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Sample records for road athens ga

  1. Making it pay in Athens, GA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malloy, M.G.

    1997-04-01

    The materials recovery facility (MRF) in Athens, GA, is a well-fed recycling facility. But, if the local government has its way, it will be even better fed in the near future. The Athens-Clarke County (ACC) regional municipality in which the facility resides has a put-or-pay contract with the plant`s owner/operator, under which the more it feeds the MRF, the more money it receives in return, through the sale of recycled end products. The ACC Solid Waste Department uses a volume-based waste collection system that encourages residents to recycle--the more they recycle, the less trash they have to put out, and the less they pay each month. The Athens facility, which will be a featured site tour at next month`s WasteExpo `97 in nearby Atlanta, had its ground-breaking two years ago, in April 1995. ACC is responsible for delivering material--or seeing that recyclables are delivered--to the MRF, which is owned and operated by Resource Recovery Systems (RRS, Centerbrook, Conn.). Over the past year, ACC has stepped up various incentives for businesses to recycle and send their recyclables to the facility, including instituting pilot programs for commercial interests that offer them versions of volume-based collection similar to that done by residents.

  2. Athens, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Registered Research Institutions in Athens, Ohio Ohio University Voinovich School of Leadership and Public Affairs Registered Energy Companies in Athens, Ohio American...

  3. West Athens, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. West Athens is a census-designated place in Los Angeles County, California.1 References...

  4. Distributed road assessment system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beer, N. Reginald; Paglieroni, David W

    2014-03-25

    A system that detects damage on or below the surface of a paved structure or pavement is provided. A distributed road assessment system includes road assessment pods and a road assessment server. Each road assessment pod includes a ground-penetrating radar antenna array and a detection system that detects road damage from the return signals as the vehicle on which the pod is mounted travels down a road. Each road assessment pod transmits to the road assessment server occurrence information describing each occurrence of road damage that is newly detected on a current scan of a road. The road assessment server maintains a road damage database of occurrence information describing the previously detected occurrences of road damage. After the road assessment server receives occurrence information for newly detected occurrences of road damage for a portion of a road, the road assessment server determines which newly detected occurrences correspond to which previously detected occurrences of road damage.

  5. Presentation: Cyclotron Road

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Secretary of Energy Advisory Board received a briefing on Cyclotron Road, lead by Ilan Gur, Director of Cyclotron Road.

  6. Cyclotron Road

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Innovation in the digital age 3 Manufacturing startups are hard 4 At risk of a lost generation 5 Cyclotron Road: a new model Venture capital Alternative capital Corporate acquisition 6 * 8 innovators selected from 150 registered applicants in a three week application window * 4 weeks to first experiments with Berkeley Lab * 20+ Berkeley Lab scientists have engaged with the projects * Projects have avoided millions in R&D capital expenditures and raised over $5 million in follow-on funding

  7. East Avenue Truck Inspection Patterson Pass Road Vasco Road

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Vasco Road Thunderbird Lane Greenville Road Greenville Road Directions to the Sandia/CA - Visitor Badge Office Interstate 580 - Oakland/San Francisco, Traveling Eastbound * Exit Vasco Road South * Continue traveling South on Vasco Road for 1.1 miles * Turn left onto Patterson Pass Road * Continue traveling East on Patterson Pass Road for 1.2 miles * Turn right onto Greenville Road * Continue traveling South on Greenville Road for 1.1 miles * Turn right onto East Avenue * Follow the road as it

  8. Quick Facts | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Contact Information Administrator: Kenneth E. Legg Headquarters: 1166 Athens Tech Road Elberton, GA 30635-6711 Telephone: 706-213-3800 FAX: 706-213-3884 Marketing Area Georgia, ...

  9. SREL Reprint #3169

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and John C. Maerz3 1Odum School of Ecology, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602, USA 2Department of Biological Sciences, University of New Hampshire, 46 College Road,...

  10. Rapid road repair vehicle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mara, L.M.

    1998-05-05

    Disclosed is a rapid road repair vehicle capable of moving over a surface to be repaired at near normal posted traffic speeds to scan for and find at the high rate of speed, imperfections in the pavement surface, prepare the surface imperfection for repair by air pressure and vacuum cleaning, applying a correct amount of the correct patching material to effect the repair, smooth the resulting repaired surface, and catalog the location and quality of the repairs for maintenance records of the road surface. The rapid road repair vehicle can repair surface imperfections at lower cost, improved quality, at a higher rate of speed than was not heretofor possible, with significantly reduced exposure to safety and health hazards associated with this kind of road repair activities in the past. 2 figs.

  11. Rapid road repair vehicle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mara, Leo M.

    1998-01-01

    Disclosed is a rapid road repair vehicle capable of moving over a surface to be repaired at near normal posted traffic speeds to scan for and find an the high rate of speed, imperfections in the pavement surface, prepare the surface imperfection for repair by air pressure and vacuum cleaning, applying a correct amount of the correct patching material to effect the repair, smooth the resulting repaired surface, and catalog the location and quality of the repairs for maintenance records of the road surface. The rapid road repair vehicle can repair surface imperfections at lower cost, improved quality, at a higher rate of speed than was was heretofor possible, with significantly reduced exposure to safety and health hazards associated with this kind of road repair activities in the past.

  12. Road Weather Predictions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Road Tripping through the Geothermal Frontier Road Tripping through the Geothermal Frontier Addthis Geothermal Well Head, Utah 1 of 5 Geothermal Well Head, Utah This geothermal well head is located near the University of Utah's FORGE candidate site. The area is already renewables-friendly, with a wind farm nearby. Image: Elisabet Metcalfe, EERE Snake River Plain, Idaho 2 of 5 Snake River Plain, Idaho The mountainous view captures INL's Snake River Plain candidate site which is located on the

  13. Rapid road repair vehicle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mara, Leo M.

    1999-01-01

    Disclosed are improvments to a rapid road repair vehicle comprising an improved cleaning device arrangement, two dispensing arrays for filling defects more rapidly and efficiently, an array of pre-heaters to heat the road way surface in order to help the repair material better bond to the repaired surface, a means for detecting, measuring, and computing the number, location and volume of each of the detected surface imperfection, and a computer means schema for controlling the operation of the plurality of vehicle subsystems. The improved vehicle is, therefore, better able to perform its intended function of filling surface imperfections while moving over those surfaces at near normal traffic speeds.

  14. Meters Roads N Streams

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0 Meters Roads N Streams o Openwells E3i APT Site *. TES Plants (1) E2J Other Set-Asides lEI Hydric Soils . 370 o 370 Soils Soil Series and Phase DBaB DBaC .Pk .TrB DTrC DTrD .TuE...

  15. PAR Pond N Roads

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PAR Pond N Roads 11N Streams 870 Meters N A Vegetation Community D Sandhill Scrub oak/Pine '/ 580 Compartment 56 290 o 290 Soils Soi I Sa-i es and Pha:;e o LaB sc Figure 26-1. Plant COl1ll1lllllities and soils associated with the Sandhills Fire Site Set-Aside Area. 26-5 Set-Aside 26: Sandhills Fire Site

  16. ADEC II Universal SCR Retrofit System for On-road and Off-road...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ADEC II Universal SCR Retrofit System for On-road and Off-road Diesel Engines ADEC II Universal SCR Retrofit System for On-road and Off-road Diesel Engines Presentation given at ...

  17. Road to Net Zero (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glover, B.

    2011-05-01

    A PowerPoint presentation on NREL's Research Support Facility (RSF) and the road to achieving net zero energy for new construction.

  18. Timber Road II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Road II Jump to: navigation, search Name Timber Road II Facility Timber Road II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Horizon Wind...

  19. East Avenue Truck Inspection Patterson Pass Road Vasco Road

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Office to be badged Sandia National Laboratories 7011 East Avenue Livermore, CA 94551 Tesla Road Interstate 580 - From OaklandSan Francisco Map Not to Scale Map Not to Scale To...

  20. Suggested Talking Points for Hydrogen Road Tour | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Suggested Talking Points for Hydrogen Road Tour Suggested Talking Points for Hydrogen Road Tour PDF icon Suggested Talking Points for Hydrogen Road Tour More Documents & ...

  1. SREL Reprint #3188

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    School of Forestry and Natural Resources, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602, USA 2Department of Environmental Health Science, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602,...

  2. Hampton Roads Demonstration Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Project Facility Hampton Roads Demonstration Project Sector Wind energy Facility Type Offshore Wind Facility Status Proposed Developer Virginia State Government Location...

  3. Decommissioning abandoned roads to protect fish

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Decommissioning-abandoned-roads-to-protect-fish Sign In About | Careers | Contact | Investors | bpa.gov Search News & Us Expand News & Us Projects & Initiatives Expand Projects...

  4. Predicting and Utilizing the Vehicle's Past and Futuer Road Grade...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Utilizing the Vehicle's Past and Futuer Road Grade Predicting and Utilizing the Vehicle's Past and Futuer Road Grade Predicted road grade may be used to estimate the power ...

  5. Marsh Road Power Plant Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to: navigation, search Name Marsh Road Power Plant Biomass Facility Facility Marsh Road Power Plant Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location San Mateo County,...

  6. The Digital Road to Scientific Knowledge Diffusion; A Faster...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: The Digital Road to Scientific Knowledge Diffusion; A Faster, Better Way to Scientific Progress? Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The Digital Road to ...

  7. Road to Fuel Savings: Clean Diesel Trucks Gain Momentum with...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Road to Fuel Savings: Clean Diesel Trucks Gain Momentum with Nissan and Cummins Collaboration Road to Fuel Savings: Clean Diesel Trucks Gain Momentum with Nissan and Cummins ...

  8. Montana - Access Road Easement Policy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Access Road Easement Policy Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library General: Montana - Access Road Easement Policy Author Montana Department of...

  9. Comparison of Different Load Road Implementation Strategies on...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Comparison of Different Load Road Implementation Strategies on Fuel Economy of USPS Step Vans An alternative form of measuring road loads, instead of using a chassis dynamometer ...

  10. HCEI Road Map: 2011 Edition (Brochure)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This road map outlines the 2011 key goals and strategies of the Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative, was founded based on a Memorandum of Understanding between the State of Hawaii and the U.S. Department of Energy in 2008.

  11. HCEI Road Map: 2011 Edition (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Braccio, R.; Finch, P.

    2011-08-01

    This road map outlines the 2011 key goals and strategies of the Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative, was founded based on a Memorandum of Understanding between the State of Hawaii and the U.S. Department of Energy in 2008.

  12. End of the road for Roadrunner

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    End of the road for Roadrunner End of the road for Roadrunner Roadrunner, the first supercomputer to break the once-elusive petaflop barrier-one million billion calculations per second-will be decommissioned on Sunday, March 31. March 29, 2013 Roadrunner, the first supercomputer to break the once-elusive petaflop barrier-one million billion calculations per second-will be decommissioned on Sunday, March 31. Roadrunner will be decommissioned on March 31. Contact Kevin Roark Communications Office

  13. General Atomics (GA) | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    General Atomics (GA) Subscribe to RSS - General Atomics (GA) General Atomics Image: General Atomics (GA) The Scorpion's Strategy: "Catch and Subdue" Read more about The Scorpion's...

  14. American Road: Clean Diesels for the Real World | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    American Road: Clean Diesels for the Real World American Road: Clean Diesels for the Real World Perspectives on clean diesels and public policy as it is developing in the US, as ...

  15. Road Tripping through the Geothermal Frontier

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    After more than a year since the announcement of available funding, the project teams for our Frontier Observatory for Research in Geothermal Energy (FORGE) each hosted our geothermal experts at their candidate sites this fall. Were calling it our road trip through the geothermal frontier.

  16. The Digital Road to Scientific Knowledge Diffusion

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Digital Road to Scientific Knowledge Diffusion A Faster, Better Way to Scientific Progress? By David E. Wojick, Walter L. Warnick, Bonnie C. Carroll, and June Crowe Introduction With the United States federal government spending over $130 billion annually for research and development, ways to increase the productivity of that research can have a significant return on investment. It is well known that all scientific advancement is based on work that has come before. Isaac Newton expressed this

  17. HCEI Road Map: 2011 Edition (Brochure)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    HCEI Road Map 2011 Edition 2 www.hawaiicleanenergyinitiative.org The Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative (HCEI) was founded based on a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between the State of Hawaii and the U.S. Department of Energy on Jan. 28, 2008. Upon inception, the State and the Department worked to form a series of working groups incorporating a variety of stakeholders throughout the state, including local government, not-for-profit organizations, private sector companies, trade associations,

  18. Investigation of the GaN-on-GaAs interface for vertical power device applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mreke, Janina Uren, Michael J.; Kuball, Martin; Novikov, Sergei V.; Foxon, C. Thomas; Hosseini Vajargah, Shahrzad; Wallis, David J.; Humphreys, Colin J.; Haigh, Sarah J.; Al-Khalidi, Abdullah; Wasige, Edward; Thayne, Iain

    2014-07-07

    GaN layers were grown onto (111) GaAs by molecular beam epitaxy. Minimal band offset between the conduction bands for GaN and GaAs materials has been suggested in the literature raising the possibility of using GaN-on-GaAs for vertical power device applications. I-V and C-V measurements of the GaN/GaAs heterostructures however yielded a rectifying junction, even when both sides of the junction were heavily doped with an n-type dopant. Transmission electron microscopy analysis further confirmed the challenge in creating a GaN/GaAs Ohmic interface by showing a large density of dislocations in the GaN layer and suggesting roughening of the GaN/GaAs interface due to etching of the GaAs by the nitrogen plasma, diffusion of nitrogen or melting of Ga into the GaAs substrate.

  19. GA SNC Solar | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GA-SNC Solar Place: Nevada Sector: Solar Product: Nevada-based PV project developer and joint venture of GA-Solar North America and Sierra Nevada Corp. References: GA-SNC...

  20. Building a road map for tailoring multilayer polyelectrolyte films (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article) | SciTech Connect Building a road map for tailoring multilayer polyelectrolyte films Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Building a road map for tailoring multilayer polyelectrolyte films Researchers are moving a step closer to a definite road map for building layer-by-layer (LbL) assembled polyelectrolyte films, with the assistance of the Liquids Reflectometer at Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Spallation Neutron Source, in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Scientists using the liquids

  1. LANL closes road, trails for safety reasons; flooding and erosion...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    closed for safety reasons LANL closes road, trails for safety reasons; flooding and erosion control work under way Closure is in response to the increased fire risk and...

  2. Dillard Road Solar Power Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Facility Facility Dillard Road Solar Power Facility Sector Solar Facility Type Photovoltaics Facility Status In Service Developer Recurrent Energy Energy Purchaser Sacramento...

  3. Ed Westcotts photography goes on the road

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    photographer Ed Westcott, is going on the road. The Oak Ridge Secret City Photographic History Exhibit consists of selected images from many of Westcott's works that have...

  4. Cyclotron Road: Creating a Home for Top Clean Energy Technology...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cyclotron Road: Creating a Home for Top Clean Energy Technology Entrepreneurs within our ... training dozens of top lab technologists in the technology commercialization process. ...

  5. Make Your Next Road Trip Fuel Efficient | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Make Your Next Road Trip Fuel Efficient Make Your Next Road Trip Fuel Efficient June 29, 2015 - 3:02pm Addthis Enjoy the open road while keeping your fuel costs low! | Photo courtesy of istockphoto.com/lisegagne Enjoy the open road while keeping your fuel costs low! | Photo courtesy of istockphoto.com/lisegagne Christina Stowers Communications Specialist in the Weatherization and Intergovernmental Programs Office What does this mean for me? You don't have to break the bank on your summer travels

  6. IRF-World Road Statistics | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AgencyCompany Organization: International Road Statistics Focus Area: Transportation, Economic Development Resource Type: Dataset Website: www.irfnet.orgstatistics.php Cost:...

  7. Electricity for road transport, flexible power systems and wind...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    systems and wind power (Smart Grid Project) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name Electricity for road transport, flexible power systems and wind power Country Denmark...

  8. A queuing model for road traffic simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guerrouahane, N.; Aissani, D.; Bouallouche-Medjkoune, L.; Farhi, N.

    2015-03-10

    We present in this article a stochastic queuing model for the raod traffic. The model is based on the M/G/c/c state dependent queuing model, and is inspired from the deterministic Godunov scheme for the road traffic simulation. We first propose a variant of M/G/c/c state dependent model that works with density-flow fundamental diagrams rather than density-speed relationships. We then extend this model in order to consider upstream traffic demand as well as downstream traffic supply. Finally, we show how to model a whole raod by concatenating raod sections as in the deterministic Godunov scheme.

  9. GaInNAs laser gain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CHOW,WENG W.; JONES,ERIC D.; MODINE,NORMAND A.; KURTZ,STEVEN R.; ALLERMAN,ANDREW A.

    2000-05-23

    The optical gain spectra for GaInNAs/GaAs quantum wells are computed using a microscopic laser theory. From these spectra, the peak gain and carrier radiative decay rate as functions of carrier density are determined. These dependences allow the study of the lasing threshold current density of GaInNAs/GaAs quantum well structures.

  10. The Road to Hydrogen--Challenges Ahead in Technology and Manufacturing...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The Road to Hydrogen--Challenges Ahead in Technology and Manufacturing The Road to Hydrogen--Challenges Ahead in Technology and Manufacturing Presentation prepared by Rick Zalesky ...

  11. EA-1980: Spar Canyon-Round Valley Access Road System Improvements...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    80: Spar Canyon-Round Valley Access Road System Improvements, Custer County, Idaho EA-1980: Spar Canyon-Round Valley Access Road System Improvements, Custer County, Idaho Summary...

  12. Quick Links | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Quick Facts Quick Facts Quick Facts Financial Data From the SEPA 2014 Annual Report: Total Revenues = $299 million (includes Corps of Engineers' revenues) Total Capital Investment = $2.6 billion (Term of repayment is 50 years from on-line date of each project.) Cumulative Investment Repaid = $938 million Cumulative Interest Paid on Investments = $2.0 billion Contact Information Administrator: Kenneth E. Legg Headquarters: 1166 Athens Tech Road Elberton, GA 30635-6711 Telephone: 706-213-3800 FAX:

  13. GaAs, AlGaAs and InGaP Tunnel Junctions for Multi-Junction Solar Cells Under Concentration: Resistance Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wheeldon, Jeffrey F.; Valdivia, Christopher E.; Walker, Alex; Kolhatkar, Gitanja; Hall, Trevor J.; Hinzer, Karin; Masson, Denis; Riel, Bruno; Fafard, Simon; Jaouad, Abdelatif; Turala, Artur; Ares, Richard; Aimez, Vincent

    2010-10-14

    The following four TJ designs, AlGaAs/AlGaAs, GaAs/GaAs, AlGaAs/InGaP and AlGaAs/GaAs are studied to determine minimum doping concentration to achieve a resistance of <10{sup -4} {omega}{center_dot}cm{sup 2} and a peak tunneling current suitable for MJ solar cells up to 1500-suns concentration (operating current of 21 A/cm{sup 2}). Experimentally calibrated numerical models are used to determine how the resistance changes as a function of doping concentration. The AlGaAs/GaAs TJ design is determined to require the least doping concentration to achieve the specified resistance and peak tunneling current, followed by the GaAs/GaAs, and AlGaAs/AlGaAs TJ designs. The AlGaAs/InGaP TJ design can only achieve resistances >5x10{sup -4} {omega}cm{sup 2}.

  14. Composition-dependent structural properties in ScGaN alloy films...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Athens, Ohio 45701 and Institut de Ciencia de Materials de Barcelona-CSIC, Campus ... Michigan 48109-2143 3 ; Institut de Ciencia de Materials de Barcelona-CSIC, Campus ...

  15. Which Road to Travel? | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Which Road to Travel? Which Road to Travel? Posted: July 16, 2013 - 6:06pm There's no question which road (crosswalk) to travel when you park in the North Portal parking lot. Thanks to the recent restriping of the parking lot, the crosswalk and parking spaces are clearly marked. Earlier this year, the Employee-Driven Safety Campaign was created as a way to easily submit safety issues as we continue pursuing Safety for Life and our Voluntary Protection Program focus. Y-12 is a large site, so it

  16. The Road to Hiroshima and Beyond | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    The Road to Hiroshima and Beyond The Road to Hiroshima and Beyond October 20, 2009 The RERF program is not a typical research program since it aims at fostering the health and welfare of the atomic-bomb survivors. A unique nurse's perspective on the RERF and the health of the A-bomb survivors is presented by Dr. Amy Knowles. PDF icon The Road to Hiroshima and Beyond More Documents & Publications Report of the Senior Review Panel on the Review of the Radiation Effects Research Foundation

  17. Microsoft Word - FINAL Contact Record 2012-01 Roads Maintenance

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    RFLMA Contact Record 2012-01 page 1 of 6 ROCKY FLATS SITE REGULATORY CONTACT RECORD Purpose: Soil Disturbance Review Plan-Roads maintenance, including grading the road to the former A-3 Pond to convert the road to two-track vehicle use. Contact Record Approval Date: May 31, 2012 Site Contact(s)/Affiliation(s): Scott Surovchak, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE); Gwen Hooton, DOE; Rick DiSalvo, S.M. Stoller Corporation (Stoller); Kurt Franzen, Stoller; Linda Kaiser, Stoller Regulatory

  18. General Atomics (GA) Fusion News: A New Spin on Understanding...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    General Atomics (GA) Fusion News: A New Spin on Understanding Plasma Confinement American Fusion News Category: General Atomics (GA) Link: General Atomics (GA) Fusion News: A New ...

  19. Intense terahertz emission from molecular beam epitaxy-grown GaAs/GaSb(001)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sadia, Cyril P.; Laganapan, Aleena Maria; Agatha Tumanguil, Mae; Estacio, Elmer; Somintac, Armando; Salvador, Arnel; Que, Christopher T.; Yamamoto, Kohji; Tani, Masahiko

    2012-12-15

    Intense terahertz (THz) electromagnetic wave emission was observed in undoped GaAs thin films deposited on (100) n-GaSb substrates via molecular beam epitaxy. GaAs/n-GaSb heterostructures were found to be viable THz sources having signal amplitude 75% that of bulk p-InAs. The GaAs films were grown by interruption method during the growth initiation and using various metamorphic buffer layers. Reciprocal space maps revealed that the GaAs epilayers are tensile relaxed. Defects at the i-GaAs/n-GaSb interface were confirmed by scanning electron microscope images. Band calculations were performed to infer the depletion region and electric field at the i-GaAs/n-GaSb and the air-GaAs interfaces. However, the resulting band calculations were found to be insufficient to explain the THz emission. The enhanced THz emission is currently attributed to a piezoelectric field induced by incoherent strain and defects.

  20. 2009 Voluntary Protection Programs Participants' Association (VPPPA) Presentation: Follow The Yellow Brick Road to Safety

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2009 Voluntary Protection Programs Participants' Association (VPPPA) Presentation: Follow The Yellow Brick Road to Safety

  1. Analysis Reveals Impact of Road Grade on Vehicle Energy Use ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    with and without road grade for five vehicle models-con- ventional, hybrid, and all-electric midsized cars and conventional and hybrid SUVs. Aggregate results of the study...

  2. 1,"Elm Road Generating Station","Coal","Wisconsin Electric Power...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wisconsin" ,"Plant","Primary energy source","Operating company","Net summer capacity (MW)" 1,"Elm Road Generating Station","Coal","Wisconsin Electric Power Co",1268 2,"Point Beach ...

  3. Predicting and Utilizing the Vehicle's Past and Futuer Road Grade

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Predicted road grade may be used to estimate the power required to propel the vehicle through the upcoming terrain so that the engine controller can deliver the necessary power.

  4. Road to Fuel Savings: GM Technology Ramps Up Engine Efficiency...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    GM Technology Ramps Up Engine Efficiency Road to Fuel Savings: GM Technology Ramps Up ... Lift Control -- that is helping save fuel and lower emissions in the 2014 Chevy Impala. ...

  5. Airport Road, Wyoming: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Airport Road is a census-designated place in Washakie County, Wyoming. It falls under...

  6. Airport Road Addition, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Airport Road Addition is a census-designated place in Brooks County, Texas.1 References ...

  7. Climate Rapid Overview and Decision Support (C-ROADS) Simulator...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Climate Rapid Overview and Decision Support (C-ROADS) Simulator1 Related Tools Gold Standard Program Model CRiSTAL VS Ex Ante Appraisal Carbon-Balance Tool (EX-ACT) ......

  8. The Road to a Sustainable Energy Future | Princeton Plasma Physics...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    31, 2015, 9:30am to 11:00am Science On Saturday MBG Auditorium The Road to a Sustainable Energy Future Professor Emily Carter, Department of Engineering; Director of the Andlinger...

  9. Road Transportable Analytical Laboratory system. Phase 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finger, S.M.; Keith, V.F.; Spertzel, R.O.; De Avila, J.C.; O`Donnell, M.; Vann, R.L.

    1993-09-01

    This developmental effort clearly shows that a Road Transportable Analytical Laboratory System is a worthwhile and achievable goal. The RTAL is designed to fully analyze (radioanalytes, and organic and inorganic chemical analytes) 20 samples per day at the highest levels of quality assurance and quality control. It dramatically reduces the turnaround time for environmental sample analysis from 45 days (at a central commercial laboratory) to 1 day. At the same time each RTAL system will save the DOE over $12 million per year in sample analysis costs compared to the costs at a central commercial laboratory. If RTAL systems were used at the eight largest DOE facilities (at Hanford, Savannah River, Fernald, Oak Ridge, Idaho, Rocky Flats, Los Alamos, and the Nevada Test Site), the annual savings would be $96,589,000. The DOE`s internal study of sample analysis needs projects 130,000 environmental samples requiring analysis in FY 1994, clearly supporting the need for the RTAL system. The cost and time savings achievable with the RTAL system will accelerate and improve the efficiency of cleanup and remediation operations throughout the DOE complex.

  10. On the Road to ANG Vehicles with Increased Driving Ranges

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    On the Road to ANG Vehicles with Increased Driving Ranges On the Road to ANG Vehicles with Increased Driving Ranges Print Thursday, 21 January 2016 16:08 As a cleaner, cheaper, and more globally evenly distributed fuel, natural gas has considerable environmental, economic, and political advantages over petroleum as a source of energy for the transportation sector. But its low energy density at ambient temperature and pressure has posed a severe challenge for onboard fuel storage in cars in the

  11. The road to sustainability (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: The road to sustainability Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The road to sustainability Sustainability is the hottest topic in energy research today, but what does it actually mean? George Crabtree and John Sarrao describe what makes a technology sustainable, and outline the materials-science challenges standing between us and clean, long-lasting energy. Although most people agree that more-sustainable energy technologies are desirable, they often find it harder to

  12. New GaInP/GaAs/GaInAs, Triple-Bandgap, Tandem Solar Cell for High-Efficiency Terrestrial Concentrator Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurtz, S.; Wanlass, M.; Kramer, C.; Young, M.; Geisz, J.; Ward, S.; Duda, A.; Moriarty, T.; Carapella, J.; Ahrenkiel, P.; Emery. K.; Jones, K.; Romero, M.; Kibbler, A.; Olson, J.; Friedman, D.; McMahon, W.; Ptak, A.

    2005-11-01

    GaInP/GaAs/GaInAs three-junction cells are grown in an inverted configuration on GaAs, allowing high quality growth of the lattice matched GaInP and GaAs layers before a grade is used for the 1-eV GaInAs layer. Using this approach an efficiency of 37.9% was demonstrated.

  13. Innovative secondary support systems for gate roads

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barczak, T.; Molinda, G.M.; Zelanko, J.C.

    1996-12-31

    With the development of the shield support, the primary requirement for successful ground control in longwall mining is to provide stable gate road and bleeder entries. Wood cribbing has been the dominant form of secondary and supplemental support. However, the cost and limited availability of timber, along with the poor performance of softwood crib supports, has forced western U.S. mines to explore the utilization of support systems other than conventional wood cribbing. The recent success of cable bolts has engendered much interest from western operators. Eastern U.S. coal operators are also now experimenting with various intrinsic and freestanding alternative support systems that provide effective ground control while reducing material handling costs and injuries. These innovative freestanding support systems include (1) {open_quotes}The Can{close_quotes} support by Burrell Mining Products International, Inc., (2) Hercules and Link-N-Lock wood cribs and Propsetter supports by Strata Products (USA) Inc., (3) Variable Yielding Crib and Power Crib supports by Mountainland Support Systems, (4) the Confined Core Crib developed by Southern Utah Fuels Corporation; and (5) the MEGA prop by MBK Hydraulik. This paper assesses design considerations and compares the performance and application of these alternative secondary support systems. Support performance in the form of load-displacement behavior is compared to conventional wood cribbing. Much of the data was developed through full-scale tests conducted by the U.S. Bureau of Mines (USBM) at the Strategic Structures Testing Laboratory in the unique Mine Roof Simulator load frame at the Pittsburgh Research Center. A summary of current mine experience with these innovative supports is also documented.

