Habibah; Umor, Mohd Rozi [Program Geologi, Pusat Pengajian Sains Sekitaran dan Sumber Alam, Fakulti Sains dan Teknologi, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Hassan, Wan Fuad Wan [Jabatan Geologi, Fakulti Sains Universiti Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2013-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper aims to provide the overview of occurrence, distribution and origin of the heavy minerals in the study area. A total of 45 selected stream sediment heavy mineral concentrate samples were panned using standard dulangs, dried and separated from other light minerals using bromoform. The heavy minerals were separated into different fractions at different amperes using Frantz Isodynamic magnetic separator. Mineral identification was done using binocular microscope augmented by X-ray diffraction analyses. Mineral abundance data were analysed graphically using triangular diagrams to show their origin. Dominant minerals present in the heavy mineral samples collected are ilmenite, cassiterite, tourmaline, zircon, topaz, and magnetite. The less common minerals, present in trace amounts are hematite, xenotime, allanite, monazite, rutile, anatase, leucoxene, chromite, garnet and olivine. Examination of the heavy mineral assemblage shows that they originated from granite batholiths of the Main Range, Changkat Rembian as well as from the metasedimentary rock in the area. The gold flakes present are found together with cassiterite and topaz indicating that gold originates from the mineralized veins contact-metamorphosed metasedimentary rocks. Almost all samples collected contain cassiterite grains in various amounts. From the mineral assemblage, the source of cassiterite originates from the mineralized quartz veins that cut granitic rocks of Main Range, Changkat Rembian as well as the metasedimentary rock in the area. Greisenized veins containing quartz, mica and tourmaline with the presence of wolframite and arsenopyrite also contribute to the presence of cassiterite in this study area.

  5. Influence of continuous-miner bit sharpness and coal-lithotype composition on coal breakage: examples from Kentucky mines. Technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lineberry, G.T.; Rogers, F.D.; Leonard, J.W.; Hower, J.C.; Graese, A.M.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This pilot study addresses the influence of coal lithotype, continuous miner bit sharpness, and coal hardness on particle sizing and liberation characteristics. The interface of the job end of the traditional continuous mining machine and the given geologic conditions at the job site; and their combined influence on particle sizing and liberation is investigated.

  6. V00306010057 rock check dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ¬« ¬« ¬« ¬« ¬« XY! 16-020 16-030(c) 16-026(l) 16-028(c) 16-026(l) V00306010057 rock check dam V00306010012 rock check dam V00306010040 rock check dam V00306010039 rock check dam V00306010058 rock check dam V00306010064 rock check dam V00306010061 rock check dam V00306010062 rock check dam V00306010063

  7. Rock magnetism of remagnetized carbonate rocks: another look

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, M.; Swanson-Hysell, N. L

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and significance of magnetism in sedimentary rocks. Journal1997. Rock Magnetism. ¨ zdemir, O Dunlop, D. J. & Oon July 30, 2013 ROCK MAGNETISM: REMAGNETIZED CARBONATES

  8. MINERAL COMMODITY SUMMARIES 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    MINERAL COMMODITY SUMMARIES 2002 MINERAL COMMODITY SUMMARIES 2002 U.S. Department of the Interior U for Mineral Products . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 The Role of Nonfuel Minerals in the U.S. Economy . . . 4 2001 U.S. Net Import Reliance for Selected Nonfuel Mineral Materials

  9. V01406010015 rock check dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    XY! ¬« ¬« V01406010015 rock check dam V01406010014 rock check dam V01406010013 rock check dam 1501403010012 earthen berm V01403010008 earthen berm V01406010003 rock check dam V01406010004 rock check dam V01406010010 rock check dam V01406010011 rock check dam 15-0651 15-0307 15-0588 15-0532 15-0575 stormdrain 7160

  10. Reactive geochemical transport simulation to study mineral trapping for CO2 disposal in deep saline arenaceous aquifers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Tianfu; Apps, John A.; Pruess, Karsten

    2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A reactive fluid flow and geochemical transport numerical model for evaluating long-term CO{sub 2} disposal in deep aquifers has been developed. Using this model, we performed a number of sensitivity simulations under CO{sub 2} injection conditions for a commonly encountered Gulf Coast sediment to analyze the impact of CO{sub 2} immobilization through carbonate precipitation. Geochemical models are needed because alteration of the predominant host rock aluminosilicate minerals is very slow and is not amenable to laboratory experiment under ambient deep-aquifer conditions. Under conditions considered in our simulations, CO{sub 2} trapping by secondary carbonate minerals such as calcite (CaCO{sub 3}), dolomite (CaMg(CO{sub 3}){sub 2}), siderite (FeCO{sub 3}), and dawsonite (NaAlCO{sub 3}(OH){sub 2}) could occur in the presence of high pressure CO{sub 2}. Variations in precipitation of secondary carbonate minerals strongly depend on rock mineral composition and their kinetic reaction rates. Using the data presented in this paper, CO{sub 2} mineral-trapping capability after 10,000 years is comparable to CO{sub 2} dissolution in pore waters (2-5 kg CO{sub 2} per cubic meter of formation). Under favorable conditions such as increase of the Mg-bearing mineral clinochlore (Mg{sub 5}Al{sub 2}Si{sub 3}O{sub 10}(OH){sub 8}) abundance, the capacity can be larger (10 kg CO{sub 2} per cubic meter of formation) due to increase of dolomite precipitation. Carbon dioxide-induced rock mineral alteration and the addition of CO{sub 2} mass as secondary carbonates to the solid matrix results in decreases in porosity. A maximum 3% porosity decrease is obtained in our simulations. A small decrease in porosity may result in a significant decrease in permeability. The numerical simulations described here provide useful insight into sequestration mechanisms, and their controlling conditions and parameters.

  11. Permeability Change of Crystalline Silicate Mineral-Packed Bed Column by Highly Alkaline Plume

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hideo Usui; Yuichi Niibori; Hitoshi Mimura [Department of Quantum Science and Energy Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, Aramaki Aza Aoba 6-6-01-2, Aoba-ku, Sendai, 980-8579 (Japan); Osamu Tochiyama [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, Katahira 2-1-1, Aoba-ku, Sendai, 980-8577 (Japan)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For the construction of the geological disposal system, the use of the cementitious material may change the permeability of the natural barrier around the repository. Cementitious materials may alter the pH of ground water to highly alkaline. Also, the potential permeability change of the natural barrier is one of the notable factors for performance assessments of geological disposal systems. In the high pH region, the solubility of silica is very high compared to that in the natural pH (around 8). Therefore, highly alkaline groundwater would dissolve and alter a part of rock surface. Usui et al. (2005) reported that the change of mineral pore structure due to chemical reaction is the key factor to consider the change of the permeability [5-6]. Moreover, such a change of the pore structure was considered to be the result of the spatial heterogeneity of chemical composition. Since such spatial heterogeneity exists also in the sedimentary rocks consisting of crystalline minerals such as quartz and feldspar, we need to examine natural rock, in order to obtain more reliable understanding about the change of permeability induced by highly alkaline groundwater (plume). In this study, silica sand as crystalline mineral was packed in the column, and the effect of dissolution induced by the highly alkaline plume on the permeability-change was examined. The silica sand particles mainly consist of SiO{sub 2} and include Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, FeO, and K{sub 2}O. The volumetric flow rate and the pressure difference between the inlet and outlet of the column were measured, and the permeability was calculated. At the same time, the concentrations of elements in the fluid were measured by ICP-AES. The experimental result showed that permeability decreased gradually, although the silica sand was continuously dissolved in the column. The behavior of the permeability is considered to be the result from the rearrangement of the particles, or precipitation of secondary mineral. In the column test using the silica sand as packed mineral, the flow-path seems to be clogged by the rearrangement of the particles rather than the increase of the pore space between the particles. (authors)

  12. Source and tectono-metamorphic evolution of mafic and pelitic metasedimentary rocks from the central Quetico metasedimentary belt, Archean Superior Province

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Source and tectono-metamorphic evolution of mafic and pelitic metasedimentary rocks from, was conducted in order to evaluate the origin, source and evolution of sedimentary rocks, including mafic rocks previously mapped as ultramafics rocks. Bulk chemical compositions of these rocks show a mixing with two end

  13. Petrography and prediction of reservoir rock properties in the Sussex Sandstone, Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shirley, Richard Hoyt

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to determine rock composition and texture. Composition was established by point count of 100 grains. Framework grains were identified and counted as monocrystalline quartz, polycrystalline quartz, volcanic rock fragments, potassium feldspar, plagioclase... and quiet water deposition of shale was resumed. The sandstone is classified as a volcanic aronite based on a det: ital composition averaging 59 percent quartz, including both monccrystalline and polycrystalline varieties, 18 percent rock frag- ments...

  14. T00406010008 rock check dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    XY! ¬« T00406010008 rock check dam T00406010009 rock check dam T00406010010 rock check dam T00406010011 rock check dam T-SMA-2.85 0.344 Acres 35-014(g) 35-016(n) T00406010005 rock check dam T00406010006 rock check dam T00403090004 curb T00402040007 established vegetation, green hatch area 7200 7200 7180

  15. Carbonation Mechanism of Reservoir Rock by Supercritical Carbon Dioxide

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project Objectives: Elucidate comprehensively the carbonation reaction mechanisms between supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) and reservoir rocks consisting of different mineralogical compositions in aqueous and non-aqueous environments at temperatures of up to 250ºC, and to develop chemical modeling of CO2-reservior rock interactions.

  16. MINERAL FACILITIES MAPPING PROJECT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbes, Fernando

    MINERAL FACILITIES MAPPING PROJECT Yadira Soto-Viruet Supervisor: David Menzie, Yolanda Fong-Sam Minerals Information Team (MIT) USGS Summer Internship 2009 U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Minerals Information Team (MIT): Annually reports on the minerals facilities of more than 180 countries

  17. MINERAL COMMODITY SUMMARIES 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    MINERAL COMMODITY SUMMARIES 2014 #12;U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey MINERAL contained within this report. Suggested citation: U.S. Geological Survey, 2014, Mineral commodity summaries and Coincident Indexes for Mineral Products......................................................... 4 The Role

  18. MINERAL COMMODITY SUMMARIES 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fleskes, Joe

    MINERAL COMMODITY SUMMARIES 2012 #12;U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey MINERAL contained within this report. Suggested citation: U.S. Geological Survey, 2012, Mineral commodity summaries and Coincident Indexes for Mineral Products......................................................... 4 The Role

  19. MINERAL COMMODITY SUMMARIES 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    MINERAL COMMODITY SUMMARIES 2003 MINERAL COMMODITY SUMMARIES 20 U.S. Department of the Interior U MINERAL COMMODITY SUMMARIES 2003 #12;U.S. DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GALE A. NORTON, Secretary For sale;CONTENTS Page General: Growth Rates of Leading and Coincident Indexes for Mineral Products

  20. Earth's Mineral Evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Downs, Robert T.

    Earth's Mineral Evolution :: Astrobiology Magazine - earth science - evol...rth science evolution Extreme Life Mars Life Outer Planets Earth's Mineral Evolution Summary (Nov 14, 2008): New research. Display Options: Earth's Mineral Evolution Based on a CIW news release Mineral Kingdom Has Co

  1. Carbon Dioxide Sealing Capacity: Textural or Compositional Controls?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cranganu, Constantin; Soleymani, Hamidreza; Sadiqua, Soleymani; Watson, Kieva

    2013-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This research project is aiming to assess the carbon dioxide sealing capacity of most common seal-rocks, such as shales and non-fractured limestones, by analyzing the role of textural and compositional parameters of those rocks. We hypothesize that sealing capacity is controlled by textural and/or compositional pa-rameters of caprocks. In this research, we seek to evaluate the importance of textural and compositional parameters affecting the sealing capacity of caprocks. The conceptu-al framework involves two testable end-member hypotheses concerning the sealing ca-pacity of carbon dioxide reservoir caprocks. Better understanding of the elements controlling sealing quality will advance our knowledge regarding the sealing capacity of shales and carbonates. Due to relatively low permeability, shale and non-fractured carbonate units are considered relatively imper-meable formations which can retard reservoir fluid flow by forming high capillary pres-sure. Similarly, these unites can constitute reliable seals for carbon dioxide capture and sequestration purposes. This project is a part of the comprehensive project with the final aim of studying the caprock sealing properties and the relationship between microscopic and macroscopic characteristics of seal rocks in depleted gas fields of Oklahoma Pan-handle. Through this study we examined various seal rock characteristics to infer about their respective effects on sealing capacity in special case of replacing reservoir fluid with super critical carbon dioxide (scCO{sub 2}). To assess the effect of textural and compositional properties on scCO{sub 2} maximum reten-tion column height we collected 30 representative core samples in caprock formations in three counties (Cimarron, Texas, Beaver) in Oklahoma Panhandle. Core samples were collected from various seal formations (e.g., Cherokee, Keys, Morrowan) at different depths. We studied the compositional and textural properties of the core samples using several techniques. Mercury Injection Porosimetry (MIP), Scanning Electron Microsco-py SEM, and Sedigraph measurements are used to assess the pore-throat-size distribu-tion, sorting, texture, and grain size of the samples. Also, displacement pressure at 10% mercury saturation (Pd) and graphically derived threshold pressure (Pc) were deter-mined by MIP technique. SEM images were used for qualitative study of the minerals and pores texture of the core samples. Moreover, EDS (Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spec-trometer), BET specific surface area, and Total Organic Carbon (TOC) measurements were performed to study various parameters and their possible effects on sealing capaci-ty of the samples. We found that shales have the relatively higher average sealing threshold pressure (Pc) than carbonate and sandstone samples. Based on these observations, shale formations could be considered as a promising caprock in terms of retarding scCO{sub 2} flow and leak-age into above formations. We hypothesized that certain characteristics of shales (e.g., 3 fine pore size, pore size distribution, high specific surface area, and strong physical chemical interaction between wetting phase and mineral surface) make them an effi-cient caprock for sealing super critical CO{sub 2}. We found that the displacement pressure at 10% mercury saturation could not be the ultimate representative of the sealing capacity of the rock sample. On the other hand, we believe that graphical method, introduced by Cranganu (2004) is a better indicator of the true sealing capacity. Based on statistical analysis of our samples from Oklahoma Panhandle we assessed the effects of each group of properties (textural and compositional) on maximum supercriti-cal CO{sub 2} height that can be hold by the caprock. We conclude that there is a relatively strong positive relationship (+.40 to +.69) between supercritical CO{sub 2} column height based on Pc and hard/ soft mineral content index (ratio of minerals with Mohs hardness more than 5 over minerals with Mohs hardness less than 5) in both shales and limestone samples. Average median pore rad

  2. Retention of Anionic Species on Granite: Influence of Granite Composition - 12129

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Videnska, Katerina [Institute of Chemical Technology, Prague (Czech Republic); Havlova, Vaclava [Nuclear Research Institute Rez, Rez, 25068 (Czech Republic)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Technetium (Tc-99, T{sub 1/2} = 2.1.10{sup 5} yrs) and selenium (Se-79, T{sub 1/2} = 6.5.10{sup 4} yrs) belong among fission products, being produced by fission of nuclear fuel. Both elements can significantly contribute to risk due to their complicated chemistry, long life times, high mobility and prevailing anionic character. Therefore, knowledge of migration behaviour under different conditions can significantly improve input into performance and safety assessment models. Granite is considered as a potential host rock for deep geological disposal of radioactive waste in many countries. Granitic rocks consist usually of quartz, feldspar, plagioclase (main components), mica, chlorite, kaolinite (minor components). The main feature of the rock is advection governed transport in fractures, complemented with diffusion process from fracture towards undisturbed rock matrix. The presented work is focused on interaction of anionic species (TcO{sub 4}{sup -}, SeO{sub 4}{sup 2-}, SeO{sub 3}{sup 2-}) with granitic rock. Furthermore, the importance of mineral composition on sorption of anionic species was also studied. The batch sorption experiments were conducted on the crushed granite from Bohemian Massive. Five fractions with defined grain size were used for static batch method. Mineral composition of each granitic fraction was evaluated using X-ray diffraction. The results showed differences in composition of granitic fractions, even though originating from one homogenized material. Sorption experiments showed influence of granite composition on adsorption of both TcO4{sup -} and SeO3{sup 2-} on granitic rock. Generally, Se(IV) showed higher retention than Tc(VII). Se(VI) was not almost sorbed at all. Fe containing minerals are pronounced as a selective Se and Tc sorbent, being reduced on their surface. As micas in granite are usually enriched in Fe, increased sorption of anionic species onto mica enriched fractions can be explained by this reason. On the other hand, fractions enriched in feldspar did not show increased sorption affinity to Tc and Se. (authors)

  3. The influence of rock heterogeneity on the scaling properties of simulated3 and natural stylolites4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 1 2 The influence of rock heterogeneity on the scaling properties of simulated3 and natural prominent deformation patterns in sedimentary rocks that24 document localized pressure solution. Recent is caused by the composition of27 the host rock, i.e. heterogeneities in the material, or is governed

  4. J00206010020 rock check dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    XY! J00206010020 rock check dam J00206010023 rock check dam 09-009 09-009 09-009 PJ-SMA-2 0.901 Acres J00206010021 rock check dam J00206010019 rock check dam J00206010014 rock check dam J00203010007 Smith DATE: 14-November-2014 REVISION NUMBER: 8 XY! IP sampler location Berm Channel/swale Check dam

  5. W02106010008 rock check dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W-SMA-14.1 5.169 Acres W02106010008 rock check dam W02106010009 rock check dam W02106010010 rock check dam W02106010011 rock check dam W02106010012 rock check dam W02103010018 earthen berm W02103010016 dam Established vegetation Seed and mulch Sediment trap/basin Gabion Cap SWMU boundary SMA drainage

  6. Chapter Eight Rock Varnish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dorn, Ron

    ) Coating Description Carbonate skin Coating composed primarily of carbonate, usually calcium carbonate; the agent may be manganese, sulphate, carbonate, silica, iron, oxalate, organisms, or anthropogenic Dust, cyanobacteria, algae Nitrate crust Potassium and calcium nitrate coatings on rocks, often in caves and rock

  7. A List of Kansas Minerals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grover, Charles H.

    1895-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Master Th e s i s Geology Grov e r , C h a r l e s H. 1895 L i s t of Kansas m i n e r a l s * A l i s t of Kansas Minerals with "brief notes on the^cr^stjalogr&phio (form, chemical composition, and the p r i n c i p a l l o c a l i t i e s f...£om which £hey have been reported* ^S/V-y The f o l l o w i n g l i s t , i t i s believed, embraces a l l the minerals of the state that have been so f a r discovered and reported. Two s i m i l a r i i s t s have been heretofore published i n...

  8. Incident at the Rock Pile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birgfeld, Doug

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At the off limit rock pile At a Portland school Where theDoug. “Incident at the Rock Pile” http://escholarship.org/Doug. “Incident at the Rock Pile” http://escholarship.org/

  9. KING FAHD UNIVERSITY OF PETROLEUM & MINERALS Dhahran, Saudi Arabia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abu-Khamsin, Sidqi

    Rocks By Dr. Sidqi A. Abu-Khamsin Professor, Department of Petroleum Engineering © Copyright by Dr;1. INTRODUCTION 1.1: The nature of petroleum All chemical compounds found in nature are classified as eitherKING FAHD UNIVERSITY OF PETROLEUM & MINERALS Dhahran, Saudi Arabia Basic Properties of Reservoir

  10. A STUDY OF ROCK-WATER-NUCLEAR WASTE INTERACTIONS IN THE PASCO BASIN, WASHINGTON -- Part: Distribution and Composition of Secondary and Primary Mineral Phases in Basalts of the Pasco Basin, Washington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benson, L.V.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    J. , and R. R. Larson, 1975. Diagenesis of Miocene siliceousA. W. , 1975. Zeolitic diagenesis in Oligocene volcanic1963. Stratigraphy and zeolite diagenesis of the John Day

  11. RADIOACTIVITY DOSAGE OF ORNAMENTAL GRANITIC ROCKS BASED ON CHEMICAL, MINERALOGICAL AND LITHOLOGICAL DATA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salas, H.T.; Nalini, H.A. Jr.; Mendes, J.C.

    2004-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    One hundred samples of granitic rock were collected from granite traders in Belo Horizonte. Autoradiography, optical microscopy, diffractometry, and chemical analysis (X-ray spectrometry, X-ray fluorescence, neutron activation, gravimetry and electron probe microanalysis) were used to determine the mineral assemblages and lithotypes. Autoradiographic results for several samples showed the presence of monazite, allanite and zircon. Chemical analysis revealed concentrations of uranium of {le} 30ppm, and thorium {le} 130ppm. Higher concentrations generally correlated with high concentrations of light rare earths in silica-rich rocks of granitic composition. Calculations were made of radioactive doses for floor tiles in a standard room for samples with total concentration of uranium and thorium greater than 60ppm. On the basis of calculations of {sup 232}Th, {sup 40}K and {sup 226}Ra from Th, K and U analysis, the doses calculated were between 0.11 and 0.34 mSv/year, which are much lower than the acceptable international exposure standard of 1.0 mSv/year.

  12. Changes in sulfides and platinum-group minerals with the degree of alteration in the Roby, Twilight, and High

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, Bernard

    with laser ablation analysis of the sulfides was used to determine which phase controlled each of the PGE content of the rocks. Keywords Platinum-group elements . Platinum-group minerals . Laser ablation

  13. URANIUM IN ALKALINE ROCKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murphy, M.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mississippi," Amer. Assoc. Petrol. Geol. Bull. , v. 22(7),Coastal Plain," Amer. Assoc. Petrol. Geol. , v. 33(8), ppArkansas," Contrib. Mineral. Petrol. , v. 63, pp 271-294.

  14. Biodegradable synthetic bone composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, Gao; Zhao, Dacheng; Saiz, Eduardo; Tomsia, Antoni P.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention provides for a biodegradable synthetic bone composition comprising a biodegradable hydrogel polymer scaffold comprising a plurality of hydrolytically unstable linkages, and an inorganic component; such as a biodegradable poly(hydroxyethylmethacrylate)/hydroxyapatite (pHEMA/HA) hydrogel composite possessing mineral content approximately that of human bone.

  15. Clay minerals in late glacial and Holocene sediments of the northern and southern Aegean Sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siebel, Wolfgang

    Clay minerals in late glacial and Holocene sediments of the northern and southern Aegean Sea Werner Different source areas, oceanography and climate regimes influenced the clay mineral assemblages and grain and the Holocene. In the North Aegean Sea, clay mineral composition is mainly controlled by sea level evolution

  16. SEISMIC AND ROCK PHYSICS DIAGNOSTICS OF MULTISCALE RESERVOIR TEXTURES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Mavko

    2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of our study on ''Relationships between seismic properties and rock microstructure'', we have (1) Studied relationships between velocity and permeability. (2) Used independent experimental methods to measure the elastic moduli of clay minerals as functions of pressure and saturation. (3) Applied different statistical methods for characterizing heterogeneity and textures from scanning acoustic microscope (SAM) images of shale microstructures. (4) Analyzed the directional dependence of velocity and attenuation in different reservoir rocks (5) Compared Vp measured under hydrostatic and non-hydrostatic stress conditions in sands. (6) Studied stratification as a source of intrinsic anisotropy in sediments using Vp and statistical methods for characterizing textures in sands.

  17. Clay mineral reactions in clastic diagenesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hower, J.

    1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies of clastic sediments have documented the formation and transformation of clay mineral assemblages during burial diagensis. The transformation of smectite to illite in shale by its reaction with the decomposition products of detrital K-feldspar and mica results in the production of new pore water at depth. The overall reaction mobilizes all the major chemical components in the shale, most of which are consumed in the formation of the diagenetic assemblage illite/smectite + chlorite + quartz. However, part of all the components is undoubtedly transported from the shale to sandstone units and is involved in cementation, replacement, and diagenetic clay mineral formation in these reservoir rocks. In contrast to burial diagenetic reactions in shale, where the sequence is monotonic and reasonably predictable, diagenetic reactions in sandstone are frequently variable. This variability is probably attributable to the fact that sandstones are open systems in which the reactions that proceed are controlled in part by the influx of new pore water, the chemistry of which is determined by an outside source. The useful understanding role of clay minerals in hydrocarbon exploration will follow from a determination of the system shale/sandstone/organic material. We need to tie in the nature and timing of shale mineral reactions and their control on the fluid and mass transfer from shale to sandstone.

  18. The effects of gas-fluid-rock interactions on CO2 injection and storage: Insights from reactive transport modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiao, Y.; Xu, T.; Pruess, K.

    2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Possible means of reducing atmospheric CO{sub 2} emissions include injecting CO{sub 2} in petroleum reservoirs for Enhanced Oil Recovery or storing CO{sub 2} in deep saline aquifers. Large-scale injection of CO{sub 2} into subsurface reservoirs would induce a complex interplay of multiphase flow, capillary trapping, dissolution, diffusion, convection, and chemical reactions that may have significant impacts on both short-term injection performance and long-term fate of CO{sub 2} storage. Reactive Transport Modeling is a promising approach that can be used to predict the spatial and temporal evolution of injected CO{sub 2} and associated gas-fluid-rock interactions. This presentation will summarize recent advances in reactive transport modeling of CO{sub 2} storage and review key technical issues on (1) the short- and long-term behavior of injected CO{sub 2} in geological formations; (2) the role of reservoir mineral heterogeneity on injection performance and storage security; (3) the effect of gas mixtures (e.g., H{sub 2}S and SO{sub 2}) on CO{sub 2} storage; and (4) the physical and chemical processes during potential leakage of CO{sub 2} from the primary storage reservoir. Simulation results suggest that CO{sub 2} trapping capacity, rate, and impact on reservoir rocks depend on primary mineral composition and injecting gas mixtures. For example, models predict that the injection of CO{sub 2} alone or co-injection with H{sub 2}S in both sandstone and carbonate reservoirs lead to acidified zones and mineral dissolution adjacent to the injection well, and carbonate precipitation and mineral trapping away from the well. Co-injection of CO{sub 2} with H{sub 2}S and in particular with SO{sub 2} causes greater formation alteration and complex sulfur mineral (alunite, anhydrite, and pyrite) trapping, sometimes at a much faster rate than previously thought. The results from Reactive Transport Modeling provide valuable insights for analyzing and assessing the dynamic behaviors of injected CO{sub 2}, identifying and characterizing potential storage sites, and managing injection performance and reducing costs.

  19. The Landscape of Klamath Basin Rock Art

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David, Robert James

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the Lines: Ethnographic Sources and Rock Art Interpretationwhen applying these sources toward rock art interpretation.information source for developing rock art interpretations.

  20. Software Engineer RockAuto www.RockAuto.com

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liblit, Ben

    Software Engineer ­ RockAuto www.RockAuto.com Position Description Software is the foundation · Familiarity with open-source development technologies like PHP, Perl, JavaScript and C (Linux system Lane, Madison, WI 53719) Why RockAuto? Strategic and tactical impact. We're an e-commerce company

  1. Microwave assisted hard rock cutting

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lindroth, David P. (Apple Valley, MN); Morrell, Roger J. (Bloomington, MN); Blair, James R. (Inver Grove Heights, MN)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for the sequential fracturing and cutting of subsurface volume of hard rock (102) in the strata (101) of a mining environment (100) by subjecting the volume of rock to a beam (25) of microwave energy to fracture the subsurface volume of rock by differential expansion; and , then bringing the cutting edge (52) of a piece of conventional mining machinery (50) into contact with the fractured rock (102).

  2. Minerals Yearbook 1989: Lithium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ober, J.A.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States led the world in lithium mineral and compound production and consumption. Estimated consumption increased slightly, and world production also grew. Sales increased for domestic producers, who announced price increases for the third consecutive year. Because lithium is electrochemically reactive and has other unique properties, there are many commercial lithium products. Producers sold lithium as mineral concentrate, brine, compound, or metal, depending upon the end use. Most lithium compounds were consumed in the production of ceramics, glass, and primary aluminum.

  3. Strontium-85 and plutonium-239 sorption in rock samples from the Semipalatinsk Test Site, Kazakhstan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mason, C.F.V.; Lu, N.; Marusak, N.L.; Scheber, B.; Chipera, S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Daukeyev, D.; Khromushin, I. [National Nuclear Center of the Republic of Kazakhstan, Almaty (Kazakhstan)

    1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The adsorption and desorption of strontium and plutonium were studied as a function of rock type and simulated ground waters from the Semipalatinsk Test Site (STS). Seven different rock types were obtained from the Balapan Region of the STS and were subjected to x-ray diffraction analyses. Two different ground waters were simulated using data supplied by the National Nuclear Center. The results indicate the sorption of strontium is strongly dependent on the minerals present in the rock species and on the total ionic strength of the ground water whereas, in all cases, plutonium was strongly irreversibly sorbed.

  4. Abstract, Joint Annual Mtg, GAC and MAC, 2012. Borate Minerals; Hilgardite, Veatchite and Volkovskite from Marine Evaporite Deposits of New

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    understanding of crystal structure of borate minerals and the development of efficient extraction techniquesAbstract, Joint Annual Mtg, GAC and MAC, 2012. Borate Minerals; Hilgardite, Veatchite composition, and optical and Xray crystallographic data were collected for borate minerals; hilgardite (Ca2B2

  5. Evidence for the Incorporation of Lead into Barite from Waste Rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the most toxic elements and is found as a major contaminant in mining environments, this study aims minerals from which sulfuric acidwasmade.Thematerialdiscussedinthispaperwascollected in iron hardpans that were formed within the waste rock pile resulting from the excavation work. In most contaminated

  6. SmNd disequilibrium in high-pressure, low-temperature Himalayan and Alpine rocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicolas, Chamot-Rooke

    disequilibrium in high-pressure, low-temperature rocks, Sm­Nd isotopic analyses were carried out on minerals from contamination processes. In the case of a magmatic protolith, contamination can be achieved through crustal sedimentary protolith contains components from an old contaminant crust. In the Himalayan samples, the inverse

  7. Rock Bands/Rock Brands: Mediation and Musical Performance in Post-liberalization Bangalore

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coventry, Chloe Louise

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    these recorded sources important rock pedagogical tools inwere a primary source of western rock music for young fans,Nevertheless, a source of funding for rock music performance

  8. Rock Properties Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. Lum

    2004-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this model report is to document the Rock Properties Model version 3.1 with regard to input data, model methods, assumptions, uncertainties and limitations of model results, and qualification status of the model. The report also documents the differences between the current and previous versions and validation of the model. The rock properties model provides mean matrix and lithophysae porosity, and the cross-correlated mean bulk density as direct input to the ''Saturated Zone Flow and Transport Model Abstraction'', MDL-NBS-HS-000021, REV 02 (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170042]). The constraints, caveats, and limitations associated with this model are discussed in Section 6.6 and 8.2. Model validation accomplished by corroboration with data not cited as direct input is discussed in Section 7. The revision of this model report was performed as part of activities being conducted under the ''Technical Work Plan for: The Integrated Site Model, Revision 05'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169635]). The purpose of this revision is to bring the report up to current procedural requirements and address the Regulatory Integration Team evaluation comments. The work plan describes the scope, objectives, tasks, methodology, and procedures for this process.

