Sample records for rochester regional optics

  1. Clean Cities: Genesee Region Clean Communities (Rochester) coalition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z CPlasma0 12Denver Metro CleanGenesee Region Clean

  2. Visualizing the Optical Interaction Tensor of a Gold Nanoparticle Pair

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Novotny, Lukas

    Visualizing the Optical Interaction Tensor of a Gold Nanoparticle Pair Bradley Deutsch, Rainer Hillenbrand,,§ and Lukas Novotny*, Institute of Optics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627, Basque Foundation for Science, 48011 Bilbao, Spain ABSTRACT The control of optical fields

  3. Optic Ataxia: From Balint's Syndrome to the Parietal Reach Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andersen, Richard

    Neuron Review Optic Ataxia: From Balint's Syndrome to the Parietal Reach Region Richard A. Andersen@vis.caltech.edu http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuron.2014.02.025 Optic ataxia is a high-order deficit in reaching's syndrome that also includes attentional and gaze disorders. Aspects of optic ataxia are misreaching

  4. Rochester Public Utilities- Solar Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Rochester Public Utilities provides incentives for residential and commercial customers to install photovoltaic (PV) and solar water heating systems. Qualifying PV systems can earn $1 per watt...

  5. Optical properties of the mouse eye Ying Geng,1,2,*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Optical properties of the mouse eye Ying Geng,1,2,* Lee Anne Schery,1 Robin Sharma,1,2 Alfredo, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, 14627, USA 2 The Institute of Optics, University of Rochester indicate that the optical quality of the mouse eye assessed by measurement of its aberrations is remarkably

  6. UNIVERSITY OF ROCHESTER AND RELATED ENTITIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    statements, the University acquired F.F. Thompson Health System, Inc. effective August 31, 2012 and accountedUNIVERSITY OF ROCHESTER AND RELATED ENTITIES Consolidated Financial Statements June 30, 2013 and 2012 #12;UNIVERSITY OF ROCHESTER AND RELATED ENTITIES Consolidated Financial Statements June 30, 2013

  7. Optimizing Spectral Color Reproduction in Multiprimary Digital David Long, Mark D. Fairchild; Munsell Color Science Laboratory, Rochester Institute of Technology; Rochester, NY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fairchild, Mark D.

    . Fairchild; Munsell Color Science Laboratory, Rochester Institute of Technology; Rochester, NY Abstract of constructing an abridged spectral reproduction display environment from P3 digital cinema-based displays

  8. ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH & SAFETY University of Rochester

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Portman, Douglas

    contain finish materials that are wood or combustible products. Doors, flooring, paneling, trim://www.safety.rochester.edu/fire/pdf/flammabilityguideline.pdf c. The materials used in furniture upholstery and mattresses can be extremely combustible. Various materials used on floors and walls of buildings are designed to reduce the generation of smoke, heat, flames

  9. Bio-Optical Response and Coupling with Physical Processes in the Lombok Strait Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boss, Emmanuel S.

    Bio-Optical Response and Coupling with Physical Processes in the Lombok Strait Region Burton H.boss@maine.edu ABSTRACT The optical structure and variability of the Lombok Straits region is poorly understood, but available remotely sensed ocean color indicates that there is a strong optical response and signal

  10. Rochester Public Utilities- Residential Conserve and Save Rebate

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Rochester Public Utilities (RPU) offers incentives to residential customers for installing energy-efficient equipment in participating homes through the Conserve and Save Rebate Program. These...

  11. Speaker: Professor Allan Greenleaf, University of Rochester Title ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1910-70-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Feb 27, 2007 ... Speaker: Professor Allan Greenleaf, University of Rochester. Title: “An FIO Calculus for Seismic Imaging, or Hunting for Oil with Folds.

  12. Rochester Public Utilities | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with form HistoryRistma AG Jump to: navigation, searchRochester Gas &Jump

  13. Rochester Gas and Electric | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ |Rippey Jump to: navigation, searchRobbins CornRochester Gas

  14. Rochester, Minnesota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ |Rippey Jump to: navigation, searchRobbins CornRochester

  15. Fermilab Today | University of Rochester Profile

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.New Mexico Feb. 13, 2013 NAME: University of NewRochester May 21,

  16. University of Rochester | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved:AdministrationAnalysisDarby Dietrich5 | NUMBER643 DOEof Rochester |

  17. INTERNATIONAL SERVICES OFFICE UNIVERSITY OF ROCHESTER 213 Morey Hall, Box 270446, Rochester, NY 14627 Phone: (585) 275-2866 Fax: (585) 276-2943

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahon, Bradford Z.

    to your University funding, certification from your academic program is required, by signature below: $ Funding Sources University Funding (signature required): Non-University Funding Scholarship: $ PersonalINTERNATIONAL SERVICES OFFICE UNIVERSITY OF ROCHESTER 213 Morey Hall, Box 270446, Rochester, NY

  18. Office for Residential Life & Housing Services University of Rochester

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cantlon, Jessica F.

    Office for Residential Life & Housing Services University of Rochester RESIDENT ADVISOR POSITION DESCRIPTION Resident Advisors help build healthy and inclusive residential communities that complement and extend classroom learning. RAs are expected to create intellectually active residential environments

  19. 3D optical tomography in the presence of void regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lorenzo, Jorge Ripoll

    reconstruction scheme for optical tomography based on the equation of radiative transfer," Med. Phys. 26 1698 and F. W¨ubbeling, Mathematical Methods in Image Reconstruction (SIAM, Philadel- phia, 2001). 15. J. Sch

  20. University of Rochester Medical Center / Saunders Research Building Entrance to Saunders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Steven A.

    Building 265 Crittenden Boulevard From Syracuse and the East NYS Thruway (I-90 West) to Exit 46 (RochesterUniversity of Rochester Medical Center / Saunders Research Building Visitor Parking Entrance to Saunders Research Building New York State Thruway University of Rochester Medical Center Enlarged Detail

  1. Obama Administration Announces $20 Million for 10 Public-Private...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Forestry, and Onondaga Community College. (1,889,890) New York: Rochester Regional Optics, Photonics, and Imaging Accelerator, a project of the University of Rochester, NYSTAR,...

  2. University of Rochester Medical Center Advancement Major Gifts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Portman, Douglas

    University of Rochester Medical Center Advancement Major Gifts Major Gift Officer, Neuromedicine, Medical Center department faculty and chairs, University Advancement Major Gift Officers and the overall medical center advancement team. The Director is expected to be a full and active member of the Major Gift

  3. Rochester's plan to downgrade mathematics: a recipe for disaster?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mar 1, 1996 ... U. of Rochester Plan to Cut Mathematics Is Recipe for Disaster ... Four graduate programs are to be terminated: mathematics, chemical engineering, comparative ... chemists, computer scientists, economists, physicists, and others. ... in their fields increasingly depend on sophisticated mathematical methods, ...

  4. "Skin Cancer-What to Look For" Rochester Recreation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Steven A.

    "Skin Cancer- What to Look For" Rochester Recreation Club for the Deaf May 20, 2010 #12;Supporters for the Deaf ("REAP") #12;Overview Skin Overview What is skin cancer? Who is at risk? How common is skin cancer? Signs of skin cancer Prevention Treatments #12;Skin Overview Skin is the largest organ in your body

  5. Glenn D. Boreman College of Optics & Photonics/CREOL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zanibbi, Richard

    Glenn D. Boreman College of Optics & Photonics/CREOL University of Central Florida Orlando, FL Glenn D. Boreman is Trustee Chair Professor of Optics at University of Central Florida, CREOL. He received a BS in optics from the University of Rochester, and a PhD in optics from the University

  6. Curriculum, Admissions, & Contact Information on Back Rochester Institute of Technology offers Masters and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zanibbi, Richard

    Curriculum, Admissions, & Contact Information on Back Rochester Institute of Technology offers in digital imaging, color instrumentation, colorant formulation, and basic & applied research. Employers

  7. Rochester Gas & Electric Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with form HistoryRistma AG Jump to: navigation, searchRochester Gas &

  8. Rochester Hills, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with form HistoryRistma AG Jump to: navigation, searchRochester Gas &Jump to:

  9. EA-160 Rochester Gas and Electric Corporation | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015 Business42.1Energy |Final Site-Wide EnvironmentalY-12Williams EnergyRochester

  10. Rochester Gas & Electric Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt Ltd Jump to: navigation,MazeOhio: EnergyTennessee:Rochelle, Georgia:Rochester

  11. University of Rochester Medical Center Advancement Director for Advancement and Alumni Relations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Portman, Douglas

    University of Rochester Medical Center Advancement Director for Advancement 58 Overview: Reporting to the Sr. Assistant Vice President for Medical Center Advancement for Academic Programs (SAVP), the Director of Advancement

  12. Large optical cavity AlGaAs injection lasers with multiple active regions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katz, J.; Bar-Chaim, N.; Margalit, S.; Yariv, A.

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new type of AlGaAs injection laser is described. The structure consists of alternating p- and n-type layers of GaAs and Al/sub x/ Ga/sub 1-x/As . The electrical mode of operation of the device is that of a Shockley diode (SCR). Optically the device operates as a large optical cavity. Single transverse mode operation was observed with optical cavities larger than 4 ..mu..m.

  13. Navy Prototype Optical Interferometer Imaging of Line Emission Regions of beta Lyrae Using Differential Phase Referencing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. R. Schmitt; T. A. Pauls; C. Tycner; J. T. Armstrong; R. T. Zavala; J. A. Benson; G. C. Gilbreath; R. B. Hindsley; D. J. Hutter; K. J. Johnston; A. M. Jorgensen; D. Mozurkewich

    2008-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of an experiment to image the interacting binary star beta Lyrae with data from the Navy Prototype Optical Interferometer (NPOI), using a differential phase technique to correct for the effects of the instrument and atmosphere on the interferometer phases. We take advantage of the fact that the visual primary of beta Lyrae and the visibility calibrator we used are both nearly unresolved and nearly centrally symmetric, and consequently have interferometric phases near zero. We used this property to detect and correct for the effects of the instrument and atmosphere on the phases of beta Lyrae and to obtain differential phases in the channel containing the Halpha emission line. Combining the Halpha-channel phases with information about the line strength, we recovered complex visibilities and imaged the Halpha emission using standard radio interferometry methods. We find that the results from our differential phase technique are consistent with those obtained from a more-standard analysis using squared visibilities (V^2's). Our images show the position of the Halpha emitting regions relative to the continuum photocenter as a function of orbital phase and indicate that the major axis of the orbit is oriented along p.a.=248.8+/-1.7 deg. The orbit is smaller than previously predicted, a discrepancy that can be alleviated if we assume that the system is at a larger distance from us, or that the contribution of the stellar continuum to the Halpha channel is larger than estimated. Finally, we also detected a differential phase signal in the channels containing HeI emission lines at 587.6 and 706.5nm, with orbital behavior different from that of the Halpha, indicating that it originates from a different part of this interacting system.

  14. Magneto-Optical Cooling of Atoms Mark G. Raizen1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raizen, Mark G.

    , it was not clear how to optimally integrate the above techniques, and a direct comparison with laser coolingMagneto-Optical Cooling of Atoms Mark G. Raizen1 , Dmitry Budker2,3 , Simon Rochester3 , Julia, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel Abstract We propose an alternative method to laser cooling

  15. From HEALTH TOPICS on the UHS Web site www.rochester.edu/uhs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahon, Bradford Z.

    From HEALTH TOPICS on the UHS Web site www.rochester.edu/uhs Common Cold ­ Self Care (Cough, Fever cold symptoms. Colds are spread from person to person through coughs, sneezes, and mucus on a person Below are recommendations for self-care for four of the most common cold symptoms ­ fever, cough, sore

  16. University of Rochester Model Non-Exclusive Patent License revised 11-08-2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    University of Rochester Model Non-Exclusive Patent License revised 11-08-2013 DRAFT DATED__________ FOR DISCUSSION PURPOSES ONLY NON EXCLUSIVE PATENT LICENSE AGREEMENT This agreement (hereinafter "Agreement, University is the owner by assignment of the Patent Rights as defined below. 1.2 University desires

  17. Rising Leader Program (RLP) Mentor Application http://www.rochester.edu/college/rccl/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahon, Bradford Z.

    Rising Leader Program (RLP) Mentor Application http://www.rochester.edu/college/rccl/ Program students are cultivated into dedicated leaders. Rising Leader Program Mentor Job Description Establishing a mentoring relationship is an essential attribute of any leader and therefore an integral component

  18. University of Rochester, University Health Service Eastman Institute for Oral Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cantlon, Jessica F.

    University of Rochester, University Health Service Eastman Institute for Oral Health Health line.) 1. Aetna Student Health for the individual. Total = $2,436 (8/1/12-7/31/13) Includes the mandatory health fee that covers visits to UHS and UCC. I understand that I need to call UHS before going

  19. Optical properties of metals: Infrared emissivity in the anomalous skin effect spectral region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Echániz, T. [Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Facultad de Ciencia y Tecnología, UPV/EHU, Sarriena s/n, Leioa 48940 (Spain); Pérez-Sáez, R. B., E-mail: raul.perez@ehu.es; Tello, M. J. [Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Facultad de Ciencia y Tecnología, UPV/EHU, Sarriena s/n, Leioa 48940 (Spain); Instituto de Síntesis y Estudio de Materiales, Universidad del País Vasco, Apdo. 644, Bilbao 48080 (Spain)

    2014-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    When the penetration depth of an electromagnetic wave in a metal is similar to the mean free path of the conduction electrons, the Drude classical theory is no longer satisfied and the skin effect becomes anomalous. Physical parameters of this theory for twelve metals were calculated and analyzed. The theory predicts an emissivity peak ?{sub peak} at room temperature in the mid-infrared for smooth surface metals that moves towards larger wavelengths as temperature decreases. Furthermore, the theory states that ?{sub peak} increases with the emission angle but its position, ?{sub peak}, is constant. Copper directional emissivity measurements as well as emissivity obtained using optical constants data confirm the predictions of the theory. Considering the relationship between the specularity parameter p and the sample roughness, it is concluded that p is not the simple parameter it is usually assumed to be. Quantitative comparison between experimental data and theoretical predictions shows that the specularity parameter can be equal to one for roughness values larger than those predicted. An exhaustive analysis of the experimental optical parameters shows signs of a reflectance broad peak in Cu, Al, Au, and Mo around the wavelength predicted by the theory for p?=?1.

  20. Ultraviolet and Optical Observations of OB Associations and Field Stars in the Southwest Region of the Large Magellanic Cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joel Wm. Parker; Dennis Zaritsky; Theodore P. Stecher; Jason Harris; Phil Massey

    2000-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Using photometry from the Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (UIT) and photometry and spectroscopy from three ground-based optical datasets we have analyzed the stellar content of OB associations and field areas in and around the regions N 79, N 81, N 83, and N 94 in the LMC. We compare data for the OB association Lucke-Hodge 2 (LH 2) to determine how strongly the initial mass function (IMF) may depend on different photometric reductions and calibrations. We also correct for the background contribution of field stars, showing the importance of correcting for field star contamination in determinations of the IMF of star formation regions. It is possible that even in the case of an universal IMF, the variability of the density of background stars could be the dominant factor creating the differences between calculated IMFs for OB associations. We have also combined the UIT data with the Magellanic Cloud Photometric Survey to study the distribution of the candidate O-type stars in the field. We find a significant fraction, roughly half, of the candidate O-type stars are found in field regions, far from any obvious OB associations. These stars are greater than 2 arcmin (30 pc) from the boundaries of existing OB associations in the region, which is a distance greater than most O-type stars with typical dispersion velocities will travel in their lifetimes. The origin of these massive field stars (either as runaways, members of low-density star-forming regions, or examples of isolated massive star formation) will have to be determined by further observations and analysis.

  1. Navy Prototype Optical Interferometer Imaging of Line Emission Regions of beta Lyrae Using Differential Phase Referencing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmitt, H R; Tycner, C; Armstrong, J T; Zavala, R T; Benson, J A; Gilbreath, G C; Hindsley, R B; Hutter, D J; Johnston, K J; Jorgensen, A M; Mozurkewich, D

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of an experiment to image the interacting binary star beta Lyrae with data from the Navy Prototype Optical Interferometer (NPOI), using a differential phase technique to correct for the effects of the instrument and atmosphere on the interferometer phases. We take advantage of the fact that the visual primary of beta Lyrae and the visibility calibrator we used are both nearly unresolved and nearly centrally symmetric, and consequently have interferometric phases near zero. We used this property to detect and correct for the effects of the instrument and atmosphere on the phases of beta Lyrae and to obtain differential phases in the channel containing the Halpha emission line. Combining the Halpha-channel phases with information about the line strength, we recovered complex visibilities and imaged the Halpha emission using standard radio interferometry methods. We find that the results from our differential phase technique are consistent with those obtained from a more-standard analysis ...

  2. Tracing Quasar Narrow-Line Regions Across Redshift: A Library of High S/N Optical Spectra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tammour, A; Richards, G T

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a single optical spectrum, the quasar narrow-line region (NLR) reveals low density, photoionized gas in the host galaxy interstellar medium, while the immediate vicinity of the central engine generates the accretion disk continuum and broad emission lines. To isolate these two components, we construct a library of high S/N optical composite spectra created from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-DR7). We divide the sample into bins of continuum luminosity and Hbeta FWHM that are used to construct median composites at different redshift steps up to 0.75. We measure the luminosities of the narrow-emission lines [NeV]3427, [NeIII]3870, [OIII]5007, and [OII]3728 with ionization potentials (IPs) of 97, 40, 35, and 13.6 eV respectively. The high IP lines' luminosities show no evidence of increase with redshift consistent with no evolution in the AGN SED or the host galaxy ISM illuminated by the continuum. In contrast, we find that the [OII] line becomes stronger at higher redshifts, and we interpret this as a co...

  3. Adaptive Optics Discovery of Supernova 2004ip in the Nuclear Regions of the Luminous Infrared Galaxy IRAS 18293-3413

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Mattila; P. Vaisanen; D. Farrah; A. Efstathiou; W. P. S. Meikle; T. Dahlen; C. Fransson; P. Lira; P. Lundqvist; G. Ostlin; S. Ryder; J. Sollerman

    2007-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a supernova discovery in Ks-band images from the NAOS CONICA adaptive optics (AO) system on the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT). The images were obtained as part of a near-infrared search for highly-obscured supernovae in the nuclear regions of luminous and ultraluminous infrared galaxies. SN 2004ip is located within a circumnuclear starburst at 1.4 arcsec (or 500 pc) projected distance from the K-band nucleus of the luminous infrared galaxy IRAS 18293-3413. The supernova luminosity and light curve are consistent with a core-collapse event suffering from a host galaxy extinction of up to about 40 magnitudes in V-band which is as expected for a circumnuclear starburst environment. This is the first supernova to be discovered making use of AO correction and demonstrates the potential of the current 8-meter class telescopes equipped with AO in discovering supernovae from the innermost nuclear regions of luminous and ultraluminous infrared galaxies.

  4. University of Rochester Event Security Fund The purpose of this fund is to assist SA recognized organizations who (a) have a small membership or (b)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cantlon, Jessica F.

    University of Rochester Event Security Fund The purpose of this fund is to assist SA recognized of this fund. o The event will have a beneficial impact on the University of Rochester community. o The size. This fund will be used to supplement budgeted event funds. Prerequisites for applying for the Event Security

  5. 1999 Summer Research Program for High School Juniors at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2002-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    oak-B202--During the summer of 1999, 12 students from Rochester-area high schools participated in the Laboratory for Laser Energetics' Summer High School Research Program. The goal of this program is to excite a group of high school students about careers in the areas of science and technology by exposing them to research in a state-of-the-art environment. Too often, students are exposed to ''research'' only through classroom laboratories that have prescribed procedures and predictable results. In LLE's summer program, the students experience all of the trials, tribulations, and rewards of scientific research. By participating in research in a real environment, the students often become more enthusiastic about careers in science and technology. In addition, LLE gains from the contributions of the many highly talented students who are attracted to the program. The students spent most of their time working on their individual research projects with members of LLE's technical staff. The projects were related to current research activities at LLE and covered a broad range of areas of interest including laser modeling, diagnostic development, chemistry, liquid crystal devices, and opacity data visualization. The students, their high schools, their LLE supervisors and their project titles are listed in the table. Their written reports are collected in this volume. The students attended weekly seminars on technical topics associated with LLE's research. Topics this year included lasers, fusion, holography, optical materials, global warming, measurement errors, and scientific ethics. The students also received safety training, learned how to give scientific presentations, and were introduced to LLE's resources, especially the computational facilities. The program culminated with the High School Student Summer Research Symposium on 25 August at which the students presented the results of their research to an audience that included parents, teachers, and members of LIX. Each student spoke for approximately ten minutes and answered questions.

  6. A review of "A Profane Wit: The Life of John Wilmot, Earl of Rochester." by James William Johnson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harold Love

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    into that sense) or catching or re-catching REVIEWS 139 syphilis. In any case, if Rochester was already, as Johnson maintains, infected, how could he have caught it again? Clearly some covert dealing existed between Rochester and Muddyman, but its nature... of mind. In a footnote on page 394 the inquisitive reader will learn that the present reviewer had ?disputed? an attempt by Johnson to establish this attribution, but without title or date given for my article. For the record, the two papers concerned...

  7. Conference Paper NFO-7:7th International Conference on Near-Field Optics and Related Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prof.Dr. Lukas Novotny

    2004-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The seventh conference in the NFO conference series, held here in Rochester, provided to be the principal forum for advances in sub-wavelength optics, near-field optical microscopy, local field enhancement, instrumental developments and the ever-increasing range of applications. This conference brought together the diverse scientific communities working on the theory and application of near-field optics (NFO) and related techniques.

  8. Our Project Regional, community,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    City departments -City Engineering and Traffic Engineering Public engagement early in project process modes and all users See.Safe.Smart.Rochester campaign to decrease modal conflict Connection

  9. In vivo cancer diagnosis with optical spectroscopy and acoustically induced blood stasis using a murine MCa35 model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, Kevin J.

    , New York Vladimir Misic Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York Lydia Liao Department of Imaging Sciences, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York Kevin Parker School of Engineering and Applied Science, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York Bruce M. Fenton

  10. Coeur Rochester, Inc.: Plant-Wide Assessment of Nevada Silver Mine Finds Opportunities to Improve Process Control and Reduce Energy Consumption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Coeur Rochester silver mine in Nevada would save almost 11 million kilowatt-hours and $813,000 annually by implementing the five energy efficiency projects described in this ITP case study.

  11. Radio Observations of the Hubble Deep Field South Region IV: Optical Properties of the Faint Radio Population

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. T. Huynh; C. A. Jackson; R. P. Norris; A. Fernandez-Soto

    2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Australia Telescope Hubble Deep Field-South (ATHDFS) survey of the Hubble Deep Field South reaches sensitivities of ~10 miceoJyJy at 1.4, 2.5, 5.2 and 8.7 GHz, making the ATHDFS one of the deepest surveys ever performed with the Australia Telescope Compact Array. Here we present the optical identifications of the ATHDFS radio sources using data from the literature. We find that ~66% of the radio sources have optical counterparts to I = 23.5 mag. Deep HST imaging of the area identifies a further 12% of radio sources. We present new spectroscopic observations for 98 of the radio sources, and supplement these spectroscopic redshifts with photometric ones calculated from 5-band optical imaging. The host galaxy colors and radio-to-optical ratios indicate that low luminosity (or "radio quiet") AGN make up a significant proportion of the sub-mJy radio population, a result which is in accordance with a number of other deep radio studies. The radio-to-optical ratios of the bright (S_1.4GHz > 1 mJy) sources is consistent with a bimodal distribution.

  12. SWIFT ULTRAVIOLET/OPTICAL TELESCOPE IMAGING OF STAR-FORMING REGIONS IN M81 AND HOLMBERG IX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoversten, E. A.; Gronwall, C.; Siegel, M. H. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Laboratory, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Vanden Berk, D. E. [Physics Department, St. Vincent College, Latrobe, PA 15650 (United States); Basu-Zych, A. R. [NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Breeveld, A. A.; Kuin, N. P. M.; Page, M. J. [Mullard Space Science Laboratory/UCL, Holbury St. Mary, Dorking, Surrey RH5 6NT (United Kingdom); Brown, P. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Roming, P. W. A. [Space Science and Engineering Division, Southwest Research Institute, 6220 Culebra Road, San Antonio, TX 78238 (United States)

    2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present Swift UV/Optical Telescope (UVOT) imaging of the galaxies M81 and Holmberg IX. We combine UVOT imaging in three near-ultraviolet (NUV) filters (uvw2: 1928 A; uvm2: 2246 A; uvw1: 2600 A) with ground-based optical imaging from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to constrain the stellar populations of both galaxies. Our analysis consists of three different methods. First, we use the NUV imaging to identify UV star-forming knots and then perform spectral energy distribution (SED) modeling on the UV/optical photometry of these sources. Second, we measure surface brightness profiles of the disk of M81 in the NUV and optical. Lastly, we use SED fitting of individual pixels to map the properties of the two galaxies. In agreement with earlier studies, we find evidence for a burst in star formation in both galaxies starting {approx}200 Myr ago coincident with the suggested time of an M81-M82 interaction. In line with theories of its origin as a tidal dwarf, we find that the luminosity-weighted age of Holmberg IX is a few hundred million years. Both galaxies are best fit by a Milky Way dust extinction law with a prominent 2175 A bump. In addition, we describe a stacked median filter technique for modeling the diffuse background light within a galaxy and a Markov chain method for cleaning segment maps generated by SExtractor.

  13. Applied grinding wheel performance evaluation for optical fabrication

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piscotty, M.A.; Taylor, J.S.; Blaedel, K.L.

    1996-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We are collaborating with the Center for Optics Manufacturing (Rochester NY) to develop fine diamond grinding wheels for spherical grinding of glass optics. A standardized method for evaluating wheel performance includes in-process acoustic emission (AE). This paper includes recent AE measurements taken during the evaluation of several fine diamond grinding wheels and discusses how this new information might relate to the physical performance of the wheels. An interesting observation is also reported on the surface topography of worn bronze wheels using an interferometric profiler.

  14. OMEGA: A NEW COLD X-RAY SIMULATION FACILITY FOR THE EVALUATION OF OPTICAL COATINGS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisher, J H; Newlander, C D; Fournier, K B; Beutler, D E; Coverdale, C A; May, M J; Tobin, M; Davis, J F; Shiekh, D

    2007-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on recent progress for the development of a new cold X-ray optical test capability using the Omega Facility located at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) at the University of Rochester. These tests were done on the 30 kJ OMEGA laser at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) at the University of Rochester, Rochester, NY. We conducted a six-shot series called OMEGA II on 14 July 2006 in one eight-hour day (supported by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency). The initial testing was performed using simple protected gold optical coatings on fused silica substrates. PUFFTFT analyses were completed and the specimen's thermal lateral stress and transverse stress conditions were calculated and interpreted. No major anomalies were detected. Comparison of the pre- and posttest reflective measurements coupled with the TFCALC analyses proved invaluable in guiding the analyses and interpreting the observed damage. The Omega facility is a high quality facility for performing evaluation of optical coatings and coupons and provides experience for the development of future National Ignition Facility (NIF) testing.

  15. Near-Infrared Adaptive Optics Imaging of the Central Regions of Nearby Sc Galaxies: I. M33

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. J. Davidge

    1999-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Near-infrared images obtained with the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) Adaptive Optics Bonnette (AOB) are used to investigate the stellar content within 18 arcsec of the center of the Local Group spiral galaxy M33. AGB stars with near-infrared spectral-energy distributions similar to those of giants in the solar neighborhood and Baade's Window are detected over most of the field. The bolometric luminosity function (LF) of these stars has a discontinuity near M_{bol} = -5.25, and comparisons with evolutionary tracks suggest that most of the AGB stars formed in a burst of star formation 1 - 3 Gyr in the past. The images are also used to investigate the integrated near-infrared photometric properties of the nucleus and the central light concentration. The nucleus is bluer than the central light concentration, in agreement with previous studies at visible wavelengths. The CO index of the central light concentration 0.5 arcsec from the galaxy center is 0.05, which corresponds to [Fe/H] = -1.2 for simple stellar systems. Hence, the central light concentration could not have formed from the chemically-enriched material that dominates the present-day inner disk of M33.

  16. OPTICAL CONSTANTS OF NH{sub 3} AND NH{sub 3}:N{sub 2} AMORPHOUS ICES IN THE NEAR-INFRARED AND MID-INFRARED REGIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zanchet, Alexandre; Rodríguez-Lazcano, Yamilet; Gálvez, Óscar; Herrero, Víctor J.; Escribano, Rafael; Maté, Belén, E-mail: belen.mate@csic.es [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, IEM-CSIC, Serrano 123, E-28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ammonia ice has been detected on different astrophysical media ranging from interstellar medium (ISM) particles to the surface of various icy bodies of our solar system, where nitrogen is also present. We have carried out a detailed study of amorphous NH{sub 3} ice and NH{sub 3}:N{sub 2} ice mixtures, based on infrared (IR) spectra in the mid-IR (MIR) and near-IR (NIR) regions, supported by theoretical quantum chemical calculations. Spectra of varying ice thicknesses were obtained and optical constants were calculated for amorphous NH{sub 3} at 15 K and 30 K and for a NH{sub 3}:N{sub 2} mixture at 15 K over a 500-7000 cm{sup –1} spectral range. These spectra have improved accuracy over previous data, where available. Moreover, we also obtained absolute values for the band strengths of the more prominent IR features in both spectral regions. Our results indicate that the estimated NH{sub 3} concentration in ISM ices should be scaled upward by ?30%.

  17. Sub-barrier fusion cross-sections for neutron-rich oxygen and carbon nuclei Indiana University, ORNL, University of Rochester, Western Michigan University, GANIL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Souza, Romualdo T.

    , ORNL, University of Rochester, Western Michigan University, GANIL Thermonuclear fusion vs pycnonuclearSub-barrier fusion cross-sections for neutron-rich oxygen and carbon nuclei Indiana University fusion 1. Astrophysics : Neutron star crusts (pycnonuclear fusion, X-ray superbursts) 2. Nuclear Physics

  18. CX-009577: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Rochester Regional, Optics, Photonics & Imaging Accelerator CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 12/12/2012 Location(s): New York, New York Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  19. All-optical remote monitoring of propane gas using a 5-km-long, low-loss optical fiber link and an InGaP light-emitting diode in the 1. 68-. mu. m region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chan, K.; Ito, H.; Inaba, H.

    1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the fully optical remote detection of low-level propane (C/sub 3/H/sub 8/) gas realized by the scheme based on a long distance, very low-loss silica optical fiber link connected to a compact absorption cell in conjunction with a high radiant InGaP light-emitting diode at 1.68 ..mu..m. For this application, the near-infrared absorption spectrum of propane was measured and studied to find very complicated bands around 1.69, 1.53, and 1.38 ..mu..m. This simple system, employing a 5-km-long silica optical fiber link, was demonstrated to be capable of achieving reproducibly the detection sensitivity less than 2.4 Torr for propane gas in air, i.e., about 14% of the lower explosion limit of propane density. This result verifies a large capability for major applications to various strategic points within the environment, such as industrial complexes as well as urban and residential areas, with considerably increased reliability and safety over the existing techniques.

  20. Transpiration purged optical probe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    2004-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical apparatus for clearly viewing the interior of a containment vessel by applying a transpiration fluid to a volume directly in front of the external surface of the optical element of the optical apparatus. The fluid is provided by an external source and transported by means of an annular tube to a capped end region where the inner tube is perforated. The perforation allows the fluid to stream axially towards the center of the inner tube and then axially away from an optical element which is positioned in the inner tube just prior to the porous sleeve. This arrangement draws any contaminants away from the optical element keeping it free of contaminants. In one of several embodiments, the optical element can be a lens, a viewing port or a laser, and the external source can provide a transpiration fluid having either steady properties or time varying properties.

  1. Optically pumped quantum-dot Cd(Zn)Se/ZnSe laser and microchip converter for yellow-green spectral region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lutsenko, E V; Voinilovich, A G; Rzheutskii, N V; Pavlovskii, V N; Yablonskii, G P; Sorokin, S V; Gronin, S V; Sedova, I V; Kop'ev, Petr S; Ivanov, Sergei V; Alanzi, M; Hamidalddin, A; Alyamani, A

    2013-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The room temperature laser generation in the yellow-green ({lambda} = 558.5-566.7 nm) spectral range has been demonstrated under optical pumping by a pulsed nitrogen laser of Cd(Zn)Se/ZnSe quantum dot heterostructures. The maximum achieved laser wavelength was as high as {lambda} = 566.7 nm at a laser cavity length of 945 {mu}m. High values of both the output pulsed power (up to 50 W) and the external differential quantum efficiency ({approx}60%) were obtained at a cavity length of 435 {mu}m. Both a high quality of the laser heterostructure and a low lasing threshold ({approx}2 kW cm{sup -2}) make it possible to use a pulsed InGaN laser diode as a pump source. A laser microchip converter based on this heterostructure has demonstrated a maximum output pulse power of {approx}90 mW at {lambda} = 560 nm. The microchip converter was placed in a standard TO-18 (5.6 mm in diameter) laser diode package. (semiconductor lasers. physics and technology)

  2. Optical Fibers Optics and Photonics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palffy-Muhoray, Peter

    Optical Fibers Optics and Photonics Dr. Palffy-Muhoray Ines Busuladzic Department of Theoretical and Applied Mathematics The University of Akron April 21, 2008 #12;Outline · History of optical fibers · What are optical fibers? · How are optical fibers made? · Light propagation through optical fibers · Application

  3. A 4-D Climatology (1979-2009) of the Monthly Tropospheric Aerosol Optical Depth Distribution over the Mediterranean Region from a Comparative Evaluation and Blending of Remote Sensing and Model Products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nabat, P.; Somot, S.; Mallet, M.; Chiapello, I.; Morcrette, J. -J.; Solmon, F.; Szopa, S.; Dulac, F.; Collins, W.; Ghan, Steven J.; Horowitz, L.; Lamarque, J.-F.; Lee, Y. H.; Naik, Vaishali; Nagashima, T.; Shindell, Drew; Skeie, R. B.

    2013-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the 1980s several spaceborne sensors have been used to retrieve the aerosol optical depth (AOD) over the Mediterranean region. In parallel, AOD climatologies coming from different numerical model simulations are now also available, permitting to distinguish the contribution of several aerosol types to the total AOD. In this work, we perform a comparative analysis of this unique multiyear database in terms of total AOD and of its apportionment by the five main aerosol types (soil dust, seasalt, sulfate, black and organic carbon). We use 9 different satellite-derived monthly AOD products: NOAA/AVHRR, SeaWiFS (2 products), TERRA/MISR, TERRA/MODIS, AQUA/MODIS, ENVISAT/MERIS, PARASOL/POLDER and MSG/SEVIRI, as well as 3 more historical datasets: NIMBUS7/CZCS, TOMS (onboard NIMBUS7 and Earth- Probe) and METEOSAT/MVIRI. Monthly model datasets include the aerosol climatology from Tegen et al. (1997), the climate-chemistry models LMDz-OR-INCA and RegCM-4, the multi-model mean coming from the ACCMIP exercise, and the reanalyses GEMS and MACC. Ground-based Level- 2 AERONET AOD observations from 47 stations around the basin are used here to evaluate the model and satellite data. The sensor MODIS (on AQUA and TERRA) has the best average AOD scores over this region, showing a relevant spatiotemporal variability and highlighting high dust loads over Northern Africa and the sea (spring and summer), and sulfate aerosols over continental Europe (summer). The comparison also shows limitations of certain datasets (especially MERIS and SeaWiFS standard products). Models reproduce the main patterns of the AOD variability over the basin. The MACC reanalysis is the closest to AERONET data, but appears to underestimate dust over Northern Africa, where RegCM-4 is found closer to MODIS thanks to its interactive scheme for dust emissions. The vertical dimension is also investigated using the CALIOP instrument. This study confirms differences of vertical distribution between dust aerosols showing a large vertical spread, and other continental and marine aerosols which are confined in the boundary layer. From this compilation, we propose a 4-D blended product from model and satellite data, consisting in monthly time series of 3-D aerosol distribution at a 50 km horizontal resolution over the Euro-Mediterranean marine and continental region for the 2003–2009 period. The product is based on the total AOD from AQUA/MODIS, apportioned into sulfates, black and organic carbon from the MACC reanalysis, and into dust and sea-salt aerosols from RegCM-4 simulations, which are distributed vertically based on CALIOP climatology.We extend the 2003–2009 reconstruction to the past up to 1979 using the 2003–2009 average and applying the decreasing trend in sulfate aerosols from LMDz-OR-INCA, whose AOD trends over Europe and the Mediterranean are median among the ACCMIP models. Finally optical properties of the different aerosol types in this region are proposed from Mie calculations so that this reconstruction can be included in regional climate models for aerosol radiative forcing and aerosolclimate studies.