  14. InGaAsN/GaAs heterojunction for multi-junction solar cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kurtz, Steven R.; Allerman, Andrew A.; Klem, John F.; Jones, Eric D.

    2001-01-01

    An InGaAsN/GaAs semiconductor p-n heterojunction is disclosed for use in forming a 0.95-1.2 eV bandgap photodetector with application for use in high-efficiency multi-junction solar cells. The InGaAsN/GaAs p-n heterojunction is formed by epitaxially growing on a gallium arsenide (GaAs) or germanium (Ge) substrate an n-type indium gallium arsenide nitride (InGaAsN) layer having a semiconductor alloy composition In.sub.x Ga.sub.1-x As.sub.1-y N.sub.y with 0GaAs layer, with the InGaAsN and GaAs layers being lattice-matched to the substrate. The InGaAsN/GaAs p-n heterojunction can be epitaxially grown by either molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) or metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). The InGaAsN/GaAs p-n heterojunction provides a high open-circuit voltage of up to 0.62 volts and an internal quantum efficiency of >70%.

  15. Magnetism and transport properties of epitaxial Fe-Ga thin films on GaAs(001)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duong Anh Tuan; Shin, Yooleemi; Cho, Sunglae; Dang Duc Dung; Vo Thanh Son

    2012-04-01

    Epitaxial Fe-Ga thin films in disordered bcc {alpha}-Fe crystal structure (A2) have been grown on GaAs(001) by molecular beam epitaxy. The saturated magnetization (M{sub S}) decreased from 1371 to 1105 kA/m with increasing Ga concentration from 10.5 to 24.3 % at room temperature. The lattice parameter increased with the increase in Ga content because of the larger atomic radius of Ga atom than that of Fe. The increase in carrier density with Ga content caused in lower resistivity.

  16. Graphene induced remote surface scattering in graphene/AlGaN/GaN heterostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Xiwen; Li, Dan; Wang, Bobo; Liu, Bin; Chen, Famin; Jin, Guangri; Lu, Yanwu

    2014-10-20

    The mobilities of single-layer graphene combined with AlGaN/GaN heterostructures on two-dimensional electron gases in graphene/AlGaN/GaN double heterojunction are calculated. The impact of electron density in single-layer graphene is also studied. Remote surface roughness (RSR) and remote interfacial charge (RIC) scatterings are introduced into this heterostructure. The mobilities limited by RSR and RIC are an order of magnitude higher than that of interface roughness and misfit dislocation. This study contributes to designing structures for generation of higher electron mobility in graphene/AlGaN/GaN double heterojunction.

  17. Band Structure of Strain-Balanced GaAsBi/GaAsN Super-lattices on GaAs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hwang, J.; Phillips, J. D.

    2011-05-31

    GaAs alloys with dilute content of Bi and N provide a large reduction in band-gap energy with increasing alloy composition. GaAsBi/GaAsN heterojunctions have a type-II band alignment, where superlattices based on these materials offer a wide range for designing effective band-gap energy by varying superlattice period and alloy composition. The miniband structure and effective band gap for strain-balanced GaAsBi/GaAsN superlattices with effective lattice match to GaAs are calculated for alloy compositions up to 5% Bi and N using the kp method. The effective band gap for these superlattices is found to vary between 0.89 and 1.32 eV for period thickness ranging from 10 to 100 . The joint density of states and optical absorption of a 40/40 GaAs0.96Bi0.04/GaAs0.98N0.02 superlattice are reported demonstrating a ground-state transition at 1.005 eV and first excited transition at 1.074 eV. The joint density of states is similar in magnitude to GaAs, while the optical absorption is approximately one order of magnitude lower due to the spatially indirect optical transition in the type-II structure. The GaAsBi/GaAsN system may provide a new material system with lattice match to GaAs in a spectral range of high importance for optoelectronic devices including solar cells, photodetectors, and light emitters.

  18. Lowering On-Road Fuel Use: A Component Approach

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lowering On-Road Fuel Use: A Component Approach Alan Meier Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory akmeier@lbl.gov What is the Component Approach? zAddresses two aspects: ‹"Off-test" energy use ‹Energy impacts of aftermarket and replacement products Some Aspects of a Car's Fuel Consumption are Not Captured in Tests z Dynamometer tests Fuel Consumption Not and adjustments Fully Captured in Fuel cannot simulate all Economy Test aspects of on-road performance z Actual consumption depends

  19. On the Road with Fuel Saving Tools | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    On the Road with Fuel Saving Tools On the Road with Fuel Saving Tools May 23, 2014 - 11:07am Addthis Driving efficiently can help you save money on gas this summer.| Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/HelpingHandPhotos Driving efficiently can help you save money on gas this summer.| Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/HelpingHandPhotos Shannon Shea Clean Cities Communications Manager What does this mean for me? Driving the speed limit can save you money. Every five miles you drive above 50

  20. Road to the hydrogen highway | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Road to the hydrogen highway Road to the hydrogen highway Posted: July 18, 2012 - 9:49am | Y-12 Report | Volume 9, Issue 1 | 2012 Photo used with permission of Toyota Motor Corporation. Toyota plans to sell hydrogen-powered cars by 2015. To reach that goal, the world's largest automaker sought out Y-12 to analyze the science behind making a hydrogen car work efficiently. Hydrogen storage material, the fuel component for a hydrogen vehicle, is key to efficiency. Toyota developed a metal hydride,

  1. INFOGRAPHIC: The Road to Fuel Efficiency | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    INFOGRAPHIC: The Road to Fuel Efficiency INFOGRAPHIC: The Road to Fuel Efficiency November 27, 2012 - 11:01am Addthis This infographic takes a look at fuel economy standards and how recent improvements in these standards will benefit consumers and the U.S. economy. | Infographic by <a href="/node/379579">Sarah Gerrity</a>. This infographic takes a look at fuel economy standards and how recent improvements in these standards will benefit consumers and the U.S. economy. |

  2. Comparison of Different Load Road Implementation Strategies on Fuel Economy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of USPS Step Vans | Department of Energy An alternative form of measuring road loads, instead of using a chassis dynamometer and a method described in 40 CFR section 86.1229-85, was conducted on on-road coastdowns, and regression analysis was used to determine the characteristics of the two U.S. Postal Service step vans, one of which was a hybrid model PDF icon deer09_carder.pdf More Documents & Publications Electric Drive and Advanced Battery and Components Testbed (EDAB) AVTA:

  3. US SoAtl GA Site Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    GA Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US SoAtl GA Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 4,000 8,000 12,000 16,000 US SoAtl GA Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $300 $600 $900 $1,200 $1,500 $1,800 US SoAtl GA Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Site energy consumption (89.5 million Btu) and energy expenditures per household ($2,067) in Georgia are similar to the U.S. household averages. * Per

  4. AlGaAsSb/GaSb Distributed Bragg Reflectors Grown by Organometallic Vapor Phase Epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C.A. Wang; C.J. Vineis; D.R. Calawa

    2002-02-13

    The first AlGaAsSb/GaSb quarter-wave distributed Bragg reflectors grown by metallic vapor phase epitaxy are reported. The peak reflectance is 96% for a 10-period structure.

  5. Degradation mechanisms of 2 MeV proton irradiated AlGaN/GaN HEMTs...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    irradiated AlGaNGaN HEMTs This content will become publicly available on August 26, 2016 Title: Degradation mechanisms of 2 MeV proton irradiated AlGaNGaN HEMTs Authors: ...

  6. Influence of Barrier Design on Current Collapse in High Voltage AlGaN/GaN

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    HEMTs. (Conference) | SciTech Connect Influence of Barrier Design on Current Collapse in High Voltage AlGaN/GaN HEMTs. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Influence of Barrier Design on Current Collapse in High Voltage AlGaN/GaN HEMTs. Abstract not provided. Authors: Biedermann, Laura Butler ; Kaplar, Robert James ; Marinella, Matthew ; Zavadil, Kevin Robert ; Atcitty, Stanley ; Sun, Min ; Palacios, Tomas Publication Date: 2012-10-01 OSTI Identifier: 1111316 Report Number(s):

  7. Influence of Barrier Design on Current Collapse in High Voltage AlGaN/GaN

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    HEMTs. (Conference) | SciTech Connect Conference: Influence of Barrier Design on Current Collapse in High Voltage AlGaN/GaN HEMTs. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Influence of Barrier Design on Current Collapse in High Voltage AlGaN/GaN HEMTs. Abstract not provided. Authors: DasGupta, Sandeepan ; Biedermann, Laura Butler ; Kaplar, Robert ; Marinella, Matthew ; Zavadil, Kevin Robert ; Atcitty, Stanley ; Sun, Min ; Palacios, Tomas Publication Date: 2013-02-01 OSTI Identifier:

  8. Road Map for Development of Crystal-Tolerant High Level Waste...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Road Map for Development of Crystal-Tolerant High Level Waste Glasses Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Road Map for Development of Crystal-Tolerant High Level Waste ...

  9. GaInP/GaAs/GaInAs Monolithic Tandem Cells for High-Performance Solar Concentrators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wanlass, M. W.; Ahrenkiel, S. P.; Albin, D. S.; Carapella, J. J.; Duda, A.; Emery, K.; Geisz, J. F.; Jones, K.; Kurtz, S.; Moriarty, T.; Romero, M. J.

    2005-08-01

    We present a new approach for ultra-high-performance tandem solar cells that involves inverted epitaxial growth and ultra-thin device processing. The additional degree of freedom afforded by the inverted design allows the monolithic integration of high-, and medium-bandgap, lattice-matched (LM) subcell materials with lower-bandgap, lattice-mismatched (LMM) materials in a tandem structure through the use of transparent compositionally graded layers. The current work concerns an inverted, series-connected, triple-bandgap, GaInP (LM, 1.87 eV)/GaAs (LM, 1.42 eV)/GaInAs (LMM, {approx}1 eV) device structure grown on a GaAs substrate. Ultra-thin tandem devices are fabricated by mounting the epiwafers to pre-metallized Si wafer handles and selectively removing the parent GaAs substrate. The resulting handle-mounted, ultra-thin tandem cells have a number of important advantages, including improved performance and potential reclamation/reuse of the parent substrate for epitaxial growth. Additionally, realistic performance modeling calculations suggest that terrestrial concentrator efficiencies in the range of 40-45% are possible with this new tandem cell approach. A laboratory-scale (0.24 cm2), prototype GaInP/GaAs/GaInAs tandem cell with a terrestrial concentrator efficiency of 37.9% at a low concentration ratio (10.1 suns) is described, which surpasses the previous world efficiency record of 37.3%.

  10. Application of SCR and PM-METALIT for Non-Road Applications: SCRi |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Department of Energy Advantages of this new application of SCR and PM-METALIT for non-road applications include compact design, robustness, low backpressure, and cost PDF icon deer09_pfahl.pdf More Documents & Publications Ensuring the Availability and Reliability of Urea Dosing For On-Road and Non-Road Cleaning Up Non-Road Diesel Vehicles: A Public Health Imperative Nonroad SCR-Urea Study

  11. Road Transportable Analytical Laboratory (RTAL) system: Volume I. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finger, S.M.; De Avila, J.C.; Keith, V.F.

    1996-08-01

    This report describes a portable laboratory system for the analysis of soils, ground water, and surface waters for the detection and quantification of hazardous materials, organics, and radioactive contaminants. The goal of the Road Transportable Analytical Laboratory (RTAL) is a sample throughput of 20 samples per day, providing a full range of analysis on each sample within 16 hours of preparation with high accuracy.

  12. HCEI Road Map and Introduction and Overview 2011

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This road map is a summary of the 2011 key goals and strategies of the Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative, which was founded based on a Memorandum of Understanding between the State of Hawaii and the U.S. Department of Energy in 2008.

  13. Road to Recovery: Bringing Recovery to Small Town America

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Nettamo, Paivi

    2012-06-14

    The Recovery Act hits the road to reach out to surrounding towns of the Savannah River Site that are struggling with soaring unemployment rates. This project helps recruit thousands of people to new jobs in environmental cleanup at the Savannah River Site.

  14. Story Road Landfill Solar Site Evaluation: San Jose

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report describes the findings of a solar site evaluation conducted at the Story Road Landfill (Site) in the City of San Jose, California (City). This evaluation was conducted as part of a larger study to assess solar potential at multiple public facilities within the City.

  15. Metal-interconnection-free integration of InGaN/GaN light emitting diodes with AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Chao; Cai, Yuefei; Liu, Zhaojun; Ma, Jun; Lau, Kei May

    2015-05-04

    We report a metal-interconnection-free integration scheme for InGaN/GaN light emitting diodes (LEDs) and AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) by combining selective epi removal (SER) and selective epitaxial growth (SEG) techniques. SER of HEMT epi was carried out first to expose the bottom unintentionally doped GaN buffer and the sidewall GaN channel. A LED structure was regrown in the SER region with the bottom n-type GaN layer (n-electrode of the LED) connected to the HEMTs laterally, enabling monolithic integration of the HEMTs and LEDs (HEMT-LED) without metal-interconnection. In addition to saving substrate real estate, minimal interface resistance between the regrown n-type GaN and the HEMT channel is a significant improvement over metal-interconnection. Furthermore, excellent off-state leakage characteristics of the driving transistor can also be guaranteed in such an integration scheme.

  16. A hole modulator for InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Zi-Hui; Kyaw, Zabu; Liu, Wei; Ji, Yun; Wang, Liancheng; Tan, Swee Tiam; Sun, Xiao Wei E-mail: VOLKAN@stanfordalumni.org; Demir, Hilmi Volkan E-mail: VOLKAN@stanfordalumni.org

    2015-02-09

    The low p-type doping efficiency of the p-GaN layer has severely limited the performance of InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs) due to the ineffective hole injection into the InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well (MQW) active region. The essence of improving the hole injection efficiency is to increase the hole concentration in the p-GaN layer. Therefore, in this work, we have proposed a hole modulator and studied it both theoretically and experimentally. In the hole modulator, the holes in a remote p-type doped layer are depleted by the built-in electric field and stored in the p-GaN layer. By this means, the overall hole concentration in the p-GaN layer can be enhanced. Furthermore, the hole modulator is adopted in the InGaN/GaN LEDs, which reduces the effective valance band barrier height for the p-type electron blocking layer from ?332?meV to ?294?meV at 80?A/cm{sup 2} and demonstrates an improved optical performance, thanks to the increased hole concentration in the p-GaN layer and thus the improved hole injection into the MQWs.

  17. AlGaN/GaN heterostructure prepared on a Si (110) substrate via pulsed sputtering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watanabe, T.; Ohta, J.; Kondo, T.; Ohashi, M.; Ueno, K.; Kobayashi, A.; Fujioka, H.

    2014-05-05

    GaN films were grown on Si (110) substrates using a low-temperature growth technique based on pulsed sputtering. Reduction of the growth temperature suppressed the strain in the GaN films, leading to an increase in the critical thickness for crack formation. In addition, an AlGaN/GaN heterostructure with a flat heterointerface was prepared using this technique. Furthermore, the existence of a two dimensional electron gas at the heterointerface with a mobility of 1360 cm{sup 2}/Vs and a sheet carrier density of 1.3??10{sup 13}?cm{sup ?2} was confirmed. Finally, the use of the AlGaN/GaN heterostructure in a high electron mobility transistor was demonstrated. These results indicate that low-temperature growth via pulsed sputtering is quite promising for the fabrication of GaN-based electronic devices.

  18. Buckle up for the #LabsRoadShow | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Buckle up for the #LabsRoadShow Buckle up for the #LabsRoadShow June 29, 2015 - 11:42am Addthis Buckle up for the #LabsRoadShow Pat Adams Pat Adams Digital Content Specialist, Office of Public Affairs How can I participate? Follow along all week on social media with #LabsRoadShow. Learn more about the National Laboratories. Tune in next month for Stop Two: Lab Contributions With the Fourth of July right around the corner, what's more American than taking a road trip? Join us as we embark on the

  19. Carbon Cycle Engineering | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Cycle Engineering Jump to: navigation, search Name: Carbon Cycle Engineering Address: 13725 Dutch Creek Road Place: Athens, Ohio Zip: 45701 Sector: Biofuels, Biomass, Efficiency,...

  20. EIS-0476: Vogtle Electric Generating Plant in Burke County, GA...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    6: Vogtle Electric Generating Plant in Burke County, GA EIS-0476: Vogtle Electric Generating Plant in Burke County, GA February 8, 2012 EIS-0476: Final Environmental Impact ...

  1. Oxidation of ultrathin GaSe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas Edwin Beechem; McDonald, Anthony E.; Ohta, Taisuke; Howell, Stephen W.; Kalugin, Nikolai G.; Kowalski, Brian M.; Brumbach, Michael T.; Spataru, Catalin D.; Pask, Jesse A.

    2015-10-26

    Oxidation of exfoliated gallium selenide (GaSe) is investigated through Raman, photoluminescence, Auger, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies. Photoluminescence and Raman intensity reductions associated with spectral features of GaSe are shown to coincide with the emergence of signatures emanating from the by-products of the oxidation reaction, namely, Ga2Se3 and amorphous Se. Furthermore, photoinduced oxidation is initiated over a portion of a flake highlighting the potential for laser based patterning of two-dimensional heterostructures via selective oxidation.

  2. Oxidation of ultrathin GaSe

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Thomas Edwin Beechem; McDonald, Anthony E.; Ohta, Taisuke; Howell, Stephen W.; Kalugin, Nikolai G.; Kowalski, Brian M.; Brumbach, Michael T.; Spataru, Catalin D.; Pask, Jesse A.

    2015-10-26

    Oxidation of exfoliated gallium selenide (GaSe) is investigated through Raman, photoluminescence, Auger, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies. Photoluminescence and Raman intensity reductions associated with spectral features of GaSe are shown to coincide with the emergence of signatures emanating from the by-products of the oxidation reaction, namely, Ga2Se3 and amorphous Se. Furthermore, photoinduced oxidation is initiated over a portion of a flake highlighting the potential for laser based patterning of two-dimensional heterostructures via selective oxidation.

  3. Highly uniform, multi-stacked InGaAs/GaAs quantum dots embedded in a GaAs nanowire

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tatebayashi, J. Ota, Y.; Ishida, S.; Nishioka, M.; Iwamoto, S.; Arakawa, Y.

    2014-09-08

    We demonstrate a highly uniform, dense stack of In{sub 0.22}Ga{sub 0.78}As/GaAs quantum dot (QD) structures in a single GaAs nanowire (NW). The size (and hence emission energy) of individual QD is tuned by careful control of the growth conditions based on a diffusion model of morphological evolution of NWs and optical characterization. By carefully tailoring the emission energies of individual QD, dot-to-dot inhomogeneous broadening of QD stacks in a single NW can be as narrow as 9.3?meV. This method provides huge advantages over traditional QD stack using a strain-induced Stranski-Krastanow growth scheme. We show that it is possible to fabricate up to 200 uniform QDs in single GaAs NWs using this growth technique without degradation of the photoluminescence intensity.

  4. Vegetation Loblolly Pine N Site Boundary N Streams Roads

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Loblolly Pine N Site Boundary N Streams Roads [2J Other Set-Asides 6£] Hy~ric Soils < ____ n ____ ** __ ._ ** _______ 300 0 - L " " " " , 300 781 .3a 600 Meters Soils Soil Series and Phase _TrB Figure 4-1. Plant CO/lllllllllties and soils associated with the Loblolly Pine Stand Set-Aside Area. sc 4-5 Set-Aside 4: Loblolly Pine Stand

  5. Synthesis, morphology and optical properties of GaN and AlGaN semiconductor nanostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuppulingam, B. Singh, Shubra Baskar, K.

    2014-04-24

    Hexagonal Gallium Nitride (GaN) and Aluminum Gallium Nitride (AlGaN) nanoparticles were synthesized by sol-gel method using Ethylene Diamine Tetra Acetic acid (EDTA) complex route. Powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) analysis confirms the hexagonal wurtzite structure of GaN and Al{sub 0.25}Ga{sub 0.75}N nanoparticles. Surface morphology and elemental analysis were carried out by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). The room temperature Photoluminescence (PL) study shows the near band edge emission for GaN at 3.35 eV and at 3.59 eV for AlGaN nanoparticles. The Aluminum (Al) composition of 20% has been obtained from PL emission around 345 nm.

  6. High-performance InGaP/GaAs pnp {delta}-doped heterojunction bipolar transistor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsai, J.-H. Chiu, S.-Y.; Lour, W.-S.; Guo, D.-F.

    2009-07-15

    In this article, a novel InGaP/GaAs pnp {delta}-doped heterojunction bipolar transistor is first demonstrated. Though the valence band discontinuity at InGaP/GaAs heterojunction is relatively large, the addition of a {delta}-doped sheet between two spacer layers at the emitter-base (E-B) junction effectively eliminates the potential spike and increases the confined barrier for electrons, simultaneously. Experimentally, a high current gain of 25 and a relatively low E-B offset voltage of 60 mV are achieved. The offset voltage is much smaller than the conventional InGaP/GaAs pnp HBT. The proposed device could be used for linear amplifiers and low-power complementary integrated circuit applications.

  7. Princeton Plasma Physics Lab - General Atomics (GA)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    general-atomics-ga General Atomics en The Scorpion's Strategy: "Catch and Subdue" http:www.pppl.govnode1132

  8. Simplified 2DEG carrier concentration model for composite barrier AlGaN/GaN HEMT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Das, Palash Biswas, Dhrubes

    2014-04-24

    The self consistent solution of Schrodinger and Poisson equations is used along with the total charge depletion model and applied with a novel approach of composite AlGaN barrier based HEMT heterostructure. The solution leaded to a completely new analytical model for Fermi energy level vs. 2DEG carrier concentration. This was eventually used to demonstrate a new analytical model for the temperature dependent 2DEG carrier concentration in AlGaN/GaN HEMT.

  9. GaTe semiconductor for radiation detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Payne, Stephen A.; Burger, Arnold; Mandal, Krishna C.

    2009-06-23

    GaTe semiconductor is used as a room-temperature radiation detector. GaTe has useful properties for radiation detectors: ideal bandgap, favorable mobilities, low melting point (no evaporation), non-hygroscopic nature, and availability of high-purity starting materials. The detector can be used, e.g., for detection of illicit nuclear weapons and radiological dispersed devices at ports of entry, in cities, and off shore and for determination of medical isotopes present in a patient.

  10. Development and Industrialization of InGaN/GaN LEDs on Patterned...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PDF icon 2015 BTO Peer Review Presentation - Development and Industrialization of InGaNGaN LEDs on Patterned Sapphire Substrates for Low Cost Emitter Architecture More Documents & ...

  11. Cultural Resource Investigations for a Multipurpose Haul Road on the Idaho National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brenda R. Pace; Cameron Brizzee; Hollie Gilbert; Clayton Marler; Julie Braun Williams

    2010-08-01

    The U. S. Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office is considering options for construction of a multipurpose haul road to transport materials and wastes between the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) and other Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site facilities. The proposed road will be closed to the public and designed for limited year-round use. Two primary options are under consideration: a new route south of the existing T-25 power line road and an upgrade to road T-24. In the Spring of 2010, archaeological field surveys and initial coordination and field reconnaissance with representatives from the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes were completed to identify any resources that may be adversely affected by the proposed road construction and to develop recommendations to protect any listed or eligible for listing on the National Register of Historic Places. The investigations showed that 24 archaeological resources and one historic marker are located in the area of potential effects for road construction and operation south of the T-25 powerline road and 27archaeological resources are located in the area of potential effects for road construction and operation along road T-24. Generalized tribal concerns regarding protection of natural resources were also documented in both road corridors. This report outlines recommendations for additional investigations and protective measures that can be implemented to minimize adverse impacts to the identified resources.

  12. Accelerated aging of GaAs concentrator solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregory, P.E.

    1982-04-01

    An accelerated aging study of AlGaAs/GaAs solar cells has been completed. The purpose of the study was to identify the possible degradation mechanisms of AlGaAs/GaAs solar cells in terrestrial applications. Thermal storage tests and accelerated AlGaAs corrosion studies were performed to provide an experimental basis for a statistical analysis of the estimated lifetime. Results of this study suggest that a properly designed and fabricated AlGaAs/GaAs solar cell can be mechanically rugged and environmentally stable with projected lifetimes exceeding 100 years.

  13. InGaN/GaN tunnel junctions for hole injection in GaN light emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krishnamoorthy, Sriram E-mail: rajan@ece.osu.edu; Akyol, Fatih; Rajan, Siddharth E-mail: rajan@ece.osu.edu

    2014-10-06

    InGaN/GaN tunnel junction contacts were grown using plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) on top of a metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD)-grown InGaN/GaN blue (450?nm) light emitting diode. A voltage drop of 5.3?V at 100?mA, forward resistance of 2 10{sup ?2} ? cm{sup 2}, and a higher light output power compared to the reference light emitting diodes (LED) with semi-transparent p-contacts were measured in the tunnel junction LED (TJLED). A forward resistance of 5??10{sup ?4} ? cm{sup 2} was measured in a GaN PN junction with the identical tunnel junction contact as the TJLED, grown completely by MBE. The depletion region due to the impurities at the regrowth interface between the MBE tunnel junction and the MOCVD-grown LED was hence found to limit the forward resistance measured in the TJLED.

  14. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT FOR THE MULTIPURPOSE HAUL ROAD

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT FOR THE MULTIPURPOSE HAUL ROAD WITHIN THE IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY SITE (EM-FMDP-I0-068) Agency: U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Action: Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) Summary: The DOE prepared a Draft Environmental Assessment (EA) for the proposed "Environmental Assessment for the Multipurpose Haul Road Within the Idaho National Laboratory Site" (DOE/EA-I772). The proposed action consists of constructing a road for

  15. GaP ring-like nanostructures on GaAs (100) with In{sub 0.15}Ga{sub 0.85}As compensation layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prongjit, Patchareewan Pankaow, Naraporn Boonpeng, Poonyasiri Thainoi, Supachok Panyakeow, Somsak Ratanathammaphan, Somchai

    2013-12-04

    We present the fabrication of GaP ring-like nanostructures on GaAs (100) substrates with inserted In{sub 0.15}Ga{sub 0.85}As compensation layers. The samples are grown by droplet epitaxy using solid-source molecular beam epitaxy. The dependency of nanostructural and optical properties of GaP nanostructures on In{sub 0.15}Ga{sub 0.85}As layer thickness is investigated by ex-situ atomic force microscope (AFM) and photoluminescence (PL). It is found that the characteristics of GaP ring-like structures on GaAs strongly depend on the In{sub 0.15}Ga{sub 0.85}As layer thickness.

  16. Green cubic GaInN/GaN light-emitting diode on microstructured silicon (100)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stark, Christoph J. M.; Detchprohm, Theeradetch; Wetzel, Christian, E-mail: wetzel@ieee.org [Department of Physics, Applied Physics, and Astronomy, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States) [Department of Physics, Applied Physics, and Astronomy, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States); Future Chips Constellation, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 110 8th Street, Troy, New York 12180 (United States); Lee, S. C.; Brueck, S. R. J. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Center for High Technology Materials, University of New Mexico, 1313 Goddard SE, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87106 (United States)] [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Center for High Technology Materials, University of New Mexico, 1313 Goddard SE, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87106 (United States); Jiang, Y.-B. [Department of Earth and Planetary Science, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 (United States)] [Department of Earth and Planetary Science, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 (United States)

    2013-12-02

    GaInN/GaN light-emitting diodes free of piezoelectric polarization were prepared on standard electronic-grade Si(100) substrates. Micro-stripes of GaN and GaInN/GaN quantum wells in the cubic crystal structure were grown on intersecting (111) planes of microscale V-grooved Si in metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy, covering over 50% of the wafer surface area. Crystal phases were identified in electron back-scattering diffraction. A cross-sectional analysis reveals a cubic structure virtually free of line defects. Electroluminescence over 20 to 100??A is found fixed at 487?nm (peak), 516?nm (dominant). Such structures therefore should allow higher efficiency, wavelength-stable light emitters throughout the visible spectrum.

  17. Lattice-matched epitaxial GaInAsSb/GaSb thermophotovoltaic devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, C.A.; Choi, H.K.; Turner, G.W.; Spears, D.L.; Manfra, M.J.; Charache, G.W.