  9. Iron and Steel Phosphate Rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    Lime Lithium Magnesium Manganese Mercury Mica Molybdenum Nickel Nitrogen Peat Perlite Phosphate Rock . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 194 Appendix C--Resource/Reserve Definitions . . . . . . 195 Commodities: Abrasives (Manufactured

  10. Engineering and Mineral Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    News ????????????????? ® College of Engineering and Mineral Resources Winter 2008 table of contents. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 wvCROSSROADS DepartmentofCivilandEnvironmentalEngineering Civil engineering exchange program and environmental engineering with a focus in transportation will have the opportunity to study abroad as part

  11. Biomimetic Mineralization: Mesoporous Biological mineral synthesis, in contrast to conven-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biomimetic Mineralization: Mesoporous Structures Biological mineral synthesis, in contrast of mineral crystals. Mesophases are materials which have domain length scales of the order of a few as a molecular blueprint for the site- directed formation of the inorganic phase, by providing an interface

  12. Mineral Rights and Proceeds (Nebraska)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This section contains provisions which determine when mineral rights are presumed to be abandoned by property owners.

  13. Backfill composition for secondary barriers in nuclear waste repositories

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beall, G.W.; Allard, B.M.

    1980-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A backfill composition for sorbing and retaining hazardous elements of nuclear wastes comprises 50 to 70% by weight of quartz, 10 to 30% by weight of montmorillonite, 1 to 10% by weight of phosphate mineral, 1 to 10% by weight of ferrous mineral, 1 to 10% by weight of sulfate mineral and 1 to 10% by weight of attapulgite.

  14. Iron and Steel Phosphate Rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    Phosphate Rock Platinum Potash Pumice Quartz Crystal Rare Earths Rhenium Rubidium Salt Sand and Gravel Graphite Peat Sulfur Beryllium Gypsum Perlite Talc Bismuth Hafnium Phosphate Rock Tantalum Boron Helium on the USGS--the Federal source for science about the Earth, its natural and living resources, natural hazards

  15. Ion beam analyses of radionuclide migration in heterogeneous rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alonso, Ursula; Missana, Tiziana; Garcia-Gutierrez, Miguel [CIEMAT, Avda. Complutense 40, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Patelli, Alessandro [CIVEN, Via delle Industrie 5, Venezia-Marghera 30175 (Italy); Rigato, Valentino; Ceccato, Daniele [LNL-INFN, Viale dell' Universita 2, Legnaro-Padova 35020 (Italy)

    2013-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The migration of radionuclides (RN) in the environment is a topic of general interest, for its implications on public health, and it is an issue for the long-term safety studies of deep geological repositories (DGR) for high-level radioactive waste. The role played by colloids on RN migration is also of great concern. Diffusion and sorption are fundamental mechanisms controlling RN migration in rocks and many experimental approaches are applied to determine transport parameters for low sorbing RN in homogeneous rocks. However, it is difficult to obtain relevant data for high sorbing RN or colloids, for which diffusion lengths are extremely short, or within heterogeneous rocks, where transport might be different in different minerals. The ion beam techniques Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) and micro-Particle Induced X-Ray Emission ({mu}PIXE), rarely applied in the field, were selected for their micro-analytical potential to study RN diffusion and surface retention within heterogeneous rocks. Main achievements obtained during last 12 years are highlighted.

  16. Multiphase Sequestration Geochemistry: Model for Mineral Carbonation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Multiphase Sequestration Geochemistry: Model for Mineral Carbonation. Multiphase Sequestration Geochemistry: Model for Mineral Carbonation. Abstract: Carbonation of formation...

  17. Oil and Gas CDT Bots in Rocks: Intelligent Rock Deformation for Fault Rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henderson, Gideon

    Heriot-Watt University, Institute of Petroleum Engineering Supervisory Team · Dr Helen Lewis, Heriot://www.pet.hw.ac.uk/staff-directory/jimsomerville.htm Key Words Nano/Micro sensors; faults; fault zones; geomechanics; rock mechanics; rock deformation-deformed equivalent, a different lab-deformed example and a geomechanical simulation of a fault zone showing permanent

  18. THE IMPACT OF MICROBIAL CHELATES ON MINERAL WEATHERING AND MICROBIAL METABOLIC ACTIVITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kulczycki, Ezra

    2010-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    composition and cellular design. A relationship between geologic host materials and biological activity is purported. The role of microorganisms upon mineral weathering was investigated by collecting soil samples from the tropical rainforest of Barro Colorado...

  19. SEISMIC AND ROCK PHYSICS DIAGNOSTICS OF MULTISCALE RESERVOIR TEXTURES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Mavko

    2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of our study on ''Relationships between seismic properties and rock microstructure'', we have studied (1) How to quantify elastic properties of clay minerals using Atomic Force Acoustic Microscopy. We show how bulk modulus of clay can be measured using atomic force acoustic microscopy (AFAM) (2) We have successfully measured elastic properties of unconsolidated sediments in an effort to quantify attributes for detection of overpressures from seismic (3) We have initiated efforts for velocity upscaling to quantify long-wavelength and short-wavelength velocity behavior and the scale-dependent dispersion caused by sediment variability in different depositional environments.

  20. Mineral Requirements of Sheep.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

    1918-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    constituents in feed, residues, and excrements were estimated. In connection with other digestion experiments, estimates were made of certain ash constituents in feeds, excrements and urine. The results of this work throw light upon the mineral requirements...,11 grams phosphoric acid. The ratio of lime to phosphoric acid in tri- calcium phosphate is 1 :0.80. Table 7.-Average magnesia eaten and digested. BALANCE EXPEBIMENTS In twenty tests with ten rations, the urine was analyzed in addition to the feeds...

  1. Paradox of Peroxy Defects and Positive Holes in Rocks Part II: Outflow of Electric Currents from Stressed Rocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scoville, John; Freund, Friedemann

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding the electrical properties of rocks is of fundamental interest. We report on currents generated when stresses are applied. Loading the center of gabbro tiles, 30x30x0.9 cm$^3$, across a 5 cm diameter piston, leads to positive currents flowing from the center to the unstressed edges. Changing the constant rate of loading over 5 orders of magnitude from 0.2 kPa/s to 20 MPa/s produces positive currents, which start to flow already at low stress levels, rock-forming minerals. The peroxy break-up leads to positive holes h$^{\\bullet}$, i.e. electronic states associated with O$^-$ in a matrix of O$^{2-}$, plus electrons, e'. Propagating...

  2. Role of minerals in thermal alteration of organic matter. II. A material balance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tannenbaum, E.; Huizinga, B.J.; Kaplan, I.R.

    1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pyrolysis experiments were performed on Green River and Monterey Formation kerogens (Types I and II, respectively) with and without calcite, illite, or montmorillonite at 300/sup 0/C for 2 to 1000 hours under dry and hydrous conditions. Pyrolysis products were identified and quantified, and a material balance of product and reactants resulted. Applying the results to maturation of organic matter in natural environments, they suggest that a given type of organic matter associated with different minerals in source rocks will yield different products. Furthermore, the different adsorption capacities of minerals exert a significant influence on the migration of polar and high molecular weight compounds generated from the breakdown of kerogen. Therefore, the overall accumulated products from carbonate source rocks are mainly heavy oils with some gas, whereas light oils and gases are the main products from source rocks that contain expandable clays with catalytic and adsorptive properties. 8 figures, 2 tables.

  3. Superhard nanophase cutter materials for rock drilling applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voronov, O.; Tompa, G.; Sadangi, R.; Kear, B.; Wilson, C.; Yan, P.

    2000-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The Low Pressure-High Temperature (LPHT) System has been developed for sintering of nanophase cutter and anvil materials. Microstructured and nanostructured cutters were sintered and studied for rock drilling applications. The WC/Co anvils were sintered and used for development of High Pressure-High Temperature (HPHT) Systems. Binderless diamond and superhard nanophase cutter materials were manufactured with help of HPHT Systems. The diamond materials were studied for rock machining and drilling applications. Binderless Polycrystalline Diamonds (BPCD) have high thermal stability and can be used in geothermal drilling of hard rock formations. Nanophase Polycrystalline Diamonds (NPCD) are under study in precision machining of optical lenses. Triphasic Diamond/Carbide/Metal Composites (TDCC) will be commercialized in drilling and machining applications.

  4. Shotgun cartridge rock breaker

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ruzzi, Peter L. (Eagan, NM); Morrell, Roger J. (Bloomington, MN)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A rock breaker uses shotgun cartridges or other firearm ammunition as the explosive charge at the bottom of a drilled borehole. The breaker includes a heavy steel rod or bar, a gun with a firing chamber for the ammunition which screws onto the rod, a long firing pin running through a central passage in the rod, and a firing trigger mechanism at the external end of the bar which strikes the firing pin to fire the cartridge within the borehole. A tubular sleeve surround the main body of the rod and includes slits the end to allow it to expand. The rod has a conical taper at the internal end against which the end of the sleeve expands when the sleeve is forced along the rod toward the taper by a nut threaded onto the external end of the rod. As the sleeve end expands, it pushes against the borehole and holds the explosive gasses within, and also prevents the breaker from flying out of the borehole. The trigger mechanism includes a hammer with a slot and a hole for accepting a drawbar or drawpin which, when pulled by a long cord, allows the cartridge to be fired from a remote location.

  5. Ion and electron microprobe study of troctolites, norite, and anorthosites from Apollo 14: Evidence for urKREEP assimilation during petrogenesis of Apollo 14 Mg-suite rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shervais, J.W.; McGee, J.J. [Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences] [Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences

    1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Most of the Moon`s highland crust comprises Fe-rich anorthosites with calcic plagioclase compositions. Subsequent evolution of the highland crust was dominated by troctolites, anorthosites, and norites of the Mg-suite. This plutonic series is characterized by calcic plagioclase, and mafic minerals with high mg{number_sign} (=100{sup *}Mg/[Mg + Fe]). In an effort to distinguish the origin of this important lunar rock series, the authors have analyzed the REE content of primary cumulus phases in ten Mg-suite cumulates using SIMS, along with their major and minor element compositions by electron microprobe analysis. Nine of these samples have high mg{number_sign}s, consistent with their formation from the most primitive parent melts of the Mg-suite. The data presented here show that Mg-suite troctolites and anorthosites preserve major and trace element characteristics acquired during their formation as igneous cumulate rocks and that these characteristics can be used to reconstruct related aspects of the parent magma composition. Data show that primitive cumulates of the Mg-suite crystallized from magmas with REE contents similar to high-K KREEP in both concentration and relative abundance. The highly enriched nature of this parent magma contrasts with its primitive major element characteristics, as pointed out by previous workers. This enigma is best explained by the mixing of residual magma ocean urKREEP melts with ultramagnesian komatiitic partial melts from the deep lunar interior. The data do not support earlier models that invoke crustal metasomatism to enrich the Mg-suite cumulates after formation, or models which call for a superKREEP parent for the troctolites and anorthosites.

  6. Strength of transversely isotropic rocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pei, Jianyong, 1975-

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis proposes a new Anisotropic Matsuoka-Nakai (AMN) criterion to characterize the failure of transversely isotropic rocks under true triaxial stress states. One major obstacle in formulating an anisotropic criterion ...

  7. Potential for tunneling based on rock and soil melting. Abstracts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowley, J.C.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The rock-melting drill was invented at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory in 1960. Electrically heated, laboratory-scale drills were subsequently shown to penetrate igneous rocks at usefully high rates, with moderate power consumptions. The development of compact nuclear reactors and of heat pipes now makes possible the extension of this technology to much larger melting penetrators, potentially capable of producing holes up to several meters in diameter and several tens of kilometers long or deep. Development of a rapid, versatile, economical method of boring large, long shafts and tunnels offers solutions to many of man's most urgent ecological, scientific, raw-materials, and energy-supply problems. A melting method appears to be the most promising and flexible means of producing such holes. It is relatively insensitive to the composition, hardness, structure, and temperature of the rock, and offers the possibilities of producing self-supporting, glass-lined holes in almost any formation and (using a technique called lithofracturing) of eliminating the debris-removal problem by forcing molten rock into cracks created in the bore wall. Large rock-melting penetrators, called Electric Subterrenes or Nuclear Subterrenes according to the energy source used, are discussed in this report, together with problems anticipated in their development. It is concluded that this development is within the grasp of present technology.

  8. Mechanical interaction between rock, buffer and canister in repositories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borgesson, L. [Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden)

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The bentonite clay buffer, which is used in the repository concept of Sweden as well as many other countries, has an important role for mechanical protection of the canister. Of special interest is the effect of a rock shear, i.e. displacement of the rock along a fracture intersecting the deposition hole, on the canister. The article shows the results of some FEM calculations of a rock shear when the new composite copper/steel canister, is used. The effect of the swelling pressure from the bentonite before shear and the effect of a symmetric as well as an asymmetric rock shear will be shown. The calculations have been preceded by extensive laboratory tests and verification calculations by which material models for the buffer and proper calculation techniques have been developed. The material model for the clay is an elastic plastic model in which porous elasticity, based on the effective stress theory, is combined with Drucker-Prager plasticity. The results indicate that the bentonite clay acts as a very good mechanical buffer against such rock displacements. Although plastic yielding may occur, mainly in the copper, the plastic strain is not more than a few percent just after the shear.

  9. Actualistic and Geochemical Modeling of Reservoir Rock, CO2 and Formation Fluid Interaction, Citronelle Oil Field, Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weislogel, Amy

    2014-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report includes description of the Citronelle field study area and the work carried out in the project to characterize the geology and composition of reservoir rock material and to collect an analyze the geochemical composition of produced fluid waters from the Citronelle field. Reservoir rock samples collected from well bore core were made into thin-sections and assessed for textural properties, including pore types and porosity distribution. Compositional framework grain modal data were collected via point-counting, and grain and cement mineralogy was assessed using SEM-EDS. Geochemistry of fluid samples is described and modeled using PHREEQC. Composition of rock and produced fluids were used as inputs for TOUGHREACT reactive transport modeling, which determined the rock-fluid system was in disequilibrium.

  10. Rock physics at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rock physics refers to the study of static and dynamic chemical and physical properties of rocks and to phenomenological investigations of rocks reacting to man-made forces such as stress waves and fluid injection. A bibliography of rock physics references written by LASL staff members is given. Listing is by surname of first author. (RWR)

  11. 2008 Rock Deformation GRC - Conference August 3-8, 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James G. Hirth

    2009-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The GRC on Rock Deformation highlights the latest research in brittle and ductile rock mechanics from experimental, field and theoretical perspectives. The conference promotes a multi-disciplinary forum for assessing our understanding of rock strength and related physical properties in the Earth. The theme for the 2008 conference is 'Real-time Rheology'. Using ever-improving geophysical techniques, our ability to constrain the rheological behavior during earthquakes and post-seismic creep has improved significantly. Such data are used to investigate the frictional behavior of faults, processes responsible for strain localization, the viscosity of the lower crust, and viscous coupling between the crust and mantle. Seismological data also provide information on the rheology of the lower crust and mantle through analysis of seismic attenuation and anisotropy. Geologists are improving our understanding of rheology by combining novel analyses of microstructures in naturally deformed rocks with petrologic data. This conference will bring together experts and students in these research areas with experimentalists and theoreticians studying the same processes. We will discuss and assess where agreement exists on rheological constraints derived at different length/time scales using different techniques - and where new insight is required. To encompass the elements of these topics, speakers and discussion leaders with backgrounds in geodesy, experimental rock deformation, structural geology, earthquake seismology, geodynamics, glaciology, materials science, and mineral physics will be invited to the conference. Thematic sessions will be organized on the dynamics of earthquake rupture, the rheology of the lower crust and coupling with the upper mantle, the measurement and interpretation of seismic attenuation and anisotropy, the dynamics of ice sheets and the coupling of reactive porous flow and brittle deformation for understanding geothermal and chemical properties of the shallow crust that are important for developing ideas in CO2 sequestration, geothermal and petrochemical research and the mechanics of shallow faults.

  12. Composition of modern sand from the Sierra Nevada, California, USA: Implications for actualistic petrofacies of continental-margin magmatic arcs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ingersoll, Raymond V.; Eastmond, Daniel J.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    modern and ancient source rocks: Geology, v. 18, p. 733–736.sand composition and source-rock type, and the secondaryrock types, including Paleozoic and Mesozoic metamorphic terranes, and Cenozoic volcanic cover, is a source

  13. Mineralogy and Geochemistry of Soils of Ultramafic Origin from the Great Dyke, Zimbabwe and Gillespie County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bangira, Courage

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Ni ..................................................................................... 18 Occurrence of Cr (VI) in soils ............................................... 19 Mineral compositions of soils and parent rocks..., silt and rock fragments ........................ 95 Chlorite particles ............................................................. 95 Talc particles...

  14. Institute for Mineral and Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for energy. Mining and processing are vulnerable to energy price increases. Power is the largest contributingInstitute for Mineral and Energy Resources Answering Global Resource and Energy Challenges #12;Answering Global Resource and Energy Challenges 2 Vision The vision of the Institute for Mineral and Energy

  15. Provenance of middle to late Miocene clastic sedimentary rocks in the central to eastern Cibao basin, northern Hispaniola

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yao, Meng

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The provenance of middle to late Miocene clastic sediments of Cibao basin in northern Hispaniola has been assessed via integrated methods including detrital framework modes, clay mineral assemblages and ratios, the composition of individual feldspar...

  16. Mineral Chemistry of Basalts Recovered from Hotspot Snake River Scientific Drilling Project, Idaho: Source and Crystallization Characteristics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seamons, Kent E.

    between these two sources (deep or shallow mantle). Whole rock compositions were corrected for plagioclase: Source and Crystallization Characteristics Richard W. Bradshaw A thesis submitted to the faculty, Idaho: Source and Crystallization Characteristics Richard W. Bradshaw Department of Geological Sciences

  17. The thermal conductivity of rock under hydrothermal conditions: measurements and applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Colin F.; Sass, John H.

    1996-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The thermal conductivities of most major rock-forming minerals vary with both temperature and confining pressure, leading to substantial changes in the thermal properties of some rocks at the high temperatures characteristic of geothermal systems. In areas with large geothermal gradients, the successful use of near-surface heat flow measurements to predict temperatures at depth depends upon accurate corrections for varying thermal conductivity. Previous measurements of the thermal conductivity of dry rock samples as a function of temperature were inadequate for porous rocks and susceptible to thermal cracking effects in nonporous rocks. We have developed an instrument for measuring the thermal conductivity of water-saturated rocks at temperatures from 20 to 350 °C and confining pressures up to 100 MPa. A transient line-source of heat is applied through a needle probe centered within the rock sample, which in turn is enclosed within a heated pressure vessel with independent controls on pore and confining pressure. Application of this technique to samples of Franciscan graywacke from The Geysers reveals a significant change in thermal conductivity with temperature. At reservoir-equivalent temperatures of 250 °C, the conductivity of the graywacke decreases by approximately 25% relative to the room temperature value. Where heat flow is constant with depth within the caprock overlying the reservoir, this reduction in conductivity with temperature leads to a corresponding increase in the geothermal gradient. Consequently, reservoir temperature are encountered at depths significantly shallower than those predicted by assuming a constant temperature gradient with depth. We have derived general equations for estimating the thermal conductivity of most metamorphic and igneous rocks and some sedimentary rocks at elevated temperature from knowledge of the room temperature thermal conductivity. Application of these equations to geothermal exploration should improve estimates of subsurface temperatures derived from heat flow measurements.

  18. Radioactive occurrences in veins and igneous and metamorphic rocks of New Mexico with annotated bibliography. [Over 600 citations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLemore, V. T.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    From an extensive literature search and field examination of 96 nonsandstone radioactive occurrences, the author compiled an annotated bibliography of over 600 citations and a list of 327 radioactive occurrences in veins and igneous and metamorphic rocks of New Mexico. The citations are indexed by individual radioactive occurrence, geographic area, county, fluorspar deposits and occurrences, geochemical analyses, and geologic maps. In addition, the geology, mineralization, and uranium and thorium potential of 41 geographic areas in New Mexico containing known radioactive occurrences in veins and igneous and metamorphic rocks or that contain host rocks considered favorable for uranium or thorium mineralization are summarized. A list of aerial-radiometric, magnetic, hydrogeochemical, and stream-sediment survey reports is included.

  19. Mineral dissolution kinetics at the pore scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, L.; Steefel, C.I.; Yang, L.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Weathering Rates of Silicate Minerals , Vol. 31 (ed. A. F.as a result of secondary mineral precipitation and approachWeathering Rates of Silicate Minerals , Vol. 31, pp. 565-

  20. Migrating Contaminant Sticks To Minerals | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Migrating Contaminant Sticks To Minerals Aluminum oxide in common soil minerals captures uranium Using computational chemistry models, scientists at Pacific Northwest National...

  1. Investigation of Mineral Transformations in Wet Supercritical...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mineral Transformations in Wet Supercritical CO2 by Electron Microscopy. Investigation of Mineral Transformations in Wet Supercritical CO2 by Electron Microscopy. Abstract: The...

  2. Structure andhydrogeochemicalfunctioningof a sparkling natural mineral1 water system determined usinga multidisciplinary approach: a case study2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    rootedhydraulically independent permeable structures that arefed by deep CO2-rich crustal20 fluids.The non sites.27 28 Keywords:thermal conditions, CO2, fractured rock, natural mineral water, France29 30 NOTE(Clemente and Villadolid-Abrigo 1993; Lachassagne et al. 2009).42 Sparklingnaturalmineral water systems comprise water, CO2

  3. Reconstruction of Sedimentary Rock Based on Mechanical Properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jin, Guodong; Patzek, Tad W.; Silin, Dmitry B.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the veri?cation of rock mechanical properties. The dynamicis white. IV. ROCK MECHANICAL PROPERTIES FIG. 9: Cementationextracting meaningful rock transport properties from these

  4. Iron and Steel Phosphate Rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    Kyanite Lead Lime Lithium Magnesium Manganese Mercury Mica Molybdenum Nickel Nitrogen Peat Perlite Graphite Peat Sulfur Beryllium Gypsum Perlite Talc Bismuth Hafnium Phosphate Rock Tantalum Boron Helium information on the USGS--the Federal source for science about the Earth, its natural and living resources

  5. CLAY MINERALOGY ALONG THE LATERITE PROFILE IN HUBEI, SOUTH CHINA: MINERAL EVOLUTION AND EVIDENCE FOR EOLIAN ORIGIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Zhaohui

    CLAY MINERALOGY ALONG THE LATERITE PROFILE IN HUBEI, SOUTH CHINA: MINERAL EVOLUTION AND EVIDENCE in more detail the associated mineralogical evolution, i.e. clay mineral composition, structural characteristics of clays in various beds with different degrees of weathering along the laterite profile

  6. Comparative Study for the Interpretation of Mineral Concentrations, Total Porosity, and TOC in Hydrocarbon-Bearing Shale from Conventional Well

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torres-Verdín, Carlos

    , and TOC in Hydrocarbon-Bearing Shale from Conventional Well Logs Haryanto Adiguna, SPE, Anadarko Petroleum, water saturation, and kerogen content determine the amount of hydrocarbon-in-place while mineral petrophysical interpretation techniques commonly used to quantify mineral composition from conventional well

  7. Universal ripper miner

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morrell, Roger J. (Bloomington, MN); Larson, David A. (Minneapolis, MN)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A universal ripper miner used to cut, collect and transfer material from an underground mine working face includes a cutter head that is vertically movable in an arcuate cutting cycle by means of drive members, such as hydraulically actuated pistons. The cutter head may support a circular cutter bit having a circular cutting edge that may be indexed to incrementally expose a fresh cutting edge. An automatic indexing system is disclosed wherein indexing occurs by means of a worm gear and indexing lever mechanism. The invention also contemplates a bi-directional bit holder enabling cutting to occur in both the upstroke and the downstroke cutting cycle. Another feature of the invention discloses multiple bits arranged in an in-line, radially staggered pattern, or a side-by-side pattern to increase the mining capacity in each cutting cycle. An on-board resharpening system is also disclosed for resharpening the cutting edge at the end of cutting stroke position. The aforementioned improvement features may be used either singly, or in any proposed combination with each other.

  8. Review of Distribution Coefficients for Radionuclides in Carbonate Minerals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sutton, M

    2009-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    An understanding of the transport of radionuclides in carbonate minerals is necessary to be able to predict the fate of (and potentially remediate) radionuclides in the environment. In some environments, carbonate minerals such as calciate, aragonite, dolomite and limestone are present and an understanding of the sorption of radionuclides in these carbonate minerals is therefore advantageous. A list of the radionuclides of interest is given in Table 1. The distribution coefficient, K{sub d} is defined as the ratio of the contaminant concentration bound on the solid phase to the contaminant concentration remaining in the liquid phase at equilibrium. Some authors report distribution coefficients and other report partition coefficients, the data presented in this work assumes equality between these two terms, and data are presented and summarized in this work as logarithmic distribution coefficient (log K{sub D}). Published literature was searched using two methods. Firstly, the JNC Sorption Database, namely Shubutani et al (1999), and Suyama and Sasamoto (2004) was used to select elements of interest and a number of carbonate minerals. Secondly, on-line literature search tools were used to locate relevant published articles from 1900 to 2009. Over 300 data points covering 16 elements (hydrogen, carbon, calcium, nickel, strontium, technetium, palladium, iodine, cesium, samarium, europium, holmium, uranium, neptunium, plutonium and americium) were used to calculate an average and range of log K{sub d} values for each element. Unfortunately, no data could be found for chlorine, argon, krypton, zirconium, niobium, tin, thorium and curium. A description of the data is given below, together with the average, standard deviation, minimum, maximum and number of inputs for radionuclide K{sub d} values for calcite, aragonate, limestone, dolomite and unidentified carbonate rocks in Table 2. Finally, the data are condensed into one group (carbonate minerals) of data for each element of interest in Table 3.

  9. Lichen: the challenge for rock art conservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dandridge, Debra Elaine

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This study investigates the effects that lichens have on rock surfaces in which ancient rock art (petroglyphs and pictographs) may be found. The study area includes four sites in the United States: one quartzite site in southwest Minnesota, two...

  10. NONLINEAR ACOUSTIC IMAGING OF STRUCTURAL DAMAGES IN LAMINATED COMPOSITES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    are performed on a carbon fiber/epoxy laminated composite plate with barely visible impact damage and requires an ever increasing accuracy of detection. A good example is the inspection of composite materials been applied to a variety of materials including rocks [4], metals [5-10] and composites [11

  11. RON MINER MEMORIAL BIOENGINEERING SCHOLARSHIP The Ron Miner Memorial Scholarship honors the memory of J. Ronald Miner, an

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    RON MINER MEMORIAL BIOENGINEERING SCHOLARSHIP The Ron Miner Memorial Scholarship honors the memory of J. Ronald Miner, an Agricultural Engineering professor at OSU for over thirty years. Ron came to OSU from the Ron Miner Memorial Scholarship which resides with the OSU Foundation. The name

  12. Grain-scale thermoelastic stresses and spatiotemporal temperature gradients on airless bodies, implications for rock breakdown

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Molaro, Jamie L; Langer, Steve A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermomechanical processes such as fatigue and shock have been suggested to cause and contribute to rock breakdown on Earth, and on other planetary bodies, particularly airless bodies in the inner solar system. In this study, we modeled grain-scale stresses induced by diurnal temperature variations on simple microstructures made of pyroxene and plagioclase on various solar system bodies. We found that a heterogeneous microstructure on the Moon experiences peak tensile stresses on the order of 100 MPa. The stresses induced are controlled by the coefficient of thermal expansion and Young's modulus of the mineral constituents, and the average stress within the microstructure is determined by relative volume of each mineral. Amplification of stresses occurs at surface-parallel boundaries between adjacent mineral grains and at the tips of pore spaces. We also found that microscopic spatial and temporal surface temperature gradients do not correlate with high stresses, making them inappropriate proxies for investig...

  13. ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT ROCK ISLAND DAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT ROCK ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON, 1959 :y .iiJA/i-3ri ^' WUUUi. ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT - ROCK ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON, 1959 by Paul D. Zimmer, Clifton and observations 10 Summary 13 #12;#12;ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT - ROCK ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON

  14. ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT ROCK ISLAND DAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    42) ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT ROCK ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON 1961 Marine Biological. McKeman, Director ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT - ROCK ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON, 1961--Fisheries No. 421 Washington, D. C. April 1962 #12;Rock Island Dam, Columbia River, Washington ii #12;CONTENTS

  15. Annual Fish Passage Report -Rock Island Dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Annual Fish Passage Report - Rock Island Dam Columbia River, Washington, 1965 By Paul D. Zimmer L. McKeman, Director Annual Fish Passage Report - Rock Island Dam Columbia River, Washington, 1965;#12;Annual Fish Passage Report - Rock Island Dam Columbia River, Washington, 1965 By PAUL D. ZIMMER, Fishery

  16. Introduction 1.1 Why study rocks?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Cin-Ty Aeolus

    2 Chapter 1 Introduction 1.1 Why study rocks? I am a petrologist and I study rocks. Petrology and modification of certain types of rocks. On one level, petrology involves the art of identifying and classifying. This is of course the reverse of the historical development of petrology. I have chosen this approach because all

  17. Rock magnetism of remagnetized carbonate rocks: another look MIKE JACKSON* & NICHOLAS L. SWANSON-HYSELL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swanson-Hysell, Nicholas

    Rock magnetism of remagnetized carbonate rocks: another look MIKE JACKSON* & NICHOLAS L. SWANSON-HYSELL Institute for Rock Magnetism, Winchell School of Earth Sciences, University of Minnesota, Minnesota, US, dominantly in the super- paramagnetic and stable single-domain size range, also give rise to distinctive rock-magnetic

  18. Water Rock Interaction [WRI 14] Chemical weathering of granitic rocks: experimental approach and Pb-Li

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    of water/rock interactions both in terms of source and extent of weathering, by measuring major and traceWater Rock Interaction [WRI 14] Chemical weathering of granitic rocks: experimental approach and Pb, France Abstract In order to characterize water/rock interactions of granite, we performed laboratory

  19. Analysis of rock-fall and rock-fall avalanche seismograms in the French Alps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    the source rock slope (Figure 1), the falling mass strikes the talus slope and breaks up and/or bounces1 Analysis of rock-fall and rock-fall avalanche seismograms in the French Alps J. Deparis, D reviews seismograms from 10 rock-fall events recorded between 1992 and 2001 by the permanent seismological

  20. 37The Oldest Lunar Rocks Apollo astronauts recovered over 840 pounds of lunar rocks, and during

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    37The Oldest Lunar Rocks Apollo astronauts recovered over 840 pounds of lunar rocks, and during applied to the different rock samples. Location Mission Rock Type Age (Myr) Mare Tranquillitatis Apollo-11 Basalt 3,500 Oceanus Procellarum Apollo-12 Basalt 3,200 Fra Mauro Formation Apollo-14 Basalt 4,150 Apollo

  1. Relative Permeability of Fractured Rock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark D. Habana

    2002-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Contemporary understanding of multiphase flow through fractures is limited. Different studies using synthetic fractures and various fluids have yielded different relative permeability-saturation relations. This study aimed to extend the understanding of multiphase flow by conducting nitrogen-water relative permeability experiments on a naturally-fractured rock from The Geysers geothermal field. The steady-state approach was used. However, steady state was achieved only at the endpoint saturations. Several difficulties were encountered that are attributed to phase interference and changes in fracture aperture and surface roughness, along with fracture propagation/initiation. Absolute permeabilities were determined using nitrogen and water. The permeability values obtained change with the number of load cycles. Determining the absolute permeability of a core is especially important in a fractured rock. The rock may change as asperities are destroyed and fractures propagate or st rain harden as the net stresses vary. Pressure spikes occurred in water a solute permeability experiments. Conceptual models of an elastic fracture network can explain the pressure spike behavior. At the endpoint saturations the water relative permeabilities obtained are much less than the nitrogen gas relative permeabilities. Saturations were determined by weighing and by resistivity calculations. The resistivity-saturation relationship developed for the core gave saturation values that differ by 5% from the value determined by weighing. Further work is required to complete the relative permeability curve. The steady-state experimental approach encountered difficulties due to phase interference and fracture change. Steady state may not be reached until an impractical length of time. Thus, unsteady-state methods should be pursued. In unsteady-state experiments the challenge will be in quantifying rock fracture change in addition to fluid flow changes.