  4. Integrated optical tamper sensor with planar waveguide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carson, R.F.; Casalnuovo, S.A.

    1993-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A monolithic optical tamper sensor, comprising an optical emitter and detector, connected by an optical waveguide and placed into the critical entry plane of an enclosed sensitive region, the tamper sensor having a myriad of scraps of a material optically absorbent at the wavelength of interest, such that when the absorbent material is in place on the waveguide, an unique optical signature can be recorded, but when entry is attempted into the enclosed sensitive region, the scraps of absorbent material will be displaced and the optical/electrical signature of the tamper sensor will change and that change can be recorded.

  5. Integrated optical tamper sensor with planar waveguide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carson, Richard F. (Albuquerque, NM); Casalnuovo, Stephen A. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A monolithic optical tamper sensor, comprising an optical emitter and detector, connected by an optical waveguide and placed into the critical entry plane of an enclosed sensitive region, the tamper sensor having a myriad of scraps of a material optically absorbent at the wavelength of interest, such that when the absorbent material is in place on the waveguide, an unique optical signature can be recorded, but when entry is attempted into the enclosed sensitive region, the scraps of absorbent material will be displaced and the optical/electrical signature of the tamper sensor will change and that change can be recorded.

  6. Method and apparatus for optical phase error correction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    DeRose, Christopher; Bender, Daniel A.

    2014-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The phase value of a phase-sensitive optical device, which includes an optical transport region, is modified by laser processing. At least a portion of the optical transport region is exposed to a laser beam such that the phase value is changed from a first phase value to a second phase value, where the second phase value is different from the first phase value. The portion of the optical transport region that is exposed to the laser beam can be a surface of the optical transport region or a portion of the volume of the optical transport region. In an embodiment of the invention, the phase value of the optical device is corrected by laser processing. At least a portion of the optical transport region is exposed to a laser beam until the phase value of the optical device is within a specified tolerance of a target phase value.

  7. University of Rochester

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMay 20102UNCLASSIFIEDOffice of Air and9

  8. Optical keyboard

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Veligdan, James T. (Manorville, NY); Feichtner, John D. (Fiddletown, CA); Phillips, Thomas E. (San Diego, CA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical keyboard includes an optical panel having optical waveguides stacked together. First ends of the waveguides define an inlet face, and opposite ends thereof define a screen. A projector transmits a light beam outbound through the waveguides for display on the screen as a keyboard image. A light sensor is optically aligned with the inlet face for sensing an inbound light beam channeled through the waveguides from the screen upon covering one key of the keyboard image.

  9. Cloaking a Sensor via Transformation Optics Allan Greenleaf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uhlmann, Gunther

    LM11852 REV IEW CO PY N O T FO R D ISTRIBU TIO N Cloaking a Sensor via Transformation Optics Allan. As one application, we describe how to use transformation optics to hide sensors in the cloaked region optics cloaking at positive frequency, besides rendering the cloaked region invisible to detection

  10. Rutgers Regional Report # Regional Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garfunkel, Eric

    , population, income, and building permits over a 32-year period from 1969 to 2001 for the 31-county Tri counties of the Tri-State (Connecticut, New Jersey, and New York) Region have been divided for analytical the nation and the Tri-State Region. What has not been fully documented, however, is the apparent shift

  11. Optical Expanders with Applications in Optical Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reif, John H.

    Optical Expanders with Applications in Optical Computing John H. Reif Akitoshi Yoshida July 20, 1999 Abstract We describe and investigate an optical system which we call an optical expander. An optical expander elec- trooptically expands an optical boolean pattern encoded in d bits into an optical

  12. Optical ionization detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wuest, Craig R. (Danville, CA); Lowry, Mark E. (Castro Valley, CA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical ionization detector wherein a beam of light is split so that one arm passes through a fiber optics and the other arm passes through a gas-filled region, and uses interferometry to detect density changes in a gas when charged particles pass through it. The gas-filled region of the detector is subjected to a high electric field and as a charged particle traverses this gas region electrons are freed from the cathode and accelerated so as to generate an electron avalanche which is collected on the anode. The gas density is effected by the electron avalanche formation and if the index or refraction is proportional to the gas density the index will change accordingly. The detector uses this index change by modulating the one arm of the split light beam passing through the gas, with respect to the other arm that is passed through the fiber optic. Upon recombining of the beams, interference fringe changes as a function of the index change indicates the passage of charged particles through the gaseous medium.

  13. Fiber optic coupled optical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fleming, Kevin J. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A displacement sensor includes a first optical fiber for radiating light to a target, and a second optical fiber for receiving light from the target. The end of the first fiber is adjacent and not axially aligned with the second fiber end. A lens focuses light from the first fiber onto the target and light from the target onto the second fiber.

  14. Optical Expanders with Applications in Optical Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reif, John H.

    Optical Expanders with Applications in Optical Computing John H. Reif \\Lambda Akitoshi Yoshida \\Lambda July 20, 1999 Abstract We describe and investigate an optical system which we call an optical expander. An optical expander elec­ trooptically expands an optical boolean pattern encoded in d bits

  15. Optically pumped isotopic ammonia laser system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Buchwald, Melvin I. (Santa Fe, NM); Jones, Claude R. (Los Alamos, NM); Nelson, Leonard Y. (Seattle, WA)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An optically pumped isotopic ammonia laser system which is capable of producing a plurality of frequencies in the middle infrared spectral region. Two optical pumping mechanisms are disclosed, i.e., pumping on R(J) and lasing on P(J) in response to enhancement of rotational cascade lasing including stimulated Raman effects, and, pumping on R(J) and lasing on P(J+2). The disclosed apparatus for optical pumping include a hole coupled cavity and a grating coupled cavity.

  16. The University of Rochester Revenue Bonds, Series 2003B (the "Series 2003B Bonds") were issued on November 6, 2003 as auction rate securities and are subject to mandatory tender for purchase and remarketing on September 3, 2008 (the "Conversion Date") in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Portman, Douglas

    on November 6, 2003 as auction rate securities and are subject to mandatory tender for purchase Fund and any Bond Purchase Fund) established under the Authority's University of Rochester Revenue Bond has no taxing power. Description: The Series 2003B Bonds will be reoffered on their Conversion Date

  17. Optical coupler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Majewski, Stanislaw; Weisenberger, Andrew G.

    2004-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In a camera or similar radiation sensitive device comprising a pixilated scintillation layer, a light guide and an array of position sensitive photomultiplier tubes, wherein there exists so-called dead space between adjacent photomultiplier tubes the improvement comprising a two part light guide comprising a first planar light spreading layer or portion having a first surface that addresses the scintillation layer and optically coupled thereto at a second surface that addresses the photomultiplier tubes, a second layer or portion comprising an array of trapezoidal light collectors defining gaps that span said dead space and are individually optically coupled to individual position sensitive photomultiplier tubes. According to a preferred embodiment, coupling of the trapezoidal light collectors to the position sensitive photomultiplier tubes is accomplished using an optical grease having about the same refractive index as the material of construction of the two part light guide.

  18. Optical analyzer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hansen, A.D.

    1987-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical analyzer wherein a sample of particulate matter, and particularly of organic matter, which has been collected on a quartz fiber filter is placed in a combustion tube, and light from a light source is passed through the sample. The temperature of the sample is raised at a controlled rate and in a controlled atmosphere. The magnitude of the transmission of light through the sample is detected as the temperature is raised. A data processor, differentiator and a two pen recorder provide a chart of the optical transmission versus temperature and the rate of change of optical transmission versus temperature signatures (T and D) of the sample. These signatures provide information as to physical and chemical processes and a variety of quantitative and qualitative information about the sample. Additional information is obtained by repeating the run in different atmospheres and/or different rates or heating with other samples of the same particulate material collected on other filters. 7 figs.

  19. Optical memory

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mao, Samuel S; Zhang, Yanfeng

    2013-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Optical memory comprising: a semiconductor wire, a first electrode, a second electrode, a light source, a means for producing a first voltage at the first electrode, a means for producing a second voltage at the second electrode, and a means for determining the presence of an electrical voltage across the first electrode and the second electrode exceeding a predefined voltage. The first voltage, preferably less than 0 volts, different from said second voltage. The semiconductor wire is optically transparent and has a bandgap less than the energy produced by the light source. The light source is optically connected to the semiconductor wire. The first electrode and the second electrode are electrically insulated from each other and said semiconductor wire.

  20. Optical switch

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reedy, R.P.

    1987-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical switching device is provided whereby light from a first glass fiber or a second glass fiber may be selectively transmitted into a third glass fiber. Each glass fiber is provided with a focusing and collimating lens system. In one mode of operation, light from the first glass fiber is reflected by a planar mirror into the third glass fiber. In another mode of operation, light from the second glass fiber passes directly into the third glass fiber. The planar mirror is attached to a rotatable table which is rotated to provide the optical switching. 3 figs.

  1. Diffuse optical imaging of the whole head Maria Angela Franceschini

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diffuse optical imaging of the whole head Maria Angela Franceschini Danny K. Joseph Theodore J@nmr.mgh.harvard.edu Abstract. Near-Infrared Spectroscopy NIRS and diffuse optical im- aging DOI are increasingly used to detect of optodes in NIRS instruments has hampered measurement of optical signals from diverse brain regions. Our

  2. Sandia Energy - Quantum Optics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Quantum Optics Home Energy Research EFRCs Solid-State Lighting Science EFRC Quantum Optics Quantum OpticsTara Camacho-Lopez2015-03-30T16:37:03+00:00 Quantum Optics with a Single...

  3. Parallel optical sampler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tauke-Pedretti, Anna; Skogen, Erik J; Vawter, Gregory A

    2014-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical sampler includes a first and second 1.times.n optical beam splitters splitting an input optical sampling signal and an optical analog input signal into n parallel channels, respectively, a plurality of optical delay elements providing n parallel delayed input optical sampling signals, n photodiodes converting the n parallel optical analog input signals into n respective electrical output signals, and n optical modulators modulating the input optical sampling signal or the optical analog input signal by the respective electrical output signals, and providing n successive optical samples of the optical analog input signal. A plurality of output photodiodes and eADCs convert the n successive optical samples to n successive digital samples. The optical modulator may be a photodiode interconnected Mach-Zehnder Modulator. A method of sampling the optical analog input signal is disclosed.

  4. University of Rochester Respirator Training

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahon, Bradford Z.

    (SCBA) UofR Respirator Training 8 #12;Air Purifying Respirators (Particulate) Tight-fitting respirator

  5. LPS Products University of Rochester

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Steven A.

    ,000 MWCO,25/CS CS $81.61 431482 Spin-X UF 6mL concentrator, 5,000 MWCO,25/CS CS $110.19 431483 Spin-X UF 6mL concentrator, 10,000 MWCO,25/CS CS $110.19 431484 Spin-X UF 6mL concentrator, 30,000 MWCO,25/CS CS $110.19 Item # Description UOM Price 431485 Spin-X UF 6mL concentrator, 50,000 MWCO,25/CS CS $100.19 431486 Spin-X UF 6m

  6. UNIVERSITY OF ROCHESTER RIVER CAMPUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Portman, Douglas

    SAFETY, NOT FIRE FIGHTING, OR COMBATING OTHER ADVERSE ELEMENTS. II. IF THE EMERGENCY CONDITION IS A FIRE/EXPLOSION Procedure ­ RC Fire Evacuation/Alarm Plan DATE: 4/11 NUMBER: 2.0 APPROVED BY: Mark Cavanaugh Page 1 of 8 Residential Life Emergency Evacuation The following are fire discovery, fire alarm, fire response

  7. Ultrafast optics For optics and photonics course,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palffy-Muhoray, Peter

    ultrafast and ultrashort generally describe pulses of widths in the nanosecond to femtosecond, or shorterUltrafast optics For optics and photonics course, Spring 2012 By :Alireza Moheghi Ultrafast optics, regimes. · Interest in ultrashort optical pulses began with the invention of the laser, · Ultrashort

  8. Application of an all-solid-state diode-laser-based sensor for carbon monoxide detection by optical absorption in the 4.4 ? 4.8 µm spectral region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodolfo, Barron Jimenez

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    for operation in harsh combustion environments but much improvement in the sensor design and operation was required. Experiments in near-adiabatic hydrogen/air CO 2 -doped flames were performed featuring two-line thermometry in the 4.8 ?m spectral region... performed in the 0.32 m room temperature gas cell filled with 1010 ppm CO in N 2 at pressures: a) 6.66 kPa and b) 13.33 kPa. GF CO , X CO , and rms noise of the fit are shown for both measured data sets Absorption 1 and 2...

  9. Optics and Optical Engineering Program Assessment Plan Program Learning Objectives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cantlon, Jessica F.

    Optics and Optical Engineering Program Assessment Plan Program Learning, and processes that underlie optics and optical engineering. 2. Strong understanding of the fundamental science, mathematics, and processes that underlie optics and optical

  10. Optical conductivity of curved graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. J. Chaves; T. Frederico; O. Oliveira; W. de Paula; M. C. Santos

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We compute the optical conductivity for an out-of-plane deformation in graphene using an approach based on solutions of the Dirac equation in curved space. Different examples of periodic deformations along one direction translates into an enhancement of the optical conductivity peaks in the region of the far and mid infrared frequencies for periodicities $\\sim100\\,$nm. The width and position of the peaks can be changed by dialling the parameters of the deformation profiles. The enhancement of the optical conductivity is due to intraband transitions and the translational invariance breaking in the geometrically deformed background. Furthemore, we derive an analytical solution of the Dirac equation in a curved space for a general deformation along one spatial direction. For this class of geometries, it is shown that curvature induces an extra phase in the electron wave function, which can also be explored to produce interference devices of the Aharonov-Bohm type.

  11. Optical microphone

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Veligdan, James T. (Manorville, NY)

    2000-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical microphone includes a laser and beam splitter cooperating therewith for splitting a laser beam into a reference beam and a signal beam. A reflecting sensor receives the signal beam and reflects it in a plurality of reflections through sound pressure waves. A photodetector receives both the reference beam and reflected signal beam for heterodyning thereof to produce an acoustic signal for the sound waves. The sound waves vary the local refractive index in the path of the signal beam which experiences a Doppler frequency shift directly analogous with the sound waves.

  12. Optical devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chaves, Julio C.; Falicoff, Waqidi; Minano, Juan C.; Benitez, Pablo; Dross, Oliver; Parkyn Jr., William A.

    2010-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical manifold for efficiently combining a plurality of blue LED outputs to illuminate a phosphor for a single, substantially homogeneous output, in a small, cost-effective package. Embodiments are disclosed that use a single or multiple LEDs and a remote phosphor, and an intermediate wavelength-selective filter arranged so that backscattered photoluminescence is recycled to boost the luminance and flux of the output aperture. A further aperture mask is used to boost phosphor luminance with only modest loss of luminosity. Alternative non-recycling embodiments provide blue and yellow light in collimated beams, either separately or combined into white.

  13. Optical microfluidics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kotz, K.T.; Noble, K.A.; Faris, G.W. [Molecular Physics Laboratory, SRI International, 333 Ravenswood Avenue, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States)

    2004-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a method for the control of small droplets based on the thermal Marangoni effect using laser heating. With this approach, droplets covering five orders of magnitude in volume ({approx}1.7 {mu}L to 14 pL), immersed in decanol, were moved on an unmodified polystyrene surface, with speeds of up to 3 mm/s. When two droplets were brought into contact, they spontaneously fused and rapidly mixed in less than 33 ms. This optically addressed microfluidic approach has many advantages for microfluidic transport, including exceptional reconfigurability, low intersample contamination, large volume range, extremely simple substrates, no electrical connections, and ready scaling to large arrays.

  14. Regional Summary Pacific Region Management Context

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , for the Eastern Pacific Ocean, and the Western and Central Pacific Fishery Commission, for the Western PacificRegional Summary Pacific Region Management Context The Pacific Region includes California, Oregon, and Washington. Federal fisheries in this region are managed by the Pacific Fishery Management Council (PFMC

  15. alamos source region: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    activity of Sgr A* in the past. E. Churazov; M. Gilfanov; R. Sunyaev; S. Kuznetsov 1999-01-13 17 An Optical Source Catalog of the North Ecliptic Pole Region Astrophysics...

  16. HYDROGEN REGIONAL INFRASTRUCTURE PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HYDROGEN REGIONAL INFRASTRUCTURE PROGRAM IN PENNSYLVANIA HYDROGEN REGIONAL INFRASTRUCTURE PROGRAM date ­ November 23, 2004 · Contract end date ­ March 31, 2006 #12;Hydrogen Regional Infrastructure Program in Pennsylvania Hydrogen Regional Infrastructure Program in Pennsylvania · Objectives ­ Capture

  17. Optical coherence domain reflectometry guidewire

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Colston, Billy W. (Livermore, CA); Everett, Matthew (Pleasanton, CA); Da Silva, Luiz B. (Danville, CA); Matthews, Dennis (Moss Beach, CA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A guidewire with optical sensing capabilities is based on a multiplexed optical coherence domain reflectometer (OCDR), which allows it to sense location, thickness, and structure of the arterial walls or other intra-cavity regions as it travels through the body during minimally invasive medical procedures. This information will be used both to direct the guidewire through the body by detecting vascular junctions and to evaluate the nearby tissue. The guidewire contains multiple optical fibers which couple light from the proximal to distal end. Light from the fibers at the distal end of the guidewire is directed onto interior cavity walls via small diameter optics such as gradient index lenses and mirrored corner cubes. Both forward viewing and side viewing fibers can be included. The light reflected or scattered from the cavity walls is then collected by the fibers, which are multiplexed at the proximal end to the sample arm of an optical low coherence reflectometer. The guidewire can also be used in nonmedical applications.

  18. SURFACE NONLINEAR OPTICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Y.R.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    B. de Castro, and Y. R. Shen, Optics Lett. i, 393 See, for3, 1980 SURFACE NONLINEAR OPTICS Y.R. Shen, C.K. Chen, andde Janiero SURFRACE NONLINEAR OPTICS Y. R. Shen, C. K. Chen,

  19. NONLINEAR OPTICS AT INTERFACES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Chenson K.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    N. Bloembergen, Nonlinear Optics (W. A. Benjamin, 1977) p.Research Division NONLINEAR OPTICS AT INTERFACES Chenson K.ED LBL-12084 NONLINEAR OPTICS AT INTERFACES Chenson K. Chen

  20. The SLS optics beamline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The SLS Optics Beamline U. Flechsig ? , R. Abela ? , R.in the ?eld of x-ray optics and synchrotron radiation in-radiation, beamline optics, channel cut monochromator,

  1. Optical manifold

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Falicoff, Waqidi; Chaves, Julio C.; Minano, Juan Carlos; Benitez, Pablo; Dross, Oliver; Parkyn, Jr., William A.

    2010-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Optical systems are described that have at least one source of a beam of blue light with divergence under 15.degree.. A phosphor emits yellow light when excited by the blue light. A collimator is disposed with the phosphor and forms a yellow beam with divergence under 15.degree.. A dichroic filter is positioned to transmit the beam of blue light to the phosphor and to reflect the beam of yellow light to an exit aperture. In different embodiments, the beams of blue and yellow light are incident upon said filter with central angles of 15.degree., 22.degree., and 45.degree.. The filter may reflect all of one polarization and part of the other polarization, and a polarization rotating retroreflector may then be provided to return the unreflected light to the filter.

  2. Fluorescent optical position sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, Jonathan D.

    2005-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A fluorescent optical position sensor and method of operation. A small excitation source side-pumps a localized region of fluorescence at an unknown position along a fluorescent waveguide. As the fluorescent light travels down the waveguide, the intensity of fluorescent light decreases due to absorption. By measuring with one (or two) photodetectors the attenuated intensity of fluorescent light emitted from one (or both) ends of the waveguide, the position of the excitation source relative to the waveguide can be determined by comparing the measured light intensity to a calibrated response curve or mathematical model. Alternatively, excitation light can be pumped into an end of the waveguide, which generates an exponentially-decaying continuous source of fluorescent light along the length of the waveguide. The position of a photodetector oriented to view the side of the waveguide can be uniquely determined by measuring the intensity of the fluorescent light emitted radially at that location.

  3. Optical absorption measurement system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Draggoo, Vaughn G. (Livermore, CA); Morton, Richard G. (San Diego, CA); Sawicki, Richard H. (Pleasanton, CA); Bissinger, Horst D. (Livermore, CA)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The system of the present invention contemplates a non-intrusive method for measuring the temperature rise of optical elements under high laser power optical loading to determine the absorption coefficient. The method comprises irradiating the optical element with a high average power laser beam, viewing the optical element with an infrared camera to determine the temperature across the optical element and calculating the absorption of the optical element from the temperature.

  4. Clusters of Extragalactic Ultra Compact HII Regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelsey E. Johnson; Chip Kobulnicky; Phil Massey; Peter Conti

    2001-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the detection of optically thick free-free radio sources in the galaxies M33, NGC 253, and NGC 6946 using data in the literature. We interpret these sources as being young, embedded star birth regions, which are likely to be clusters of ultracompact HII regions. All 35 of the sources presented in this article have positive radio spectral indices alpha>0 suggesting an optically thick thermal bremsstrahlung emission arising in the HII region surrounding hot stars. Energy requirements indicate a range of a several to >500 O7V star equivalents powering each HII region. Assuming a Salpeter IMF, this corresponds to integrated stellar masses of 0.1--60,000 Msun. For roughly half of the sources in our sample, there is no obvious optical counterpart, giving further support for their deeply embedded nature. Their luminosities and radio spectral energy distributions are consistent with HII regions having electron densities from 1500 cm^-3 to 15000 cm^-3 and radii of 1 - 7 pc. We suggest that the less luminous of these sources are extragalactic ultracompact HII region complexes, those of intermediate luminosity are similar to W49 in the Galaxy, while the brightest will be counterparts to 30 Doradus. These objects constitute the lower mass range of extragalactic ``ultradense HII regions'' which we argue are the youngest stages of massive star cluster formation yet observed. This sample is beginning to fill in the continuum of objects between small associations of ultracompact HII regions and the massive extragalactic clusters that may evolve into globular clusters.

  5. Cloaking a sensor via transformation optics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allan Greenleaf; Yaroslav Kurylev; Matti Lassas; Gunther Uhlmann

    2010-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    It is generally believed that transformation optics based cloaking, besides rendering the cloaked region invisible to detection by scattering of incident waves, also shields the region from those same waves. We demonstrate a coupling between the cloaked and uncloaked regions, exposing a difference between cloaking for rays and waves. Interior resonances allow this coupling to be amplified, and careful choice of parameters leads to effective cloaks with degraded shielding. As one application, we describe how to use transformation optics to hide sensors in the cloaked region and yet enable the sensors to efficiently measure waves incident on the exterior of the cloak, an effect similar to the plasmon based approach of Alu' and Engheta.

  6. Northwest Regional Technology Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northwest Regional Technology Center for Homeland Security The Northwest Regional Technology Center and deployment of technologies that are effective homeland security solutions for the region, and accelerate technology transfer to the national user community. Foster a collaborative spirit across agencies

  7. LABORATORY I: GEOMETRIC OPTICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Lab I - 1 LABORATORY I: GEOMETRIC OPTICS In this lab, you will solve several problems related to the formation of optical images. Most of us have a great deal of experience with the formation of optical images this laboratory, you should be able to: · Describe features of real optical systems in terms of ray diagrams

  8. Optical XOR gate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vawter, G. Allen

    2013-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical XOR gate is formed as a photonic integrated circuit (PIC) from two sets of optical waveguide devices on a substrate, with each set of the optical waveguide devices including an electroabsorption modulator electrically connected in series with a waveguide photodetector. The optical XOR gate utilizes two digital optical inputs to generate an XOR function digital optical output. The optical XOR gate can be formed from III-V compound semiconductor layers which are epitaxially deposited on a III-V compound semiconductor substrate, and operates at a wavelength in the range of 0.8-2.0 .mu.m.

  9. Method and apparatus for use of III-nitride wide bandgap semiconductors in optical communications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hui, Rongqing (Lenexa, KS); Jiang,Hong-Xing (Manhattan, KS); Lin, Jing-Yu (Manhattan, KS)

    2008-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The present disclosure relates to the use of III-nitride wide bandgap semiconductor materials for optical communications. In one embodiment, an optical device includes an optical waveguide device fabricated using a III-nitride semiconductor material. The III-nitride semiconductor material provides for an electrically controllable refractive index. The optical waveguide device provides for high speed optical communications in an infrared wavelength region. In one embodiment, an optical amplifier is provided using optical coatings at the facet ends of a waveguide formed of erbium-doped III-nitride semiconductor materials.

  10. Observations of colocated optical and radar aurora H. Bahcivan,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lummerzheim, Dirk

    Observations of colocated optical and radar aurora H. Bahcivan,1 D. L. Hysell,2 D. Lummerzheim,3 M of the E region radar aurora obtained with a 30 MHz imaging radar and the optical aurora (green line, the radar aurora in the vicinity of a stable evening auroral arc arises because of the arc's polarization

  11. Optical and mechanical behavior of the optical fiber infrasound sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeWolf, Scott

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1.2 The Optical Fiber Infrasound Sensor . . . . . . .Fiber Infrasound Sensor Optical fibers are well known forSchnidrig. An optical fiber infrasound sensor: A new lower

  12. Latching micro optical switch

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garcia, Ernest J; Polosky, Marc A

    2013-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical switch reliably maintains its on or off state even when subjected to environments where the switch is bumped or otherwise moved. In addition, the optical switch maintains its on or off state indefinitely without requiring external power. External power is used only to transition the switch from one state to the other. The optical switch is configured with a fixed optical fiber and a movable optical fiber. The movable optical fiber is guided by various actuators in conjunction with a latching mechanism that configure the switch in one position that corresponds to the on state and in another position that corresponds to the off state.

  13. Sandia National Laboratories: Quantum Optics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ClimateQuantum Optics Quantum Optics videobanner Quantum Optics with a Single Semiconductor Quantum Dot Speaker: Weng Chow, EFRC Scientist Date: September 14, 2011 Event:...

  14. STRAIN MONITORING IN STIFFENED COMPOSITE PANELS USING EMBEDDED FIBRE OPTICAL AND STRAIN GAUGE SENSORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    (SHM) system based on Fibre Optic Bragg Grating (FOBG) sensors and standard resistance strain gauges for CFRP fuselage stiffened panels based on fibre optic Bragg grating sensors for the Green Regional. Among these approaches, methods based on optical [1]-[6] sensors are among the most rapidly developing

  15. Cloud optical and microphysical properties derived from ground-based and satellite sensors over

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Zhanqing

    Cloud optical and microphysical properties derived from ground-based and satellite sensors over of cloud optical and microphysical properties were made at Taihu, a highly polluted site in the central Yangtze Delta region, during a research campaign from May 2008 to December 2009. Cloud optical depth (COD

  16. DAMAGE DETECTION IN COMPOSITE STRUCTURES FROM FIBRE OPTIC DISTRIBUTED STRAIN MEASUREMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    of backscattered radiation), placing the plain optical fibre at the region where damage is expected. Because of itsDAMAGE DETECTION IN COMPOSITE STRUCTURES FROM FIBRE OPTIC DISTRIBUTED STRAIN MEASUREMENTS Alfredo the backscattered radiation ocurring at every point of the optical fibre by its natural disturbances, and three

  17. Optical Curtain Effect: Extraordinary Optical Transmission Enhanced by Antireflection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Yanxia; Lin, Yinyue; Li, Guohui; Hao, Yuying; He, Sailing; Fang, Nicholas X

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we employ an antireflective coating which comprises of inverted pi shaped metallic grooves to manipulate the behaviour of a TM-polarized plane wave transmitted through a periodic nanoslit array. At normal incidence, such scheme can not only retain the optical curtain effect in the output region, but also generate the extraordinary transmission of light through the nanoslits with the total transmission efficiency as high as 90%. Besides, we show that the spatially invariant field distribution in the output region as well as the field distribution of resonant modes around the inverted pi shaped grooves can be reproduced immaculately when the system is excited by an array of point sources beneath the inverted pi shaped grooves. In further, we investigate the influence of center-groove and side-corners of the inverted pi shaped grooves on suppressing the reflection of light, respectively. Based on our work, it shows promising potential in applications of enhancing the extraction efficiency as well ...

  18. Active optical zoom system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wick, David V.

    2005-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    An active optical zoom system changes the magnification (or effective focal length) of an optical imaging system by utilizing two or more active optics in a conventional optical system. The system can create relatively large changes in system magnification with very small changes in the focal lengths of individual active elements by leveraging the optical power of the conventional optical elements (e.g., passive lenses and mirrors) surrounding the active optics. The active optics serve primarily as variable focal-length lenses or mirrors, although adding other aberrations enables increased utility. The active optics can either be LC SLMs, used in a transmissive optical zoom system, or DMs, used in a reflective optical zoom system. By appropriately designing the optical system, the variable focal-length lenses or mirrors can provide the flexibility necessary to change the overall system focal length (i.e., effective focal length), and therefore magnification, that is normally accomplished with mechanical motion in conventional zoom lenses. The active optics can provide additional flexibility by allowing magnification to occur anywhere within the FOV of the system, not just on-axis as in a conventional system.

  19. High bandwidth optical mount

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bender, D.A.; Kuklo, T.

    1994-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical mount, which directs a laser beam to a point by controlling the position of a light-transmitting optic, is stiffened so that a lowest resonant frequency of the mount is approximately one kilohertz. The optical mount, which is cylindrically-shaped, positions the optic by individually moving a plurality of carriages which are positioned longitudinally within a sidewall of the mount. The optical mount is stiffened by allowing each carriage, which is attached to the optic, to move only in a direction which is substantially parallel to a center axis of the optic. The carriage is limited to an axial movement by flexures or linear bearings which connect the carriage to the mount. The carriage is moved by a piezoelectric transducer. By limiting the carriage to axial movement, the optic can be kinematically clamped to a carriage. 5 figs.

  20. ''Atomic Optics'': Nonimaging Optics on the Nanoscale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roland Winston Joseph O'Gallagher

    2005-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final report for a one year close out extension of our basic research program that was established at the University of Chicago more than sixteen years ago to explore and develop the optical sub-discipline that has come to be known as ''nonimaging optics''. This program has been extremely fruitful, having both broadened the range of formalism available for workers in this field and led to the discovery of many new families of optical devices. These devices and techniques have applications wherever the efficient transport and transformation of light distributions are important, in particular in illumination, fiber optics, collection and concentration of sunlight, and the detection of faint light signals in physics and astrophysics. Over the past thirty years, Nonimaging Optics (Welford and Winston, 1989) has brought a fresh approach to the analysis of many problems in classical macro-scale optics. Through the application of phase-space concepts, statistical methods, thermodynamic arguments, etc., many previously established performance limits were able to be broken and many technical surprises with exciting practical applications were discovered. The most recent three-year phase of our long-term continuing program ended in late 2002 and emphasized extending our work in geometrical optics and expanding it to include some interesting questions in physical optics as well as in the new field of statistical optics. This report presents a survey of the basic history and concepts of nonimaging optics and reviews highlights and significant accomplishments over the past fifteen years. This is followed by a more detailed summary of recent research directions and accomplishments during the last three years. This most recent phase was marked by the broadening in scope to include a separate project involving a collaboration with an industrial partner, Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC). This effort was proposed and approved in 1998 and was incorporated into this project (September, 1998) with the required additional funding provided through this already existing grant.

  1. Reflective optical imaging system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shafer, David R. (Fairfield, CT)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical system compatible with short wavelength (extreme ultraviolet) radiation comprising four reflective elements for projecting a mask image onto a substrate. The four optical elements are characterized in order from object to image as convex, concave, convex and concave mirrors. The optical system is particularly suited for step and scan lithography methods. The invention increases the slit dimensions associated with ringfield scanning optics, improves wafer throughput and allows higher semiconductor device density.

  2. Optical voltage reference

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rankin, R.; Kotter, D.

    1994-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical voltage reference for providing an alternative to a battery source is described. The optical reference apparatus provides a temperature stable, high precision, isolated voltage reference through the use of optical isolation techniques to eliminate current and impedance coupling errors. Pulse rate frequency modulation is employed to eliminate errors in the optical transmission link while phase-lock feedback is employed to stabilize the frequency to voltage transfer function. 2 figures.

  3. Fiber optic micro accelerometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Swierkowski, Steve P.

    2005-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    An accelerometer includes a wafer, a proof mass integrated into the wafer, at least one spring member connected to the proof mass, and an optical fiber. A Fabry-Perot cavity is formed by a partially reflective surface on the proof mass and a partially reflective surface on the end of the optical fiber. The two partially reflective surfaces are used to detect movement of the proof mass through the optical fiber, using an optical detection system.

  4. University of Central Florida College of Optics & Photonics Optics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Stryland, Eric

    University of Central Florida College of Optics & Photonics Optics Spring 2010 OSE-6432: Principles of guided wave optics; electro -optics, acousto-optics and optoelectronics. Location: CREOL-A-214 or by Appointment Reference Materials: 1. Class Notes. 2. "Fundamentals of Optical Waveguides", K. Okamoto, Academic

  5. SITN Regional Outreach Map

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Region States in Region Awardee(s) Location of Awardee(s) Contact(s) Northeast (Photovoltaics) CT * ME * MA * NH NY * RI * VT Hudson Valley Community College Troy, NY Richard...

  6. Ultracompact HII Regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stan Kurtz; Jose Franco

    2001-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We review some recent observational results on the properties of ultracompact HII regions, in particular the presence of extended continuum emission surrounding ultracompact sources and the discovery of a new class of so-called ``Hypercompact'' HII regions. In addition, we discuss recent attempts to probe the density structure within UC HII regions using the technique of spectral index analysis.

  7. Method and system for high power reflective optical elements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Demos, Stavros G.; Rubenchik, Alexander M.; Negres, Raluca A.

    2013-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of repairing damage in an optical element includes providing a laser system including at least one optical element having a coating layer having an incident light surface and directing a laser pulse from the laser system to impinge on the incident light surface. The method also includes sustaining damage to a portion of the incident light surface and melting the damaged portion of the incident light surface and a region adjacent to the damaged portion. The method further includes flowing material from the region adjacent the damaged portion to the damaged portion and solidifying the material in the damaged portion and the region adjacent to the damaged portion.

  8. Omnidirectional fiber optic tiltmeter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benjamin, B.C.; Miller, H.M.

    1983-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A tiltmeter is provided which is useful in detecting very small movements such as earth tides. The device comprises a single optical fiber, and an associated weight affixed thereto, suspended from a support to form a pendulum. A light source, e.g., a light emitting diode, mounted on the support transmits light through the optical fiber to a group of further optical fibers located adjacent to but spaced from the free end of the single optical fiber so that displacement of the single optical fiber with respect to the group will result in a change in the amount of light received by the individual optical fibers of the group. Photodetectors individually connectd to the fibers produce corresponding electrical outputs which are differentially compared and processed to produce a resultant continuous analog output representative of the amount and direction of displacement of the single optical fiber.

  9. Fiber optic vibration sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dooley, Joseph B. (Harriman, TN); Muhs, Jeffrey D. (Lenoir City, TN); Tobin, Kenneth W. (Harriman, TN)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fiber optic vibration sensor utilizes two single mode optical fibers supported by a housing with one optical fiber fixedly secured to the housing and providing a reference signal and the other optical fiber having a free span length subject to vibrational displacement thereof with respect to the housing and the first optical fiber for providing a signal indicative of a measurement of any perturbation of the sensor. Damping or tailoring of the sensor to be responsive to selected levels of perturbation is provided by altering the diameter of optical fibers or by immersing at least a portion of the free span length of the vibration sensing optical fiber into a liquid of a selected viscosity.