    1997-05-01

    The materials development of Ga{sub 1{minus}x}In{sub x}As{sub y}Sb{sub 1{minus}y} alloys for lattice-matched thermophotovoltaic (TPV) devices is reported. Epilayers with cutoff wavelength 2--2.4 {micro}m at room temperature and lattice-matched to GaSb substrates were grown by both low-pressure organometallic vapor phase epitaxy and molecular beam epitaxy. These layers exhibit high optical and structural quality. For demonstrating lattice-matched thermophotovoltaic devices, p- and n-type doping studies were performed. Several TPV device structures were investigated, with variations in the base/emitter thicknesses and the incorporation of a high bandgap GaSb or AlGaAsSb window layer. Significant improvement in the external quantum efficiency is observed for devices with an AlGaAsSb window layer compared to those without one.

  18. The #LabsRoadShow: National Lab Contributions | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The #LabsRoadShow: National Lab Contributions The #LabsRoadShow: National Lab Contributions July 27, 2015 - 1:03am Addthis The #LabsRoadShow: National Lab Contributions Pat Adams Pat Adams Digital Content Specialist, Office of Public Affairs How can I participate? Follow along all week on social media with #LabsRoadShow. Meet the National Labs. Join us on Friday, 7/31 at 1p.m. ET on Facebook for a Q&A on particle physics. Last month you had the chance to meet the National Labs. Now it's time

  19. Hit the Road: Applying Lessons from National Campaigns to a Local Context (201)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Better Buildings Residential Network Peer Exchange Call Series: Hit the Road: Applying Lessons from National Campaigns to a Local Context (201), call slides and discussion summary.

  20. Online Planning Tools Make Road Trips a Snap | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Online Planning Tools Make Road Trips a Snap Online Planning Tools Make Road Trips a Snap May 18, 2015 - 11:42pm Addthis Use planning tools from FuelEconomy.gov to save fuel and money on your summer road trips. | Photo courtesy of Pat Corkery/NREL. Use planning tools from FuelEconomy.gov to save fuel and money on your summer road trips. | Photo courtesy of Pat Corkery/NREL. Shannon Brescher Shea Communications Manager, Clean Cities Program What does this mean for me? Spend less money to fuel

  1. GIZ Sourcebook Module 5b: Urban Road Safety | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    with the consequential social, economic, and health burdens imposing heavy constraints on sustainable development. This module focuses on addressing local road safety, creating a...

  2. Archaeological investigations on the Buckboard Mesa Road Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amick, D.S.; Henton, G.H.; Pippin, L.C.

    1991-10-01

    In 1986, the Desert Research Institute (DRI) conducted an archaeological reconnaissance of a new alignment for the Buckboard Mesa Road on the Nevada Test Site for the Department of Energy (DOE). During this reconnaissance, several archaeological sites of National Register quality were discovered and recorded including a large quarry, site 26Ny4892, and a smaller lithic scatter, site 26Ny4894. Analysis of the debitage at 26Ny4892 indicates that this area was used primarily as a quarry for relatively small cobbles of obsidian found in the alluvium. Lithic reduction techniques used here are designed for efficiently reducing small pieces of toolstone and are oriented towards producing flake blanks from small cores and bifacially reducing exhausted cores. Projectile point cross references indicate that the area has seen at least casual use for about 10,000 years and more sustained use for the last 3,000 years. Initial obsidian hydration measurements indicate sustained use of the quarry for about the last 3,000 years although the loci of activities appear to change over time. Based on this study, the DRI recommends that quarrying activities in the area of 26Ny4892 are sufficiently sampled and that additional investigations into that aspect of prehistoric activity in the area are not necessary. This does not apply to other aspects of prehistoric use. DRI recommends that preconstruction surveys continue to identify nonquarrying, prehistoric utilization of the area. With the increased traffic on the Buckboard Mesa Road, there is a greater potential for vandalism to sites of National Register-quality located near the road. The DRI recommends that during the orientation briefing the workers at the Test Site be educated about the importance of cultural resources and the need for their protection. 202 refs., 41 figs., 52 tabs.

  3. Innovative technology summary report: Road Transportable Analytical Laboratory (RTAL)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-10-01

    The Road Transportable Analytical Laboratory (RTAL) has been used in support of US Department of Energy (DOE) site and waste characterization and remediation planning at Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) and is being considered for implementation at other DOE sites, including the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant. The RTAL laboratory system consists of a set of individual laboratory modules deployable independently or as an interconnected group to meet each DOE site`s specific analysis needs. The prototype RTAL, deployed at FEMP Operable Unit 1 Waste Pits, has been designed to be synergistic with existing analytical laboratory capabilities, thereby reducing the occurrence of unplanned rush samples that are disruptive to efficient laboratory operations.

  4. COLLOQUIUM: Living with Climate Change: The Road from Paris | Princeton

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Plasma Physics Lab April 20, 2016, 4:15pm to 5:30pm Colloquia MBG Auditorium (284 cap.) COLLOQUIUM: Living with Climate Change: The Road from Paris Dr. Dale Jamieson New York University Presentation: File WC20APR2016_DJamieson.pptx The twenty-first Conference of the Parties (COP21) of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) in Paris ended with an agreement that some call "the world's greatest diplomatic success" while others insist it is "too

  5. GaAs photoconductive semiconductor switch

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Loubriel, G.M.; Baca, A.G.; Zutavern, F.J.

    1998-09-08

    A high gain, optically triggered, photoconductive semiconductor switch (PCSS) implemented in GaAs as a reverse-biased pin structure with a passivation layer above the intrinsic GaAs substrate in the gap between the two electrodes of the device is disclosed. The reverse-biased configuration in combination with the addition of the passivation layer greatly reduces surface current leakage that has been a problem for prior PCSS devices and enables employment of the much less expensive and more reliable DC charging systems instead of the pulsed charging systems that needed to be used with prior PCSS devices. 5 figs.

  6. GaN: Defect and Device Issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pearton, S.J.; Ren, F.; Shul, R.J.; Zolper, J.C.

    1998-11-09

    The role of extended and point defects, and key impurities such as C, O and H, on the electrical and optical properties of GaN is reviewed. Recent progress in the development of high reliability contacts, thermal processing, dry and wet etching techniques, implantation doping and isolation and gate insulator technology is detailed. Finally, the performance of GaN-based electronic and photonic devices such as field effect transistors, UV detectors, laser diodes and light-emitting diodes is covered, along with the influence of process-induced or grown-in defects and impurities on the device physics.

  7. GaAs photoconductive semiconductor switch

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Loubriel, Guillermo M. (Sandia Park, NM); Baca, Albert G. (Albuquerque, NM); Zutavern, Fred J. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1998-01-01

    A high gain, optically triggered, photoconductive semiconductor switch (PCSS) implemented in GaAs as a reverse-biased pin structure with a passivation layer above the intrinsic GaAs substrate in the gap between the two electrodes of the device. The reverse-biased configuration in combination with the addition of the passivation layer greatly reduces surface current leakage that has been a problem for prior PCSS devices and enables employment of the much less expensive and more reliable DC charging systems instead of the pulsed charging systems that needed to be used with prior PCSS devices.

  8. Enhanced thermoelectric transport in modulation-doped GaN/AlGaN core/shell nanowires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song, Erdong; Li, Qiming; Swartzentruber, Brian; Pan, Wei; Wang, George T.; Martinez, Julio A.

    2015-11-25

    The thermoelectric properties of unintentionally n-doped core GaN/AlGaN core/shell N-face nanowires are reported. We found that the temperature dependence of the electrical conductivity is consistent with thermally activated carriers with two distinctive donor energies. The Seebeck coefficient of GaN/AlGaN nanowires is more than twice as large as that for the GaN nanowires alone. However, an outer layer of GaN deposited onto the GaN/AlGaN core/shell nanowires decreases the Seebeck coefficient at room temperature, while the temperature dependence of the electrical conductivity remains the same. We attribute these observations to the formation of an electron gas channel within the heavily-doped GaN core of the GaN/AlGaN nanowires. The room-temperature thermoelectric power factor for the GaN/AlGaN nanowires can be four times higher than the GaN nanowires. As a result, selective doping in bandgap engineered core/shell nanowires is proposed for enhancing the thermoelectric power.

  9. Enhanced thermoelectric transport in modulation-doped GaN/AlGaN core/shell nanowires

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Song, Erdong; Li, Qiming; Swartzentruber, Brian; Pan, Wei; Wang, George T.; Martinez, Julio A.

    2015-11-25

    The thermoelectric properties of unintentionally n-doped core GaN/AlGaN core/shell N-face nanowires are reported. We found that the temperature dependence of the electrical conductivity is consistent with thermally activated carriers with two distinctive donor energies. The Seebeck coefficient of GaN/AlGaN nanowires is more than twice as large as that for the GaN nanowires alone. However, an outer layer of GaN deposited onto the GaN/AlGaN core/shell nanowires decreases the Seebeck coefficient at room temperature, while the temperature dependence of the electrical conductivity remains the same. We attribute these observations to the formation of an electron gas channel within the heavily-doped GaN coremore » of the GaN/AlGaN nanowires. The room-temperature thermoelectric power factor for the GaN/AlGaN nanowires can be four times higher than the GaN nanowires. As a result, selective doping in bandgap engineered core/shell nanowires is proposed for enhancing the thermoelectric power.« less

  10. Structural and optical properties of InGaNGaN nanowire heterostructures grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Limbach, F.; Gotschke, T.; Stoica, T.; Calarco, R.; Sutter, E.; Ciston, J.; Cusco, R.; Artus, L.; Kremling, S.; Ho?fling, S.; et al

    2011-01-01

    InGaN/GaN nanowire (NW) heterostructures grown by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy were studied in comparison to their GaN and InGaN counterparts. The InGaN/GaN heterostructure NWs are composed of a GaN NW, a thin InGaN shell, and a multifaceted InGaN cap wrapping the top part of the GaN NW. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) images taken from different parts of a InGaN/GaN NW show a wurtzite structure of the GaN core and the epitaxial InGaN shell around it, while additional crystallographic domains are observed whithin the InGaN cap region. Large changes in the lattice parameter along the wire, from pure GaNmoreto higher In concentration demonstrate the successful growth of a complex InGaN/GaN NW heterostructure. Photoluminescence (PL) spectra of these heterostructure NW ensembles show rather broad and intense emission peak at 2.1 eV. However, ?-PL spectra measured on single NWs reveal a reduced broadening of the visible luminescence. The analysis of the longitudinal optical phonon Raman peak position and its shape reveal a variation in the In content between 20% and 30%, in agreement with the values estimated by PL and HRTEM investigations. The reported studies are important for understanding of the growth and properties of NW heterostructures suitable for applications in optoelectronics and photovoltaics.less

  11. Structural and optical properties of InGaN--GaN nanowire heterostructures grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Limbach, F.; Gotschke, T.; Stoica, T.; Calarco, R.; Sutter, E.; Ciston, J.; Cusco, R.; Artus, L.; Kremling, S.; Hofling, S.; et al

    2011-01-01

    InGaN/GaN nanowire (NW) heterostructures grown by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy were studied in comparison to their GaN and InGaN counterparts. The InGaN/GaN heterostructure NWs are composed of a GaN NW, a thin InGaN shell, and a multifaceted InGaN cap wrapping the top part of the GaN NW. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) images taken from different parts of a InGaN/GaN NW show a wurtzite structure of the GaN core and the epitaxial InGaN shell around it, while additional crystallographic domains are observed whithin the InGaN cap region. Large changes in the lattice parameter along the wire, from pure GaNmore » to higher In concentration demonstrate the successful growth of a complex InGaN/GaN NW heterostructure. Photoluminescence (PL) spectra of these heterostructure NW ensembles show rather broad and intense emission peak at 2.1 eV. However, μ-PL spectra measured on single NWs reveal a reduced broadening of the visible luminescence. The analysis of the longitudinal optical phonon Raman peak position and its shape reveal a variation in the In content between 20% and 30%, in agreement with the values estimated by PL and HRTEM investigations. The reported studies are important for understanding of the growth and properties of NW heterostructures suitable for applications in optoelectronics and photovoltaics.« less

  12. Structural and optical properties of InGaN--GaN nanowire heterostructures grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Limbach, F.; Gotschke, T.; Stoica, T.; Calarco, R.; Sutter, E.; Ciston, J.; Cusco, R.; Artus, L.; Kremling, S.; Hofling, S.; Worschech, L.; Grutzmacher, D.

    2011-01-01

    InGaN/GaN nanowire (NW) heterostructures grown by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy were studied in comparison to their GaN and InGaN counterparts. The InGaN/GaN heterostructure NWs are composed of a GaN NW, a thin InGaN shell, and a multifaceted InGaN cap wrapping the top part of the GaN NW. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) images taken from different parts of a InGaN/GaN NW show a wurtzite structure of the GaN core and the epitaxial InGaN shell around it, while additional crystallographic domains are observed whithin the InGaN cap region. Large changes in the lattice parameter along the wire, from pure GaN to higher In concentration demonstrate the successful growth of a complex InGaN/GaN NW heterostructure. Photoluminescence (PL) spectra of these heterostructure NW ensembles show rather broad and intense emission peak at 2.1 eV. However, μ-PL spectra measured on single NWs reveal a reduced broadening of the visible luminescence. The analysis of the longitudinal optical phonon Raman peak position and its shape reveal a variation in the In content between 20% and 30%, in agreement with the values estimated by PL and HRTEM investigations. The reported studies are important for understanding of the growth and properties of NW heterostructures suitable for applications in optoelectronics and photovoltaics.

  13. InGaAs/GaAs quantum dot interdiffiusion induced by cap layer overgrowth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jasinski, J.; Babinski, A.; Czeczott, M.; Bozek, R.

    2000-06-28

    The effect of thermal treatment during and after growth of InGaAs/GaAs quantum dot (QD) structures was studied. Transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy confirmed the presence of interacting QDs, as was expected from analysis of temperature dependence of QD photoluminescence (PL) peak. The results indicate that the effect of post-growth annealing can be similar to the effect of elevated temperature of capping layer growth. Both, these thermal treatments can lead to a similar In and Ga interdiffiusion resulting in a similar blue-shift of QD PL peak.

  14. Optical spectroscopy of quantum confined states in GaAs/AlGaAs quantum well tubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shi, Teng; Fickenscher, Melodie; Smith, Leigh; Jackson, Howard; Yarrison-Rice, Jan; Gao, Qiang; Tan, Hoe; Jagadish, Chennupati; Etheridge, Joanne; Wong, Bryan M.

    2013-12-04

    We have investigated the quantum confinement of electronic states in GaAs/Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1?x}As nanowire heterostructures which contain radial GaAs quantum wells of either 4nm or 8nm. Photoluminescence and photoluminescence excitation spectroscopy are performed on single nanowires. We observed emission and excitation of electron and hole confined states. Numerical calculations of the quantum confined states using the detailed structural information on the quantum well tubes show excellent agreement with these optical results.

  15. Investigation of surface-plasmon coupled red light emitting InGaN/GaN multi-quantum well with Ag nanostructures coated on GaN surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Yi; Liu, Bin E-mail: rzhang@nju.edu.cn; Zhang, Rong E-mail: rzhang@nju.edu.cn; Xie, Zili; Zhuang, Zhe; Dai, JiangPing; Tao, Tao; Zhi, Ting; Zhang, Guogang; Chen, Peng; Ren, Fangfang; Zhao, Hong; Zheng, Youdou

    2015-04-21

    Surface-plasmon (SP) coupled red light emitting InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well (MQW) structure is fabricated and investigated. The centre wavelength of 5-period InGaN/GaN MQW structure is about 620?nm. The intensity of photoluminescence (PL) for InGaN QW with naked Ag nano-structures (NS) is only slightly increased due to the oxidation of Ag NS as compared to that for the InGaN QW. However, InGaN QW with Ag NS/SiO{sub 2} structure can evidently enhance the emission efficiency due to the elimination of surface oxide layer of Ag NS. With increasing the laser excitation power, the PL intensity is enhanced by 25%53% as compared to that for the SiO{sub 2} coating InGaN QW. The steady-state electric field distribution obtained by the three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain method is different for both structures. The proportion of the field distributed in the Ag NS for the GaN/Ag NS/SiO{sub 2} structure is smaller as compared to that for the GaN/naked Ag NS structure. As a result, the energy loss of localized SP modes for the GaN/naked Ag NS structure will be larger due to the absorption of Ag layer.

  16. Strain-compensated (Ga,In)N/(Al,Ga)N/GaN multiple quantum wells for improved yellow/amber light emission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lekhal, K.; Damilano, B. De Mierry, P.; Venngus, P.; Ngo, H. T.; Rosales, D.; Gil, B.; Hussain, S.

    2015-04-06

    Yellow/amber (570600?nm) emitting In{sub x}Ga{sub 1?x}N/Al{sub y}Ga{sub 1?y}N/GaN multiple quantum wells (QWs) have been grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition on GaN-on- sapphire templates. When the (Al,Ga)N thickness of the barrier increases, the room temperature photoluminescence is red-shifted while its yield increases. This is attributed to an increase of the QW internal electric field and an improvement of the material quality due to the compensation of the compressive strain of the In{sub x}Ga{sub 1?x}N QWs by the Al{sub y}Ga{sub 1?y}N layers, respectively.

  17. Cleaning Up Non-Road Diesel Vehicles: A Public Health Imperative |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Department of Energy 2 DEER Conference Presentation: Union of Concerned Scientists PDF icon 2002_deer_monahan.pdf More Documents & Publications EPA Diesel Update A View From The Bridge Commonalities between Non-road and On-road Diesel Emissions

  18. Effects of Intermediate Ethanol Blends on Legacy Vehicles and Small Non-Road Engines, Report 1 … Updated Feb 2009

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Effects of Intermediate Ethanol Blends on Legacy Vehicles and Small Non-Road Effects of Intermediate Ethanol Blends on Legacy Vehicles and Small Non-Road Engines, Report 1 … Updated Feb 2009

  19. On strongly GA-convex functions and stochastic processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bekar, Nurgl Okur; Akdemir, Hande Gnay; ??can, ?mdat

    2014-08-20

    In this study, we introduce strongly GA-convex functions and stochastic processes. We provide related well-known Kuhn type results and Hermite-Hadamard type inequality for strongly GA-convex functions and stochastic processes.

  20. Composition profiling of GaAs/AlGaAs quantum dots grown by droplet epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bocquel, J.; Koenraad, P. M.; Giddings, A. D.; Prosa, T. J.; Larson, D. J.; Mano, T.

    2014-10-13

    Droplet epitaxy (DE) is a growth method which can create III-V quantum dots (QDs) whose optoelectronic properties can be accurately controlled through the crystallisation conditions. In this work, GaAs/AlGaAs DE-QDs have been analyzed with the complimentary techniques of cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy and atom probe tomography. Structural details and a quantitative chemical analysis of QDs of different sizes are obtained. Most QDs were found to be pure GaAs, while a small proportion exhibited high intermixing caused by a local etching process. Large QDs with a high aspect ratio were observed to have an Al-rich crown above the GaAs QD. This structure is attributed to differences in mobility of the cations during the capping phase of the DE growth.

  1. High-field quasi-ballistic transport in AlGaN/GaN heterostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Danilchenko, B. A.; Tripachko, N. A.; Belyaev, A. E.; Vitusevich, S. A. Hardtdegen, H.; Lth, H.

    2014-02-17

    Mechanisms of electron transport formation in 2D conducting channels of AlGaN/GaN heterostructures in extremely high electric fields at 4.2?K have been studied. Devices with a narrow constriction for the current flow demonstrate high-speed electron transport with an electron velocity of 6.8??10{sup 7}?cm/s. Such a velocity is more than two times higher than values reported for conventional semiconductors and about 15% smaller than the limit value predicted for GaN. Superior velocity is attained in the channel with considerable carrier reduction. The effect is related to a carrier runaway phenomenon. The results are in good agreement with theoretical predictions for GaN-based materials.

  2. AlGaAs/GaAs photovoltaic converters for high power narrowband radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khvostikov, Vladimir; Kalyuzhnyy, Nikolay; Mintairov, Sergey; Potapovich, Nataliia; Shvarts, Maxim; Sorokina, Svetlana; Andreev, Viacheslav; Luque, Antonio

    2014-09-26

    AlGaAs/GaAs-based laser power PV converters intended for operation with high-power (up to 100 W/cm{sup 2}) radiation were fabricated by LPE and MOCVD techniques. Monochromatic (? = 809 nm) conversion efficiency up to 60% was measured at cells with back surface field and low (x = 0.2) Al concentration 'window'. Modules with a voltage of 4 V and the efficiency of 56% were designed and fabricated.

  3. InGaAs/GaAs (110) quantum dot formation via step meandering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diez-Merino, Laura; Tejedor, Paloma

    2011-07-01

    InGaAs (110) semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) offer very promising prospects as a material base for a new generation of high-speed spintronic devices, such as single electron transistors for quantum computing. However, the spontaneous formation of InGaAs QDs is prevented by two-dimensional (2D) layer-by-layer growth on singular GaAs (110) substrates. In this work we have studied, by using atomic force microscopy and photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL), the growth of InGaAs/GaAs QDs on GaAs (110) stepped substrates by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), and the modification of the adatom incorporation kinetics to surface steps in the presence of chemisorbed atomic hydrogen. The as-grown QDs exhibit lateral dimensions below 100 nm and emission peaks in the 1.35-1.37 eV range. It has been found that a step meandering instability derived from the preferential attachment of In adatoms to [110]-step edges relative to [11n]-type steps plays a key role in the destabilization of 2D growth that leads to 3D mound formation on both conventional and H-terminated vicinal substrates. In the latter case, the driving force for 3D growth via step meandering is enhanced by H-induced upward mass transport in addition to the lower energy cost associated with island formation on H-terminated substrates, which results in a high density array of InGaAs/GaAs dots selectively nucleated on the terrace apices with reduced lateral dimensions and improved PL efficiency relative to those of conventional MBE-grown samples.

  4. GaNPAs Solar Cells Lattice-Matched To GaP: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geisz, J. F.; Friedman, D. J.; Kurtz, S.

    2002-05-01

    This conference paper describes the III-V semiconductors grown on silicon substrates are very attractive for lower-cost, high-efficiency multijunction solar cells, but lattice-mismatched alloys that result in high dislocation densities have been unable to achieve satisfactory performance. GaNxP1-x-yAsy is a direct-gap III-V alloy that can be grown lattice-matched to Si when y= 4.7x - 0.1. We propose the use of lattice-matched GaNPAs on silicon for high-efficiency multijunction solar cells. We have grown GaNxP1-x-yAsy on GaP (with a similar lattice constant to silicon) by metal-organic chemical vapor phase epitaxy with direct band-gaps in the range of 1.5 to 2.0 eV. We demonstrate the performance of single-junction GaNxP1-x-yAsy solar cells grown on GaP substrates and discuss the prospects for the development of monolithic high-efficiency multijunction solar cells based on silicon substrates.

  5. Lateral and Vertical Transistors Using the AlGaN/GaN Heterostructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chowdhury, S; Mishra, UK

    2013-10-01

    Power conversion losses are endemic in all areas of electricity consumption, including motion control, lighting, air conditioning, and information technology. Si, the workhorse of the industry, has reached its material limits. Increasingly, the lateral AlGaN/GaN HEMT based on gallium nitride (GaN-on-Si) is becoming the device of choice for medium power electronics as it enables high-power conversion efficiency and reduced form factor at attractive pricing for wide market penetration. The reduced form factor enabled by high-efficiency operation at high frequency further enables significant system price reduction because of savings in bulky extensive passive elements and heat sink costs. The high-power market, however, still remains unaddressed by lateral GaN devices. The current and voltage demand for high power conversion application makes the chip area in a lateral topology so large that it becomes more difficult to manufacture. Vertical GaN devices would play a big role alongside of silicon carbide (SiC) to address the high power conversion needs. In this paper, the development, performance, and status of lateral and vertical GaN devices are discussed.

  6. Reducing the environmental impact of road and rail vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mayer, R.M.; Poulikakos, L.D.; Lees, A.R.; Heutschi, K.; Kalivoda, M.T.

    2012-01-15

    Methods have been developed to measure in situ the dynamic impact of both road and rail vehicles on the infrastructure and the environment. The resulting data sets have been analysed to quantify the environmental impacts in a transparent manner across both modes. A primary concern is that a small number of vehicles are being operated outside safe or regulatory limits which can have a disproportionate large impact. The analysis enables the various impacts to be ranked across both modes so enabling one to discern the benefits of intermodal transport. The impact of various policy options is considered and how to identify vehicles which can be classified as environmentally friendly. This would require European agreement as many heavy goods vehicle operate across country borders.

  7. Lattice-Mismatched GaAs/InGaAs Two-Junction Solar Cells by Direct Wafer Bonding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tanabe, K.; Aiken, D. J.; Wanlass, M. W.; Morral, A. F.; Atwater, H. A.

    2006-01-01

    Direct bonded interconnect between subcells of a lattice-mismatched III-V compound multijunction cell would enable dislocation-free active regions by confining the defect network needed for lattice mismatch accommodation to tunnel junction interfaces, while metamorphic growth inevitably results in less design flexibility and lower material quality than is desirable. The first direct-bond interconnected multijunction solar cell, a two-terminal monolithic GaAs/InGaAs two-junction solar cell, is reported and demonstrates viability of direct wafer bonding for solar cell applications. The tandem cell open-circuit voltage was approximately the sum of the subcell open-circuit voltages. This achievement shows direct bonding enables us to construct lattice-mismatched III-V multijunction solar cells and is extensible to an ultrahigh efficiency InGaP/GaAs/InGaAsP/InGaAs four-junction cell by bonding a GaAs-based lattice-matched InGaP/GaAs subcell and an InP-based lattice-matched InGaAsP/InGaAs subcell. The interfacial resistance experimentally obtained for bonded GaAs/InP smaller than 0.10 Ohm-cm{sup 2} would result in a negligible decrease in overall cell efficiency of {approx}0.02%, under 1-sun illumination.

  8. Hybrid type-I InAs/GaAs and type-II GaSb/GaAs quantum dot structure with enhanced photoluminescence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ji, Hai-Ming; Liang, Baolai Simmonds, Paul J.; Juang, Bor-Chau; Yang, Tao; Young, Robert J.; Huffaker, Diana L.

    2015-03-09

    We investigate the photoluminescence (PL) properties of a hybrid type-I InAs/GaAs and type-II GaSb/GaAs quantum dot (QD) structure grown in a GaAs matrix by molecular beam epitaxy. This hybrid QD structure exhibits more intense PL with a broader spectral range, compared with control samples that contain only InAs or GaSb QDs. This enhanced PL performance is attributed to additional electron and hole injection from the type-I InAs QDs into the adjacent type-II GaSb QDs. We confirm this mechanism using time-resolved and power-dependent PL. These hybrid QD structures show potential for high efficiency QD solar cell applications.

  9. Properties of (Ga,Mn)As codoped with Li

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miyakozawa, Shohei; Chen, Lin; Matsukura, Fumihiro; Ohno, Hideo

    2014-06-02

    We grow Li codoped (Ga,Mn)As layers with nominal Mn composition up to 0.15 by molecular beam epitaxy. The layers before and after annealing are characterized by x-ray diffraction, transport, magnetization, and ferromagnetic resonance measurements. The codoping with Li reduces the lattice constant and electrical resistivity of (Ga,Mn)As after annealing. We find that (Ga,Mn)As:Li takes similar Curie temperature to that of (Ga,Mn)As, but with pronounced magnetic moments and in-plane magnetic anisotropy, indicating that the Li codoping has nontrivial effects on the magnetic properties of (Ga,Mn)As.

  10. Lessons learnt from post EIS evaluations of national road schemes in Ireland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, E.A.; O'Malley, V.P.

    2012-01-15

    The Irish National Roads Authority (NRA) recently completed over twenty post environmental impact assessment evaluations of noise chapters prepared as part of Environmental Impact Statements (EISs) for new national road schemes in Ireland. The study focused on a range of issues including a review of noise monitoring procedures, noise prediction methodologies and an assessment of the effectiveness of noise mitigation measures currently in use on national road schemes. This review was carried out taking cognisance of best international practices for noise assessment and methodologies used to mitigate road traffic noise. The primary focus of the study was to assess the actual noise impacts of national road scheme developments and to revise, where necessary, methodologies recommended in the current NRA guidance document describing the treatment of noise on national road schemes. This paper presents a summary of the study and identifies a number of key areas that should be considered prior to the development of future guidance documents. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Presents a post-EIS evaluation of noise assessments for national roads in Ireland. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effectiveness of some noise mitigation measures is critically evaluated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Issues related to the current EIS noise assessment methodologies are discussed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Implications for alterations to the NRA noise guidelines.

  11. SREL Reprint #3047

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Department of Geology, The University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602, USA 4Department of Chemistry and Earth Sciences, Dartmouth College, Hanover NH, USA Abstract: Despite the...