  2. J Bone Miner Metab . Author manuscript Mineral maturity and crystallinity index are distinct characteristics of bone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    J Bone Miner Metab . Author manuscript Page /1 13 Mineral maturity and crystallinity index are distinct characteristics of bone mineral Delphine Farlay 1 * , G rard Panczeré 2 , Christian Rey 3 , Pierre the hypothesis that mineral maturity and crystallinity index are two different characteristics of bone mineral

  3. Mechanical defradation of Emplacement Drifts at Yucca Mountain- A Modeling Case Study. Part I: Nonlithophysal Rock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. Lin; D. Kicker; B. Damjanac; M. Board; M. Karakouzian

    2006-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper outlines rock mechanics investigations associated with mechanical degradation of planned emplacement drifts at Yucca Mountain, which is the designated site for the proposed U.S. high-level nuclear waste repository. The factors leading to drift degradation include stresses from the overburden, stresses induced by the heat released from the emplaced waste, stresses due to seismically related ground motions, and time-dependent strength degradation. The welded tuff emplacement horizon consists of two groups of rock with distinct engineering properties: nonlithophysal units and lithophysal units, based on the relative proportion of lithophysal cavities. The term 'lithophysal' refers to hollow, bubble like cavities in volcanic rock that are surrounded by a porous rim formed by fine-grained alkali feldspar, quartz, and other minerals. Lithophysae are typically a few centimeters to a few decimeters in diameter. Part I of the paper concentrates on the generally hard, strong, and fractured nonlithophysal rock. The degradation behavior of the tunnels in the nonlithophysal rock is controlled by the occurrence of keyblocks. A statistically equivalent fracture model was generated based on extensive underground fracture mapping data from the Exploratory Studies Facility at Yucca Mountain. Three-dimensional distinct block analyses, generated with the fracture patterns randomly selected from the fracture model, were developed with the consideration of in situ, thermal, and seismic loads. In this study, field data, laboratory data, and numerical analyses are well integrated to provide a solution for the unique problem of modeling drift degradation.

  4. Antarctic glaciers and rock weathering: Exploring chemical and mineralogy processes within the blue ice fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, Zaoyang

    Antarctic glaciers and rock weathering: Exploring chemical and mineralogy processes within the blue of Geographical and Earth Sciences, we will determine the mineralogy and chemical composition of a suite mineralogy, porosity & permeability)? · Does the volume of weathering products and their mineralogy

  5. Minerals handbook 1984/1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crowson, P.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This handbook consists of statistical tables giving a profile of almost 50 strategic minerals. A compendium of statistics on reserves, production, and trade, the book provides a view of international supply and demand. Information is complied here which is otherwise available only through scattered sources. The 1984/1985 edition has been updated and expanded. Reserves have been recalculated on the new basis instituted by the United States. Seven new minerals have been added: arsenic, berrylium, bismuth, boron, gallium, rare earths, and tellurium. Growth rates of consumption have been extended and the section on end use of patterns for each mineral now shows the percentage for Europe and Japan as well as the U.S.

  6. An experimental investigaion of seawater/basalt interactions: the role of water/rock ratios and temperature gradients 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Archer, Paul Lawrence

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the precipitation of Fe-sulfides (pyri te and pyrrhoti te) in both 5/1 and 50/1 water/rock ratio systems. As a result of this precipitation, Fe was effectively fractionated from Mn and the Fe/Mn ratio of the fluid decreased. Because the 50/1 systems had lower pH.... EPR). This investi- gation also provides data potentially useful in predicting the occur- rence and kind of mineralization at ocean spreading centers as a function of the temperature and water/rock ratio regime of that system. 11 METHODS Ex...

  7. Hot Dry Rock; Geothermal Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The commercial utilization of geothermal energy forms the basis of the largest renewable energy industry in the world. More than 5000 Mw of electrical power are currently in production from approximately 210 plants and 10 000 Mw thermal are used in direct use processes. The majority of these systems are located in the well defined geothermal generally associated with crustal plate boundaries or hot spots. The essential requirements of high subsurface temperature with huge volumes of exploitable fluids, coupled to environmental and market factors, limit the choice of suitable sites significantly. The Hot Dry Rock (HDR) concept at any depth originally offered a dream of unlimited expansion for the geothermal industry by relaxing the location constraints by drilling deep enough to reach adequate temperatures. Now, after 20 years intensive work by international teams and expenditures of more than $250 million, it is vital to review the position of HDR in relation to the established geothermal industry. The HDR resource is merely a body of rock at elevated temperatures with insufficient fluids in place to enable the heat to be extracted without the need for injection wells. All of the major field experiments in HDR have shown that the natural fracture systems form the heat transfer surfaces and that it is these fractures that must be for geothermal systems producing from naturally fractured formations provide a basis for directing the forthcoming but, equally, they require accepting significant location constraints on HDR for the time being. This paper presents a model HDR system designed for commercial operations in the UK and uses production data from hydrothermal systems in Japan and the USA to demonstrate the reservoir performance requirements for viable operations. It is shown that these characteristics are not likely to be achieved in host rocks without stimulation processes. However, the long term goal of artificial geothermal systems developed by systematic engineering procedures at depth may still be attained if high temperature sites with extensive fracturing are developed or exploited. [DJE -2005

  8. Big Bang Day : Physics Rocks

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Is particle physics the new rock 'n' roll? The fundamental questions about the nature of the universe that particle physics hopes to answer have attracted the attention of some very high profile and unusual fans. Alan Alda, Ben Miller, Eddie Izzard, Dara O'Briain and John Barrowman all have interests in this branch of physics. Brian Cox - CERN physicist, and former member of 90's band D:Ream, tracks down some very well known celebrity enthusiasts and takes a light-hearted look at why this subject can appeal to all of us.

  9. Laboratory characterization of rock joints

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hsiung, S.M.; Kana, D.D.; Ahola, M.P.; Chowdhury, A.H.; Ghosh, A. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States). Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A laboratory characterization of the Apache Leap tuff joints under cyclic pseudostatic and dynamic loads has been undertaken to obtain a better understanding of dynamic joint shear behavior and to generate a complete data set that can be used for validation of existing rock-joint models. Study has indicated that available methods for determining joint roughness coefficient (JRC) significantly underestimate the roughness coefficient of the Apache Leap tuff joints, that will lead to an underestimation of the joint shear strength. The results of the direct shear tests have indicated that both under cyclic pseudostatic and dynamic loadings the joint resistance upon reverse shearing is smaller than that of forward shearing and the joint dilation resulting from forward shearing recovers during reverse shearing. Within the range of variation of shearing velocity used in these tests, the shearing velocity effect on rock-joint behavior seems to be minor, and no noticeable effect on the peak joint shear strength and the joint shear strength for the reverse shearing is observed.

  10. The Landscape of Klamath Basin Rock Art

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David, Robert James

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I incorporate results from the XRF and projectile pointRay Fluorescence (hereafter, XRF) to help affiliate rock artstudies or reports in which XRF analysis have been done.

  11. Rock Bands/Rock Brands: Mediation and Musical Performance in Post-liberalization Bangalore

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coventry, Chloe Louise

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    as in its modes of fandom, production and dissemination. Inaspects of rock music fandom: America had everything a youngthe beginnings of rock music fandom in India, even while, as

  12. Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field Investigations Of In Situ Geochemical Behavior Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  13. King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Ghadhban, Samir

    King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals Summer Training Report 2010 Abdul-Aziz Al ...........................................................................................13 #12;2 1. Introduction King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals (KFUPM) give an opportunity

  14. Mineral Supplementation of Beef Cows in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herd, Dennis B.

    1997-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Nutrient balance is the key to any effective nutrition program, especially where trace minerals are concerned. Many factors cannot be optimized when mineral intake is not properly balanced. Recommendations are given for the producer....

  15. Mineral Selection for Multicomponent Equilibrium Geothermometry

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Plamer, C. D.; Ohly, S. R.; Smith, R. W.; Neupane, G.; McLing, T.; Mattson, E.

    2015-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Muliticomponent geothermometry requires knowledge of the mineral phases in the reservoir with which the geothermal fluids may be equilibrated.

  16. Mineral Supplementation of Beef Cows in Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herd, Dennis B.

    1997-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    in these problem herds returned to acceptable levels with mineral supplementation practices described in this publication. Need for Minerals Maintenance, growth, lactation, reproduction and animal health cannot be optimized where mineral intake is not properly... than during lactation. Since milk is low in copper, the cow must build the fetal liver concentration of copper 4 Table 1. Diet Formulation Guidelines 1996 Beef NRC Common Requirements Formulation Lactating Lactating Maximum Mineral Dry Cow Cow Dry Cow...

  17. Mineral Sequestration of Carbon Dixoide in a Sandstone-Shale System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Tianfu; Apps, John A.; Pruess, Karsten

    2004-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A conceptual model of CO2 injection in bedded sandstone-shale sequences has been developed using hydrogeologic properties and mineral compositions commonly encountered in Gulf Coast sediments. Numerical simulations were performed with the reactive fluid flow and geochemical transport code TOUGHREACT to analyze mass transfer between sandstone and shale layers and CO2 immobilization through carbonate precipitation. Results indicate that most CO2 sequestration occurs in the sandstone. The major CO2 trapping minerals are dawsonite and ankerite. The CO2 mineral-trapping capacity after 100,000 years reaches about 90 kg per cubic meter of the medium. The CO2 trapping capacity depends on primary mineral composition. Precipitation of siderite and ankerite requires Fe+2 supplied mainly by chlorite and some by hematite dissolution and reduction. Precipitation of dawsonite requires Na+ provided by oligoclase dissolution. The initial abundance of chlorite and oligoclase therefore affects the CO2 mineral trapping capacity. The sequestration time required depends on the kinetic rate of mineral dissolution and precipitation. Dawsonite reaction kinetics is not well understood, and sensitivity regarding the precipitation rate was examined. The addition of CO2 as secondary carbonates results in decreased porosity. The leaching of chemical constituents from the interior of the shale causes slightly increased porosity. The limited information currently available for the mineralogy of natural high-pressure CO2 gas reservoirs is also generally consistent with our simulation. The ''numerical experiments'' give a detailed understanding of the dynamic evolution of a sandstone-shale geochemical system.

  18. Stable-Isotope Studies Of Rocks And Secondary Minerals In A Vapor...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    degree than in any other episode or in other hot-water systems. Authors Steven J. Lambert and Samuel Epstein Published Journal Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research,...

  19. Stable-Isotope Studies Of Rocks And Secondary Minerals In A Vapor-Dominated

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎SolarCity CorpSpringfield,Wind Farm Jump to:OlafHydrothermal

  20. Application Of Fluid Inclusion And Rock-Gas Analysis In Mineral Exploration

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcatAntrim County, Michigan:Applewood, Colorado:Of Travale,| Open

  1. Mineral minimization in nature's alternative teeth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zok, Frank

    REVIEW Mineral minimization in nature's alternative teeth Christopher C. Broomell1, , Rashda K, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106, USA Contrary to conventional wisdom, mineralization, with little to no help from mineralization. Based on biochemical analyses, three of these mouthparts, the jaws

  2. PROGRAM AND ABSTRACTS FOR CLAY MINERALS SOCIETY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    r PROGRAM AND ABSTRACTS FOR CLAY MINERALS SOCIETY 28th ANNUAL MEETING NI\\SI\\National Aeronautit &II LPI #12;PROGRAM AND ABSTRACTS FOR CLAY MINERALS SOCIETY 28th ANNUAL MEETING Houston, Texas October contains abstracts that have been accepted for presentation at the Clay Minerals Society 28th Annual

  3. Thermodynamic stabilities of U(VI) minerals: Estimated and observed relationships

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finch, R.J. [Univ. of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Gibbs free energies of formation ({Delta}G{degree}{sub f}) for several structurally related U(VI) minerals are estimated by summing the Gibbs energy contributions from component oxides. The estimated {Delta}G{degree}{sub f} values are used to construct activity-activity (stability) diagrams, and the predicted stability fields are compared with observed mineral occurrences and reaction pathways. With some exceptions, natural occurrences agree well with the mineral stability fields estimated for the systems SiO{sub 2}-CaO-UO{sub 3}-H{sub 2}O and CO{sub 2}-CaO-UO{sub 3}H{sub 2}O, providing confidence in the estimated thermodynamic values. Activity-activity diagrams are sensitive to small differences in {Delta}G{degree}{sub f} values, and mineral compositions must be known accurately, including structurally bound H{sub 2}O. The estimated {Delta}G{degree}{sub f} values are not considered reliable for a few minerals for two major reasons: (1) the structures of the minerals in question are not closely similar to those used to estimate the {Delta}G{sub f}* values of the component oxides, and/or (2) the minerals in question are exceptionally fine grained, leading to large surface energies that increase the effective mineral solubilities. The thermodynamic stabilities of uranium(VI) minerals are of interest for understanding the role of these minerals in controlling uranium concentrations in oxidizing groundwaters associated with uranium ore bodies, uranium mining and mill tailings and geological repositories for nuclear waste.

  4. Manufactured caverns in carbonate rock

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bruce, David A.; Falta, Ronald W.; Castle, James W.; Murdoch, Lawrence C.

    2007-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a process for manufacturing underground caverns suitable in one embodiment for storage of large volumes of gaseous or liquid materials. The method is an acid dissolution process that can be utilized to form caverns in carbonate rock formations. The caverns can be used to store large quantities of materials near transportation facilities or destination markets. The caverns can be used for storage of materials including fossil fuels, such as natural gas, refined products formed from fossil fuels, or waste materials, such as hazardous waste materials. The caverns can also be utilized for applications involving human access such as recreation or research. The method can also be utilized to form calcium chloride as a by-product of the cavern formation process.

  5. WAVE GENERATIONS FROM CONFINED EXPLOSIONS IN ROCKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, Sarah T.

    WAVE GENERATIONS FROM CONFINED EXPLOSIONS IN ROCKS C. L. Liu and Thomas J. Ahrens Seismological Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 In order to record P- and S-waves on the interactions between incident P- and SV-waves and free-surfaces of rocks. The relations between particle

  6. Rheology of rock glaciers: a preliminary assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giardino, J.R.; Vitek, J.D.; Hoskins, E.R.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Movement of rock debris under the influence of gravity, i.e., mass movement, generates a range of phenomena from soil creep, through solifluction,debris flows and rock glaciers to rock falls. Whereas the resultant forms of these phenomena are different, common elements in the mechanics of movement are utilized in the basic interpretation of the processes of formation. Measurements of morphologic variables provide data for deductive analyses of processes that operate too slowly to observe or for processes that generated relict phenomena. External and internal characteristics or rock glacier morphometry and measured rates of motion serve as the basis for the development of a rheological model to explain phenomena classified as rock glaciers. A rock glacier in the Sangre de Cristo Mountains of Southern Colorado, which exhibits a large number of ridges and furrows and lichen bare fronts of lobes, suggests present day movement. A strain-net established on the surface provides evidence of movement characteristics. These data plus morphologic and fabric data suggest two rheological models to explain the flow of this rock glacier. Model one is based upon perfect plastic flow and model two is based upon stratified fluid movement with viscosity changing with depth. These models permit a better understanding of the movement mechanics and demonstrate that catastrophic events and slow creep contribute to the morphologic characteristics of this rock glacier.

  7. Damage and plastic deformation of reservoir rocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ze'ev, Reches

    Damage and plastic deformation of reservoir rocks: Part 1. Damage fracturing Seth Busetti, Kyran mechanics, fluid flow in fractured reservoirs, and geomechanics in nonconventional reservoirs. Kyran Mish finite deformation of reservoir rocks. We present an at- tempt to eliminate the main limitations

  8. ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT ROCK ISLAND DAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT ROCK ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON 1960 . SPECIAL SCIENTIFIC ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON, 1960 by Paul D. Zimmer and Clifton C. Davidson United States Fish This annual report of fishway operations at Rock Island Dam in 1960 is dedicated to the memory of co

  9. ROCK ELASTIC PROPERTIES: DEPENDENCE ON MICROSTRUCTURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ROCK ELASTIC PROPERTIES: DEPENDENCE ON MICROSTRUCTURE James G. Berryman and Patricia A. Berge Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory P. O. Box 808 L­202 Livermore, CA 94551­9900 #12; ROCK ELASTIC PROPERTIES: DEPENDENCE ON MICROSTRUCTURE James G. Berryman and Patricia A. Berge Lawrence Livermore National

  10. Mineral bridges in nacre revisited

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antonio G. Checa; Julyan H. E. Cartwright; Marc-Georg Willinger

    2012-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We confirm with high-resolution techniques the existence of mineral bridges between superposed nacre tablets. In the towered nacre of both gastropods and the cephalopod Nautilus there are large bridges aligned along the tower axes, corresponding to gaps (150-200 nm) in the interlamellar membranes. Gaps are produced by the interaction of the nascent tablets with a surface membrane that covers the nacre compartment. In the terraced nacre of bivalves bridges associated with elongated gaps in the interlamellar membrane (> 100 nm) have mainly been found at or close to the edges of superposed parental tablets. To explain this placement, we hypothesize that the interlamellar membrane breaks due to differences in osmotic pressure across it when the interlamellar space below becomes reduced at an advanced stage of calcification. In no cases are the minor connections between superimposed tablets (mineral bridges, found to be such.

  11. Synthetic Tomographic Images of Slabs from Mineral Physics Y. Ricard, E. Mattern and J. Matas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    minimization. The numerical code can handle arbitrary elemental composition in the system MgO, FeO, CaO, Al2O3 and equations of states of each individual mineral, future geodynamical models will need to include must extract the radioactive heat production plus the mantle and core secular cooling while the hot

  12. Annual Logging Symposium, June 19-23, 2010 IMPROVED ESTIMATION OF MINERAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torres-Verdín, Carlos

    concentration of shale, and volumetric concentrations of mineral constituents in the presence of complex min- eral compositions, invasion, and shoulder beds. The method assumes a multi-layer reservoir model con concentrations from well logs, core data, and geological logs are nec- essary for the accurate estimation

  13. FRACTURE DETECTION IN CRYSTALLINE ROCK USING ULTRASONIC SHEAR WAVES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waters, K.H.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the piezoelectric source plate and the rock surface. With aThe S^j sources were bonded to the rock surface with a fast-^ source plate was epoxied in position on the rock specimen.

  14. Influence of processing conditions on the morphology of expanded perlite/polypropylene composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mattausch, H., E-mail: hannelore.mattausch@unileoben.ac.at, E-mail: stephan.laske@unileoben.ac.at; Laske, S., E-mail: hannelore.mattausch@unileoben.ac.at, E-mail: stephan.laske@unileoben.ac.at; Holzer, C., E-mail: clemens.holzer@unileoben.ac.at [Chair of Polymer Processing, Department of Polymer Engineering and Science, Montanuniversitaet Leoben (Austria); Cirar, K., E-mail: kristin.cirar@unileoben.ac.at, E-mail: helmut.flachberger@unileoben.ac.at; Flachberger, H., E-mail: kristin.cirar@unileoben.ac.at, E-mail: helmut.flachberger@unileoben.ac.at [Chair of Mineral Processing, Department Mineral Resources and Petroleum Engineering , Montanuniversitaet Leoben (Austria)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Perlite is an oversaturated, volcanic, glassy rock, which has chemically bound water from 2 to 5 wt%. Upon heating, perlite can be expanded up to 20 times of its original volume. Important applications are in the field of building industry, in refrigeration engineering or the pharmaceutical industry. As mineral filler in polymers, expanded perlite can increase the thermal conductivity, the viscosity and the mechanical properties of polypropylene composites. But there are still many challenges that must be analyzed to reach the full potential of those composites. This research work focuses on the morphology of expanded perlite/polypropylene (PP) compounds and the interactions between filler and polymer. To achieve good performance a homogenous dispersion of the filler in the polymer matrix is needed because the enhancement of the material correlates strongly with the morphology of the composite. Therefore it is necessary to characterize the microstructure of these materials in order to establish adequate structure-process-property relationships. The expanded perlite/PP composites were compounded with a co-rotating twin screw extruder Theysohn TSK 30/40D. For producing the closed cell expanded perlite a new technology, the bublon process, was used. For the material characterization two particles sizes were chosen and the filler content was varied at 5, 10 and 15 wt%. For the analysis of the effects of the screw geometry, two setups have been chosen for the processing of the materials. The produced materials were analyzed by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and tensile testing. The results show a reinforcement effect of the filler and differences in the inner structure of expanded perlite and in the morphology.

  15. The thin section rock physics: Modeling and measurement of seismic wave velocity on the slice of carbonates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wardaya, P. D., E-mail: pongga.wardaya@utp.edu.my; Noh, K. A. B. M., E-mail: pongga.wardaya@utp.edu.my; Yusoff, W. I. B. W., E-mail: pongga.wardaya@utp.edu.my [Petroleum Geosciences Department, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Tronoh, Perak, 31750 (Malaysia); Ridha, S. [Petroleum Engineering Department, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Tronoh, Perak, 31750 (Malaysia); Nurhandoko, B. E. B. [Wave Inversion and Subsurface Fluid Imaging Research Laboratory (WISFIR), Dept. of Physics, Institute of Technology Bandung, Bandung, Indonesia and Rock Fluid Imaging Lab, Bandung (Indonesia)

    2014-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses a new approach for investigating the seismic wave velocity of rock, specifically carbonates, as affected by their pore structures. While the conventional routine of seismic velocity measurement highly depends on the extensive laboratory experiment, the proposed approach utilizes the digital rock physics view which lies on the numerical experiment. Thus, instead of using core sample, we use the thin section image of carbonate rock to measure the effective seismic wave velocity when travelling on it. In the numerical experiment, thin section images act as the medium on which wave propagation will be simulated. For the modeling, an advanced technique based on artificial neural network was employed for building the velocity and density profile, replacing image's RGB pixel value with the seismic velocity and density of each rock constituent. Then, ultrasonic wave was simulated to propagate in the thin section image by using finite difference time domain method, based on assumption of an acoustic-isotropic medium. Effective velocities were drawn from the recorded signal and being compared to the velocity modeling from Wyllie time average model and Kuster-Toksoz rock physics model. To perform the modeling, image analysis routines were undertaken for quantifying the pore aspect ratio that is assumed to represent the rocks pore structure. In addition, porosity and mineral fraction required for velocity modeling were also quantified by using integrated neural network and image analysis technique. It was found that the Kuster-Toksoz gives the closer prediction to the measured velocity as compared to the Wyllie time average model. We also conclude that Wyllie time average that does not incorporate the pore structure parameter deviates significantly for samples having more than 40% porosity. Utilizing this approach we found a good agreement between numerical experiment and theoretically derived rock physics model for estimating the effective seismic wave velocity of rock.

  16. altered granitic rock: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    22 Everglades National Park Groundwater wells Surface water monitoring locations Rock mining locations 12 Demers, Nora Egan 211 Nova Scotia Rock Garden Club Membership...

  17. Regional Geology: GIS Database for Alternative Host Rocks and...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Regional Geology: GIS Database for Alternative Host Rocks and Potential Siting Guidelines Regional Geology: GIS Database for Alternative Host Rocks and Potential Siting Guidelines...

  18. aspo hard rock: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bayesian estimation of rock mass boundary conditions with applications to the AECL underground research laboratory F. Tonon*,1 conditions for rock mass models is...

  19. antarctic rocks colonized: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bayesian estimation of rock mass boundary conditions with applications to the AECL underground research laboratory F. Tonon*,1 conditions for rock mass models is...

  20. algonquin class rocks: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bayesian estimation of rock mass boundary conditions with applications to the AECL underground research laboratory F. Tonon*,1 conditions for rock mass models is...

  1. acidic crystalline rock: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bayesian estimation of rock mass boundary conditions with applications to the AECL underground research laboratory F. Tonon*,1 conditions for rock mass models is...

  2. aphanitic melt rocks: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bayesian estimation of rock mass boundary conditions with applications to the AECL underground research laboratory F. Tonon*,1 conditions for rock mass models is...

  3. aespoe hard rock: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bayesian estimation of rock mass boundary conditions with applications to the AECL underground research laboratory F. Tonon*,1 conditions for rock mass models is...

  4. Stress and fault rock controls on fault zone hydrology, Coso...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    rock controls on fault zone hydrology, Coso geothermal field, CA Abstract In crystalline rock of the Coso Geothermal Field, CA, fractures are the primary source of permeability....

  5. EIS-0471: Areva Eagle Rock Enrichment Facility in Bonneville...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1: Areva Eagle Rock Enrichment Facility in Bonneville County, ID EIS-0471: Areva Eagle Rock Enrichment Facility in Bonneville County, ID May 20, 2011 EIS-0471: Final Environmental...

  6. Differential effective medium modeling of rock elastic moduli with critical porosity constraints

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mukerji, T.; Mavko, G. [Stanford Univ. CA (United States)] [Stanford Univ. CA (United States); Berryman, J.; Berge, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rocks generally have a percolation porosity at which they lose rigidity and fall apart. Percolation behaviour is a purely geometrical property, independent of any physical properties, and is a powerful constraint on any valid velocity-porosity relation. The authors show how the conventional Differential Effective Medium (DEM) theory can be modified to incorporate percolation of elastic moduli in rocks by taking the material at the critical porosity as one of the constituents of a two-phase composite. Any desired percolation porosity can be specified as an input. In contrast, the conventional DEM model always predicts percolation at a porosity of either 0 or 100 percent. Most sedimentary rocks however have intermediate percolation porosities and are therefore not well represented by the conventional theory. The modified DEM model incorporates percolation behavior, and at the same time is always consistent with the Hashin-Shtrikman bounds. The predictions compare favorably with laboratory sandstone data. 24 refs., 3 figs.

  7. Mineral Resource Information System for Field Lab in the Osage Mineral Reservation Estate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carroll, H.B.; Johnson, William I.

    1999-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The Osage Mineral Reservation Estate is located in Osage County, Oklahoma. Minerals on the Estate are owned by members of the Osage Tribe who are shareholders in the Estate. The Estate is administered by the Osage Agency, Branch of Minerals, operated by the U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA). Oil, natural gas, casinghead gas, and other minerals (sand, gravel, limestone, and dolomite) are exploited by lessors. Operators may obtain from the Branch of Minerals and the Osage Mineral Estate Tribal Council leases to explore and exploit oil, gas, oil and gas, and other minerals on the Estate. Operators pay a royalty on all minerals exploited and sold from the Estate. A mineral Resource Information system was developed for this project to evaluate the remaining hydrocarbon resources located on the Estate. Databases on Microsoft Excel spreadsheets of operators, leases, and production were designed for use in conjunction with an evaluation spreadsheet for estimating the remaining hydrocarbons on the Estate.

  8. Rock bed behavior and reverse thermosiphon effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perry, J.E.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two rock beds, in the Mark Jones and Doug Balcomb houses, have been instrumented, monitored, and analyzed. Observed experimental operation has been compared with, or explained by, theoretical predictions. The latter are based on one-dimensional finite-difference computer calculation of rock bed charging and discharging, with fixed or variable inputs of air flow rate and temperature. Both rock beds exhibit appreciable loss of stored heat caused by lack of backdraft dampers or incomplete closure of such dampers. These topics are discussed, and some improvements that might be made in future installations are noted.

  9. Utilization of coal-associated minerals. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slonaker, J. F.; Akers, D. J.; Alderman, J. K.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under contract number DE-AS21-77ET10533 with the US-DOE several methods of utilizing coal associated by-products were examined for potential commercial use. Such use could transform a costly waste disposal situation into new materials for further use and could provide incentive for the adoption of new coal utilization processes. Several utilization processes appear to have merit and are recommended for further study. Each process is discussed separately in the text of this report. Common coal cleaning processes were also examined to determine the effect of such processes on the composition of by-products. Data obtained in this portion of the research effort are reported in the Appendix. Information of this type is required before utilization processes can be considered. A knowledge of the mineral composition of these materials is also required before even simple disposal methods can be considered.

  10. Rock Slopes from Mechanics to Decision Making

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Einstein, Herbert H.

    Rock slope instabilities are discussed in the context of decision making for risk assessment and management. Hence, the state of the slope and possible failure mechanism need to be defined first. This is done with geometrical ...

  11. First Rocks from Outside the Solar System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Westphal, Andrew

    2014-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Andrew Westphal presents his findings in examining the first rocks from outside the solar system at our '8 Big Ideas' Science at the Theater event on October 8th, 2014, in Oakland, California.

  12. Determination of mechanical properties of reservoir rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barnett, Ashley

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus, experimental procedure, and methodology have been developed to determine the mechanical response of reservoir rock. The apparatus is capable of subjecting cylindrical core specimens to triaxial stress states and temperatures...

  13. Stress-induced transverse isotropy in rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwartz, L.M.; Murphy, W.F. III [Schlumberger-Doll Research Center, Ridgefield, CT (United States); Berryman, J.G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The application of uniaxial pressure can induce elastic anisotropy in otherwise isotropic rock. We consider models based on two very different rock classes, granites and weakly consolidated granular systems. We show that these models share common underlying assumptions, that they lead to similar qualitative behavior, and that both provide a microscopic basis for elliptical anisotropy. In the granular case, we make experimentally verifiable predictions regarding the horizontally propagating modes based on the measured behavior of the vertical modes.

  14. Minerals and Mining Program (South Dakota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Minerals and Mining Program has the authority to oversee mining activities in the state and issue regulations pertaining to the permitting and environmental impact mitigation of, and...

  15. Understanding microbe-mineral electron exchange | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    insight into how bacteria, such as S. oneidensis (above), exchange electrons with minerals in their surroundings as part of cellular respiration-a series of electron exchanges...

  16. Mineral Test Hole Regulatory Act (Tennessee)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Mineral Hole Regulatory Act is applicable to any person (individual, corporation, company, association, joint venture, partnership, receiver, trustee, guardian, executor, administrator,...

  17. Hydrothermal alteration mineral mapping using hyperspectral imagery...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in Dixie Valley, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Hydrothermal alteration mineral mapping using hyperspectral...

  18. Electrostatic Potential of Specific Mineral Faces. | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    interactions, and in testing surface complexation theories. Citation: Zarzycki PP, SME Chatman, T Preocanin, and KM Rosso.2011."Electrostatic Potential of Specific Mineral...