  10. Fiber optic vibration sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dooley, J.B.; Muhs, J.D.; Tobin, K.W.

    1995-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A fiber optic vibration sensor utilizes two single mode optical fibers supported by a housing with one optical fiber fixedly secured to the housing and providing a reference signal and the other optical fiber having a free span length subject to vibrational displacement thereof with respect to the housing and the first optical fiber for providing a signal indicative of a measurement of any perturbation of the sensor. Damping or tailoring of the sensor to be responsive to selected levels of perturbation is provided by altering the diameter of optical fibers or by immersing at least a portion of the free span length of the vibration sensing optical fiber into a liquid of a selected viscosity. 2 figures.

  11. Modular Optical PDV System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Araceli Rutkowski, David Esquibel

    2008-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A modular optical photon Doppler velocimetry (PDV) detector system has been developed by using readily available optical components with a 20-GHz Miteq optical detector into eight channels of single-wide modules integrated into a 3U rack unit (1U = 1.75 inches) with a common power supply. Optical fibers were precisely trimmed, welded, and timed within each unit. This system has been used to collect dynamic velocity data on various physics experiments. An optical power meter displays the laser input power to the module and optical power at the detector. An adjustable micro-electromechanical system (MEMS) optical attenuator is used to adjust the amount of unshifted light entering the detector. Front panel LEDs show the presence of power to the module. A fully loaded chassis with eight channels consumes 45 watts of power. Each chassis requires 1U spacing above and below for heat management. Modules can be easily replaced.

  12. The Corona Australis Star Forming Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ralph Neuhäuser; Jan Forbrich

    2008-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    At a distance of about 130 pc, the Corona Australis molecular cloud complex is one of the nearest regions with ongoing and/or recent star formation. It is a region with highly variable extinction of up to AV~45 mag, containing, at its core, the Coronet protostar cluster. There are now 55 known optically detected members, starting at late B spectral types. At the opposite end of the mass spectrum, there are two confirmed brown dwarf members and seven more candidate brown dwarfs. The CrA region has been most widely surveyed at infrared wavelengths, in X-rays, and in the millimeter continuum, while follow-up observations from centimeter radio to X-rays have focused on the Coronet cluster.

  13. Preliminary analyses of matrix properties of Silurian and Devonian carbonate rocks in the Indiana and Ohio parts of the Midwestern Basins and Arches Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casey, G.D. (Geological Survey, Columbus, OH (United States). Water Resources Div.)

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Geological Survey's Regional Aquifer-Systems Analysis (RASA) in the Midwestern Basins and Arches Region is investigating the Silurian and Devonian carbonate-rock aquifer in parts of Indiana, Ohio, Michigan, and Illinois. Core samples from the carbonate-rock aquifer in Indiana and Ohio were analyzed for horizontal permeability and porosity. These matrix properties were used to describe the hydrogeologic aspects of the carbonate-rock aquifer throughout the regional study area. Core descriptions by the Indiana and Ohio State Geological surveys, were used for sub-dividing the core into the various lithostratigraphic groups. The lithostratigraphic groups are: the Brassfield/Sexton Creek Limestone, the Sublockport (including the Dayton Limestone and the Rochester Shale Equivalent), the Lockport Dolomite or the Salamonie Dolomite, the Salina Group, the lower section of the Muscatatuck Group and the upper section of the Muscatatuck Group. The porosities and horizontal permeabilities determined from the 38 samples were analyzed by nonparametric statistical methods. The data were grouped by lithologic unit, well location, and position within a depositional basin (the Appalachian, Michigan and Illinois Basins). In each case, all groups of data had identical distributions. These results show that the horizontal permeability and porosity of the matrix in the Silurian and Devonian carbonate rocks that were sampled are statistically similar and that variation between the groups is not statistically important.

  14. SEARCHING FOR NEW HYPERCOMPACT H II REGIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanchez-Monge, Alvaro [Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, INAF, Largo E. Fermi 5, I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Pandian, Jagadheep D. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Dr., Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Kurtz, Stan, E-mail: asanchez@arcetri.astro.it [Centro de RadioastronomIa y Astrofisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apdo. Postal 3-72, 58090 Morelia, Michoacan (Mexico)

    2011-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Hypercompact (HC) H II regions are, by nature, very young H II regions, associated with the earliest stages of massive star formation. They may represent the transition phase as an early B-type star grows into an O-type star. Unfortunately, so few HC H II regions are presently known that their general attributes and defining characteristics are based on small number statistics. A larger sample is needed for detailed studies and good statistics. Class II methanol masers are one of the best indicators of the early stages of massive star formation. Using the Arecibo Methanol Maser Galactic Plane Survey-the most sensitive blind survey for 6.7 GHz methanol masers to date-we selected 24 HC H II region candidates. We made Expanded Very Large Array continuum observations at 3.6 and 1.3 cm to search for HC H II regions associated with these masers. We identified six potential HC H II regions in our sample based on the presence of optically thick free-free emission. Overall, we find that 30% of the methanol masers have an associated centimeter radio continuum source (separation less than 0.1 pc), which is in general agreement with previous studies.

  15. Compound semiconductor optical waveguide switch

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spahn, Olga B.; Sullivan, Charles T.; Garcia, Ernest J.

    2003-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical waveguide switch is disclosed which is formed from III-V compound semiconductors and which has a moveable optical waveguide with a cantilevered portion that can be bent laterally by an integral electrostatic actuator to route an optical signal (i.e. light) between the moveable optical waveguide and one of a plurality of fixed optical waveguides. A plurality of optical waveguide switches can be formed on a common substrate and interconnected to form an optical switching network.

  16. CDKN-CARICOM-A Regional Implementation Plan for CARICOM's Regional...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    CARICOM-A Regional Implementation Plan for CARICOM's Regional Climate Change Resilience Framework Jump to: navigation, search Name CDKN-CARICOM-A Regional Implementation Plan for...

  17. Multichannel optical sensing device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Selkowitz, Stephen E. (Piedmont, CA)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A multichannel optical sensing device is disclosed, for measuring the outr sky luminance or illuminance or the luminance or illuminance distribution in a room, comprising a plurality of light receptors, an optical shutter matrix including a plurality of liquid crystal optical shutter elements operable by electrical control signals between light transmitting and light stopping conditions, fiber optic elements connected between the receptors and the shutter elements, a microprocessor based programmable control unit for selectively supplying control signals to the optical shutter elements in a programmable sequence, a photodetector including an optical integrating spherical chamber having an input port for receiving the light from the shutter matrix and at least one detector element in the spherical chamber for producing output signals corresponding to the light, and output units for utilizing the output signals including a storage unit having a control connection to the microprocessor based programmable control unit for storing the output signals under the sequence control of the programmable control unit.

  18. Multichannel optical sensing device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Selkowitz, S.E.

    1985-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A multichannel optical sensing device is disclosed, for measuring the outdoor sky luminance or illuminance or the luminance or illuminance distribution in a room, comprising a plurality of light receptors, an optical shutter matrix including a plurality of liquid crystal optical shutter elements operable by electrical control signals between light transmitting and light stopping conditions, fiber optical elements connected between the receptors and the shutter elements, a microprocessor based programmable control unit for selectively supplying control signals to the optical shutter elements in a programmable sequence, a photodetector including an optical integrating spherical chamber having an input port for receiving the light from the shutter matrix and at least one detector element in the spherical chamber for producing output signals corresponding to the light, and output units for utilizing the output signals including a storage unit having a control connection to the microprocessor based programmable control unit for storing the output signals under the sequence control of the programmable control unit.

  19. Atmospheric optical calibration system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hulstrom, Roland L. (Bloomfield, CO); Cannon, Theodore W. (Golden, CO)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An atmospheric optical calibration system is provided to compare actual atmospheric optical conditions to standard atmospheric optical conditions on the basis of aerosol optical depth, relative air mass, and diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio. An indicator can show the extent to which the actual conditions vary from standard conditions. Aerosol scattering and absorption properties, diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio, and precipitable water vapor determined on a real-time basis for optical and pressure measurements are also used to generate a computer spectral model and for correcting actual performance response of a photovoltaic device to standard atmospheric optical condition response on a real-time basis as the device is being tested in actual outdoor conditions.

  20. Atmospheric optical calibration system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hulstrom, R.L.; Cannon, T.W.

    1988-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    An atmospheric optical calibration system is provided to compare actual atmospheric optical conditions to standard atmospheric optical conditions on the basis of aerosol optical depth, relative air mass, and diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio. An indicator can show the extent to which the actual conditions vary from standard conditions. Aerosol scattering and absorption properties, diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio, and precipitable water vapor determined on a real-time basis for optical and pressure measurements are also used to generate a computer spectral model and for correcting actual performance response of a photovoltaic device to standard atmospheric optical condition response on a real-time basis as the device is being tested in actual outdoor conditions. 7 figs.

  1. Entanglement in Classical Optics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Partha Ghose; Anirban Mukherjee

    2013-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The emerging field of entanglement or nonseparability in classical optics is reviewed, and its similarities with and differences from quantum entanglement clearly pointed out through a recapitulation of Hilbert spaces in general, the special restrictions on Hilbert spaces imposed in quantum mechanics and the role of Hilbert spaces in classical polarization optics. The production of Bell-like states in classical polarization optics is discussed, and new theorems are proved to discriminate between separable and nonseparable states in classical wave optics where no discreteness is involved. The influence of the Pancharatnam phase on a classical Bell-like state is deived. Finally, to what extent classical polarization optics can be used to simulate quantum information processing tasks is also discussed. This should be of great practical importance because coherence and entanglement are robust in classical optics but not in quantum systems.

  2. CEMI Western Regional Summit

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Please Join Assistant Secretary of Energy Dr. David Danielson for the Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative's Western Regional Summit. Register now for this free event.

  3. Content Protection for Optical Media Content Protection for Optical Media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amir, Yair

    Content Protection for Optical Media Content Protection for Optical Media A Comparison of Self-Protecting Digital Content and AACS Independent Security Evaluators www.securityevaluators.com May 3, 2005 Copyright for Optical Media 2 #12;Content Protection for Optical Media Content Protection for Optical Media 3 Executive

  4. Optical atomic magnetometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Budker, Dmitry; Higbie, James; Corsini, Eric P

    2013-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical atomic magnetometers is provided operating on the principles of nonlinear magneto-optical rotation. An atomic vapor is optically pumped using linearly polarized modulated light. The vapor is then probed using a non-modulated linearly polarized light beam. The resulting modulation in polarization angle of the probe light is detected and used in a feedback loop to induce self-oscillation at the resonant frequency.

  5. Prismatic optical display

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Veligdan, James T.; DeSanto, Leonard; Brewster, Calvin

    2004-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A spatially modulated light beam is projected, reflected, and redirected through a prismatic optical panel to form a video image for direct viewing thereon.

  6. Optical theorem and unitarity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valeriy Nazaruk

    2014-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    It is shown that an application of optical theorem for the non-unitary S-matrix can lead to the qualitative error in the result.

  7. Optical limiting materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McBranch, Duncan W. (Santa Fe, NM); Mattes, Benjamin R. (Santa Fe, NM); Koskelo, Aaron C. (Los Alamos, NM); Heeger, Alan J. (Santa Barbara, CA); Robinson, Jeanne M. (Los Alamos, NM); Smilowitz, Laura B. (Los Alamos, NM); Klimov, Victor I. (Los Alamos, NM); Cha, Myoungsik (Goleta, CA); Sariciftci, N. Serdar (Santa Barbara, CA); Hummelen, Jan C. (Groningen, NL)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Optical limiting materials. Methanofullerenes, fulleroids and/or other fullerenes chemically altered for enhanced solubility, in liquid solution, and in solid blends with transparent glass (SiO.sub.2) gels or polymers, or semiconducting (conjugated) polymers, are shown to be useful as optical limiters (optical surge protectors). The nonlinear absorption is tunable such that the energy transmitted through such blends saturates at high input energy per pulse over a wide range of wavelengths from 400-1100 nm by selecting the host material for its absorption wavelength and ability to transfer the absorbed energy into the optical limiting composition dissolved therein. This phenomenon should be generalizable to other compositions than substituted fullerenes.

  8. LSST Camera Optics Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riot, V J; Olivier, S; Bauman, B; Pratuch, S; Seppala, L; Gilmore, D; Ku, J; Nordby, M; Foss, M; Antilogus, P; Morgado, N

    2012-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) uses a novel, three-mirror, telescope design feeding a camera system that includes a set of broad-band filters and three refractive corrector lenses to produce a flat field at the focal plane with a wide field of view. Optical design of the camera lenses and filters is integrated in with the optical design of telescope mirrors to optimize performance. We discuss the rationale for the LSST camera optics design, describe the methodology for fabricating, coating, mounting and testing the lenses and filters, and present the results of detailed analyses demonstrating that the camera optics will meet their performance goals.

  9. Distributed fiber optic moisture intrusion sensing system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, Jonathan D. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2003-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Method and system for monitoring and identifying moisture intrusion in soil such as is contained in landfills housing radioactive and/or hazardous waste. The invention utilizes the principle that moist or wet soil has a higher thermal conductance than dry soil. The invention employs optical time delay reflectometry in connection with a distributed temperature sensing system together with heating means in order to identify discrete areas within a volume of soil wherein temperature is lower. According to the invention an optical element and, optionally, a heating element may be included in a cable or other similar structure and arranged in a serpentine fashion within a volume of soil to achieve efficient temperature detection across a large area or three dimensional volume of soil. Remediation, moisture countermeasures, or other responsive action may then be coordinated based on the assumption that cooler regions within a soil volume may signal moisture intrusion where those regions are located.

  10. Solar Energy Materials & Solar Cells 92 (2008) 821829 Modeling the optical properties of WO3 and WO3SiO2 thin films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thirumalai, Devarajan

    Solar Energy Materials & Solar Cells 92 (2008) 821­829 Modeling the optical properties of WO3 the optical response of the films in the near-UV and visible region: two interband transitions for energies E

  11. Optical Properties of a ?-Vacuum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luis Huerta; Jorge Zanelli

    2012-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Chern-Simons (CS) forms generalize the minimal coupling between gauge potentials and point charges, to sources represented by charged extended objects (branes). The simplest example of such a CS-brane coupling is a domain wall coupled to the electromagnetic CS three-form. This describes a topologically charged interface where the CS form AdA is supported, separating two three-dimensional spatial regions in 3+1 spacetime. Electrodynamics at either side of the brane is described by the same Maxwell's equations, but those two regions have different vacua, characterized by a different value of the \\theta-parameter multiplying the Pontryagin form F ^ F. The \\theta-term is the abelian version of the concept introduced by 't Hooft for the resolution of the U(1) problem in QCD. We point out that CS-generalized classical electrodynamics shows new phenomena when two neighboring regions with different \\theta-vacua are present. These topological effects result from surface effects induced by the boundary and we explore the consequences of such boundary effects for the propagation of the electromagnetic field in Maxwell theory. Several features, including optical and electrostatic/magnetostatic responses, which may be observable in condensed matter systems, like topological insulators, are discussed.

  12. AN INTRODUCTION TO QUANTUM OPTICS...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palffy-Muhoray, Peter

    AN INTRODUCTION TO QUANTUM OPTICS... ...the light as you've never seen before... Optics:http://science.howstuffworks.com/laser5.htm #12;5 DEFINITION Quantum Optics: "Quantum optics is a field in quantum physics, dealing OPTICS OPERATORS Light is described in terms of field operators for creation and annihilation of photons

  13. Regional Analysis Briefs

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2028-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Regional Analysis Briefs (RABs) provide an overview of specific regions that play an important role in world energy markets, either directly or indirectly. These briefs cover areas that are currently major producers (Caspian Sea), have geopolitical importance (South China Sea), or may have future potential as producers or transit areas (East Africa, Eastern Mediterranean).

  14. NONLINEAR EFFECTS OF A MODAL DOMAIN OPTICAL FIBER SENSOR IN A VIBRATION SUPPRESSION CONTROL LOOP FOR A FLEXIBLE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lindner, Douglas K.

    NONLINEAR EFFECTS OF A MODAL DOMAIN OPTICAL FIBER SENSOR IN A VIBRATION SUPPRESSION CONTROL LOOP Recently, a modal domain optical fiber sensor has been demonstrated as a sensor in a control system the region of linear operation in terms of the optical fiber sensor parameters. #12;2 1. INTRODUCTION

  15. Optical realization of relativistic non-Hermitian quantum mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefano Longhi

    2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Light propagation in distributed feedback optical structures with gain/loss regions is shown to provide an accessible laboratory tool to visualize in optics the spectral properties of the one-dimensional Dirac equation with non-Hermitian interactions. Spectral singularities and PT symmetry breaking of the Dirac Hamiltonian are shown to correspond to simple observable physical quantities and related to well-known physical phenomena like resonance narrowing and laser oscillation.

  16. Low-energy proton capture reactions in the mass region 55-60

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dutta, Saumi; Gangopadhyay, G; Bhattacharyya, Abhijit

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Low energy proton capture reactions in the mass 55-60 region are studied in a microscopic optical model. Nuclear density profile is calculated using the relativistic mean field theory. The DDM3Y interaction is folded with the theoretical density to obtain the proton-nucleus optical potential. A definite set of normalization parameters has been obtained for the concerned mass region by comparing with all available experimental data in this mass region. These parameters have been used to obtain proton capture rates for astrophysically important reactions in this mass region.

  17. Low-energy proton capture reactions in the mass region 55-60

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saumi Dutta; Dipti Chakraborty; G. Gangopadhyay; Abhijit Bhattacharyya

    2015-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Low energy proton capture reactions in the mass 55-60 region are studied in a microscopic optical model. Nuclear density profile is calculated using the relativistic mean field theory. The DDM3Y interaction is folded with the theoretical density to obtain the proton-nucleus optical potential. A definite set of normalization parameters has been obtained for the concerned mass region by comparing with all available experimental data in this mass region. These parameters have been used to obtain proton capture rates for astrophysically important reactions in this mass region.

  18. Flexible optical panel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Veligdan, James T. (Manorville, NY)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A flexible optical panel includes laminated optical waveguides, each including a ribbon core laminated between cladding, with the core being resilient in the plane of the core for elastically accommodating differential movement thereof to permit winding of the panel in a coil.

  19. Multimode optical fiber

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bigot-Astruc, Marianne; Molin, Denis; Sillard, Pierre

    2014-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A depressed graded-index multimode optical fiber includes a central core, an inner depressed cladding, a depressed trench, an outer depressed cladding, and an outer cladding. The central core has an alpha-index profile. The depressed claddings limit the impact of leaky modes on optical-fiber performance characteristics (e.g., bandwidth, core size, and/or numerical aperture).

  20. Apollo Ring Optical Switch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maestas, J.H.

    1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical switch was designed, built, and installed at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico, to facilitate the integration of two Apollo computer networks into a single network. This report presents an overview of the optical switch as well as its layout, switch testing procedure and test data, and installation.

  1. Digital optical conversion module

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kotter, D.K.; Rankin, R.A.

    1988-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A digital optical conversion module used to convert an analog signal to a computer compatible digital signal including a voltage-to-frequency converter, frequency offset response circuitry, and an electrical-to-optical converter. Also used in conjunction with the digital optical conversion module is an optical link and an interface at the computer for converting the optical signal back to an electrical signal. Suitable for use in hostile environments having high levels of electromagnetic interference, the conversion module retains high resolution of the analog signal while eliminating the potential for errors due to noise and interference. The module can be used to link analog output scientific equipment such as an electrometer used with a mass spectrometer to a computer. 2 figs.

  2. Fiber optic hydrophone

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kuzmenko, P.J.; Davis, D.T.

    1994-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A miniature fiber optic hydrophone based on the principles of a Fabry-Perot interferometer is disclosed. The hydrophone, in one embodiment, includes a body having a shaped flexible bladder at one end which defines a volume containing air or suitable gas, and including a membrane disposed adjacent a vent. An optical fiber extends into the body with one end terminating in spaced relation to the membrane. Acoustic waves in the water that impinge on the bladder cause the pressure of the volume therein to vary causing the membrane to deflect and modulate the reflectivity of the Fabry-Perot cavity formed by the membrane surface and the cleaved end of the optical fiber disposed adjacent to the membrane. When the light is transmitted down the optical fiber, the reflected signal is amplitude modulated by the incident acoustic wave. Another embodiment utilizes a fluid filled volume within which the fiber optic extends. 2 figures.

  3. Digital ultrasonically encoded (DUE) optical focusing into random media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tay, Jian Wei; Suzuki, Yuta; Wang, Lihong V

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Focusing light into opaque random or scattering media such as biological tissue is a much sought-after goal for biomedical applications such as photodynamic therapy, optical manipulation, and photostimulation. However, focusing with conventional lenses is restricted to one transport mean free path in scattering media, limiting both optical penetration depth and resolution. Focusing deeper is possible by using optical phase conjugation or wavefront shaping to compensate for the scattering. For practical applications, wavefront shaping offers the advantage of a robust optical system that is less sensitive to optical misalignment. Here, the phase of the incident light is spatially tailored using a phase-shifting array to pre-compensate for scattering. The challenge, then, is to determine the phase pattern which allows light to be optimally delivered to the target region. Optimization algorithms are typically employed for this purpose, with visible particles used as targets to generate feedback. However, using th...

  4. Optical amplifier-powered quantum optical amplification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John Jeffers

    2011-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    I show that an optical amplifier, when combined with photon subtraction, can be used for quantum state amplification, adding noise at a level below the standard minimum. The device could be used to significantly decrease the probability of incorrectly identifying coherent states chosen from a finite set.

  5. Regional Districts (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Adjacent Water Control and Improvement Districts and Municipal Utility Districts can opt to form a Regional District to oversee water issues. Such districts may be created:(1) to purchase, own,...

  6. Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE has created a network of seven Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSPs) to help develop the technology, infrastructure, and regulations to implement large-scale CO2 storage (also...

  7. Projection optics box

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hale, Layton C. (Livermore, CA); Malsbury, Terry (Tracy, CA); Hudyma, Russell M. (San Ramon, CA); Parker, John M. (Tracy, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A projection optics box or assembly for use in an optical assembly, such as in an extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) system using 10-14 nm soft x-ray photons. The projection optics box utilizes a plurality of highly reflective optics or mirrors, each mounted on a precision actuator, and which reflects an optical image, such as from a mask, in the EUVL system onto a point of use, such as a target or silicon wafer, the mask, for example, receiving an optical signal from a source assembly, such as a developed from laser system, via a series of highly reflective mirrors of the EUVL system. The plurality of highly reflective optics or mirrors are mounted in a housing assembly comprised of a series of bulkheads having wall members secured together to form a unit construction of maximum rigidity. Due to the precision actuators, the mirrors must be positioned precisely and remotely in tip, tilt, and piston (three degrees of freedom), while also providing exact constraint.

  8. Gregorian optical system with non-linear optical technology for protection against intense optical transients

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ackermann, Mark R. (Albuquerque, NM); Diels, Jean-Claude M. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2007-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical system comprising a concave primary mirror reflects light through an intermediate focus to a secondary mirror. The secondary mirror re-focuses the image to a final image plane. Optical limiter material is placed near the intermediate focus to optically limit the intensity of light so that downstream components of the optical system are protected from intense optical transients. Additional lenses before and/or after the intermediate focus correct optical aberrations.

  9. Optical Quadratic Measure Eigenmodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Mazilu; Joerg Baumgartl; Sebastian Kosmeier; Kishan Dholakia

    2010-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a mathematically rigorous technique which facilitates the optimization of various optical properties of electromagnetic fields. The technique exploits the linearity of electromagnetic fields along with the quadratic nature of their interaction with matter. In this manner we may decompose the respective fields into optical quadratic measure eigenmodes (QME). Key applications include the optimization of the size of a focused spot, the transmission through photonic devices, and the structured illumination of photonic and plasmonic structures. We verify the validity of the QME approach through a particular experimental realization where the size of a focused optical field is minimized using a superposition of Bessel beams.

  10. Fiber optic laser rod

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Erickson, G.F.

    1988-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser rod is formed from a plurality of optical fibers, each forming an individual laser. Synchronization of the individual fiber lasers is obtained by evanescent wave coupling between adjacent optical fiber cores. The fiber cores are dye-doped and spaced at a distance appropriate for evanescent wave coupling at the wavelength of the selected dye. An interstitial material having an index of refraction lower than that of the fiber core provides the optical isolation for effective lasing action while maintaining the cores at the appropriate coupling distance. 2 figs.

  11. Tuned optical cavity magnetometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Okandan, Murat (Edgewood, NM); Schwindt, Peter (Albuquerque, NM)

    2010-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    An atomic magnetometer is disclosed which utilizes an optical cavity formed from a grating and a mirror, with a vapor cell containing an alkali metal vapor located inside the optical cavity. Lasers are used to magnetically polarize the alkali metal vapor and to probe the vapor and generate a diffracted laser beam which can be used to sense a magnetic field. Electrostatic actuators can be used in the magnetometer for positioning of the mirror, or for modulation thereof. Another optical cavity can also be formed from the mirror and a second grating for sensing, adjusting, or stabilizing the position of the mirror.

  12. Silicon fiber optic sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pocha, Michael D. (Livermore, CA); Swierkowski, Steve P. (Livermore, CA); Wood, Billy E. (Livermore, CA)

    2007-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A Fabry-Perot cavity is formed by a partially or wholly reflective surface on the free end of an integrated elongate channel or an integrated bounding wall of a chip of a wafer and a partially reflective surface on the end of the optical fiber. Such a constructed device can be utilized to detect one or more physical parameters, such as, for example, strain, through the optical fiber using an optical detection system to provide measuring accuracies of less than aboutb0.1%.

  13. Optical limiting materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McBranch, D.W.; Mattes, B.R.; Koskelo, A.C.; Heeger, A.J.; Robinson, J.M.; Smilowitz, L.B.; Klimov, V.I.; Cha, M.; Sariciftci, N.S.; Hummelen, J.C.

    1998-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Methanofullerenes, fulleroids and/or other fullerenes chemically altered for enhanced solubility, in liquid solution, and in solid blends with transparent glass (SiO{sub 2}) gels or polymers, or semiconducting (conjugated) polymers, are shown to be useful as optical limiters (optical surge protectors). The nonlinear absorption is tunable such that the energy transmitted through such blends saturates at high input energy per pulse over a wide range of wavelengths from 400--1,100 nm by selecting the host material for its absorption wavelength and ability to transfer the absorbed energy into the optical limiting composition dissolved therein. This phenomenon should be generalizable to other compositions than substituted fullerenes. 5 figs.

  14. Methods for globally treating silica optics to reduce optical damage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, Philip Edward; Suratwala, Tayyab Ishaq; Bude, Jeffrey Devin; Shen, Nan; Steele, William Augustus; Laurence, Ted Alfred; Feit, Michael Dennis; Wong, Lana Louie

    2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for preventing damage caused by high intensity light sources to optical components includes annealing the optical component for a predetermined period. Another method includes etching the optical component in an etchant including fluoride and bi-fluoride ions. The method also includes ultrasonically agitating the etching solution during the process followed by rinsing of the optical component in a rinse bath.

  15. Adaptive optics enhanced simultaneous en-face optical coherence tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dainty, Chris

    Adaptive optics enhanced simultaneous en-face optical coherence tomography and scanning laser ophthalmoscopy David Merino and Chris Dainty Applied Optics Group, Department of Experimental Physics, National and Adrian Gh. Podoleanu Applied Optics Group, School of Physical Sciences, University of Kent at Canterbury

  16. PURDUE UNIVERSITY ULTRAFAST OPTICS AND OPTICAL FIBER COMMUNICATIONS LABORATORY Femtosecond Pulse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Purdue University

    as new pulse sequence processing functionalities. #12;PURDUE UNIVERSITY ULTRAFAST OPTICS AND OPTICAL UNIVERSITY ULTRAFAST OPTICS AND OPTICAL FIBER COMMUNICATIONS LABORATORY CLEO 2002 One Guide ­ One PulsePURDUE UNIVERSITY ULTRAFAST OPTICS AND OPTICAL FIBER COMMUNICATIONS LABORATORY CLEO 2002

  17. PURDUE UNIVERSITY ULTRAFAST OPTICS & OPTICAL FIBER COMMUNICATIONS LABORATORY Photonic RF Waveform Synthesis,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Purdue University

    PURDUE UNIVERSITY ULTRAFAST OPTICS & OPTICAL FIBER COMMUNICATIONS LABORATORY Photonic RF Waveform, Shijun Xiao Funding from ARO, DARPA, and NSF #12;PURDUE UNIVERSITY ULTRAFAST OPTICS & OPTICAL FIBER performance (spectral engineering, dispersion compensation) #12;PURDUE UNIVERSITY ULTRAFAST OPTICS & OPTICAL

  18. Absorbance modulation optical lithography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsai, Hsin-Yu Sidney

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, the concept of absorbance-modulation optical lithography (AMOL) is described, and the feasibility experimentally verified. AMOL is an implementation of nodal lithography, which is not bounded by the diffraction ...

  19. Optical gamma thermometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Koster, Glen Peter; Xia, Hua; Lee, Boon Kwee

    2013-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical gamma thermometer includes a metal mass having a temperature proportional to a gamma flux within a core of a nuclear reactor, and an optical fiber cable for measuring the temperature of the heated metal mass. The temperature of the heated mass may be measured by using one or more fiber grating structures and/or by using scattering techniques, such as Raman, Brillouin, and the like. The optical gamma thermometer may be used in conjunction with a conventional reactor heat balance to calibrate the local power range monitors over their useful in-service life. The optical gamma thermometer occupies much less space within the in-core instrument tube and costs much less than the conventional gamma thermometer.

  20. Erected mirror optical switch

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Allen, James J.

    2005-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A microelectromechanical (MEM) optical switching apparatus is disclosed that is based on an erectable mirror which is formed on a rotatable stage using surface micromachining. An electrostatic actuator is also formed on the substrate to rotate the stage and mirror with a high angular precision. The mirror can be erected manually after fabrication of the device and used to redirect an incident light beam at an arbitrary angel and to maintain this state in the absence of any applied electrical power. A 1.times.N optical switch can be formed using a single rotatable mirror. In some embodiments of the present invention, a plurality of rotatable mirrors can be configured so that the stages and mirrors rotate in unison when driven by a single micromotor thereby forming a 2.times.2 optical switch which can be used to switch a pair of incident light beams, or as a building block to form a higher-order optical switch.

  1. Optical Quantum Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeremy L. O'Brien

    2008-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2001 all-optical quantum computing became feasible with the discovery that scalable quantum computing is possible using only single photon sources, linear optical elements, and single photon detectors. Although it was in principle scalable, the massive resource overhead made the scheme practically daunting. However, several simplifications were followed by proof-of-principle demonstrations, and recent approaches based on cluster states or error encoding have dramatically reduced this worrying resource overhead, making an all-optical architecture a serious contender for the ultimate goal of a large-scale quantum computer. Key challenges will be the realization of high-efficiency sources of indistinguishable single photons, low-loss, scalable optical circuits, high efficiency single photon detectors, and low-loss interfacing of these components.

  2. Stereoscopic optical viewing system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tallman, Clifford S. (Walnut Creek, CA)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved optical system which provides the operator a stereoscopic viewing field and depth of vision, particularly suitable for use in various machines such as electron or laser beam welding and drilling machines. The system features two separate but independently controlled optical viewing assemblies from the eyepiece to a spot directly above the working surface. Each optical assembly comprises a combination of eye pieces, turning prisms, telephoto lenses for providing magnification, achromatic imaging relay lenses and final stage pentagonal turning prisms. Adjustment for variations in distance from the turning prisms to the workpiece, necessitated by varying part sizes and configurations and by the operator's visual accuity, is provided separately for each optical assembly by means of separate manual controls at the operator console or within easy reach of the operator.

  3. Stereoscopic optical viewing system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tallman, C.S.

    1986-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved optical system which provides the operator with a stereoscopic viewing field and depth of vision, particularly suitable for use in various machines such as electron or laser beam welding and drilling machines. The system features two separate but independently controlled optical viewing assemblies from the eyepiece to a spot directly above the working surface. Each optical assembly comprises a combination of eye pieces, turning prisms, telephoto lenses for providing magnification, achromatic imaging relay lenses and final stage pentagonal turning prisms. Adjustment for variations in distance from the turning prisms to the workpiece, necessitated by varying part sizes and configurations and by the operator's visual accuity, is provided separately for each optical assembly by means of separate manual controls at the operator console or within easy reach of the operator.

  4. Integrated optical isolators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zaman, Tauhid R

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Introduction: Optical isolators are important components in lasers. Their main function is to eliminate noise caused by back-reflections into these lasers. The need for integrated isolators comes from the continuing growth ...

  5. Optical displacement sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carr, Dustin W. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical displacement sensor is disclosed which uses a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) coupled to an optical cavity formed by a moveable membrane and an output mirror of the VCSEL. This arrangement renders the lasing characteristics of the VCSEL sensitive to any movement of the membrane produced by sound, vibrations, pressure changes, acceleration, etc. Some embodiments of the optical displacement sensor can further include a light-reflective diffractive lens located on the membrane or adjacent to the VCSEL to control the amount of lasing light coupled back into the VCSEL. A photodetector detects a portion of the lasing light from the VCSEL to provide an electrical output signal for the optical displacement sensor which varies with the movement of the membrane.

  6. Fiber optic fluid detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Angel, S.M.

    1987-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Particular gases or liquids are detected with a fiber optic element having a cladding or coating of a material which absorbs the fluid or fluids and which exhibits a change of an optical property, such as index of refraction, light transmissiveness or fluoresence emission, for example, in response to absorption of the fluid. The fluid is sensed by directing light into the fiber optic element and detecting changes in the light, such as exit angle changes for example, that result from the changed optical property of the coating material. The fluid detector may be used for such purposes as sensing toxic or explosive gases in the atmosphere, measuring ground water contamination or monitoring fluid flows in industrial processes, among other uses. 10 figs.

  7. Intracoronary Optical Diagnostics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lowe, Harry C.

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT), is a novel intravascular imaging modality analogous to intravascular ultrasound but uses light instead of sound. This review details the background, development, and status of current ...

  8. Northeast Regional Biomass Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lusk, P.D.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Northeast Regional Biomass Program has been in operation for a period of nine years. During this time, state managed programs and technical programs have been conducted covering a wide range of activities primarily aim at the use and applications of wood as a fuel. These activities include: assessments of available biomass resources; surveys to determine what industries, businesses, institutions, and utility companies use wood and wood waste for fuel; and workshops, seminars, and demonstrations to provide technical assistance. In the Northeast, an estimated 6.2 million tons of wood are used in the commercial and industrial sector, where 12.5 million cords are used for residential heating annually. Of this useage, 1504.7 mw of power has been generated from biomass. The use of wood energy products has had substantial employment and income benefits in the region. Although wood and woodwaste have received primary emphasis in the regional program, the use of municipal solid waste has received increased emphasis as an energy source. The energy contribution of biomass will increase as potentia users become more familiar with existing feedstocks, technologies, and applications. The Northeast Regional Biomass Program is designed to support region-specific to overcome near-term barriers to biomass energy use.

  9. Optical pumping in a whispering mode optical waveguide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kurnit, Norman A. (Santa Fe, NM)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A device and method for optical pumping in a whispering mode optical waveguide. Both a helical ribbon and cylinder are disclosed which incorporate an additional curvature for confining the beam to increase intensity. An optical pumping medium is disposed in the optical path of the beam as it propagates along the waveguide. Optical pumping is enhanced by the high intensities of the beam and long interaction pathlengths which are achieved in a small volume.

  10. Optical pumping in a whispering-mode optical waveguide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kurnit, N.A.

    1981-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A device and method for optical pumping in a whispering mode optical waveguide are described. Both a helical ribbon and cylinder are disclosed which incorporate an additional curvature for confining the beam to increase intensity. An optical pumping medium is disposed in the optical path of the beam as it propagates along the waveguide. Optical pumping is enhanced by the high intensities of the beam and long interaction path lengths which are achieved in a small volume.

  11. Optical Quantum Computation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. C. Ralph; G. J. Pryde

    2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We review the field of Optical Quantum Computation, considering the various implementations that have been proposed and the experimental progress that has been made toward realizing them. We examine both linear and nonlinear approaches and both particle and field encodings. In particular we discuss the prospects for large scale optical quantum computing in terms of the most promising physical architectures and the technical requirements for realizing them.