  12. SREL Reprint #3210

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    & Environmental Sciences, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, USA 4Department of Microbiology, University of Georgia, Athens, GA, USA Abstract: Arkashin Schurf (Arkashin) and...

  13. SREL Reprint #3172

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    School of Forestry and Natural Resources, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602, USA 2Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, University of Georgia, Drawer E, Aiken, SC 29802,...

  14. SREL Reprint #3120

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1Department of Environmental Health Science, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602, USA 2Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, University of Georgia, Drawer E, Aiken, SC 29802,...

  15. Three-junction solar cells comprised of a thin-film GaInP/GaAs tandem cell mechanically stacked on a Si cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yazawa, Y.; Tamura, K.; Watahiki, S.; Kitatani, T.; Ohtsuka, H.; Warabisako, T.

    1997-12-31

    Three-junction tandem solar cells were fabricated by mechanical stacking of a thin-film GaInP/GaAs monolithic tandem cell and a Si cell. The epitaxial lift-off (ELO) technique was used for the thinning of GaInP/GaAs tandem cells. Both spectral responses of the GaInP top cell and the GaAs middle cell in the thin-film GaInP/GaAs monolithic tandem cell were conserved. The Si cell performance has been improved by reducing the absorption loss in the GaAs substrate.

  16. Reactive codoping of GaAlInP compound semiconductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hanna, Mark Cooper; Reedy, Robert

    2008-02-12

    A GaAlInP compound semiconductor and a method of producing a GaAlInP compound semiconductor are provided. The apparatus and method comprises a GaAs crystal substrate in a metal organic vapor deposition reactor. Al, Ga, In vapors are prepared by thermally decomposing organometallic compounds. P vapors are prepared by thermally decomposing phospine gas, group II vapors are prepared by thermally decomposing an organometallic group IIA or IIB compound. Group VIB vapors are prepared by thermally decomposing a gaseous compound of group VIB. The Al, Ga, In, P, group II, and group VIB vapors grow a GaAlInP crystal doped with group IIA or IIB and group VIB elements on the substrate wherein the group IIA or IIB and a group VIB vapors produced a codoped GaAlInP compound semiconductor with a group IIA or IIB element serving as a p-type dopant having low group II atomic diffusion.

  17. What Eco-Driving Techniques Do You Use on the Road? | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Eco-Driving Techniques Do You Use on the Road? What Eco-Driving Techniques Do You Use on the Road? July 22, 2010 - 7:30am Addthis On Tuesday, you read about eco-driving and how it can improve fuel economy and reduce your greenhouse gas emissions. Simple measures such as observing the speed limit, planning your trips, and keeping your tires properly inflated can make a big difference in your savings. What eco-driving techniques do you use on the road? Each Thursday, you have the chance to share

  18. Road Map for Development of Crystal-Tolerant High Level Waste Glasses

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Road Map for Development of Crystal-Tolerant High Level Waste Glasses Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Road Map for Development of Crystal-Tolerant High Level Waste Glasses This road map guides the research and development for formulation and processing of crystal-tolerant glasses, identifying near- and long-term activities that need to be completed over the period from 2014 to 2019. The primary objective is to maximize waste loading for Hanford

  19. Chemical beam epitaxy growth of AlGaAs/GaAs tunnel junctions using trimethyl aluminium for multijunction solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paquette, B.; DeVita, M.; Turala, A.; Kolhatkar, G.; Boucherif, A.; Jaouad, A.; Aimez, V.; Ars, R.; Wilkins, M.; Wheeldon, J. F.; Walker, A. W.; Hinzer, K.; Fafard, S.

    2013-09-27

    AlGaAs/GaAs tunnel junctions for use in high concentration multijunction solar cells were designed and grown by chemical beam epitaxy (CBE) using trimethyl aluminium (TMA) as the p-dopant source for the AlGaAs active layer. Controlled hole concentration up to 4?10{sup 20} cm{sup ?3} was achieved through variation in growth parameters. Fabricated tunnel junctions have a peak tunneling current up to 6140 A/cm{sup 2}. These are suitable for high concentration use and outperform GaAs/GaAs tunnel junctions.

  20. 0.7-eV GaInAs Junction for a GaInP/GaAs/GaInAs(1eV)/GaInAs(0.7eV) Four-Junction Solar Cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friedman, D. J.; Geisz, J. F.; Norman, A. G.; Wanlass, M. W.; Kurtz, S. R.

    2006-01-01

    We discuss recent developments in III-V multijunction solar cells, focusing on adding a fourth junction to the Ga{sub 0.5}In{sub 0.5} P/GaAs/Ga{sub 0.75}In{sub 0.25}As inverted three-junction cell. This cell, grown inverted on GaAs so that the lattice-mismatched Ga{sub 0.75}In{sub 0.25}As third junction is the last one grown, has demonstrated 38% efficiency, and 40% is likely in the near future. To achieve still further gains, a lower-bandgap Ga{sub x}In{sub 1-x}As fourth junction could be added to the three-junction structure for a four-junction cell whose efficiency could exceed 45% under concentration. Here, we present the initial development of the Ga{sub x}In{sub 1-x}As fourth junction. Junctions of various bandgaps ranging from 0.88 to 0.73 eV were grown, in order to study the effect of the different amounts of lattice mismatch. At a bandgap of 0.88 eV, junctions were obtained with very encouraging {approx}80% quantum efficiency, 57% fill factor, and 0.36 eV open-circuit voltage. The device performance degrades with decreasing bandgap (i.e., increasing lattice mismatch). We model the four-junction device efficiency vs. fourth junction bandgap to show that an 0.7-eV fourth-junction bandgap, while optimal if it could be achieved in practice, is not necessary; an 0.9-eV bandgap would still permit significant gains in multijunction cell efficiency while being easier to achieve than the lower-bandgap junction.

  1. Electron tunneling spectroscopy study of electrically active traps in AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Jie Cui, Sharon; Ma, T. P.; Hung, Ting-Hsiang; Nath, Digbijoy; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Rajan, Siddharth

    2013-11-25

    We investigate the energy levels of electron traps in AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors by the use of electron tunneling spectroscopy. Detailed analysis of a typical spectrum, obtained in a wide gate bias range and with both bias polarities, suggests the existence of electron traps both in the bulk of AlGaN and at the AlGaN/GaN interface. The energy levels of the electron traps have been determined to lie within a 0.5?eV band below the conduction band minimum of AlGaN, and there is strong evidence suggesting that these traps contribute to Frenkel-Poole conduction through the AlGaN barrier.

  2. Analysis of defects in GaAsN grown by chemical beam epitaxy on high index GaAs substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bouzazi, Boussairi; Kojima, Nobuaki; Ohshita, Yoshio; Yamaguchi, Masafumi

    2013-09-27

    The lattice defects in GaAsN grown by chemical beam epitaxy on GaAs 311B and GaAs 10A toward [110] were characterized and discussed by using deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) and on the basis of temperature dependence of the junction capacitances (C{sub J}). In one hand, GaAsN films grown on GaAs 311B and GaAs 10A showed n-type and p-type conductivities, respectively although the similar and simultaneous growth conditions. This result is indeed in contrast to the common known effect of N concentration on the type of conductivity, since the surface 311B showed a significant improvement in the incorporation of N. Furthermore, the temperature dependence of C{sub J} has shown that GaAs 311B limits the formation of N-H defects. In the other hand, the energy states in the forbidden gap of GaAsN were obtained. Six electron traps, E1 to E6, were observed in the DLTS spectrum of GaAsN grown on GaAs 311B, with apparent activation energies of 0.02, 0.14, 0.16, 0.33, 0.48, and 0.74 eV below the bottom edge of the conduction band, respectively. In addition, four hole traps, H1 to H4, were observed in the DLTS spectrum of GaAsN grown on GaAs 10A, with energy depths of 0.13, 0.20, 0.39, and 0.52 eV above the valence band maximum of the alloy, respectively. Hence, the surface morphology of the GaAs substrate was found to play a key factor role in clarifying the electrical properties of GaAsN grown by CBE.

  3. Photocapacitance study of type-II GaSb/GaAs quantum ring solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagener, M. C.; Botha, J. R.; Carrington, P. J.; Krier, A.

    2014-01-07

    In this study, the density of states associated with the localization of holes in GaSb/GaAs quantum rings are determined by the energy selective charging of the quantum ring distribution. The authors show, using conventional photocapacitance measurements, that the excess charge accumulated within the type-II nanostructures increases with increasing excitation energies for photon energies above 0.9?eV. Optical excitation between the localized hole states and the conduction band is therefore not limited to the ?(k?=?0) point, with pseudo-monochromatic light charging all states lying within the photon energy selected. The energy distribution of the quantum ring states could consequently be accurately related from the excitation dependence of the integrated photocapacitance. The resulting band of localized hole states is shown to be well described by a narrow distribution centered 407?meV above the GaAs valence band maximum.

  4. A InGaN/GaN quantum dot green ({lambda}=524 nm) laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang Meng; Banerjee, Animesh; Lee, Chi-Sen; Hinckley, John M.; Bhattacharya, Pallab

    2011-05-30

    The characteristics of self-organized InGaN/GaN quantum dot lasers are reported. The laser heterostructures were grown on c-plane GaN substrates by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy and the laser facets were formed by focused ion beam etching with gallium. Emission above threshold is characterized by a peak at 524 nm (green) and linewidth of 0.7 nm. The lowest measured threshold current density is 1.2 kA/cm{sup 2} at 278 K. The slope and wall plug efficiencies are 0.74 W/A and {approx}1.1%, respectively, at 1.3 kA/cm{sup 2}. The value of T{sub 0}=233 K in the temperature range of 260-300 K.

  5. Efficiency enhancement of InGaN/GaN solar cells with nanostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bai, J.; Yang, C. C.; Athanasiou, M.; Wang, T.

    2014-02-03

    We demonstrate InGaN/GaN multi-quantum-well solar cells with nanostructures operating at a wavelength of 520?nm. Nanostructures with a periodic nanorod or nanohole array are fabricated by means of modified nanosphere lithography. Under 1 sun air-mass 1.5 global spectrum illumination, a fill factor of 50 and an open circuit voltage of 1.9?V are achieved in spite of very high indium content in InGaN alloys usually causing degradation of crystal quality. Both the nanorod array and the nanohole array significantly improve the performance of solar cells, while a larger enhancement is observed for the nanohole array, where the conversion efficiency is enhanced by 51%.

  6. Graphene in ohmic contact for both n-GaN and p-GaN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhong, Haijian; Liu, Zhenghui; Shi, Lin; Xu, Gengzhao; Fan, Yingmin; Huang, Zengli; Wang, Jianfeng; Ren, Guoqiang; Xu, Ke

    2014-05-26

    The wrinkles of single layer graphene contacted with either n-GaN or p-GaN were found both forming ohmic contacts investigated by conductive atomic force microscopy. The local IV results show that some of the graphene wrinkles act as high-conductive channels and exhibiting ohmic behaviors compared with the flat regions with Schottky characteristics. We have studied the effects of the graphene wrinkles using density-functional-theory calculations. It is found that the standing and folded wrinkles with zigzag or armchair directions have a tendency to decrease or increase the local work function, respectively, pushing the local Fermi level towards n- or p-type GaN and thus improving the transport properties. These results can benefit recent topical researches and applications for graphene as electrode material integrated in various semiconductor devices.

  7. Microsoft Word - Class 1 S Access Road-031611 FINAL.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mr. Bearzi: Enclosed is a Class 1 Permit Modification Notification to: * Add South Access Road for Transportation of TRU Mixed Waste We certify under penalty of law that this...

  8. EA-1941: Boyer-Tillamook Access Road Improvement Project, Tillamook and Yamhill Counties, Oregon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    BPA prepared an EA, FONSI, and Mitigation Action Plan to assess the potential environmental impacts of proposed improvements to 13 miles of access roads for its existing 115-kV Boyer-Tillamook No. 1 Transmission Line in Tillamook and Yamhill counties, Oregon. Associated activities would include resurfacing roads, adding drainage, widening 3 miles of road, constructing 0.1 mile of new road, maintaining culverts, and constructing outlet ditches and retaining walls. In addition, new bridges would be built, and culverts that currently block fish passage for anadromous and resident fish would be replaced. Additional information is available at the project website: http://efw.bpa.gov/environmental_services/Document_Library/Boyer-Tillamook/.

  9. On-Road Particle Matter Emissions from a MY 2010 Compliant HD...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    from a 2010 compliant HD Diesel tractor while traveling on-road for 2300 miles found average gravimetric TPM over the entire route to be well below EPAs 2010 PM standard. ...

  10. EA-1184: Transfer of the DP Road Tract to the County of Los Alamos, New Mexico

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposal to transfer ownership of the undeveloped DP Road Property from the U.S. Department of Energy to Los Alamos County, New Mexico.

  11. RCRA Facility Investigation/Remedial Investigation Report for the Grace Road Site (631-22G)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palmer, E.

    1998-10-02

    This report summarizes the activities and documents the results of a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Facility Investigation/Remedial Investigation conducted at Grace Road Site on the Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina.

  12. Technologies for a Sustainable Heavy-Duty On-Road Fleet | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Only selected energy pathways for the heavy-duty on-road fleet are consistent with the ... More Documents & Publications 21st Century Truck Partnership Roadmap Roadmap and Technical ...

  13. 454 Sequencing: The road to the Future ( 7th Annual SFAF Meeting, 2012)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Knight, James R [Roche

    2013-03-22

    Jim Knight on "454 Sequencing: The Road to the Future" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

  14. On-Road Development of the C-Gas Plus Engine in Heavy-Duty Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2003-06-01

    Fact sheet details on-road development of C-Gas Plus natural gas engine in Viking Freight heavy-duty trucks, including emissions, fuel costs, and petroleum displacement.

  15. Analysis Reveals Impact of Road Grade on Vehicle Energy Use (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-04-01

    Findings of study indicate that, on average, road grade could be responsible for 1%-3% of fuel use in light-duty automobiles, with many individual trips impacted by as much as 40%.

  16. Origins of ion irradiation-induced Ga nanoparticle motion on GaAs surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kang, M.; Wu, J. H.; Chen, H. Y.; Thornton, K.; Goldman, R. S. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2136 (United States)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2136 (United States); Sofferman, D. L. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2136 (United States) [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2136 (United States); Department of Physics, Adelphi University, Garden City, New York 11530-0701 (United States); Beskin, I. [Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-1040 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-1040 (United States)

    2013-08-12

    We have examined the origins of ion irradiation-induced nanoparticle (NP) motion. Focused-ion-beam irradiation of GaAs surfaces induces random walks of Ga NPs, which are biased in the direction opposite to that of ion beam scanning. Although the instantaneous NP velocities are constant, the NP drift velocities are dependent on the off-normal irradiation angle, likely due to a difference in surface non-stoichiometry induced by the irradiation angle dependence of the sputtering yield. It is hypothesized that the random walks are initiated by ion irradiation-induced thermal fluctuations, with biasing driven by anisotropic mass transport.

  17. Photoluminescence studies of individual and few GaSb/GaAs quantum rings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, M. P.; Woodhead, C. S.; Roberts, J.; Noori, Y. J.; Noble, M. T.; Krier, A.; Hayne, M.; Young, R. J.; Smakman, E. P.; Koenraad, P. M.

    2014-11-15

    We present optical studies of individual and few GaSb quantum rings embedded in a GaAs matrix. Contrary to expectation for type-II confinement, we measure rich spectra containing sharp lines. These lines originate from excitonic recombination and are observed to have resolution-limited full-width at half maximum of 200 ?eV. The detail provided by these measurements allows the characteristic type-II blueshift, observed with increasing excitation power, to be studied at the level of individual nanostructures. These findings are in agreement with hole-charging being the origin of the observed blueshift.

  18. Application of the ASME code in the design of the GA-4 and GA-9 casks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mings, W.J. ); Koploy, M.A. )

    1992-01-01

    General Atomics (GA) is developing two spent fuel shipping casks for transport by legal weight truck (LWT). The casks are designed to the loading, environmental conditions and safety requirements defined in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 71 (10CFR71). To ensure that all components of the cask meet the 10CFR71 rules, GA established structural design criteria for each component based on NRC Regulatory Guides and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (ASME Code). This paper discusses the criteria used for different cask components, how they were applied and the conservatism and safety margins built into the criteria and assumption.

  19. Application of the ASME code in the design of the GA-4 and GA-9 casks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mings, W.J.; Koploy, M.A.

    1992-08-01

    General Atomics (GA) is developing two spent fuel shipping casks for transport by legal weight truck (LWT). The casks are designed to the loading, environmental conditions and safety requirements defined in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 71 (10CFR71). To ensure that all components of the cask meet the 10CFR71 rules, GA established structural design criteria for each component based on NRC Regulatory Guides and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (ASME Code). This paper discusses the criteria used for different cask components, how they were applied and the conservatism and safety margins built into the criteria and assumption.

  20. Temperature dependency of the emission properties from positioned In(Ga)As/GaAs quantum dots

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Braun, T.; Schneider, C.; Maier, S.; Forchel, A.; Höfling, S.; Kamp, M.; Igusa, R.; Iwamoto, S.; Arakawa, Y.

    2014-09-15

    In this letter we study the influence of temperature and excitation power on the emission linewidth from site-controlled InGaAs/GaAs quantum dots grown on nanoholes defined by electron beam lithography and wet chemical etching. We identify thermal electron activation as well as direct exciton loss as the dominant intensity quenching channels. Additionally, we carefully analyze the effects of optical and acoustic phonons as well as close-by defects on the emission linewidth by means of temperature and power dependent micro-photoluminescence on single quantum dots with large pitches.

  1. Athens, Greece: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia GeoNames ID 264371 Coordinates 37.97918, 23.716647 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":...

  2. Athens, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ohio American Hydrogen Corporation Carbon Cycle Engineering Dovetail Solar and Wind DuPont Electronic Technologies, Inc. Global Cooling Inc. Panich + Noel Architects Panich,...

  3. On-Road Use of Fischer-Tropsch Diesel Blends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nigel Clark; Mridul Gautam; Donald Lyons; Chris Atkinson; Wenwei Xie; Paul Norton; Keith Vertin; Stephen Goguen; James Eberhardt

    1999-04-26

    Alternative compression ignition engine fuels are of interest both to reduce emissions and to reduce U.S. petroleum fuel demand. A Malaysian Fischer-Tropsch gas-to-liquid fuel was compared with California No.2 diesel by characterizing emissions from over the road Class 8 tractors with Caterpillar 3176 engines, using a chassis dynamometer and full scale dilution tunnel. The 5-Mile route was employed as the test schedule, with a test weight of 42,000 lb. Levels of oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) were reduced by an average of 12% and particulate matter (PM) by 25% for the Fischer-Tropsch fuel over the California diesel fuel. Another distillate fuel produced catalytically from Fischer-Tropsch products originally derived from natural gas by Mossgas was also compared with 49-state No.2 diesel by characterizing emissions from Detroit Diesel 6V-92 powered transit buses, three of them equipped with catalytic converters and rebuilt engines, and three without. The CBD cycle was employed as the test schedule, with a test weight of 33,050 lb. For those buses with catalytic converters and rebuilt engines, NO x was reduced by 8% and PM was reduced by 31% on average, while for those buses without, NO x was reduced by 5% and PM was reduced by 20% on average. It is concluded that advanced compression ignition fuels from non-petroleum sources can offer environmental advantages in typical line haul and city transit applications.

  4. USVI Energy Road Map: Charting the Course to a Clean Energy Future

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    (Brochure), EDIN (Energy Development in Island Nations), U.S. Virgin Islands | Department of Energy USVI Energy Road Map: Charting the Course to a Clean Energy Future (Brochure), EDIN (Energy Development in Island Nations), U.S. Virgin Islands USVI Energy Road Map: Charting the Course to a Clean Energy Future (Brochure), EDIN (Energy Development in Island Nations), U.S. Virgin Islands This brochure provides an overview of the integrated clean energy deployment process and progress of the

  5. The Road to Net Zero (Presentation), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Luncheon in Denver, Colorado -- As Prepared | Department of Energy The Road Through Paris: Secretary Moniz's Remarks at the Tim Wirth Chair Luncheon in Denver, Colorado -- As Prepared The Road Through Paris: Secretary Moniz's Remarks at the Tim Wirth Chair Luncheon in Denver, Colorado -- As Prepared September 4, 2015 - 10:20am Addthis Dr. Ernest Moniz Dr. Ernest Moniz Secretary of Energy Acknowledgements Thank you, Tim [Wirth] for inviting me to this sixteenth Wirth Chair lunch. Naomi and I

  6. The Road Through Paris: Secretary Moniz's Remarks at the Tim Wirth Chair

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Luncheon in Denver, Colorado -- As Prepared | Department of Energy The Road Through Paris: Secretary Moniz's Remarks at the Tim Wirth Chair Luncheon in Denver, Colorado -- As Prepared The Road Through Paris: Secretary Moniz's Remarks at the Tim Wirth Chair Luncheon in Denver, Colorado -- As Prepared September 4, 2015 - 10:20am Addthis Dr. Ernest Moniz Dr. Ernest Moniz Secretary of Energy Acknowledgements Thank you, Tim [Wirth] for inviting me to this sixteenth Wirth Chair lunch. Naomi and I

  7. Vehicle Technologies Office: AVTA - Plug-in Electric Vehicle On-Road

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Demonstration Data | Department of Energy Plug-in Electric Vehicle On-Road Demonstration Data Vehicle Technologies Office: AVTA - Plug-in Electric Vehicle On-Road Demonstration Data Through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, the Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) accelerated the electrification of the nation's vehicle fleet. VTO invested $400 million in 18 projects to demonstrate plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs, also known as electric cars) and infrastructure, including 10

  8. Cyclotron Road-A New Model for Clean Energy R&D | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cyclotron Road-A New Model for Clean Energy R&D Cyclotron Road-A New Model for Clean Energy R&D Addthis Description This video is about a new model for clean energy research and development the U.S. Department is testing through a program at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The goal is to support scientific R&D that is still too risky for private-sector investment, and too applied for academia

  9. One Year Down the Road of Biogas Industry Development | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy One Year Down the Road of Biogas Industry Development One Year Down the Road of Biogas Industry Development December 18, 2015 - 9:40am Addthis Newtown Creek Wastewater Treatment Plant | New York City Department of Environmental Protection Newtown Creek Wastewater Treatment Plant | New York City Department of Environmental Protection DC Water’s Blue Plains Advanced Wastewater Treatment Plant | DC water DC Water's Blue Plains Advanced Wastewater Treatment Plant | DC water Newtown

  10. Cyclotron Road Announces the Selection of its Second Cohort of Innovators:

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Berkeley Lab program continues innovative effort to spur technology development | Department of Energy Cyclotron Road Announces the Selection of its Second Cohort of Innovators: Berkeley Lab program continues innovative effort to spur technology development Cyclotron Road Announces the Selection of its Second Cohort of Innovators: Berkeley Lab program continues innovative effort to spur technology development March 3, 2016 - 10:42am Addthis News release from Berkeley Lab, February 29, 2016

  11. DOE Statement on UK Government's "Road to 2010" Report on Nuclear Security

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy Statement on UK Government's "Road to 2010" Report on Nuclear Security DOE Statement on UK Government's "Road to 2010" Report on Nuclear Security July 17, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - Thomas P. D'Agostino, the Department of Energy's Under Secretary for Nuclear Security and Administrator of the National Nuclear Security Administration, today applauded the British government's new report on advancing the global nuclear security agenda.

  12. Amped Up! Volume 1, No. 5: EERE Innovation on the Road Through Paris |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 5: EERE Innovation on the Road Through Paris Amped Up! Volume 1, No. 5: EERE Innovation on the Road Through Paris Clean Energy Technologies: Wind Clean Energy Technologies: Wind Energy Department investments in new wind turbine technologies and performance are increasing America's reliance on wind power to provide safe, clean, domestic energy. Clean Energy Technologies: Solar Clean Energy Technologies: Solar Solar energy innovations at the Energy Department have

  13. Road to Fuel Savings: Clean Diesel Trucks Gain Momentum with Nissan and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cummins Collaboration | Department of Energy Road to Fuel Savings: Clean Diesel Trucks Gain Momentum with Nissan and Cummins Collaboration Road to Fuel Savings: Clean Diesel Trucks Gain Momentum with Nissan and Cummins Collaboration August 28, 2014 - 9:51am Addthis Pictured here is a clean diesel engine for light trucks that was part of Cummins research and development effort from 1997-2004. Supported with funding by the Energy Department, this engine is as clean and quiet as a gasoline

  14. Hit the Road, Jack! New Thermal Window Technology Lessens Menace of Jack

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Frost | Department of Energy Hit the Road, Jack! New Thermal Window Technology Lessens Menace of Jack Frost Hit the Road, Jack! New Thermal Window Technology Lessens Menace of Jack Frost January 17, 2012 - 4:25pm Addthis The frost patterns on your window might be pretty, but they're not helping you save any energy. Energy efficient windows provide an effective barrier from inclement weather. | Photo courtesy of <a

  15. Road Map for Development of Crystal-Tolerant High Level Waste Glasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matyas, Josef; Vienna, John D.; Peeler, David; Fox, Kevin; Herman, Connie; Kruger, Albert A.

    2014-05-31

    This road map guides the research and development for formulation and processing of crystal-tolerant glasses, identifying near- and long-term activities that need to be completed over the period from 2014 to 2019. The primary objective is to maximize waste loading for Hanford waste glasses without jeopardizing melter operation by crystal accumulation in the melter or melter discharge riser. The potential applicability to the Savannah River Site (SRS) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is also addressed in this road map.

  16. ChemCam follows the 'Yellowknife Road' to Martian wet area

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    'Yellowknife Road' to martian wet area ChemCam follows the 'Yellowknife Road' to martian wet area Researchers have tracked a trail of minerals that point to the prior presence of water at the Curiosity rover site on Mars. January 15, 2013 The Mars Science Laboratory's Curiosity Rover recently took this photo of the Martian landscape looking toward Mount Sharp while on its way toward Yellowknife Bay-an area where researchers have found minerals indicating the past presence of water. (NASA Photo)

  17. The Digital Road to Scientific Knowledge Diffusion; A Faster, Better Way to

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Scientific Progress? (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect The Digital Road to Scientific Knowledge Diffusion; A Faster, Better Way to Scientific Progress? Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The Digital Road to Scientific Knowledge Diffusion; A Faster, Better Way to Scientific Progress? With the United States federal government spending billions annually for research and development, ways to increase the productivity of that research can have a significant return on investment. The

  18. GaP/Si heterojunction Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saive, R.; Chen, C.; Emmer, H.; Atwater, H.

    2015-05-11

    Improving the efficiency of solar cells requires the introduction of novel device concepts. Recent developments have shown that in Si solar cell technology there is still room for tremendous improvement. Using the heterojunction with intrinsic thin layer (HIT) approach 25.6 % power conversion efficiency was achieved. However, a-Si as a window and passivation layer comes with disadvantages as a-Si shows low conductivity and high parasitic absorption. Therefore, it is likely that using a crystalline material as window layer with high band gab and high mobility can further improve efficiency. We have studied GaP grown by MOCVD on Si with (001) and (112) orientation. We obtained crystalline layers with carrier mobility around 100 cm2/Vs and which passivate Si as confirmed by carrier lifetime measurements. We performed band alignment studies by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy yielding a valence band offset of 0.3 eV. Comparing this value with the Schottky-model leads to an interface dipole of 0.59 eV. The open circuit voltage increases with increasing doping and is consistent with the theoretical open circuit voltage deduced from work function difference and interface dipole. We obtain an open circuit voltage of 0.38 V for n-doped GaP with doping levels in the order of 10^17 1/cm^3. In our next steps we will increase the doping level further in order to gain higher open circuit voltage. We will discuss the implications of these findings for GaP/Si heterojunction solar cells.

  19. Distributed bragg reflector using AIGaN/GaN

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Waldrip, Karen E.; Lee, Stephen R.; Han, Jung

    2004-08-10

    A supported distributed Bragg reflector or superlattice structure formed from a substrate, a nucleation layer deposited on the substrate, and an interlayer deposited on the nucleation layer, followed by deposition of (Al,Ga,B)N layers or multiple pairs of (Al,Ga,B)N/(Al,Ga,B)N layers, where the interlayer is a material selected from AlN, Al.sub.x Ga.sub.1-x N, and AlBN with a thickness of approximately 20 to 1000 angstroms. The interlayer functions to reduce or eliminate the initial tensile growth stress, thereby reducing cracking in the structure. Multiple interlayers utilized in an AlGaN/GaN DBR structure can eliminate cracking and produce a structure with a reflectivity value greater than 0.99.