  19. Fiber ReinforcedFiber Reinforced CementitiousCementitious CompositesComposites B. Mobasher

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mobasher, Barzin

    prefabricated shapes panels shotcrete curtain walls Slabs on grade precast elements Composite decks Vaults Continuous and discontinuous fibers Natural, Asbestos, Wood, rock wool. Synthetic, Steel, E-glass, AR Glass of Interface Weak Zone Steel fibers, high w/c, CH formation Glass fibers strand effect, embrittlement, filling

  20. ChemCam Rock Laser for the Mars Science Laboratory

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    LANL

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Los Alamos has a long history of space-related instr... Los Alamos has a long history of space-related instruments, tied primarily to its role in defense-related treaty verification. Space-based detectors have helped determine the differences between signals from lightning bolts and potential nuclear explosions. LANL-developed gamma-ray detection instruments first revealed the existence of what we now know as gamma-ray bursts, an exciting area of astrophysical research. And the use of LANL instruments on varied space missions continues with such products as the ChemCam rock laser for NASA, shown here. The Engineering Model of the ChemCam Mars Science Laboratory rover instrument arrived at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory on February 6, 2008. ChemCam will use imaging and laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) to determine rock and soil compositions on Mars, up to 9 meters from the rover. The engineering model is being integrated into the rover test bed for the development and testing of the rover software. The actual flight model components are concurrently being assembled at Los Alamos and in Toulouse, France, and will be delivered to JPL in July. The Mars Science Laboratory is scheduled to launch in 2009. Animations courtesy of JPL/NASA.

  1. ChemCam rock laser for Mars Science Laboratory "Curiosity"

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Wiens, Roger

    2014-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Los Alamos has a long history of space-related instruments, tied primarily to its role in defense-related treaty verification. Space-based detectors have helped determine the differences between signals from lightning bolts and potential nuclear explosions. LANL-developed gamma-ray detection instruments first revealed the existence of what we now know as gamma-ray bursts, an exciting area of astrophysical research. And the use of LANL instruments on varied space missions continues with such products as the ChemCam rock laser for NASA, shown here. The Engineering Model of the ChemCam Mars Science Laboratory rover instrument arrived at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory on February 6, 2008. The Flight Model was shipped in August, 2010 for installation on the rover at JPL. ChemCam will use imaging and laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) to determine rock and soil compositions on Mars, up to 9 meters from the rover. The engineering model is being integrated into the rover test bed for the development and testing of the rover software. The actual flight model components were concurrently assembled at Los Alamos and in Toulouse, France. The Mars Science Laboratory is scheduled to launch in 2011. Animations courtesy of JPL/NASA.

  2. Synchrotron based mass spectrometry to investigate the molecular properties of mineral-organic associations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Suet Yi; Kleber, Markus; Takahashi, Lynelle K.; Nico, Peter; Keiluweit, Marco; Ahmed, Musahid

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Soil organic matter (OM) is important because its decay drives life processes in the biosphere. Analysis of organic compounds in geological systems is difficult because of their intimate association with mineral surfaces. To date there is no procedure capable of quantitatively separating organic from mineral phases without creating artifacts or mass loss. Therefore, analytical techniques that can (a) generate information about both organic and mineral phases simultaneously and (b) allow the examination of predetermined high-interest regions of the sample as opposed to conventional bulk analytical techniques are valuable. Laser Desorption Synchrotron Postionization (synchrotron-LDPI) mass spectrometry is introduced as a novel analytical tool to characterize the molecular properties of organic compounds in mineral-organic samples from terrestrial systems, and it is demonstrated that when combined with Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS), can provide complementary information on mineral composition. Mass spectrometry along a decomposition gradient in density fractions, verifies the consistency of our results with bulk analytical techniques. We further demonstrate that by changing laser and photoionization energies, variations in molecular stability of organic compounds associated with mineral surfaces can be determined. The combination of synchrotron-LDPI and SIMS shows that the energetic conditions involved in desorption and ionization of organic matter may be a greater determinant of mass spectral signatures than the inherent molecular structure of the organic compounds investigated. The latter has implications for molecular models of natural organic matter that are based on mass spectrometric information.

  3. Development of Chemical Model to Predict the Interactions between Supercritical CO2and Fluid, and Rocks in EGS Reservoirs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This project will develop a chemical model, based on existing models and databases, that is capable of simulating chemical reactions between supercritical (SC) CO2 and Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) reservoir rocks of various compositions in aqueous, non-aqueous and 2-phase environments.

  4. A LANL Scientist's Dream Takes Off to Zap Rocks on Mars

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Wiens, Roger

    2012-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Roger Wiens, with a team of 40 people at Los Alamos National Laboratory and the collaboration of the French space institute IRAP, created ChemCam, a laser spectrometer and telescope device aboard the Curiosity rover. ChemCam will blast rocks from as far as 7 meters, vaporize bits of their surfaces, and spectroscopically determine their chemical composition, aiding in the search for life on Mars, and making this scientist's boyhood dream a reality.

  5. The mission of the USGS National Minerals Information Center (formerly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    The mission of the USGS National Minerals Information Center (formerly the Minerals Information of and demand for minerals and mineral materials essential to the U.S. economy and national security. Examples with the information required to ensure that the Nation has an adequate and dependable supply of minerals and materials

  6. Lipid Peroxidation Induced by Expandable Clay Minerals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    Lipid Peroxidation Induced by Expandable Clay Minerals D A R I A K I B A N O V A , A N T O N I O N and toxicity. Herein, potential hazards of clay particle uptake areaddressed.Thispaperreportsthatthecontentanddistribution of structural Fe influence the ability of expandable clay minerals to induce lipid peroxidation (LP), a major

  7. Clay Minerals and Italy the Nannobacterial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Zong-Liang

    Clay Minerals and Italy ­ the Nannobacterial Connection R. L. FOLK THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN This work is dedicated to F. Leo Lynch, a brilliant clay mineralogist who died in 2009. During Leo of nannobacterial precipitation of clay minerals were identified. (Lynch, 1994; Folk, Lynch & Rasbury, 1994). Leo

  8. Institute for Mineral and Energy Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Institute for Mineral and Energy Resources #12;IMER VISION IMER's vision is to enable the efficient and sustainable use and development of the world's mineral and energy resources for the benefit of society resources. IMER OBJECTIVES · Advance the science and technology required to enhance the prospectivity

  9. Chapter 15 Mineral Resources and the Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pan, Feifei

    Materials produced from natural gas or crude oil, such as plastics Fertilizers for agriculture, phosphate tons per year. Gold and silver have annual consumption rates of 10,000 tons or less. Worldwide consumption of minerals #12; The fundamental problem associated with the availability of mineral resources

  10. Energy and Mineral Development in Indian Country

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Rocky Mountain Mineral Law Foundation is hosting the Special Institute on Energy and Mineral Development in Indian Country. This two-day conference will cover laws, policies, and practices regarding natural resources development in Indian Country and how they've evolved in the recent years.

  11. Groundwater chemistry and water-rock interactions at Stripa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nordstrom, D.K.; Ball, J.W. (Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (USA)); Donahoe, R.J. (Univ. of Alabama, Tuscaloosa (USA)); Whittemore, D. (Univ. of Kansas, Lawrence (USA))

    1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ground waters from near surface to a depth of 1,232 m in the Stripa granite have been sampled and analyzed for major and trace constituents. The groundwater composition consists of two general types: a typical recharge water of Ca-HCO{sub 3} type (<300 m depth) and a deeper Na-Ca-Cl type (>700 m depth) of high pH (8-10) that reaches a maximum of 1,250 mg/L in total dissolved solids (TDS). Intermediate depths show mixtures of the two types that are highly fracture-dependent rather than depth-dependent. Any borehole can vary significantly and erratically in TDS for either a horizontal or vertical direction. The general transition from Ca-HCO{sub 3} type to Na-Ca-Cl type correlates with the depth profile for hydraulic conductivity that drops from 10{sup {minus}8} m/s to 10{sup {minus}11} m/s or lower. Thermomechanical stress (from heater experiments) clearly shows an effect on the groundwater composition that could be caused by changing flow paths, leakage of fluid inclusions or both. Dissolution and precipitation of calcite, fluorite and barite, aluminosilicate hydrolysis, and addition of a saline source (possibly fluid inclusion leakage) play the major roles in defining the groundwater composition. The low permeability of the Stripa granite has produced a groundwater composition that appears intermediate between the dilute, shallow ground waters typical of recharge in a crystalline rock terrain and the saline waters and brines typical of cratonic shield areas at depth.

  12. Deep drilling technology for hot crystalline rock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowley, J.C.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal systems at the Fenton Hill, New Mexico site has required the drilling of four deep boreholes into hot, Precambrian granitic and metamorphic rocks. Thermal gradient holes, four observation wells 200 m (600 ft) deep, and an exploration core hole 800 m (2400 ft) deep guided the siting of the four deep boreholes. Results derived from the exploration core hole, GT-1 (Granite Test No. 1), were especially important in providing core from the granitic rock, and establishing the conductive thermal gradient and heat flow for the granitic basement rocks. Essential stratigraphic data and lost drilling-fluid zones were identified for the volcanic and sedimentary rocks above the contact with the crystalline basement. Using this information drilling strategies and well designs were then devised for the planning of the deeper wells. The four deep wells were drilled in pairs, the shallowest were planned and drilled to depths of 3 km in 1975 at a bottom-hole temperature of nearly 200/sup 0/C. These boreholes were followed by a pair of wells, completed in 1981, the deepest of which penetrated the Precambrian basement to a vertical depth of 4.39 km at a temperature of 320/sup 0/C.

  13. Minerals yearbook: Mineral industries of Europe and central Eurasia. Volume 3. 1992 international review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Volume III, Minerals Yearbook -- International Review contains the latest available mineral data on more than 175 foreign countries and discusses the importance of minerals to the economies of these nations. Since the 1989 International Review, the volume has been presented as six reports. The report presents the Mineral Industries of Europe and Central Eurasia. The report incorporates location maps, industry structure tables, and an outlook section previously incorporated in the authors' Minerals Perspectives Series quinquennial regional books, which are being discontinued. This section of the Minerals Yearbook reviews the minerals industries of 45 countries: the 12 nations of the European Community (EC); 6 of the 7 nations of the European Free Trade Association (EFTA); Malta; the 11 Eastern European economies in transition (Albania, Bosnia and Hercegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Czechoslovakia, Hungary, Macedonia, Poland, Romania, Serbia and Montenegro, and Slovenia); and the countries of Central Eurasia (Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Estonia, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgystan, Latvia, Lithuania, Moldova, Russia, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Ukraine, and Uzbekistan).

  14. A collaborative research venture between the minerals industry and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michelson, David G.

    A collaborative research venture between the minerals industry and The University of British Columbia MDRUMINERAL DEPOSIT RESEARCH UNIT To increase the understanding of mineral deposits and highly trained geologists for employment in the minerals industry. Mission Vision MDRU

  15. FORMATION OF SEPIOLITE-PALYGORSKITE AND RELATED MINERALS FROM SOLUTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    FORMATION OF SEPIOLITE-PALYGORSKITE AND RELATED MINERALS FROM SOLUTION REZAN BIRSOY* Dokuz Eylu's sepiolite-palygorskite precipitates in lacustrine and perimarine environments. Although these minerals can transform from precursor minerals, the most common formation mechanism involves crystallization from

  16. Senior Research Associate Taconite Industry Minerals Research Endowed Chair

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Netoff, Theoden

    Senior Research Associate Taconite Industry Minerals Research Endowed Chair Job Requisition 170892 Coleraine Minerals Research Laboratory Natural Resources Research Institute University of Minnesota Duluth (www.nrri.umn.edu) Position Description The Taconite Industry Minerals Research Endowed Chair

  17. Mineral Deposit Research Unit The University of British Columbia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ollivier-Gooch, Carl

    1 Mineral Deposit Research Unit The University of British Columbia Earth Sciences Building metallogenic constraints on mineralization in poorly understood or exposed portions of Yukon and Alaska. The mineral deposit studies, models, and metallogenic frameworks developed in this project

  18. Source rock maturation, San Juan sag

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gries, R.R.; Clayton, J.L.

    1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Kinetic modeling for thermal histories was simulated for seven wells in the San Juan sag honoring measured geochemical data. Wells in the area of Del Norte field (Sec. 9, T40N, R5E), where minor production has been established from an igneous sill reservoir, show that the Mancos Shale source rocks are in the mature oil generation window as a combined result of high regional heat flow and burial by approximately 2,700 m of Oligocene volcanic rocks. Maturation was relatively recent for this area and insignificant during Laramide subsidence. In the vicinity of Gramps field (Sec. 24, T33N, R2E) on the southwest flank of the San Juan sag, these same source rocks are exposed due to erosion of the volcanic cover but appear to have undergone a similar maturation history. At the north and south margins of the sag, two wells (Champlin 34A-13, Sec. 13, T35N, R4.5E; and Champlin 24A-1, Sec. 1, T44N, R5E) were analyzed and revealed that although the regional heat flow was probably similar to other wells, the depth of burial was insufficient to cause maturation (except where intruded by thick igneous sills that caused localized maturation). The Meridian Oil 23-17 South Fork well (Sec. 17, T39N, R4E) was drilled in a deeper part of the San Juan sag, and source rocks were intruded by numerous igneous sills creating a complex maturation history that includes overmature rocks in the lowermost Mancos Shale, possible CO{sub 2} generation from the calcareous Niobrara Member of the Mancos Shale, and mature source rocks in the upper Mancos Shale.

  19. Rock melting tool with annealer section

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bussod, Gilles Y. (Santa Fe, NM); Dick, Aaron J. (Oakland, CA); Cort, George E. (Montrose, CO)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A rock melting penetrator is provided with an afterbody that rapidly cools a molten geological structure formed around the melting tip of the penetrator to the glass transition temperature for the surrounding molten glass-like material. An annealing afterbody then cools the glass slowly from the glass transition temperature through the annealing temperature range to form a solid self-supporting glass casing. This allows thermally induced strains to relax by viscous deformations as the molten glass cools and prevents fracturing of the resulting glass liner. The quality of the glass lining is improved, along with its ability to provide a rigid impermeable casing in unstable rock formations.

  20. Oilfield rock bits: Are they a commodity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caldwell, R.

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses the quality of various types of rock drill bits and evaluates cost of these bits against service and performance to determine if bits should be viewed as a commodity when drilling a production or exploration well. Continuing advancements in materials technology, machining capabilities, hydraulics arrangements, bearing configuration, seal technology and cutter design continue to push the performance curve for oilfield rock bits. However, some very important advancements are patented, proprietary features of individual manufacturers. This paper reviews some of these design and performance features to help determine if they are worth the extra investment based on actual field drilling experience.

  1. Specific energy for laser removal of rocks.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Z.; Kornecki, G.; Reed, C. B.; Gahan, B. C.; Parker, R. A.; Batarseh, S.; Graves, R. M.

    2001-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Application of advanced high power laser technology into oil and gas well drilling has been attracting significant research interests recently among research institutes, petroleum industries, and universities. Potential laser or laser-aided oil and gas well drilling has many advantages over the conventional rotary drilling, such as high penetration rate, reduction or elimination of tripping, casing, and bit costs, and enhanced well control, perforating and side-tracking capabilities. The energy required to remove a unit volume of rock, namely the specific energy (SE), is a critical rock property data that can be used to determine both the technical and economic feasibility of laser oil and gas well drilling.

  2. Geochemical relationships of petroleum in Mesozoic reservoirs to carbonate source rocks of Jurassic Smackover Formation, southwestern Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Claypool, G.E.; Mancini, E.A.

    1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Algal carbonate mudstones of the Jurassic Smackover Formation are the main source rocks for oil and condensate in Mesozoic reservoir rocks in southwestern Alabama. This interpretation is based on geochemical analyses of oils, condensates, and organic matter in selected samples of shale (Norphlet Formation, Haynesville Formation, Trinity Group, Tuscaloosa Group) and carbonate (Smackover Formation) rocks. Potential and probable oil source rocks are present in the Tuscaloosa Group and Smackover Formation, respectively. Extractable organic matter from Smackover carbonates has molecular and isotopic similarities to Jurassic oil. Although the Jurassic oils and condensates in southwestern Alabama have genetic similarities, they show significant compositional variations due to differences in thermal maturity and organic facies/lithofacies. Organic facies reflect different depositional conditions for source rocks in the various basins. The Mississippi Interior Salt basin was characterized by more continuous marine to hypersaline conditions, whereas the Manila and Conecuh embayments periodically had lower salnity and greater input of clastic debris and terrestrial organic matter. Petroleum and organic matter in Jurassic rocks of southwestern Alabama show a range of thermal transformations. The gas content of hydrocarbons in reservoirs increases with increasing depth and temperature. In some reservoirs where the temperature is above 266/degrees/F(130/degrees/C), gas-condensate is enriched in isotopically heavy sulfur, apparently derived from thermochemical reduction of Jurassic evaporite sulfate. This process also resulted in increase H/sub 2/S and CO in the gas, and depletion of saturated hydrocarbons in the condensate liquids.

  3. ITP Mining: Mining Industry of the Future Mineral Processing...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of the Future Mineral Processing Technology Roadmap ITP Mining: Mining Industry of the Future Mineral Processing Technology Roadmap mptroadmap.pdf More Documents & Publications ITP...

  4. Determining Individual Mineral Contributions To U(VI) Adsorption...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Individual Mineral Contributions To U(VI) Adsorption In A Contaminated Aquifer Sediment: A Fluorescence Spectroscopy Determining Individual Mineral Contributions To U(VI)...

  5. Linked Reactivity at Mineral-Water Interfaces Through Bulk Crystal...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at mineral-water interfaces is of fundamental importance to geochemistry, but for minerals that are natural semiconductors the pursuit of mechanistic understanding is uniquely...

  6. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- International Minerals and...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    International Minerals and Chemical Corp - Pilot Plant - FL 02 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: International Minerals and Chemical Corp - Pilot Plant (FL.02) Designated Name: Not...

  7. King Fahd University of Petroleum & Minerals Collage of Electrical Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Ghadhban, Samir

    King Fahd University of Petroleum & Minerals Collage of Electrical Engineering Summer Training King Fahd university of Petroleum and Minerals OMVG Gambia River Basin Development Organization PLCs

  8. Biogeochemical Transformation of Fe Minerals in a Petroleum-Contaminat...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transformation of Fe Minerals in a Petroleum-Contaminated Aquifer. Biogeochemical Transformation of Fe Minerals in a Petroleum-Contaminated Aquifer. Abstract: Biogeochemical...

  9. Relations Of Ammonium Minerals At Several Hydrothermal Systems...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Minerals At Several Hydrothermal Systems In The Western Us Abstract Ammonium bound to silicate and sulfate minerals has recently been located at several major hydrothermal systems...

  10. LOW TEMPERATURE GEOTHERMAL MINERAL RECOVERY PROGRAM 02/11/2014...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    mineral-webinar.pdf More Documents & Publications LOW TEMPERATURE GEOTHERMAL MINERAL RECOVERY PROGRAM Geothermal Play Fairway Analysis Geothermal Play Fairway Analysis...

  11. Climate VISION: PrivateSector Initiatives: Minerals - Industry...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Industry Associations Industrial Minerals Association - North America The International Minerals Association - North America (IMA-NA) was formed in early 2002 to tap the benefits...

  12. affecting bone mineral: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Mineral and Energy Physics Websites Summary: Institute for Mineral and Energy Resources Answering Global Resource and Energy Challenges 12;Answering Global Resource and...

  13. alters bone mineral: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Mineral and Energy Physics Websites Summary: Institute for Mineral and Energy Resources Answering Global Resource and Energy Challenges 12;Answering Global Resource and...

  14. absorptiometric bone mineral: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Mineral and Energy Physics Websites Summary: Institute for Mineral and Energy Resources Answering Global Resource and Energy Challenges 12;Answering Global Resource and...

  15. avoiding mineral pretreatment: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Mineral and Energy Physics Websites Summary: Institute for Mineral and Energy Resources Answering Global Resource and Energy Challenges 12;Answering Global Resource and...

  16. affecting born mineral: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Mineral and Energy Physics Websites Summary: Institute for Mineral and Energy Resources Answering Global Resource and Energy Challenges 12;Answering Global Resource and...

  17. atrazine mineralization capacity: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Mineral and Energy Physics Websites Summary: Institute for Mineral and Energy Resources Answering Global Resource and Energy Challenges 12;Answering Global Resource and...

  18. african mineral dust: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laurent 19 Does the size distribution of mineral dust aerosols depend on the wind speed at emission? CERN Preprints Summary: The size distribution of mineral dust aerosols...

  19. artery calcium mineral: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    between diatom aggregates, minerals, particulate organic carbon, and dissolved organic October 2008. 1 Correlations of particulate organic carbon (POC) and mineral fluxes into...

  20. Biotic and abiotic pathways of phosphorus cycling in minerals...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and abiotic pathways of phosphorus cycling in minerals and sediments: insights from oxygen isotopes in phosphate. Biotic and abiotic pathways of phosphorus cycling in minerals...

  1. MS Degree in Mechanical Engineering, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran, Saudi Arabia, April 2006. Grade Point Average 3.34/4.00. MS Thesis on "The Effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, John M.

    /Lab Engineer, The Petroleum Institute, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates · May 2006 June 2012: Core Analysis Engineer, Research Institute, Center for Petroleum and Minerals, KFUPM, Dhahran, Saudi Arabia · February for the Petroleum Institute in Abu Dhabi · In depth knowledge and practical experience of reservoir rock properties

  2. Porosity and surface area evolution during weathering of two igneous rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Navarre-Sitchler, Alexis [Colorado School of Mines, Golden; Cole, David [Ohio State University; Rother, Gernot [ORNL; Jin, Lixin [University of Texas, El Paso; Buss, Heather [University of Bristol, UK; Brantley, S. L. [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During weathering, rocks release nutrients and storewater vital for growth ofmicrobial and plant life. Thus, the growth of porosity as weathering advances into bedrock is a life-sustaining process for terrestrial ecosystems. Here, we use small-angle and ultra small-angle neutron scattering to show how porosity develops during initial weathering under tropical conditions of two igneous rock compositions, basaltic andesite and quartz diorite. The quartz diorite weathers spheroidally while the basaltic andesite does not. The weathering advance rates of the two systems also differ, perhaps due to this difference in mechanism, from 0.24 to 100 mm kyr1, respectively. The scattering data document how surfaces inside the feldspar-dominated rocks change as weathering advances into the protolith. In the unaltered rocks, neutrons scatter fromtwo types of featureswhose dimensions vary from6 nmto 40 lm: pores and bumps on pore grain surfaces. These features result in scattering data for both unaltered rocks that document multi-fractal behavior: scattering is best described by amass fractal dimension (Dm) and a surface fractal dimension (Ds) for features of length scales greater than and less than 1 lm, respectively. In the basaltic andesite, Dm is approximately 2.9 and Ds is approximately 2.7. The mechanism of solute transport during weathering of this rock is diffusion. Porosity and surface area increase from 1.5%to 8.5%and 3 to 23 m2 g1 respectively in a relatively consistent trend across themm-thick plagioclase reaction front. Across this front, both fractal dimensions decrease, consistentwith development of amoremonodisperse pore networkwith smoother pore surfaces. Both changes are consistent largely with increasing connectivity of pores without significant surface roughening, as expected for transport-limited weathering. In contrast, porosity and surface area increase from 1.3% to 9.5% and 1.5 to 13 m2 g1 respectively across a many cm-thick reaction front in the spheroidally weathering quartz diorite. In that rock, Dm is approximately 2.8 andDs is approximately 2.5 prior to weathering. These two fractals transform during weathering to multiple surface fractals as micro-cracking reduces the size of diffusion-limited subzones of thematrix.Across the reaction front of plagioclase in the quartz diorite, the specific surface area and porosity change very little until the pointwhere the rock disaggregates into saprolite. The different patterns in porosity development of the two rocks are attributed to advective infiltration plus diffusion in the rock that spheroidally fractures versus diffusion-only in the rock that does not. Fracturing apparently diminishes the size of the diffusion-limited parts of the spheroidally weathering rock system to promote infiltration of meteoric fluids, thereforeexplaining the faster weathering advance rate into that rock.

  3. Process for the physical segregation of minerals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yingling, Jon C.; Ganguli, Rajive

    2004-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    With highly heterogeneous groups or streams of minerals, physical segregation using online quality measurements is an economically important first stage of the mineral beneficiation process. Segregation enables high quality fractions of the stream to bypass processing, such as cleaning operations, thereby reducing the associated costs and avoiding the yield losses inherent in any downstream separation process. The present invention includes various methods for reliably segregating a mineral stream into at least one fraction meeting desired quality specifications while at the same time maximizing yield of that fraction.

  4. The role of reaction affinity and secondary minerals in regulating chemical weathering rates at the Santa Cruz Soil Chronosequence, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maher, K.; Steefel, C. I.; White, A.F.; Stonestrom, D.A.

    2009-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to explore the reasons for the apparent discrepancy between laboratory and field weathering rates and to determine the extent to which weathering rates are controlled by the approach to thermodynamic equilibrium, secondary mineral precipitation and flow rates, a multicomponent reactive transport model (CrunchFlow) was used to interpret soil profile development and mineral precipitation and dissolution rates at the 226 ka marine terrace chronosequence near Santa Cruz, CA. Aqueous compositions, fluid chemistry, transport, and mineral abundances are well characterized (White et al., 2008, GCA) and were used to constrain the reaction rates for the weathering and precipitating minerals in the reactive transport modeling. When primary mineral weathering rates are calculated with either of two experimentally determined rate constants, the nonlinear, parallel rate law formulation of Hellmann and Tisser and [2006] or the aluminum inhibition model proposed by Oelkers et al. [1994], modeling results are consistent with field-scale observations when independently constrained clay precipitation rates are accounted for. Experimental and field rates, therefore, can be reconciled at the Santa Cruz site. Observed maximum clay abundances in the argillic horizons occur at the depth and time where the reaction fronts of the primary minerals overlap. The modeling indicates that the argillic horizon at Santa Cruz can be explained almost entirely by weathering of primary minerals and in situ clay precipitation accompanied by undersaturation of kaolinite at the top of the profile. The rate constant for kaolinite precipitation was also determined based on model simulations of mineral abundances and dissolved Al, SiO{sub 2}(aq) and pH in pore waters. Changes in the rate of kaolinite precipitation or the flow rate do not affect the gradient of the primary mineral weathering profiles, but instead control the rate of propagation of the primary mineral weathering fronts and thus total mass removed from the weathering profile. Our analysis suggests that secondary clay precipitation is as important as aqueous transport in governing the amount of dissolution that occurs within a profile because clay minerals exert a strong control over the reaction affinity of the dissolving primary minerals. The modeling also indicates that the weathering advance rate and the total mass of mineral dissolved is controlled by the thermodynamic saturation of the primary dissolving phases plagioclase and K-feldspar, as is evident from the difference in propagation rates of the reaction fronts for the two minerals despite their very similar kinetic rate laws.

  5. MINERALIZATION OF RADIOACTIVE WASTES BY FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMING (FBSR): COMPARISONS TO VITREOUS WASTE FORMS, AND PERTINENT DURABILITY TESTING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jantzen, C

    2008-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested to generate a document for the Washington State Department of Ecology and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency that would cover the following topics: (1) A description of the mineral structures produced by Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) of Hanford type Low Activity Waste (LAW including LAWR which is LAW melter recycle waste) waste, especially the cage structured minerals and how they are formed. (2) How the cage structured minerals contain some contaminants, while others become part of the mineral structure (Note that all contaminants become part of the mineral structure and this will be described in the subsequent sections of this report). (3) Possible contaminant release mechanisms from the mineral structures. (4) Appropriate analyses to evaluate these release mechanisms. (5) Why the appropriate analyses are comparable to the existing Hanford glass dataset. In order to discuss the mineral structures and how they bond contaminants a brief description of the structures of both mineral (ceramic) and vitreous waste forms will be given to show their similarities. By demonstrating the similarities of mineral and vitreous waste forms on atomic level, the contaminant release mechanisms of the crystalline (mineral) and amorphous (glass) waste forms can be compared. This will then logically lead to the discussion of why many of the analyses used to evaluate vitreous waste forms and glass-ceramics (also known as glass composite materials) are appropriate for determining the release mechanisms of LAW/LAWR mineral waste forms and how the durability data on LAW/LAWR mineral waste forms relate to the durability data for LAW/LAWR glasses. The text will discuss the LAW mineral waste form made by FBSR. The nanoscale mechanism by which the minerals form will be also be described in the text. The appropriate analyses to evaluate contaminant release mechanisms will be discussed, as will the FBSR test results to date and how they compare to testing performed on LAW glasses. Other details about vitreous waste form durability and impacts of REDuction/OXidation (REDOX) on durability are given in Appendix A. Details about the FBSR process, various pilot scale demonstrations, and applications are given in Appendix B. Details describing all the different leach tests that need to be used jointly to determine the leaching mechanisms of a waste form are given in Appendix C. Cautions regarding the way in which the waste form surface area is measured and in the choice of leachant buffers (if used) are given in Appendix D.

  6. Electrode compositions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Block, J.; Fan, X.

    1998-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrode composition is described for use as an electrode in a non-aqueous battery system. The electrode composition contains an electrically active powder in a solid polymer and, as a dispersant, a C{sub 8}-C{sub 15} alkyl capped oligomer of a hexanoic acid that is electrochemically inert at 2.5--4.5 volts.

  7. Esimation of field-scale thermal conductivities of unsaturated rocks from in-situ temperature data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhopadhyay, Sumit; Tsang, Yvonne W.; Birkholzer, Jens T.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    vicinity of the heat source, and rock temperature exceededand the dry rock near the heat source. The other differencesources, heat transfer takes place through the wet rock (see

  8. Seismic and Acoustic Investigations of Rock Fall Initiation, Processes, and Mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zimmer, Valerie Louise

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    systems  and  rock  fall  source  and  impact  areas,  it  meters  from  a  rock  fall  source  area.   The   success  possible  to  the  rock  fall  source  areas,   spacing  

  9. GEOTECHNICAL ASSESSMENT AND INSTRUMENTATION NEEDS FOR NUCLEAR WASTE ISOLATION IN CRYSTALLINE AND ARGILLACEOUS ROCKS SYMPOSIUM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    INSTRUMENTATION NEEDS FOR DETERMINING ROCK PROPERTIES..Acknowledgements • ROCK PROPERTIES Participant Listing.OF MODELING IN ROCK PROPERTIES EVALUATION AND APPLICATION. •

  10. Parameter estimation from flowing fluid temperature logging data in unsaturated fractured rock using multiphase inverse modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhopadhyay, S.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    have assumed the same rock properties for the entire packed-earlier, among the rock properties (permeability, porosity,However, these are not rock properties and are constrained

  11. Coupled thermohydromechanical analysis of a heater test in unsaturated clay and fractured rock at Kamaishi Mine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutqvist, J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Kamaishi mine. Laboratory rock property tests. Power reactor5.2 Near field rock properties and fiactire geometand hydraulic rock properties, and hydraulic conditions

  12. An Integrated Modeling Analysis of Unsaturated Flow Patterns in Fractured Rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yu-Shu; Lu, Guoping; Zhang, Keni; Pan, Lehua; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    because large contrasts in rock properties exist across thetransitional changes in rock properties argues that lateralthe distribution of rock properties within different units.