  12. Supersymmetric transparent optical intersections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefano Longhi

    2015-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Supersymmetric (SUSY) optical structures provide a versatile platform to manipulate the scattering and localization properties of light, with potential applications to mode conversion, spatial multiplexing and invisible devices. Here we show that SUSY can be exploited to realize broadband transparent intersections between guiding structures in optical networks for both continuous and discretized light. These include transparent crossing of high-contrast-index waveguides and directional couplers, as well as crossing of guiding channels in coupled resonator lattices.

  13. Integrated Optical Probes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brent Frogget, Douglas DeVore, Vincent Romero, David Esquibel, and David Holtkamp

    2008-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Optical probes used in velocimetry measurements have typically been individual probes that collect data for a single diagnostic at a single point. These probes have been used in diagnostics such as VISAR, PDV, and radiometry, which measure surface velocity, temperature, and other characteristics. When separate probes are used for these measurements, the different diagnostic points measured must be significantly separated. We have developed integrated probes that collect data for multiple optical diagnostics; these probes measure points in close proximity.

  14. Magnetic Landscape of Sun's Polar Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Tsuneta; K. Ichimoto; Y. Katsukawa; B. W. Lites; K. Matsuzaki; S. Nagata; D. Orozco Suarez; T. Shimizu; M. Shimojo; R. A. Shine; Y. Suematsu; T. K. Suzuki; T. D. Tarbell; A. M. Title

    2008-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the magnetic landscape of the polar region of the Sun that is unprecedented in terms of high spatial resolution, large field of view, and polarimetric precision. These observations were carried out with the Solar Optical Telescope aboard \\emph{Hinode}. Using a Milne-Eddington inversion, we found many vertically-oriented magnetic flux tubes with field strength as strong as 1 kG that are scattered in latitude between 70-90 degree. They all have the same polarity, consistent with the global polarity of the polar region. The field vectors were observed to diverge from the center of the flux elements, consistent with a view of magnetic fields that expand and fan out with height. The polar region is also covered with ubiquitous horizontal fields. The polar regions are the source of the fast solar wind channelled along unipolar coronal magnetic fields whose photospheric source is evidently rooted in the strong field, vertical patches of flux. We conjecture that vertical flux tubes with large expansion around the photosphere-corona boundary serve as efficient chimneys for Alfven waves that accelerate the solar wind.

  15. Optical Solitons and their applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palffy-Muhoray, Peter

    Optical Solitons and their applications By: Mohammad Nopoush Supervisor: Professor Palffy-Muhoray #12;Definition Optical: Non-changing optical field during propagation due to delicate balance between nonlinear and linear effects. Nonlinear effects: Due to the optical Kerr effect (AC Kerr effect

  16. Optical computing Damien Woods a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woods, Damien

    Optical computing Damien Woods a aDepartment of Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Institute, Vierimaantie 5, 84100 Ylivieska, Finland Abstract In this survey we consider optical computers of such optical computing archi- tectures, including descriptions of the type of hardware commonly used in optical

  17. Undergraduate Handbook Dear Optics student,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cantlon, Jessica F.

    Undergraduate Handbook Fall 2013 #12;2 Dear Optics student, It is my great pleasure to welcome you to The Institute of Optics. The Institute of Optics has been educating the next generation of leaders in the field since it was founded in 1929 as the first optics department in the country

  18. SCIENCE, OPTICS & YOU GUIDEBOOK INTRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weston, Ken

    SCIENCE, OPTICS & YOU GUIDEBOOK - i - INTRODUCTION WHAT IS SCIENCE, 0PTICS & YOU? The Science, Optics and You Guidebook is made up as follows: Science, Optics and You is a standards light, color, and optics. Activities are designed to engage students in active investigation

  19. Universal Linear Optics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacques Carolan; Chris Harrold; Chris Sparrow; Enrique Martín-López; Nicholas J. Russell; Joshua W. Silverstone; Peter J. Shadbolt; Nobuyuki Matsuda; Manabu Oguma; Mikitaka Itoh; Graham D. Marshall; Mark G. Thompson; Jonathan C. F. Matthews; Toshikazu Hashimoto; Jeremy L. O'Brien; Anthony Laing

    2015-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Linear optics underpins tests of fundamental quantum mechanics and computer science, as well as quantum technologies. Here we experimentally demonstrate the longstanding goal of a single reprogrammable optical circuit that is sufficient to implement all possible linear optical protocols up to the size of that circuit. Our six-mode universal system consists of a cascade of 15 Mach-Zehnder interferometers with 30 thermo-optic phase shifters integrated into a single photonic chip that is electrically and optically interfaced for arbitrary setting of all phase shifters, input of up to six photons and their measurement with a 12 single-photon detector system. We programmed this system to implement heralded quantum logic and entangling gates, boson sampling with verification tests, and six-dimensional complex Hadamards. We implemented 100 Haar random unitaries with average fidelity 0.999 $\\pm$ 0.001. Our system is capable of switching between these and any other linear optical protocol in seconds. These results point the way to applications across fundamental science and quantum technologies.

  20. Inverted cones grating for flexible metafilter at optical and infrared frequencies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brückner, Jean-Baptiste; Le Rouzo, Judikaël; Escoubas, Ludovic [Aix-Marseille Université, IM2NP, CNRS-UMR 7334, Domaine Universitaire de Saint-Jérôme, Service 231, 13397 Marseille Cedex 20 (France); Brissonneau, Vincent; Dubarry, Christophe [CEA-LITEN DTNM, 17 Avenue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble cedex 9 (France); Ferchichi, Abdelkerim; Gourgon, Cécile [LTM CNRS, Laboratoire des Technologies de la Microélectronique 17 Avenue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble cedex 9 (France); Berginc, Gérard [Thales Optronique S.A., 2 Avenue Gay Lussac, 78990 Elancourt (France)

    2014-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    By combining the antireflective properties from gradual changes in the effective refractive index and cavity coupling from cone gratings and the efficient optical behavior of a tungsten film, a flexible filter showing very broad antireflective properties from the visible to short wavelength infrared region and, simultaneously, a mirror-like behavior in the mid-infrared wavelength region and long-infrared wavelength region has been conceived. Nanoimprint technology has permitted the replication of inverted cone patterns on a large scale on a flexible polymer, afterwards coated with a thin tungsten film. This optical metafilter is of great interest in the stealth domain where optical signature reduction from the optical to short wavelength infrared region is an important matter. As it also acts as selective thermal emitter offering a good solar-absorption/infrared-emissivity ratio, interests are found as well for solar heating applications.

  1. Barium Titanate Nanoparticles as Exogenous Contrast Agents in Second Harmonic Optical Coherence Tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pearson, Jeremy T

    2013-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    I propose and demonstrate a method by which barium titanate nanoparticle clusters can be used as exogenous contrast agents in Second Harmonic Optical Coherence Tomography imaging systems to localize and highlight desired regions of tissue. SH...

  2. Optical amplifier exhibiting net phase-mismatch selected to at least partially reduce gain-induced phase-matching during operation and method of operation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Feve, Jean-Philippe (Cupertino, CA); Kliner, Dahv A. V. (San Ramon, CA); Farrow; Roger L. (Pleasanton, CA)

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical amplifier, such as an optical waveguide amplifier (e.g., an optical fiber amplifier or a planar waveguide) or a non-guiding optical amplifier, that exhibits a net phase-mismatch selected to at least partially reduce gain-induced phase-matching during operation thereof is disclosed. In one aspect of the invention, an optical amplifier structure includes at least one optical amplifier having a length and a gain region. The at least one optical amplifier exhibits a net phase-mismatch that varies along at least part of the length thereof selected to at least partially reduce gain-induced phase-matching during operation thereof.

  3. Transparent electrode for optical switch

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goldhar, J.; Henesian, M.A.

    1984-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention relates generally to optical switches and techniques for applying a voltage to an electro-optical crystal, and more particularly, to transparent electodes for an optical switch. System architectures for very large inertial confinement fusion (ICF) lasers require active optical elements with apertures on the order of one meter. Large aperture optical switches are needed for isolation of stages, switch-out from regenerative amplifier cavities and protection from target retroreflections.

  4. High transmission nanoscale bowtie-shaped aperture probe for near-field optical imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Xianfan

    High transmission nanoscale bowtie-shaped aperture probe for near-field optical imaging Liang Wang probe integrated with nanoscale bowtie aperture for enhanced optical transmission is demonstrated. The bowtie-shape aperture allows a propagating mode in the bowtie gap region, which enables simultaneous

  5. Catheter guided by optical coherence domain reflectometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Everett, Matthew (Pleasanton, CA); Colston, Billy W. (Livermore, CA); Da Silva, Luiz B. (Danville, CA); Matthews, Dennis (Moss Beach, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A guidance and viewing system based on multiplexed optical coherence domain reflectometry is incorporated into a catheter, endoscope, or other medical device to measure the location, thickness, and structure of the arterial walls or other intra-cavity regions at discrete points on the medical device during minimally invasive medical procedures. The information will be used both to guide the device through the body and to evaluate the tissue through which the device is being passed. Multiple optical fibers are situated along the circumference of the device. Light from the distal end of each fiber is directed onto the interior cavity walls via small diameter optics (such as gradient index lenses and mirrored corner cubes). Both forward viewing and side viewing fibers can be included. The light reflected or scattered from the cavity walls is then collected by the fibers and multiplexed at the proximal end to the sample arm of an optical low coherence reflectometer. The system may also be implemented in a nonmedical inspection device.

  6. INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING JOURNAL OF OPTICS A: PURE AND APPLIED OPTICS Polarization Optics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Friesem, Asher A.

    INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING JOURNAL OF OPTICS A: PURE AND APPLIED OPTICS EDITORIAL Polarization Optics Guest Editors Jari Turunen University of Joensuu, Finland Asher A Friesem Weizmann Institute This special issue on Polarization Optics contains one review article and 23 research papers, many of which

  7. spring 2010 Rochester Institute of Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zanibbi, Richard

    by a device to those measured in a light booth or other viewing environment. The figure shows the comparison and product quality, and other industrial and practical applications. I found the conference very interesting illuminant. This will enable for a direct comparison between the colorimetric coordinates measured

  8. Greater Rochester Nursing Home Quality Consortium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Steven A.

    Agenda 08:15 Registration; Continental Breakfast; Lean Six Sigma Teams' Posters 09:00 Welcome the Impact of Transforming Elder Care 10:15 Lean Six Sigma Team Project Presentations Melissa Allmaier, RN, Six Sigma Master Black Belt John Biuso, BSIE, Six Sigma Black Belt, CPIM Project Team leaders

  9. FEASIBILITY PLAN THE UNIVERSITY OF ROCHESTER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Steven A.

    ..............................................................................page 10 Maintaining and Expanding the Strength of COB and Postdoctoral Dental Education Programs................................................................................................................page 17 Changes in Net Assets

  10. &News from the University of Rochester

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Portman, Douglas

    a voice in fracking research » New book focuses on the prevention of early aging and how to mitigate its

  11. University of Rochester University Health Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahon, Bradford Z.

    -related information, mental health related care, or substance abuse diagnosis and treatment information requires one.) Healthcare Insurance coverage Personal Other Transfer of Care TYPE OF RECORDS REQUESTED illness/injury Date(s) of treatment Treatment summary (includes history/physical, laboratory tests & x

  12. Category:Rochester, NY | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:Power LPInformationCashtonGo BackLocation Media in category

  13. Rochester, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt Ltd Jump to: navigation,MazeOhio: EnergyTennessee:Rochelle,Illinois: Energy

  14. Rochester, Massachusetts: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt Ltd Jump to: navigation,MazeOhio: EnergyTennessee:Rochelle,Illinois:

  15. Rochester, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt Ltd Jump to: navigation,MazeOhio: EnergyTennessee:Rochelle,Illinois:Michigan:

  16. Rochester, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt Ltd Jump to: navigation,MazeOhio:Ohio: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,

  17. Rochester, Vermont: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt Ltd Jump to: navigation,MazeOhio:Ohio: Energy Resources Jump to:

  18. Rochester, Washington: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt Ltd Jump to: navigation,MazeOhio:Ohio: Energy Resources Jump to:Washington:

  19. Regional Report Issue Paper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Regional Report Introduction The economy of the United States is more than three and one-half years accounting for both increasing shares of the economy and of recessionary employment losses. Manufacturing, driven by globalization and advancing information technology. Recoveries now produce jobs new

  20. Contributions to the Quantum Optics of Multi-mode Optical Parametric Oscillators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlos Navarrete-Benlloch

    2015-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis is mainly devoted to the study of the quantum properties of optical parametric oscillators (OPOs), which are nowadays the sources of the highest-quality quantum-correlated light, apart from fundamental tools in the classical-optics realm, allowing for the conversion of laser light into virtually all regions of the optical spectrum. Regarding its content, the thesis might seem a bit unusual, because two thirds of it are devoted to a self-contained (though dense) introduction to quantum optics, including the quantum physics of harmonic oscillators, the quantization of the electromagnetic field in an open optical cavity and the detection of its output light, as well as the derivation of the basic model and known properties of OPOs. Hence, all the original results of the thesis are contained in the last third, were it is proven that all OPOs can be understood as multi-mode devices whose quantum properties can be explained in terms of three basic phenomena: bifurcation squeezing, spontaneous symmetry breaking, and pump clamping, which are introduced through simple, yet realistic examples.

  1. LEADERSHIP HANDBOOK FOR REGIONAL COMMUNITIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weaver, Harold A. "Hal"

    LEADERSHIP HANDBOOK FOR REGIONAL COMMUNITIES JOHNS HOPKINS ALUMNI ASSOCIATION & THE OFFICE OF ALUMNI RELATIONS #12;Leadership Handbook for Regional Chapters 2 CONTENTS Contents .......................................................................................................................9 Chapter Leadership

  2. Regional Competitions - EERE Commercialization Office

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Runner-up Teams The Six Regional Competitions The Massachusetts Institute of Technology logo. Northeast Region Lead: Massachusetts Institute of Technology (Cambridge, MA) This...

  3. Correlated long-term optical and X-ray variations in NGC 5548

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phil Uttley; Rick Edelson; Ian McHardy; Bradley M. Peterson; Alex Markowitz

    2003-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We combine the long-term optical light curve of the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC5548 with the X-ray light curve measured by the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer over 6 years, to determine the relationship between the optical and X-ray continua. The X-ray light curve is strongly correlated with the optical light curve on long (~year) time-scales. The amplitude of the long-term optical variability in NGC5548 is larger than that of the X-ray variability (after accounting for the host galaxy contribution), implying that X-ray reprocessing is not the main source of the optical/X-ray correlation. The correlated X-ray and optical variations in NGC5548 may be caused by instabilities in the inner part of the accretion flow, where both the X-ray and optical emission regions may be located.

  4. Light scattering by radiation fields: the optical medium analogy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Donato Bini; Pierluigi Fortini; Andrea Geralico; Maria Haney; Antonello Ortolan

    2014-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The optical medium analogy of a radiation field generated by either an exact gravitational plane wave or an exact electromagnetic wave in the framework of general relativity is developed. The equivalent medium of the associated background field is inhomogeneous and anisotropic in the former case, whereas it is inhomogeneous but isotropic in the latter. The features of light scattering are investigated by assuming the interaction region to be sandwiched between two flat spacetime regions, where light rays propagate along straight lines. Standard tools of ordinary wave optics are used to study the deflection of photon paths due to the interaction with the radiation fields, allowing for a comparison between the optical properties of the equivalent media associated with the different background fields.

  5. Optical reference geometry of the Kerr-Newman spacetimes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zden?k Stuchlík; Stanislav Hledík; Josef Jurá?

    2008-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Properties of the optical reference geometry related to Kerr-Newman black-hole and naked-singularity spacetimes are illustrated using embedding diagrams of their equatorial plane. Among all inertial forces defined in the framework of the optical geometry, just the centrifugal force plays a fundamental role in connection to the embedding diagrams because it changes sign at the turning points of the diagrams. The limits of embeddability are given, and it is established which of the photon circular orbits hosted the by Kerr-Newman spacetimes appear in the embeddable regions. Some typical embedding diagrams are constructed, and the Kerr-Newman backgrounds are classified according to the number of embeddable regions of the optical geometry as well as the number of their turning points. Embedding diagrams are closely related to the notion of the radius of gyration which is useful for analyzing fluid rotating in strong gravitational fields.

  6. Mid-Infrared Optical Frequency Combs based on Crystalline Microresonators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, C Y; Del'Haye, P; Schliesser, A; Hofer, J; Holzwarth, R; Hänsch, T W; Picqué, N; Kippenberg, T J

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mid-infrared spectral range (\\lambda ~ 2 \\mu m to 20 \\mu m) is known as the "molecular fingerprint" region as many molecules have their highly characteristic, fundamental ro-vibrational bands in this part of the electromagnetic spectrum. Broadband mid-infrared spectroscopy therefore constitutes a powerful and ubiquitous tool for optical analysis of chemical components that is used in biochemistry, astronomy, pharmaceutical monitoring and material science. Optical frequency combs, i.e. broad spectral bandwidth coherent light sources consisting of equally spaced sharp lines, have revolutionized optical frequency metrology one decade ago. They now demonstrate dramatically improved acquisition rates, resolution and sensitivity for molecular spectroscopy mostly in the visible and near-infrared ranges. Mid-infrared frequency combs have therefore become highly desirable and recent progress in generating such combs by nonlinear frequency conversion has opened access to this spectral region. Here we report on a pr...

  7. Method of fabricating optical waveguides by ion implantation doping

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Appleton, B.R.; Ashley, P.R.; Buchal, C.J.

    1987-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for fabricating high-quality optical waveguides in optical quality oxide crystals by ion implantation doping and controlled epitaxial recrystallization is provided. Masked LiNbO/sub 3/ crystals are implanted with high concentrations of Ti dopant at ion energies of about 360 keV while maintaining the crystal near liquid nitrogen temperature. Ion implantation doping produces an amorphous, Ti-rich nonequilibrium phase in the implanted region. Subsequent thermal annealing in a water-saturated oxygen atmosphere at up to 1000/degree/C produces solid-phase epitaxial regrowth onto the crystalline substrate. A high-quality crystalline layer results which incorporates the Ti into the crystal structure at much higher concentrations than is possible by standard diffusion techniques, and this implanted region has excellent optical waveguiding properties.

  8. Optical key system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hagans, Karla G. (Livermore, CA); Clough, Robert E. (Danville, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical key system comprises a battery-operated optical key and an isolated lock that derives both its operating power and unlock signals from the correct optical key. A light emitting diode or laser diode is included within the optical key and is connected to transmit a bit-serial password. The key user physically enters either the code-to-transmit directly, or an index to a pseudorandom number code, in the key. Such person identification numbers can be retained permanently, or ephemeral. When a send button is pressed, the key transmits a beam of light modulated with the password information. The modulated beam of light is received by a corresponding optical lock with a photovoltaic cell that produces enough power from the beam of light to operate a password-screen digital logic. In one application, an acceptable password allows a two watt power laser diode to pump ignition and timing information over a fiberoptic cable into a sealed engine compartment. The receipt of a good password allows the fuel pump, spark, and starter systems to each operate. Therefore, bypassing the lock mechanism as is now routine with automobile thieves is pointless because the engine is so thoroughly disabled.

  9. Optical high acidity sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jorgensen, B.S.; Nekimken, H.L.; Carey, W.P.; O`Rourke, P.E.

    1997-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for determining acid concentrations in solutions having acid concentrations of from about 0.1 Molar to about 16 Molar is disclosed. The apparatus includes a chamber for interrogation of the sample solution, a fiber optic light source for passing light transversely through the chamber, a fiber optic collector for receiving the collimated light after transmission through the chamber, a coating of an acid resistant polymeric composition upon at least one fiber end or lens, the polymeric composition in contact with the sample solution within the chamber and having a detectable response to acid concentrations within the range of from about 0.1 Molar to about 16 Molar, a measurer for the response of the polymeric composition in contact with the sample solution, and a comparer of the measured response to predetermined standards whereby the acid molarity of the sample solution within the chamber can be determined. Preferably, a first lens is attached to the end of the fiber optic light source, the first lens adapted to collimate light from the fiber optic light source, and a second lens is attached to the end of the fiber optic collector for focusing the collimated light after transmission through the chamber. 10 figs.

  10. Fiber optic hydrogen sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Buchanan, B.R.; Prather, W.S.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus and method for detecting a chemical substance by exposing an optic fiber having a core and a cladding to the chemical substance so that the chemical substance can be adsorbed onto the surface of the cladding. The optic fiber is coiled inside a container having a pair of valves for controlling the entrance and exit of the substance. Light from a light source is received by one end of the optic fiber, preferably external to the container, and carried by the core of the fiber. Adsorbed substance changes the transmissivity of the fiber as measured by a spectrophotometer at the other end, also preferably external to the container. Hydrogen is detected by the absorption of infrared light carried by an optic fiber with a silica cladding. Since the adsorption is reversible, a sensor according to the present invention can be used repeatedly. Multiple positions in a process system can be monitored using a single container that can be connected to each location to be monitored so that a sample can be obtained for measurement, or, alternatively, containers can be placed near each position and the optic fibers carrying the partially-absorbed light can be multiplexed for rapid sequential reading, by a single spectrophotometer.

  11. Absolute calibration of optical flats

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sommargren, Gary E.

    2005-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention uses the phase shifting diffraction interferometer (PSDI) to provide a true point-by-point measurement of absolute flatness over the surface of optical flats. Beams exiting the fiber optics in a PSDI have perfect spherical wavefronts. The measurement beam is reflected from the optical flat and passed through an auxiliary optic to then be combined with the reference beam on a CCD. The combined beams include phase errors due to both the optic under test and the auxiliary optic. Standard phase extraction algorithms are used to calculate this combined phase error. The optical flat is then removed from the system and the measurement fiber is moved to recombine the two beams. The newly combined beams include only the phase errors due to the auxiliary optic. When the second phase measurement is subtracted from the first phase measurement, the absolute phase error of the optical flat is obtained.

  12. Understanding Spatial and Spectral Morphologies of Ultracompact H II Regions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, Thomas; /ZAH, Heidelberg; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark; /Amer. Museum Natural Hist. /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst. Astron.; Banerjee, Robi; /ZAH, Heidelberg; Klessen, Ralf S.; /ZAH, Heidelberg /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Dullemond, Cornelis P.; /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst. Astron.

    2010-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The spatial morphology, spectral characteristics, and time variability of ultracompact H II regions provide strong constraints on the process of massive star formation. We have performed simulations of the gravitational collapse of rotating molecular cloud cores, including treatments of the propagation of ionizing and non-ionizing radiation. We here present synthetic radio continuum observations of H II regions from our collapse simulations, to investigate how well they agree with observation, and what we can learn about how massive star formation proceeds. We find that intermittent shielding by dense filaments in the gravitationally unstable accretion flow around the massive star leads to highly variable H II regions that do not grow monotonically, but rather flicker, growing and shrinking repeatedly. This behavior appears able to resolve the well-known lifetime problem. We find that multiple ionizing sources generally form, resulting in groups of ultracompact H II regions, consistent with observations. We confirm that our model reproduces the qualitative H II region morphologies found in surveys, with generally consistent relative frequencies. We also find that simulated spectral energy distributions (SEDs) from our model are consistent with the range of observed H II region SEDs, including both regions showing a normal transition from optically thick to optically thin emission, and those with intermediate spectral slopes. In our models, anomalous slopes are solely produced by inhomogeneities in the H II region, with no contribution from dust emission at millimeter or submillimeter wavelengths. We conclude that many observed characteristics of ultracompact H II regions appear consistent with massive star formation in fast, gravitationally unstable, accretion flows.

  13. UNDERSTANDING SPATIAL AND SPECTRAL MORPHOLOGIES OF ULTRACOMPACT H II REGIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, Thomas; Banerjee, Robi; Klessen, Ralf S. [Zentrum fuer Astronomie der Universitaet Heidelberg, Institut fuer Theoretische Astrophysik, Albert-Ueberle-Str. 2, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Low, Mordecai-Mark Mac [Department of Astrophysics, American Museum of Natural History, 79th Street at Central Park West, New York, New York 10024-5192 (United States); Dullemond, Cornelis P., E-mail: thomas.peters@ita.uni-heidelberg.d [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2010-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The spatial morphology, spectral characteristics, and time variability of ultracompact (UC) H II regions provide strong constraints on the process of massive star formation. We have performed simulations of the gravitational collapse of rotating molecular cloud cores, including treatments of the propagation of ionizing and non-ionizing radiation. We here present synthetic radio continuum observations of H II regions from our collapse simulations, to investigate how well they agree with observation, and what we can learn about how massive star formation proceeds. We find that intermittent shielding by dense filaments in the gravitationally unstable accretion flow around the massive star leads to highly variable H II regions that do not grow monotonically, but rather flicker, growing and shrinking repeatedly. This behavior appears to be able to resolve the well-known lifetime problem. We find that multiple ionizing sources generally form, resulting in groups of UC H II regions, consistent with observations. We confirm that our model reproduces the qualitative H II region morphologies found in surveys, with generally consistent relative frequencies. We also find that simulated spectral energy distributions (SEDs) from our model are consistent with the range of observed H II region SEDs, including both regions showing a normal transition from optically thick to optically thin emission, and those with intermediate spectral slopes. In our models, anomalous slopes are solely produced by inhomogeneities in the H II region, with no contribution from dust emission at millimeter or submillimeter wavelengths. We conclude that many observed characteristics of UC H II regions appear consistent with massive star formation in fast, gravitationally unstable, accretion flows.

  14. Interactive optical panel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Veligdan, J.T.

    1995-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    An interactive optical panel assembly includes an optical panel having a plurality of ribbon optical waveguides stacked together with opposite ends thereof defining panel first and second faces. A light source provides an image beam to the panel first face for being channeled through the waveguides and emitted from the panel second face in the form of a viewable light image. A remote device produces a response beam over a discrete selection area of the panel second face for being channeled through at least one of the waveguides toward the panel first face. A light sensor is disposed across a plurality of the waveguides for detecting the response beam therein for providing interactive capability. 10 figs.

  15. Interactive optical panel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Veligdan, James T. (Manorville, NY)

    1995-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    An interactive optical panel assembly 34 includes an optical panel 10 having a plurality of ribbon optical waveguides 12 stacked together with opposite ends thereof defining panel first and second faces 16, 18. A light source 20 provides an image beam 22 to the panel first face 16 for being channeled through the waveguides 12 and emitted from the panel second face 18 in the form of a viewable light image 24a. A remote device 38 produces a response beam 40 over a discrete selection area 36 of the panel second face 18 for being channeled through at least one of the waveguides 12 toward the panel first face 16. A light sensor 42,50 is disposed across a plurality of the waveguides 12 for detecting the response beam 40 therein for providing interactive capability.

  16. Regional Transportation Coordination Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golden Crescent Regional Planning Commission

    Committee for this study. ? Develop a coordination public transportation plan ? Identify resources required to develop the plan ? Provide policy guidance to lead the planning and coordination effort Golden Crescent Regional Transit 1... of Texas. This resource will be relied upon for further development of the Intermodal Transportation Terminal. ? FTA Section 5309 (Bus) Discretionary Support ? To assist in meeting the GCRPC?s capital replacement needs. This resource...

  17. Lorentz Group in Ray Optics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Baskal; E. Georgieva; Y. S. Kim; M. E. Noz

    2004-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been almost one hundred years since Einstein formulated his special theory of relativity in 1905. He showed that the basic space-time symmetry is dictated by the Lorentz group. It is shown that this group of Lorentz transformations is not only applicable to special relativity, but also constitutes the scientific language for optical sciences. It is noted that coherent and squeezed states of light are representations of the Lorentz group. The Lorentz group is also the basic underlying language for classical ray optics, including polarization optics, interferometers, the Poincare\\'e sphere, one-lens optics, multi-lens optics, laser cavities, as well multilayer optics.

  18. Optical Characterization Laboratory (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet describes the purpose, lab specifications, applications scenarios, and information on how to partner with NREL's Optical Characterization Laboratory at the Energy Systems Integration Facility. The Optical Characterization Laboratory at NREL's Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) conducts optical characterization of large solar concentration devices. Concentration solar power (CSP) mirror panels and concentrating solar systems are tested with an emphasis is on measurement of parabolic trough mirror panels. The Optical Characterization Laboratory provides state-of-the-art characterization and testing capabilities for assessing the optical surface quality and optical performance for various CSP technologies including parabolic troughs, linear Fresnel, dishes, and heliostats.

  19. Cavity quantum electro-optics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mankei Tsang

    2010-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The quantum dynamics of the coupling between a cavity optical field and a resonator microwave field via the electro-optic effect is studied. This coupling has the same form as the opto-mechanical coupling via radiation pressure, so all previously considered opto-mechanical effects can in principle be observed in electro-optic systems as well. In particular, I point out the possibilities of laser cooling of the microwave mode, entanglement between the optical mode and the microwave mode via electro-optic parametric amplification, and back-action-evading optical measurements of a microwave quadrature.

  20. Nonimaging optical illumination system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Winston, R.; Ries, H.

    1996-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A nonimaging illumination optical device for producing a selected far field illuminance over an angular range. The optical device includes a light source, a light reflecting surface, and a family of light edge rays defined along a reference line with the reflecting surface defined in terms of the reference line as a parametric function R(t) where t is a scalar parameter position and R(t)=k(t)+Du(t) where k(t) is a parameterization of the reference line, and D is a distance from a point on the reference line to the reflection surface along the desired edge ray through the point. 35 figs.

  1. Nonimaging optical illumination system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Winston, R.; Ries, H.

    1998-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A nonimaging illumination optical device for producing a selected far field illuminance over an angular range. The optical device includes a light source a light reflecting surface, and a family of light edge rays defined along a reference line with the reflecting surface defined in terms of the reference lines a parametric function R(t) where t is a scalar parameter position and R(t)=k(t)+Du(t) where k(t) is a parameterization of the reference line, and D is a distance from a point on the reference line to the reflection surface along the desired edge ray through the point. 35 figs.

  2. Full spectrum optical safeguard

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ackerman, Mark R. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical safeguard device with two linear variable Fabry-Perot filters aligned relative to a light source with at least one of the filters having a nonlinear dielectric constant material such that, when a light source produces a sufficiently high intensity light, the light alters the characteristics of the nonlinear dielectric constant material to reduce the intensity of light impacting a connected optical sensor. The device can be incorporated into an imaging system on a moving platform, such as an aircraft or satellite.

  3. Optics in data center network architecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farrington, Nathan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chapter 2 Reducing Cabling Complexity with Optics . . . . .Advances in Information Optics and Photonics. SPIE, 2008. [c-Through: Part-time Optics in Data Centers,” in Proceedings

  4. High-index-contrast electromechanical optical switches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bryant, Reginald (Reginald Eugene), 1978-

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    System developers are looking to replace protocol-dependent, bandwidth-limited optical networks with intelligent optically-transparent integrated photonic networks. Several electromechanical optical switches are explored ...

  5. Optical fiber based ultrashort pulse multispectral nonlinear optical microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larson, Adam Michael

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Nonlinear optical microscopy (NLOM) utilizing femtosecond laser pulses is well suited for imaging living tissues. This work reports on the design and development of an optical fiber based multispectral NLOM developed around a laser generating...

  6. Microwave to Optical Link Using an Optical Microresonator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jost, J D; Lecaplain, C; Brasch, V; Pfeiffer, M H P; Kippenberg, T J

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ability to phase coherently link optical to radio frequencies with femtosecond modelocked lasers has enabled counting cycles of light and is the basis of optical clocks, absolute frequency synthesis, tests of fundamental physics, and improved spectroscopy. Using an optical microresonator frequency comb to establish a coherent link promises to greatly extend optical frequency synthesis and measurements to areas requiring compact form factor, on chip integration and repetition rates in the microwave regime, including coherent telecommunications, astrophysical spectrometer calibration or microwave photonics. Here we demonstrate for the first time a microwave to optical link using a microresonator. Using a temporal dissipative single soliton state in an ultra high Q crystalline microresonator an optical frequency comb is generated that is self-referenced, allowing to phase coherently link a 190 THZ optical carrier directly to a 14 GHz microwave frequency. Our work demonstrates that precision optical frequency...

  7. Transmission of Solar Radiation by Clouds over Snow and Ice Surfaces. Part II: Cloud Optical Depth and Shortwave Radiative Forcing from Pyranometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Warren, Stephen

    coincident hourly sea ice reports, instantaneous cloud radiative forcing and effective cloud optical depth. "Effective" optical depths (for a radiatively equivalent horizontally homogeneous cloud) are classified a characteristic optical depth of 15 at 47°S, increasing to 24 in the region of maximum cloud cover at 58°S

  8. Optical method of atomic ordering estimation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prutskij, T. [Instituto de Ciencias, BUAP, Privada 17 Norte, No 3417, col. San Miguel Huyeotlipan, Puebla, Pue. (Mexico); Attolini, G. [IMEM/CNR, Parco Area delle Scienze 37/A - 43010, Parma (Italy); Lantratov, V.; Kalyuzhnyy, N. [Ioffe Physico-Technical Institute, 26 Polytekhnicheskaya, St Petersburg 194021, Russian Federation (Russian Federation)

    2013-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    It is well known that within metal-organic vapor-phase epitaxy (MOVPE) grown semiconductor III-V ternary alloys atomically ordered regions are spontaneously formed during the epitaxial growth. This ordering leads to bandgap reduction and to valence bands splitting, and therefore to anisotropy of the photoluminescence (PL) emission polarization. The same phenomenon occurs within quaternary semiconductor alloys. While the ordering in ternary alloys is widely studied, for quaternaries there have been only a few detailed experimental studies of it, probably because of the absence of appropriate methods of its detection. Here we propose an optical method to reveal atomic ordering within quaternary alloys by measuring the PL emission polarization.

  9. Bachelor of Science Degree in Optics Bachelor of Science Degree in Optical Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bachelor of Science Degree in Optics Bachelor of Science Degree in Optical Engineering The Institute of Optics Major Requirements OPT 201 Geometrical Optics Lab (2 cr.) OPT 202 Physical Optics Lab (2 Theory of Optics OPT 225 Optical Sources and Detectors OPT 241 Geometrical Optics OPT 242 Aberrations

  10. Bachelor of Science Degree in Optics Bachelor of Science Degree in Optical Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahon, Bradford Z.

    Bachelor of Science Degree in Optics Bachelor of Science Degree in Optical Engineering The Institute of Optics Major Requirements OPT 197 Geometrical Optics Lab (2 cr.) OPT 198 Physical Optics Lab (2 Theory of Optics OPT 225 Optical Sources and Detectors OPT 241 Geometrical Optics OPT 242 Aberrations

  11. adaptive optics optical: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    adaptive optics optical First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Adaptive Optical Transport...

  12. 10_6_wolf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    sented. Emil Wolf is the Wilson Professor of Optical Physics and also Professor of Optics at the University of Rochester. His main research is in physical optics. He has...

  13. OPTIMISTIC-OPTICALITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huffman, Andrew Jacob

    2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    . ________________________________ Chairperson Michael Krueger ________________________________ Norman Akers ________________________________ Shawn Bitters Date Defended: March 29, 2012 ii The Thesis Committee for ANDREW HUFFMAN certifies... OPTIMISTIC-OPTICALITY BY ANDREW HUFFMAN Submitted to the graduate degree program in ART and the Graduate Faculty of the University of Kansas in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts...

  14. High throughput optical scanner

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Basiji, David A. (Seattle, WA); van den Engh, Gerrit J. (Seattle, WA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A scanning apparatus is provided to obtain automated, rapid and sensitive scanning of substrate fluorescence, optical density or phosphorescence. The scanner uses a constant path length optical train, which enables the combination of a moving beam for high speed scanning with phase-sensitive detection for noise reduction, comprising a light source, a scanning mirror to receive light from the light source and sweep it across a steering mirror, a steering mirror to receive light from the scanning mirror and reflect it to the substrate, whereby it is swept across the substrate along a scan arc, and a photodetector to receive emitted or scattered light from the substrate, wherein the optical path length from the light source to the photodetector is substantially constant throughout the sweep across the substrate. The optical train can further include a waveguide or mirror to collect emitted or scattered light from the substrate and direct it to the photodetector. For phase-sensitive detection the light source is intensity modulated and the detector is connected to phase-sensitive detection electronics. A scanner using a substrate translator is also provided. For two dimensional imaging the substrate is translated in one dimension while the scanning mirror scans the beam in a second dimension. For a high throughput scanner, stacks of substrates are loaded onto a conveyor belt from a tray feeder.