  20. TJ Solar Cell (GaInP/GaAs/Ge Ultrahigh-Efficiency Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friedman, Daniel

    2002-04-17

    This talk will discuss recent developments in III-V multijunction photovoltaic technology which have led to the highest-efficiency solar cells ever demonstrated. The relationship between the materials science of III-V semiconductors and the achievement of record solar cell efficiencies will be emphasized. For instance, epitaxially-grown GAInP has been found to form a spontaneously-ordered GaP/InP (111) superlattice. This ordering affects the band gap of the material, which in turn affects the design of solar cells which incorporate GaInP. For the next generation of ultrahigh-efficiency III-V solar cells, we need a new semiconductor which is lattice-matched to GaAs, has a band gap of 1 eV, and has long minority-carrier diffusion lengths. Out of a number of candidate materials, the recently-discovered alloy GaInNAs appears to have the greatest promise. This material satisfies the first two criteria, but has to date shown very low diffusion lengths, a problem which is our current focus in the development of these next-generation cells.

  1. Multijunction GaInP/GaInAs/Ge solar cells with Bragg reflectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Emelyanov, V. M. Kalyuzhniy, N. A.; Mintairov, S. A.; Shvarts, M. Z.; Lantratov, V. M.

    2010-12-15

    Effect of subcell parameters on the efficiency of GaInP/Ga(In)As/Ge tandem solar cells irradiated with 1-MeV electrons at fluences of up to 3 x 10{sup 15} cm{sup -2} has been theoretically studied. The optimal thicknesses of GaInP and GaInAs subcells, which provide the best photocurrent matching at various irradiation doses in solar cells with and without built-in Bragg reflectors, were determined. The dependences of the photoconverter efficiency on the fluence of 1-MeV electrons and on the time of residence in the geostationary orbit were calculated for structures optimized to the beginning and end of their service lives. It is shown that the optimization of the subcell heterostructures for a rated irradiation dose and the introduction of Bragg reflectors into the structure provide a 5% overall increase in efficiency for solar cells operating in the orbit compared with unoptimized cells having no Bragg reflector.

  2. Localized corrosion of GaAs surfaces and formation of porous GaAs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmuki, P.; Vitus, C.M.; Isaacs, H.S.; Fraser, J.; Graham, M.J.

    1995-12-01

    The present work deals with pitting corrosion of p- and n-type GaAs (100). Pit growth can be electrochemically initiated on both conduction types in chloride-containing solutions and leads after extended periods of time to the formation of a porous GaAs structure. In the case of p-type material, localized corrosion is only observed if a passivating film is present on the surface, otherwise -- e.g. in acidic solutions -- the material suffers from a uniform attack (electropolishing) which is independent of the anion present. In contrast, pitting corrosion of n-type material can be triggered independent of the presence of an oxide film. This is explained in terms of the different current limiting factor for the differently doped materials (oxide film in the case of the p- and a space charge layer in the case of the n-GaAs). The porous structure was characterized by SEM, EDX and AES, and consists mainly of GaAs. From scratch experiments it is clear that the pit initiation process is strongly influenced by surface defects. For n-type material, AFM investigations show that light induced roughening of the order of several hundred nm occurs under non-passivating conditions. This nm- scale roughening however does not affect the pitting process.

  3. AlGaAs/InGaAlP tunnel junctions for multijunction solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SHARPS,P.R.; LI,N.Y.; HILLS,J.S.; HOU,H.; CHANG,PING-CHIH; BACA,ALBERT G.

    2000-05-16

    Optimization of GaInP{sub 2}/GaAs dual and GaInP{sub 2}/GaAs/Ge triple junction cells, and development of future generation monolithic multi-junction cells will involve the development of suitable high bandgap tunnel junctions. There are three criteria that a tunnel junction must meet. First, the resistance of the junction must be kept low enough so that the series resistance of the overall device is not increased. For AMO, 1 sun operation, the tunnel junction resistance should be below 5 x 10{sup {minus}2} {Omega}-cm. Secondly, the peak current density for the tunnel junction must also be larger than the J{sub sc} of the cell so that the tunnel junction I-V curve does not have a deleterious effect on the I-V curve of the multi-junction device. Finally, the tunnel junction must be optically transparent, i.e., there must be a minimum of optical absorption of photons that will be collected by the underlying subcells. The paper reports the investigation of four high bandgap tunnel junctions grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition.

  4. High-Efficiency GaInP/GaAs Tandem Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bertness, K. A.; Friedman, D. J.; Kurtz, S. R.; Kibbler, A. E.; Cramer, C.; Olson, J. M.

    1996-09-01

    GaInP/GaAs tandem solar cells have achieved efficiencies between 25.7-30.2%, depending on illumination conditions. The efficiencies are the highest confirmed two-terminal values measured for any solar cell within each standard illumination category. The monolithic, series-connected design of the tandem cells allows them to be substituted for silicon or gallium arsenide cells in photovoltaic panel systems with minimal design changes. The advantages of using GaInP/GaAs tandem solar cells in space and terrestrial applications are discussed primarily in terms of the reduction in balance-of-system costs that accrues when using a higher efficiency cell. The new efficiency values represent a significant improvement over previous efficiencies for this materials system, and we identify grid design, back interface passivation, and top interface passivation as the three key factors leading to this improvement. In producing the high-efficiency cells, we have addressed nondestructive diagnostics and materials growth reproducibility as well as peak cell performance.

  5. High-efficiency GaInP/GaAs tandem solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bertness, K.A.; Friedman, D.J.; Kurtz, S.R.; Kibbler, A.E.; Kramer, C.; Olson, J.M.

    1994-12-01

    GaInP/GaAs tandem solar cells have achieved new record efficiencies, specifically 25.7% under air-mass 0 (AM0) illumination, 29.5% under AM 1.5 global (AM1.5G) illumination, and 30.2% at 140-180x concentration under AM 1.5 direct (AM1.5D) illumination. These values are the highest two-terminal efficiencies achieved by any solar cell under these illumination conditions. The monolithic, series-connected design of the tandem cells allows them to be substituted for silicon or gallium arsenide cells in photovoltaic panel systems with minimal design changes. The advantages of using GaInP/GaAs tandem solar cells in space and terrestrial applications are discussed primarily in terms of the reduction in balance-of-system costs that accrues when using a higher efficiency cell. The new efficiency values represent a significant improvement over previous efficiencies for this materials system, and we identify grid design, back interface passivation, and top interface passivation as the three key factors leading to this improvement. In producing the high-efficiency cells, we have addressed nondestructive diagnostics and materials growth reproducibility as well as peak cell performance. 31 refs.

  6. fe0013961-GaTech | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Performer Georgia Tech Research Corporation, Atlanta GA 30332 Background While earlier research focused on the properties of the hydrate mass per se (Sloan Jr and Koh 2007), ...

  7. Inverse spin Hall effect in Pt/(Ga,Mn)As

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakayama, H.; Chen, L.; Chang, H. W.; Ohno, H.; Matsukura, F.

    2015-06-01

    We investigate dc voltages under ferromagnetic resonance in a Pt/(Ga,Mn)As bilayer structure. A part of the observed dc voltage is shown to originate from the inverse spin Hall effect. The sign of the inverse spin Hall voltage is the same as that in Py/Pt bilayer structure, even though the stacking order of ferromagnetic and nonmagnetic layers is opposite to each other. The spin mixing conductance at the Pt/(Ga,Mn)As interface is determined to be of the order of 10{sup 19 }m{sup −2}, which is about ten times greater than that of (Ga,Mn)As/p-GaAs.

  8. Photoluminescence from GaAs nanodisks fabricated by using combination...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    GaAs nanodisks fabricated by using combination of neutral beam etching and atomic hydrogen-assisted molecular beam epitaxy regrowth Citation Details In-Document Search Title:...

  9. Deep level defects in n-type GaAsBi and GaAs grown at low temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mooney, P. M.; Watkins, K. P.; Jiang, Zenan; Basile, A. F.; Lewis, R. B.; Bahrami-Yekta, V.; Masnadi-Shirazi, M.; Beaton, D. A.; Tiedje, T.

    2013-04-07

    Deep level defects in n-type GaAs{sub 1-x}Bi{sub x} having 0 < x < 0.012 and GaAs grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) at substrate temperatures between 300 and 400 Degree-Sign C have been investigated by Deep Level Capacitance Spectroscopy. Incorporating Bi suppresses the formation of an electron trap with activation energy 0.40 eV, thus reducing the total trap concentration in dilute GaAsBi layers by more than a factor of 20 compared to GaAs grown under the same conditions. We find that the dominant traps in dilute GaAsBi layers are defect complexes involving As{sub Ga}, as expected for MBE growth at these temperatures.

  10. Room-temperature mid-infrared "M"-type GaAsSb/InGaAs quantum well

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    lasers on InP substrate (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Room-temperature mid-infrared "M"-type GaAsSb/InGaAs quantum well lasers on InP substrate Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Room-temperature mid-infrared "M"-type GaAsSb/InGaAs quantum well lasers on InP substrate We have demonstrated experimentally the InP-based "M"-type GaAsSb/InGaAs quantum-well (QW) laser lasing at 2.41 μm at room temperature by optical pumping. The threshold power density

  11. Au impact on GaAs epitaxial growth on GaAs (111){sub B} substrates in molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liao, Zhi-Ming; Chen, Zhi-Gang; Xu, Hong-Yi; Guo, Ya-Nan; Sun, Wen; Zhang, Zhi; Yang, Lei; Lu, Zhen-Yu; Chen, Ping-Ping; Lu, Wei; Zou, Jin; Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Queensland, St. Lucia, Queensland 4072

    2013-02-11

    GaAs growth behaviour under the presence of Au nanoparticles on GaAs {l_brace}111{r_brace}{sub B} substrate is investigated using electron microscopy. It has been found that, during annealing, enhanced Ga surface diffusion towards Au nanoparticles leads to the GaAs epitaxial growth into {l_brace}113{r_brace}{sub B} faceted triangular pyramids under Au nanoparticles, governed by the thermodynamic growth, while during conventional GaAs growth, growth kinetics dominates, resulting in the flatted triangular pyramids at high temperature and the epitaxial nanowires growth at relatively low temperature. This study provides an insight of Au nanoparticle impact on GaAs growth, which is critical for understanding the formation mechanisms of semiconductor nanowires.

  12. Deep level centers and their role in photoconductivity transients of InGaAs/GaAs quantum dot chains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kondratenko, S. V. Vakulenko, O. V.; Mazur, Yu. I. Dorogan, V. G.; Marega, E.; Benamara, M.; Ware, M. E.; Salamo, G. J.

    2014-11-21

    The in-plane photoconductivity and photoluminescence are investigated in quantum dot-chain InGaAs/GaAs heterostructures. Different photoconductivity transients resulting from spectrally selecting photoexcitation of InGaAs QDs, GaAs spacers, or EL2 centers were observed. Persistent photoconductivity was observed at 80?K after excitation of electron-hole pairs due to interband transitions in both the InGaAs QDs and the GaAs matrix. Giant optically induced quenching of in-plane conductivity driven by recharging of EL2 centers is observed in the spectral range from 0.83?eV to 1.0?eV. Conductivity loss under photoexcitation is discussed in terms of carrier localization by analogy with carrier distribution in disordered media.

  13. An inverted AlGaAs/GaAs patterned-Ge tunnel junction cascade concentrator solar cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venkatasubramanian, R. )

    1993-01-01

    This report describes work to develop inverted-grown Al[sub 0.34]Ga[sub 0.66]As/GaAs cascades. Several significant developments are reported on as follows: (1) The AM1.5 1-sun total-area efficiency of the top Al[sub 0.34]Ga[sub 0.66]As cell for the cascade was improved from 11.3% to 13.2% (NREL measurement [total-area]). (2) The cycled'' organometallic vapor phase epitaxy growth (OMVPE) was studied in detail utilizing a combination of characterization techniques including Hall-data, photoluminescence, and secondary ion mass spectroscopy. (3) A technique called eutectic-metal-bonding (EMB) was developed by strain-free mounting of thin GaAs-AlGaAs films (based on lattice-matched growth on Ge substrates and selective plasma etching of Ge substrates) onto Si carrier substrates. Minority-carrier lifetime in an EMB GaAs double-heterostructure was measured as high as 103 nsec, the highest lifetime report for a freestanding GaAs thin film. (4) A thin-film, inverted-grown GaAs cell with a 1-sun AM1.5 active-area efficiency of 20.3% was obtained. This cell was eutectic-metal-bonded onto Si. (5) A thin-film inverted-grown, Al[sub 0.34]Ga[sub 0.66]As/GaAs cascade with AM1.5 efficiency of 19.9% and 21% at 1-sun and 7-suns, respectively, was obtained. This represents an important milestone in the development of an AlGaAs/GaAs cascade by OMVPE utilizing a tunnel interconnect and demonstrates a proof-of-concept for the inverted-growth approach.

  14. Growth and Band Offsets of Epitaxial Lanthanide Oxides on GaN and AlGaN.

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Conference) | SciTech Connect Growth and Band Offsets of Epitaxial Lanthanide Oxides on GaN and AlGaN. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Growth and Band Offsets of Epitaxial Lanthanide Oxides on GaN and AlGaN. Abstract not provided. Authors: Ihlefeld, Jon ; Brumbach, Michael T. ; Allerman, Andrew A. ; Wheeler, David Roger ; Atcitty, Stanley Publication Date: 2015-01-01 OSTI Identifier: 1244879 Report Number(s): SAND2015-0073C 558329 DOE Contract Number: AC04-94AL85000 Resource

  15. DC characteristics of OMVPE-grown N-p-n InGaP/InGaAsN DHBTs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, N.Y.; Chang, P.C.; Baca, A.G.; Xie, X.M.; Sharps, P.R.; Hou, H.Q.

    2000-01-04

    The authors demonstrate, for the first time, a functional N-p-n heterojunction bipolar transistor using a novel material, InGaAsN, with a bandgap energy of 1.2eV as the p-type base layer. A 300{angstrom}-thick In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}As graded layer was introduced to reduce the conduction band offset at the p-type InGaAsN base and n-type GaAs collector junction. For an emitter size of 500 {mu}m{sup 2}, a peak current gain of 5.3 has been achieved.

  16. Reliability of AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors on low dislocation density bulk GaN substrate: Implications of surface step edges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Killat, N. E-mail: Martin.Kuball@bristol.ac.uk; Montes Bajo, M.; Kuball, M. E-mail: Martin.Kuball@bristol.ac.uk; Paskova, T.; Materials Science and Engineering Department, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 ; Evans, K. R.; Leach, J.; Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23284 ; Li, X.; Özgür, Ü.; Morkoç, H.; Chabak, K. D.; Crespo, A.; Gillespie, J. K.; Fitch, R.; Kossler, M.; Walker, D. E.; Trejo, M.; Via, G. D.; Blevins, J. D.

    2013-11-04

    To enable gaining insight into degradation mechanisms of AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors, devices grown on a low-dislocation-density bulk-GaN substrate were studied. Gate leakage current and electroluminescence (EL) monitoring revealed a progressive appearance of EL spots during off-state stress which signify the generation of gate current leakage paths. Atomic force microscopy evidenced the formation of semiconductor surface pits at the failure location, which corresponds to the interaction region of the gate contact edge and the edges of surface steps.

  17. A monolithic white LED with an active region based on InGaN QWs separated by short-period InGaN/GaN superlattices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsatsulnikov, A. F. Lundin, W. V.; Sakharov, A. V.; Zavarin, E. E.; Usov, S. O.; Nikolaev, A. E.; Kryzhanovskaya, N. V.; Synitsin, M. A.; Sizov, V. S.; Zakgeim, A. L.; Mizerov, M. N.

    2010-06-15

    A new approach to development of effective monolithic white-light emitters is described based on using a short-period InGaN/GaN superlattice as a barrier layer in the active region of LED structures between InGaN quantum wells emitting in the blue and yellow-green spectral ranges. The optical properties of structures of this kind have been studied, and it is demonstrated that the use of such a superlattice makes it possible to obtain effective emission from the active region.

  18. Evaluation of Proposed Hampton Roads Area Sites for Using Small Modular Reactors to Support Federal Clean Energy Goals

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Evaluation of Proposed Hampton Roads Area Sites for Using Small Modular Reactors to Support Federal Clean Energy Goals ORNL/LTR-2014/155 April 2014

  19. Photoeffects in WO{sub 3}/GaAs electrode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoon, K.H.; Lee, J.W.; Cho, Y.S.; Kang, D.H.

    1996-12-01

    Photoeffects of a {ital p}-type GaAs coated with WO{sub 3} thin film have been investigated as a function of film thickness and photoresponse transients of the WO{sub 3}/GaAs electrode were studied. Also, these results were compared to those for a single {ital p}-type GaAs electrode. The photocurrent of the WO{sub 3}/GaAs electrode depended on the film thickness of the WO{sub 3}, showing an optimum photon efficiency for specimens of 800 A thickness. This is due to the existence of an effective interface state within the band gap which reduces trapping of carriers and facilitates carrier movement. For an 800-A-thick WO{sub 3} thin film deposited {ital p}-GaAs photoelectrode, the photogenerated electrons were found to move to an electrolyte at a higher positive onset potential compared with that of single {ital p}-type GaAs, which was confirmed as a result of transient behavior. {ital I}{endash}{ital V} and {ital C}{endash}{ital V} characteristics of the WO{sub 3}/GaAs electrode were also compared with those of a single {ital p}-type GaAs electrode. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  20. Long-wavelength shift and enhanced room temperature photoluminescence efficiency in GaAsSb/InGaAs/GaAs-based heterostructures emitting in the spectral range of 1.01.2??m due to increased charge carrier's localization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kryzhkov, D. I. Yablonsky, A. N.; Morozov, S. V.; Aleshkin, V. Ya.; Krasilnik, Z. F.; Zvonkov, B. N.; Vikhrova, O. V.

    2014-11-28

    In this work, a study of the photoluminescence (PL) temperature dependence in quantum well GaAs/GaAsSb and double quantum well InGaAs/GaAsSb/GaAs heterostructures grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition with different parameters of GaAsSb and InGaAs layers has been performed. It has been demonstrated that in double quantum well InGaAs/GaAsSb/GaAs heterostructures, a significant shift of the PL peak to a longer-wavelength region (up to 1.2??m) and a considerable reduction in the PL thermal quenching in comparison with GaAs/GaAsSb structures can be obtained due to better localization of charge carriers in the double quantum well. For InGaAs/GaAsSb/GaAs heterostructures, an additional channel of radiative recombination with participation of the excited energy states in the quantum well, competing with the main ground-state radiative transition, has been revealed.

  1. Growth of GaN@InGaN Core-Shell and Au-GaN Hybrid Nanostructures for Energy Applications

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kuykendall, Tevye; Aloni, Shaul; Jen-La Plante, Ilan; Mokari, Taleb

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrated a method to control the bandgap energy of GaN nanowires by forming GaN@InGaN core-shell hybrid structures using metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). Furthermore, we show the growth of Au nanoparticles on the surface of GaN nanowires in solution at room temperature. The work shown here is a first step toward engineering properties that are crucial for the rational design and synthesis of a new class of photocatalytic materials. The hybrid structures were characterized by various techniques, including photoluminescence (PL), energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS), transmission and scanning electron microscopy (TEM and SEM), and x-ray diffraction (XRD).

  2. Sidewall passivation for InGaN/GaN nanopillar light emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, Won Hyuck; Abraham, Michael; Yu, Shih-Ying [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); You, Guanjun; Liu, Jie; Wang, Li; Xu, Jian, E-mail: jianxu@engr.psu.edu [Department of Engineering Science and Mechanics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Mohney, Suzanne E., E-mail: mohney@ems.psu.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Materials Research Institute, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States)

    2014-07-07

    We studied the effect of sidewall passivation on InGaN/GaN multiquantum well-based nanopillar light emitting diode (LED) performance. In this research, the effects of varying etch rate, KOH treatment, and sulfur passivation were studied for reducing nanopillar sidewall damage and improving device efficiency. Nanopillars prepared under optimal etching conditions showed higher photoluminescence intensity compared with starting planar epilayers. Furthermore, nanopillar LEDs with and without sulfur passivation were compared through electrical and optical characterization. Suppressed leakage current under reverse bias and four times higher electroluminescence (EL) intensity were observed for passivated nanopillar LEDs compared with unpassivated nanopillar LEDs. The suppressed leakage current and EL intensity enhancement reflect the reduction of non-radiative recombination at the nanopillar sidewalls. In addition, the effect of sulfur passivation was found to be very stable, and further insight into its mechanism was gained through transmission electron microscopy.

  3. Ultrafast dynamics of type-II GaSb/GaAs quantum dots

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Komolibus, K.; Piwonski, T.; Gradkowski, K.; Reyner, C. J.; Liang, B.; Huffaker, D. L.; Huyet, G.; Houlihan, J.

    2015-01-19

    In this paper, room temperature two-colour pump-probe spectroscopy is employed to study ultrafast carrier dynamics in type-II GaSb/GaAs quantum dots. Our results demonstrate a strong dependency of carrier capture/escape processes on applied reverse bias voltage, probing wavelength and number of injected carriers. The extracted timescales as a function of both forward and reverse bias may provide important information for the design of efficient solar cells and quantum dot memories based on this material. The first few picoseconds of the dynamics reveal a complex behaviour with an interesting feature, which does not appear in devices based on type-I materials, and hence is linked to the unique carrier capture/escape processes possible in type-II structures.

  4. Large linear magnetoresistance in a GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aamir, Mohammed Ali, E-mail: aamir@physics.iisc.ernet.in; Goswami, Srijit, E-mail: aamir@physics.iisc.ernet.in; Ghosh, Arindam [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012 (India); Baenninger, Matthias; Farrer, Ian; Ritchie, David A. [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, J.J. Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Tripathi, Vikram [Department of Theoretical Physics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai 400005 (India); Pepper, Michael [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, University College, London WC1E 7JE (United Kingdom)

    2013-12-04

    We report non-saturating linear magnetoresistance (MR) in a two-dimensional electron system (2DES) at a GaAs/AlGaAs heterointerface in the strongly insulating regime. We achieve this by driving the gate voltage below the pinch-off point of the device and operating it in the non-equilibrium regime with high source-drain bias. Remarkably, the magnitude of MR is as large as 500% per Tesla with respect to resistance at zero magnetic field, thus dwarfing most non-magnetic materials which exhibit this linearity. Its primary advantage over most other materials is that both linearity and the enormous magnitude are retained over a broad temperature range (0.3 K to 10 K), thus making it an attractive candidate for cryogenic sensor applications.

  5. Room temperature spin transport in undoped (110) GaAs/AlGaAs quantum wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yokota, Nobuhide Aoshima, Yohei; Ikeda, Kazuhiro; Kawaguchi, Hitoshi

    2014-02-17

    We are reporting on our first observation of a micrometer-order electron spin transport in a (110) GaAs/AlGaAs multiple quantum well (QW) at room temperature using a space- and time-resolved Kerr rotation technique. A 37-μm transport was observed within an electron spin lifetime of 1.2 ns at room temperature when using an in-plane electric field of 1.75 kV/cm. The spatio-temporal profiles of electron spins were well reproduced by the spin drift-diffusion equations coupled with the Poisson equation, supporting the validity of the measurement. The results suggest that (110) QWs are useful as a spin transport layer for semiconductor spintronic devices operating at room temperature.

  6. Evaluation of the two-photon absorption characteristics of GaSb/GaAs quantum rings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagener, M. C.; Botha, J. R.; Carrington, P. J.; Krier, A.

    2014-07-28

    The optical parameters describing the sub-bandgap response of GaSb/GaAs quantum rings solar cells have been obtained from photocurrent measurements using a modulated pseudo-monochromatic light source in combination with a second, continuous photo-filling source. By controlling the charge state of the quantum rings, the photoemission cross-sections describing the two-photon sub-bandgap transitions could be determined independently. Temperature dependent photo-response measurements also revealed that the barrier for thermal hole emission from the quantum rings is significantly below the quantum ring localisation energy. The temperature dependence of the sub-bandgap photo-response of the solar cell is also described in terms of the photo- and thermal-emission characteristics of the quantum rings.

  7. Elastic properties of Pu metal and Pu-Ga alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soderlind, P; Landa, A; Klepeis, J E; Suzuki, Y; Migliori, A

    2010-01-05

    We present elastic properties, theoretical and experimental, of Pu metal and Pu-Ga ({delta}) alloys together with ab initio equilibrium equation-of-state for these systems. For the theoretical treatment we employ density-functional theory in conjunction with spin-orbit coupling and orbital polarization for the metal and coherent-potential approximation for the alloys. Pu and Pu-Ga alloys are also investigated experimentally using resonant ultrasound spectroscopy. We show that orbital correlations become more important proceeding from {alpha} {yields} {beta} {yields} {gamma} plutonium, thus suggesting increasing f-electron correlation (localization). For the {delta}-Pu-Ga alloys we find a softening with larger Ga content, i.e., atomic volume, bulk modulus, and elastic constants, suggest a weakened chemical bonding with addition of Ga. Our measurements confirm qualitatively the theory but uncertainties remain when comparing the model with experiments.

  8. Reactive codoping of GaAlInP compound semiconductors (Patent...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Patent: Reactive codoping of GaAlInP compound semiconductors Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Reactive codoping of GaAlInP compound semiconductors A GaAlInP compound ...

  9. Germanium subcells for multijunction GaInP/GaInAs/Ge solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalyuzhnyy, N. A.; Gudovskikh, A. S.; Evstropov, V. V.; Lantratov, V. M.; Mintairov, S. A.; Timoshina, N. Kh.; Shvarts, M. Z.; Andreev, V. M.

    2010-11-15

    Photovoltaic converters based on n-GaInP/n-p-Ge heterostructures grown by the OMVPE under different conditions of formation of the p-n junction are studied. The heterostructures are intended for use as narrow-gap subcells of the GaInP/GaInAs/Ge three-junction solar cells. It is shown that, in Ge p-tn junctions, along with the diffusion mechanism, the tunneling mechanism of the current flow exists; therefore, the two-diode electrical equivalent circuit of the Ge p-n junction is used. The diode parameters are determined for both mechanisms from the analysis of both dark and 'light' current-voltage dependences. It is shown that the elimination of the component of the tunneling current allows one to increase the efficiency of the Ge subcell by {approx}1% with conversion of nonconcentrated solar radiation. The influence of the tunneling current on the efficiency of the Ge-based devices can be in practice reduced to zero at photogenerated current density of {approx}1.5 A/cm{sup 2} due to the use of the concentrated solar radiation.

  10. Thermal Design and Characterization of Heterogeneously Integrated InGaP/GaAs HBTs

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Choi, Sukwon; Peake, Gregory M.; Keeler, Gordon A.; Geib, Kent M.; Briggs, Ronald D.; Beechem, Thomas E.; Shaffer, Ryan A.; Clevenger, Jascinda; Patrizi, Gary A.; Klem, John F.; et al

    2016-04-21

    Flip-chip heterogeneously integrated n-p-n InGaP/GaAs heterojunction bipolar transistors (HBTs) with integrated thermal management on wide-bandgap AlN substrates followed by GaAs substrate removal are demonstrated. Without thermal management, substrate removal after integration significantly aggravates self-heating effects, causing poor I–V characteristics due to excessive device self-heating. An electrothermal codesign scheme is demonstrated that involves simulation (design), thermal characterization, fabrication, and evaluation. Thermoreflectance thermal imaging, electrical-temperature sensitive parameter-based thermometry, and infrared thermography were utilized to assess the junction temperature rise in HBTs under diverse configurations. In order to reduce the thermal resistance of integrated devices, passive cooling schemes assisted by structural modification, i.e.,more » positioning indium bump heat sinks between the devices and the carrier, were employed. By implementing thermal heat sinks in close proximity to the active region of flip-chip integrated HBTs, the junction-to-baseplate thermal resistance was reduced over a factor of two, as revealed by junction temperature measurements and improvement of electrical performance. In conclusion, the suggested heterogeneous integration method accounts for not only electrical but also thermal requirements providing insight into realization of advanced and robust III–V/Si heterogeneously integrated electronics.« less

  11. Transport properties of InGaAs/GaAs Heterostructures with {delta}-doped quantum wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baidus, N. V.; Vainberg, V. V.; Zvonkov, B. N.; Pylypchuk, A. S. Poroshin, V. N.; Sarbey, O. G.