  13. On the relationship between stress and elastic strain for porous and fractured rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Hui-Hai

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the other associated rock properties. Important examples ofand/or hydraulic rock properties. We show that theand other rock mechanical/hydraulic properties, and these

  14. SEARCH FOR UNDERGROUND OPENINGS FOR IN SITU TEST FACILITIES IN CRYSTALLINE ROCK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wallenberg, H.A.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to complie and correlate rock properties and preliminaryProject Table 1. Rock properties and project characteristicsof Information Rock properties - Bad Creek area Exhibit 1.

  15. Thermal-chemical-mechanical feedback during fluid-rock interactions: Implications for chemical transport and scales of equilibria in the crust

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dutrow, Barbara

    2008-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Our research evaluates the hypothesis that feedback amongst thermal-chemical-mechanical processes operative in fluid-rock systems alters the fluid flow dynamics of the system which, in turn, affects chemical transport and temporal and spatial scales of equilibria, thus impacting the resultant mineral textural development of rocks. Our methods include computational experimentation and detailed analyses of fluid-infiltrated rocks from well-characterized terranes. This work focuses on metamorphic rocks and hydrothermal systems where minerals and their textures are utilized to evaluate pressure (P), temperature (T), and time (t) paths in the evolution of mountain belts and ore deposits, and to interpret tectonic events and the timing of these events. Our work on coupled processes also extends to other areas where subsurface flow and transport in porous media have consequences such as oil and gas movement, geothermal system development, transport of contaminants, nuclear waste disposal, and other systems rich in fluid-rock reactions. Fluid-rock systems are widespread in the geologic record. Correctly deciphering the products resulting from such systems is important to interpreting a number of geologic phenomena. These systems are characterized by complex interactions involving time-dependent, non-linear processes in heterogeneous materials. While many of these interactions have been studied in isolation, they are more appropriately analyzed in the context of a system with feedback. When one process impacts another process, time and space scales as well as the overall outcome of the interaction can be dramatically altered. Our goals to test this hypothesis are: to develop and incorporate algorithms into our 3D heat and mass transport code to allow the effects of feedback to be investigated numerically, to analyze fluid infiltrated rocks from a variety of terranes at differing P-T conditions, to identify subtle features of the infiltration of fluids and/or feedback, and to quantify the importance of feedback in complex fluid-rock systems and its affects on time and space scales and rates of reaction. We have made significant contributions toward understanding feedback and its impacts by numerical experimentation using 3D computational modeling of fluid-rock systems and by chemical and textural analyses of fluid-infiltrated rocks.

  16. Hot-dry-rock geothermal resource 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heiken, G.; Goff, F.; Cremer, G. (ed.)

    1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The work performed on hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal resource evaluation, site characterization, and geophysical exploration techniques is summarized. The work was done by region (Far West, Pacific Northwest, Southwest, Rocky Mountain States, Midcontinent, and Eastern) and limited to the conterminous US.

  17. Storage capacity in hot dry rock reservoirs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, Donald W. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of extracting thermal energy, in a cyclic manner, from geologic strata which may be termed hot dry rock. A reservoir comprised of hot fractured rock is established and water or other liquid is passed through the reservoir. The water is heated by the hot rock, recovered from the reservoir, cooled by extraction of heat by means of heat exchange apparatus on the surface, and then re-injected into the reservoir to be heated again. Water is added to the reservoir by means of an injection well and recovered from the reservoir by means of a production well. Water is continuously provided to the reservoir and continuously withdrawn from the reservoir at two different flow rates, a base rate and a peak rate. Increasing water flow from the base rate to the peak rate is accomplished by rapidly decreasing backpressure at the outlet of the production well in order to meet periodic needs for amounts of thermal energy greater than a baseload amount, such as to generate additional electric power to meet peak demands. The rate of flow of water provided to the hot dry rock reservoir is maintained at a value effective to prevent depletion of the liquid

  18. Storage capacity in hot dry rock reservoirs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, D.W.

    1997-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is described for extracting thermal energy, in a cyclic manner, from geologic strata which may be termed hot dry rock. A reservoir comprised of hot fractured rock is established and water or other liquid is passed through the reservoir. The water is heated by the hot rock, recovered from the reservoir, cooled by extraction of heat by means of heat exchange apparatus on the surface, and then re-injected into the reservoir to be heated again. Water is added to the reservoir by means of an injection well and recovered from the reservoir by means of a production well. Water is continuously provided to the reservoir and continuously withdrawn from the reservoir at two different flow rates, a base rate and a peak rate. Increasing water flow from the base rate to the peak rate is accomplished by rapidly decreasing backpressure at the outlet of the production well in order to meet periodic needs for amounts of thermal energy greater than a baseload amount, such as to generate additional electric power to meet peak demands. The rate of flow of water provided to the hot dry rock reservoir is maintained at a value effective to prevent depletion of the liquid inventory of the reservoir. 4 figs.

  19. Damage and plastic deformation of reservoir rocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ze'ev, Reches

    Damage and plastic deformation of reservoir rocks: Part 2. Propagation of a hydraulic fracture Seth fracture and fault mechanics, fluid flow in fractured reservoirs, and geome- chanics in nonconventional the development of complex hydraulic fractures (HFs) that are commonly ob- served in the field and in experiments

  20. Transfer of hot dry rock technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, M.C.

    1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development Program has focused worldwide attention on the facts that natural heat in the upper part of the earth's crust is an essentially inexhaustible energy resource which is accessible almost everywhere, and that practical means now exist to extract useful heat from the hot rock and bring it to the earth's surface for beneficial use. The Hot Dry Rock Program has successfully constructed and operated a prototype hot, dry rock energy system that produced heat at the temperatures and rates required for large-scale space heating and many other direct uses of heat. The Program is now in the final stages of constructing a larger, hotter system potentially capable of satisfying the energy requirements of a small, commercial, electrical-generating power plant. To create and understand the behavior of such system, it has been necessary to develop or support the development of a wide variety of equipment, instruments, techniques, and analyses. Much of this innovative technology has already been transferred to the private sector and to other research and development programs, and more is continuously being made available as its usefulness is demonstrated. This report describes some of these developments and indicates where this new technology is being used or can be useful to industry, engineering, and science.

  1. Radiocarbon dating of ancient rock paintings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ilger, W.A.; Hyman, M.; Rowe, M.W. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Southon, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1995-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents progress made on a technique for {sup 14}C dating pictographs. A low-temperature oxygen plasma is used coupled with high-vacuum technologies to selectively remove C-containing material in the paints without contamination from inorganic carbon from rock substrates or accretions.

  2. Life cycle assessment of a rock crusher

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Landfield, A.H.; Karra, V.

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nordberg, Inc., a capital equipment manufacturer, performed a Life Cycle Assessment study on its rock crusher to aid in making decisions on product design and energy improvements. Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) is a relatively new cutting edge environmental tool recently standardized by ISO that provides quantitative environmental and energy data on products or processes. This paper commences with a brief introduction to LCA and presents the system boundaries, modeling and assumptions for the rock crusher study. System boundaries include all life major cycle stages except manufacturing and assembly of the crusher. Results of the LCA show that over 99% of most of the flows into and out of the system may be attributed to the use phase of the rock crusher. Within the use phase itself, over 95% of each environmental inflow and outflow (with some exceptions) are attributed to electricity consumption, and not the replacement of spares/wears or lubricating oil over the lifetime of the crusher. Results tables and charts present selected environmental flows, including CO{sub 2} NOx, SOx, particulate matter, and energy consumption, for each of the rock crusher life cycle stages and the use phase. This paper aims to demonstrate the benefits of adopting a rigorous scientific approach to assess energy and environmental impacts over the life cycle of capital equipment. Nordberg has used these results to enhance its engineering efforts toward developing an even more energy efficient machine to further progress its vision of providing economic solutions to its customers by reducing the crusher operating (mainly electricity) costs.

  3. Sustainable growth and valuation of mineral reserves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adelman, Morris Albert

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The annual change in the value of an in-ground mineral is equal to the increase or decrease of inventories ("reserves"), multiplied by the market value of a reserve unit. The limited shrinking resource base does not exist. ...

  4. Minerals on School and Public Lands

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Commissioner of School and Public Lands is authorized to lease the mineral interests of such lands for development. Section 5-7 of the SD Codified Laws describes provisions for the leasing of...

  5. Mineral Leases by Political Subdivisions (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation authorizes local political subdivisions to lease lands they own for the development of mineral interests, including coal and lignite. A public hearing process is required prior to...

  6. Oil, Gas, and Metallic Minerals (Iowa)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Operators of oil, gas, and metallic mineral exploration and production operations are required to obtain a drilling permit from the Iowa Department of Natural Resources and file specific forms with...

  7. Uranium potential of precambrian rocks in the Raft River area of northwestern Utah and south-central Idaho. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Black, B.A.

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A total of 1214 geochemical samples were collected and analyzed. The sampling media included 334 waters, 616 stream sediments, and 264 rocks. In addition, some stratigraphic sections of Elba and Yost Quartzites and Archean metasedimentary rock were measured and sampled and numerous radiation determinations made of the various target units. Statistical evaluation of the geochemical data permitted recognition of 156 uranium anomalies, 52 in water, 79 in stream sediment, and 25 in rock. Geographically, 68 are located in the Grouse Creek Mountains, 43 in the Raft River Mountains, and 41 in the Albion Range. Interpretation of the various data leads to the conclusion that uranium anomalies relate to sparingly and moderately soluble uraniferous heavy minerals, which occur as sparse but widely distributed magmatic, detrital, and/or metamorphically segregated components in the target lithostratigraphic units. The uraniferous minerals known to occur and believed to account for the geochemical anomalies include allanite, monazite, zircon, and apatite. In some instances samarskite may be important. These heavy minerals contain uranium and geochemically related elements, such as Th, Ce, Y, and Zr, in sufficient quantities to account for both the conspicuous lithologic preference and the generally observed low amplitude of the anomalies. The various data generated in connection with this study, as well as those available in the published literature, collectively support the conclusion that the various Precambrian W and X lithostratigraphic units pre-selected for evaluation probably lack potential to host important Precambrian quartz-pebble conglomerate uranium deposits. Moreover it is also doubted that they possess any potential to host Proterozoic unconformity-type uranium deposits.

  8. Rock Bands/Rock Brands: Mediation and Musical Performance in Post-liberalization Bangalore

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coventry, Chloe Louise

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2009 PolyGram advertisement Coca-cola and MTV contest PepsiNokia, Pepsi, Seagrams, and Coca Cola sponsored rock showsGroup and Brigade Group, Coca-Cola, and the biotechnology

  9. FACTORS IN THE DESIGN OF A ROCK MECHANICS CENTRIFUGE FOR STRONG ROCK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, George B

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1 . Capacit i es of known centrifuges and v proposed SoftSolla I rock mechanics centrifuge r, ---------1~ --- dxB. , (1980), Geotechnical centrifuges for model studies and

  10. anorthite: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Zverina, Walter Charles 1989-01-01 19 Krivaja Konjuh Ophiolite Complex in Bosnia and Herzegovina Addition to Study on Mineral Composition of Metamorphic Rocks CiteSeer...

  11. amphibolites: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    mica... Michie, Joanna 2012-06-07 26 Krivaja Konjuh Ophiolite Complex in Bosnia and Herzegovina Addition to Study on Mineral Composition of Metamorphic Rocks CiteSeer...

  12. Overview of conservation treatments applied to rock glyph archaeological sites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dandridge, Debra E

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rock glyphs, ubiquitously referred to as rock art, are often the most highly visible components of archaeological sites. Such artifacts, therefore, are most prone to deterioration and degradation from human caused and natural elements...

  13. Study of Acid Response of Qatar Carbonate Rocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhaohong

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    of understanding of Qatar carbonate especially Middle East carbonates and the abundance of Middle East carbonate reservoirs is the main motivation behind this study. This work is an experimental study to understand the acid response to Qatar rocks in rocks...

  14. Modeling of crack initiation, propagation and coalescence in rocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gonçalves da Silva, Bruno Miguel

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural or artificial fracturing of rock plays a very important role in geologic processes and for engineered structures in and on rock. Fracturing is associated with crack initiation, propagation and coalescence, which ...

  15. Inversion of seismic attributes for petrophysical parameters and rock facies 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shahraeeni, Mohammad Sadegh

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Prediction of rock and fluid properties such as porosity, clay content, and water saturation is essential for exploration and development of hydrocarbon reservoirs. Rock and fluid property maps obtained from such predictions ...

  16. National survey of crystalline rocks and recommendations of regions to be explored for high-level radioactive waste repository sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smedes, H.W.

    1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A reconnaissance of the geological literature on large regions of exposed crystalline rocks in the United States provides the basis for evaluating if any of those regions warrant further exploration toward identifying potential sites for development of a high-level radioactive waste repository. The reconnaissance does not serve as a detailed evaluation of regions or of any smaller subunits within the regions. Site performance criteria were selected and applied insofar as a national data base exists, and guidelines were adopted that relate the data to those criteria. The criteria include consideration of size, vertical movements, faulting, earthquakes, seismically induced ground motion, Quaternary volcanic rocks, mineral deposits, high-temperature convective ground-water systems, hydraulic gradients, and erosion. Brief summaries of each major region of exposed crystalline rock, and national maps of relevant data provided the means for applying the guidelines and for recommending regions for further study. It is concluded that there is a reasonable likelihood that geologically suitable repository sites exist in each of the major regions of crystalline rocks. The recommendation is made that further studies first be conducted of the Lake Superior, Northern Appalachian and Adirondack, and the Southern Appalachian Regions. It is believed that those regions could be explored more effectively and suitable sites probably could be found, characterized, verified, and licensed more readily there than in the other regions.

  17. Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal Area (Phillips, 2004)...

  18. Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal Area (Ito & Tanaka, 1995)...

  19. Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Ito & Tanaka, 1995) Exploration...

  20. Uranium and its relationship to host rock mineralogy in an unoxidized roll front in the Jackson group, South Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prasse, Eric Martin

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    /Tordilla Sandstone Dubose Deweesville Sandstone Conquista Clay Dilworth Sandstone tion of uran1um bearing solutions to take place. Sandstone is the most common uranium host rock because its perme- ability permits the flow of m1nera11z1ng solutions through... to the flow of uranium bear1ng solutions during mineralization . In addition, the Deweesvi lie contai ns a shaly lens in its middle which is the upper boundary of several ore bod1es ( Dickinson and Sullivan, 1976), including the deposit studied 1 n...

  1. Magnetic minerals produced by magnetotactic bacteria Balzs Arat1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    Magnetic minerals produced by magnetotactic bacteria Balázs Arató1 , Mihály Pósfai1 and Rafal E-controlled mineralization Abstract. Magnetotactic bacteria produce intracellular magnetic minerals that have distinct for studying the biological membrane around the mineral grains. Our goals were to deduce the possible growth

  2. 2011 Minerals Yearbook U.S. Department of the Interior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011 Minerals Yearbook U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey BORON [ADVANCE production table was prepared by Lisa D. Miller, international data coordinator. U.S. consumption of minerals of boron minerals (table 6). World production of boron minerals increased in 2011 to an estimated 4

  3. 2005 Minerals Yearbook ZirconiuM and HafniuM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2005 Minerals Yearbook ZirconiuM and HafniuM U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey of the mining and processing of heavy-mineral sands containing the titanium minerals ilmenite and rutile.). duPont produced zircon from its heavy-mineral sands operation near Starke, fL. iluka produced zircon

  4. 2010 Minerals Yearbook U.S. Department of the Interior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010 Minerals Yearbook U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey BORON [ADVANCE of minerals and compounds reported in boron oxide continued to increase in 2010 but quantities are withheld's leading producers of boron minerals (table 6). World production of boron minerals increased in 2010

  5. Preventing oxidation of iron sulfide minerals by polyethylene polyamines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belzile, Nelson

    processes of sulfide minerals still remains an important issue for both mineral extraction and environmentalPreventing oxidation of iron sulfide minerals by polyethylene polyamines Yu-Wei Chen a,*, Yuerong on the passivation of pyrite and pyrrhotite minerals. Polyethylene polyamines, such as triethylenetetramine (TETA

  6. West Virginia University College of Engineering and Mineral Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    , and extracted minerals. Mine Environment - Designing and operating ventilation systems and controlling methane

  7. A CONSTITUTIVE MODEL TO PREDICT THE HYDROMECHANICAL BEHAVIOUR OF ROCK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aubertin, Michel

    in the presence of water to better assess the stability of rock structures under many situations. The accurate conditions. A rock mass behaviour can also be influenced by the water flow and ensuing pore pressure. For example, a previously stable rock structure can become unstable with an increase of water pressure inside

  8. Sigma Xi, The Scientific Research Society Rock Varnish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dorn, Ron

    Sigma Xi, The Scientific Research Society Rock Varnish Author(s): Ronald I. Dorn Source: American;Rock Varnish Over thousandsofyears,a thincoatingofclay,cementedtorocksbymanganese and iron that appeared "smooth, black, and as ifcoated with plumbago." Indian legends explained that these rocks had been

  9. Technical Note Evaluation of mechanical rock properties using a Schmidt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ze'ev, Reches

    Technical Note Evaluation of mechanical rock properties using a Schmidt Hammer O. Katza, b, c, *, Z, 91904, Israel b Geological Survey of Israel, 30 Malkhe Yisrael St., Jerusalem, 95501, Israel c Rock of concrete hardness [1], and was later used to estimate rock strength [2,3]. It con- sists of a spring

  10. A NEW MODEL FOR PERFORMANCE PREDICTION OF HARD ROCK TBMS.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TBMs. The model uses information on the rock properties and cutting geometry to calculate TBM rate on data collected in the field and is merely a regression between machine parameters, rock properties is introduced to provide an estimate of disc cutting forces as a function of rock properties and the cutting

  11. Apollo Rock Reveals Moon Had Molten Core | Universe Additional Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weiss, Benjamin P.

    Apollo Rock Reveals Moon Had Molten Core | Universe Today Subscribe Podcast Home Additional Apollo Rock Reveals Moon Had Molten Core Written by Nancy Atkinson If you're new here, you may want to subscribe to my RSS feed. Thanks for visiting! Apollo Rock Reveals Moon Had Molten Core | Universe Today

  12. Bitumen composition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halasz, A.; Spinell, G.; Doolittle, D.H.

    1989-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This patent describes a bitumen composition. It comprises: asphalt and from about 1 wt.% to about 10 wt.%, based on asphalt, of an {alpha} -olefin polymer having a molecular weight within the range from about 750 to 5000.

  13. ROCK PROPERTIES AND THEIR EFFECT ON THERMALLY-INDUCED DISPLACEMENTS AND STRESSES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, T.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of laboratory rock property measurements. ACKNOWLEDGEMENT10517 u>ve-'zz&\\--lo ROCK PROPERTIES AND THEIR EFFECT OHin values i for the rock properties for an 1n-s1tu rock mass

  14. GEOL 103 Writing Assignment 2. Rock Cycle 1. How do each of the three major rock types form? Include the source of the material and the rock-forming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, Carl S.

    ? Include the source of the material and the rock-forming process. · Igneous rocks form from the hiGEOL 103 Writing Assignment 2. Rock Cycle 1. How do each of the three major rock types form-temperature (650-1200 °C) melting of other rocks (ign. mmorphic, or sed), following by cooling, possibly

  15. Hydride compositions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, Myung, W.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed are a composition for use in storing hydrogen and a method for making the composition. The composition comprises a mixture of two or more hydrides, each hydride having a different series of hydrogen sorption isotherms that contribute to the overall isotherms of the mixture. The hydrides are chosen so that the isotherms of the mixture have regions wherein the H equilibrium pressure increases with increasing hydrogen, preferably linearly. The isotherms of the mixture can be adjusted by selecting hydrides with different isotherms and by varying the amounts of the individual hydrides, or both. Preferably, the mixture is made up of hydrides that have isotherms with substantially flat plateaus and in nearly equimolar amounts. The composition is activated by degassing, exposing to H, and then heating below the softening temperature of any of the constituents. When the composition is used to store hydrogen, its hydrogen content can be found simply by measuring P{sub H}{sub 2} and determining H/M from the isothermic function of the composition.

  16. Review of the thermal stability and cation exchange properties of the zeolite minerals clinoptilolite, mordenite, and analcime; applications to radioactive waste isolation in silicic tuff

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smyth, J.R.; Caporuscio, F.A.

    1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Silicic tuffs of the southern Great Basin and basalts of the Columbia River Plateau are under investigation as potential host rocks for high- and intermediate-level radioactive wastes. Nonwelded and partially welded tuffs may contain major amounts (> 50%) of the zeolite minerals clinoptilolite, mordenite, and analcime. Densely welded tuffs and some basalt flows may contain clinoptilolite as fracture filling that limits the permeability of these rocks. The cation exchange properties of these zeolite minerals allow them to pose a formidable natural barrier to the migration of cationic species of various radionuclides in aqueous solutions. However, these minerals are unstable at elevated temperatures and at low water-vapor pressures and may break down either by reversible dehydration or by irreversible mineralogical reactions. All the breakdown reactions occurring at increased temperature involve a net volume reduction and evolution of fluids. Thus, they may provide a pathway (shrinkage fractures) and a driving force (fluid pressure) for release of radionuclides to the biosphere. These reactions may be avoided by keeping zeolite-bearing horizons saturated with water and below about 85{sup 0}C. This may restrict allowable gross thermal loadings in waste repositories in volcanic rocks.

  17. GEOTECHNICAL ASSESSMENT AND INSTRUMENTATION NEEDS FOR NUCLEAR WASTE ISOLATION IN CRYSTALLINE AND ARGILLACEOUS ROCKS SYMPOSIUM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Characterization of Rock Masses Structural GeologicalCharacterization of Rock Masses . • • • • • • • • 5.2.1 Structural Geological

  18. Seismic and Acoustic Investigations of Rock Fall Initiation, Processes, and Mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zimmer, Valerie Louise

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Happy  Isles  and  the  1999  Glacier  Point  rock  falls,  there   was   an   attempt   to   monitor   rock   fall   in   Yosemite   Valley  

  19. Evaluation of Used Fuel Disposition in Clay-Bearing Rock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jové Colón, Carlos F.; Weck, Philippe F.; Sassani, David H.; Zheng, Liange; Rutqvist, Jonny; Steefel, Carl I.; Kim, Kunhwi; Nakagawa, Seiji; Houseworth, James; Birkholzer, Jens; Caporuscio, Florie A.; Cheshire, Michael; Rearick, Michael S.; McCarney, Mary K.; Zavarin, Mavrik; Benedicto, Ana; Kersting, Annie B.; Sutton, Mark; Jerden, James; Frey, Kurt E.; Copple, Jacqueline M.; Ebert, William

    2014-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Radioactive waste disposal in shale/argillite rock formations has been widely considered given its desirable isolation properties (low permeability), geochemically reduced conditions, anomalous groundwater pressures, and widespread geologic occurrence. Clay/shale rock formations are characterized by their high content of clay minerals such as smectites and illites where diffusive transport and chemisorption phenomena predominate. These, in addition to low permeability, are key attributes of shale to impede radionuclide mobility. Shale host-media has been comprehensively studied in international nuclear waste repository programs as part of underground research laboratories (URLs) programs in Switzerland, France, Belgium, and Japan. These investigations, in some cases a decade or more long, have produced a large but fundamental body of information spanning from site characterization data (geological, hydrogeological, geochemical, geomechanical) to controlled experiments on the engineered barrier system (EBS) (barrier clay and seals materials). Evaluation of nuclear waste disposal in shale formations in the USA was conducted in the late 70’s and mid 80’s. Most of these studies evaluated the potential for shale to host a nuclear waste repository but not at the programmatic level of URLs in international repository programs. This report covers various R&D work and capabilities relevant to disposal of heat-generating nuclear waste in shale/argillite media. Integration and cross-fertilization of these capabilities will be utilized in the development and implementation of the shale/argillite reference case planned for FY15. Disposal R&D activities under the UFDC in the past few years have produced state-of-the-art modeling capabilities for coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical (THMC), used fuel degradation (source term), and thermodynamic modeling and database development to evaluate generic disposal concepts. The THMC models have been developed for shale repository leveraging in large part on the information garnered in URLs and laboratory data to test and demonstrate model prediction capability and to accurately represent behavior of the EBS and the natural (barrier) system (NS). In addition, experimental work to improve our understanding of clay barrier interactions and TM couplings at high temperatures are key to evaluate thermal effects as a result of relatively high heat loads from waste and the extent of sacrificial zones in the EBS. To assess the latter, experiments and modeling approaches have provided important information on the stability and fate of barrier materials under high heat loads. This information is central to the assessment of thermal limits and the implementation of the reference case when constraining EBS properties and the repository layout (e.g., waste package and drift spacing). This report is comprised of various parts, each one describing various R&D activities applicable to shale/argillite media. For example, progress made on modeling and experimental approaches to analyze physical and chemical interactions affecting clay in the EBS, NS, and used nuclear fuel (source term) in support of R&D objectives. It also describes the development of a reference case for shale/argillite media. The accomplishments of these activities are summarized as follows: ? Development of a reference case for shale/argillite; ? Investigation of Reactive Transport and Coupled THM Processes in EBS: FY14; ? Update on Experimental Activities on Buffer/Backfill Interactions at elevated Pressure and Temperature; ? Thermodynamic Database Development: Evaluation Strategy, Modeling Tools, First-Principles Modeling of Clay, and Sorption Database Assessment; ? ANL Mixed Potential Model For Used Fuel Degradation: Application to Argillite and Crystalline Rock Environments.

  20. Phosphorescent compositions, methods of making the compositions, and methods of using the compositions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jia, Weiyi; Wang, Xiaojun; Jia, George D.; Lewis, Linda; Yen, Laurel C.

    2014-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Compositions, methods of making compositions, materials including compositions, crayons including compositions, paint including compositions, ink including compositions, waxes including compositions, polymers including compositions, vesicles including the compositions, methods of making each, and the like are disclosed.

  1. Phosphorescent compositions, methods of making the compositions, and methods of using the compositions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jia, Weiyi; Wang, Xiaojun; Yen, William; Yen, Laurel C.; Jia, George D.

    2012-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Compositions, methods of making compositions, materials including compositions, crayons including compositions, paint including compositions, ink including compositions, waxes including compositions, polymers including compositions, vesicles including the compositions, methods of making each, and the like are disclosed.

  2. A Phased Array Approach to Rock Blasting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leslie Gertsch; Jason Baird

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of laboratory-scale simultaneous two-hole shots was performed in a rock simulant (mortar) to record the shock wave interference patterns produced in the material. The purpose of the project as a whole was to evaluate the usefulness of phased array techniques of blast design, using new high-precision delay technology. Despite high-speed photography, however, we were unable to detect the passage of the shock waves through the samples to determine how well they matched the expected interaction geometry. The follow-up mine-scale tests were therefore not conducted. Nevertheless, pattern analysis of the vectors that would be formed by positive interference of the shockwaves from multiple charges in an ideal continuous, homogeneous, isotropic medium indicate the potential for powerful control of blast design, given precise characterization of the target rock mass.

  3. THE EFFECT OF IN SITU ALTERATION ON GOLD COMPOSITION AT NYARKAGWE, SUKUMALAND GREENSTONE BELT, NW-TANZANIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to mineraiogical reactions and a change of temperature (initially high and later continuously de creasing of water incorporated In hydrous minerals due to the reaction of hot saline brines with country rock of deposition). Shear zones and quartz veins acted as chimneys for heat release due to hot fluid transfer

  4. One Weird Trick to Stop Selfish Miners: Fresh Bitcoins, A Solution for the Honest Miner.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    One Weird Trick to Stop Selfish Miners: Fresh Bitcoins, A Solution for the Honest Miner. Ethan Heilman Boston University heilman@bu.edu Abstract--A recent result in Bitcoin is the selfish mining incentive-compatible and harmful to Bitcoin. In this paper we introduce a new defense against selfish mining

  5. Low Pore Connectivity in Natural Rock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Qinhong; Ewing, Robert P.; Dultz, Stefan

    2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    As repositories for CO? and radioactive waste, as oil and gas reservoirs, and as contaminated sites needing remediation, rock formations play a central role in energy and environmental management. The connectivity of the rock's porespace strongly affects fluid flow and solute transport. This work examines pore connectivity and its implications for fluid flow and chemical transport. Three experimental approaches (imbibition, tracer concentration profiles, and imaging) were used in combination with network modeling. In the imbibition results, three types of imbibition slope [log (cumulative imbibition) vs. log (imbibition time)] were found: the classical 0.5, plus 0.26, and 0.26 transitioning to 0.5. The imbibition slope of 0.26 seen in Indiana sandstone, metagraywacke, and Barnett shale indicates low pore connectivity, in contrast to the slope of 0.5 seen in the well-connected Berea sandstone. In the tracer profile work, rocks exhibited different distances to the plateau porosity, consistent with the pore connectivity from the imbibition tests. Injection of a molten metal into connected pore spaces, followed by 2-D imaging of the solidified alloy in polished thin sections, allowed direct assessment of pore structure and lateral connection in the rock samples. Pore-scale network modeling gave results consistent with measurements, confirming pore connectivity as the underlying cause of both anomalous behaviors: imbibition slope not having the classical value of 0.5, and accessible porosity being a function of distance from the edge. A poorly connected porespace will exhibit anomalous behavior in fluid flow and chemical transport, such as a lower imbibition slope (in air–water system) and diffusion rate than expected from classical behavior.

  6. Rock Chalk Report, May 7, 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Trouble seeing something? view it online or To unsubscribe, click here or send an email to: unsubscribe- 87@pacmail.em.marketinghq.net. May 7, 2014 Rock Chalk Report The Official Newsletter of Kansas Athletics... an email to: unsubscribe-87@pacmail.em.marketinghq.net. © 2014, University of Kansas. The team names, logos and uniform designs are registered trademarks of the teams indicated. No logos, photographs or graphics in this email may be reproduced without...

  7. Heterogeneous Chemistry of Individual Mineral Dust Particles from Different Dust Source Regions: The Importance of Particle Mineralogy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krueger, Brenda J.; Grassian, Vicki H.; Cowin, James P.; Laskin, Alexander

    2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The heterogeneous chemistry of individual dust particles from four different dust source regions is investigated on a particle-by-particle basis using state-of-the-art scanning electron microscopy techniques including computer-controlled scanning electron microscopy/computer-controlled X-ray analysis (CCSEM/EDX). Morphology and compositional changes of individual particles as they react with nitric acid are observed. Clear differences in the reactivity of mineral dusts from these four different dust regions with nitric acid could be observed. Mineral dust from source regions containing high levels of calcium, such as those found in parts of China and Saudi Arabia, are found to react to the greatest extent. Calcium containing minerals, such as calcite (CaCO3) and dolomite (CaMg(CO3)2), react to form nitrate salt whereas other calcium containing minerals such as gypsum (CaSO4?2H2O) do not react. The importance of particle chemical composition and mineralogy in the heterogeneous chemistry of mineral dust aerosols is definitively borne out in this study of individual dust particles.