  15. Optical Shelving: Suppressed Fluorescence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mould, R A

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The shelving phenomenon of quantum optics, originally observed by Dehmelt, is analyzed in terms of the nRules that are given in another paper. The heuristic value of these rules is apparent because they reveal the mechanism that enforces the suppression of fluorescence during the dark period associated with shelving.

  16. Optical Shelving: Suppressed Fluorescence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richard A Mould

    2011-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The shelving phenomenon of quantum optics, originally observed by Dehmelt, is analyzed in terms of the qRules that are given in another paper. The heuristic value of these rules is apparent because they not only describe the dark period during shelving, but they reveal the mechanism that enforces the suppression of fluorescence during that time.

  17. Ultrasound-modulated optical tomography 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nam, Haewon

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Ultrasound-modulated optical tomography is modeled by a linear integral equation and an inverse problem involving a diffusion equation in n spatial dimensions, n=2, 3. Based on measured data, the optical absorption coefficient ?...

  18. Distributed optical fiber vibration sensing 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Hui

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents a distributed optical fiber vibration sensor. The purpose of this sensing system is to monitor, in real time, the status of railcars by burying an optical fiber underground beside the rails. Using a coherent homodyne technique...

  19. Magneto-optic current sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lanagan, Michael T.; Valsko-Vlasov, Vitalii K.; Fisher, Brandon L.; Welp, Ulrich

    2003-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical current transducer configured to sense current in the conductor is disclosed. The optical current transducer includes a light source and a polarizer that generates linearly polarized light received from a the light source. The light is communicated to a magneto-optic garnet that includes, among other elements, bismuth, iron and oxygen and is coupled to the conductor. The magneto-optic garnet is configured to rotate the polarization of the linearly polarized light received from the polarizer. The optical current transducer also includes an analyzer in optical communication with the magneto-optic garnet. The analyzer detects the rotation of the linearly polarized light caused by the magneto-optic garnet.

  20. 4-ID-D optics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4-ID-D Beamline Optics A schetch of the major optical components for beam line 4-ID-D are shown above. All these components located in the B-station upstream from the D...

  1. Optics (XSD) | Advanced Photon Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Optics Group (X-ray Science Division) The mission of the Optics Group is to facilitate the efficient and productive use and operation of APS beamline-based research facilities. In...

  2. Miniature MT optical assembly (MMTOA)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laughlin, Daric (Overland Park, KS); Abel, Phillip (Overland Park, KS)

    2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical assembly (10) includes a rigid mount (12) with a recess (26) proximate a first side thereof, a substrate (14), and an optical die (16) flip-chip bonded to the substrate (14). The substrate (14) is secured to the first side of the mount and includes a plurality of die bonding elements (40), a plurality of optical apertures (32), and a plurality of external bonding elements (42). A plurality of traces (44) interconnect the die bonding elements (40) and the external bonding elements (42). The optical die (16) includes a plurality of optical elements, each element including an optical signal interface (48), the die being bonded to the plurality of die bonding elements (40) such that the optical signal interface (48) of each element is in registry with an optical aperture (32) of the substrate (14) and the die (16) is at least partially enclosed by the recess (26).

  3. Ultrafast Optics and Optical Fiber Communications Laboratory http://purcell.ecn.purdue.edu/~fsoptics/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Purdue University

    Ultrafast Optics and Optical Fiber Communications Laboratory http, A. M. Weiner Purdue University C. Lin Avanex Corporation Conference on Lasers and Electro Optics;Ultrafast Optics and Optical Fiber Communications Laboratory http://purcell.ecn.purdue.edu/~fsoptics/ 2

  4. Regional Energy Baseline 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, H.; Baltazar, J.C.; Haberl, J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ESL-TR-11-09-02 REGIONAL ENERGY BASELINE (1960 ~ 2009) 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 800 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 To tal En erg y U se pe r C ap ita (M MB tu) Year Total Energy... Use per Capita (1960-2009) US SEEC 12-States TX Hyojin Kim Juan-Carlos Baltazar, Ph.D. Jeff S. Haberl, Ph.D., P.E. September 2011 ENERGY SYSTEMS LABORATORY Texas Engineering Experiment Station Texas A&M University...

  5. Regional Energy Baseline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, H.; Baltazar, J.C.; Haberl, J.

    ESL-TR-11-09-02 REGIONAL ENERGY BASELINE (1960 ~ 2009) 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 800 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 To tal En erg y U se pe r C ap ita (M MB tu) Year Total Energy... Use per Capita (1960-2009) US SEEC 12-States TX Hyojin Kim Juan-Carlos Baltazar, Ph.D. Jeff S. Haberl, Ph.D., P.E. September 2011 ENERGY SYSTEMS LABORATORY Texas Engineering Experiment Station Texas A&M University...

  6. Regional companies eye growth

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand Requirements Recently Approved JustificationBio-Inspired PowerRegional companies eye

  7. Optical computing Damien Woods a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woods, Damien

    Optical computing Damien Woods a aDepartment of Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Institute, Vierimaantie 5, 84100 Ylivieska, Finland Abstract We consider optical computers that encode data using images and compute by transforming such images. We give an overview of a number of such optical

  8. Aerogel-clad optical fiber

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sprehn, G.A.; Hrubesh, L.W.; Poco, J.F.; Sandler, P.H.

    1997-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical fiber is surrounded by an aerogel cladding. For a low density aerogel, the index of refraction of the aerogel is close to that of air, which provides a high numerical aperture to the optical fiber. Due to the high numerical aperture, the aerogel clad optical fiber has improved light collection efficiency. 4 figs.

  9. Single-cycle nonlinear optics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goulielmakis, E.; Max-Planck-Institut fur Quantenoptik

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    g l e - C y c l e Nonlinear Optics E. G o u l i e l m a k iSingle-Cycle Nonlinear Optics E. Goulielmakis *, M.D-85748 Garching. Center for X-Ray Optics, Lawrence Berkeley

  10. Large core fiber optic cleaver

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Halpin, J.M.

    1996-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to a device and method for cleaving optical fibers which yields cleaved optical fiber ends possessing high damage threshold surfaces. The device can be used to cleave optical fibers with core diameters greater than 400 {micro}m. 30 figs.

  11. Large core fiber optic cleaver

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Halpin, John M. (Livermore, CA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to a device and method for cleaving optical fibers which yields cleaved optical fiber ends possessing high damage threshold surfaces. The device can be used to cleave optical fibers with core diameters greater than 400 .mu.m.

  12. 1206 OPTICS LETTERS / Vol. 28, No. 14 / July 15, 2003 Optical-fiber-based Mueller optical coherence tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Lihong

    1206 OPTICS LETTERS / Vol. 28, No. 14 / July 15, 2003 Optical-fiber-based Mueller optical coherence-3120 Received January 8, 2003 An optical-fiber-based multichannel polarization-sensitive Mueller optical was dynamically calibrated to eliminate the polarization distortion caused by the single-mode optical fiber

  13. Optical Tweezer Arrays and Optical Substrates Created with Diffractive Optics Eric R. Dufresne and David G. Grier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grier, David

    Optical Tweezer Arrays and Optical Substrates Created with Diffractive Optics Eric R. Dufresne optical tweezers from a single laser beam using diffractive optical elements. As a demonstration of this technique, we have implemented a 4 \\Theta 4 square array of optical tweezers -- the hexadeca

  14. Colorado Regional Faults

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Originator: Colorado Geological Survey (CGS) Publication Date: 2012 Title: Regional Faults Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science, University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains the regional faults of Colorado Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4543192.100000 m Left: 144385.020000 m Right: 754585.020000 m Bottom: 4094592.100000 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System 1984 (WGS ’984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  15. Innovative . Flexible . RegionalInnovative . Flexible . Regional Health Care

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shihadeh, Alan

    Executive Master in Innovative . Flexible . RegionalInnovative . Flexible . Regional Health Care Learning Outcomes Health Systems, Policy and Reform - Communicating with Policy Makers - Evidence - Human Resources Management - Data and Decision Making Executive Master in Health Care Leadership (EMHCL

  16. Bonded, walk-off compensated optical elements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ebbers, Christopher A. (Livermore, CA)

    2003-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A bonded, walk-off compensated crystal, for use with optical equipment, and methods of making optical components including same.

  17. american summer monsoon: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    model (MRCM) in simulating the West African monsoon. The MRCM is built on the Regional Climate Model, ... Im, Eun-Soon 320 UNIVERSITY OF ROCHESTER Summer Housing Application...

  18. asia summer monsoon: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    model (MRCM) in simulating the West African monsoon. The MRCM is built on the Regional Climate Model, ... Im, Eun-Soon 300 UNIVERSITY OF ROCHESTER Summer Housing Application...

  19. Fiber optic probe for light scattering measurements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nave, Stanley E. (Evans, GA); Livingston, Ronald R. (Aiken, SC); Prather, William S. (Augusta, GA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fiber optic probe and a method for using the probe for light scattering analyses of a sample. The probe includes a probe body with an inlet for admitting a sample into an interior sample chamber, a first optical fiber for transmitting light from a source into the chamber, and a second optical fiber for transmitting light to a detector such as a spectrophotometer. The interior surface of the probe carries a coating that substantially prevents non-scattered light from reaching the second fiber. The probe is placed in a region where the presence and concentration of an analyte of interest are to be detected, and a sample is admitted into the chamber. Exciting light is transmitted into the sample chamber by the first fiber, where the light interacts with the sample to produce Raman-scattered light. At least some of the Raman-scattered light is received by the second fiber and transmitted to the detector for analysis. Two Raman spectra are measured, at different pressures. The first spectrum is subtracted from the second to remove background effects, and the resulting sample Raman spectrum is compared to a set of stored library spectra to determine the presence and concentration of the analyte.

  20. Fiber optic probe for light scattering measurements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nave, S.E.; Livingston, R.R.; Prather, W.S.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention is comprised of a fiber optic probe and a method for using the probe for light scattering analyses of a sample. The probe includes a probe body with an inlet for admitting a sample into an interior sample chamber, a first optical fiber for transmitting light from a source into the chamber, and a second optical fiber for transmitting light to a detector such as a spectrophotometer. The interior surface of the probe carries a coating that substantially prevents non-scattered light from reaching the second fiber. The probe is placed in a region where the presence and concentration of an analyte of interest are to be detected, and a sample is admitted into the chamber. Exciting light is transmitted into the sample chamber by the first fiber, where the light interacts with the sample to produce Raman-scattered light. At least some of the Raman- scattered light is received by the second fiber and transmitted to the detector for analysis. Two Raman spectra are measured, at different pressures. The first spectrum is subtracted from the second to remove background effects, and the resulting sample Raman spectrum is compared to a set of stored library spectra to determine the presence and concentration of the analyte.

  1. Large optics inspection, tilting, and washing stand

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ayers, Marion Jay; Ayers, Shannon Lee

    2012-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A large optics stand provides a risk free means of safely tilting large optics with ease and a method of safely tilting large optics with ease. The optics are supported in the horizontal position by pads. In the vertical plane the optics are supported by saddles that evenly distribute the optics weight over a large area.

  2. Large optics inspection, tilting, and washing stand

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ayers, Marion Jay (Brentwood, CA); Ayers, Shannon Lee (Brentwood, CA)

    2010-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A large optics stand provides a risk free means of safely tilting large optics with ease and a method of safely tilting large optics with ease. The optics are supported in the horizontal position by pads. In the vertical plane the optics are supported by saddles that evenly distribute the optics weight over a large area.

  3. Enhanced radiation resistant fiber optics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lyons, P.B.; Looney, L.D.

    1993-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for producing an optical fiber having enhanced radiation resistance is provided, the process including maintaining an optical fiber within a hydrogen-containing atmosphere for sufficient time to yield a hydrogen-permeated optical fiber having an elevated internal hydrogen concentration, and irradiating the hydrogen-permeated optical fiber at a time while the optical fiber has an elevated internal hydrogen concentration with a source of ionizing radiation. The radiation source is typically a cobalt-60 source and the fiber is pre-irradiated with a dose level up to about 1000 kilorads of radiation. 4 figures.

  4. Enhanced radiation resistant fiber optics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lyons, Peter B. (Los Alamos, NM); Looney, Larry D. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for producing an optical fiber having enhanced radiation resitance is provided, the process including maintaining an optical fiber within a hydrogen-containing atmosphere for sufficient time to yield a hydrogen-permeated optical fiber having an elevated internal hydrogen concentration, and irradiating the hydrogen-permeated optical fiber at a time while the optical fiber has an elevated internal hydrogen concentration with a source of ionizing radiation. The radiation source is typically a cobalt-60 source and the fiber is pre-irradiated with a dose level up to about 1000 kilorads of radiation.

  5. Southern Region Watershed Management Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coordinators and the organization, management and activities of the Southern Region Water Quality Planning1 Southern Region Watershed Management Project September 15, 2000 to September 14, 2005 Terminal responding to water quality and conservation issues with educational assistance, technology development

  6. Nonimaging optical illumination system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Winston, Roland (Chicago, IL); Ries, Harald (Villigen PSI, CH)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A nonimaging illumination optical device for producing a selected far field illuminance over an angular range. The optical device includes a light source 102, a light reflecting surface 108, and a family of light edge rays defined along a reference line 104 with the reflecting surface 108 defined in terms of the reference line 104 as a parametric function R(t) where t is a scalar parameter position and R(t)=k(t)+Du(t) where k(t) is a parameterization of the reference line 104, and D is a distance from a point on the reference line 104 to the reflection surface 108 along the desired edge ray through the point.

  7. Nonimaging optical illumination system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Winston, Roland (Chicago, IL); Ries, Harald (Villigen, CH)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A nonimaging illumination optical device for producing a selected far field illuminance over an angular range. The optical device includes a light source 102, a light reflecting surface 108, and a family of light edge rays defined along a reference line 104 with the reflecting surface 108 defined in terms of the reference line 104 as a parametric function R(t) where t is a scalar parameter position and R(t)=k(t)+Du(t) where k(t) is a parameterization of the reference line 104, and D is a distance from a point on the reference line 104 to the reflection surface 108 along the desired edge ray through the point.

  8. Nonimaging optical illumination system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Winston, Roland (Chicago, IL); Ries, Harald (Villigen PSI, CH)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A nonimaging illumination optical device for producing a selected far field illuminance over an angular range. The optical device includes a light source 102, a light reflecting surface 108, and a family of light edge rays defined along a reference line 104 with the reflecting surface 108 defined in terms of the reference line 104 as a parametric function R(t) where t is a scalar parameter position and R(t)=k(t)+Du(t) where k(t) is a parameterization of the reference line 104, and D is a distance from a point on the reference line 104 to the reflection surface 108 along the desired edge ray through the point.

  9. Fiber optic moisture sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kirkham, R.R.

    1984-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for sensing moisture changes by utilizing optical fiber technology. One embodiment uses a reflective target at the end of an optical fiber. The reflectance of the target varies with its moisture content and can be detected by a remote unit at the opposite end of the fiber. A second embodiment utilizes changes in light loss along the fiber length. This can be attributed to changes in reflectance of cladding material as a function of its moisture content. It can also be affected by holes or inserts interposed in the cladding material and/or fiber. Changing light levels can also be coupled from one fiber to another in an assembly of fibers as a function of varying moisture content in their overlapping lengths of cladding material.

  10. Black optic display

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Veligdan, James T. (Manorville, NY)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical display includes a plurality of stacked optical waveguides having first and second opposite ends collectively defining an image input face and an image screen, respectively, with the screen being oblique to the input face. Each of the waveguides includes a transparent core bound by a cladding layer having a lower index of refraction for effecting internal reflection of image light transmitted into the input face to project an image on the screen, with each of the cladding layers including a cladding cap integrally joined thereto at the waveguide second ends. Each of the cores is beveled at the waveguide second end so that the cladding cap is viewable through the transparent core. Each of the cladding caps is black for absorbing external ambient light incident upon the screen for improving contrast of the image projected internally on the screen.

  11. Optical Network Testbeds Workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joe Mambretti

    2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the summary report of the third annual Optical Networking Testbed Workshop (ONT3), which brought together leading members of the international advanced research community to address major challenges in creating next generation communication services and technologies. Networking research and development (R&D) communities throughout the world continue to discover new methods and technologies that are enabling breakthroughs in advanced communications. These discoveries are keystones for building the foundation of the future economy, which requires the sophisticated management of extremely large qualities of digital information through high performance communications. This innovation is made possible by basic research and experiments within laboratories and on specialized testbeds. Initial network research and development initiatives are driven by diverse motives, including attempts to solve existing complex problems, the desire to create powerful new technologies that do not exist using traditional methods, and the need to create tools to address specific challenges, including those mandated by large scale science or government agency mission agendas. Many new discoveries related to communications technologies transition to wide-spread deployment through standards organizations and commercialization. These transition paths allow for new communications capabilities that drive many sectors of the digital economy. In the last few years, networking R&D has increasingly focused on advancing multiple new capabilities enabled by next generation optical networking. Both US Federal networking R&D and other national R&D initiatives, such as those organized by the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT) of Japan are creating optical networking technologies that allow for new, powerful communication services. Among the most promising services are those based on new types of multi-service or hybrid networks, which use new optical networking technologies. Several years ago, when many of these optical networking research topics were first being investigated, they were the subject of controversial debate. The new techniques challenged many long-held concepts related to architecture and technology. However, today all major networking organizations are transitioning toward infrastructure that incorporates these new concepts. This progress has been assisted through the series of Optical Networking Testbed Workshops (ONT). The first (ONT1) outlined a general framework of key issues and topics and developed a series of recommendations (www.nren.nasa.gov/workshop7). The second (ONT2) developed a common vision of optical network technologies, services, infrastructure, and organizations (www.nren.nasa.gov/workshop8). Processes that allow for a common vision encourage widespread deployment of these types of resources among advanced networking communities. Also, such a shared vision enables key concepts and technologies to migrate from basic research testbeds to wider networking communities. The ONT-3 workshop built on these earlier activities by expanding discussion to include additional considerations of the international interoperability and of greater impact of optical networking technology on networking in general. In accordance with this recognition, the workshop confirmed that future-oriented research and development is indispensable to fundamentally change the current Internet architecture to create a global network incorporating completely new concepts. The workshop also recognized that the first priority to allow for this progress is basic research and development, including international collaborative activities, which are important for the global realization of interoperability of a new generation architecture.

  12. Modular optical detector system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Horn, Brent A. (Livermore, CA); Renzi, Ronald F. (Tracy, CA)

    2006-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A modular optical detector system. The detector system is designed to detect the presence of molecules or molecular species by inducing fluorescence with exciting radiation and detecting the emitted fluorescence. Because the system is capable of accurately detecting and measuring picomolar concentrations it is ideally suited for use with microchemical analysis systems generally and capillary chromatographic systems in particular. By employing a modular design, the detector system provides both the ability to replace various elements of the detector system without requiring extensive realignment or recalibration of the components as well as minimal user interaction with the system. In addition, the modular concept provides for the use and addition of a wide variety of components, including optical elements (lenses and filters), light sources, and detection means, to fit particular needs.

  13. Adaptive Optics in Star Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolfgang Brandner

    2003-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the past ten years, the concept of adaptive optics has evolved from early experimental stages to a standard observing tool now available at almost all major optical and near-infrared telescope facilities. Adaptive optics will also be essential in exploiting the full potential of the large optical/infrared interferometers currently under construction. Both observations with high-angular resolution and at high contrast, and with a high point source sensitivity are facilitated by adaptive optics. Among the areas which benefit most from the use of adaptive optics are studies of the circumstellar environment (envelopes, disks, outflows), substellar companions and multiple systems, and dense young stellar populations. This contribution highlights some of the recent advances in star formation studies facilitated by adaptive optics, and gives a brief tutorial on optimized observing and data reduction strategies.

  14. Accretion disks around Black Holes with Advection and Optical Depth Transition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu. V. Artemova; G. S. Bisnovatyi-Kogan; I. V. Igumenshchev; I. D. Novikov

    2004-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the effects of advection and radial gradients of pressure and radial drift velocity on the structure of accretion disks around black holes with proper description of optically thick/thin transitions. We concentrated our efforts on the models with large accretion rate. Contrary to disk models neglecting advection, we find that continuous solutions extending from the outer disk regions to the inner edge exist for all accretion rates we have considered. We show that the sonic point moves outward with increasing accretion rate, and that in the innermost disk region advection acts as a heating process that may even dominate over dissipative heating. Despite the importance of advection on it's structure, the disk remains geometrically thin. Global solutions of advective accretion disks, which describe continuously the transition between optically thick outer region and optically thin inner region are constructed and analyzed.

  15. Optically Controlled Jitter Generator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julia Manasson; V. A. Manasson

    2006-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A new simple circuit producing random pulse trains is proposed and experimentally studied. The circuit is composed of an operational amplifier and two feedback links, one of which comprises two photodiodes. The photodiodes are responsible for nonlinearity in the feedback. By varying the illumination it is possible to control the nonlinearity in the photodiode current-voltage characteristics and change the degree of randomness in the oscillations. The circuit's simplicity and optical control make it attractive for coupled map lattices.

  16. Optically pulsed electron accelerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fraser, J.S.; Sheffield, R.L.

    1985-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    An optically pulsed electron accelerator can be used as an injector for a free electron laser and comprises a pulsed light source, such as a laser, for providing discrete incident light pulses. A photoemissive electron source emits electron bursts having the same duration as the incident light pulses when impinged upon by same. The photoemissive electron source is located on an inside wall of a radiofrequency-powered accelerator cell which accelerates the electron burst emitted by the photoemissive electron source.

  17. Optically pulsed electron accelerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fraser, John S. (Los Alamos, NM); Sheffield, Richard L. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An optically pulsed electron accelerator can be used as an injector for a free electron laser and comprises a pulsed light source, such as a laser, for providing discrete incident light pulses. A photoemissive electron source emits electron bursts having the same duration as the incident light pulses when impinged upon by same. The photoemissive electron source is located on an inside wall of a radio frequency powered accelerator cell which accelerates the electron burst emitted by the photoemissive electron source.

  18. PXIE Optics and Layout

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lebedev, V.A.; Nagaitsev, S.; Ostiguy, J.-F.; Shemyakin, A.V.; Shteynas, B.G.; Solyak, N.; /Fermilab; Solyak, N.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Project X Injector Experiment (PXIE) will serve as a prototype for the Project X front end. The aim is to validate the Project-X design and to decrease technical risks mainly related to the front end. The paper discusses the main requirements and constraints motivating the facility layout and optics. Final adjustments to the Project X front end design, if needed, will be based on operational experience gained with PXIE.

  19. MicroSight Optics

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    MicroSight is an innovative gunsight technology that allows a marksman's eye to focus on both the front gunsight and the intended target. The MicroSight improves both firearm safety and performance by imaging two objects at different focal distances. The MicroSight was developed at Idaho National Laboratory, and has been licensed by Apollo Optical Systems. You can learn more about INL's research programs at http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  20. MicroSight Optics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MicroSight is an innovative gunsight technology that allows a marksman's eye to focus on both the front gunsight and the intended target. The MicroSight improves both firearm safety and performance by imaging two objects at different focal distances. The MicroSight was developed at Idaho National Laboratory, and has been licensed by Apollo Optical Systems. You can learn more about INL's research programs at http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  1. Cicrumnuclear Supernova Remnants and HII Regions in NGC 253

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James S. Ulvestad

    2000-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Archival VLA data has been used to produce arcsecond-resolution 6- and 20-cm images of the region surrounding the nuclear 200-pc (~15") starburst in NGC 253. Twenty-two discrete sources stronger than 0.4 mJy have been detected within ~2 kpc (~3') of the galaxy nucleus; almost all these sources must be associated with the galaxy. None of the radio sources coincides with a detected X-ray binary, so they appear to be due to supernova remnants and H II regions. The region outside the central starburst has a derived radio supernova rate of <~0.1/yr, and may account for at least 20% of the recent star formation in NGC 253. Most of the newly identified sources have steep, nonthermal radio spectra, but several relatively strong thermal sources also exist, containing the equivalent of tens of O5 stars. These stars are spread over tens of parsecs, and are embedded in regions having average ionized gas densities of 20-200/cm^3, much lower than in the most active nuclear star-forming regions in NGC 253 or in the super star clusters seen in other galaxies. The strongest region of thermal emission coincides with a highly reddened area seen at near-infrared wavelengths, possibly containing optically obscured H II regions.

  2. Optical fiber inspection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moore, F.W.

    1985-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A remote optical inspection system including an inspection head. The inspection head has a passageway through which pellets or other objects are passed. A window is provided along the passageway through which light is beamed against the objects being inspected. A plurality of lens assemblies are arranged about the window so that reflected light can be gathered and transferred to a plurality of coherent optical fiber light guides. The light guides transfer the light images to a television or other image transducer which converts the optical images into a representative electronic signal. The electronic signal can then be displayed on a signal viewer such as a television monitor for inspection by a person. A staging means can be used to support the objects for viewing through the window. Routing means can be used to direct inspected objects into appropriate exit passages for accepted or rejected objects. The inspected objects are advantageously fed in a singular manner to the staging means and routing means. The inspection system is advantageously used in an enclosure when toxic or hazardous materials are being inspected. 10 figs.

  3. Optical polarizer material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ebbers, C.A.

    1999-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Several crystals have been identified which can be grown using standard single crystals growth techniques and which have a high birefringence. The identified crystals include Li.sub.2 CO.sub.3, LiNaCO.sub.3, LiKCO.sub.3, LiRbCO.sub.3 and LiCsCO.sub.3. The condition of high birefringence leads to their application as optical polarizer materials. In one embodiment of the invention, the crystal has the chemical formula LiK.sub.(1-w-x-y) Na.sub.(1-w-x-z) Rb.sub.(1-w-y-z) Cs.sub.(1-x-y-z) CO.sub.3, where w+x+y+z=1. In another embodiment, the crystalline material may be selected from a an alkali metal carbonate and a double salt of alkali metal carbonates, where the polarizer has a Wollaston configuration, a Glan-Thompson configuration or a Glan-Taylor configuration. A method of making an LiNaCO.sub.3 optical polarizer is described. A similar method is shown for making an LiKCO.sub.3 optical polarizer.

  4. Optical polarizer material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ebbers, Christopher A. (Livermore, CA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several crystals have been identified which can be grown using standard single crystals growth techniques and which have a high birefringence. The identified crystals include Li.sub.2 CO.sub.3, LiNaCO.sub.3, LiKCO.sub.3, LiRbCO.sub.3 and LiCsCO.sub.3. The condition of high birefringence leads to their application as optical polarizer materials. In one embodiment of the invention, the crystal has the chemical formula LiK.sub.(1-w-x-y) Na.sub.(1-w-x-z) Rb.sub.(1-w-y-z) Cs.sub.(1-x-y-z) CO.sub.3, where w+x+y+z=1. In another embodiment, the crystalline material may be selected from a an alkali metal carbonate and a double salt of alkali metal carbonates, where the polarizer has a Wollaston configuration, a Glan-Thompson configuration or a Glan-Taylor configuration. A method of making an LiNaCO.sub.3 optical polarizer is described. A similar method is shown for making an LiKCO.sub.3 optical polarizer.

  5. Optical modular arithmetic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dmitri S. Pavlichin; Hideo Mabuchi

    2014-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanoscale integrated photonic devices and circuits offer a path to ultra-low power computation at the few-photon level. Here we propose an optical circuit that performs a ubiquitous operation: the controlled, random-access readout of a collection of stored memory phases or, equivalently, the computation of the inner product of a vector of phases with a binary "selector" vector, where the arithmetic is done modulo 2pi and the result is encoded in the phase of a coherent field. This circuit, a collection of cascaded interferometers driven by a coherent input field, demonstrates the use of coherence as a computational resource, and of the use of recently-developed mathematical tools for modeling optical circuits with many coupled parts. The construction extends in a straightforward way to the computation of matrix-vector and matrix-matrix products, and, with the inclusion of an optical feedback loop, to the computation of a "weighted" readout of stored memory phases. We note some applications of these circuits for error correction and for computing tasks requiring fast vector inner products, e.g. statistical classification and some machine learning algorithms.

  6. Regional Summary Pacific Management Context

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Bocaccio, Pacific ocean perch, cowcod, and darkblotched and widow rockfish are currently in rebuildingRegional Summary Pacific Management Context The Pacific Region includes California, Oregon, and Washington. Federal fisheries in this region are managed by the Pacific Fishery Management Council (PFMC

  7. 6, 1332313366, 2006 Regional pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ACPD 6, 13323­13366, 2006 Regional pollution potentials of major population centers M. G. Lawrence a Creative Commons License. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions Regional pollution potentials. Lawrence (lawrence@mpch-mainz.mpg.de) 13323 #12;ACPD 6, 13323­13366, 2006 Regional pollution potentials

  8. Optical Microscopy and 4Optical Microscopy and 4 Pi MicroscopyPi Microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    La Rosa, Andres H.

    Optical Microscopy and 4Optical Microscopy and 4 Pi MicroscopyPi Microscopy Carolyn A. SuttonCarolyn A. Sutton PH 464PH 464 #12;OverviewOverview The OpticalThe Optical MicroscopeMicroscopy 4 Pi Microscopy4 Pi Microscopy Optical Microscope for Metallography #12;Optical Microscope: OriginsOptical

  9. ULTRAFAST OPTICS AND OPTICAL FIBER COMMUNICATIONS LABORATORYLEOS 2003 Multiple Output Channel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Purdue University

    DSTAWG DST Pulse Shaper Fiber ports Imaging optics U.S. Quarter #12;ULTRAFAST OPTICS AND OPTICAL FIBER;ULTRAFAST OPTICS AND OPTICAL FIBER COMMUNICATIONS LABORATORYLEOS 2003 One Guide ­ One Pulse Pulses slab Loss-engineering to control relative pulse amplitude. #12;ULTRAFAST OPTICS AND OPTICAL FIBER

  10. An optical fan for light beams for high-precision optical measurements and optical switching

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhi-Yuan Zhou; Yan Li; Dong-Sheng Ding; Yun-Kun Jiang; Wei Zhang; Shuai Shi; Bao-Sen Shi; Guang-Can Guo

    2014-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The polarization and orbital angular momentum properties of light are of great importance in optical science and technology in the fields of high precision optical measurements and high capacity and high speed optical communications. Here we show, a totally new method, based on a combination of these two properties and using the thermal dispersion and electro-optical effect of birefringent crystals, the construction of a simple and robust scheme to rotate a light beam like a fan. Using a computer-based digital image processing technique, we determine the temperature and the thermal dispersion difference of the crystal with high resolution. We also use the rotation phenomenon to realize thermo-optic and electro-optic switches. The basic operating principles for measurement and switching processes are presented in detail. The methods developed here will have wide practical applicability in various fields, including remote sensing, materials science and optical communication networks.

  11. Pedestal substrate for coated optics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hale, Layton C. (Livermore, CA); Malsbury, Terry N. (Tracy, CA); Patterson, Steven R. (Concord, NC)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A pedestal optical substrate that simultaneously provides high substrate dynamic stiffness, provides low surface figure sensitivity to mechanical mounting hardware inputs, and constrains surface figure changes caused by optical coatings to be primarily spherical in nature. The pedestal optical substrate includes a disk-like optic or substrate section having a top surface that is coated, a disk-like base section that provides location at which the substrate can be mounted, and a connecting cylindrical section between the base and optics or substrate sections. The connecting cylindrical section may be attached via three spaced legs or members. However, the pedestal optical substrate can be manufactured from a solid piece of material to form a monolith, thus avoiding joints between the sections, or the disk-like base can be formed separately and connected to the connecting section. By way of example, the pedestal optical substrate may be utilized in the fabrication of optics for an extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography imaging system, or in any optical system requiring coated optics and substrates with reduced sensitivity to mechanical mounts.

  12. Understanding Regional Economic Growth in IndiaUnderstanding Regional Economic Growth in India Understanding Regional Economic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Understanding Regional Economic Growth in IndiaUnderstanding Regional Economic Growth in India Understanding Regional Economic Growth in India* Jeffrey D. Sachs Director The Earth Institute at Columbia_ramiah@yahoo.co.uk Asian Economic Papers 1:3 © 2002 The Earth Institute at Columbia University and the Massachusetts

  13. All-optical switching in optically induced nonlinear waveguide couplers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diebel, Falko, E-mail: falko.diebel@uni-muenster.de; Boguslawski, Martin; Rose, Patrick; Denz, Cornelia [Institut für Angewandte Physik and Center for Nonlinear Science (CeNoS), Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster, 48149 Münster (Germany); Leykam, Daniel; Desyatnikov, Anton S. [Nonlinear Physics Centre, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia)

    2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We experimentally demonstrate all-optical vortex switching in nonlinear coupled waveguide arrays optically induced in photorefractive media. Our technique is based on multiplexing of nondiffracting Bessel beams to induce various types of waveguide configurations. Using double- and quadruple-well potentials, we demonstrate precise control over the coupling strength between waveguides, the linear and nonlinear dynamics and symmetry-breaking bifurcations of guided light, and a power-controlled optical vortex switch.

  14. Far-infrared optical and dielectric response of ZnS measured by terahertz time-domain spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Far-infrared optical and dielectric response of ZnS measured by terahertz time-domain spectroscopy material in the infrared and far-infrared region.1 It plays a vital role in being used as infrared windows the frequency-dependent optical properties and complex di- electric response of ZnS over a broad far-infrared

  15. Aerosol remote sensing in polar regions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tomasi, C.; Wagener, R.; Kokhanovsky, A. A.; Lupi, A.; Ritter, C.; Smirnov, A.; O Neill, N. T.; Stone, R. S.; Holben, B. N.; Nyeki, S.; Wehrli, C.; Stohl, A.; Mazzola, M.; Lanconelli, C.; Vitale, V.; Stebel, K.; Aaltonen, V.; de Leeuw, G.; Rodriguez, E.; Herber, A. B.; Radionov, V. F.; Zielinski, T.; Petelski, T.; Sakerin, S. M.; Kabanov, D. M.; Xue, Y.; Mei, L.; Istomina, L.; Wagener, R.; McArthur, B.; Sobolewski, P. S.; Kivi, R.; Courcoux, Y.; Larouche, P.; Broccardo, S.; Piketh, S. J.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Multi-year sets of ground-based sun-photometer measurements conducted at 12 Arctic sites and 9 Antarctic sites were examined to determine daily mean values of aerosol optical thickness ?(?) at visible and near-infrared wavelengths, from which best-fit values of Ångström's exponent ? were calculated. Analysing these data, the monthly mean values of ?(0.50 ?m) and ? and the relative frequency histograms of the daily mean values of both parameters were determined for winter–spring and summer–autumn in the Arctic and for austral summer in Antarctica. The Arctic and Antarctic covariance plots of the seasonal median values of ? versus ?(0.50 ?m) showed: (i) a considerable increase in ?(0.50 ?m) for the Arctic aerosol from summer to winter–spring, without marked changes in ?; and (ii) a marked increase in ?(0.50 ?m) passing from the Antarctic Plateau to coastal sites, whereas ? decreased considerably due to the larger fraction of sea-salt aerosol. Good agreement was found when comparing ground-based sun-photometer measurements of ?(?) and ? at Arctic and Antarctic coastal sites with Microtops measurements conducted during numerous AERONET/MAN cruises from 2006 to 2013 in three Arctic Ocean sectors and in coastal and off-shore regions of the Southern Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans, and the Antarctic Peninsula. Lidar measurements were also examined to characterise vertical profiles of the aerosol backscattering coefficient measured throughout the year at Ny-Ålesund. Satellite-based MODIS, MISR, and AATSR retrievals of ?(?) over large parts of the oceanic polar regions during spring and summer were in close agreement with ship-borne and coastal ground-based sun-photometer measurements. An overview of the chemical composition of mode particles is also presented, based on in-situ measurements at Arctic and Antarctic sites. Fourteen log-normal aerosol number size-distributions were defined to represent the average features of nuclei, accumulation and coarse mode particles for Arctic haze, summer background aerosol, Asian dust and boreal forest fire smoke, and for various background austral summer aerosol types at coastal and high-altitude Antarctic sites. The main columnar aerosol optical characteristics were determined for all 14 particle modes, based on in-situ measurements of the scattering and absorption coefficients. Diurnally averaged direct aerosol-induced radiative forcing and efficiency were calculated for a set of multimodal aerosol extinction models, using various Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function models over vegetation-covered, oceanic and snow-covered surfaces. These gave a reliable measure of the pronounced effects of aerosols on the radiation balance of the surface–atmosphere system over polar regions.