    2012-05-15

    The lateral transport of electrons in single- and double-well pseudomorphic GaAs/n-InGaAs/GaAs heterostructures with quantum wells 50-100 meV deep and impurity {delta}-layers in the wells, with concentrations in the range 10{sup 11} < N{sub s} < 10{sup 12} cm{sup -2}, has been investigated. Single-well structures with a doped well at the center exhibit a nonmonotonic temperature dependence of the Hall coefficient and an increase in low-temperature electron mobility with an increase in the impurity concentration. The results obtained indicate that the impurity-band electron states play an important role in the conductivity of these structures. Involvement of the impurity band also allows to explain adequately the characteristics of the conductivity of double-well structures; in contrast to single-well structures, band bending caused by asymmetric doping is of great importance. The numerical calculations of conductivity within the model under consideration confirm these suggestions.

  12. Optical properties of multi-stacked InGaAs/GaNAs quantum dot solar cell fabricated on GaAs (311)B substrate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shoji, Yasushi; Akimoto, Katsuhiro; Okada, Yoshitaka

    2012-09-15

    Quantum dot solar cells (QDSCs) comprised of 10 stacked pairs of strain-compensated InGaAs/GaNAs QD structure have been fabricated by atomic hydrogen-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. A homogeneous and high-density QD array structure with improved in-plane ordering and total density of {approx}10{sup 12} cm{sup -2} has been achieved on GaAs (311)B grown at 460 Degree-Sign C after stacking. The external quantum efficiency (EQE) of InGaAs/GaNAs QDSC increases in the longer wavelength range due to additive contribution from QD layers inserted in the intrinsic region. The short-circuit current density measured for QDSC is 17.2 mA/cm{sup 2} compared to 14.8 mA/cm{sup 2} of GaAs reference cell. Further, an increase in EQE due to photocurrent production by 2-step photon absorption has been observed at room temperature though it is still small at around 0.1%.

  13. Progress toward technology transition of GaInP{sub 2}/GaAs/Ge multijunction solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keener, D.N.; Marvin, D.C.; Brinker, D.J.; Curtis, H.B.; Price, P.M.

    1997-12-31

    The objective of the joint WL/PL/NASA Multijunction Solar Cell Manufacturing Technology (ManTech) Program is to scale up high efficiency GaInP{sub 2}/GaAs/Ge multijunction solar cells to production size, quantity, and yield while limiting the production cost/Watt ($/W) to 15% over GaAs cells. Progress made by the program contractors, Spectrolab and TECSTAR, include, respectively, best cell efficiencies of 25.76% and 24.7% and establishment of 24.2% and 23.8% lot average efficiency baseline designs. The paper also presents side-by-side testing results collected by Phillips Laboratory and NASA Lewis on Phase 1 deliverable cells, which shows compliance with program objectives. Cell performance, pre- and post-radiation, and temperature coefficient results on initial production GaInP{sub 2}/GaAs/Ge solar cells will be presented.

  14. Structural and emission properties of InGaAs/GaAs quantum dots emitting at 1.3??m

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldmann, Elias Jahnke, Frank; Paul, Matthias; Kettler, Jan; Jetter, Michael; Michler, Peter; Krause, Florian F.; Mller, Knut; Mehrtens, Thorsten; Rosenauer, Andreas

    2014-10-13

    A combined experimental and theoretical study of InGaAs/GaAs quantum dots (QDs) emitting at 1.3??m under the influence of a strain-reducing InGaAs quantum well is presented. We demonstrate a red shift of 2040?nm observed in photoluminescence spectra due to the quantum well. The InGaAs/GaAs QDs grown by metal organic vapor phase epitaxy show a bimodal height distribution (1?nm and 5?nm) and indium concentrations up to 90%. The emission properties are explained with combined tight-binding and configuration-interaction calculations of the emission wavelengths in conjunction with high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy investigations of QD geometry and indium concentrations in the QDs, which directly enter the calculations. QD geometries and concentration gradients representative for the ensemble are identified.

  15. Road-corridor planning in the EIA procedure in Spain. A review of case studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loro, Manuel [Department of Urban and Regional Planning and Environment, Civil Engineering School, Universidad Politcnica de Madrid, Prof. Aranguren s Transport Research Centre Universidad Politcnica de Madrid, ETSI Caminos, Canales y Puertos, Prof. Aranguren s Centro de investigacin del transporte, TRANSyT-UPM, ETSI Caminos, Canales y Puertos, Universidad Politcnica de Madrid, Prof. Aranguren s Arce, Rosa M. [Department of Urban and Regional Planning and Environment, Civil Engineering School, Universidad Politcnica de Madrid, Prof. Aranguren s Transport Research Centre Universidad Politcnica de Madrid, ETSI Caminos, Canales y Puertos, Prof. Aranguren s Centro de investigacin del transporte, TRANSyT-UPM, ETSI Caminos, Canales y Puertos, Universidad Politcnica de Madrid, Prof. Aranguren s Ortega, Emilio [Transport Research Centre Universidad Politcnica de Madrid, ETSI Caminos, Canales y Puertos, Prof. Aranguren s Centro de investigacin del transporte, TRANSyT-UPM, ETSI Caminos, Canales y Puertos, Universidad Politcnica de Madrid, Prof. Aranguren s Department of Construction and Rural Roads, Forestry Engineering School, Universidad Politcnica de Madrid, Ciudad Universitaria s and others

    2014-01-15

    The assessment of different alternatives in road-corridor planning must be based on a number of well-defined territorial variables that serve as decision making criteria, and this requires a high-quality preliminary environmental assessment study. In Spain the formal specifications for the technical requirements stipulate the constraints that must be considered in the early stages of defining road corridors, but not how they should be analyzed and ranked. As part of the feasibility study of a new road definition, the most common methodology is to establish different levels of Territorial Carrying Capacity (TCC) in the study area in order to summarize the territorial variables on thematic maps and to ease the tracing process of road-corridor layout alternatives. This paper explores the variables used in 22 road-construction projects conducted by the Ministry of Public Works that were subject to the Spanish EIA regulation and published between 2006 and 2008. The aim was to evaluate the quality of the methods applied and the homogeneity and suitability of the variables used for defining the TCC. The variables were clustered into physical, environmental, land-use and cultural constraints for the purpose of comparing the TCC values assigned in the studies reviewed. We found the average quality of the studies to be generally acceptable in terms of the justification of the methodology, the weighting and classification of the variables, and the creation of a synthesis map. Nevertheless, the methods for assessing the TCC are not sufficiently standardized; there is a lack of uniformity in the cartographic information sources and methodologies for the TCC valuation. -- Highlights: We explore 22 road-corridor planning studies subjected to the Spanish EIA regulation. We analyze the variables selected for defining territorial carrying capacity. The quality of the studies is acceptable (methodology, variable weighting, mapping). There is heterogeneity in the methods for territorial carrying capacity valuation.

  16. CNG in OKC: Improving Efficiency at the Pump and on the Road | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy CNG in OKC: Improving Efficiency at the Pump and on the Road CNG in OKC: Improving Efficiency at the Pump and on the Road March 8, 2012 - 4:02pm Addthis Andy Mitchell, Public Works Project Manager for the City of Oklahoma City, refills a vehicle at the new fast-fill CNG fueling station located at the city's main maintenance facility. | Courtesy of the City of Oklahoma City. Andy Mitchell, Public Works Project Manager for the City of Oklahoma City, refills a vehicle at the new

  17. U.S. Virgin Islands Energy Road Map: Analysis | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Road Map: Analysis U.S. Virgin Islands Energy Road Map: Analysis This report lays out the strategy envisioned by the stakeholders in the U.S. Virgin Islands, U.S. Department of Energy, and U.S. Department of Interior to achieve the ambitious goal of achieving a 60% reduction in business-as-usual fossil fuel demand by 2025 (60x25) within the electricity sector. Instead, this work and supporting analysis provides a framework within which decisions can begin to be made, a concrete vision of

  18. From Rice Paddies to the Road: Transforming Rice Husks into Lithium-ion

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Anodes for Plug-in Electric Vehicles | Department of Energy From Rice Paddies to the Road: Transforming Rice Husks into Lithium-ion Anodes for Plug-in Electric Vehicles From Rice Paddies to the Road: Transforming Rice Husks into Lithium-ion Anodes for Plug-in Electric Vehicles April 27, 2016 - 10:15am Addthis Rice hulls and other samples used for demonstrating the capabilities of the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Rapid Biomass Analysis System. Researchers

  19. STEM Middle School Mentoring Cafés Take it on the Road | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy STEM Middle School Mentoring Cafés Take it on the Road STEM Middle School Mentoring Cafés Take it on the Road November 12, 2015 - 3:00pm Addthis STEM Mentoring Cafes - sponsored in part by the Energy Department - engage middle schoolers with science and technology professionals at local science centers and museums nationwide to inspire them to learn about a broad spectrum of energy-related career fields. source: Matty Greene/US DOE STEM Mentoring Cafes - sponsored in part by the

  20. VIDEO: Getting Started on the Road to Clean Energy | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    VIDEO: Getting Started on the Road to Clean Energy VIDEO: Getting Started on the Road to Clean Energy May 5, 2016 - 10:45am Addthis Pat Adams Pat Adams Digital Content Specialist, Office of Public Affairs Simon Edelman Simon Edelman Chief Creative Officer For America's next generation of clean energy innovators, getting started can be the hardest part. That's why the Department of Energy is testing a new model for clean energy research and development (R&D) through a program called Cyclotron

  1. You Can Still Save on the Road -- Even with No Cash for Clunkers |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Can Still Save on the Road -- Even with No Cash for Clunkers You Can Still Save on the Road -- Even with No Cash for Clunkers August 26, 2009 - 1:16pm Addthis Eric Barendsen Energy Technology Program Specialist, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Just about everybody by now has heard of the Car Allowance Rebate System (CARS) Program, better known as "Cash for Clunkers," which had pumped $1.9 billion worth of incentives into the ailing car industry

  2. Amped Up! Newsletter Focuses on EERE Innovation on the COP 21 Road Through

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Paris | Department of Energy Amped Up! Newsletter Focuses on EERE Innovation on the COP 21 Road Through Paris Amped Up! Newsletter Focuses on EERE Innovation on the COP 21 Road Through Paris November 13, 2015 - 4:00pm Addthis Source: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Source: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory The 21st Conference of the Parties (COP 21) takes place next month in Paris, France as the world waits to see if a universal and legally binding agreement can finally be reached

  3. New EV Everywhere Logo is Ready for the Road | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EV Everywhere Logo is Ready for the Road New EV Everywhere Logo is Ready for the Road November 6, 2015 - 1:17pm Addthis The brand-new logo for EV Everywhere, the effort to encourage the adoption of plug-in electric vehicles. The Energy Department ran a contest to choose a logo, and the winning design was submitted by Brian Marquis. The brand-new logo for EV Everywhere, the effort to encourage the adoption of plug-in electric vehicles. The Energy Department ran a contest to choose a logo, and the

  4. LANL closes road, trails for safety reasons; flooding and erosion control

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    work under way Road, trails closed for safety reasons LANL closes road, trails for safety reasons; flooding and erosion control work under way Closure is in response to the increased fire risk and danger of flash flooding. July 8, 2011 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new

  5. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Shore Road Project - Old Greenwich,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Connecticut | Department of Energy Shore Road Project - Old Greenwich, Connecticut DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Shore Road Project - Old Greenwich, Connecticut Case study of a DOE Zero Energy Ready Home in Old Greenwich, CT, that scored HERS 40 without PV and HERS 27 with PV. This 4,100 ft2 custom home has 13-inch ICF basement walls and 11-inch insulated concrete form (ICF) above-grade walls with a closed-cell spray foam-insulated roof deck, and a continuously running energy

  6. Video: SuperTruck Barreling Down the Road of Sustainability | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy SuperTruck Barreling Down the Road of Sustainability Video: SuperTruck Barreling Down the Road of Sustainability May 14, 2015 - 4:30pm Addthis New Energy 101 video shows how the Energy Department's SuperTruck initiative is making Class 8 trucks more fuel efficient and less expensive to operate. | Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy video. Paul Lester Paul Lester Digital Content Specialist, Office of Public Affairs KEY FACTS SuperTruck initiative helping make Class 8

  7. Why Did the LED Light Bulb Cross the Road? | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Did the LED Light Bulb Cross the Road? Why Did the LED Light Bulb Cross the Road? January 24, 2012 - 1:31pm Addthis Big Bill and Little Bill are here to talk with you about energy efficiency on behalf of Energy Impact Illinois. Roland Risser Roland Risser Deputy Assistant Secretary for Renewable Power (Acting) How can I participate? You can view all of Big Bill and Little Bill's videos on the Energy Bill's YouTube channel. Everyone knows that laughter is good for you. Studies suggest it can

  8. Y-12's rough roads smoothed over with 23,000 tons of recycled asphalt |

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration Home / Blog Y-12's rough roads smoothed over with 23,000 tons of recycled asphalt Tuesday, December 29, 2015 - 12:00am NNSA Blog Some 23,000 tons of asphalt removed during this summer's UPF site work have been put to use throughout the site. Potholes and gravel roads are now "paved" with the recycled asphalt that has been ground into a material called base course. Unlike gravel, the material tends to rebind into a solid form as it is packed

  9. After-hours, weekend changes through East Jemez road vehicle access portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    begin June 18 After-hours, weekend changes through East Jemez Road Vehicle Access Portal After-hours, weekend changes through East Jemez road vehicle access portal begin June 18 All vehicles entering the portal must use center lane number 4. June 15, 2012 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma

  10. Online Optimal Control of Connected Vehicles for Efficient Traffic Flow at Merging Roads

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rios-Torres, Jackeline; Malikopoulos, Andreas; Pisu, Pierluigi

    2015-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of coordinating online connected vehicles at merging roads to achieve a smooth traffic flow without stop-and-go driving. We present a framework and a closed-form solution that optimize the acceleration profile of each vehicle in terms of fuel economy while avoiding collision with other vehicles at the merging zone. The proposed solution is validated through simulation and it is shown that coordination of connected vehicles can reduce significantly fuel consumption and travel time at merging roads.

  11. Evaluating the Impact of Road Grade on Simulated Commercial Vehicle Fuel Economy Using Real-World Drive Cycles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopp, Sean; Wood, Eric; Duran, Adam

    2015-10-13

    Commercial vehicle fuel economy is known to vary significantly with both positive and negative road grade. Medium- and heavy-duty vehicles operating at highway speeds require incrementally larger amounts of energy to pull heavy payloads up inclines as road grade increases. Non-hybrid vehicles are then unable to recapture energy on descent and lose energy through friction braking. While the on-road effects of road grade are well understood, the majority of standard commercial vehicle drive cycles feature no climb or descent requirements. Additionally, existing literature offers a limited number of sources that attempt to estimate the on-road energy implications of road grade in the medium- and heavy-duty space. This study uses real-world commercial vehicle drive cycles from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Fleet DNA database to simulate the effects of road grade on fuel economy across a range of vocations, operating conditions, and locations. Drive-cycles are matched with vocation-specific vehicle models and simulated with and without grade. Fuel use due to grade is presented, and variation in fuel consumption due to drive cycle and vehicle characteristics is explored through graphical and statistical comparison. The results of this study suggest that road grade accounts for 1%-9% of fuel use in commercial vehicles on average and up to 40% on select routes.

  12. Ferromagnetism in undoped One-dimensional GaN Nanowires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeganathan, K. E-mail: jagan@physics.bdu.ac.in; Purushothaman, V.; Debnath, R.; Arumugam, S.

    2014-05-15

    We report an intrinsic ferromagnetism in vertical aligned GaN nanowires (NW) fabricated by molecular beam epitaxy without any external catalyst. The magnetization saturates at ?0.75 emu/gm with the applied field of 3000 Oe for the NWs grown under the low-Gallium flux of 2.4 10{sup ?8} mbar. Despite a drop in saturation magnetization, narrow hysteresis loop remains intact regardless of Gallium flux. Magnetization in vertical standing GaN NWs is consistent with the spectral analysis of low-temperature photoluminescence pertaining to Ga-vacancies associated structural defects at the nanoscale.

  13. Characterization of Zns-GaP Naon-composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Todd, V.

    1993-12-09

    It proved possible to produce consistent, high-quality nanocrystalline ZnS powders with grain sizes as small as 8 nm. These powders are nano-porous and are readily impregnated with GaP precursor, although inconsistently. Both crystal structure and small grain size of the ZnS can be maintained through the use of GaP. Heat treatment of the impregnated powders results in a ZnS-GaP composite structure where the grain sizes of the phases are on the order of 10--20 nm. Conventional powder processing should be able to produce optically dense ceramic compacts with improved mechanical properties and suitable IR transmission.

  14. Life in the Fast Lane: Road Crossing Behavior of Mule Deer in a Wildland-Urban Interface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, Leslie A.; Biggs, James; Bennett, Kathryn D.; Bare, Carey; Sherwood, Sherri R.

    2012-04-04

    In 2009, approximately 260,000 animal-vehicle collisions were reported in the United States, resulting in 12,000 human injuries and 173 human fatalities. Research has focused on identifying factors associated with high densities of animal-vehicle collisions, including variables such as traffic speed and volume, road design, topographic features, vegetative cover, and local deer or elk (Cervus elaphus) abundance. The purposes of this study were to document how often and where mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) crossed roads in a western United States wildland-urban interface area, and to relate deer road-crossing behavior to deer-vehicle collision locations. Seven adult mule deer (four males [M] and three females [F]) were captured and collared with GPS-enabled collars during December 2001 and January 2002. Five of the seven deployed collars were recovered. None of the roads in the study area appeared to act as a substantial barrier to deer passage. Deer home ranges straddled highways and primary, secondary, and tertiary arterial roads. Deer crossed all types of roads. The average number of times deer crossed road during 24 hours of monitoring ranged from 2.1 to 7.0. Deer in the Los Alamos townsite avoided crossing roads during day and before sunset. Deer-vehicle accidents occurred at 350 percent of the level expected after sunset. All other time periods had fewer accidents than expected. The distribution of accidents across time periods was not similar to the distribution of road crossings across time periods for any deer. Within Los Alamos County there was a clear trend for deer-vehicle collisions to occur on roads with speed limits > 35 mph. Deer in the townsite frequently crossed roads with lower speed limits; therefore, the reason for the paucity of accidents along these roads was evidently the ability of drivers to detect deer (or the ability of deer to detect vehicles) and respond before an accident occurred. There was a significant but not strong correlation between the density of accidents and the density of road crossings. This was probably related to the high number of deer crossings of tertiary arterial roads, where accidents were not likely to occur.

  15. Outdoor Testing of GaInP2/GaAs Tandem Cells with Top Cell Thickness Varied

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McMahon, W. E.; Emergy, K. E.; Friedman, D. J.; Ottoson, L.; Young, M. S.; Ward, J. S.; Kramer, C. M.; Duda, A.; Kurtz, S.

    2005-08-01

    In this study, we measure the performance of GaInP2/GaAs tandem cells under direct beam sunlight outdoors in order to quantify their sensitivity to both spectral variation and GaInP2 top-cell thickness. A set of cells with five different top-cell thicknesses was mounted on a two-axis tracker with the incident sunlight collimated to exclude all except the direct beam. Current-voltage (I-V) curves were taken throughout the course of several days, along with measurements of the direct solar spectrum. Our two major conclusions are: (1) GaInP2/GaAs tandem cells designed for either the ASTM G-173 direct (G-173D) spectrum or the "air mass 1.5 global" (AM1.5G) spectrum perform the best, and (2) cells can be characterized indoors and modeled using outdoor spectra with the same result. These results are equally valid for GaInP2/GaAs/Ge triple-junction cells.

  16. Local Structures and Interface Morphology of InGaAsN Thin Films Grown on GaAs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allerman, A.A.; Chen, J.G.; Geisz, J.F.; Huang, S.; Hulbert, S.L.; Jones, E.D.; Kao, Y.H.; Kurtz, S.; Kurtz, S.R.; Olson, J.M.; Soo, Y.L.

    1999-02-23

    The compound semiconductor system InGaAsN exhibits many intriguing properties which are particularly useful for the development of innovative high efficiency thin film solar cells and long wavelength lasers. The bandgap in these semiconductors can be varied by controlling the content of N and In and the thin films can yet be lattice-matched to GaAs. In the present work, x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) and grazing incidence x-ray scattering (GIXS) techniques have been employed to probe the local environment surrounding both N and In atoms as well as the interface morphology of InGaAsN thin films epitaxially grown on GaAs. The soft x-ray XAFS results around nitrogen K-edge reveal that N is in the sp{sup 3} hybridized bonding configuration in InGaAsN and GaAsN, suggesting that N impurities most likely substitute for As sites in these two compounds. The results of In K-edge XAFS suggest a possible trend of a slightly larger coordination number of As nearest neighbors around In atoms in InGaAsN samples with a narrower bandgap whereas the In-As interatomic distance remains practically the same as in InAs within the experimental uncertainties. These results combined suggest that N-substitution of the As sites plays an important role of bandgap-narrowing while in the meantime counteracting the compressive strain caused by In-doping. Grazing incidence x-ray scattering (GIXS) experiments verify that InGaAsN thin films can indeed form very smooth interfaces with GaAs yielding an average interfacial roughness of 5-20{angstrom}.

  17. EPA GHG Certification of Medium- and Heavy-Duty Vehicles: Development of Road Grade Profiles Representative of US Controlled Access Highways

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, Eric; Duran, Adam; Burton, Evan; Gonder, Jeffrey; Kelly, Kenneth

    2015-05-12

    This report includes a detailed comparison of the TomTom national road grade database relative to a local road grade dataset generated by Southwest Research Institute and a national elevation dataset publically available from the U.S. Geological Survey. This analysis concluded that the TomTom national road grade database was a suitable source of road grade data for purposes of this study.

  18. Electrical spin injection using GaCrN in a GaN based spin light emitting diode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Banerjee, D.; Ganguly, S.; Saha, D.; Adari, R.; Sankaranarayan, S.; Kumar, A.; Aldhaheri, R. W.; Hussain, M. A.; Balamesh, A. S.

    2013-12-09

    We have demonstrated electrical spin-injection from GaCrN dilute magnetic semiconductor (DMS) in a GaN-based spin light emitting diode (spin-LED). The remanent in-plane magnetization of the thin-film semiconducting ferromagnet has been used for introducing the spin polarized electrons into the non-magnetic InGaN quantum well. The output circular polarization obtained from the spin-LED closely follows the normalized in-plane magnetization curve of the DMS. A saturation circular polarization of ?2.5% is obtained at 200?K.

  19. Effects of light illumination on electron velocity of AlGaN/GaN heterostructures under high electric field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Lei; Yang, Xuelin Cheng, Jianpeng; Sang, Ling; Xu, Fujun; Tang, Ning; Feng, Zhihong; Lv, Yuanjie; Wang, Xinqiang; Shen, B.; Ge, Weikun

    2014-12-15

    We have investigated the variation of electron velocity in AlGaN/GaN heterostructures depending on illuminating light intensity and wavelength. It is shown that the electron velocity at high electric field increases under above-band light illumination. This electron velocity enhancement is found to be related to the photo-generated cold holes which interact with hot electrons and thus accelerate the energy relaxation at high electric field. The results suggest an alternative way to improve the electron energy relaxation rate and hence the electron velocity in GaN based heterostructures.

  20. Microscopic, electrical and optical studies on InGaN/GaN quantum wells based LED devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mutta, Geeta Rani; Venturi, Giulia; Castaldini, Antonio; Cavallini, Anna

    2014-02-21

    We report here on the micro structural, electronic and optical properties of a GaN-based InGaN/GaN MQW LED grown by the MOVPE method. The present study shows that the threading dislocations present in these LED structures are terminated as V pits at the surface and have an impact on the electrical and optical activity of these devices. It has been pointed that these dislocations were of edge, screw and mixed types. EBIC maps suggest that the electrically active defects are screw and mixed dislocations and behave as nonradiative recombinant centres.

  1. High-power InGaAs/GaAs quantum-well laser with enhanced broad spectrum of stimulated emission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Huolei; Yu, Hongyan; Zhou, Xuliang; Kan, Qiang; Yuan, Lijun; Wang, Wei; Pan, Jiaoqing; Chen, Weixi; Ding, Ying

    2014-10-06

    We report the demonstration of an InGaAs/GaAs quantum well (QW) broadband stimulated emission laser with a structure that integrated a GaAs tunnel junction with two QW active regions. The laser exhibits ultrabroad lasing spectral coverage of ?51?nm at a center wavelength of 1060?nm with a total emission power of 790 mW, corresponding to a high average spectral power density of 15.5 mW/nm, under pulsed current conditions. Compared to traditional lasers, this laser with an asymmetric separate-confinement heterostructure shows broader lasing bandwidth and higher spectral power density.

  2. Maps and Directions | Savannah River Ecology Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Go under I-520 (Bobby Jones Expressway) and follow instructions (below) from Sandbar Ferry Rd. From AthensAtlanta, GA: Take I-20 east to Augusta, GA. Near Augusta, take I-520 ...

  3. Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity Cold Weather On-road Testing of the Chevrolet Volt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smart, John

    2015-03-01

    This report details cold weather on-road testing of a Chevrolet Volt. It quantifies changes in efficiency and electric range as ambient temperature changes. It will be published to INL's AVTA website as an INL technical report and will be accessible to the general public.

  4. Addendum: Tenth International Symposium on Alcohol Fuels, The road to commercialization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    The Tenth International Symposium on ALCOHOL FUELS ``THE ROAD TO COMMERCIALIZATION`` was held at the Broadmoor Hotel, Colorado Springs, Colorado, USA November 7--10, 1993. Twenty-seven papers on the production of alcohol fuels, specifications, their use in automobiles, buses and trucks, emission control, and government policies were presented. Individual papers have been processed separately for entry into the data base.

  5. Life Cycle Assessment Comparing the Use of Jatropha Biodiesel in the Indian Road and Rail Sectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitaker, M.; Heath, G.

    2010-05-01

    This life cycle assessment of Jatropha biodiesel production and use evaluates the net greenhouse gas (GHG) emission (not considering land-use change), net energy value (NEV), and net petroleum consumption impacts of substituting Jatropha biodiesel for conventional petroleum diesel in India. Several blends of biodiesel with petroleum diesel are evaluated for the rail freight, rail passenger, road freight, and road-passenger transport sectors that currently rely heavily on petroleum diesel. For the base case, Jatropha cultivation, processing, and use conditions that were analyzed, the use of B20 results in a net reduction in GHG emissions and petroleum consumption of 14% and 17%, respectively, and a NEV increase of 58% compared with the use of 100% petroleum diesel. While the road-passenger transport sector provides the greatest sustainability benefits per 1000 gross tonne kilometers, the road freight sector eventually provides the greatest absolute benefits owing to substantially higher projected utilization by year 2020. Nevertheless, introduction of biodiesel to the rail sector might present the fewest logistic and capital expenditure challenges in the near term. Sensitivity analyses confirmed that the sustainability benefits are maintained under multiple plausible cultivation, processing, and distribution scenarios. However, the sustainability of any individual Jatropha plantation will depend on site-specific conditions.

  6. EA-1980: Spar Canyon-Round Valley Access Road System Improvements, Custer County, Idaho

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bonneville Power Administration is preparing an EA to assess potential environmental impacts of proposed improvements to the access road system for its existing Spar Canyon-Round Valley Transmission Line located on Bureau of Land Management land in Custer County, Idaho.

  7. Fact #625: May 31, 2010 Distribution of Trucks by On-Road Vehicle Weight

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    According to weigh-in-motion data collected by fifteen states, the majority of 5-axle tractor-trailers on the road weigh between 33,000 and 73,000 lbs.Eleven percent of the tractor-trailers had...

  8. USVI Energy Road Map: Charting the Course to a Clean Energy Future (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-07-01

    This brochure provides an overview of the integrated clean energy deployment process and progress of the Energy Development in Island Nations U.S. Virgin Islands pilot project road map, including over-arching goals, organization, strategy, technology-specific goals and accomplishments, challenges, solutions, and upcoming milestones.

  9. Cyclotron Road: Creating a Home for Top Clean Energy Technology Entrepreneurs within our National Laboratories

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The best young scientists and researchers in the U.S. have a new pathway to advance innovative research and development projects that could accelerate America’s clean energy future. It’s a new tech-to-market program called Cyclotron Road where top entrepreneurial researchers can develop cutting-edge clean energy technologies at the Energy Department’s Berkeley Lab.

  10. Evaporation-based Ge/.sup.68 Ga Separation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mirzadeh, Saed; Whipple, Richard E.; Grant, Patrick M.; O'Brien, Jr., Harold A.