  8. Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, M.C.; Hendron, R.H.; Murphy, H.D.; Wilson, M.G.

    1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During Fiscal Year 1987, emphasis in the Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development Program was on preparations for a Long-Term Flow Test'' of the Phase II'' or Engineering'' hot dry rock energy system at Fenton Hill, New Mexico. A successful 30-day flow test of the system during FY86 indicated that such a system would produce heat at a temperature and rate that could support operation of a commercial electrical power plant. However, it did not answer certain questions basic to the economics of long-term operation, including the rate of depletion of the thermal reservoir, the rate of water loss from the system, and the possibility of operating problems during extended continuous operation. Preparations for a one-year flow test of the system to answer these and more fundamental questions concerning hot dry rock systems were made in FY87: design of the required surface facilities; procurement and installation of some of their components; development and testing of slimline logging tools for use through small-diameter production tubing; research on temperature-sensitive reactive chemical tracers to monitor thermal depletion of the reservoir; and computer simulations of the 30-day test, extended to modeling the planned Long-Term Flow Test. 45 refs., 34 figs., 5 tabs.

  9. Gage for measuring displacements in rock samples

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holcomb, D.J.; McNamee, M.J.

    1985-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A gage for measuring diametral displacement within a rock sample for use in a rock mechanics laboratory and in the field, comprises a support ring housing a linear variable differential transformer (LVDT), a mounting screw, and a leaf spring. The mounting screw is adjustable and defines a first point of contact with the rock sample. The leaf spring has opposite ends fixed to the inner periphery of the mounting ring. An intermediate portion of the leaf spring projecting radially inward from the ring is formed with a dimple defining a second point of contact with the sample. The first and second points of contact are diametrically opposed to each other. The LVDT is mounted in the ring with its axis parallel to the line of measurement and its core rod received in the dimple of the leaf spring. Any change in the length of the line between the first and second support points is directly communicated to the LVDT. The leaf spring is rigid to completely support lateral forces so that the LVDT is free of all load for improved precision.

  10. Squirt flow in fully saturated rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dvorkin, J.; Mavko, G.; Nur, A. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Geophysics] [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Geophysics

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors estimate velocity/frequency dispersion and attenuation in fully saturated rocks by employing the squirt-flow mechanism of solid-fluid interaction. In this model, pore fluid is squeezed from thin soft cracks into the surrounding large pores. Information about the compliance of these soft cracks at low confining pressures is extracted from high-pressure velocity data. The frequency dependence of squirt-induced pressure in the soft cracks is linked with the porosity and permeability of the soft pore space, and the characteristic squirt-flow length. These unknown parameters are combined into one expression that is assumed to be a fundamental rock property that does not depend on frequency. The appropriate value of this expression for a given rock can be found by matching the authors theoretical predictions with the experimental measurements of attenuation or velocity. The low-frequency velocity limits, as given by their model, are identical to those predicted by Gassmann`s formula. The high-frequency limits may significant exceed those given by the Biot theory: the high-frequency frame bulk modulus is close to that measured at high confining pressure. They have applied their model to D`Euville Limestone, Navajo Sandstone, and Westerly Granite. The model realistically predicts the observed velocity/frequency dispersion, and attenuation.

  11. Merguerian, Charles; and Ozdemir, Levent, 2003, Rock Mass Properties and Hard Rock TBM Penetration Rate Investigations, Queens Tunnel Complex, NYC Water Tunnel #3, Stage 2: p.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merguerian, Charles

    Merguerian, Charles; and Ozdemir, Levent, 2003, Rock Mass Properties and Hard Rock TBM Penetration Properties and Hard Rock TBM Penetration Rate Investigations, Queens Tunnel Complex, NYC Water Tunnel #3 quantification that the rock mass exhibited an unusually high degree of toughness and rock directional properties

  12. Photoimageable composition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dentinger, Paul; Krafick, Karen L.; Simison, Kelby Liv

    2005-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of photoacid generators including an alkoxyphenylphenyliodonium salt and/or bis(t-butylphenyl)iodonium salt in a photoimageable composition helps improve resolution. Suitable photoimageable compositions includes: (a) a multifuctional polymeric epoxy resin that is dissolved in an organic solvent wherein the epoxy resin comprises oligomers of bisphenol A that is quantitatively protected by glycidyl ether and wherein the oligomers have an average functionality that ranges from about 3 to 12; and a photoacid generator comprising an alkoxyphenylphenyliodonium salt and/or bis(t-butylphenyl)iodonium salt. Preferred alkoxyphenylphenyliodonium salts include 4-octyloxyphenyl phenyliodonium hexafluoroantimonate and 4-methoxyphenyl phenyliodonium hexafluoroantimonate. The photoimageable composition is particularly suited for producing high aspect ratio microstructures.

  13. Photoimageable composition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Simison, Kelby Liv; Dentinger, Paul

    2003-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of selected buffering amines in a photoimageable composition prevents process bias which with conventional photoresists causes designed features to be distorted, especially in corners and high resolution features. It is believed that the amines react with the catalysts, e.g., photoacids, generated to create an inert salt. The presence of the amines also increases resolution. Suitable photoimageable compositions includes: (a) a multifunctional polymeric epoxy resin that is dissolved in an organic solvent wherein the epoxy resin comprises oligomers of bisphenol A that is quantitatively protected by glycidyl ether and wherein the oligomers have an average functionality that ranges from about 3 to 12; (b) a photoactive compound; and (c) an amine that is selected from the group consisting of triisobutylamine, 1,8-bis(dimethylamino)naphthalene (also known as PROTON SPONGET.TM.), 2,2'-diazabicyclo[2.2.2] octane and mixtures thereof. The photoimageable composition is particularly suited for producing high aspect ratio metal microstructures.

  14. Composite material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hutchens, Stacy A. (Knoxville, TN); Woodward, Jonathan (Solihull, GB); Evans, Barbara R. (Oak Ridge, TN); O'Neill, Hugh M. (Knoxville, TN)

    2012-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A composite biocompatible hydrogel material includes a porous polymer matrix, the polymer matrix including a plurality of pores and providing a Young's modulus of at least 10 GPa. A calcium comprising salt is disposed in at least some of the pores. The porous polymer matrix can comprise cellulose, including bacterial cellulose. The composite can be used as a bone graft material. A method of tissue repair within the body of animals includes the steps of providing a composite biocompatible hydrogel material including a porous polymer matrix, the polymer matrix including a plurality of pores and providing a Young's modulus of at least 10 GPa, and inserting the hydrogel material into cartilage or bone tissue of an animal, wherein the hydrogel material supports cell colonization in vitro for autologous cell seeding.

  15. Evaluation of experimentally measured and model-calculated pH for rock-brine-CO2 systems under geologic CO2 sequestration conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shao, Hongbo; Thompson, Christopher J.; Cantrell, Kirk J.

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    pH is an essential parameter for understanding the geochemical reactions that occur in rock-brine-CO2 systems when CO2 is injected into deep geologic formations for long-term storage. Due to a lack of reliable experimental methods, most laboratory studies conducted under geological CO2 sequestration (GCS) conditions have relied on thermodynamic modeling to estimate pH. The accuracy of these model predictions is typically uncertain. In our previous work, we have developed a method for pH determination by in-situ spectrophotometry. In the present work, we expanded the applicable pH range for this method and measured the pH of several rock-brine-CO2 systems at GCS conditions for five rock samples collected from ongoing GCS demonstration projects. Experimental measurements were compared with pH values calculated using several geochemical modeling approaches. The effect of different thermodynamic databases on the accuracy of model prediction was evaluated. Results indicate that the accuracy of model calculations is rock-dependent. For rocks comprised of carbonate and sandstone, model results generally agreed well with experimentally measured pH; however, for basalt, significant differences were observed. These discrepancies may be due to the models’ failure to fully account for certain reaction occurring between the basalt minerals the CO2-saturated brine solutions.

  16. Source rock evaluation, oil-source rock correlation, and kinetic modeling - San Juan Sag, CO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clayton, J.L. (Geological survey, Denver, CO (USA)); Gries, R.R.

    1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, oil and gas shows have been reported in Cretaceous and Tertiary rocks of the San Juan sag, and minor oil production was established from volcanic rocks (Kirby Petroleum 1 Jynnifer well, Sec. 9, T40N, R5E.). Potential source rocks present in the San Juan sag are the upper and lower (including the Niobrara Member) Mancos Shale (Upper Cretaceous). The combined upper and lower Mancos Shale is about 666 m thick and contains between about 0.5 and 5.5% organic carbon, although most values are between about 1.5 and 2.0%. The Niobrara Member of the lower Mancos Shale has the highest overall organic matter content in the section (organic carbon averages <2.0%). Pyrolysis and solvent extraction data (typically 2,000-6,000 and 1,000-4,000 ppm, respectively) indicate that the upper and lower Mancos Shale and the Niobrara Member are all good potential source rocks for oil and gas. Oil-source rock correlations using gas chromatography, mass spectrometry, and stable carbon isotope ratios indicate that the upper Mancos Shale is the most likely source for the oil produced from the 1 Jynnifer discovery well. The source of the oil produced from the nearby Gramps field is less certain, but may be the lower Mancos Shale or Niobrara Member. The hydrocarbon generation history of the San Juan sag is complex because of highly variable heat flow in the area caused by Oligocene volcanism. Sills have caused thermal alteration of organic matter in shales on a local scale, and larger volcanic bodies may have produced proportionality larger thermal effects. More regional heating by larger volcanic bodies is an important factor in the oil generation history of the area. The authors have constructed kinetic models at several locations in the area to estimate the timing and amount of hydrocarbon products generated from the source rocks. The main phase of oil and gas generation and expulsion occurred during the Oligocene.

  17. 12.001 Introduction to Geology, Spring 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elkins-Tanton, Lindy

    This undergraduate level course presents a basic study in geology. It introduces major minerals and rock types, rock-forming processes, and time scales; temperatures, pressures, compositions, structure of the Earth, and ...

  18. Impact of Particle Generation Method on the Apparent Hygroscopicity of Insoluble Mineral Particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, Ryan; Moore, Meagan J.; Petters, Markus D.; Kreidenweis, Sonia M.; Qafoku, Odeta; Laskin, Alexander; Roberts, Greg C.; Prather, Kimberly A.

    2010-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Atmospheric mineral dust particles represent a major component of tropospheric aerosol mass and provide a reactive surface for heterogeneous reactions with trace atmospheric gases (Dentener et al. 1996).Heterogeneous processes alter the chemical balance of the atmosphere and also modify the physicochemical properties of mineral dust particles (Bauer et al. 2004). Organic and inorganic vapors can react with or partition to dust particles and alter their chemical composition (Al-Hosney et al. 2005; Laskin et al. 2005a, 2005b; Liu et al. 2008; Sullivan et al. 2007, 2009a; Sullivan and Prather 2007; Usher et al. 2003). Calcite (CaCO3) is one of the most reactive components of mineral dust, readily reacting with acidic gases. The fraction of CaCO3 in total dust mineralogy displays large variations between desert regions and other regions of the world as well as between individual mineral particles (Claquin et al. 1999; Jeong 2008; Laskin et al. 2005b; Sullivan et al. 2007). Through reactions with acidic gases CaCO3 can be converted to soluble hygroscopic products including CaCl2 and Ca(NO3)2, and sparingly soluble, non-hygroscopic products including CaSO4 and CaC2O4 (Krueger et al. 2004; Liu et al. 2008; Sullivan et al. 2009a, 2009b).

  19. Transformation Composition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drewes, Frank

    Proc. AGTIVE'99, to appear in LNCS Graph Transformation Modules and their Composition ? Frank,knirsch,kreo,kuskeg@informatik.uni-bremen.de Abstract. In this paper, we investigate the notion of transformation modules as a structuring principle. Based on the notion of transformation units, a concept that allows to specify binary relations on graphs

  20. Analysis of Potential Leakage Pathways and Mineralization within Caprocks for Geologic Storage of CO(sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, James

    2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We used a multifaceted approach to investigate the nature of caprocks above, and the interface between, reservoir-­?quality rocks that might serve as targets for carbon storage. Fieldwork in southeastern Utah examined the regional-­? to m-­?scale nature of faults and fractures across the sedimentiological interfaces. We also used microscopic analyses and mechanical modeling to examine the question as to how the contacts between units interact, and how fractures may allow fluids to move from reservoirs to caprock. Regional-­?scale analyses using ASTER data enabled us to identify location of alteration, which led to site-­?specific studies of deformation and fluid flow. In the Jurassic Carmel Formation, a seal for the Navajo Sandstone, we evaluated mesoscale variability in fracture density and morphology and variability in elastic moduli in the Jurassic Carmel Formation, a proposed seal to the underlying Navajo Sandstone for CO{sub 2} geosequestration. By combining mechano-­?stratigraphic outcrop observations with elastic moduli derived from wireline log data, we characterize the variability in fracture pattern and morphology with the observed variability in rock strength within this heterolithic top seal. Outcrop inventories of discontinuities show fracture densities decrease as bed thickness increases and fracture propagation morphology across lithologic interfaces vary with changing interface type. Dynamic elastic moduli, calculated from wireline log data, show that Young’s modulus varies by up to 40 GPa across depositional interfaces, and by an average of 3 GPa across the reservoir/seal interface. We expect that the mesoscale changes in rock strength will affect the distributions of localized stress and thereby influence fracture propagation and fluid flow behavior within the seal. These data provide a means to closely tie outcrop observations to those derived from subsurface data and estimates of subsurface rock strength. We also studied damage zones associated normal faults in the Permian Cedar Mesa Sandstone, southeastern Utah. These faults are characterized by a single slip surfaces and damage zones containing deformation bands, veins, and joints. Field observations include crosscutting relationships, permeability increase, rock strength decrease, and ultraviolet light induced mineral fluorescence within the damage zone. These field observations combined with the interpreted paragenetic sequence from petrographic analysis, suggests a deformation history of reactivation and several mineralization events in an otherwise low-­?permeability fault. All deformation bands and veins fluoresce under ultraviolet light, suggesting connectivity and a shared mineralization history. Pre-­?existing deformation features act as loci for younger deformation and mineralization events, this fault and its damage zone illustrate the importance of the fault damage zone to subsurface fluid flow. We model a simplified stress history in order to understand the importance of rock properties and magnitude of tectonic stress on the deformation features within the damage zone. The moderate confining pressures, possible variations in pore pressure, and the porous, fine-­?grained nature of the Cedar Mesa Sandstone results in a fault damage zone characterized by enhanced permeability, subsurface fluid flow, and mineralization. Structural setting greatly influences fracture spacing and orientation. Three structural settings were examined and include fault proximity, a fold limb of constant dip, and a setting proximal to the syncline hinge. Fracture spacing and dominant fracture orientation vary at each setting and distinctions between regional and local paleo-­?stress directions can be made. Joints on the fold limb strike normal to the fold axis/bedding and are interpreted to be sub-­?parallel to the maximum regional paleo-­?stress direction as there is no fold related strain. Joints proximal to faults and the syncline hinge may have formed under local stress conditions associated with folding and faulting, and

  1. Susceptibility of Granite Rock to scCO2/Water at 200 degrees C and 250 degrees C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sugama, T.; Gill, S., Ecker, L., Butcher, T., Warren, J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Granite rock comprising anorthoclase-type albite and quartz as its major phases and biotite mica as the minor one was exposed to supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO{sub 2})/water at 250 C and 13.78 MPa pressure for 104 hours. For comparison purpose, four other rocks, albite, hornblende, diorite, and quartz, also were exposed. During the exposure of granite, ionic carbonic acid, known as the wet carbonation reactant, preferentially reacted with anorthoclase-type albite and biotite, rather than with quartz. The susceptibility of biotite to wet carbonation was higher than that of anorthoclase-type albite. All the carbonation by-products of anorthoclase-type albite were amorphous phases including Na- and K-carbonates, a kaolinite clay-like compound, and silicon dioxide, while wet carbonation converted biotite into potassium aluminum silicate, siderite, and magnesite in crystalline phases and hydrogen fluoride (HF). Three of these reaction by-products, Na- and K-carbonates and HF, were highly soluble in water. Correspondingly, the carbonated top surface layer, about 1.27 mm thick as carbonation depth, developed porous microstructure with numerous large voids, some of which have a size of {>=} 10 {mu}m, reflecting the erosion of granite by the leaching of these water-soluble reaction by-products. Comparing with this carbonation depth, its depth of other minerals was considerable lower, particularly, for hornblende and diorite with 0.07 and 0.02 mm, while no carbonate compound was detected in quartz. The major factor governing these low carbonation depths in these rocks was the formation of water-insensitive scale-like carbonate by-products such as calcite (CaCO{sub 3}), siderite (FeCO{sub 3}), and magnesite (MgCO{sub 3}). Their formation within the superficial layer of these minerals served as protective barrier layer that inhibits and retards further carbonation of fresh underlying minerals, even if the exposure time was extended. Thus, the coverage by this barrier layer of the non-carbonated surfaces of the underlying rock was reason why the hornblende and diorite exhibited a minimum depth of carbonation. Under exposure to the scCO{sub 2}/water at 200 C and 10.34 MPa pressure for up to 42 days, the ranking of the magnitude of erosion caused by wet carbonation was in the following order; granite > albite > hornblende > diorite > quartz. The eroding-caused weight loss of granite (0.88 %) was {approx}2.4, {approx}5.2, {approx}9.8, and {approx}17.6 times greater than that of albite, hornblends, diorite, and quartz, respectively.

  2. Geochemical and Petrological Investigations into Mantle Minerals from Experiments and Natural Samples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Macris, Catherine Amy

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A. Schauble (2010) Inter-mineral Iron Isotope Fractionationand E. Tonui (2008) Inter-mineral Iron Isotope Fractionation+ (aq) with carbonate minerals. Geochimica et Cosmochimica

  3. Mineral transformation and biomass accumulation associated with uranium bioremediation at Rifle, Colorado

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, L.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    iron(III) oxyhydroxides: effects of mineral solubility andMineral Transformation and Biomass Accumulation Associatedthe accumulation of new mineral phases and biomass. Word

  4. Bone mineral density and fractures in older men with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or asthma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dam, T.-T.; Harrison, S.; Fink, H. A.; Ramsdell, J.; Barrett-Connor, E.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    x ORIGINAL ARTICLE Bone mineral density and fractures inwas associated with lower bone mineral density (BMD) at theKeywords Bone loss . Bone mineral density . Elderly .

  5. Mineral balances, including in drinking water, estimated for Merced County dairy herds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Castillo, Alejandro R Dr.; Santos, Jose Eduardo P.; Tabone, Tom J.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    et al. (1994). TABLE 3. Estimates of daily mineral intake,drinking-water mineral contributionand net mineral excretion in lactating cows on Merced County

  6. Hot dry rock venture risks investigation:

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study assesses a promising resource in central Utah as the potential site of a future commerical hot dry rock (HDR) facility for generating electricity. The results indicate that, if the HDR reservoir productivity equals expectations based on preliminary results from research projects to date, a 50 MWe HDR power facility at Roosevelt Hot Springs could generate power at cost competitive with coal-fired plants. However, it is imperative that the assumed productivity be demonstrated before funds are committed for a commercial facility. 72 refs., 39 figs., 38 tabs.

  7. Adsorption of water vapor on reservoir rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Progress is reported on: adsorption of water vapor on reservoir rocks; theoretical investigation of adsorption; estimation of adsorption parameters from transient experiments; transient adsorption experiment -- salinity and noncondensible gas effects; the physics of injection of water into, transport and storage of fluids within, and production of vapor from geothermal reservoirs; injection optimization at the Geysers Geothermal Field; a model to test multiwell data interpretation for heterogeneous reservoirs; earth tide effects on downhole pressure measurements; and a finite-difference model for free surface gravity drainage well test analysis.

  8. Rock Energy Cooperative | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with form HistoryRistma AG Jump to: navigation, searchRochester Gas &JumpRock

  9. Rim Rock Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ | RoadmapRenewableGeothermalsourceOhio:RigbyRim Rock Wind

  10. ArchRock Corporation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcatAntrim County,Delhi (NCT),Arborview CapitalArchRock Corporation

  11. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Slick Rock

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling Corp -K Le BlondSantaWyomingSlick Rock Slick

  12. Rock Lab Analysis | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt Ltd Jump to: navigation,MazeOhio:Ohio: Energy ResourcesRock Lab Analysis Jump

  13. Rock, Wisconsin: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt Ltd Jump to: navigation,MazeOhio:Ohio: Energy Jump to: navigation, searchRock,

  14. Eagle Rock Geothermal Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489 No revision| Open Jump to:(RES-AEI) |Rock Geothermal Facility

  15. Earth Minerals Did you read chapter 29

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, Gus

    1 Chapter 29 Earth Minerals Did you read chapter 29 before coming to class? A. Yes B. No Lets play that begins in Hawaii Other "Hot Spots" around the world The interior structure of Earth has been determined outer core #12;2 What is different on earth (as opposed to other planets)? Continents Why does

  16. USED MINERAL-BASED CRANKCASE OIL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Used Mineral-Based Crankcase

    based crankcase oil vary depending on the brand and type of oil, whether gasoline or diesel fuel was used, the mechanical condition of the engine that the oil came from, and the amount of use between oil changes. Used oil is not naturally found in the environment. What happens to used mineral-based crankcase oil when it enters the environment? q Used mineral-based crankcase oil enters the air through the exhaust system during engine use. q It may enter water or soil when disposed of improperly. q The hydrocarbon components of the oil generally stick to the soil surface. q Some hydrocarbons evaporate into the air very quickly, and others evaporate more slowly. q Hydrocarbon components of the oil that enter surface water bind to small particles in the water and eventually settle to the bottom. q Hydrocarbons from used mineral-based crankcase oil may build up in shellfish or other organisms. q Some metals in used mineral-based crankcase oil dissolve in water and move through the s

  17. Iron oxyhydroxide mineralization on microbial extracellular polysaccharides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chan, Clara S.; Fakra, Sirine C.; Edwards, David C.; Emerson, David; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2010-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Iron biominerals can form in neutral pH microaerophilic environments where microbes both catalyze iron oxidation and create polymers that localize mineral precipitation. In order to classify the microbial polymers that influence FeOOH mineralogy, we studied the organic and mineral components of biominerals using scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM), micro X-ray fluorescence ({mu}XRF) microscopy, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). We focused on iron microbial mat samples from a creek and abandoned mine; these samples are dominated by iron oxyhydroxide-coated structures with sheath, stalk, and filament morphologies. In addition, we characterized the mineralized products of an iron-oxidizing, stalk-forming bacterial culture isolated from the mine. In both natural and cultured samples, microbial polymers were found to be acidic polysaccharides with carboxyl functional groups, strongly spatially correlated with iron oxyhydroxide distribution patterns. Organic fibrils collect FeOOH and control its recrystallization, in some cases resulting in oriented crystals with high aspect ratios. The impact of polymers is particularly pronounced as the materials age. Synthesis experiments designed to mimic the biomineralization processes show that the polysaccharide carboxyl groups bind dissolved iron strongly but release it as mineralization proceeds. Our results suggest that carboxyl groups of acidic polysaccharides are produced by different microorganisms to create a wide range of iron oxyhydroxide biomineral structures. The intimate and potentially long-term association controls the crystal growth, phase, and reactivity of iron oxyhydroxide nanoparticles in natural systems.

  18. 2006 Minerals Yearbook ZIRCONIUM AND HAFNIUM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .S. Geological Survey from a voluntary survey of domestic operations. Of the 44 operations surveyed, 31 did concentrates are developed by a second voluntary survey of domestic mining operations. Of the two domestic2006 Minerals Yearbook ZIRCONIUM AND HAFNIUM U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey

  19. Sensitivity analysis of GSI based mechanical characterization of rock mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ván, P

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, the rock mechanical and rock engineering designs and calculations are frequently based on Geological Strength Index (GSI) method, because it is the only system that provides a complete set of mechanical properties for design purpose. Both the failure criteria and the deformation moduli of the rock mass can be calculated with GSI based equations, which consists of the disturbance factor, as well. The aim of this paper is the sensitivity analysis of GSI and disturbance factor dependent equations that characterize the mechanical properties of rock masses. The survey of the GSI system is not our purpose. The results show that the rock mass strength calculated by the Hoek-Brown failure criteria and both the Hoek-Diederichs and modified Hoek-Diederichs deformation moduli are highly sensitive to changes of both the GSI and the D factor, hence their exact determination is important for the rock engineering design.

  20. United States National Waste Terminal Storage argillaceous rock studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brunton, G.D.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The past and present argillaceous rock studies for the US National Waste Terminal Storage Program consist of: (1) evaluation of the geological characteristics of several widespread argillaceous formations in the United States; (2) laboratory studies of the physical and chemical properties of selected argillaceous rock samples; and (3) two full-scale in situ surface heater experiments that simulate the emplacement of heat-generating radioactive waste in argillaceous rock.

  1. Department of Mining & Minerals Engineering Graduate Program of Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buehrer, R. Michael

    Department of Mining & Minerals Engineering Graduate Program of Study Name: ID#: Advisor: Graduate Members, with not less than three from the Department of Mining and Minerals Engineering and not less than

  2. african gold miners: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the outline of the country's geology and its mineral deposits. Mali, its geology and mineral resources Country summary Mali, located in West Africa, has a land area of 24 000...

  3. V-215: NetworkMiner Directory Traversal and Insecure Library...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Two vulnerabilities have been reported in NetworkMiner, which can be exploited by malicious people to compromise a user's system. PLATFORM: NetworkMiner 1.x ABSTRACT: The...

  4. aluminosilicate clay minerals: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    used mineral-based crankcase oil may build up in shellfish or other organisms. q Some metals in used mineral-based crankcase oil dissolve in water and move through the s Used...

  5. anaerobic toluene mineralization: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and found in nature as the mineral tincal. Boric acid, also known as orthoboric acid boric acid. The most common minerals of commercial importance in the United States were...

  6. accompanying mineral crystal: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Foreign investment: Coal 45 1 Oil 4.7 6 Industrial minerals: Cement 42 1 Fluorspar 55 1 Rare earths 85 1 Metals: Aluminum 312 Mineral-filled polypropylene: Improvement of scratch...

  7. apatite structured minerals: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Foreign investment: Coal 45 1 Oil 4.7 6 Industrial minerals: Cement 42 1 Fluorspar 55 1 Rare earths 85 1 Metals: Aluminum 166 Mineral-filled polypropylene: Improvement of scratch...

  8. azoto mineral durante: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Foreign investment: Coal 45 1 Oil 4.7 6 Industrial minerals: Cement 42 1 Fluorspar 55 1 Rare earths 85 1 Metals: Aluminum 109 Mineral-filled polypropylene: Improvement of scratch...

  9. articular cartilage mineralization: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Foreign investment: Coal 45 1 Oil 4.7 6 Industrial minerals: Cement 42 1 Fluorspar 55 1 Rare earths 85 1 Metals: Aluminum 304 Mineral-filled polypropylene: Improvement of scratch...

  10. advanced mineral calciner: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Foreign investment: Coal 45 1 Oil 4.7 6 Industrial minerals: Cement 42 1 Fluorspar 55 1 Rare earths 85 1 Metals: Aluminum 174 Mineral-filled polypropylene: Improvement of scratch...

  11. anionic alkali mineral: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Foreign investment: Coal 45 1 Oil 4.7 6 Industrial minerals: Cement 42 1 Fluorspar 55 1 Rare earths 85 1 Metals: Aluminum 444 Mineral-filled polypropylene: Improvement of scratch...

  12. actinide pyrochlore minerals: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Foreign investment: Coal 45 1 Oil 4.7 6 Industrial minerals: Cement 42 1 Fluorspar 55 1 Rare earths 85 1 Metals: Aluminum 192 Mineral-filled polypropylene: Improvement of scratch...

  13. alkali mineral complex: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Foreign investment: Coal 45 1 Oil 4.7 6 Industrial minerals: Cement 42 1 Fluorspar 55 1 Rare earths 85 1 Metals: Aluminum 303 Mineral-filled polypropylene: Improvement of scratch...

  14. activity bone mineral: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Foreign investment: Coal 45 1 Oil 4.7 6 Industrial minerals: Cement 42 1 Fluorspar 55 1 Rare earths 85 1 Metals: Aluminum 325 Mineral-filled polypropylene: Improvement of scratch...

  15. amaro mineral sand: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Foreign investment: Coal 45 1 Oil 4.7 6 Industrial minerals: Cement 42 1 Fluorspar 55 1 Rare earths 85 1 Metals: Aluminum 452 Mineral-filled polypropylene: Improvement of scratch...

  16. aporte del mineral: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Foreign investment: Coal 45 1 Oil 4.7 6 Industrial minerals: Cement 42 1 Fluorspar 55 1 Rare earths 85 1 Metals: Aluminum 118 Mineral-filled polypropylene: Improvement of scratch...

  17. artisanal gold miners: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Foreign investment: Coal 45 1 Oil 4.7 6 Industrial minerals: Cement 42 1 Fluorspar 55 1 Rare earths 85 1 Metals: Aluminum 370 Mineral-filled polypropylene: Improvement of scratch...

  18. agua por mineral: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Foreign investment: Coal 45 1 Oil 4.7 6 Industrial minerals: Cement 42 1 Fluorspar 55 1 Rare earths 85 1 Metals: Aluminum 171 Mineral-filled polypropylene: Improvement of scratch...

  19. adhesionvia template-driven mineralization: Topics by E-print...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Foreign investment: Coal 45 1 Oil 4.7 6 Industrial minerals: Cement 42 1 Fluorspar 55 1 Rare earths 85 1 Metals: Aluminum 90 Mineral-filled polypropylene: Improvement of scratch...

  20. austrian mineral water: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Foreign investment: Coal 45 1 Oil 4.7 6 Industrial minerals: Cement 42 1 Fluorspar 55 1 Rare earths 85 1 Metals: Aluminum 223 Mineral-filled polypropylene: Improvement of scratch...

  1. antimony minerals part: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Foreign investment: Coal 45 1 Oil 4.7 6 Industrial minerals: Cement 42 1 Fluorspar 55 1 Rare earths 85 1 Metals: Aluminum 151 Mineral-filled polypropylene: Improvement of scratch...

  2. Description of mineral major and trace element composition Mineral major elements were determined by electron microprobe at the Vrije Universiteit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simon, Nina

    in garnet, cpx and opx were measured by laser ablation ICP-MS at the University of Utrecht (most samples in Simon et al. (2003). No trace element zonation could be detected with the laser ablation ICP-MS in most, Sr, Nb, Ca) during laser ablation, but some of the analyses were possibly affected by contamination

  3. Velocity and attenuation in partially molten rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mavko, G.M.

    1980-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Interpretation of seismic velocity and attenuation in partially molten rocks has been limited, with few exceptions, to models that assume the melt to be distributed either as spheres or as thin films. However, other melt phase geometries, such as interconnected tubes along grain edges, might equally well account for seismic observations if there is a much larger fraction of melt. Seismic velocity and attenuation are estimated in rocks in which the melt phase has the tube geometry, and the results are compared with results expected for the more familiar film model under similar conditions. For a given melt fraction, tubes are found to give moduli intermediate between moduli for rigid spherical inclusions and compliant films. For example, in polycrystalline olivine at 20 kbar the model predicts a decrease in V/sub s/ of 10% and a decrease in V/sub p/ of 5% at 0.05 melt fraction, without considering inelastic relaxation. Shear attenuation appears to be dominated by viscous flow of melt between the tubes and/or films. For olivine the tube model predicts the increment of relaxation due to melt, ..delta mu../..mu.., to be 0.01 at 0.05 melt fraction. Relaxation of the bulk modulus is dominated by flow between melt pockets of different shape, heat flow, and solid-melt phase change. If melt is present, considerable bulk attenuation is expected, although the relaxation may be observable only at long periods, outside the seismic body wave band.