  16. Aerosol remote sensing in polar regions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tomasi, C.; Wagener, R.; Kokhanovsky, A. A.; Lupi, A.; Ritter, C.; Smirnov, A.; O Neill, N. T.; Stone, R. S.; Holben, B. N.; Nyeki, S.; et al

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Multi-year sets of ground-based sun-photometer measurements conducted at 12 Arctic sites and 9 Antarctic sites were examined to determine daily mean values of aerosol optical thickness ?(?) at visible and near-infrared wavelengths, from which best-fit values of Ångström's exponent ? were calculated. Analysing these data, the monthly mean values of ?(0.50 ?m) and ? and the relative frequency histograms of the daily mean values of both parameters were determined for winter–spring and summer–autumn in the Arctic and for austral summer in Antarctica. The Arctic and Antarctic covariance plots of the seasonal median values of ? versus ?(0.50 ?m) showed: (i)more »a considerable increase in ?(0.50 ?m) for the Arctic aerosol from summer to winter–spring, without marked changes in ?; and (ii) a marked increase in ?(0.50 ?m) passing from the Antarctic Plateau to coastal sites, whereas ? decreased considerably due to the larger fraction of sea-salt aerosol. Good agreement was found when comparing ground-based sun-photometer measurements of ?(?) and ? at Arctic and Antarctic coastal sites with Microtops measurements conducted during numerous AERONET/MAN cruises from 2006 to 2013 in three Arctic Ocean sectors and in coastal and off-shore regions of the Southern Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans, and the Antarctic Peninsula. Lidar measurements were also examined to characterise vertical profiles of the aerosol backscattering coefficient measured throughout the year at Ny-Ålesund. Satellite-based MODIS, MISR, and AATSR retrievals of ?(?) over large parts of the oceanic polar regions during spring and summer were in close agreement with ship-borne and coastal ground-based sun-photometer measurements. An overview of the chemical composition of mode particles is also presented, based on in-situ measurements at Arctic and Antarctic sites. Fourteen log-normal aerosol number size-distributions were defined to represent the average features of nuclei, accumulation and coarse mode particles for Arctic haze, summer background aerosol, Asian dust and boreal forest fire smoke, and for various background austral summer aerosol types at coastal and high-altitude Antarctic sites. The main columnar aerosol optical characteristics were determined for all 14 particle modes, based on in-situ measurements of the scattering and absorption coefficients. Diurnally averaged direct aerosol-induced radiative forcing and efficiency were calculated for a set of multimodal aerosol extinction models, using various Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function models over vegetation-covered, oceanic and snow-covered surfaces. These gave a reliable measure of the pronounced effects of aerosols on the radiation balance of the surface–atmosphere system over polar regions.« less

  17. Method for optical and mechanically coupling optical fibers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Toeppen, John S. (Livermore, CA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for splicing optical fibers. A fluorescing solder glass frit having a melting point lower than the melting point of first and second optical fibers is prepared. The solder glass frit is then attached to the end of the first optical fiber and/or the end of the second optical fiber. The ends of the optical fibers are aligned and placed in close proximity to each other. The solder glass frit is then heated to a temperature which is lower than the melting temperature of the first and second optical fibers, but which is high enough to melt the solder glass frit. A force is applied to the first and second optical fibers pushing the ends of the fibers towards each other. As the solder glass flit becomes molten, the layer of molten solder glass is compressed into a thin layer between the first and second optical fibers. The thin compressed layer of molten solder glass is allowed to cool such that the first and second optical fibers are bonded to each other by the hardened layer of solder glass.

  18. Fiber optic compass development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Kyongtae

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    is illustrated schematically in Fig. 3-1. The light source is an erbium doped fiber (EDF) laser in the ring configuration [11-12]. Total amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) power is 7 mW at 45 mW pump power. The laser is spectrally scanned in the 1525 ~ 1565... optic modulator and amplified by a commercial erbium- doped fiber amplifier (EDFA). The spectrum of the laser after amplification at 6 different wavelengths is shown in Fig. 3-3. After amplification, the light passes through a fiber coupler...

  19. Quantum Gravitational Optics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graham M Shore

    2003-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In quantum theory, the curved spacetime of Einstein's general theory of relativity acts as a dispersive optical medium for the propagation of light. Gravitational rainbows and birefringence replace the classical picture of light rays mapping out the null geodesics of curved spacetime. Even more remarkably, {\\it superluminal} propagation becomes a real possibility, raising the question of whether it is possible to send signals into the past. In this article, we review recent developments in the quantum theory of light propagation in general relativity and discuss whether superluminal light is compatible with causality.

  20. Optical humidity sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tarvin, J.A.

    1987-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical dielectric humidity sensor is disclosed which includes a dielectric mirror having multiple alternating layers of two porous water-adsorbent dielectric materials with differing indices of refraction carried by a translucent substrate. A narrow-band polarized light source is positioned to direct light energy onto the mirror, and detectors are positioned to receive light energy transmitted through and reflected by the mirror. A ratiometer indicates humidity in the atmosphere which surrounds the dielectric mirror as a function of a ratio of light energies incident on the detectors. 2 figs.

  1. Fiber optic geophysical sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Homuth, E.F.

    1991-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A fiber optic geophysical sensor is described in which laser light is passed through a sensor interferometer in contact with a geophysical event, and a reference interferometer not in contact with the geophysical event but in the same general environment as the sensor interferometer. In one embodiment, a single tunable laser provides the laser light. In another embodiment, separate tunable lasers are used for the sensor and reference interferometers. The invention can find such uses as monitoring for earthquakes, and the weighing of objects. 2 figures.

  2. Ferroelectric optical image comparator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Butler, M.A.; Land, C.E.; Martin, S.J.; Pfeifer, K.B.

    1993-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A ferroelectric optical image comparator has a lead lanthanum zirconate titanate thin-film device which is constructed with a semi-transparent or transparent conductive first electrode on one side of the thin film, a conductive metal second electrode on the other side of the thin film, and the second electrode is in contact with a nonconducting substrate. A photoinduced current in the device represents the dot product between a stored image and an image projected onto the first electrode. One-dimensional autocorrelations are performed by measuring this current while displacing the projected image. 7 figures.

  3. Sandia Energy - Quantum Optics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear PressLaboratory FellowsPolariton LasingQuantum Optics

  4. University of Minnesota Rochester Information Commons 111 S. Broadway Rochester Minnesota 55904

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Tiefeng

    Minnesota 55904 AMERICAN PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSOCIATION FORMAT These are simplified guidelines for use½ inches on left side if paper will go into a binder. · Indent paragraphs 5 spaces. · Do not divide words begin with capital letters. · For title page instructions, see the last blue page of this Guideline

  5. This article was downloaded by:[Rochester Institute of Technology] [Rochester Institute of Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kandlikar, Satish

    , chemical processing plants, nuclear reactor systems, and fuel cells. The present work considers a 1 mm-square minichannel and adiabatic flows corresponding to practical PEM fuel cell conditions. Pressure drop data, the use of computers for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis has produced less than satisfying

  6. System for testing optical fibers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Golob, John E. [Olathe, KS; Looney, Larry D. [Los Alamos, NM; Lyons, Peter B. [Los Alamos, NM; Nelson, Melvin A. [Santa Barbara, CA; Davies, Terence J. [Santa Barbara, CA

    1980-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for measuring a combination of optical transmission properties of fiber optic waveguides. A polarized light pulse probe is injected into one end of the optical fiber. Reflections from discontinuities within the fiber are unpolarized whereas reflections of the probe pulse incident to its injection remain polarized. The polarized reflections are prevented from reaching a light detector whereas reflections from the discontinuities reaches the detector.

  7. Optical Tweezer Arrays and Optical Substrates Created with Di#ractive Optics Eric R. Dufresne and David G. Grier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grier, David

    Optical Tweezer Arrays and Optical Substrates Created with Di#ractive Optics Eric R. Dufresne)) We describe a simple method for creating multiple optical tweezers from a single laser beam using di#ractive optical elements. As a demonstration of this technique, we have implemented a 4 × 4 square array

  8. Optical Tweezer Arrays and Optical Substrates Created with Diffractive Optics Eric R. Dufresne and David G. Grier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grier, David

    Optical Tweezer Arrays and Optical Substrates Created with Diffractive Optics Eric R. Dufresne)) We describe a simple method for creating multiple optical tweezers from a single laser beam using diffractive optical elements. As a demonstration of this technique, we have implemented a 4 × 4 square array

  9. Fiber optic diffraction grating maker

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deason, Vance A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Ward, Michael B. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A compact and portable diffraction grating maker comprised of a laser beam, optical and fiber optics devices coupling the beam to one or more evanescent beam splitters, and collimating lenses or mirrors directing the split beam at an appropriate photosensitive material. The collimating optics, the output ends of the fiber optic coupler and the photosensitive plate holder are all mounted on an articulated framework so that the angle of intersection of the beams can be altered at will without disturbing the spatial filter, collimation or beam quality, and assuring that the beams will always intersect at the position of the plate.

  10. Efficiencies of Quantum Optical Detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel Hogg; Dominic W. Berry; A. I. Lvovsky

    2014-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a definition for the efficiency that can be universally applied to all classes of quantum optical detectors. This definition is based on the maximum amount of optical loss that a physically plausible device can experience while still replicating the properties of a given detector. We prove that detector efficiency cannot be increased using linear optical processing. That is, given a set of detectors, as well as arbitrary linear optical elements and ancillary light sources, it is impossible to construct detection devices that would exhibit higher efficiencies than the initial set.

  11. Fiber optic diffraction grating maker

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deason, V.A.; Ward, M.B.

    1991-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A compact and portable diffraction grating maker is comprised of a laser beam, optical and fiber optics devices coupling the beam to one or more evanescent beam splitters, and collimating lenses or mirrors directing the split beam at an appropriate photosensitive material. The collimating optics, the output ends of the fiber optic coupler and the photosensitive plate holder are all mounted on an articulated framework so that the angle of intersection of the beams can be altered at will without disturbing the spatial filter, collimation or beam quality, and assuring that the beams will always intersect at the position of the plate. 4 figures.

  12. Misalignment corrections in optical interconnects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, Deqiang

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    IEEE, 88, pp806-18, A. Yariv, "Quantum Electronics", Wiley;30 Oct. -1 Nov. 2002 A. Yariv, "Optical waves in crystals :

  13. Low noise optical position sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spear, J.D.

    1999-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel optical position sensor is described that uses two component photodiodes electrically connected in parallel, with opposing polarities. A lens provides optical gain and restricts the acceptance angle of the detector. The response of the device to displacements of an optical spot is similar to that of a conventional bi-cell type position sensitive detector. However, the component photodiode design enables simpler electronic amplification with inherently less electrical noise than the bi-cell. Measurements by the sensor of the pointing noise of a focused helium-neon laser as a function of frequency demonstrate high sensitivity and suitability for optical probe beam deflection experiments. 14 figs.

  14. Low noise optical position sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spear, Jonathan David (Berkeley, CA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel optical position sensor is described that uses two component photodiodes electrically connected in parallel, with opposing polarities. A lens provides optical gain and restricts the acceptance angle of the detector. The response of the device to displacements of an optical spot is similar to that of a conventional bi-cell type position sensitive detector. However, the component photodiode design enables simpler electronic amplification with inherently less electrical noise than the bi-cell. Measurements by the sensor of the pointing noise of a focused helium-neon laser as a function of frequency demonstrate high sensitivity and suitability for optical probe beam deflection experiments.

  15. Optically stimulated differential impedance spectroscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maxey, Lonnie C; Parks, II, James E; Lewis, Sr., Samuel A; Partridge, Jr., William P

    2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and apparatuses for evaluating a material are described. Embodiments typically involve use of an impedance measurement sensor to measure the impedance of a sample of the material under at least two different states of illumination. The states of illumination may include (a) substantially no optical stimulation, (b) substantial optical stimulation, (c) optical stimulation at a first wavelength of light, (d) optical stimulation at a second wavelength of light, (e) a first level of light intensity, and (f) a second level of light intensity. Typically a difference in impedance between the impedance of the sample at the two states of illumination is measured to determine a characteristic of the material.

  16. Ca II 854.2 nm BISECTORS AND CIRCUMFACULAR REGIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pietarila, A.; Harvey, J. W. [National Solar Observatory, 950 N. Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States)] [National Solar Observatory, 950 N. Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States)

    2013-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Active regions appear bright in Ca II 854.2 nm line core intensity while the surrounding areas, referred to as circumfacular regions, are darker than the active region or the quiet Sun. We use Synoptic Optical Long-term Investigations of the Sun Vector Spectromagnetograph Ca II 854.2 nm data (photospheric and chromospheric full disk magnetograms as well as high spectral resolution Stokes I and V profiles) to study the connection between magnetic canopies, circumfacular regions, and Ca II 854.2 nm bisector amplitudes (spans). The line bisector amplitude is reduced in circumfacular regions, where the 3 minute period power in chromospheric H{alpha} intensity oscillations is also reduced relative to the surrounding quiet Sun. The latter is consistent with magnetic canopies in circumfacular regions suppressing upward propagating steepening acoustic waves. Our results provide further strong evidence for shock waves as the cause of the inverse C-shaped bisector and explain the observed solar cycle variation of the shape and amplitude of Sun-as-a-star Ca II 854.2 nm bisectors.

  17. Ultrafast optical technique for the characterization of altered materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maris, H.J.

    1998-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed herein is a method and a system for non-destructively examining a semiconductor sample having at least one localized region underlying a surface through into which a selected chemical species has been implanted or diffused. A first step induces at least one transient time-varying change in optical constants of the sample at a location at or near to a surface of the sample. A second step measures a response of the sample to an optical probe beam, either pulsed or continuous wave, at least during a time that the optical constants are varying. A third step associates the measured response with at least one of chemical species concentration, chemical species type, implant energy, a presence or absence of an introduced chemical species region at the location, and a presence or absence of implant-related damage. The method and apparatus in accordance with this invention can be employed in conjunction with a measurement of one or more of the following effects arising from a time-dependent change in the optical constants of the sample due to the application of at least one pump pulse: (a) a change in reflected intensity; (b) a change in transmitted intensity; (c) a change in a polarization state of the reflected and/or transmitted light; (d) a change in the optical phase of the reflected and/or transmitted light; (e) a change in direction of the reflected and/or transmitted light; and (f) a change in optical path length between the sample`s surface and a detector. 22 figs.

  18. Ultrafast optical technique for the characterization of altered materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maris, Humphrey J. (Barrington, RI)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed herein is a method and a system for non-destructively examining a semiconductor sample (30) having at least one localized region underlying a surface (30a) through into which a selected chemical species has been implanted or diffused. A first step induces at least one transient time-varying change in optical constants of the sample at a location at or near to a surface of the sample. A second step measures a response of the sample to an optical probe beam, either pulsed or continuous wave, at least during a time that the optical constants are varying. A third step associates the measured response with at least one of chemical species concentration, chemical species type, implant energy, a presence or absence of an introduced chemical species region at the location, and a presence or absence of implant-related damage. The method and apparatus in accordance with this invention can be employed in conjunction with a measurement of one or more of the following effects arising from a time-dependent change in the optical constants of the sample due to the application of at least one pump pulse: (a) a change in reflected intensity; (b) a change in transmitted intensity; (c) a change in a polarization state of the reflected and/or transmitted light; (d) a change in the optical phase of the reflected and/or transmitted light; (e) a change in direction of the reflected and/or transmitted light; and (f) a change in optical path length between the sample's surface and a detector.

  19. Optical cavity furnace for semiconductor wafer processing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sopori, Bhushan L.

    2014-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical cavity furnace 10 having multiple optical energy sources 12 associated with an optical cavity 18 of the furnace. The multiple optical energy sources 12 may be lamps or other devices suitable for producing an appropriate level of optical energy. The optical cavity furnace 10 may also include one or more reflectors 14 and one or more walls 16 associated with the optical energy sources 12 such that the reflectors 14 and walls 16 define the optical cavity 18. The walls 16 may have any desired configuration or shape to enhance operation of the furnace as an optical cavity 18. The optical energy sources 12 may be positioned at any location with respect to the reflectors 14 and walls defining the optical cavity. The optical cavity furnace 10 may further include a semiconductor wafer transport system 22 for transporting one or more semiconductor wafers 20 through the optical cavity.

  20. Bundled monocapillary optics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hirsch, Gregory (1277 Linds Mar Center, Suite 128, Pacifica, CA 94044)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A plurality of glass or metal wires are precisely etched to form the desired shape of the individual channels of the final polycapillary optic. This shape is created by carefully controlling the withdrawal speed of a group of wires from an etchant bath. The etched wires undergo a subsequent operation to create an extremely smooth surface. This surface is coated with a layer of material which is selected to maximize the reflectivity of the radiation being used. This reflective surface may be a single layer of material, or a multilayer coating for optimizing the reflectivity in a narrower wavelength interval. The collection of individual wires is assembled into a close-packed multi-wire bundle, and the wires are bonded together in a manner which preserves the close-pack configuration, irrespective of the local wire diameter. The initial wires are then removed by either a chemical etching procedure or mechanical force. In the case of chemical etching, the bundle is generally segmented by cutting a series of etching slots. Prior to removing the wire, the capillary array is typically bonded to a support substrate. The result of the process is a bundle of precisely oriented radiation-reflecting hollow channels. The capillary optic is used for efficiently collecting and redirecting the radiation from a source of radiation which could be the anode of an x-ray tube, a plasma source, the fluorescent radiation from an electron microprobe, a synchrotron radiation source, a reactor or spallation source of neutrons, or some other source.

  1. Optical transcutaneous bilirubin detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1991-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention consists of a transcutaneous bilirubin detector comprising a source of light having spectral components absorbable and not absorbable by bilirubin, a handle assembly, electronic circuitry and a fiber optic bundle connecting the assembly to the light source and circuitry. Inside the assembly is a prism that receives the light from one end of the fiber optic bundle and directs it onto the skin and directs the reflected light back into the bundle. The other end of the bundle is trifucated, with one end going to the light source and the other two ends going to circuitry that determines how much light of each kind has been reflected. A relatively greater amount absorbed by the skin from the portion of the spectrum absorbable by bilirubin may indicate the presence of the illness. Preferably, two measurements are made, one on the kneecap and one on the forehead, and compared to determine the presence of bilirubin. To reduce the impact of light absorption by hemoglobin in the blood carried by the skin, pressure is applied with a plunger and spring in the handle assembly, the pressure limited by points of a button slidably carried in the assembly that are perceived by touch when the pressure applied is sufficient.

  2. Covert Optical Communication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boulat A. Bash; Andrei H. Gheorghe; Monika Patel; Jonathan Habif; Dennis Goeckel; Don Towsley; Saikat Guha

    2014-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Encryption prevents unauthorized decoding, but does not ensure stealth---a security demand that a mere presence of a message be undetectable. We characterize the ultimate limit of covert communication that is secure against the most powerful physically-permissible adversary. We show that, although it is impossible over a pure-loss channel, covert communication is attainable in the presence of any excess noise, such as a $300$K thermal blackbody. In this case, $\\mathcal{O}(\\sqrt{n})$ bits can be transmitted reliably and covertly in $n$ optical modes using standard optical communication equipment. The all-powerful adversary may intercept all transmitted photons not received by the intended receiver, and employ arbitrary quantum memory and measurements. Conversely, we show that this square root scaling cannot be outperformed. We corroborate our theory in a proof-of-concept experiment. We believe that our findings will enable practical realizations of covert communication and sensing, both for point-to-point and networked scenarios.

  3. Electrostatic shape-shifting ion optics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dahl, David A.; Scott, Jill R.; Appelhans, Anthony D.

    2006-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrostatic shape-shifting ion optics includes an outer electrode that defines an interior region between first and second opposed open ends. A first inner electrode is positioned within the interior region of the outer electrode at about the first open end. A second inner electrode is positioned within the interior region of the outer electrode at about the second open end. A first end cap electrode is positioned at about a first open end of the first inner electrode so that the first end cap electrode substantially encloses the first open end of the first inner electrode. A second end cap electrode is positioned at about a second open end of the second inner electrode so that the second end cap electrode substantially encloses the second open end of the second inner electrode. A voltage source operatively connected to each of the electrodes applies voltage functions to each of the electrodes to produce an electric field within an interior space enclosed by the electrodes.

  4. Previous Dayside Aurora Conjugacy Investigations Optical-Non-optical comparisons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fillingim, Matthew

    Dayside Aurora Conjugacy Investigations Optical-Non-optical comparisons: · Dickinson et al., 1986, compared low-altitude satellite particle data to ground-based images · Northern hemisphere aurora poleward of southern aurora · Technique only sensitive to shifts in latitude · Mende et al., 1990, compared ground

  5. First results for a FCC-hh ring optics design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chance, Antoine; Payet, Jacques; Alemany Fernandez, Reyes; Holzer, Bernhard; Schulte, Daniel

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The first order considerations of the optics for the FCC-hh ring are presented. The arc cell is generated taking into account some general considerations like the whole circumference, maximum gradients and lengths of the elements in the cell. The integration of the insertion regions started. Three types of Dispersion Suppressors (DIS) are studied. The sensitivity of the arc parameters to these layout considerations is studied in more detail. An alternative layout is shown as well.

  6. Engineering extension.uci.edu/optics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrett, Jeffrey A.

    Engineering extension.uci.edu/optics OpticalEngineeringand OpticalInstrumentDesign Certificate and optical systems. These are essential to virtually every industry including defense, medical, clean energy. The Optical Engineering Certificate Program addresses the growing demand for skilled professionals who can

  7. Coordinated Regional Public Transportation Plan: Heart of Texas Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heart of Texas Council of Governments

    2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coordinated Regional Public Transportation Plan Heart of Texas Region Bosque, Falls, Freestone, Hill, Limestone & McLennan Counties December 1, 2006 TABLE OF CONTENTS Acknowledgements... of Texas Council of Governments (HOTCOG) and the McLennan County Youth Collaboration (MCYC) ---21 Central Texas Senior Ministries (CTSM), Hill County Transit (HCT) and Scott and White (S&W) Medical Facilities...

  8. Reconfigurable optical switches with monolithic electrical-to-optical interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, J.; Zhou, P. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Center for High Technology Materials; Zolper, J.C.; Lear, K.L.; Vawter, G.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Leibenguth, R.E.; Adams, A.C. [AT and T Bell Labs., Breinigsville, PA (United States)

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vertical cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) can be integrated with heterojunction phototransistors (HPTs) and heterojunction bipolar transistors (HBTs) on the same wafer to form high speed optical and optoelectronic switches, respectively, that can be optically or electrically addressed. This permits the direct communication and transmission of data between distributed electronic processors through an optical switching network. The experimental demonstration of an integrated optoelectronic HBT/VCSEL switch combining a GaAs/AlGaAs heterojunction bipolar transistor (HBT) with a VCSEL is described below, using the same epilayer structure upon which binary HPT/VCSEL optical switches are also built. The monolithic HBT/VCSEL switch has high current gain, low power dissipation, and a high optical to electrical conversion efficiency. Its modulation has been measured and modeled.

  9. Optical forces and optical torques on various materials arising from optical lattices in the Lorentz-Mie regime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jia, Lin

    By combining the Maxwell stress tensor with the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method, we calculate the optical force and optical torque on particles from optical lattices. We compare our method to the two-component ...

  10. Regional Energy Efficiency Programs | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Programs Regional Energy Efficiency Programs This presentation covers regional industrial energy efficiency programs in the Midwest, Southeast, and Southwest. Regional Energy...

  11. Optical Formula Recognition Stephane Lavirotte

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Optical Formula Recognition St´ephane Lavirotte Lo¨ic Pottier Safir Team Safir Team INRIA Sophia This paper describes the design and the first steps of implementation of Ofr (Optical Formula Recognition on the third part: we define a class of context-sensitive graph gram- mars for mathematical formulas, study

  12. CONTROL FOR AN OPTICALLY POWERED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;CONTROL FOR AN OPTICALLY POWERED FIRING SET USING MINIATURE PHOTOVOLTAIC ARRAYS BY TODD EDWARDAL85000 #12;CONTROL FOR AN OPTICALLY POWERED FIRING SET USING MINIATURE PHOTOVOLTAIC ARRAYS BY TODD of Science Electrical Engineering The University of New Mexico Albuquerque, New Mexico May, 2009 #12;CONTROL

  13. Optical Theorem in Nonlinear Media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Wei

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the optical theorem for scattering of electromagnetic waves in nonlinear media. This result is used to obtain the power extinguished from a field by a nonlinear scatterer. The cases of second harmonic generation and the Kerr effect are studied in some detail. Applications to nonlinear apertureless scanning near-field optical microscopy are considered.

  14. Optical Prosthetics Mimicking the Eye

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    La Rosa, Andres H.

    Optical Prosthetics Mimicking the Eye Abstract The eye is a complex optical system that, like other still being in its infancy. Introduction The eye consists of many parts. · Sclera: The majority of the eye, it forms the white shell and the basic shape of the eyeball. · Cornea: The frontal 1/6 of the eye

  15. VARIATION OF AEROSOL OPTICAL PROPERTIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Stephen E.

    radiative forcing due to the aerosol, W m-2 FT is the solar constant, W m-2 Ac is the fractional cloud cover;APPROACH TO MODELING AEROSOL RADIATIVE EFFECTS Transport Chemistry Microphysics Removal ModelEmissions Size-distributed Composition Optical Properties Radiative Effects Optics Model Radiation Transfer Model #12;CLASSES OF AEROSOL

  16. PITTSBURGH REGIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL THREATS ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Huiqiang

    AND COMMUNITIES PITTSBURGH, PA. | AUGUST 2013 #12;PRETA AIR: HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS 32 PITTSBURGH REGIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL THREATS ANALYSIS REPORT PRETA AIR: HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS (HAPs)/AIR TOXICS PREPARED BY AUTHORSPITTSBURGH REGIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL THREATS ANALYSIS (PRETA) REPORT PRETA AIR: HAZARDOUS AIR

  17. 1, 497531, 2004 Regional hydrology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    BGD 1, 497­531, 2004 Regional hydrology controls stream microbial biofilms T. J. Battin et al hydrology controls stream microbial biofilms: evidence from a glacial catchment T. J. Battin1, , A. Wille2@pflaphy.pph.univie.ac.at) 497 #12;BGD 1, 497­531, 2004 Regional hydrology controls stream microbial biofilms T. J. Battin et al

  18. REGIONAL WATER SUPPLY PLANNING AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mays, Larry W.

    CHAPTER 3 REGIONAL WATER SUPPLY PLANNING AND CAPACITY EXPANSION MODELS Messele Z. Ejeta California Department of Water Resources Sacramento, California Larry W. Mays Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering Arizona State University Tempe, Arizona 3.1 INTRODUCTION Water supply planning on a regional scale

  19. Presentation of Regional SDSN Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garulli, Andrea

    ;Conference topics: Pollution in the Mediterranean sea Climate change Improving the management Energy#12;Presentation of UN SDSN and MED SDSN Regional SDSN Center for the Mediterranean Region #12;UN for the Mediterranean Basin Why a Mediterranean Network? Shared history Shared environment Shared future MED

  20. Optical set-reset latch

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Skogen, Erik J.

    2013-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical set-reset (SR) latch is formed from a first electroabsorption modulator (EAM), a second EAM and a waveguide photodetector (PD) which are arranged in an optical and electrical feedback loop which controls the transmission of light through the first EAM to latch the first EAM in a light-transmissive state in response to a Set light input. A second waveguide PD controls the transmission of light through the second EAM and is used to switch the first EAM to a light-absorptive state in response to a Reset light input provided to the second waveguide PD. The optical SR latch, which may be formed on a III-V compound semiconductor substrate (e.g. an InP or a GaAs substrate) as a photonic integrated circuit (PIC), stores a bit of optical information and has an optical output for the logic state of that bit of information.

  1. Optical Approach to Gravitational Redshift

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. G. Yi

    2012-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical approach begins by interpreting the gravitational redshift resulting to a change in the relative velocity of light due to the medium of propagation in the gravitational field. The discussion continues by pointing out an agreement in structure between the equation for rays in geometrical optics and the geodesic equation of general relativity. From their comparison we learn that the path of rays should be given by the relation $ds^2=n^2(r)dr^2+r^2d\\theta^2$, not by $ds^2=dr^2+r^2d\\theta^2$, in a medium with spherical symmetry of refractive index $n(r)$. The development of an optical analogy suggests introducing $n^2(r)$ in place of $g_{rr}$ as an optical version of the Schwarzschild metric. In form and content, $n^2(r)$ is different from $g_{rr}$. The optical point of view replaces the general-relativity explanations in terms of time and gravitation.

  2. Miniature mechanical transfer optical coupler

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abel, Philip (Overland Park, KS); Watterson, Carl (Kansas City, MO)

    2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A miniature mechanical transfer (MT) optical coupler ("MMTOC") for optically connecting a first plurality of optical fibers with at least one other plurality of optical fibers. The MMTOC may comprise a beam splitting element, a plurality of collimating lenses, and a plurality of alignment elements. The MMTOC may optically couple a first plurality of fibers disposed in a plurality of ferrules of a first MT connector with a second plurality of fibers disposed in a plurality of ferrules of a second MT connector and a third plurality of fibers disposed in a plurality of ferrules of a third MT connector. The beam splitting element may allow a portion of each beam of light from the first plurality of fibers to pass through to the second plurality of fibers and simultaneously reflect another portion of each beam of light from the first plurality of fibers to the third plurality of fibers.

  3. Development of optical field emitter arrays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Yujia, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Optical field emitters are electron emission sources actuated by incident light. Optically actuated field emitters may produce ultrafast pulses of electrons when excited by ultrafast optical pulses, thus making them of ...

  4. SCIENCE, OPTICS & YOU GUIDEBOOK FOR THE TEACHER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weston, Ken

    SCIENCE, OPTICS & YOU GUIDEBOOK TABLE OF CONTENTS FOR THE TEACHER INTRODUCTION What is Science Optics and You? ...................................................... Using Centers to Teach Science) ACTIVITIES MODULE 1: THINKINGABOUT LIGHTAND OPTICS ........................... 1. Perspectives: Powers of 10

  5. Integrated optical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Watkins, A.D.; Smartt, H.B.; Taylor, P.L.

    1994-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    An integrated optical sensor for arc welding having multifunction feedback control is described. The sensor, comprising generally a CCD camera and diode laser, is positioned behind the arc torch for measuring weld pool position and width, standoff distance, and post-weld centerline cooling rate. Computer process information from this sensor is passed to a controlling computer for use in feedback control loops to aid in the control of the welding process. Weld pool position and width are used in a feedback loop, by the weld controller, to track the weld pool relative to the weld joint. Sensor standoff distance is used in a feedback loop to control the contact tip to base metal distance during the welding process. Cooling rate information is used to determine the final metallurgical state of the weld bead and heat affected zone, thereby controlling post-weld mechanical properties. 6 figures.

  6. Integrated optical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Watkins, Arthur D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Smartt, Herschel B. (Idaho Falls, ID); Taylor, Paul L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An integrated optical sensor for arc welding having multifunction feedback control. The sensor, comprising generally a CCD camera and diode laser, is positioned behind the arc torch for measuring weld pool position and width, standoff distance, and post-weld centerline cooling rate. Computer process information from this sensor is passed to a controlling computer for use in feedback control loops to aid in the control of the welding process. Weld pool position and width are used in a feedback loop, by the weld controller, to track the weld pool relative to the weld joint. Sensor standoff distance is used in a feedback loop to control the contact tip to base metal distance during the welding process. Cooling rate information is used to determine the final metallurgical state of the weld bead and heat affected zone, thereby controlling post-weld mechanical properties.

  7. Bevalac external beamline optics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalnins, J.G.; Krebs, G.F.; Tekawa, M.M.; Alonso, J.R.

    1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This handbook is intended as an aid for tuning the external particle beam (EPB) lines at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's Bevalac. The information contained within will be useful to the Bevalac's Main Control Room and experimenters alike. First, some general information is given concerning the EPB lines and beam optics. Next, each beam line is described in detail: schematics of the beam line components are shown, all the variables required to run a beam transport program are presented, beam envelopes are given with wire chamber pictures and magnet currents, focal points and magnifications. Some preliminary scaling factors are then presented which should aid in choosing a given EPB magnet's current for a given central Bevalac field. Finally, some tuning hints are suggested.

  8. Growth and optical characterizations on 3-aminophenol perchlorate (3-AMPP) crystal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boopathi, K., E-mail: ramasamyp@ssn.edu.in; Ramasamy, P., E-mail: ramasamyp@ssn.edu.in [Centre for Crystal Growth, SSN College of Engineering, Kalavakkam-603110 (India)

    2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A single crystal of organic nonlinear optical material 3-aminophenol perchlorate (3-AMP) was successfully grown by the slow evaporation solution method. Single-crystal X-ray diffractrometer was utilized to measure unit cell parameters and to confirm lattice parameter. 3-aminophenol perchlorate belongs to monoclinic space group P2{sub 1}. The optical transparency window in the UV-vis-NIR region is found to be good for nonlinear optical applications second harmonic studies were carried out. The second harmonic output intensity was tested using the Kurtz and Perry powder method and was found to be 1.1 times that of potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP)

  9. Influence of sputtering power on the optical properties of ITO thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K, Aijo John; M, Deepak, E-mail: manju.thankamoni@gmail.com; T, Manju, E-mail: manju.thankamoni@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Sree Sankara College, Kalady P. O., Ernakulam Dist., Kerala (India); Kumar, Vineetha V. [Dept. of Physics, K. E. College, Mannanam, Kottayam Dist., Kerala (India)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Tin doped indium oxide films are widely used in transparent conducting coatings such as flat panel displays, crystal displays and in optical devices such as solar cells and organic light emitting diodes due to the high electrical resistivity and optical transparency in the visible region of solar spectrum. The deposition parameters have a commendable influence on the optical and electrical properties of the thin films. In this study, ITO thin films were prepared by RF magnetron sputtering. The properties of the films prepared under varying sputtering power were compared using UV- visible spectrophotometry. Effect of sputtering power on the energy band gap, absorption coefficient and refractive index are investigated.

  10. Metamaterial flexible sheets could transform optics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Metamaterial flexible sheets could transform optics Metamaterial flexible sheets could transform optics Advances would boost security screening systems, infrared thermal cameras,...

  11. Correlations Between Optical, Chemical and Physical Properties...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Correlations Between Optical, Chemical and Physical Properties of Biomass Burn Aerosols. Correlations Between Optical, Chemical and Physical Properties of Biomass Burn Aerosols....

  12. Method of lightening radiation darkened optical elements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reich, Frederich R. (Richland, WA); Schwankoff, Albert R. (W. Richland, WA)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of lightening a radiation-darkened optical element in wich visible optical energy or electromagnetic radiation having a wavelength in the range of from about 2000 to about 20,000 angstroms is directed into the radiation-darkened optical element; the method may be used to lighten radiation-darkened optical element in-situ during the use of the optical element to transmit data by electronically separating the optical energy from the optical output by frequency filtering, data cooling, or interlacing the optic energy between data intervals.

  13. Silicon Photonics for Low- Energy Optical Communications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in MZ configuration, travelling wave carrier depletion MZ modulator, and thermo-optic MZ switch). Number Title US 7,616,850 Wavelength-tunable Optical Ring Resonators...

  14. Sandia National Laboratories: micro-optical devices

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    micro-optical devices Sandia and EMCORE: Solar Photovoltaics, Fiber Optics, MODE, and Energy Efficiency On March 29, 2013, in Concentrating Solar Power, Energy, Partnership,...

  15. Quantum Enabled Security (QES) for Optical Communications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Quantum Enabled Security (QES) for Optical Communications Quantum Enabled Security (QES) for Optical Communications Los Alamos National Laboratory has developed Quantum Enabled...

  16. Microfluidics for optics and quantitative cell biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campbell, James Kyle

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Microfluidics for Optics and6 2. Microfluidics for Quantitative CellTHE DISSERTATION Microfluidics for Optics and Quantitative

  17. The Project The Southern Region Water Quality Regional Coordination Project is designed to promote regional collaboration,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Project The Southern Region Water Quality Regional Coordination Project is designed to promote to protect and restore water resources. Effective approaches for watershed management, pollution prevention to the research, extension and education resources available through the Land Grant University System

  18. Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative Midwest Regional Summit...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative Midwest Regional Summit: Lightweighting Breakout Session Summary Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative Midwest Regional Summit: Lightweighting...