    1981-01-01

    Micro concentrations of .sup.68 Ga in secular equilibrium with .sup.68 Ge in strong aqueous HCl solution may readily be separated in ionic form from the .sup.68 Ge for biomedical use by evaporating the solution to dryness and then leaching the .sup.68 Ga from the container walls with dilute aqueous solutions of HCl or NaCl. The chloro-germanide produced during the evaporation may be quantitatively recovered to be used again as a source of .sup.68 Ga. If the solution is distilled to remove any oxidizing agents which may be present as impurities, the separation factor may easily exceed 10.sup.5. The separation is easily completed and the .sup.68 Ga made available in ionic form in 30 minutes or less.

  11. Linear and nonlinear optical properties of GaAs/Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1?x}As/GaAs/Al{sub y}Ga{sub 1?y}As multi-shell spherical quantum dot

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Emre Kavruk, Ahmet E-mail: aekavruk@gmail.com; Koc, Fatih; Sahin, Mehmet E-mail: mehsahin@gmail.com

    2013-11-14

    In this work, the optical properties of GaAs/Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1?x}As/GaAs/Al{sub y}Ga{sub 1?y}As multi-shell quantum dot heterostructure have been studied as a function of Al doping concentrations for cases with and without a hydrogenic donor atom. It has been observed that the absorption coefficient strength and/or resonant absorption wavelength can be adjusted by changing the Al content of inner-barrier and/or outer-barrier regions. Besides, it has been shown that the donor atom has an important effect on the control of the electronic and optical properties of the structure. The results have been presented as a function of the Al contents of the inner-barrier x and outer-barrier y regions and probable physical reasons have been discussed.

  12. High Quantum Efficiency AlGaN/InGaN Photodetectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buckley, James H; Leopold, Daniel

    2009-11-24

    High efficiency photon counting detectors in use today for high energy particle detection applications have a significant spectral mismatch with typical sources and have a number of practical problems compared with conventional bialkali photomultiplier tubes. Numerous high energy physics experiments that employ scintillation light detectors or Cherenkov detectors would benefit greatly from photomultipliers with higher quantum efficiencies. The need for extending the sensitivity of photon detectors to the blue and UV wavebands comes from the fact that both Cherenkov light and some scintillators have an emission spectrum which is peaked at short wavelengths. This research involves the development of high quantum efficiency, high gain, UV/blue photon counting detectors based on AlGaN/InGaN photocathode heterostructures grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). The work could eventually lead to nearly ideal light detectors with a number of distinct advantages over existing technologies for numerous applications in high-energy physics and particle astrophysics. Potential advantages include much lower noise detection, better stability and radiation resistance than other cathode structures, very low radioactive background levels for deep underground experiments and high detection efficiency of individual UV-visible photons. We are also working on the development of photocathodes with intrinsic gain, initially improving the detection efficiency of hybrid semiconductor-vacuum tube devices, and eventually leading to an all-solid-state photomultiplier device.

  13. Enhanced optical property in quaternary GaInAsSb/AlGaAsSb quantum wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Chien-Hung Lee, Chien-Ping

    2014-10-21

    High quality GaInAsSb/AlGaAsSb quantum wells (QWs) have been grown by molecular beam epitaxy using proper interface treatments. By controlling the group-V elements at interfaces, we obtained excellent optical quality QWs, which were free from undesired localized trap states, which may otherwise severely affect the exciton recombination. Strong and highly efficient exciton emissions up to room temperature with a wavelength of 2.2 μm were observed. A comprehensive investigation on the QW quality was carried out using temperature dependent and power dependent photoluminescence (PL) measurements. The PL emission intensity remains nearly constant at low temperatures and is free from the PL quenching from the defect induced localized states. The temperature dependent emission energy had a bulk-like behavior, indicating high quality well/barrier interfaces. Because of the uniformity of the QWs and smooth interfaces, the low temperature limit of inhomogeneous line width broadening is as small as 5 meV.

  14. Characterization of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) films with varying gallium ratios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Claypoole, Jesse; Peace, Bernadette; Sun, Neville; Dwyer, Dan; Eisaman, Matthew D.; Haldar, Pradeep; Efstathiadis, Harry

    2015-09-05

    Cu(In1-x,Gax)Se2 (CIGS) absorber layers were deposited on molybdenum (Mo) coated soda-lime glass substrates with varying Ga content (described as Ga/(In+Ga) ratios) with respect to depth. As the responsible mechanisms for the limitation of the performance of the CIGS solar cells with high Ga contents are not well understood, the goal of this work was to investigate different properties of CIGS absorber films with Ga/(In+Ga) ratios varied between 0.29 and 0.41 (as determined by X-ray florescence spectroscopy (XRF)) in order to better understand the role that the Ga content has on film quality. The Ga grading in the CIGS layer has the effect causing a higher bandgap toward the surface and Mo contact while the band gap in the middle of the CIGS layer is lower. Also, a wider and larger Ga/(In+Ga) grading dip located deeper in the CIGS absorber layers tend to produce larger grains in the regions of the films that have lower Ga/(In+Ga) ratios. It was found that surface roughness decreases from 51.2 nm to 41.0 nm with increasing Ga/(In+Ga) ratios. However, the surface roughness generally decreases if the Ga grading occurs deeper in the absorber layer.

  15. A new InGaP/GaAs tunneling heterostructure-emitter bipolar transistor (T-HEBT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsai, Jung-Hui; Lee, Ching-Sung; Lour, Wen-Shiung; Ma, Yung-Chun; Ye, Sheng-Shiun

    2011-05-15

    Excellent characteristics of an InGaP/GaAs tunneling heterostructure-emitter bipolar transistor (T-HEBT) are first demonstrated. The insertion of a thin n-GaAs emitter layer between tynneling confinement and base layers effectivelty eliminates the potential spike at base-emitter junction and reduces the collector-emitter offset voltage, while the thin InGaP tunneling confinement layer is employed to reduce the transporting time across emitter region for electrons and maintain the good confinement effect for holes. Experimentally, the studied T-HEBN exhibits a maximum current gain of 285, a relatively low offset voltage of 40 mW, and a current-gain cutoff frequency of 26.4 GHz.

  16. Quaternary AlInGaN/InGaN quantum well on vicinal c-plane substrate for high emission intensity of green wavelengths

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Seoung-Hwan; Pak, Y. Eugene; Park, Chang Young; Mishra, Dhaneshwar; Yoo, Seung-Hyun; Cho, Yong-Hee Shim, Mun-Bo; Kim, Sungjin

    2015-05-14

    Electronic and optical properties of non-trivial semipolar AlInGaN/InGaN quantum well (QW) structures are investigated by using the multiband effective-mass theory and non-Markovian optical model. On vicinal c-plane GaN substrate miscut by a small angle (??GaN/InGaN system is shown to have ?3 times larger spontaneous emission peak intensity than the conventional InGaN/GaN system at green wavelength. It is attributed to much larger optical matrix element of the quaternary AlInGaN/InGaN system, derived from the reduction of internal electric field induced by polarizations. This effect exceeds the performance-degrading factor of smaller quasi-Fermi-level separation for the quaternary AlInGaN/InGaN system than that for the conventional InGaN/GaN system. Results indicate that the use of quaternary III-nitride QWs on vicinal substrates may be beneficial in improving the performance of optical devices emitting green light.

  17. The first principle study of Ni{sub 2}ScGa and Ni{sub 2}TiGa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    zduran, Mustafa; Turgut, Kemal; Arikan, Nihat; ?yigr, Ahmet; Candan, Abdullah

    2014-10-06

    We computed the electronic structure, elastic moduli, vibrational properties, and Ni{sub 2}TiGa and Ni{sub 2}ScGa alloys in the cubic L2{sub 1} structure. The obtained equilibrium lattice constants of these alloys are in good agreement with available data. In cubic systems, there are three independent elastic constants, namely C{sub 11}, C{sub 12} and C{sub 44}. We calculated elastic constants in L2{sub 1} structure for Ni{sub 2}TiGa and Ni{sub 2}ScGa using the energy-strain method. The electronic band structure, total and partial density of states for these alloys were investigated within density functional theory using the plane-wave pseudopotential method implemented in Quantum-Espresso program package. From band structure, total and projected density of states, we observed metallic characters of these compounds. The electronic calculation indicate that the predominant contributions of the density of states at Fermi level come from the Ni 3d states and Sc 3d states for Ni{sub 2}TiGa, Ni 3d states and Sc 3d states for Ni{sub 2}ScGa. The computed density of states at Fermi energy are 2.22 states/eV Cell for Ni{sub 2}TiGa, 0.76 states/eV Cell for Ni{sub 2}ScGa. The vibrational properties were obtained using a linear response in the framework at the density functional perturbation theory. For the alloys, the results show that the L2{sub 1} phase is unstable since the phonon calculations have imagine modes.

  18. Growth and Band Offsets of Epitaxial Lanthanide Oxides on GaN and AlGaN

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Sandia National Laboratories Exceptional service in the national interest SAND2015-0073C Growth and Band Offsets of Epitaxial Lanthanide Oxides on GaN and AlGaN 22 January 2015 Jon Ihlefeld, Michael Brumbach, Andrew A. Allerman, David R. Wheeler, and Stanley Atcitty This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Program managed by Dr. Imre Gyuk and the Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program at Sandia National

  19. Effects of high-temperature AIN buffer on the microstructure of AlGaN/GaN HEMTs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coerekci, S.; Oeztuerk, M. K.; Yu, Hongbo; Cakmak, M.; Oezcelik, S.; Oezbay, E.

    2013-06-15

    Effects on AlGaN/GaN high-electron-mobility transistor structure of a high-temperature AlN buffer on sapphire substrate have been studied by high-resolution x-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy techniques. The buffer improves the microstructural quality of GaN epilayer and reduces approximately one order of magnitude the edge-type threading dislocation density. As expected, the buffer also leads an atomically flat surface with a low root-mean-square of 0.25 nm and a step termination density in the range of 10{sup 8} cm{sup -2}. Due to the high-temperature buffer layer, no change on the strain character of the GaN and AlGaN epitaxial layers has been observed. Both epilayers exhibit compressive strain in parallel to the growth direction and tensile strain in perpendicular to the growth direction. However, an high-temperature AlN buffer layer on sapphire substrate in the HEMT structure reduces the tensile stress in the AlGaN layer.

  20. p-doping-free InGaN/GaN light-emitting diode driven by three-dimensional hole gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Zi-Hui; Tiam Tan, Swee; Kyaw, Zabu; Liu, Wei; Ji, Yun; Ju, Zhengang; Zhang, Xueliang [LUMINOUS Centre of Excellence for Semiconductor Lighting and Displays, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, 639798 Singapore (Singapore) [LUMINOUS Centre of Excellence for Semiconductor Lighting and Displays, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, 639798 Singapore (Singapore); LUMINOUS Centre of Excellence for Semiconductor Lighting and Displays, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, 639798 Singapore (Singapore); Wei Sun, Xiao, E-mail: EXWSUN@ntu.edu.sg [LUMINOUS Centre of Excellence for Semiconductor Lighting and Displays, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, 639798 Singapore (Singapore); LUMINOUS Centre of Excellence for Semiconductor Lighting and Displays, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, 639798 Singapore (Singapore); Department of Electronics and Electrical Engineering, South University of Science and Technology of China, Shenzhen, Guangdong 518055 (China); Volkan Demir, Hilmi, E-mail: VOLKAN@stanfordalumni.org [LUMINOUS Centre of Excellence for Semiconductor Lighting and Displays, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, 639798 Singapore (Singapore); LUMINOUS Centre of Excellence for Semiconductor Lighting and Displays, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, 639798 Singapore (Singapore); Department of Electrical and Electronics, UNAM-Institute of Material Science and Nanotechnology, Bilkent University, Ankara TR-06800 (Turkey); Department of Physics, UNAM-Institute of Material Science and Nanotechnology, Bilkent University, Ankara TR-06800 (Turkey)

    2013-12-23

    Here, GaN/Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N heterostructures with a graded AlN composition, completely lacking external p-doping, are designed and grown using metal-organic-chemical-vapour deposition (MOCVD) system to realize three-dimensional hole gas (3DHG). The existence of the 3DHG is confirmed by capacitance-voltage measurements. Based on this design, a p-doping-free InGaN/GaN light-emitting diode (LED) driven by the 3DHG is proposed and grown using MOCVD. The electroluminescence, which is attributed to the radiative recombination of injected electrons and holes in InGaN/GaN quantum wells, is observed from the fabricated p-doping-free devices. These results suggest that the 3DHG can be an alternative hole source for InGaN/GaN LEDs besides common Mg dopants.

  1. Intermixing of InGaAs/GaAs Quantum Well Using Multiple Cycles Annealing Cu-doped SiO2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hongpinyo, V; Ding, Y H; Dimas, C E; Wang, Y; Ooi, B S; Qiu, W; Goddard, L L; Behymer, E M; Cole, G D; Bond, T C

    2008-06-11

    The authors investigate the effect of intermixing in InGaAs/GaAs quantum well structure using Cu-doped SiO{sub 2}. The incorporation of Cu into the silica film yields larger bandgap shift than typical impurity-free vacancy diffusion (IFVD) method at a lower activation temperature. We also observe enhancement of the photoluminescence (PL) signal from the intermixed InGaAs/GaAs quantum well structure after being cycle-annealed at 850 C.

  2. Characterization of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) films with varying gallium ratios

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Claypoole, Jesse; Peace, Bernadette; Sun, Neville; Dwyer, Dan; Eisaman, Matthew D.; Haldar, Pradeep; Efstathiadis, Harry

    2015-09-05

    Cu(In1-x,Gax)Se2 (CIGS) absorber layers were deposited on molybdenum (Mo) coated soda-lime glass substrates with varying Ga content (described as Ga/(In+Ga) ratios) with respect to depth. As the responsible mechanisms for the limitation of the performance of the CIGS solar cells with high Ga contents are not well understood, the goal of this work was to investigate different properties of CIGS absorber films with Ga/(In+Ga) ratios varied between 0.29 and 0.41 (as determined by X-ray florescence spectroscopy (XRF)) in order to better understand the role that the Ga content has on film quality. The Ga grading in the CIGS layer hasmore » the effect causing a higher bandgap toward the surface and Mo contact while the band gap in the middle of the CIGS layer is lower. Also, a wider and larger Ga/(In+Ga) grading dip located deeper in the CIGS absorber layers tend to produce larger grains in the regions of the films that have lower Ga/(In+Ga) ratios. It was found that surface roughness decreases from 51.2 nm to 41.0 nm with increasing Ga/(In+Ga) ratios. However, the surface roughness generally decreases if the Ga grading occurs deeper in the absorber layer.« less

  3. Radiation damage of GaAs thin-film solar cells on Si substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Itoh, Y.; Yamaguchi, M.; Nishioka, T.; Yamamoto, A.

    1987-01-15

    1-MeV electron irradiation damages in GaAs thin-film solar cells on Si substrates are examined for the first time. Damage constant for minority-carrier diffusion length in GaAs heteroepitaxial films on Si substrates is found to be the same as that in GaAs homoepitaxial films on GaAs substrates. This agreement suggests that GaAs/Si has the same defect introduction rate with radiation as GaAs/GaAs. The degradation of GaAs solar cells on Si with electron irradiation is less than that of GaAs solar cells on GaAs, because in the present, GaAs films on Si substrates have lower minority-carrier diffusion length compared to GaAs films on GaAs and these films are insensitive to radiation. The p/sup +/-p/sup +/-n AlGaAs-GaAs heteroface solar cell with junction depth of about 0.3 ..mu..m is concluded to be useful for a high-efficiency and radiation-resistant solar cell fabricated on a Si substrate.

  4. Laser Gain and Threshold Properties in Compressive-Strained and Lattice-Matched GaInNAs/GaAs Quantum Wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chow, W.W.; Jones, E.D.; Modine, N.A.; Allerman, A.A.; Kurtz, S.R.

    1999-08-04

    The optical gain spectra for compressive-strained and lattice-matched GaInNAs/GaAs quantum wells are computed using a microscopic laser theory. From these spectra, the peak gain and carrier radiative decay rate as functions of carrier density are determined. These dependences allow the study of lasing threshold current density for different GAInNAs/GaAs laser structures.

  5. Radiation resistance of GaAs-GaAlAs vertical cavity surface emitting lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jabbour, J.; Zazoui, M.; Sun, G.C.; Bourgoin, J.C.; Gilard, O.

    2005-02-15

    The variations of the optical and electrical characteristics of a vertical cavity surface emitting laser based on GaAs quantum wells have been monitored versus irradiation with 1 MeV electrons. The results are understood by the introduction of nonradiative recombination centers in the wells whose characteristics, capture cross section for minority carriers times their introduction rate, can be determined. A similar study performed for proton irradiation shows that the results can be explained in the same way when the introduction rate of the defects is replaced by the proton energy loss into atomic collisions. These results allow us to deduce the equivalence between electron and proton irradiations: A flux of 1 proton cm{sup -2} which loses an energy E{sub nl} (eV) into atomic collisions is equivalent to a fluence of about 9x10{sup -2} E{sub nl} cm{sup -2}, 1 MeV electrons.

  6. Microsoft Word - Privacy_Contact_Listing_September_21_2010

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Phone: 865-576-1216 Fax: 865-576-1556 5 Southeastern Power Administration Joel Seymour U.S. Department of Energy Southeastern Power Administration 1166 Athens Tech Road...

  7. Vertical zone melt growth of GaAs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henry, R.L.; Nordquist, P.E.R.; Gorman, R.J.

    1993-12-31

    A Vertical Zone Melt (VZM) technique has been applied to the single crystal growth of GaAs. A pyrolytic boron nitride crucible and a (100) oriented seed were used along with liquid encapsulation by boric oxide. In the case of GaAs, the ampoule was pressurized with either argon or argensic vapor from elemental arsenic at pressures ranging from 1 to 2 atmospheres. A molten zone length of 22 mm gave a growth interface which is nearly flat and resulted in routine single crystal growth. Temperature gradients of 4{degrees}C/cm. and 9{degrees}C/cm. have produced dislocation densities of <1000/cm{sup 2} and 2000-5000/cm{sup 2} respectively for 34 mm diameter crystals of GaAs. Post growth cooling rates for GaAs have been 35, 160 and 500{degrees}C/hr. The cooling rate has been found to affect the number and size of arsenic precipitates and the EL2 concentration in the GaAs crystal. The effects of these and other growth parameters on the crystalline perfection and electrical properties of the crystals will be discussed.

  8. EA-0904: Access Road from State Route 240 to the 200 West Area Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to construct an access road on the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site in Richland, Washington, from State Route 240 to Beloit Avenue...

  9. ISC15 The Road to Application Performance on Intel Xeon Phi

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Road to Application Performance on Intel Xeon Phi July 16, 2015 SIMD: CilkPlus and OpenMP Kent Milfeld, Georg Zitzlsberger, Michael Klemm, Carlos Rosales 1 SIMD 2 Single Instruction Multiple Data (SIMD) Data Registers Intel Cilk Plus SIMD Directive Declaration Examples OpenMP SIMD Directive Declaration SIMD loop SIMD CilkPlus OpenMP SIMD mapping Alignment & Elemental Functions Alignment Beyond Present Directives SIMD 3 Single Instruction Multiple Data (SIMD) Data Registers Playground

  10. Road Blocks Yield Key Information about a Catalyst | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Road Blocks Yield Key Information about a Catalyst Researchers systematically blocked key chemical reaction pathways to get unambiguous information about how carbon-nitrogen bonds are formed in a catalytic reaction known as hydroamination. Understanding a multi-step catalytic mechanism is like a solving a puzzle where you can't see the pieces. However, you can add your own "pieces" with known shapes to figure out what other pieces of the puzzle then will (or will not) fit.

  11. The Honorable Carl Levin United States Senator 15100 North Line Road

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    November 30, 1993 The Honorable Carl Levin United States Senator 15100 North Line Road Room 107A Southgate, Michigan 48195 Dear Senator Levin: Secretary O'Leary asked that we respond to your October 20, 1993, letter regarding our work at a General Motors facility In southeastern Michigan. Located at 1450 Beecher Street in Adrian, the facility was operated by companies that worked under contract for the former Atomic Energy Commission to perform extrusion work on thorium and depleted, natural,

  12. Microsoft Word - Class 1 S Access Road-031611 FINAL.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Carlsbad. New Mexico 88221 Mr. James Bearzi, Chief Hazardous Waste Bureau New Mexico Environment Department 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Building 1 Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505-6303 MAR 1 7 2011 Subject: Notification of a Class 1 Permit Modification to the Hazardous Waste Facility Permit, Permit Number: NM4890139088* TSDF Dear Mr. Bearzi: Enclosed is a Class 1 Permit Modification Notification to: * Add South Access Road for Transportation of TRU Mixed Waste We certify under penalty of law that this

  13. Active DPF for Off-Road Particulate Matter (PM) Control | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Energy presentation details how a possibly catalyzed active diesel particulate filter can be used to control off-road particulate matter. PDF icon deer08_servati.pdf More Documents & Publications DPF for a Tractor Auxiliary Power Unit A Low-Cost Continuous Emissions Monitoring System for Mobile and Stationary Engine SCR/DPF Applications/Data-Logger for Vehicle Data Acquisition Power Generating Stationary Engines Nox Control: A Closed Loop Control Technology

  14. Comparison of On-Road Portable and Bench Emission Measurements | Department

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    An overview comparison of fuel cell technologies by the Fuel Cell Technologies Office. PDF icon Comparison of Fuel Cell Technologies More Documents & Publications Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies Program: Fuel Cells Fact Sheet Fuel Cells Fact Sheet MCFC and PAFC R&D Workshop Summary Report of Energy

    Chassis dynamometer testing using a conventional emissions bench and on-road testing with a portable emissions system were performed to compare exhaust emissions from selected

  15. Ensuring the Availability and Reliability of Urea Dosing For On-Road and

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Non-Road | Department of Energy 3 DEER Conference Presentation: Hilite International PDF icon 2003_deer_barton.pdf More Documents & Publications SCR Systems for Heavy Duty Trucks: Progress Towards Meeting Euro 4 Emission Standards in 2005 Safe and compact ammonia storage/delivery systems for SCR-DeNOX in automotive units State-of-the-Art and Emergin Truck Engine Technologies

  16. Structural transformations in amorphous ↔ crystalline phase change of Ga-Sb alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, T. G.; Sen, S.; Hung, I.; Gan, Z.; Kalkan, B.; Raoux, S.

    2013-12-21

    Ga-Sb alloys with compositions ranging between ∼12 and 50 at. % Ga are promising materials for phase change random access memory applications. The short-range structures of two such alloys with compositions Ga{sub 14}Sb{sub 86} and Ga{sub 46}Sb{sub 54} are investigated, in their amorphous and crystalline states, using {sup 71}Ga and {sup 121}Sb nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and synchrotron x-ray diffraction. The Ga and Sb atoms are fourfold coordinated in the as-deposited amorphous Ga{sub 46}Sb{sub 54} with nearly 40% of the constituent atoms being involved in Ga-Ga and Sb-Sb homopolar bonding. This necessitates extensive bond switching and elimination of homopolar bonds during crystallization. On the other hand, Ga and Sb atoms are all threefold coordinated in the as-deposited amorphous Ga{sub 14}Sb{sub 86}. Crystallization of this material involves phase separation of GaSb domains in Sb matrix and a concomitant increase in the Ga coordination number from 3 to 4. Results from crystallization kinetics experiments suggest that the melt-quenching results in the elimination of structural “defects” such as the homopolar bonds and threefold coordinated Ga atoms in the amorphous phases of these alloys, thereby rendering them structurally more similar to the corresponding crystalline states compared to the as-deposited amorphous phases.

  17. Nano-scale luminescence characterization of individual InGaN/GaN quantum wells stacked in a microcavity using scanning transmission electron microscope cathodoluminescence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmidt, Gordon Mller, Marcus; Veit, Peter; Bertram, Frank; Christen, Jrgen; Glauser, Marlene; Carlin, Jean-Franois; Cosendey, Gatien; Butt, Raphal; Grandjean, Nicolas

    2014-07-21

    Using cathodoluminescence spectroscopy directly performed in a scanning transmission electron microscope at liquid helium temperatures, the optical and structural properties of a 62 InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well embedded in an AlInN/GaN based microcavity are investigated at the nanometer scale. We are able to spatially resolve a spectral redshift between the individual quantum wells towards the surface. Cathodoluminescence spectral linescans allow directly visualizing the critical layer thickness in the quantum well stack resulting in the onset of plastic relaxation of the strained InGaN/GaN system.

  18. Quaternary InGaAsSb Thermophotovoltaic Diode Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M Dashiell; J Beausang; H Ehsani; G Nichols; D DePoy; L Danielson; P Talamo; K Rahner; E Brown; S Burger; P Fourspring; W Topper; P Baldasaro; C Wang; R Huang; M Connors; G Turner; Z Shellenbarger; G Taylor; Jizhong Li; R Martinelli; D Donetski; S Anikeev; G Belenky; S Luryl

    2005-01-26

    Thermophotovoltaic (TPV) diodes fabricated from InGaAsSb alloys lattice-matched to GaSb substrates are grown by Metal Organic Vapor Phase Epitaxy (MOVPE). 0.53eV InGaAsSb TPV diodes utilizing front-surface spectral control filters have been tested in a vacuum cavity and a TPV thermal-to-electric conversion efficiency ({eta}{sub TPV}) and a power density (PD) of {eta}{sub TPV} = 19% and PD=0.58 W/cm{sup 2} were measured for T{sub radiator} = 950 C and T{sub diode} = 27 C. Recombination coefficients deduced from minority carrier measurements and the theory reviewed in this article predict a practical limit to the maximum achievable conversion efficiency and power density for 0.53eV InGaAsSb TPV. The limits for the above operating temperatures are projected to be {eta}{sub TPV} = 26% and PD = 0.75 W/cm{sup 2}. These limits are extended to {eta}{sub TPV} = 30% and PD = 0.85W/cm{sup 2} if the diode active region is bounded by a reflective back surface to enable photon recycling and a two-pass optical path length. The internal quantum efficiency of the InGaAsSb TPV diode is close to the theoretically predicted limits, with the exception of short wavelength absorption in GaSb contact layers. Experiments show that the open circuit voltage of the 0.53eV InGaAsSb TPV diodes is not strongly dependent on the device architectures studied in this work where both N/P and P/N double heterostructure diodes have been grown with various acceptor and donor doping levels, having GaSb and AlGaAsSb confinement, and also partial back surface reflectors. Lattice matched InGaAsSb TPV diodes were fabricated with bandgaps ranging from 0.6 to 0.5eV without significant degradation of the open circuit voltage factor, quantum efficiency, or fill factor as the composition approached the miscibility gap. The key diode performance parameter which is limiting efficiency and power density below the theoretical limits in InGaAsSb TPV devices is the open circuit voltage. The open circuit voltages of state-of-the-art 0.53eV InGaAsSb TPV diode are {approx}10% lower than the predicted semi-empirical limit to open circuit voltage for a device having absorbing substrate; the voltages are {approx}17% below that for an Auger-limited device having back surface reflector and two-pass optical design.

  19. Experimental study of slab solar collection on the hydronic system of road

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Qing; Huang, Yong; Li, Ming; Liu, Yan [Jilin University, Changchun (China); Yan, Y.Y. [University of Nottingham (United Kingdom)

    2010-12-15

    This paper studied the slab solar collection (SSC) process, which is one of the essential compositions of road hydronic ice-snow melting (HISM) system that stores solar energy in summer to melt ice and snow on the road in winter. Its aim is to find out the heat transfer characteristic of the SSC and heat collecting efficiency and the influence of pipe spacing and flow rate by experiment. As shown in experimental results, the average heat collecting capacity is about 150-250 W/m{sup 2} in natural summer condition, while the solar radiation intensity is about 300-1000 W/m{sup 2}. It is shown that the increment of fluid flow results in the increment of heat collection efficiency, while the increment of pipe spacing results in the decrement of the efficiency in experiment modes. The results show that the road slab can obtain about 30% solar heat in summertime, and the solar collection can lower the pavement temperature and reduce the insolation weathering. (author)

  20. On-road evaluation of advanced hybrid electric vehicles over a wide range of ambient temperatures.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, R.; Duoba, M. J.; Bocci, D.; Lohse-Busch, H.

    2007-01-01

    In recent years, Hybrid Electric Vehicles (HEV's) have become a production viable and effective mode of efficient transportation. HEV's can provide increased fuel economy over convention technology vehicle, but these advantages can be affected dramatically by wide variations in operating temperatures. The majority of data measured for benchmarking HEV technologies is generated from ambient test cell temperatures at 22 C. To investigate cold and hot temperature affects on HEV operation and efficiency, an on-road evaluation protocol is defined and conducted over a six month study at widely varying temperatures. Two test vehicles, the 2007 Toyota Camry HEV and 2005 Ford Escape HEV, were driven on a pre-defined urban driving route in ambient temperatures ranging from -14 C to 31 C. Results from the on-road evaluation were also compared and correlated to dynamometer testing of the same drive cycle. Results from this on-road evaluation show the battery power control limits and engine operation dramatically change with temperature. These changes decrease fuel economy by more than two times at -14 C as compared to 25 C. The two vehicles control battery temperature in different manners. The Escape HEV uses the air conditioning system to provide cool air to the batteries at high temperatures and is therefore able to maintain battery temperature to less than 33 C. The Camry HEV uses cabin air to cool the batteries. The observed maximum battery temperature was 44 C.