  4. The US Hot Dry Rock project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendron, R.H.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hot Dry Rock geothermal energy project began in the early 1970's with the objective of developing a technology to make economically available the large ubiquitous thermal energy of the upper earth crust. The program has been funded by the Department of Energy (and its predecessors) and for a few years with participation by West Germany and Japan. An energy reservoir was accessed by drilling and hydraulically fracturing in the precambrian basement rock outside the Valles Caldera of north-central New Mexico. Water was circulated through the reservoir (Phase I, 1978-1980) producing up to 5 MWt at 132/sup 0/C. A second (Phase II) reservoir has been established with a deeper pair of holes and an initial flow test completed producing about 10 MWt at 190/sup 0/C. These accomplishments have been supported and paralleled by developments in drilling, well completion and instrumentation hardware. Acoustic or microseismic fracture mapping and geochemistry studies in addition to hydraulic and thermal data contribute to reservoir analyses. Studies of some of the estimated 430,000 quads of HDR resources in the United States have been made with special attention focused on sites most advantageous for early development.

  5. archaean sedimentary rocks: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    situations, much more dependent on the properties of joints Aubertin, Michel 302 Rock Mining Operation Effects on Water Quality in the Everglades Biology and Medicine Websites...

  6. artificial rock fractures: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    drainage. ISRM 2003Technology roadmap for rock mechanics, South African Institute of Mining and Metallurgy, 2 Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: subsidence...

  7. archean supracrustal rocks: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    interesting than whales's research interests include sustainable transportation, life-cycle assessment, and the national security Zhang, Junshan 164 ELASTIC ROCK PROPERTIES OF...

  8. archean metavolcanic rocks: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    interesting than whales's research interests include sustainable transportation, life-cycle assessment, and the national security Zhang, Junshan 156 ELASTIC ROCK PROPERTIES OF...

  9. acid rock discharges: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    interesting than whales's research interests include sustainable transportation, life-cycle assessment, and the national security Zhang, Junshan 226 ELASTIC ROCK PROPERTIES OF...

  10. alkalic rock: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    interesting than whales's research interests include sustainable transportation, life-cycle assessment, and the national security Zhang, Junshan 120 ELASTIC ROCK PROPERTIES OF...

  11. Elastic properties of saturated porous rocks with aligned fractures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2003-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This unexpected result is caused by the wave-induced flow of fluids between pores and fractures. ..... For non-fractured rock setting fracture weaknesses. DN and ...

  12. average sedimentary rock: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    challenge of interpreting environmental tracer concentrations in fractured rock and carbonate aquifers Multidisciplinary Databases and Resources Websites Summary: are reported to...

  13. altered sedimentary rocks: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    challenge of interpreting environmental tracer concentrations in fractured rock and carbonate aquifers Multidisciplinary Databases and Resources Websites Summary: are reported to...

  14. Poroelastic damage rheology: Dilation, compaction, and failure of rocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyakhovsky, Vladimir

    Poroelastic damage rheology: Dilation, compaction, and failure of rocks Yariv Hamiel Institute December 2004; Published 26 January 2005. Hamiel, Y., V. Lyakhovsky, and A. Agnon (2005), Poroelastic

  15. Reservoir Investigations on the Hot Dry Rock Geothermal System...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mexico- Tracer Test Results Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Reservoir Investigations on the Hot Dry Rock Geothermal System,...

  16. Rock Sampling At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Field Area Exploration Technique Rock Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Northern Arizona University has re-assessed the existing exploration...

  17. AltaRock Energy Announces Successful Multiple-Zone Stimulation...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Announces Successful Multiple-Zone Stimulation of Well at the Newberry Enhanced Geothermal Systems Demonstration AltaRock Energy Announces Successful Multiple-Zone Stimulation...

  18. Lithology and Alteration Mineralogy of Reservoir Rocks at Coso...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of the upwelling plume were investigated using petrographic and analytical analyses of reservoir rock and vein material. The nature of the low-angle outflow zone and the...

  19. Lithology and alteration mineralogy of reservoir rocks at Coso...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of the upwelling plume were investigated using petrographic and analytical analyses of reservoir rock and vein material. The nature of the low-angle outflow zone and the...

  20. EGS rock reactions with Supercritical CO2 saturated with water and water saturated with Supercritical CO2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Earl D. Mattson; Travis L. McLing; William Smith; Carl Palmer

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EGS using CO2 as a working fluid will likely involve hydro-shearing low-permeability hot rock reservoirs with a water solution. After that process, the fractures will be flushed with CO2 that is maintained under supercritical conditions (> 70 bars). Much of the injected water in the main fracture will be flushed out with the initial CO2 injection; however side fractures, micro fractures, and the lower portion of the fracture will contain connate water that will interact with the rock and the injected CO2. Dissolution/precipitation reactions in the resulting scCO2/brine/rock systems have the potential to significantly alter reservoir permeability, so it is important to understand where these precipitates form and how are they related to the evolving ‘free’ connate water in the system. To examine dissolution / precipitation behavior in such systems over time, we have conducted non-stirred batch experiments in the laboratory with pure minerals, sandstone, and basalt coupons with brine solution spiked with MnCl2 and scCO2. The coupons are exposed to liquid water saturated with scCO2 and extend above the water surface allowing the upper portion of the coupons to be exposed to scCO2 saturated with water. The coupons were subsequently analyzed using SEM to determine the location of reactions in both in and out of the liquid water. Results of these will be summarized with regard to significance for EGS with CO2 as a working fluid.

  1. The Link between Clay Mineral Weathering and the Stabilization of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    The Link between Clay Mineral Weathering and the Stabilization of Ni Surface Precipitates R O B E R 19717 The formation of transition-metal surface precipitates may occur during sorption to clay minerals formation are poorly understood. We monitored changes in the reversibility of Ni sorbed to a clay mineral

  2. 2008 Minerals Yearbook U.S. Department of the Interior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008 Minerals Yearbook U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey TITANIUM October 2010, international data coordinator. World production of titanium dioxide (TiO2 ) contained in titanium mineral to be heavily reliant on imports of titanium mineral concentrates from Australia, Canada, and South Africa

  3. Mineralization of Pentachlorophenol With Enhanced Degradation and Power Generation From

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ARTICLE Mineralization of Pentachlorophenol With Enhanced Degradation and Power Generation From Air to completely mineralize pentachlorophenol (PCP; 5 mg/L), in the pres- ence of acetate or glucose. Degradation; mineralization Introduction Pentachlorophenol (PCP) is one of many recalcitrant and toxic compounds found

  4. 2007 Minerals Yearbook U.S. Department of the Interior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007 Minerals Yearbook U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey BORON May 2010 #12, international data coordinator. U.S. consumption of minerals and compounds reported in boron oxide content (tables 1, 5). Turkey and the United States were the world's leading producers of boron minerals (table 6

  5. Mineral formation during simulated leaks of Hanford waste tanks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flury, Markus

    Mineral formation during simulated leaks of Hanford waste tanks Youjun Deng a , James B. Harsh a at the US DOE Hanford Site, Washington, caus- ing mineral dissolution and re-precipitation upon contact with subsurface sediments. The main mineral precipitation and transformation pathways were studied in solutions

  6. King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals Electrical Engineering Department

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Ghadhban, Samir

    King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals Electrical Engineering Department EE399 Summer Tra Advisor Examiner King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals Electrical Engineering Department EE399-Shafie ID: 200669580 King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals #12;2 · TAPLE OF CONNTENT - Introduction

  7. 2011 Minerals Yearbook U.S. Department of the Interior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011 Minerals Yearbook U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey ZIRCONIUM AND HAFNIUM mineral concentrates in 2011, excluding U.S. production, was about 1.62 million metric tons (Mt) compared with 1.25 Mt in 2010. The primary source of zirconium was the mineral zircon (ZrSiO4 ), principally found

  8. 2008 Minerals Yearbook U.S. Department of the Interior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008 Minerals Yearbook U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey BORON October 2010, international data coordinator. U.S. consumption of minerals and compounds reported in boron oxide continued and the United States were the world's leading producers of boron minerals (table 6). World production of boron

  9. MIXTURES OF FINE-GRAINED MINERALS KAOLINITE AND CARBONATE GRAINS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palomino, Angelica M.

    MIXTURES OF FINE-GRAINED MINERALS À KAOLINITE AND CARBONATE GRAINS ANGELICA M. PALOMINO 1, *, SUSAN, Georgia 30332-0355, USA Abstract--The behavior of mineral mixtures can be significantly different from properties of the individual minerals, and their ensuing effects on interparticle interactions and fabric

  10. Ab initio theory of phase transitions and thermoelasticity of minerals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oganov, Artem R.

    Ab initio theory of phase transitions and thermoelasticity of minerals ARTEM R. OGANOV* , JOHN P transitions, equations of state, elasticity and thermoelastic properties of the Earth-forming minerals minerals at the extreme conditions of the Earth's interior. One can accurately predict the structures

  11. 2006 Minerals Yearbook U.S. Department of the Interior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006 Minerals Yearbook BORON U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey October 2007 tetraborate decahydrate and found in nature as the mineral tincal. Boric acid, also known as orthoboric acid boric acid. The most common minerals of commercial importance in the United States were colemanite

  12. Mineralization by Inhibitor Exclusion THE CALCIFICATION OF COLLAGEN WITH FETUINS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Paul A.

    Mineralization by Inhibitor Exclusion THE CALCIFICATION OF COLLAGEN WITH FETUINS Received is to understand the mechanisms that deposit mineral within collagen fibrils, and as a first step we recentlyDa protein are excluded. Based on these observations, we proposed a novel mechanism for fibril mineralization

  13. COLLECTIONS POLICY MANUAL Earth and Mineral Sciences Museum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maroncelli, Mark

    COLLECTIONS POLICY MANUAL Earth and Mineral Sciences Museum College of Earth and Mineral Sciences Manual for the Earth and Mineral Sciences Museum has been developed to standardize procedures and provide guidelines for handling collections. The policies outlined here were established by the EMS Museum Director

  14. Carbon Sequestration via Mineral Carbonation: Overview and Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Carbon Sequestration via Mineral Carbonation: Overview and Assessment 14 March 2002 Howard Herzog overview and assessment of carbon sequestration by mineral carbonation (referred to as "mineral sequestration R&D. The first is that carbonates have a lower energy state than CO2. Therefore, at least

  15. 2009 Minerals Yearbook U.S. Department of the Interior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009 Minerals Yearbook U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey BORON [ADVANCE, and Blacksburg, SC, through Industrial Minerals Inc. (American Borate Co., 2005; Industrial Minerals Inc., 2007 extracted from three salt layers, up to 100 meters (m) deep, in Searles Lake, located near Trona in San

  16. Molecular Characterization of Bacterial Respiration on Minerals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blake, Robert C.

    2013-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall aim of this project was to contribute to our fundamental understanding of proteins and biological processes under extreme environmental conditions. We sought to define the biochemical and physiological mechanisms that underlie biodegradative and other cellular processes in normal, extreme, and engineered environments. Toward that end, we sought to understand the substrate oxidation pathways, the electron transport mechanisms, and the modes of energy conservation employed during respiration by bacteria on soluble iron and insoluble sulfide minerals. In accordance with these general aims, the specific aims were two-fold: To identify, separate, and characterize the extracellular biomolecules necessary for aerobic respiration on iron under strongly acidic conditions; and to elucidate the molecular principles whereby these bacteria recognize and adhere to their insoluble mineral substrates under harsh environmental conditions. The results of these studies were described in a total of nineteen manuscripts. Highlights include the following: 1. The complete genome of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans ATCC 23270 (type strain) was sequenced in collaboration with the DOE Joint Genome Institute; 2. Genomic and mass spectrometry-based proteomic methods were used to evaluate gene expression and in situ microbial activity in a low-complexity natural acid mine drainage microbial biofilm community. This was the first effort to successfully analyze a natural community using these techniques; 3. Detailed functional and structural studies were conducted on rusticyanin, an acid-stable electron transfer protein purified from cell-free extracts of At. ferrooxidans. The three-dimensional structure of reduced rusticyanin was determined from a combination of homonuclear proton and heteronuclear 15N- and 13C-edited NMR spectra. Concomitantly, the three-dimensional structure of oxidized rusticyanin was determined by X-ray crystallography to a resolution of 1.9 A by multiwavelength anomalous dispersion (MAD) phasing; 4. An acid-stable red cytochrome with a novel absorbance peak at 579 nm was purified from cell-free extracts of L. ferriphilum. Functional studies demonstrated that this cytochrome was an important component of the aerobic iron respiratory chain in this organism; 5. The specific adhesion of At. ferrooxidans to pyrite is mediated by an extracellular protein that was identified as aporusticyanin. The adhesion of At. ferrooxidans to minerals was characterized by high affinity binding that exhibited a high specificity for pyrite over other sulfide minerals. The principal biopolymer involved in this high-affinity adhesion to pyrite was isolated by mineral affinity chromatography and identified as aporusticyanin. The adhesion of purified aporusticyanin to minerals was observed to adhere to different mineral with a pattern of reactivity identical to that observed with the intact bacterium. Further, preincubation of pyrite with excess exogenous aporusticyanin served to inhibit the adherence of intact cells to the surface of the mineral, indicating that the protein and the cells adhered to the pyrite in a mutually exclusive manner. Taken together, these observations support a model where aporusticyanin located on the surface of the bacterial cell acts as a mineral-specific receptor for the initial adherence of At. ferrooxidans to solid pyrite; 6. The specific adhesion of L. ferriphilum to pyrite was mediated by a different acid-stable extracellular protein than aporusticyanin; and 7. A prototype integrating cavity absorption meter (ICAM) was assembled to determine whether this novel spectrophotometer could be used to study cellular respiration in situ.

  17. Hard Rock Miners` Phthisis in 19th and Early 20th Century Britain: From Diagnosis to Compensation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mintz, Fredric

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    G. C. (1843). Diseases Of The Lungs From Mechanical Causes;G. C. (1843). Diseases of the lungs from mechanical causes;in all the tissues of the lung, which was firm, solid, and

  18. Development and evaluation of a thermodynamic dataset for phases of interest in CO2 mineral sequestration in basaltic rocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aradottir, E.S.P.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrogen-bonded water in laumontite II: experimental determination of site-speci?c thermodynam- ic properties

  19. Hard Rock Miners` Phthisis in 19th and Early 20th Century Britain: From Diagnosis to Compensation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mintz, Fredric

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    constitutional findings such as gout, eczema, psoriasis ora diathesis. ” 171 In fact, gout, eczema and albuminuria areof nylon hose. Very likely gout was common in his carriage

  20. Hard Rock Miners` Phthisis in 19th and Early 20th Century Britain: From Diagnosis to Compensation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mintz, Fredric

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Press. Section of Industrial Hygiene and Diseases ofp. Unknown. (1893). Industrial Hygiene. The Lancet (Dec. 23,and Unknown. (1893). Industrial Hygiene. The Lancet (Dec.

  1. Geochemistry of selected oils and rocks from the central portion of the West Siberian basin, Russia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, K.E.; Huizinga, B.J. (Chevron Overseas Petroleum Inc., San Ramon, CA (United States)); Kontorovich, A.Eh.; Andrusevich, V.E. (Inst. of Geology, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)); Moldowan, J.M. (Chevron Petroleum Technology Co., Richmond, CA (United States)); Demaison, G.J. (Petroscience Inc., Walnut Creek, CA (United States)); Stasova, O.F. (NPO SIBGEO, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation))

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Six analyzed oils, produced from Middle jurassic to Upper Cretaceous strata in the Middle Ob region of the West Siberian basin, show biomarker and stable carbon isotope compositions indicating an origin from the Upper Jurassic Bazhenov Formation. The chemical compositions of these oils are representative of more than 85% of the reserves in West Siberia (Kontorovich et al., 1975). Bazhenov-sourced oil in Cenomanian strata in the Van-Egan field underwent biodegradation in the reservoir, resulting in a low API gravity, an altered homohopane distribution, and the appearance of 25-norhopanes without alteration of the steranes. High API gravity oil from the Salym field has surpassed the peak of the oil window, consistent with abnormally high temperatures and pressures in the Bazhenov source rock from which it is produced. The remaining oils are very similar, including samples from Valanginian and Bathonian-Callovian intervals in a sequence of stacked reservoirs in the Fedorov field. Bazhenov rock samples from the study area contain abundant oil-prone, marine organic matter preserved under anoxic conditions. While the Upper Jurassic Vasyugan Formation shows lower oil-regenerative potential than the Bazhenov Formation, it cannot be excluded as a source rock because insufficient sample was available for biomarker analysis. Core from the Lower to Middle Jurassic Tyumen Formation in the YemYegov 15 well was compared with the oils because it is thermally mature and shows TOC and HI values, indicating slightly more favorable oil-generative characteristics than the average for the formation (2.75 wt. % for 270 samples; 95 mg HC/g TOC for 25 samples). The core contains terrigenous, gas-prone organic matter that shows no relationship with the analyzed oils. 59 refs., 15 figs., 8 tabs.

  2. The production of consumption: addressing the impact of mineral mining on tuberculosis in southern Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Basu, Sanjay; Stuckler, David; Gonsalves, Gregg; Lurie, Mark

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of South Africa: Department of Minerals and Energy; SouthSouth Africa, various departments, ranging from the Minerals and Energyof Minerals and Energy: Mining and minerals in South Africa:

  3. Clay minerals in the Meuse -Haute Marne underground laboratory (France): Possible influence of organic matter on clay mineral evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Clay minerals in the Meuse - Haute Marne underground laboratory (France): Possible influence of organic matter on clay mineral evolution Francis Claret1,2,* , Boris A. Sakharov3 , Victor A. Drits3 words: Callovo-Oxfordian, Clay minerals, Clay diagenesis, Illite-smectite, Mixed- layering

  4. aggregates rock and stone: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CiteSeer Summary: Abstract. The main reason for usage of crushed stone mineral aggregate is need for concrete construction building with care about environmental...

  5. Minerals Management Service perspective of platform reassessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dyhrkopp, F.G. [Minerals Management Service, New Orleans, LA (United States). Office of Structural and Technical Support

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As a result of the destruction caused by the Loma Prieta Earthquake, which occurred in the San Francisco Bay Area in 1989, and the passage of Hurricane Andrew through the Central Gulf of Mexico (GOM) oil and gas fields in August 1002, the Minerals Management Service (MMS) has been actively developing a policy over the past few years that will comprehensively address the reassessment of existing Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) oil and gas structures. Central to the development of such policy has been the need to develop a procedure by which reassessment can be carried out. This paper discusses the history of MMS involvement in the area of reassessment, their concerns, and how they view the reassessment procedures found in the Draft Section 17, Assessment of Existing Platforms, proposed for inclusion in future API RP 2A Editions. Minerals Management Service procedures for review and approval of proposals to remove and reuse existing structures in OCS waters are also discussed.

  6. Energy and mineral resource systems: An introduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tapp, B.A.; Watkins, J.R.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This book provides a welcome approach to understanding the fundamental role that energy and mineral resources play in the affairs of nations and individuals. Chapter 1 presents background material on energy in the human environment. Chapter 2 deals with historical changes in predominant energy sources, energy efficiencies based on the first and second laws of thermodynamics, potential utility of secondary energy sources, and the distribution of energy reserves among political and economic units. Chapter 3 discusses the methods and pitfalls of projecting future energy demand and technologies of alternative energy sources. Chapter 4 analyzes the projected growth-decline patterns in world oil and coal production, viability of alternative sources, and three possible future energy scenarios. Chapter 5 concludes with methods of energy flow analysis and further discussion on future energy scenarios. Chapter 6 begins by establishing several basic points about mineral resource systems then proceeds with a discussion of consumption-production patterns of metals. Chapter 7 presents estimates of global metal stocks, outlines factors determining metal demand, and examines metal import-export balances and resource potential for Australia and the Pacific Basin region. Chapter 8 highlights current issues that affect the mineral resource industry. Chapter 9 recounts the historical changes in exploration approaches, from prospecting to the utilization of genetic models, specialist teams, and regional geochemical and geophysical surveys. Chapter 10 assesses the implications of the previously noted trends in metal consumption and new technologies and concludes that future energy and mineral resource system evaluations will be according to new strategems and economic criteria.

  7. IEED Energy and Mineral Development Grants

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Secretary of the Interior, through the Office of lndian Energy and Economic Development (IEED), is soliciting grant proposals from federally recognized Indian tribes and tribal energy resource development organizations for projects that assess, evaluate, or otherwise promote the processing, use, or development of energy and mineral resources on Indian lands. Grant awards are subject to the availability of funds as appropriated by Congress and allotted to IEED.

  8. Lubricant compositions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, A.L.; Lawson, R.D.; Root, J.C.

    1981-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Lubricant compositions adapted for use under extreme pressure conditions are disclosed. They comprise a major proportion of a lubricating grease, and a minor proportion of an additive consisting essentially of a solid, oil insoluble arylene sulfide polymer, and a metal salt, particularly an alkali metal or alkaline earth metal salt, particularly an alkali metal or alkaline earth metal salt of a phosphorus acid, for example, mono- or dicalcium phosphate, or an alkali metal or alkaline earth metal carbonate exemplified by calcium carbonate, or a mixture of such a phosphate salt and carbonate.

  9. SEISMIC AND ROCK PHYSICS DIAGNOSTICS OF MULTISCALE RESERVOIR TEXTURES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Mavko

    2003-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of our study on ''Relationships between seismic properties and rock microstructure'', we have studied (1) Effects of pore texture on porosity, permeability, and sonic velocity. We show how a relation can be found between porosity, permeability, and velocity by separating the formations of rocks with similar pore textures.

  10. Fluid Migration During Ice/Rock Planetesimal Differentiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raney, Robert 1987-

    2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    /water reaction, which will depend on the rate at which water can be segregated from a melting ice/rock core. For the liquid water phase to migrate toward the surface, the denser rock phase must compact. The primary question that this thesis will answer is how...

  11. Geophysical detection and structural characterization of discontinuities in rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Geophysical detection and structural characterization of discontinuities in rock slopes (J. Deparis geophysical methods (seismic, electric and electromagnetic) are available to address this problem, differing and geophysical methods for characterizing the rock mass. Section 2 is dedicated to a review of the main

  12. RUPTURE BY DAMAGE ACCUMULATION IN ROCKS David Amitrano

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    RUPTURE BY DAMAGE ACCUMULATION IN ROCKS David Amitrano LIRIGM, Université J. Fourier, Grenoble of rocks is associated with microcracks nucleation and propagation, i.e. damage. The accumulation of damage as strength and modulus. The damage process can be studied both statically by direct observation of thin

  13. ROCK: A Robust Clustering Algorithm for Categorical Attributes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennsylvania, University of

    ROCK: A Robust Clustering Algorithm for Categorical Attributes Sudipto Guha Stanford University/proximity between a pair of data points. We develop a robust hierarchical clustering algorithm ROCK that employs measures that are relevant in situations where a domain expert/similarity table is the only source

  14. Rock to Regolith Earth's Critical Zone on Volcanic Ocean Islands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geist, Dennis

    increases monotonically towards surface #12;Frost creep transport Frequency and depth of freezing event (f in a landscape? (the w question) What governs the efficiency of regolith transport? (the Q question) What lens growth #12;Ice lenses in soils Ice lenses in rock Water freezing in soil and rocks Murton et al

  15. ELASTIC ROCK PROPERTIES OF TIGHT GAS SANDSTONES FOR RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to successfully produce low permeability gas reservoirs. My study links rock physics to well log and seismic data shales to reservoir sandstones. Typically, the presence of gas-saturated sandstones lowers the Vp/Vs evenELASTIC ROCK PROPERTIES OF TIGHT GAS SANDSTONES FOR RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AT RULISON FIELD

  16. Investigations of Near-Field Thermal-Hydrologic-Mechanical-Chemical Models for Radioactive Waste Disposal in Clay/Shale Rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, H.H.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    hydraulic rock properties 25  a variety of rock properties and their relationships to flowmechanical and/or hydraulic rock properties. The theoretical

  17. A comparative simulation study of coupled THM processes and their effect on fractured rock permeability around nuclear waste repositories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutqvist, Jonny

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    European countries. The initial rock properties for the twoinduced changes in rock properties. The purpose of the model3. Some basic THM rock properties Parameter Bulk Density, [

  18. RADIOACTIVE WASTE STORAGE IN MINED CAVERNS IN CRYSTALLINE ROCK-RESULTS OF FIELD INVESTIGATIONS AT STRIPA, SWEDEN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Witherspoon, P.A.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and M. Board. 1980. "Rock Properties and Their Effect onerature dependence of rock properties has been taken intomeasurements of the rock properties we need to understand

  19. Characterization of Spatial Variability of Hydrogeologic Properties for Unsaturated Flow in the Fractured Rocks at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Quanlin; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.; Liu, Hui-Hai; Oldenburg, Curtis M.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    variables and prior rock properties are obtained from theircalibration of rock properties. Zhou et al, CharacterizationLateral variability of rock properties can be seen from the

  20. Injection of CO2 with H2S and SO2 and Subsequent Mineral Trapping in Sandstone-Shale Formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Tianfu; Apps, John A.; Pruess, Karsten; Yamamoto, Hajime

    2004-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) injection into deep geologic formations can potentially reduce atmospheric emissions of greenhouse gases. Sequestering less-pure CO{sub 2} waste streams (containing H{sub 2}S and/or SO{sub 2}) would be less expensive or would require less energy than separating CO{sub 2} from flue gas or a coal gasification process. The long-term interaction of these injected acid gases with shale-confining layers of a sandstone injection zone has not been well investigated. We therefore have developed a conceptual model of injection of CO{sub 2} with H{sub 2}S and/or SO{sub 2} into a sandstone-shale sequence, using hydrogeologic properties and mineral compositions commonly encountered in Gulf Coast sediments of the United States. We have performed numerical simulations of a 1-D radial well region considering sandstone alone and a 2-D model using a sandstone-shale sequence under acid-gas injection conditions. Results indicate that shale plays a limited role in mineral alteration and sequestration of gases within a sandstone horizon for short time periods (10,000 years in present simulations). The co-injection of SO{sub 2} results in different pH distribution, mineral alteration patterns, and CO{sub 2} mineral sequestration than the co-injection of H{sub 2}S or injection of CO{sub 2} alone. Simulations generate a zonal distribution of mineral alteration and formation of carbon and sulfur trapping minerals that depends on the pH distribution. The co-injection of SO{sub 2} results in a larger and stronger acidified zone close to the well. Precipitation of carbon trapping minerals occurs within the higher pH regions beyond the acidified zones. In contrast, sulfur trapping minerals are stable at low pH ranges (below 5) within the front of the acidified zone. Corrosion and well abandonment due to the co-injection of SO{sub 2} could be important issues. Significant CO{sub 2} is sequestered in ankerite and dawsonite, and some in siderite. The CO{sub 2} mineral-trapping capability can reach 80 kg per cubic meter of medium. Most sulfur is trapped through alunite precipitation, although some is trapped by anhydrite precipitation and minor amount of pyrite. The addition of the acid gases and induced mineral alteration result in changes in porosity. The limited information currently available on the mineralogy of natural high-pressure acid-gas reservoirs is generally consistent with our simulations.

  1. 1.4 PETROPHYSICS: Combined Rock and Fluid Character Integration of geological and petrophysical data allows development of a rock-fluid model for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schechter, David S.

    data allows development of a rock-fluid model for upper Spraberry rocks. This study identifies the different rock types that comprise the subject reservoirs, marginal reservoirs and non-reservoir rocks shales, clay rich siltstones and very fine sandstones units uses gamma-ray logs (Fig.1.2-1) and is widely

  2. Estimation of hydrologic properties of an unsaturated, fractured rock mass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klavetter, E.A.; Peters, R.R.

    1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this document, two distinctly different approaches are used to develop continuum models to evaluate water movement in a fractured rock mass. Both models provide methods for estimating rock-mass hydrologic properties. Comparisons made over a range of different tuff properties show good qualitative and quantitative agreement between estimates of rock-mass hydrologic properties made by the two models. This document presents a general discussion of: (1) the hydrology of Yucca Mountain, and the conceptual hydrological model currently being used for the Yucca Mountain site, (2) the development of two models that may be used to estimate the hydrologic properties of a fractured, porous rock mass, and (3) a comparison of the hydrologic properties estimated by these two models. Although the models were developed in response to hydrologic characterization requirements at Yucca Mountain, they can be applied to water movement in any fractured rock mass that satisfies the given assumptions.

  3. Carbonation of Clay Minerals Exposed to scCO2/Water at 200 degrees and 250 degrees C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sugama, T.; Ecker, L.; Gill, S.; Butcher, T. (BNL); Bour, D. (AltaRock Energy, Inc.)

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To clarify the mechanisms of carbonation of clay minerals, such as bentonite, kaolinite, and soft clay, we exposed them to supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2)/water at temperatures of 200 and 250 C and pressures of 1500 and 2000 psi for 72- and 107-hours. Bentonite, comprising three crystalline phases, montmorillonite (MMT), anorthoclase-type albite, and quartz was susceptible to reactions with ionic carbonic acid yielded by the interactions between scCO2 and water, particularly MMT and anorthoclase-type albite phases. For MMT, the cation-exchangeable ions, such as Na+ and Ca2+, present in its basal interplanar space, were replaced by proton, H+, from ionic carbonic acid; thereafter, the cations leaching from MMT directly reacted with CO32- as a counter ion of H+ to form carbonate compounds. Such in-situ carbonation process in basal space caused the shrinkage and breakage of the spacing structure within MMT. In contrast, the wet carbonation of anorthoclase-type albite, categorized as rock minerals, entailed the formation of three amorphous by-products, such as carbonates, kaolinite-like compounds, and silicon dioxide. Together, these two different carbonations caused the disintegration and corruption of bentonite. Kaolinite clay containing the amorphous carbonates and silicon dioxide was inert to wet carbonation. We noted only a gain in weight due to its water uptake, suggesting that kaolinite-like by-products generated by the wet carbonation of rock minerals might remain unchanged even during extended exposure. Soft clay consisting of two crystalline phases, dolomite and silicon dioxide, also was unaltered by wet carbonation, despite the uptake of water.