  19. Regional Public Coordination Transportation Plan Texoma Region #22

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texoma Council of Governments

    2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in conjunction with TxDOT to increase public awareness of the project. As an integral part of this project, each of the 24 regions studying public transportation in their area was charged with assessing Barriers, Constraints and Best Practices in public... Sherman TAPS TAPS TAPS operates in seven (7) counties, with three (3) of the counties in the Texoma Region. TAPS services include demand response, commuter bus services and special services. Square Miles Population ?00 Rider Trips ?05 Clay 1...

  20. Power inverter with optical isolation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Duncan, Paul G.; Schroeder, John Alan

    2005-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    An optically isolated power electronic power conversion circuit that includes an input electrical power source, a heat pipe, a power electronic switch or plurality of interconnected power electronic switches, a mechanism for connecting the switch to the input power source, a mechanism for connecting comprising an interconnecting cable and/or bus bar or plurality of interconnecting cables and/or input bus bars, an optically isolated drive circuit connected to the switch, a heat sink assembly upon which the power electronic switch or switches is mounted, an output load, a mechanism for connecting the switch to the output load, the mechanism for connecting including an interconnecting cable and/or bus bar or plurality of interconnecting cables and/or output bus bars, at least one a fiber optic temperature sensor mounted on the heat sink assembly, at least one fiber optic current sensor mounted on the load interconnection cable and/or output bus bar, at least one fiber optic voltage sensor mounted on the load interconnection cable and/or output bus bar, at least one fiber optic current sensor mounted on the input power interconnection cable and/or input bus bar, and at least one fiber optic voltage sensor mounted on the input power interconnection cable and/or input bus bar.

  1. OPTICAL BIOPSY: COMPLEMENTING HISTOLOGY WITH NONLINEAR OPTICAL MICROSCOPY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shafer, Christina

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    acquisition from 32 detectors. The initial task competed involved the scanning mechanism; a program was created to control motorized optical scanning mirrors. The next task required a circuit board to be built to interface the detectors with the computer. A...

  2. Graphene Nanobubble: A New Optical Nonlinear Material

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bao, Qiaoliang; Xiang, Yuanjiang; Zhang, Kai; Li, Shaojuan; Jiang, Xiaofang; Xu, Qing-Hua; Loh, Kian Ping; Venkatesan, T

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphene is a rising star in nonlinear optics due to its saturable absorption and giant Kerr nonlinearity, these properties are useful in digital optics based on optical nonlinear devices. However, practical applications require large optical nonlinearities and these are inherently limited by the interaction length of atomically thin graphene. Here, we demonstrate optical bistability in a Fabry Perot cavity containing monolayer and bilayer graphene which have been restructured to form nanobubbles. We find that graphene nanobubble can act as a new type of optical nonlinear media due to its vertical side wall as well as added curvature, which enable strong non linear dispersive effects leading to a large optically induced phase change. Unlike thermally induced bistability, the all optical switching between two transmission states happens within a time scale of tens of nanoseconds. Nanobubble based optical devices with intrinsic optical nonlinearity help to overcome the optical path length limitation of atomical...

  3. Thin-film optical initiator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Erickson, Kenneth L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A thin-film optical initiator having an inert, transparent substrate, a reactive thin film, which can be either an explosive or a pyrotechnic, and a reflective thin film. The resultant thin-film optical initiator system also comprises a fiber-optic cable connected to a low-energy laser source, an output charge, and an initiator housing. The reactive thin film, which may contain very thin embedded layers or be a co-deposit of a light-absorbing material such as carbon, absorbs the incident laser light, is volumetrically heated, and explodes against the output charge, imparting about 5 to 20 times more energy than in the incident laser pulse.

  4. Optic probe for semiconductor characterization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sopori, Bhushan L. (Denver, CO); Hambarian, Artak (Yerevan, AM)

    2008-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Described herein is an optical probe (120) for use in characterizing surface defects in wafers, such as semiconductor wafers. The optical probe (120) detects laser light reflected from the surface (124) of the wafer (106) within various ranges of angles. Characteristics of defects in the surface (124) of the wafer (106) are determined based on the amount of reflected laser light detected in each of the ranges of angles. Additionally, a wafer characterization system (100) is described that includes the described optical probe (120).

  5. Pacific Islands Region News Release

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pacific Islands Region News Release Contact: Wende Goo FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE 808-721-4098 May 27 of these unique twins by contributing more than 100 hours of work to construct a holding pen for the young seal

  6. Council's Regional Hydropower Potential Scoping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Council's Regional Hydropower Potential Scoping Study Generating Resources Advisory Committee 11 to determine potential, and draw conclusions Determine if realistic, reasonable assumption for hydropower at existing non-powered dams, and upgrades at existing hydropower facilities #12;Questions Asked Can

  7. Anomalous Emission from HII regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Dickinson

    2008-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Spinning dust appears to be the best explanation for the anomalous emission that has been observed at $\\sim 10-60$ GHz. One of the best examples of spinning dust comes from a HII region in the Perseus molecular cloud. Observations of other HII regions also show tentative evidence for excess emission at frequencies $\\sim 30$ GHz, although at lower emissivity levels. A new detection of excess emission at 31 GHz in the HII region RCW175 has been made. The most plausible explanation again comes from spinning dust. HII regions are a good place to look for spinning dust as long as accurate radio data spanning the $\\sim 5-100$ GHz range is available.

  8. RAFT Regional Algal Feedstock Testbed

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session 3B—Integration of Supply Chains III: Algal Biofuels Strategy RAFT Regional Algal Feedstock Testbed Kimberly Ogden, Professor, University of Arizona, Engineering Technical Lead, National Alliance for Advanced Biofuels and Bioproducts

  9. Regional 166 Direct Loan (Ohio)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Ohio Development Services Agency's (ODSA) Regional 166 Direct Loan provides low-interest loans to businesses creating new jobs or preserving existing employment opportunities in the State of Ohio.

  10. INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING JOURNAL OF OPTICS A: PURE AND APPLIED OPTICS The plurality of optical singularities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berry, Michael Victor

    INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING JOURNAL OF OPTICS A: PURE AND APPLIED OPTICS EDITORIAL The plurality of optical singularities Guest Editors Michael Berry (Co-Director of NATO ARW) H H Wills Physics, Kiev, Ukraine This collection of papers arose from an Advanced Research Workshop on Singular Optics

  11. Polyplanar optical display electronics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeSanto, L.; Biscardi, C. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Dept. of Advanced Technology

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Polyplanar Optical Display (POD) is a unique display screen which can be used with any projection source. The prototype ten inch display is two inches thick and has a matte black face which allows for high contrast images. The prototype being developed is a form, fit and functional replacement display for the B-52 aircraft which uses a monochrome ten-inch display. In order to achieve a long lifetime, the new display uses a 100 milliwatt green solid-state laser (10,000 hr. life) at 532 nm as its light source. To produce real-time video, the laser light is being modulated by a Digital Light Processing (DLP{trademark}) chip manufactured by Texas Instruments. In order to use the solid-state laser as the light source and also fit within the constraints of the B-52 display, the Digital Micromirror Device (DMD{trademark}) circuit board is removed from the Texas Instruments DLP light engine assembly. Due to the compact architecture of the projection system within the display chassis, the DMD{trademark} chip is operated remotely from the Texas Instruments circuit board. The authors discuss the operation of the DMD{trademark} divorced from the light engine and the interfacing of the DMD{trademark} board with various video formats (CVBS, Y/C or S-video and RGB) including the format specific to the B-52 aircraft. A brief discussion of the electronics required to drive the laser is also presented.

  12. Optical sedimentation recorder

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bishop, James K.B.

    2014-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A robotic optical sedimentation recorder is described for the recordation of carbon flux in the oceans wherein both POC and PIC particles are captured at the open end of a submersible sampling platform, the captured particles allowed to drift down onto a collection plate where they can be imaged over time. The particles are imaged using three separate light sources, activated in sequence, one source being a back light, a second source being a side light to provide dark field illumination, and a third source comprising a cross polarized light source to illuminate birefringent particles. The recorder in one embodiment is attached to a buoyancy unit which is capable upon command for bringing the sedimentation recorder to a programmed depth below the ocean surface during recordation mode, and on command returning the unit to the ocean surface for transmission of recorded data and receipt of new instructions. The combined unit is provided with its own power source and is designed to operate autonomously in the ocean for extended periods of time.

  13. Ultrafast optical pulse shaping: A tutorial review Andrew M. Weiner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Purdue University

    Ultrafast optical pulse shaping: A tutorial review Andrew M. Weiner Purdue University, School 2011 Keywords: Ultrafast optics Pulse shaping Femtosecond optics Coherent control Optical signal programmable reshapingof ultrafast pulses, or generation of arbitrary optical waveforms, according to user

  14. 1 x N^2 wavelength-selective switch with two cross-scanning one-axis analog micromirror arrays in a 4-f optical system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsai, J C; Huang, STY; Hah, D; Wu, Ming C

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    optical microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), optical ?berinclude optical microelectromechanical systems (MEMS),

  15. Ion optics of RHIC EBIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pikin, A.; Alessi, J.; Beebe, E.; Kponou, A.; Okamura, M.; Raparia, D.; Ritter, J.; Tan, Y.; Kuznetsov, G.

    2011-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    RHIC EBIS has been commissioned to operate as a versatile ion source on RHIC injection facility supplying ion species from He to Au for Booster. Except for light gaseous elements RHIC EBIS employs ion injection from several external primary ion sources. With electrostatic optics fast switching from one ion species to another can be done on a pulse to pulse mode. The design of an ion optical structure and the results of simulations for different ion species are presented. In the choice of optical elements special attention was paid to spherical aberrations for high-current space charge dominated ion beams. The combination of a gridded lens and a magnet lens in LEBT provides flexibility of optical control for a wide range of ion species to satisfy acceptance parameters of RFQ. The results of ion transmission measurements are presented.

  16. Optical and optoelectronic fiber devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shapira, Ofer, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ability to integrate materials with disparate electrical, thermal, and optical properties into a single fiber structure enabled the realization of fiber devices with diverse and complex functionalities. Amongst those, ...

  17. Scintillator fiber optic long counter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCollum, T.; Spector, G.B.

    1994-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A flat response position sensitive neutron detector capable of providing neutron spectroscopic data utilizing scintillator fiber optic filaments embedded in a neutron moderating housing having an open end through which neutrons enter to be detected is described. 11 figures.

  18. Bio-inspired optical components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walish, Joseph John

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Guiding electro-magnetic radiation is fundamental to optics. Lenses, mirrors, and photonic crystals all accomplish this task by different routes. Understanding the interaction of light with materials is fundamental to ...

  19. Mobile fiber optic emission spectrograph

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spencer, W.A.; Coleman, C.J.; McCarty, J.E.; Beck, R.S.

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Technical Assistance Request HLW/DWPF-TAR-970064 asked SRTC to evaluate the use of a fiber optic coupled emission spectrometer. The spectrometer would provide additional ICP analyses in the DWPF laboratory.

  20. New optical materials containing isobenzofuran

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meek, Scott Thomas

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Isobenzofuran, a member of the benzo[c]heterocycles, is an extremely reactive molecule with unusual electronic properties. In this thesis we investigate the integration of isobenzofuran subunits into conjugated optical ...

  1. Geometrical optics in general relativity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Loinger

    2006-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    General relativity includes geometrical optics. This basic fact has relevant consequences that concern the physical meaning of the discontinuity surfaces propagated in the gravitational field - as it was first emphasized by Levi-Civita.

  2. Stochastic Physical Optics & Bell's correlation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. F. Geurdes

    2012-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    With the use of classical statistical argumentation similar to the one used in e.g. statistical optics, it is demonstrated that in entanglement of photons, a classical realist explanation cannot be excluded by the CHSH measure in experiment.

  3. Adaptive Optics for Large Telescopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olivier, S

    2008-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of adaptive optics was originally conceived by astronomers seeking to correct the blurring of images made with large telescopes due to the effects of atmospheric turbulence. The basic idea is to use a device, a wave front corrector, to adjust the phase of light passing through an optical system, based on some measurement of the spatial variation of the phase transverse to the light propagation direction, using a wave front sensor. Although the original concept was intended for application to astronomical imaging, the technique can be more generally applied. For instance, adaptive optics systems have been used for several decades to correct for aberrations in high-power laser systems. At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), the world's largest laser system, the National Ignition Facility, uses adaptive optics to correct for aberrations in each of the 192 beams, all of which must be precisely focused on a millimeter scale target in order to perform nuclear physics experiments.

  4. Buried fiber optic intrusion sensor 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maier, Eric William

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A distributed fiber optic intrusion sensor capable of detecting intruders from the pressure of their weight on the earth's surface was investigated in the laboratory and in field tests. The presence of an intruder above or in proximity...

  5. Optical Conductivity with Holographic Lattices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gary T. Horowitz; Jorge E. Santos; David Tong

    2012-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We add a gravitational background lattice to the simplest holographic model of matter at finite density and calculate the optical conductivity. With the lattice, the zero frequency delta function found in previous calculations (resulting from translation invariance) is broadened and the DC conductivity is finite. The optical conductivity exhibits a Drude peak with a cross-over to power-law behavior at higher frequencies. Surprisingly, these results bear a strong resemblance to the properties of some of the cuprates.

  6. Infrared Fiber Optics James A. Harrington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Infrared Fiber Optics James A. Harrington Ceramic & Materials Engineering Rutgers University Piscataway, NJ 08854-8065 1. Introduction Infrared (IR) optical fibers may be defined as fiber optics IR fiber optics may logically be divided into three broad categories: glass, crystalline, and hollow

  7. Optical fiber reliability models M. John Matthewson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthewson, M. John

    3 Optical fiber reliability models M. John Matthewson Fiber Optic Materials Research Program Systems containing optical fiber have design lives on the order of decades so that models for assessing and promising areas for future work are proposed. 1. INTRODUCTION Mechanical failure of optical fiber must

  8. Optical feedback structures and methods of making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Snee, Preston T; Chan, Yin Thai; Nocera, Daniel G; Bawendi, Moungi G

    2014-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical resonator can include an optical feedback structure disposed on a substrate, and a composite including a matrix including a chromophore. The composite disposed on the substrate and in optical communication with the optical feedback structure. The chromophore can be a semiconductor nanocrystal. The resonator can provide laser emission when excited.

  9. BIO-OPTICAL PRESENTATIONS YEARS 2000 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbes, Fernando

    BIO-OPTICAL PRESENTATIONS YEARS 2000 ­ 2004 YEAR 00-01 Armstrong, R.A., F. Gilbes, R. Guerrero. Lopez, and F. Gilbes, 2000, "Apparent Optical Properties at the Caribbean Time Station", Ocean Optics XV, Monaco. Gilbes, F., and R.A. Armstrong, 2000, "Inherent Optical Properties at the Caribbean Time Series

  10. Modulated optical vortices Jennifer E. Curtis 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grier, David

    Modulated optical vortices Jennifer E. Curtis 1 and David G. Grier Dept. of Physics, James Franck-beam optical gradient force traps created by focusing helical modes of light are known as optical vortices. Modulating the helical pitch of such a modes' wavefront yields a new class of optical traps whose dynamically

  11. Lasers and Optical Engineering Concentration Technical Electives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schumacher, Russ

    Lasers and Optical Engineering Concentration Technical Electives Course Number Course Title Credits495¹ Independent Study 1-3 n/a F,S,SS ECE503 Ultrafast Optics 3 ECE 342 S ECE504 Physical Optics 3 ECE 353 F ECE506 Optical Interferometry and Laser Metrology ECE 341; ECE 342; ECE 441 F ECE507 Plasma

  12. 12 August 2005 Observing Optical Transition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anlage, Steven

    12 August 2005 Observing Optical Transition Radiation from 10keV Electrons 1 #12;12 August 2005 Observing Optical Transition Radiation from 10keV Electrons 2 #12;12 August 2005 Observing Optical Transition Radiation from 10keV Electrons 3 #12;12 August 2005 Observing Optical Transition Radiation from 10

  13. Fiber optic sensor and method for making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vartuli, James Scott; Bousman, Kenneth Sherwood; Deng, Kung-Li; McEvoy, Kevin Paul; Xia, Hua

    2010-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A fiber optic sensor including a fiber having a modified surface integral with the fiber wherein the modified surface includes an open pore network with optical agents dispersed within the open pores of the open pore network. Methods for preparing the fiber optic sensor are also provided. The fiber optic sensors can withstand high temperatures and harsh environments.

  14. Correlations of atmospheric water ice and dust in the Martian Polar regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Adrian J; Scargle, Jeffrey D

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the interannual variability of the atmospheric ice/dust cycle in the Martian polar regions for Mars Years 28-30. We used CRISM emission phase function measurements to derive atmospheric dust optical depths and data from the MARCI instrument to derive atmospheric water ice optical depths. We have used autocorrelation and cross correlation functions in order to quantify the degree to which dust and ice are correlated throughout both polar regions during Mars Years 28-29. We find that in the south polar region, dust has the tendency to "self clear", demonstrated by negative autocorrelation around the central peak. This does not occur in the north polar region. In the south polar region, dust and ice are temporally and spatially anti correlated. In the north polar region, this relationship is reversed, however temporal correlation of northern dust and ice clouds is weak - 6 times weaker than the anticorrelation in the south polar region. Our latitudinal autocorrelation functions allow us to put avera...

  15. Regional Transmission Projects: Finding Solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    The Keystone Center

    2005-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Keystone Center convened and facilitated a year-long Dialogue on "Regional Transmission Projects: Finding Solutions" to develop recommendations that will help address the difficult and contentious issues related to expansions of regional electric transmission systems that are needed for reliable and economic transmission of power within and across regions. This effort brought together a cross-section of affected stakeholders and thought leaders to address the problem with the collective wisdom of their experience and interests. Transmission owners sat at the table with consumer advocates and environmental organizations. Representatives from regional transmission organizations exchanged ideas with state and federal regulators. Generation developers explored common interests with public power suppliers. Together, the Dialogue participants developed consensus solutions about how to begin unraveling some of the more intractable issues surrounding identification of need, allocation of costs, and reaching consensus on siting issues that can frustrate the development of regional transmission infrastructure. The recommendations fall into three broad categories: 1. Recommendations on appropriate institutional arrangements and processes for achieving regional consensus on the need for new or expanded transmission infrastructure 2. Recommendations on the process for siting of transmission lines 3. Recommendations on the tools needed to support regional planning, cost allocation, and siting efforts. List of Dialogue participants: List of Dialogue Participants: American Electric Power American Transmission Company American Wind Energy Association California ISO Calpine Corporation Cinergy Edison Electric Institute Environmental Defense Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Great River Energy International Transmission Company ISO-New England Iowa Public Utility Board Kanner & Associates Midwest ISO National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners National Association of State Utility Consumer Advocates National Grid Northeast Utilities PA Office of Consumer Advocates Pacific Gas & Electric Corporation Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission PJM Interconnection The Electricity Consumers Resource Council U.S. Department of Energy US Department of the Interior Van Ness Feldman Western Interstate Energy Board Wind on the Wires Wisconsin Public Service Commission Xcel Energy

  16. Preliminary hydrogeologic framework of the Silurian and Devonian carbonate aquifer system in the Midwestern Basins and Arches Region of Indiana, Ohio, Michigan, and Illinois

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casey, G.D. (Geological Survey, Columbus, OH (United States))

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The aquifer and confining units have been identified; data on the thickness, extent, and structural configuration of these units have been collected; and thickness and structure-contour maps have been generated. Hydrologic information for the confining units and the aquifer also has been compiled. Where present, the confining unit that caps the carbonate aquifer consists of shales of Middle and Upper Devonian age and Lower Mississippian age, however, these units have been eroded from a large part of the study area. The regional carbonate aquifer consists of Silurian and Devonian limestones and dolomites. The rocks that comprise the aquifer in Indiana and northwestern Illinois are grouped into four major stratigraphic units: Brassfield and Sexton Creek Limestones or the Cataract Formation, the Salamonie Dolomite, the Salina Group, and the Detroit River and Traverse Formations or the Muscatatuck Group. In Ohio and southern Michigan the aquifer is grouped into ten stratigraphic units: Brassfield Limestone and Cataract Formation, the Dayton Limestone, the Rochester Shale equivalent, the Lockport Dolomite, the Salina Formation, the Hillsboro Sandstone, the Detroit River Group, the Columbus Limestone, the Delaware Limestone, and the Traverse Formation. The thickness of the carbonate aquifer increases from the contact with the outcropping Ordovician shales in the south-central part of the study area from the contact into the Appalachian Foreland Structural Basin from 0 ft at the contact to more than 700 ft at the eastern boundary of the study area, to more than 1,000 ft beneath Lake Erie and greater than 1,200 ft in southeastern Michigan. At the edge of the Michigan Intercontinental Structural Basin in western Ohio and eastern Indiana, the thickness ranges from 700 to 900 ft. and from 200 ft to 300 ft in south-central Indiana along the northeastern edge of the Illinois Intercontinental Structural Basin.

  17. Analysis of Enhanced Two-Photon Absorption in Tapered Optical Fibers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hao You; S. M. Hendrickson; J. D. Franson

    2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze the rate of two-photon absorption in tapered optical fibers with diameters less than the wavelength of the incident light. The rate of two-photon absorption is shown to be enhanced due to the small mode volume of the tapered fiber and the relatively large overlap of the evanescent field with an atomic vapor that surrounds the tapered region. The two-photon absorption rate is optimized as a function of the diameter of the tapered region.

  18. Regional

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection RadiationRecord-SettingHead5 IdleRegardingIndustrial Technologies|3

  19. Southeast Texas Region Regional Public Transportation Coordination Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southeast Texas Regional Planning Commission

    Providers Public transportation in the southeast Texas region includes primarily demand- response service, with two localities managing fixed-route systems. Table 2 identifies the transportation providers within the region. The major transportation... citywide bus services with eleven local routes. PAT operates from 6:15am to 6:15pm five days a week. Annual ridership for BMT totaled 671,420 fixed route and 22,155 demand response trips in 2005, while PAT ridership reached 116,632 fixed route and 20...

  20. Polymer Waveguides and Thermo-Optic Switches for an Optical True Time Delay Phased Array Antenna

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Ray

    Polymer Waveguides and Thermo-Optic Switches for an Optical True Time Delay Phased Array Antenna device size. 2x2 thermo-optic TIR switches were fabricated with insertion losses of 2.8 dB. A 4-bit TTD loss of 23.88 dB. Keywords: Optical Waveguide, Phased Array Antenna, Thermo-Optic Switch, Polymer

  1. High precision and continuous optical transport using a standing wave optical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin. University of

    High precision and continuous optical transport using a standing wave optical line trap Vassili://chaos.utexas.edu/ Abstract: We introduce the Standing Wave Optical Line Trap (SWOLT) as a novel tool for precise optical nanoparticles. © 2011 Optical Society of America OCIS codes: (000.2170) Equipment and techniques; (120

  2. September 15, 1997 / Vol. 22, No. 18 / OPTICS LETTERS 1433 Optical bistability induced by mirror

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fang-Yen, Christopher

    September 15, 1997 / Vol. 22, No. 18 / OPTICS LETTERS 1433 Optical bistability induced by mirror, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 Received May 2, 1997 We have observed optical bistability caused in 106 (ppm) have been successfully measured. © 1997 Optical Society of America Optical bistability

  3. The College of Optics & Photonics The College of Optics and Photonics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Stryland, Eric

    CREOL The College of Optics & Photonics The College of Optics and Photonics #12;CREOL The College of Optics & Photonics CREOLThe College of Optics and Photonics Industrial Affiliates Day 2010 #12;CREOL The College of Optics & Photonics Prof. William T. Rhodes Department of Comp & Elect Engrng & Comp Science

  4. Optic Flow Sensor Objective: Using optic flow sensors, detect and track

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirthlin, Michael J.

    Optic Flow Sensor Objective: Using optic flow sensors, detect and track the walls of a rural or urban terrain. Principle Investigators: Tim McLain, Randy Beard Optic Flow Sensor · Computationally factor ­ 1" x 1" x 1.5" · Inexpensive ­ $80 including optics · Fast ­ computes optic flow at 2300 fps2006

  5. Hybrid Optical Pumping of Optically Dense Alkali-Metal Vapor without Quenching Gas M. V. Romalis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romalis, Mike

    Hybrid Optical Pumping of Optically Dense Alkali-Metal Vapor without Quenching Gas M. V. Romalis; published 7 December 2010) Optical pumping of an optically thick atomic vapor typically requires a quenching the atoms. We show that optical pumping of a trace contamination of Rb present in K metal results in a 4

  6. Regions for Select Spot Prices

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand Requirements Recently Approved JustificationBio-Inspired PowerRegional companiesRegions

  7. Semiconductor-based all-optical switching for optical time-division multiplexed networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robinson, Bryan S. (Bryan Shawn), 1975-

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    All-optical switching will likely be required for future optical networks operating at data rates which exceed electronic processing speeds. Switches utilizing nonlinearities in semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOA) are ...

  8. Design and implementation of a fiber optic doppler optical coherence microscopy system for cochlear imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Logan P

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, the design and implementation of a fiber optic Doppler optical coherence microscopy (FO-DOCM) system for cochlear imaging applications is presented. The use of a fiber optic design significantly reduces ...

  9. Carbon/Ternary Alloy/Carbon Optical Stack on Mylar as an Optical...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CarbonTernary AlloyCarbon Optical Stack on Mylar as an Optical Data Storage Medium to Potentially Replace Magnetic Tape. CarbonTernary AlloyCarbon Optical Stack on Mylar as an...

  10. Debris and Radiation-Induced Damage Effects on EUV Nanolithography Source Collector Mirror Optics Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harilal, S. S.

    Debris and Radiation-Induced Damage Effects on EUV Nanolithography Source Collector Mirror Optics, Argonne, Illinois ABSTRACT Exposure of collector mirrors facing the hot, dense pinch plasma in plasma region of the lamp are known to induce serious damage to nearby collector mirrors. Candidate collector

  11. Optical diffraction for measurements of nano-mechanical bending

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hermans, Rodolfo I; Ndieyira, Joseph Wafula; McKendry, Rachel A; Aeppli, Gabriel

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Micromechanical transducers such as cantilevers for AFM often rely on optical readout methods that require illumination of a specific region of the microstructure. Here we explore and exploit the diffraction effects that have been previously neglected when modeling cantilever bending measurement techniques. The illumination of a cantilever end causes an asymmetric diffraction pattern at the photodetector that significantly affects the calibration of the signal in the popular optical beam deflection technique (OBDT). Conditions for optimized linear signals that avoid detection artifacts conflict with small numerical aperture illumination and narrow cantilevers which are softer and therefore more sensitive. Embracing diffraction patterns as a physical measurable allows a richer detection technique that decouples measurements of tilt and curvature and simultaneously relaxes the requirements on the alignment of illumination and detector. We show analytical results, numerical simulations and physiologically releva...

  12. Intra-Cavity Total Reflection For High Sensitivity Measurement Of Optical Properties

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pipino, Andrew C. R. (Gaithersburg, MD); Hudgens, Jeffrey W. (Rockville, MD)

    1999-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical cavity resonator device is provided for conducting sensitive murement of optical absorption by matter in any state with diffraction-limited spatial resolution through utilization of total internal reflection within a high-Q (high quality, low loss) optical cavity. Intracavity total reflection generates an evanescent wave that decays exponentially in space at a point external to the cavity, thereby providing a localized region where absorbing materials can be sensitively probed through alteration of the Q-factor of the otherwise isolated cavity. When a laser pulse is injected into the cavity and passes through the evanescent state, an amplitude loss resulting from absorption is incurred that reduces the lifetime of the pulse in the cavity. By monitoring the decay of the injected pulse, the absorption coefficient of manner within the evanescent wave region is accurately obtained from the decay time measurement.

  13. Intra-Cavity Total Reflection For High Sensitivity Measurement Of Optical Properties

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pipino, Andrew Charles Rule (Gaithersburg, MD)

    1999-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical cavity resonator device is provided for conducting sensitive murement of optical absorption by matter in any state with diffraction-limited spatial resolution through utilization of total internal reflection within a high-Q (high quality, low loss) optical cavity. Intracavity total reflection generates an evanescent wave that decays exponentially in space at a point external to the cavity, thereby providing a localized region where absorbing materials can be sensitively probed through alteration of the Q-factor of the otherwise isolated cavity. When a laser pulse is injected into the cavity and passes through the evanescent state, an amplitude loss resulting from absorption is incurred that reduces the lifetime of the pulse in the cavity. By monitoring the decay of the injected pulse, the absorption coefficient of manner within the evanescent wave region is accurately obtained from the decay time measurement.

  14. EE Regional Technology Roadmap Includes comparison

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EE Regional Technology Roadmap Includes comparison against 6th Power Plan (Update cyclically Data Clearinghouse BPA/RTF NEEA/Regional Programs Group Update Regional EE Technology Roadmap Lighting

  15. Fiber optics spectrochemical emission sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Griffin, J.W.; Olsen, K.B.

    1992-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is described of in situ monitoring of a body of a fluid stored in a tank or groundwater or vadose zone gases in a well for the presence of selected chemical species. The method uses a probe insertable into the well or tank via a cable and having an electrical apparatus for exciting selected chemical species in the body of fluid. The probe can have a pair of electrodes for initiating a spark or a plasma cell for maintaining a plasma to excite the selected chemical species. The probe also has an optical apparatus for receiving optical emissions emitted by the excited species and optically transmitting the emissions via the cable to an analysis location outside the well. The analysis includes detecting a selected wavelength in the emissions indicative of the presence of the selected chemical species. A plurality of probes can be suspended at an end of a respective cable, with the transmitting and analyzing steps for each probe being synchronized sequentially for one set of support equipment and instrumentation to monitor at multiple test points. The optical apparatus is arranged about the light guide axis so that the selected chemical species are excited in the fluid in alignment with the light guide axis. Optical emissions are received from the excited chemical species along such axis. 18 figs.

  16. Optical sensor of magnetic fields

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Butler, M.A.; Martin, S.J.

    1986-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical magnetic field strength sensor for measuring the field strength of a magnetic field comprising a dilute magnetic semi-conductor probe having first and second ends, longitudinally positioned in the magnetic field for providing Faraday polarization rotation of light passing therethrough relative to the strength of the magnetic field. Light provided by a remote light source is propagated through an optical fiber coupler and a single optical fiber strand between the probe and the light source for providing a light path therebetween. A polarizer and an apparatus for rotating the polarization of the light is provided in the light path and a reflector is carried by the second end of the probe for reflecting the light back through the probe and thence through the polarizer to the optical coupler. A photo detector apparatus is operably connected to the optical coupler for detecting and measuring the intensity of the reflected light and comparing same to the light source intensity whereby the magnetic field strength may be calculated.

  17. Fiber optics spectrochemical emission sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Griffin, Jeffrey W. (Kennewick, WA); Olsen, Khris B. (West Richland, WA)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of in situ monitoring of a body of a fluid stored in a tank or groundwater or vadose zone gases in a well for the presence of selected chemical species uses a probe insertable into the well or tank via a cable and having electrical apparatus for exciting selected chemical species in the body of fluid. The probe can have a pair of electrodes for initiating a spark or a plasma cell for maintaining a plasma to excite the selected chemical species. The probe also has optical apparatus for receiving optical emissions emitted by the excited species and optically transmitting the emissions via the cable to an analysis location outside the well. The analysis includes detecting a selected wavelength in the emissions indicative of the presence of the selected chemical species. A plurality of probes can be suspended at an end of a respective cable, with the transmitting and analyzing steps for each probe being synchronized sequentially for one set of support equipment and instrumentation to monitor at multiple test points. The optical apparatus is arranged about the light guide axis so that the selected chemical species are excited the fluid in alignment with the light guide axis and optical emissions are received from the excited chemical species along such axis.

  18. Panhandle Region Transportation Coordination Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Panhandle Regional Transportation Advisory Group

    drivers; shared office staff with PCS Schedule for out of county trips Amarillo MWF Notes on Service Provided Medicaid to Amarillo M-F; school trips M-F; Hereford Satellite Center; some trips to Hereford Senior Center and nursing homes Table 2............................................................................................................................ 2-5 Health and Human Services Organizations ................................................................................. 2-9 History of Regional Coordination of Public Transportation .................................................... 2...

  19. Regional Systems Development for Geothermal Energy Resources...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Regional Systems Development for Geothermal Energy Resources Pacific Region (California and Hawaii)....

  20. Clean Cities Regional Support & Petroleum Displacement Awards...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Regional Support & Petroleum Displacement Awards Clean Cities Regional Support & Petroleum Displacement Awards 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual...

  1. Large aperture optical switching devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldhar, J.; Henesian, M.A.

    1983-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed a new approach to constructing large aperture optical switches for next generation inertial confinement fusion lasers. A transparent plasma electrode formed in low pressure ionized gas acts as a conductive coating to allow the uniform charging of the optical faces of an electro-optic material. In this manner large electric fields can be applied longitudinally to large aperture, high aspect ratio Pockels cells. We propose a four-electrode geometry to create the necessary high conductivity plasma sheets, and have demonstrated fast (less than 10 nsec) switching in a 5x5 cm aperture KD*P Pockels cell with such a design. Detaid modelling of Pockels cell performance with plasma electrodes has been carried out for 15 and 30 cm aperture designs.

  2. Integrated optical biosensor system (IOBS)

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grace, Karen M. (Los Alamos, NM); Sweet, Martin R. (Los Alamos, NM); Goeller, Roy M. (Los Alamos, NM); Morrison, Leland Jean (White Rock, NM); Grace, Wynne Kevin (Los Alamos, NM); Kolar, Jerome D. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2007-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical biosensor has a first enclosure with a pathogen recognition surface, including a planar optical waveguide and grating located in the first enclosure. An aperture is in the first enclosure for insertion of sample to be investigated to a position in close proximity to the pathogen recognition surface. A laser in the first enclosure includes means for aligning and means for modulating the laser, the laser having its light output directed toward said grating. Detection means are located in the first enclosure and in optical communication with the pathogen recognition surface for detecting pathogens after interrogation by the laser light and outputting the detection. Electronic means is located in the first enclosure and receives the detection for processing the detection and outputting information on the detection, and an electrical power supply is located in the first enclosure for supplying power to the laser, the detection means and the electronic means.

  3. Divergence of optical vortex beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reddy, Salla Gangi; Prabhakar, Shashi; Anwar, Ali; Banerji, J; Singh, R P

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We show, both theoretically and experimentally, that the propagation of optical vortices in free space can be analysed by using the width ($w(z)$) of the host Gaussian beam and the inner and outer radii of the vortex beam at the source plane ($z=0$) as defined in \\textit{Optics Letters \\textbf{39,} 4364-4367 (2014)}. We also studied the divergence of vortex beams, considered as the rate of change of inner or outer radius with the propagation distance, and found that it varies with the order in the same way as that of the inner and outer radii at zero propagation distance. These results may be useful in designing optical fibers for orbital angular momentum modes that play a crucial role in quantum communication.

  4. Toward automated beam optics control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silbar, R.R.; Schultz, D.E.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have begun a program aiming toward automatic control of charged-particle beam optics using artificial intelligence programming techniques. In developing our prototype, we are working with LISP machines and the KEE expert system shell. Our first goal was to develop a ''mouseable'' representation of a typical beam line. This responds actively to changes entered from the mouse or keyboard, giving an updated display of the beam line itself, its optical properties, and the instrumentation and control devices as seen by the operater. We have incorporated TRANSPORT, written in Fortran but running as a callable procedure in the LISP environment, for simulation of the beam-line optics. This paper describes the experience gained in meeting our first goal and discusses plans to extend the work so that it is usable, in realtime, on an operating beam line. 11 refs.

  5. Texas State Planning Region 3 Report of Regional Transportation Coordination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nortex Regional Planning Commission

    2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the 24 regions studying public transportation in their area was charged with assessing Barriers, Constraints and Best Practices in public transportation. This Coordination Committee addressed this issue with enthusiasm, generating significant topics...DOT requirement that all vehicles be ADA compliant, Medicaid restrictions and Insurance as significant barriers to public transportation. Best practices included sharing of information regarding this project through publication in rural newspapers, inter...

  6. Apparatus And Method Of Using Flexible Printed Circuit Board In Optical Transceiver Device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, Gene R. (Albuquerque, NM); Armendariz, Marcelino G. (Albuquerque, NM); Bryan, Robert P. (Albuquerque, NM); Carson, Richard F. (Albuquerque, NM); Duckett, III, Edwin B. (Albuquerque, NM); McCormick, Frederick B. (Albuquerque, NM); Peterson, David W. (Sandia Park, NM); Peterson, Gary D. (Albuquerque, NM); Reysen, Bill H. (Lafayette, CO)

    2005-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to a flexible printed circuit board that is used in connection with an optical transmitter, receiver or transceiver module. In one embodiment, the flexible printed circuit board has flexible metal layers in between flexible insulating layers, and the circuit board comprises: (1) a main body region orientated in a first direction having at least one electrical or optoelectronic device; (2) a plurality of electrical contact pads integrated into the main body region, where the electrical contact pads function to connect the flexible printed circuit board to an external environment; (3) a buckle region extending from one end of the main body region; and (4) a head region extending from one end of the buckle region, and where the head region is orientated so that it is at an angle relative to the direction of the main body region. The electrical contact pads may be ball grid arrays, solder balls or land-grid arrays, and they function to connect the circuit board to an external environment. A driver or amplifier chip may be adapted to the head region of the flexible printed circuit board. In another embodiment, a heat spreader passes along a surface of the head region of the flexible printed circuit board, and a window is formed in the head region of the flexible printed circuit board. Optoelectronic devices are adapted to the head spreader in such a manner that they are accessible through the window in the flexible printed circuit board.

  7. Reflective optical imaging system with balanced distortion

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chapman, Henry N. (Sunol, CA); Hudyma, Russell M. (San Ramon, CA); Shafer, David R. (Fairfield, CT); Sweeney, Donald W. (San Ramon, CA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical system compatible with short wavelength (extreme ultraviolet) An optical system compatible with short wavelength (extreme ultraviolet) radiation comprising four reflective elements for projecting a mask image onto a substrate. The four optical elements comprise, in order from object to image, convex, concave, convex and concave mirrors. The optical system is particularly suited for step and scan lithography methods. The invention enables the use of larger slit dimensions associated with ring field scanning optics, improves wafer throughput and allows higher semiconductor device density. The inventive optical system is characterized by reduced dynamic distortion because the static distortion is balanced across the slit width.

  8. Coherent coupling of optical gain elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ury, I.; Yariv, A

    1989-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A coherent light source is described comprising: a non-linear photorefractive medium; a laser for illuminating the photorefractive medium; a mirror on the opposite side of the photorefractive medium from the laser and aligned for retroreflecting light back toward the laser; and optical gain elements. Each optical gain element has its optical axis aligned with the photo-refractive medium, each optical gain element having a reflective end remote from the photorefractive medium, the laser and optical gain elements being sufficiently aligned that laser light scattered from the photorefractive medium illuminates all of the optical gain elements for amplification and producing a coherent output beam.

  9. Geometrical Optics of Dense Aerosols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hay, Michael J.; Valeo, Ernest J.; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2013-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Assembling a free-standing, sharp-edged slab of homogeneous material that is much denser than gas, but much more rare ed than a solid, is an outstanding technological challenge. The solution may lie in focusing a dense aerosol to assume this geometry. However, whereas the geometrical optics of dilute aerosols is a well-developed fi eld, the dense aerosol limit is mostly unexplored. Yet controlling the geometrical optics of dense aerosols is necessary in preparing such a material slab. Focusing dense aerosols is shown here to be possible, but the nite particle density reduces the eff ective Stokes number of the flow, a critical result for controlled focusing. __________________________________________________

  10. Study of optical Laue diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chakravarthy, Giridhar, E-mail: cgiridhar84@gmail.com, E-mail: aloksharan@email.com; Allam, Srinivasa Rao, E-mail: cgiridhar84@gmail.com, E-mail: aloksharan@email.com; Satyanarayana, S. V. M., E-mail: cgiridhar84@gmail.com, E-mail: aloksharan@email.com; Sharan, Alok, E-mail: cgiridhar84@gmail.com, E-mail: aloksharan@email.com [Department of Physics, Pondicherry University, Puducherry-605014 (India)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the study of the optical diffraction pattern of one and two-dimensional gratings with defects, designed using desktop pc and printed on OHP sheet using laser printer. Gratings so prepared, using novel low cost technique provides good visual aid in teaching. Diffraction pattern of the monochromatic light (632.8nm) from the grating so designed is similar to that of x-ray diffraction pattern of crystal lattice with point defects in one and two-dimensions. Here both optical and x-ray diffractions are Fraunhofer. The information about the crystalline lattice structure and the defect size can be known.

  11. applied optical metrology: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Improved optical metrology using phase retrieval Gregory R. Brady The Institute of Optics.3940) Metrology; (100.5070) Phase retrieval; (070.2580) Fourier optics; (050.1960)...

  12. POLARIZATION-INVARIANT DIRECTIONAL CLOAKING BY TRANSFORMATION OPTICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agarwal, Krishna; Chen, Xudong; Hu, Li; Liu, Hongyu; Uhlmann, Gunther

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    cloaking with the SHS lining,” Optics Express, Vol. 15, No.and free- space cloak,” Optics Express, Vol. 17, 19947–P. Sheng, “Transformation optics and metamaterials,” Nature

  13. RAY AND WAVE OPTICS OF INTEGRABLE AND STOCHASTIC SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, S.W.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    18-22, 1979 RAY AND WAVE OPTICS OF INTEGRABLE AND STOCHASTICof the geometrical optics (ray Hamiltonian) system derivedthe classical (geometrical optics) system (1) and the state6

  14. Methods and systems for Raman and optical cross-interrogation in flow-through silicon membranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bond, Tiziana C.; Letant, Sonia E.

    2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Cross-interrogating photonic detection systems and methods are shown. A flow through photonic crystal membrane with a surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate is provided with pores which are distributed along multiple regions. The pores of one region have walls to which a first type of target specific anchor can be attached, while pores of another region have walls to which a second type of target specific anchor can be attached. An optical arrangement out-of-plane to the SERS substrate is also provided for enhanced sensitivity and identification of target organisms.

  15. Gauss Optics and Gauss Sum on an Optical Phenomena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shigeki Matsutani

    2008-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    In the previous article (Found Phys. Lett. {\\bf{16}} 325-341), we showed that a reciprocity of the Gauss sums is connected with the wave and particle complementary. In this article, we revise the previous investigation by considering a relation between the Gauss optics and the Gauss sum based upon the recent studies of the Weil representation for a finite group.

  16. OPTICAL PARAMETRIC AMPLIFIER TEST FOR OPTICAL STOCHASTIC COOLING OF RHIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brookhaven National Laboratory

    that has been pumped by a second harmonic of pulsed CO2 laser system. Particle emission was emulated by output of another hybrid CO2 laser operating in single longitudenal mode regime at wavelength 9.552 m in heating. The compromise between cooling and heating imposes requirements on the optical amplifier gain

  17. Regional Slip Tendency Analysis of the Great Basin Region

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Faulds, James E.

    - The resulting along?fault and fault?to?fault variation in slip or dilation potential is a proxy for along fault and fault?to?fault variation in fluid flow conduit potential. Stress Magnitudes and directions were calculated across the entire Great Basin. Stress field variation within each focus area was approximated based on regional published data and the world stress database (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson?Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2010; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012; Moeck et al., 2010; Moos and Ronne, 2010 and Reinecker et al., 2005). The minimum horizontal stress direction (Shmin) was contoured, and spatial bins with common Shmin directions were calculated. Based on this technique, we subdivided the Great Basin into nine regions (Shmin <070, 070140). Slip and dilation tendency were calculated using 3DStress for the faults within each region using the mean Shmin for the region. Shmin variation throughout Great Basin are shown on Figure 3. For faults within the Great Basin proper, we applied a normal faulting stress regime, where the vertical stress (sv) is larger than the maximum horizontal stress (shmax), which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (sv>shmax>shmin). Based on visual inspection of the limited stress magnitude data in the Great Basin, we used magnitudes such that shmin/shmax = .527 and shmin/sv= .46. These values are consistent with stress magnitude data at both Dixie Valley (Hickman et al., 2000) and Yucca Mountain (Stock et al., 1985). For faults within the Walker Lane/Eastern California Shear Zone, we applied a strike?slip faulting stress, where shmax > sv > shmin. Upon visual inspection of limited stress magnitude data from the Walker Lane and Eastern California Shear zone, we chose values such that SHmin/SHmax = .46 and Shmin/Sv= .527 representative of the region. Results: The results of our slip and dilation tendency analysis are shown in Figures 4 (dilation tendency), 5 (slip tendency) and 6 (slip tendency + dilation tendency). Shmin varies from northwest to east?west trending throughout much of the Great Basin. As such, north? to northeast?striking faults have the highest tendency to slip and to dilate, depending on the local trend of shmin. These results provide a first order filter on faults and fault systems in the Great Basin, affording focusing of local?scale exploration efforts for blind or hidden geothermal resources.

  18. Surface figure control for coated optics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ray-Chaudhuri, Avijit K. (Livermore, CA); Spence, Paul A. (Pleasanton, CA); Kanouff, Michael P. (Livermore, CA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A pedestal optical substrate that simultaneously provides high substrate dynamic stiffness, provides low surface figure sensitivity to mechanical mounting hardware inputs, and constrains surface figure changes caused by optical coatings to be primarily spherical in nature. The pedestal optical substrate includes a disk-like optic or substrate section having a top surface that is coated, a disk-like base section that provides location at which the substrate can be mounted, and a connecting cylindrical section between the base and optics or substrate sections. The optic section has an optical section thickness.sup.2 /optical section diameter ratio of between about 5 to 10 mm, and a thickness variation between front and back surfaces of less than about 10%. The connecting cylindrical section may be attached via three spaced legs or members. However, the pedestal optical substrate can be manufactured from a solid piece of material to form a monolith, thus avoiding joints between the sections, or the disk-like base can be formed separately and connected to the connecting section. By way of example, the pedestal optical substrate may be utilized in the fabrication of optics for an extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography imaging system, or in any optical system requiring coated optics and substrates with reduced sensitivity to mechanical mounts.

  19. Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kenneth J. Nemeth

    2006-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership's (SECARB) Phase I program focused on promoting the development of a framework and infrastructure necessary for the validation and commercial deployment of carbon sequestration technologies. The SECARB program, and its subsequent phases, directly support the Global Climate Change Initiative's goal of reducing greenhouse gas intensity by 18 percent by the year 2012. Work during the project's two-year period was conducted within a ''Task Responsibility Matrix''. The SECARB team was successful in accomplishing its tasks to define the geographic boundaries of the region; characterize the region; identify and address issues for technology deployment; develop public involvement and education mechanisms; identify the most promising capture, sequestration, and transport options; and prepare action plans for implementation and technology validation activity. Milestones accomplished during Phase I of the project are listed below: (1) Completed preliminary identification of geographic boundaries for the study (FY04, Quarter 1); (2) Completed initial inventory of major sources and sinks for the region (FY04, Quarter 2); (3) Completed initial development of plans for GIS (FY04, Quarter 3); (4) Completed preliminary action plan and assessment for overcoming public perception issues (FY04, Quarter 4); (5) Assessed safety, regulatory and permitting issues (FY05, Quarter 1); (6) Finalized inventory of major sources/sinks and refined GIS algorithms (FY05, Quarter 2); (7) Refined public involvement and education mechanisms in support of technology development options (FY05, Quarter 3); and (8) Identified the most promising capture, sequestration and transport options and prepared action plans (FY05, Quarter 4).

  20. VO.sub.2 precipitates for self-protected optical surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gea, Laurence A. (Knoxville, TN); Boatner, Lynn A. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for forming crystallographically coherent precipitates of vanadium dioxide in the near-surface region of sapphire and the resulting product is disclosed. Ions of vanadium and oxygen are stoichiometrically implanted into a sapphire substrate (Al.sub.2 O.sub.3), and subsequently annealed to form vanadium dioxide precipitates in the substrate. The embedded VO.sub.2 precipitates, which are three-dimensionally oriented with respect to the crystal axes of the Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 host lattice, undergo a first-order monoclinic-to-tetragonal (and also semiconducting-to-metallic) phase transition at .about.77.degree. C. This transformation is accompanied by a significant variation in the optical transmission of the implanted region and results in the formation of an optically active, thermally "switchable" surface region on Al.sub.2 O.sub.3.

  1. Developing a Regional Recovery Framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lesperance, Ann M.; Olson, Jarrod; Stein, Steven L.; Clark, Rebecca; Kelly, Heather; Sheline, Jim; Tietje, Grant; Williamson, Mark; Woodcock, Jody

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract A biological attack would present an unprecedented challenge for local, state, and federal agencies; the military; the private sector; and individuals on many fronts ranging from vaccination and treatment to prioritization of cleanup actions to waste disposal. To prepare the Seattle region to recover from a biological attack, the Seattle Urban Area Security Initiative (UASI) partners collaborated with military and federal agencies to develop a Regional Recovery Framework for a Biological Attack in the Seattle Urban Area. The goal was to reduce the time and resources required to recover and restore wide urban areas, military installations, and other critical infrastructure following a biological incident by providing a coordinated systems approach. Based on discussions in small workshops, tabletop exercises, and interviews with emergency response agency staff, the partners identified concepts of operation for various areas to address critical issues the region will face as recovery progresses. Key to this recovery is the recovery of the economy. Although the Framework is specific to a catastrophic, wide-area biological attack using anthrax, it was designed to be flexible and scalable so it could also serve as the recovery framework for an all-hazards approach. The Framework also served to coalesce policy questions that must be addressed for long-term recovery. These questions cover such areas as safety and health, security, financial management, waste management, legal issues, and economic development.

  2. West Central Texas Regional Transportation Final Report 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    West Central Texas Council of Governments

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    WEST CENTRAL TEXAS REGIONAL REGIONAL TRANSPORTATION TRANSPORTATION FINAL REPORT NOVEMBER 2006 West Central Texas Regional Transit Coordination Plan Final Report and Executive Summary November 2006 A&R Consulting The Goodman... Workshops 177 Appendix C - Public Meetings 183 West Central Texas Regional Transit Coordination Plan Final Report and Executive Summary November 2006 A&R Consulting The Goodman Corporation November 2006 3 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY...

  3. Remotely readable fiber optic compass

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Migliori, Albert (Santa Fe, NM); Swift, Gregory W. (Los Alamos, NM); Garrett, Steven L. (Pebble Beach, CA)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A remotely readable fiber optic compass. A sheet polarizer is affixed to a magnet rotatably mounted in a compass body, such that the polarizer rotates with the magnet. The optical axis of the sheet polarizer is preferably aligned with the north-south axis of the magnet. A single excitation light beam is divided into four identical beams, two of which are passed through the sheet polarizer and through two fixed polarizing sheets which have their optical axes at right angles to one another. The angle of the compass magnet with respect to a fixed axis of the compass body can be determined by measuring the ratio of the intensities of the two light beams. The remaining ambiguity as to which of the four possible quadrants the magnet is pointing to is resolved by the second pair of light beams, which are passed through the sheet polarizer at positions which are transected by two semicircular opaque strips formed on the sheet polarizer. The incoming excitation beam and the four return beams are communicated by means of optical fibers, giving a remotely readable compass which has no electrical parts.

  4. Remotely readable fiber optic compass

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Migliori, A.; Swift, G.W.; Garrett, S.L.

    1985-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A remotely readable fiber optic compass. A sheet polarizer is affixed to a magnet rotatably mounted in a compass body, such that the polarizer rotates with the magnet. The optical axis of the sheet polarizer is preferably aligned with the north-south axis of the magnet. A single excitation light beam is divided into four identical beams, two of which are passed through the sheet polarizer and through two fixed polarizing sheets which have their optical axes at right angles to one another. The angle of the compass magnet with respect to a fixed axis of the compass body can be determined by measuring the ratio of the intensities of the two light beams. The remaining ambiguity as to which of the four possible quadrants the magnet is pointing to is resolved by the second pair of light beams, which are passed through the sheet polarizer at positions which are transected by two semicircular opaque strips formed on the sheet polarizer. The incoming excitation beam and the four return beams are communicated by means of optical fibers, giving a remotely readable compass which has no electrical parts.

  5. Hadamard multimode optical imaging transceiver

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cooke, Bradly J; Guenther, David C; Tiee, Joe J; Kellum, Mervyn J; Olivas, Nicholas L; Weisse-Bernstein, Nina R; Judd, Stephen L; Braun, Thomas R

    2012-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a method and system for simultaneously acquiring and producing results for multiple image modes using a common sensor without optical filtering, scanning, or other moving parts. The system and method utilize the Walsh-Hadamard correlation detection process (e.g., functions/matrix) to provide an all-binary structure that permits seamless bridging between analog and digital domains. An embodiment may capture an incoming optical signal at an optical aperture, convert the optical signal to an electrical signal, pass the electrical signal through a Low-Noise Amplifier (LNA) to create an LNA signal, pass the LNA signal through one or more correlators where each correlator has a corresponding Walsh-Hadamard (WH) binary basis function, calculate a correlation output coefficient for each correlator as a function of the corresponding WH binary basis function in accordance with Walsh-Hadamard mathematical principles, digitize each of the correlation output coefficient by passing each correlation output coefficient through an Analog-to-Digital Converter (ADC), and performing image mode processing on the digitized correlation output coefficients as desired to produce one or more image modes. Some, but not all, potential image modes include: multi-channel access, temporal, range, three-dimensional, and synthetic aperture.

  6. Optical black holes and solitons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shawn Westmoreland

    2010-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We exhibit a static, cylindrically symmetric, exact solution to the Euler-Heisenberg field equations (EHFE) and prove that its effective geometry contains (optical) black holes. It is conjectured that there are also soliton solutions to the EHFE which contain black hole geometries.

  7. Buried fiber optic intrusion sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maier, Eric William

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    to the buried sensor induces a phase shift in light propagating along the fiber which allows for the detection and localization of intrusions. Through the use of an ultra-stable erbium-doped fiber laser and phase sensitive optical time domain reflectometry...

  8. Interferometric fiber optic displacement sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farah, J.

    1999-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is presented to produce a change in the optical path length in the gap between two single mode optical fibers proportional to the lateral displacement of either fiber end normal to its axis. This is done with the use of refraction or diffraction at the interface between a guiding and non-guiding media to change the direction of propagation of the light in the gap. A method is also presented for laying a waveguide on a cantilever so that the displacement of the tip of the cantilever produces a proportional path length change in the gap by distancing the waveguide from the neutral axis of the cantilever. The fiber is supported as a cantilever or a waveguide is deposited on a micromachined cantilever and incorporated in an interferometer which is made totally on a silicon substrate with the use of integrated-optic technology. A resonant element in the form of a micro-bridge is incorporated in the ridge waveguide and produces a frequency output which is readily digitizeable and immune to laser frequency noise. Finally, monolithic mechanical means for phase modulation are provided on the same sensor substrate. This is done by vibrating the cantilever or micro-bridge either electrically or optically. 23 figs.

  9. Frame dragging with optical vortices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strohaber, James

    2011-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    ). It is found that when a massive spinning neutral particle is placed along the optical axis, a phenomenon known as inertial frame dragging occurs. Our results are compared with those found previously for a ring laser and an order of magnitude estimate...

  10. Interferometric fiber optic displacement sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farah, John (M.I.T. P.O. Box 397301, Cambridge, MA 02139)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is presented to produce a change in the optical path length in the gap between two single mode optical fibers proportional to the lateral displacement of either fiber end normal to its axis. This is done with the use of refraction or diffraction at the interface between a guiding and non-guiding media to change the direction of propagation of the light in the gap. A method is also presented for laying a waveguide on a cantilever so that the displacement of the tip of the cantilever produces a proportional path length change in the gap by distancing the waveguide from the neutral axis of the cantilever. The fiber is supported as a cantilever or a waveguide is deposited on a micromachined cantilever and incorporated in an interferometer which is made totally on a silicon substrate with the use of integrated-optic technology. A resonant element in the form of a micro-bridge is incorporated in the ridge waveguide and produces a frequency output which is readily digitizeable and immune to laser frequency noise. Finally, monolithic mechanical means for phase modulation are provided on the same sensor substrate. This is done by vibrating the cantilever or micro-bridge either electrically or optically.

  11. Fabrication of an optical component

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nichols, Michael A. (Livermore, CA); Aikens, David M. (Pleasanton, CA); Camp, David W. (Oakland, CA); Thomas, Ian M. (Livermore, CA); Kiikka, Craig (Livermore, CA); Sheehan, Lynn M. (Livermore, CA); Kozlowski, Mark R. (Livermore, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for forming optical parts used in laser optical systems such as high energy lasers, high average power lasers, semiconductor capital equipment and medical devices. The optical parts will not damage during the operation of high power lasers in the ultra-violet light range. A blank is first ground using a fixed abrasive grinding method to remove the subsurface damage formed during the fabrication of the blank. The next step grinds and polishes the edges and forms bevels to reduce the amount of fused-glass contaminants in the subsequent steps. A loose abrasive grind removes the subsurface damage formed during the fixed abrasive or "blanchard" removal process. After repolishing the bevels and performing an optional fluoride etch, the surface of the blank is polished using a zirconia slurry. Any subsurface damage formed during the loose abrasive grind will be removed during this zirconia polish. A post polish etch may be performed to remove any redeposited contaminants. Another method uses a ceria polishing step to remove the subsurface damage formed during the loose abrasive grind. However, any residual ceria may interfere with the optical properties of the finished part. Therefore, the ceria and other contaminants are removed by performing either a zirconia polish after the ceria polish or a post ceria polish etch.

  12. Engineering of optical polarization based on electronic band structures of A-plane ZnO layers under biaxial strains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matsui, Hiroaki, E-mail: hiroaki@ee.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Tabata, Hitoshi [Department of Bioengineering, The University of Tokyo, 1-3-7 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Department of Electrical Engineering and Information Systems, The University of Tokyo, 1-3-7 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Hasuike, Noriyuki; Harima, Hiroshi [Department of Electronics and Information Science, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan)

    2014-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    In-plane anisotropic strains in A-plane layers on the electronic band structure of ZnO were investigated from the viewpoint of optical polarization anisotropy. Investigations utilizing k·p perturbation theory revealed that energy transitions and associated oscillation strengths were dependent on in-plane strains. The theoretical correlation between optical polarizations and in-plane strains was experimentally demonstrated using A-plane ZnO layers with different in-plane strains. Finally, optical polarization anisotropy and its implications for in-plane optical properties are discussed in relation to the energy shift between two orthogonal directions. Higher polarization rotations were obtained in an A-plane ZnO layer with in-plane biaxially compressive strains as compared to strain-free ZnO. This study provides detailed information concerning the role played by in-plane strains in optically polarized applications based on nonpolar ZnO in the ultra-violet region.

  13. Ultrafast Optical Pulses: Synthesis and Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Kai

    2013-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation is devoted to ultrafast waveform synthesis using coherent Raman sidebands with the assistance of pulse shapers based on acousto-optic programmable dispersive ?lter (AOPDF) or deformable mirror (DM). Ultrashort optical science has...

  14. Micro benchtop optics by bulk silicon micromachining

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, Abraham P. (Walnut Creek, CA); Pocha, Michael D. (Livermore, CA); McConaghy, Charles F. (Livermore, CA); Deri, Robert J. (Pleasanton, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Micromachining of bulk silicon utilizing the parallel etching characteristics of bulk silicon and integrating the parallel etch planes of silicon with silicon wafer bonding and impurity doping, enables the fabrication of on-chip optics with in situ aligned etched grooves for optical fibers, micro-lenses, photodiodes, and laser diodes. Other optical components that can be microfabricated and integrated include semi-transparent beam splitters, micro-optical scanners, pinholes, optical gratings, micro-optical filters, etc. Micromachining of bulk silicon utilizing the parallel etching characteristics thereof can be utilized to develop miniaturization of bio-instrumentation such as wavelength monitoring by fluorescence spectrometers, and other miniaturized optical systems such as Fabry-Perot interferometry for filtering of wavelengths, tunable cavity lasers, micro-holography modules, and wavelength splitters for optical communication systems.

  15. Optical chirped beam amplification and propagation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barty, Christopher P.

    2004-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A short pulse laser system uses dispersive optics in a chirped-beam amplification architecture to produce high peak power pulses and high peak intensities without the potential for intensity dependent damage to downstream optical components after amplification.

  16. Adaptive optic demonstrators for extremely large telescopes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campbell, Michael Aloysius

    2011-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The next generation of ground-based optical/infrared (IR) telescopes will have primary mirrors of up to 42 m. To take advantage of the large potential increase in angular resolution, adaptive optics will be essential to ...

  17. Optical Force Measurements In Concentrated Colloidal Suspensions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Laurence

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work concerns the construction and testing of an optical tweezers-based force transducer, and its application to a hard-sphere colloidal system. A particle in an optical trap forward-scatters a fraction of the ...

  18. A. La Rosa Lecture Notes APPLIED OPTICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    _______________________________________________________________________________ Rays and Optical beams Ref: A. Yariv and P. Yeh, "Photonics," Oxford University Press. Chapter 2. IA. La Rosa Lecture Notes APPLIED OPTICS. Ray Matrices I.A Special cases Case: Propagation through a thin lens Case: Propagation through

  19. NANOSCALE OPTICAL COMPUTING USING RESONANCE ENERGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lebeck, Alvin R.

    OPTICAL COMPUTING USING RESONANCE ENERGY TRANSFER LOGIC A NEW NANOSCALE DEVICE BASED ON A SINGLE-MOLECULE OPTICAL PHENOMENON CALLED RESONANCE ENERGY TRANSFER. THIS DEVICE ENABLES A COMPLETE INTEGRATED TECHNOLOGY, PROVIDING A POTENTIAL PATH TO MOLECULAR-SCALE COMPUTING

  20. Special light trajectories in optical medium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miroslav Pardy

    2010-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fermat principle is used to define trajectories in nonhomogenous optical media. The Poincare model of the Lobachevskii geometry is derived. The index of refraction is determined for the light confined in the circular trajectory in the optical medium.

  1. Photonic integrated circuits for optical logic applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Ryan Daniel

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The optical logic unit cell is the photonic analog to transistor-transistor logic in electronic devices. Active devices such as InP-based semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOA) emitting at 1550 nm are vertically integrated ...

  2. Hot stars in young massive clusters: Mapping the current Galactic metallicity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Figer, Donald F.

    for Detectors, Rochester Institute of Technology, 54 Lomb Memorial Drive, Rochester, NY 14623, USA (4) Instituto). Notice the different flux scales. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS: This project is partially supported by the Spanish extincted regions of the Galactic disk. Also, the young ages of blue massive stars (

  3. Transient horizontal magnetic fields in solar plage regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Ishikawa; S. Tsuneta; K. Ichimoto; H. Isobe; Y. Katsukawa; B. W. Lites; S. Nagata; T. Shimizu; R. A. Shine; Y. Suematsu; T. D. Tarbell; A. M. Title

    2008-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the discovery of isolated, small-scale emerging magnetic fields in a plage region with the Solar Optical Telescope aboard Hinode. Spectro-polarimetric observations were carried out with a cadence of 34 seconds for the plage region located near disc center. The vector magnetic fields are inferred by Milne-Eddington inversion. The observations reveal widespread occurrence of transient, spatially isolated horizontal magnetic fields. The lateral extent of the horizontal magnetic fields is comparable to the size of photospheric granules. These horizontal magnetic fields seem to be tossed about by upflows and downflows of the granular convection. We also report an event that appears to be driven by the magnetic buoyancy instability. We refer to buoyancy-driven emergence as type1 and convection-driven emergence as type2. Although both events have magnetic field strengths of about 600 G, the filling factor of type1 is a factor of two larger than that of type2. Our finding suggests that the granular convection in the plage regions is characterized by a high rate of occurrence of granular-sized transient horizontal fields.

  4. Interaction Region Design and Detector Integration at JLab's MEIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Fanglei [JLAB; Brindza, Paul D. [JLAB; Derbenev, Yaroslav S. [JLAB; Ent, Rolf [JLAB; Morozov, Vasiliy [JLAB; Nadel-Turonski, Pawel A. [JLAB; Zhang, Yuhong [JLAB; Hyde, Charles E. [ODU; Sullivan, Michael [SLAC

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Electron Ion Collider (EIC) will be a next-generation facility for the study of the strong interaction (QCD). JLab?s MEIC is designed for high luminosities of up to 10^34 cm^-2 s^-1. This is achieved in part due to an aggressively small beta-star, which imposes stringent requirements on the collider rings? dynamical properties. Additionally, one of the unique features of MEIC is a full-acceptance detector with a dedicated, small-angle, high-resolution detection system, capable of covering a wide range of momenta (and charge-to-mass ratios) with respect to the original ion beam to enable access to new physics. The detector design relies on a number of features, such as a 50 mrad beam crossing angle, large-aperture ion and electron final focusing quads and spectrometer dipoles as well as a large machine-element-free detection space downstream of the final focusing quads. We present an interaction region design developed with close integration of the detector and beam dynamical aspects. The dynamical aspect of the design rests on a symmetry-based concept for compensation of non-linear effects. The optics and geometry have been optimized to accommodate the detection requirements and to ensure the interaction region?s modularity for easiness of integration into the collider ring lattices. As a result, the design offers an excellent detector performance combined with the necessary non-linear dynamical properties.

  5. Applications of fiber optics in physical protection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buckle, T.H. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this NUREG is to provide technical information useful for the development of fiber-optic communications and intrusion detection subsystems relevant to physical protection. There are major sections on fiber-optic technology and applications. Other topics include fiber-optic system components and systems engineering. This document also contains a glossary, a list of standards and specifications, and a list of fiber-optic equipment vendors.

  6. Reflective optical imaging method and circuit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shafer, David R. (Fairfield, CT)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical system compatible with short wavelength (extreme ultraviolet) radiation comprising four reflective elements for projecting a mask image onto a substrate. The four optical elements are characterized in order from object to image as convex, concave, convex and concave mirrors. The optical system is particularly suited for step and scan lithography methods. The invention increases the slit dimensions associated with ringfield scanning optics, improves wafer throughput and allows higher semiconductor device density.

  7. High pressure fiber optic sensor system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guida, Renato; Xia, Hua; Lee, Boon K; Dekate, Sachin N

    2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The present application provides a fiber optic sensor system. The fiber optic sensor system may include a small diameter bellows, a large diameter bellows, and a fiber optic pressure sensor attached to the small diameter bellows. Contraction of the large diameter bellows under an applied pressure may cause the small diameter bellows to expand such that the fiber optic pressure sensor may measure the applied pressure.

  8. IR OPTICS MEASUREMENT WITH LINEAR COUPLING'S ACTION-ANGLE PARAMETERIZATION.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LUO, Y.; BAI, M.; PILAT, R.; SATOGATA, T.; TRBOJEVIC, D.

    2005-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A parameterization of linear coupling in action-angle coordinates is convenient for analytical calculations and interpretation of turn-by-turn (TBT) beam position monitor (BPM) data. We demonstrate how to use this parameterization to extract the twiss and coupling parameters in interaction regions (IRs), using BPMs on each side of the long IR drift region. The example of TBT BPM analysis was acquired at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), using an AC dipole to excite a single eigenmode. Besides the full treatment, a fast estimate of beta*, the beta function at the interaction point (IP), is provided, along with the phase advance between these BPMs. We also calculate and measure the waist of the beta function and the local optics.

  9. Evaluation of systems and components for hybrid optical firing sets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Landry, M.J.; Rupert, J.W.; Mittas, A.

    1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High-energy density light appears to be a unique energy form that may be used to enhance the nuclear safety of weapon systems. Hybrid optical firing sets (HOFS) utilize the weak-link/strong-link exclusion region concept for nuclear safety; this method is similar to present systems, but uses light to transmit power across the exclusion region barrier. This report describes the assembling, operating, and testing of fourteen HOFS. These firing sets were required to charge a capacitor-discharge unit to 2.0 and 2.5 kV (100 mJ) in less than 1 s. First, we describe the components, the measurement techniques used to evaluate the components, and the different characteristics of the measured components. Second, we describe the HOFS studied, the setups used for evaluating them, and the resulting characteristics. Third, we make recommendations for improving the overall performance and suggest the best HOFS for packaging. 36 refs., 145 figs., 14 tabs.

  10. 34 | OPN Optics & Photonics News www.osa-opn.org OPTICAL CONSTRUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    34 | OPN Optics & Photonics News www.osa-opn.org OPTICAL CONSTRUCTION Optical Pipeline: Trapping light heats a surface of absorbing particle nonuniformly, gas molecules rebound off the surface-propagating vortex beams. Optical vortices create a ring-shaped transverse intensity distribution, and the particles

  11. Advanced Optical Modulation Formats and Their Comparison in Fiber-Optic Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kansas, University of

    Advanced Optical Modulation Formats and Their Comparison in Fiber-Optic Systems R Hui, S. Zhang, B crosstalks in SCM/WDM optical systems and the impact due to fiber characteristics. We also demonstrated decisions on the fiber plant investments and fiber-optic equipment purchasing. Our comparative study

  12. Polymer Based Thermo-optic Switch for Optical True Time Delay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Ray

    Polymer Based Thermo-optic Switch for Optical True Time Delay Xiaolong Wanga , Brie Howleya Warfare Center, Newport, RI 02841 Abstract: A thermo-optic switch using total internal reflection interference. One practical way to implement continuous TTD is to integrate polymer based thermo-optic switches

  13. Aero-Optics 1 Physics and Computation of Aero-Optics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gordeyev, Stanislav

    Aero-Optics 1 Physics and Computation of Aero-Optics Meng Wang Department of Aerospace-fidelity simulation, opti- cal mitigation Abstract This article provides a critical review of aero-optics-induced optical distortions. Following a brief introduction of the fundamental theory and key concepts

  14. Fiber coupling with adaptive optics for free-space optical communication Thomas Weyraucha

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fiber coupling with adaptive optics for free-space optical communication Thomas Weyraucha , Mikhail, Department of Manufacturing Engineering, Brookline, MA 02446 ABSTRACT We describe an adaptive optical fiber coupling system for free-space optical communication comprising a micro- electromechanical deformable

  15. 832 OPTICS LETTERS / Vol. 25, No. 11 / June 1, 2000 Simultaneous optical wavelength interchange with a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    832 OPTICS LETTERS / Vol. 25, No. 11 / June 1, 2000 Simultaneous optical wavelength interchange January 21, 2000 We present a theoretical analysis for simultaneous optical wavelength interchange and isolation of a pair of collinear input optical signals by use of two concurrent difference

  16. All-optical Fog Sensor for Determining the Fog Visibility Range in Optical Wireless Communication Links

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haddadi, Hamed

    All-optical Fog Sensor for Determining the Fog Visibility Range in Optical Wireless Communication is to use an all optical based fog sensor to study the atmospheric visibility of fog and its constituents on the optical wireless communication (OWC) links in a controlled laboratory test-bid. The fog sensor measures

  17. Abstract--A low noise optical sensor and biocompatible microscale optical filters for integrated fluorescence sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maryland at College Park, University of

    Abstract--A low noise optical sensor and biocompatible microscale optical filters for integrated sensors. The transmission ratio in the pass-band and suppression ratio in the stop-band of the optical and of the optical filter. Test results comparing sensor and filter performance with competing technologies

  18. Printed Optics: 3D Printing of Embedded Optical Elements for Interactive Devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poupyrev, Ivan

    Printed Optics: 3D Printing of Embedded Optical Elements for Interactive Devices Karl D.D. Willis1 d Figure 1: Custom optical elements are fabricated with 3D printing and embedded in interactive), and embedded optoelectronics (d). ABSTRACT We present an approach to 3D printing custom optical ele- ments

  19. Multivariate Optical Computation for Predictive Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myrick, Michael Lenn

    Multivariate Optical Computation for Predictive Spectroscopy Matthew P. Nelson, Jeffrey F. Aust, J Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1A 0R6 A novel optical approach to predicting chemical into the structure of a set of paired optical filters. Light passing through the paired filters produces an analog

  20. Moisture Penetration Through Optical Fiber Coatings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthewson, M. John

    Moisture Penetration Through Optical Fiber Coatings J. L. Armstrong, M. J. Matthewson and C. R for measuring the diffusion coefficients of water vapor through optical fiber polymer coatings has been. Kurkjian #12;732 International Wire & Cable Symposium Proceedings 1998 Moisture Penetration Through Optical