  4. Evidence for the incorporation of lead into barite from waste rock pile materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    COURTIN-NOMADE, ALEXANDRA

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    into Barite from Waste Rock Pile Materials A L E X A N D R Awithin the waste rock pile resulting from the excavationdeveloped within waste rock pile originated from a former

  5. Full waveform inversion of a 3-D source inside an artificial rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    To, A C; Glaser, Steven D

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of a 3-D Source Inside an Artificial Rock Albert C. To andof a 3-D source inside an artificial rock plate inof a 3-D source inside an artificial rock plate is

  6. Coupled hydro-mechanical processes in crytalline rock and in induratedand plastic clays: A comparative discussion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin-Fu; Blumling, Peter; Bernier, Frederic

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of heterogeneity in rock property (clay content and henceNon-linear) elastic properties of the rock. Biot coefficientNon-linear) elastic properties of the rock including their

  7. Minerals yearbook: Mineral industries of Europe and the USSR. Volume 3. 1990 international review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The section of the Minerals Yearbook reviews the minerals industries of 29 countries: the 12 nations of the European Community (Belgium, France, the Federal Republic of Germany (FRG), Italy, Greece, the Netherlands, Denmark/Greenland, Spain, Portugal, Luxembourg, The United Kingdom, and Ireland); 6 of the 7 nations of the European Free Trade Association (Sweden, Norway, Finland, Iceland, Austria, and Switzerland); Malta; the 8 Centrally Planned Economies of Eastern Europe (the German Democratic Republic (GDR), Poland, Yugoslavia, Albania, Hungary, Czechoslovakia, Romania, and Bulgaria); and the USSR.

  8. Nutrient Composition of Feeds. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gill, Ronald J.; Herd, Dennis B.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ) and phosphorus and sometimes deficient in magnesium, copper and zinc. Potassium is only deficient in droughty, weathered or leached forages. Problems concerning forages and other minerals are not common in Texas. More detailed information on minerals... ------- ---------- ?----- ----1.19 60 Cow 1st Call ----- -? ------~--~----- - -------? ---------- ----- ---- ------ -- ~----- r-- r------ -?Lactating Cow 1.08 55 -----? -? r-----1----- ----- ---- -----? -? ~-----~-- ~------ - Pregnant Heiler .98 so .87 45...

  9. Evaluation of Five Sedimentary Rocks Other Than Salt for Geologic Repository Siting Purposes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Croff, A.G.; Lomenick, T.F.; Lowrie, R.S.; Stow, S.H.

    2003-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), in order to increase the diversity of rock types under consideration by the geologic disposal program, initiated the Sedimary ROck Program (SERP), whose immediate objectiv eis to evaluate five types of secimdnary rock - sandstone, chalk, carbonate rocks (limestone and dolostone), anhydrock, and shale - to determine the potential for siting a geologic repository. The evaluation of these five rock types, together with the ongoing salt studies, effectively results in the consideration of all types of relatively impermeable sedimentary rock for repository purposes. The results of this evaluation are expressed in terms of a ranking of the five rock types with respect to their potential to serve as a geologic repository host rock. This comparative evaluation was conducted on a non-site-specific basis, by use of generic information together with rock evaluation criteria (RECs) derived from the DOE siting guidelines for geologic repositories (CFR 1984). An information base relevant to rock evaluation using these RECs was developed in hydrology, geochemistry, rock characteristics (rock occurrences, thermal response, rock mechanics), natural resources, and rock dissolution. Evaluation against postclosure and preclosure RECs yielded a ranking of the five subject rocks with respect to their potential as repository host rocks. Shale was determined to be the most preferred of the five rock types, with sandstone a distant second, the carbonate rocks and anhydrock a more distant third, and chalk a relatively close fourth.

  10. ITP Mining: Mining Industry of the Future Mineral Processing...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    comminution schemes that take advantage of natural weakness in the rock can improve the efficiency of crushing operations. Models which characterize the fracture and wear...

  11. Boron mineralization in Louann Salt and Norphlet Shale, Clarke County, Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simmons, W.B.

    1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A suite of unusual boron minerals is present in the upper Louann Salt and immediately overlying Norphlet Shale in Clarke County, Alabama. Core samples come from a depth of about 12,000 ft in a well located on the flank of a nonpiecement salt dome. The suite consists of calcium and magnesium borates similar to those occurring in the Zechstein salt deposits of Germany. Well-developed micron-size to millimeter-size crystals were recovered from water-insoluble residue from the salt. The minerals identified include boracite (modified pseudoisometric cubes), hilgardite (prismatic crystal aggregates), szaibelyite (acicular crystal aggregates), and volkovskite (plates, rare prisms). Associated minerals are anhydrite, gypsum, magnesite, phlogopite, tlc, and quartz. Boracite and hilgardite have boron isotopic compositions indicative of marine evaporite deposits. Danburite occurs in irregular nodules up to 2 cm in diameter in the overlying Norphlet Shale. The nodules constitute up to 30% of the Norphlet immediately adjacent to the Louann but disappear within about 1 m from the contact. The danburite appears to be the result of boron-rich fluids derived from the underlying marine evaporite sequence, infiltrating and reacting with the shale.

  12. America's Atomic Army: The Historical Archaeology of Camp Desert Rock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Susan R. Edwards

    2007-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Established in 1951, Camp Desert Rock served as the training ground for America's 'Atomic Army'. For the next six years, U.S. ground troops traveled to the Nevada desert to participate in military maneuvers during atmospheric atomic weapons testing. Nearly 60,000 soldiers received physical and psychological training in atomic warfare. Abandoned when atmospheric testing ended, Camp Desert Rock was dismantled and its buildings moved to other locations. Today, the camp appears as a sterile expanse of desert marked by rock-lined tent platforms, concrete foundations, and trash scatters. Although visually unimposing, the site is rich with the history of America's nuclear testing program.

  13. Nevada Division of Minerals | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRoseConcerns Jump to:Neppel Wind Power ProjectNeutron LogWildlifeMinerals

  14. Mineral Springs of Alaska | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville, Ohio:Menomonee|MililaniMindanao GEPP Jump to:WestReport: Mineral

  15. Selective flotation of phosphate minerals with hydroxamate collectors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, Jan D. (Salt Lake City, UT); Wang, Xuming (Salt Lake City, UT); Li, Minhua (Salt Lake City, UT)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is disclosed for separating phosphate minerals from a mineral mixture, particularly from high-dolomite containing phosphate ores. The method involves conditioning the mineral mixture by contacting in an aqueous in environment with a collector in an amount sufficient for promoting flotation of phosphate minerals. The collector is a hydroxamate compound of the formula; ##STR1## wherein R is generally hydrophobic and chosen such that the collector has solubility or dispersion properties it can be distributed in the mineral mixture, typically an alkyl, aryl, or alkylaryl group having 6 to 18 carbon atoms. M is a cation, typically hydrogen, an alkali metal or an alkaline earth metal. Preferably, the collector also comprises an alcohol of the formula, R'--OH wherein R' is generally hydrophobic and chosen such that the collector has solubility or dispersion properties so that it can be distributed in the mineral mixture, typically an alkyl, aryl, or alkylaryl group having 6 to 18 carbon atoms.

  16. Degradation of dome cutting minerals in Hanford waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reynolds, Jacob G.; Huber, Heinz J.; Cooke, Gary A.

    2013-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    At the Hanford Tank Farms, recent changes in retrieval technology require cutting new risers in several single-shell tanks. The Hanford Tank Farm Operator is using water jet technology with abrasive silicate minerals such as garnet or olivine to cut through the concrete and rebar dome. The abrasiveness of these minerals, which become part of the high-level waste stream, may enhance the erosion of waste processing equipment. However, garnet and olivine are not thermodynamically stable in Hanford waste, slowly degrading over time. How likely these materials are to dissolve completely in the waste before the waste is processed in the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant can be evaluated using theoretical analysis for olivine and collected direct experimental evidence for garnet. Based on an extensive literature study, a large number of primary silicates decompose into sodalite and cancrinite when exposed to Hanford waste. Given sufficient time, the sodalite also degrades into cancrinite. Even though cancrinite has not been directly added to any Hanford tanks during process times, it is the most common silicate observed in current Hanford waste. By analogy, olivine and garnet are expected to ultimately also decompose into cancrinite. Garnet used in a concrete cutting demonstration was immersed in a simulated supernate representing the estimated composition of the liquid retrieving waste from Hanford tank 241-C-107 at both ambient and elevated temperatures. This simulant was amended with extra NaOH to determine if adding caustic would help enhance the degradation rate of garnet. The results showed that the garnet degradation rate was highest at the highest NaOH concentration and temperature. At the end of 12 weeks, however, the garnet grains were mostly intact, even when immersed in 2 molar NaOH at 80 deg C. Cancrinite was identified as the degradation product on the surface of the garnet grains. In the case of olivine, the rate of degradation in the high-pH regimes of a waste tank is expected to depend on two main parameters: carbonate is expected to slow olivine degradation rates, whereas hydroxide is expected to enhance olivine dissolution rates. Which of these two competing dissolution drivers will have a larger impact on the dissolution rate in the specific environment of a waste tank is currently not identifiable. In general, cancrinite is much smaller and less hard than either olivine or garnet, so would be expected to be less erosive to processing equipment. Complete degradation of either garnet or olivine prior to being processed at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant cannot be confirmed, however.

  17. Degradation of Dome Cutting Minerals in Hanford Waste - 13100

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reynolds, Jacob G.; Cooke, Gary A.; Huber, Heinz J. [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC, P.O. Box 850, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)] [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC, P.O. Box 850, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At the Hanford Tank Farms, recent changes in retrieval technology require cutting new risers in several single-shell tanks. The Hanford Tank Farm Operator is using water jet technology with abrasive silicate minerals such as garnet or olivine to cut through the concrete and rebar dome. The abrasiveness of these minerals, which become part of the high-level waste stream, may enhance the erosion of waste processing equipment. However, garnet and olivine are not thermodynamically stable in Hanford waste, slowly degrading over time. How likely these materials are to dissolve completely in the waste before the waste is processed in the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant can be evaluated using theoretical analysis for olivine and collected direct experimental evidence for garnet. Based on an extensive literature study, a large number of primary silicates decompose into sodalite and cancrinite when exposed to Hanford waste. Given sufficient time, the sodalite also degrades into cancrinite. Even though cancrinite has not been directly added to any Hanford tanks during process times, it is the most common silicate observed in current Hanford waste. By analogy, olivine and garnet are expected to ultimately also decompose into cancrinite. Garnet used in a concrete cutting demonstration was immersed in a simulated supernate representing the estimated composition of the liquid retrieving waste from Hanford tank 241-C-107 at both ambient and elevated temperatures. This simulant was amended with extra NaOH to determine if adding caustic would help enhance the degradation rate of garnet. The results showed that the garnet degradation rate was highest at the highest NaOH concentration and temperature. At the end of 12 weeks, however, the garnet grains were mostly intact, even when immersed in 2 molar NaOH at 80 deg. C. Cancrinite was identified as the degradation product on the surface of the garnet grains. In the case of olivine, the rate of degradation in the high-pH regimes of a waste tank is expected to depend on two main parameters: carbonate is expected to slow olivine degradation rates, whereas hydroxide is expected to enhance olivine dissolution rates. Which of these two competing dissolution drivers will have a larger impact on the dissolution rate in the specific environment of a waste tank is currently not identifiable. In general, cancrinite is much smaller and less hard than either olivine or garnet, so would be expected to be less erosive to processing equipment. Complete degradation of either garnet or olivine prior to being processed at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant cannot be confirmed, however. (authors)

  18. Sustainable Water Management in the Minerals Industry 1 SUSTAINABLE WATER MANAGEMENT IN THE MINERALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGuinness, Mark

    Sustainable Water Management in the Minerals Industry 1 SUSTAINABLE WATER MANAGEMENT interest. It arises in the provision of water for Queensland coal mines, where additional water is available via a pipeline from a public supply, and also in cases where recycled or more expensive water

  19. Evidence for the incorporation of lead into barite from waste rock pile materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    COURTIN-NOMADE, ALEXANDRA; SOUBRAND-COLIN, MARILYNE; MARCUS, MATTHEW A.; FAKRA, SIRINE .C

    2008-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Because Pb is one of the most toxic elements and is found as a major contaminant in mining environments, this study aims to identify the distribution of this element in host phases issued from the alteration of mine wastes. The sampling location was a former mine near Oakland, California (USA). This mine was once a source of sulfide minerals from which sulfuric acid was made. The material discussed in this paper was collected in iron hardpans that were formed within the waste rock pile resulting from the excavation work. In most contaminated environments (soils, mine waste), secondary metal-bearing phases arising from alteration processes are usually fine-grained (from 10 {micro}m to less than 1 {micro}m) and highly heterogeneous, requiring the use of micron-scale techniques. We performed micro-Raman spectroscopy, microscanning X-ray diffraction (SXRD), and microextended X-ray near edge spectroscopy (XANES) to determine the relationships between Pb and a Ba/Fe-rich host phase. Micro-Raman spectroscopy suggests that Pb is preferentially incorporated into barite rather than goethite. Results from micro-Raman experiments show the high sensitivity of this analytical tool to the incorporation of Pb into barite by being especially sensitive to the variations of the S-O bond and showing the characteristic bands due to the contribution of Pb. This association is confirmed and is well-illustrated by micro-SXRD mineral species maps showing the correlation between Pb and barite. Microfocused XANES indicates that Pb is present as Pb{sup 2+}, agreeing with the in situ physicochemical parameters.

  20. Reclamation of Land Used for Mineral Mining (Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation aims to provide for the rehabilitation and conservation of land affected by the mining of minerals through proper planning, proper use of appropriate methods of mining,...

  1. Australasian Code for Reporting of Exploration Results, Mineral...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (JORC) Published The Joint Ore Reserves Committee of The Australasian Institute of Mining and Metallurgy, Australian Institute of Geoscientists, and Minerals Council of...

  2. Epithermal Gold Mineralization and a Geothermal Resource at Blue...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Epithermal Gold Mineralization and a Geothermal Resource at Blue Mountain, Humboldt County, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal...

  3. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Minerals: GHG Inventory...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    GHG Inventory Protocols Read the Industrial Minerals Association - North America (IMA-NA) Borates and Soda Ash Sections Greenhouse Gas Inventory Protocol (PDF 75 KB) Download...

  4. Understanding Mineral Transport in Switchgrass | U.S. DOE Office...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    minerals influence the platform (e.g., pyrolysis, thermochemistry) used to produce biofuels from plant feedstocks. For example, high levels of silicon in ash decrease conversion...

  5. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- International Minerals and...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Corp - Bonnie Mill Plant - FL 03 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: International Minerals and Chemicals Corp., Bonnie Mill Plant (FL.03) Eliminated from consideration under...

  6. archaeology mineral exploration: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Archaeology Press emphasizes primary research data and its 172 Oil and Gas Exploration Geosciences Websites Summary: Metals Industrial Minerals Oil and Gas Geothermal...

  7. Earth's most abundant mineral finally has a name | Argonne National...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    clarified the definition of Bridgmanite, a high-density form of magnesium iron silicate and the Earth's most abundant mineral - using Argonne National Laboratory's Advanced...

  8. SpectraMiner, an Interactive Data Mining and Visualization Software...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    we call SpectraMiner that makes it possible to handle hundreds of clusters without loss of information and thus overcome the limits set by traditional statistical data...

  9. Oxygen And Carbon Isotope Ratios Of Hydrothermal Minerals From...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Oxygen And Carbon Isotope Ratios Of Hydrothermal Minerals From Yellowstone Drill Cores Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Oxygen...

  10. atomic minerals exploration: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    method for delineating covered mineralization. Plants are capable of accumulating rare earth elements (REEs) in their tissue, and (more) Bluemel, Britt 2014-01-01 35...

  11. arable mineral soils: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    year (tyr) of magnesium ferrosilicon, and 8,500 tyr of ferrosilicon (Globe Specialty Metals, inc 320 Placement of Mineral Trioxide Aggregate Using Two Different Techniques....

  12. Mineral Association Changes the Secondary Structure and Dynamics...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dynamics of Murine Amelogenin. Mineral Association Changes the Secondary Structure and Dynamics of Murine Amelogenin. Abstract: Biomineralization proteins, present during the...

  13. A Film Depositional Model of Permeability for Mineral Reactions...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to solid-aqueous phase reactions. Citation: Freedman VL, P Saripalli, DH Bacon, and PD Meyer.2004."A Film Depositional Model of Permeability for Mineral Reactions in Unsaturated...

  14. SkyMine Carbon Mineralization Pilot Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christenson, Norm; Walters, Jerel

    2014-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This Topical Report addresses accomplishments achieved during Phase 2b of the SkyMine® Carbon Mineralization Pilot Project. The primary objectives of this project are to design, construct, and operate a system to capture CO2 from a slipstream of flue gas from a commercial coal-fired cement kiln, convert that CO2 to products having commercial value (i.e., beneficial use), show the economic viability of the CO2 capture and conversion process, and thereby advance the technology to the point of readiness for commercial scale demonstration and deployment. The overall process is carbon negative, resulting in mineralization of CO2 that would otherwise be released into the atmosphere. The project will also substantiate market opportunities for the technology by sales of chemicals into existing markets, and identify opportunities to improve technology performance and reduce costs at the commercial scale. The project is being conducted in two phases. The primary objectives of Phase 1 were to evaluate proven SkyMine® process chemistry for commercial pilot-scale operation and complete the preliminary design for the pilot plant to be built and operated in Phase 2, complete a NEPA evaluation, and develop a comprehensive carbon life cycle analysis. The objective of Phase 2b was to build the pilot plant to be operated and tested in Phase 2c.

  15. Modeling dust as component minerals in the Community Atmosphere Model: development of framework and impact on radiative forcing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scanza, Rachel; Mahowald, N.; Ghan, Steven J.; Zender, C. S.; Kok, J. F.; Liu, Xiaohong; Zhang, Y.; Albani, Samuel

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mineralogy of desert dust is important due to its effect on radiation, clouds and biogeochemical cycling of trace nutrients. This study presents the simulation of dust radiative forcing as a function of both mineral composition and size at the global scale using mineral soil maps for estimating emissions. Externally mixed mineral aerosols in the bulk aerosol module in the Community Atmosphere Model version 4 (CAM4) and internally mixed mineral aerosols in the modal aerosol module in the Community Atmosphere Model version 5.1 (CAM5) embedded in the Community Earth System Model version 1.0.5 (CESM) are speciated into common mineral components in place of total dust. The simulations with mineralogy are compared to available observations of mineral atmospheric distribution and deposition along with observations of clear-sky radiative forcing efficiency. Based on these simulations, we estimate the all-sky direct radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere as +0.05Wm?2 for both CAM4 and CAM5 simulations with mineralogy and compare this both with simulations of dust in release versions of CAM4 and CAM5 (+0.08 and +0.17Wm?2) and of dust with optimized optical properties, wet scavenging and particle size distribution in CAM4 and CAM5, ?0.05 and ?0.17Wm?2, respectively. The ability to correctly include the mineralogy of dust in climate models is hindered by its spatial and temporal variability as well as insufficient global in-situ observations, incomplete and uncertain source mineralogies and the uncertainties associated with data retrieved from remote sensing methods.

  16. The Effect of Heterogeneity on Matrix Acidizing of Carbonate Rocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keys, Ryan S.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    pressure. A hydrochloric acid solution is used in carbonate reservoirs, which actually dissolves the calcite rock matrix in the form of conductive channels called wormholes. These wormholes propagate from the wellbore out into the reservoir, bypassing...

  17. Characterizing Flow in Oil Reservoir Rock Using Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holmes, David W.

    In this paper, a 3D Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) simulator for modeling grain scale fluid flow in porous rock is presented. The versatility of the SPH method has driven its use in increasingly complex areas of flow ...

  18. Experimental Study on Rock Deformation and Permeability Variation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ding, Jihui

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of a petroleum reservoir would inevitably induce a rearrangement of the in-situ stress field. The rearrangement of the stress field would then bring about a deformation of the reservoir rock and a change of the permeability...

  19. A Study of Hydraulic Fracturing Initiation in Transversely Isotropic Rocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Serajian, Vahid

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    fractures and also can be used to develop information about in-situ rock properties using failure pressure values observed in the field. Finally, mechanical and permeability anisotropy are measured using Pulse Permeameter and triaxial tests on Pierre shale....

  20. Modeling of Seismic Signatures of Carbonate Rock Types 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jan, Badr H.

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbonate reservoirs of different rock types have wide ranges of porosity and permeability, creating zones with different reservoir quality and flow properties. This research addresses how seismic technology can be used ...

  1. ROCK MASS CHARACTERIZATION FOR STORAGE OF NUCLEAR WASTE IN GRANITE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Witherspoon, P.A.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of an in-situ jointed granite. Intl. J. Rock Mech. and Min.of Groundwaters in the Stripa Granite: Results and Pre­of water through Westerly Granite at temperatures of 100 -

  2. Geochemical Data on Waters, Gases, Scales, and Rocks from the...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Geochemical Data on Waters, Gases, Scales, and Rocks from the Dixie Valley Region, Nevada (1996-1999)...

  3. Drilling Complete on Australian Hot Dry Rock Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The first commercial attempt to create a commercial geothermal power plant using hot dry rock technology reached a crucial milestone on January 22, when a production well successfully reached its target depth.

  4. FREE ROCKING OF PRISMATIC BLOCKS By P. R. Lipscombe1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pellegrino, Sergio

    FREE ROCKING OF PRISMATIC BLOCKS By P. R. Lipscombe1 and S. Pellegrino2 ABSTRACT: This paper. This cycle comes to an end when the block becomes vertical and starts to rotate again about A. Because some

  5. Modeling of Seismic Signatures of Carbonate Rock Types

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jan, Badr H.

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbonate reservoirs of different rock types have wide ranges of porosity and permeability, creating zones with different reservoir quality and flow properties. This research addresses how seismic technology can be used to identify different...

  6. Mimbres rock art: a graphic legacy of cultural expression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tidemann, Kathryn

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rock art abounds along the Mimbres River banks and drainage tributaries reflecting the rich cultural remains of the ancient Mimbres people. The Mimbres are a well established cultural group who lived in southwest New Mexico and northern Mexico from...

  7. Zeolitization Of Intracaldera Sediments And Rhyolitic Rocks In...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Rhyolitic Rocks In The 1.25 Ma Lake Of Valles Caldera, New Mexico, USA Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Zeolitization Of...

  8. Zeolitization Of Intracaldera Sediments And Rhyolitic Rocks In...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sediments And Rhyolitic Rocks In The 1.25 Ma Lake Of Valles Caldera, New Mexico, Usa Abstract Quantitative X-ray diffraction analysis of about 80 rhyolite and associated...

  9. DNAPL remediation of fractured rock evaluated via numerical simulation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pang, Ti Wee

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fractured rock formations represent a valuable source of groundwater and can be highly susceptible to contamination by dense, non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs). The goal of this research is to evaluate the effectiveness ...

  10. Figure 2. Stratigraphic Summary of Ages, Names and Rock Types...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2. Stratigraphic Summary of Ages, Names and Rock Types in the ANWR 1002 and Coastal Plain Area of the Alaska North Slope. Potentially Productive Reservoirs and Plays Assessed by...

  11. Drill-back studies examine fractured, heated rock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wollenberg, H.A.; Flexser, S.; Myer, L.R.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To investigate the effects of heating on the mineralogical, geochemical, and mechanical properties of rock by high-level radioactive waste, cores are being examined from holes penetrating locations where electric heaters simulated the presence of a waste canister, and from holes penetration natural hydrothermal systems. Results to date indicate the localized mobility and deposition of uranium in an open fracture in heated granitic rock, the mobility of U in a breccia zone in an active hydrothermal system in tuff, and the presence of U in relatively high concentration in fracture-lining material in tuff. Mechanical -- property studies indicate that differences in compressional- and shear-wave parameters between heated and less heated rock can be attributed to differences in the density of microcracks. Emphasis has shifted from initial studies of granitic rock at Stripa, Sweden to current investigations of welded tuff at the Nevada Test Site. 7 refs., 8 figs.

  12. Rock Hill Utilities- Water Heater and Heat Pump Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Through the SmartChoice program, Rock Hill Utilities offers rebates for water heater and heat pump replacements. Information on financing for heat pumps can also be found on the web site listed...

  13. Mineral dissolution kinetics at the pore scale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, L.; Steefel, C.I.; Yang, L.

    2007-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Mineral dissolution rates in the field have been reported to be orders of magnitude slower than those measured in the laboratory, an unresolved discrepancy that severely limits our ability to develop scientifically defensible predictive or even interpretive models for many geochemical processes in the earth and environmental sciences. One suggestion links this discrepancy to the role of physical and chemical heterogeneities typically found in subsurface soils and aquifers in producing scale-dependent rates where concentration gradients develop. In this paper, we examine the possibility that scale-dependent mineral dissolution rates can develop even at the single pore and fracture scale, the smallest and most fundamental building block of porous media. To do so, we develop two models to analyze mineral dissolution kinetics at the single pore scale: (1) a Poiseuille Flow model that applies laboratory-measured dissolution kinetics at the pore or fracture wall and couples this to a rigorous treatment of both advective and diffusive transport, and (2) a Well-Mixed Reactor model that assumes complete mixing within the pore, while maintaining the same reactive surface area, average flow rate, and geometry as the Poiseuille Flow model. For a fracture, a 1D Plug Flow Reactor model is considered in addition to quantify the effects of longitudinal versus transverse mixing. The comparison of averaged dissolution rates under various conditions of flow, pore size, and fracture length from the three models is used as a means to quantify the extent to which concentration gradients at the single pore and fracture scale can develop and render rates scale-dependent. Three important minerals that dissolve at widely different rates, calcite, plagioclase, and iron hydroxide, are considered. The modeling indicates that rate discrepancies arise primarily where concentration gradients develop due to comparable rates of reaction and advective transport, and incomplete mixing via molecular diffusion. The magnitude of the reaction rate is important, since it is found that scaling effects (and thus rate discrepancies) are negligible at the single pore and fracture scale for plagioclase and iron hydroxide because of the slow rate at which they dissolve. In the case of calcite, where dissolution rates are rapid, scaling effects can develop at high flow rates from 0.1 cm/s to 1000 cm/s and for fracture lengths less than 1 cm. At more normal flow rates, however, mixing via molecular diffusion is effective in homogenizing the concentration field, thus eliminating any discrepancies between the Poiseuille Flow and the Well-Mixed Reactor model. This suggests that a scale dependence to mineral dissolution rates is unlikely at the single pore or fracture scale under normal geological/hydrologic conditions, implying that the discrepancy between laboratory and field rates must be attributed to other factors.

  14. Composite of refractory material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holcombe, Cressie E. (Knoxville, TN); Morrow, Marvin S. (Kingston, TN)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A composite refractory material composition comprises a boron carbide matrix and minor constituents of yttrium-boron-oxygen-carbon phases uniformly distributed throughout the boron carbide matrix.

  15. Composite of refractory material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holcombe, C.E.; Morrow, M.S.

    1994-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A composite refractory material composition comprises a boron carbide matrix and minor constituents of yttrium-boron-oxygen-carbon phases uniformly distributed throughout the boron carbide matrix.

  16. Rock glacier monitoring with low-cost GPS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    moving stations on rock glacier Low-cost L1 GPS receivers (blox) Power source: solar panels Local data Rock glacier GPS antennaGPS antenna Solar panelSolar panel Box incl.Box incl. -GPS receiverData logger Instruments Solar panelSolar panel (24W, 12V, 50x50cm)(24W, 12V, 50x50cm) Costs per station: 2

  17. Reservoir rock-property calculations from thin section measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sneed, David Richard

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    RESERVOIR ROCK-PROPERTY CALCULATIONS FROM THIN SECTION MEASUREMENTS A Thesis by DAVID RICHARD SNEED Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE August 1988 Major Subject: Geology RESERVOIR ROCK-PROPERTY CALCULATIONS FROM THIN SECTION MEASUREMENTS A Thesis by DAVID RICHARD SNEED Approved as to style and content by: Robert R. Berg (Chair of Committee) ~ c(. Thomas T. Tieh (Member...

  18. Characterization and mischaracterization of authigenic magnesium-bearing minerals: Examples from Norphlet Sandstone, Alabama, Florida, and Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kugler, R.L. (Geological Survey of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States))

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Jurassic Norphlet sandstones are significant gas, condensate, and carbon dioxide reservoirs in the eastern Gulf Coast region. Diagenetic factors affecting the quality of these reservoirs are variable at microscopic to megascopic scales. Major authigenic components of the reservoirs include quartz, albite, K-feldspar, a variety of carbonate minerals, anhydrite, pyrite, illite, and chlorite; minor components include zeolite, tourmaline, apatite, and anatase. Although the diagenetic character of Norphlet sandstone has been intensely investigated, diagenetic pathways and the origin of porosity remain controversial. Characterization of chemically variable authigenic minerals is crucial to understanding fluid migration pathways and rock-water interactions. Detailed polarized-light and electron microscopy, energy- and wavelength-dispersion X-ray microanalysis, and X-ray diffractometry reveal that common authigenic Mg-bearing minerals in Norphlet reservoirs have been overlooked or improperly chemically characterized. Breunnerite has not been identified by other investigators, although it is abundant in cores from some wells. Authigenic chlorite, which is widespread in offshore reservoirs, commonly has been described as being Fe-rich, whereas electron probe microanalyses indicate that this chlorite is Mg-rich. Qualitative chemical characterization of authigenic minerals commonly is determined by EDX analysis during routine observation of textural relationships with a SEM. This type of analysis typically is performed with little regard for beam-sample-detector geometric relationships and other operational parameters. Peak intensities on EDX spectra collected using a lower electron beam potential (10 kV) more closely reflect proportions of Mg and Fe in breunnerite and chlorite. Thus, SEM operating parameters should be carefully considered, even for qualitative chemical analysis.

  19. Estimating seismic velocities at ultrasonic frequencies in partially saturated rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mavko, G.; Nolen-Hoeksema, R. (Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Geophysics)

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Seismic velocities in rocks at ultrasonic frequencies depend not only on the degree of saturation but also on the distribution of the fluid phase at various scales within the pore space. Two scales of saturation heterogeneity are important: (1) saturation differences between thin compliant pores and larger stiffer pores, and (2) differences between saturated patches and undersaturated patches at a scale much larger than any pore. The authors propose a formalism for predicting the range of velocities in partially saturated rocks that avoids assuming idealized pore shapes by using measured dry rock velocity versus pressure and dry rock porosity versus pressure. The pressure dependence contains all of the necessary information about the distribution of pore compliance for estimating effects of saturation at the finest scales where small amounts of fluid in the thinnest, most compliant parts of the pore space stiffen the rock in both compression and shear (increasing both P- and S-wave velocities) in approximately the same way that confining pressure stiffens the rock by closing the compliant pores. Large-scale saturation patches tend to increase only the high-frequency bulk modulus by amounts roughly proportional to the saturation. The pore-scale effects will be most important at laboratory and logging frequencies when pore-scale pore pressure gradients are unrelaxed. The patchy-saturation effects can persist even at seismic field frequencies if the patch sizes are sufficiently large and the diffusivities are sufficiently low for the larger-scale pressure gradients to be unrelaxed.

  20. composition of putative oceans on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Treiman, Allan H.

    point · Warm/hot ocean · Water-saturated atmosphere · Consumption of liquid water · hydration: continents and oceans Hot oceanic water Quartz Hydrated, oxidized rock Partially altered rock Unaltered rock · CO2, ~0.3-0.9 (volume fraction) · H2O, ~0.01-0.6 · N2, ~0.02-0.15 · High temperature corresponds