  1. Alloy inhomogeneity and carrier localization in AlGaN sections and AlGaN/AlN nanodisks in nanowires with 240350?nm emission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Himwas, C.; Hertog, M. den; Dang, Le Si; Songmuang, R.; Monroy, E.

    2014-12-15

    We present structural and optical studies of AlGaN sections and AlGaN/AlN nanodisks (NDs) in nanowires grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. The Al-Ga intermixing at Al(Ga)N/GaN interfaces and the chemical inhomogeneity in AlGaN NDs evidenced by scanning transmission electron microscopy are attributed to the strain relaxation process. This interpretation is supported by the three-dimensional strain distribution calculated by minimizing the elastic energy in the structure. The alloy inhomogeneity increases with the Al content, leading to enhanced carrier localization signatures in the luminescence characteristics, i.e., red shift of the emission, s-shaped temperature dependence, and linewidth broadening. Despite these effects, the emission energy of AlGaN/AlN NDs can be tuned in the 240350?nm range with internal quantum efficiencies around 30%.

  2. Highly transparent ammonothermal bulk GaN substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, WK; Ehrentraut, D; Downey, BC; Kamber, DS; Pakalapati, RT; Do Yoo, H; D'Evelyn, MP

    2014-10-01

    A novel apparatus has been employed to grow ammonothermal (0001) gallium nitride (GaN) with diameters up to 2 in The crystals have been characterized by x-ray diffraction rocking-curve (XRC) analysis, optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), cathodoluminescence (CL), and optical spectroscopy. High crystallinity GaN with FWHM values about 20-50 arcsec and dislocation densities below 1 x 10(5) cm(-2) have been obtained. High optical transmission was achieved with an optical absorption coefficient below 1 cm(-1) at a wavelength of 450 nm. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Graphene/GaN diodes for ultraviolet and visible photodetectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Fang; Chen, Shao-Wen; Meng, Jie; Tse, Geoffrey; Fu, Xue-Wen; Xu, Fu-Jun [State Key Laboratory for Mesoscopic Physics, Department of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Shen, Bo; Liao, Zhi-Min, E-mail: liaozm@pku.edu.cn, E-mail: yudp@pku.edu.cn; Yu, Da-Peng, E-mail: liaozm@pku.edu.cn, E-mail: yudp@pku.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Mesoscopic Physics, Department of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Quantum Matter, Beijing (China)

    2014-08-18

    The Schottky diodes based on graphene/GaN interface are fabricated and demonstrated for the dual-wavelength photodetection of ultraviolet (UV) and green lights. The physical mechanisms of the photoelectric response of the diodes with different light wavelengths are different. For UV illumination, the photo-generated carriers lower the Schottky barrier and increase the photocurrent. For green light illumination, as the photon energy is smaller than the bandgap of GaN, the hot electrons excited in graphene via internal photoemission are responsible for the photoelectric response. Using graphene as a transparent electrode, the diodes show a ?mS photoresponse, providing an alternative route toward multi-wavelength photodetectors.

  4. Simple intrinsic defects in GaAs : numerical supplement.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schultz, Peter Andrew

    2012-04-01

    This Report presents numerical tables summarizing properties of intrinsic defects in gallium arsenide, GaAs, as computed by density functional theory. This Report serves as a numerical supplement to the results published in: P.A. Schultz and O.A. von Lilienfeld, 'Simple intrinsic defects in GaAs', Modelling Simul. Mater. Sci Eng., Vol. 17, 084007 (2009), and intended for use as reference tables for a defect physics package in device models. The numerical results for density functional theory calculations of properties of simple intrinsic defects in gallium arsenide are presented.

  5. Electronic contribution to friction on GaAs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Applied Science and Technology Graduate Group, UC Berkeley; Dept. of Materials Sciences and Engineering, UC Berkeley; Salmeron, Miquel; Qi, Yabing; Park, J.Y.; Hendriksen, B.L.M.; Ogletree, D.F.; Salmeron, Miquel

    2008-04-15

    The electronic contribution to friction at semiconductor surfaces was investigated by using a Pt-coated tip with 50nm radius in an atomic force microscope sliding against an n-type GaAs(100) substrate. The GaAs surface was covered by an approximately 1 nm thick oxide layer. Charge accumulation or depletion was induced by the application of forward or reverse bias voltages. We observed a substantial increase in friction force in accumulation (forward bias) with respect to depletion (reverse bias). We propose a model based on the force exerted by the trapped charges that quantitatively explains the experimental observations of excess friction.

  6. Polycrystalline MBE-grown GaAs for solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friedman, D.J.; Kurtz, S.R.; Kibbler, A.E.; Al-Jassim, M.; Jones, K.; Keyes, B.; Matson, R.

    1997-02-01

    This paper will discuss initial studies of thin-film GaAs grown by molecular-beam epitaxy for use in developing a thin-film GaAs solar cell. Photocurrent and photoluminescence intensity are related to the material morphology as a function of growth conditions. Growth temperature and V/III ratio have a dramatic effect on the photocurrent. However, it seems likely that even after optimizing such growth parameters, it will be necessary to provide substrates that can provide templates to enhance grain size from the start of thin-film growth. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  7. Polycrystalline MBE-grown GaAs for solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friedman, D. J.; Kurtz, Sarah R.; Kibbler, A. E.; Al-Jassim, M.; Jones, K.; Keyes, B.; Matson, R.

    1997-02-15

    This paper will discuss initial studies of thin-film GaAs grown by molecular-beam epitaxy for use in developing a thin-film GaAs solar cell. Photocurrent and photoluminescence intensity are related to the material morphology as a function of growth conditions. Growth temperature and V/III ratio have a dramatic effect on the photocurrent. However, it seems likely that even after optimizing such growth parameters, it will be necessary to provide substrates that can provide templates to enhance grain size from the start of thin-film growth.

  8. 2009 TEPP Annual Report

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... 5 2 Beckley WV 2 15 11 26 14 Total 16 111 105 38 14 268 66 3 Athens GA 1 6 6 2 3 Atlanta GA 3 50 50 28 3 Calhoun GA 5 77 77 6 3 Dalton GA 6 104 104 25 3 Forsyth GA 1 13 15 28 5 ...

  9. High-performance broadband optical coatings on InGaN/GaN solar cells for multijunction device integration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, N. G. Farrell, R. M.; Iza, M.; Speck, J. S.; Perl, E. E.; Keller, S.; Bowers, J. E.; Nakamura, S.; DenBaars, S. P.

    2014-04-21

    We demonstrate InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well solar cells grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition on a bulk (0001) substrate with high-performance broadband optical coatings to improve light absorption. A front-side anti-reflective coating and a back-side dichroic mirror were designed to minimize front surface reflections across a broad spectral range and maximize rear surface reflections only in the spectral range absorbed by the InGaN, making the cells suitable for multijunction solar cell integration. Application of optical coatings increased the peak external quantum efficiency by 56% (relative) and conversion efficiency by 37.5% (relative) under 1 sun AM0 equivalent illumination.

  10. Terahertz intersubband absorption in non-polar m-plane AlGaN/GaN quantum wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edmunds, C.; Malis, O.; Shao, J.; Shirazi-HD, M.; Manfra, M. J.

    2014-07-14

    We demonstrate THz intersubband absorption (15.6–26.1 meV) in m-plane AlGaN/GaN quantum wells. We find a trend of decreasing peak energy with increasing quantum well width, in agreement with theoretical expectations. However, a blue-shift of the transition energy of up to 14 meV was observed relative to the calculated values. This blue-shift is shown to decrease with decreasing charge density and is, therefore, attributed to many-body effects. Furthermore, a ∼40% reduction in the linewidth (from roughly 8 to 5 meV) was obtained by reducing the total sheet density and inserting undoped AlGaN layers that separate the wavefunctions from the ionized impurities in the barriers.

  11. Inversion-mode GaAs wave-shaped field-effect transistor on GaAs (100) substrate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Jingyun; Si, Mengwei; Wu, Heng; Ye, Peide D.; Lou, Xiabing; Gordon, Roy G.; Shao, Jiayi; Manfra, Michael J.

    2015-02-16

    Inversion-mode GaAs wave-shaped metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (WaveFETs) are demonstrated using atomic-layer epitaxy of La{sub 2}O{sub 3} as gate dielectric on (111)A nano-facets formed on a GaAs (100) substrate. The wave-shaped nano-facets, which are desirable for the device on-state and off-state performance, are realized by lithographic patterning and anisotropic wet etching with optimized geometry. A well-behaved 1 μm gate length GaAs WaveFET shows a maximum drain current of 64 mA/mm, a subthreshold swing of 135 mV/dec, and an I{sub ON}/I{sub OFF} ratio of greater than 10{sup 7}.

  12. Strong enhancement of terahertz emission from GaAs in InAs/GaAs quantum dot structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Estacio, Elmer; Pham, Minh Hong; Takatori, Satoru; Cadatal-Raduban, Marilou; Nakazato, Tomoharu; Shimizu, Toshihiko; Sarukura, Nobuhiko; Somintac, Armando; Defensor, Michael; Awitan, Fritz Christian B.; Jaculbia, Rafael B.; Salvador, Arnel; Garcia, Alipio

    2009-06-08

    We report on the intense terahertz emission from InAs/GaAs quantum dot (QD) structures grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Results reveal that the QD sample emission was as high as 70% of that of a p-type InAs wafer, the most intense semiconductor emitter to date. Excitation wavelength studies showed that the emission was due to absorption in strained undoped GaAs, and corresponds to a two order-of-magnitude enhancement. Moreover, it was found that multilayer QDs emit more strongly compared with a single layer QD sample. At present, we ascribe the intense radiation to huge strain fields at the InAs/GaAs interface.

  13. Fabrication and Characterization of a Single Hole Transistor in p-type GaAs/AlGaAs Heterostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tracy, Lisa A; Reno, John L.; Hargett, Terry W.

    2015-09-01

    Most spin qubit research to date has focused on manipulating single electron spins in quantum dots. However, hole spins are predicted to have some advantages over electron spins, such as reduced coupling to host semiconductor nuclear spins and the ability to control hole spins electrically using the large spin-orbit interaction. Building on recent advances in fabricating high-mobility 2D hole systems in GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructures at Sandia, we fabricate and characterize single hole transistors in GaAs. We demonstrate p-type double quantum dot devices with few-hole occupation, which could be used to study the physics of individual hole spins and control over coupling between hole spins, looking towards eventual applications in quantum computing. Intentionally left blank

  14. Characteristics of InGaP/InGaAs pseudomorphic high electron mobility transistors with triple delta-doped sheets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chu, Kuei-Yi; Chiang, Meng-Hsueh Cheng, Shiou-Ying; Liu, Wen-Chau

    2012-02-15

    Fundamental and insightful characteristics of InGaP/InGaAs double channel pseudomorphic high electron mobility transistors (DCPHEMTs) with graded and uniform triple {delta}-doped sheets are coomprehensively studied and demonstrated. To gain physical insight, band diagrams, carrier densities, and direct current characteristics of devices are compared and investigated based on the 2D semiconductor simulator, Atlas. Due to uniform carrier distribution and high electron density in the double InGaAs channel, the DCPHEMT with graded triple {delta}-doped sheets exhibits better transport properties, higher and linear transconductance, and better drain current capability as compared with the uniformly triple {delta}-doped counterpart. The DCPHEMT with graded triple {delta}-doped structure is fabricated and tested, and the experimental data are found to be in good agreement with simulated results.

  15. Current transient spectroscopy for trapping analysis on Au-free AlGaN/GaN Schottky barrier diode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, J. Groeseneken, G.; Stoffels, S.; Lenci, S.; Venegas, R.; Decoutere, S.; Bakeroot, B.

    2015-02-23

    This paper presents a combined technique of high voltage off-state stress and current transient measurements to investigate the trapping/de-trapping characteristics of Au-free AlGaN/GaN Schottky barrier diodes. The device features a symmetric three-terminal structure with a central anode contact surrounded by two separate cathodes. Under the diode off-state stress conditions, the two separate cathodes were electrically shorted. The de-trapping dynamics was studied by monitoring the recovery of the two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) current at different temperatures by applying 0.5?V at cathode 2 while grounding cathode 1. During the recovery, the anode contact acts as a sensor of changes in diode leakage current. This leakage variation was found to be mainly due to the barrier height variation. With this method, the energy level and capture cross section of different traps in the AlGaN/GaN Schottky barrier diode can be extracted. Furthermore, the physical location of different trapping phenomena is indicated by studying the variation of the diode leakage current during the recovery. We have identified two distinct trapping mechanisms: (i) electron trapping at the AlGaN surface in the vicinity of the Schottky contact which results in the leakage reduction (barrier height ?{sub B} increase) together with R{sub ON} degradation; (ii) the electron trapping in the GaN channel layer which partially depletes the 2DEG. The physical origin of the two different traps is discussed in the text.

  16. Emission spectra of a laser based on an In(Ga)As/GaAs quantum-dot superlattice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sobolev, M. M. Buyalo, M. S.; Nevedomskiy, V. N.; Zadiranov, Yu. M.; Zolotareva, R. V.; Vasil’ev, A. P.; Ustinov, V. M.; Portnoi, E. L.

    2015-10-15

    The spectral characteristics of a laser with an active region based on a ten-layer system of In(Ga)As/GaAs vertically correlated quantum dots with 4.5-nm GaAs spacer layers between InAs quantum dots are studied under the conditions of spontaneous and stimulated emission, depending on the current and the duration of pump pulses. Data obtained by transmission electron microscopy and electroluminescence and absorption polarization anisotropy measurements make it possible to demonstrate that the investigated system of tunnel-coupled InAs quantum dots separated by thin GaAs barriers represents a quantum-dot superlattice. With an increase in the laser pump current, the electroluminescence intensity increases linearly and the spectral position of the electroluminescence maximum shifts to higher energies, which is caused by the dependence of the miniband density-of-states distribution on the pump current. Upon exceeding the threshold current, multimode lasing via the miniband ground state is observed. One of the lasing modes can be attributed to the zero-phonon line, and the other is determined by the longitudinal-optical phonon replica of quantum-dot emission. The results obtained give evidence that, under conditions of the laser pumping of an In(Ga)As/GaAs quantum-dot superlattice, strong coupling between the discrete electron states in the miniband and optical phonons takes place. This leads to the formation of quantum-dot polarons, resulting from the resonant mixing of electronic states whose energy separation is comparable to the optical-phonon energy.

  17. InGaAs/GaAsP strain balanced multi-quantum wires grown on misoriented GaAs substrates for high efficiency solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alonso-lvarez, D.; Thomas, T.; Fhrer, M.; Hylton, N. P.; Ekins-Daukes, N. J.; Lackner, D.; Philipps, S. P.; Bett, A. W.; Sodabanlu, H.; Fujii, H.; Watanabe, K.; Sugiyama, M.; Nasi, L.; Campanini, M.

    2014-08-25

    Quantum wires (QWRs) form naturally when growing strain balanced InGaAs/GaAsP multi-quantum wells (MQW) on GaAs [100] 6 misoriented substrates under the usual growth conditions. The presence of wires instead of wells could have several unexpected consequences for the performance of the MQW solar cells, both positive and negative, that need to be assessed to achieve high conversion efficiencies. In this letter, we study QWR properties from the point of view of their performance as solar cells by means of transmission electron microscopy, time resolved photoluminescence and external quantum efficiency (EQE) using polarised light. We find that these QWRs have longer lifetimes than nominally identical QWs grown on exact [100] GaAs substrates, of up to 1??s, at any level of illumination. We attribute this effect to an asymmetric carrier escape from the nanostructures leading to a strong 1D-photo-charging, keeping electrons confined along the wire and holes in the barriers. In principle, these extended lifetimes could be exploited to enhance carrier collection and reduce dark current losses. Light absorption by these QWRs is 1.6 times weaker than QWs, as revealed by EQE measurements, which emphasises the need for more layers of nanostructures or the use light trapping techniques. Contrary to what we expected, QWR show very low absorption anisotropy, only 3.5%, which was the main drawback a priori of this nanostructure. We attribute this to a reduced lateral confinement inside the wires. These results encourage further study and optimization of QWRs for high efficiency solar cells.

  18. Defect-Reduction Mechanism for Improving Radiative Efficiency in InGaN/GaN Light-Emitting Diodes using InGaN Underlayers

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Armstrong, Andrew M.; Bryant, Benjamin N.; Crawford, Mary H.; Koleske, Daniel D.; Lee, Stephen R.; Wierer, Jr., Jonathan J.

    2015-04-01

    The influence of a dilute InxGa1-xN (x~0.03) underlayer (UL) grown below a single In0.16Ga0.84N quantum well (SQW), within a light-emitting diode(LED), on the radiative efficiency and deep level defect properties was studied using differential carrier lifetime (DCL) measurements and deep level optical spectroscopy (DLOS). DCL measurements found that inclusion of the UL significantly improved LED radiative efficiency. At low current densities, the non-radiative recombination rate of the LED with an UL was found to be 3.9 times lower than theLED without an UL, while the radiative recombination rates were nearly identical. This, then, suggests that the improved radiative efficiency resultedmore » from reduced non-radiative defect concentration within the SQW. DLOS measurement found the same type of defects in the InGaN SQWs with and without ULs. However, lighted capacitance-voltage measurements of the LEDs revealed a 3.4 times reduction in a SQW-related near-mid-gap defect state for the LED with an UL. Furthermore, quantitative agreement in the reduction of both the non-radiative recombination rate (3.9×) and deep level density (3.4×) upon insertion of an UL corroborates deep level defect reduction as the mechanism for improved LED efficiency.« less

  19. Properties of H, O and C in GaN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pearton, S.J.; Abernathy, C.R.; Lee, J.W.

    1996-04-01

    The electrical properties of the light ion impurities H, O and C in GaN have been examined in both as-grown and implanted material. H is found to efficiently passivate acceptors such as Mg, Ca and C. Reactivation occurs at {ge} 450 C and is enhanced by minority carrier injection. The hydrogen does not leave the GaN crystal until > 800 C, and its diffusivity is relatively high ({approximately} 10{sup {minus}11} cm{sup 2}/s) even at low temperatures (< 200 C) during injection by wet etching, boiling in water or plasma exposure. Oxygen shows a low donor activation efficiency when implanted into GaN, with an ionization level of 30--40 meV. It is essentially immobile up to 1,100 C. Carbon can produce low p-type levels (3 {times} 10{sup 17} cm{sup {minus}3}) in GaN during MOMBE, although there is some evidence it may also create n-type conduction in other nitrides.

  20. Testing a GaAs cathode in SRF gun

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, E.; Kewisch, J.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Burrill, A.; Rao, T.; Wu, Q.; Holmes, D.

    2011-03-28

    RF electron guns with a strained superlattice GaAs cathode are expected to generate polarized electron beams of higher brightness and lower emittance than do DC guns, due to their higher field gradient at the cathode's surface and lower cathode temperature. We plan to install a bulk GaAs:Cs in a SRF gun to evaluate the performance of both the gun and the cathode in this environment. The status of this project is: In our 1.3 GHz 1/2 cell SRF gun, the vacuum can be maintained at nearly 10{sup -12} Torr because of cryo-pumping at 2K. With conventional activation of bulk GaAs, we obtained a QE of 10% at 532 nm, with lifetime of more than 3 days in the preparation chamber and have shown that it can survive in transport from the preparation chamber to the gun. The beam line has been assembled and we are exploring the best conditions for baking the cathode under vacuum. We report here the progress of our test of the GaAs cathode in the SRF gun. Future particle accelerators, such as eRHIC and the ILC require high-brightness, high-current polarized electrons. Strained superlattice GaAs:Cs has been shown to be an efficient cathode for producing polarized electrons. Activation of GaAs with Cs,O(F) lowers the electron affinity and makes it energetically possible for all the electrons, excited into the conduction band that drift or diffuse to the emission surface, to escape into the vacuum. Presently, all operating polarized electron sources, such as the CEBAF, are DC guns. In these devices, the excellent ultra-high vacuum extends the lifetime of the cathode. However, the low field gradient on the photocathode's emission surface of the DC guns limits the beam quality. The higher accelerating gradients, possible in the RF guns, generate a far better beam. Until recently, most RF guns operated at room temperature, limiting the vacuum to {approx}10{sup -9} Torr. This destroys the GaAs's NEA surface. The SRF guns combine the excellent vacuum conditions of DC guns and the high accelerating gradient of the RF guns, potentially offering a long lived cathode with very low emittance. Testing this concept requires preparation of the cathode, transportation to the SRF gun and evaluation of the performance of the cathode and the gun at cryogenic temperatures. In our work at BNL, we successfully activated the bulk GaAs in the preparation chamber. The highest quantum efficient was 10% at 532 nm that fell to 0.5% after 100 hours. We explored three different ways to activate the GaAs. We verified that the GaAs photocathode remains stable for 30 hours in a 10{sup -11} Torr vacuum. Passing the photocathode through the low 10{sup -9} Torr transfer section in several seconds caused the QE to drop to 0.8%. The photocathode with 0.8% QE can be tested for the SRF gun. The gun and beam pipe were prepared and assembled. After baking at 200 C baking, the vacuum of the gun and beam pipe can sustain a low 10{sup -11} Torr at room temperature. The final test to extract electrons from the gun is ongoing. In this paper, we discuss our progress with this SRF gun and the results of the photocathode in preparation chamber and in magnet transfer line.

  1. Contrasting Behavior of GaP(001) and InP(001) at the Interface...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Contrasting Behavior of GaP(001) and InP(001) at the Interface with Water Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Contrasting Behavior of GaP(001) and InP(001) at the Interface ...

  2. Electron-limiting defect complex in hyperdoped GaAs: The D D...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Electron-limiting defect complex in hyperdoped GaAs: The D D X center Prev Next Title: Electron-limiting defect complex in hyperdoped GaAs: The D D X center Authors: Ma, Jie ...

  3. Coexistence of charge-density wave and ferromagnetism in Ni2MnGa...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Coexistence of charge-density wave and ferromagnetism in Ni2MnGa Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Coexistence of charge-density wave and ferromagnetism in Ni2MnGa ...

  4. Bismuth-induced phase control of GaAs nanowires grown by molecular...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Bismuth-induced phase control of GaAs nanowires grown by molecular beam epitaxy Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Bismuth-induced phase control of GaAs nanowires grown by ...

  5. Site-controlled fabrication of Ga nanodroplets by focused ion beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Xingliang; Wang, Zhiming M.; Wu, Jiang; Li, Handong; Zhou, Zhihua; Wang, Xiaodong

    2014-03-31

    Ga droplets are created by focused ion beam irradiation of GaAs surface. We report that ordered Ga droplets can be formed on the GaAs surface without any implantation damage. The droplets are characterized with bigger sizes than those droplets formed on damaged area. These aligned Ga droplets are formed via the migration of Ga atoms from ion irradiation area to the edge of undamaged GaAs surface and further nucleation into droplets. The morphological evolution and size distribution of these nanodroplets are investigated systematically with different beam irradiation time and incident angles. Based on this method, well positioned Ga nanodroplets, such as chains, are achieved by using focus ion beam patterning. The controllable assembly of droplets on undamaged semiconductor surface can be used to fabricate templates, to fabricate quantum structures and quantum devices by droplet epitaxy technique.

  6. Ge doped GaN with controllable high carrier concentration for...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Ge doped GaN with controllable high carrier concentration for plasmonic applications Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Ge doped GaN with controllable high carrier...

  7. Reactive codoping of GaAlInP compound semiconductors (Patent...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    This site is a product of DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) and ... A GaAlInP compound semiconductor and a method of producing a GaAlInP compound ...

  8. Quaternary InGaAsSb Thermophotovoltaic Diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MW Dashiell; JF Beausang; H Ehsani; GJ Nichols; DM Depoy; LR Danielson; P Talamo; KD Rahner; EJ Brown; SR Burger; PM Foruspring; WF Topper; PF Baldasaro; CA Wang; R Huang; M Connors; G Turner; Z Shellenbarger; G Taylor; J Li; R Martinelli; D Donetski; S Anikeev; G Belenky; S Luryi

    2006-03-09

    In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}As{sub y}Sb{sub 1-y} thermophotovoltaic (TPV) diodes were grown lattice-matched to GaSb substrates by Metal Organic Vapor Phase Epitaxy (MOVPE) in the bandgap range of E{sub G} = 0.5 to 0.6eV. InGaAsSb TPV diodes, utilizing front-surface spectral control filters, are measured with thermal-to-electric conversion efficiency and power density of {eta}{sub TPV} = 19.7% and PD =0.58 W/cm{sup 2} respectively for a radiator temperature of T{sub radiator} = 950 C, diode temperature of T{sub diode} = 27 C, and diode bandgap of E{sub G} = 0.53eV. Practical limits to TPV energy conversion efficiency are established using measured recombination coefficients and optical properties of front surface spectral control filters, which for 0.53eV InGaAsSb TPV energy conversion is {eta}{sub TPV} = 28% and PD = 0.85W/cm{sup 2} at the above operating temperatures. The most severe performance limits are imposed by (1) diode open-circuit voltage (VOC) limits due to intrinsic Auger recombination and (2) parasitic photon absorption in the inactive regions of the module. Experimentally, the diode V{sub OC} is 15% below the practical limit imposed by intrinsic Auger recombination processes. Analysis of InGaAsSb diode electrical performance vs. diode architecture indicate that the V{sub OC} and thus efficiency is limited by extrinsic recombination processes such as through bulk defects.

  9. Influence of Ga content on the structure and anomalous Hall effect of Fe{sub 1−x}Ga{sub x} thin films on GaSb(100)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anh Tuan, Duong; Shin, Yooleemi; Viet Cuong, Tran; Cho, Sunglae; Phan, The-Long

    2014-05-07

    The Fe{sub 1−x}Ga{sub x} thin films (x = 0.4, 0.5) have been grown on GaSb(100) substrate using molecular beam epitaxy. An epitaxial film with bcc α-Fe crystal structure (A2) is observed in Fe{sub 0.6}Ga{sub 0.4} film, while an impure Fe{sub 3}Ga phase with DO{sub 3} structure is appeared in Fe{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5} film. The saturated magnetizations at room temperature are observed to be 570 emu/cm{sup 3} and 180 emu/cm{sup 3} and the coercivities to be 170 and 364 Oe for Fe{sub 0.6}Ga{sub 0.4} and Fe{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5}, respectively. A hysteresis trend in Hall resistance vs. magnetic field is observed for Fe{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5} film. However, there is a weak hysteresis noticed in Fe{sub 0.4}Ga{sub 0.6} thin film.

  10. EIS-0476: Vogtle Electric Generating Plant in Burke County, GA | Department

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    of Energy 6: Vogtle Electric Generating Plant in Burke County, GA EIS-0476: Vogtle Electric Generating Plant in Burke County, GA February 8, 2012 EIS-0476: Final Environmental Impact Statement Department of Energy Loan Guarantees for Proposed Units 3 and 4 at the Vogtle Electric Generating Plant, Burke County, GA February 25, 2014 EIS-0476: Record of Decision Department of Energy Loan Guarantees for Proposed Units 3 and 4 at the Vogtle Electric Generating Plant, Burke County, GA

  11. On the redox origin of surface trapping in AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Feng; Chen, Di; Tuller, Harry L.; Thompson, Carl V.; Palacios, Toms

    2014-03-28

    Water-related redox couples in ambient air are identified as an important source of the surface trapping states, dynamic on-resistance, and drain current collapse in AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs). Through in-situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), direct signature of the water-related specieshydroxyl groups (OH) was found at the AlGaN surface at room temperature. It was also found that these species, as well as the current collapse, can be thermally removed above 200?C in vacuum conditions. An electron trapping mechanism based on the H{sub 2}O/H{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O/O{sub 2} redox couples is proposed to explain the 0.5?eV energy level commonly attributed to the surface trapping states. Finally, the role of silicon nitride passivation in successfully removing current collapse in these devices is explained by blocking the water molecules away from the AlGaN surface.

  12. Plasmonic terahertz detectors based on a high-electron mobility GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bia?ek, M. Witowski, A. M.; Grynberg, M.; ?usakowski, J.; Orlita, M.; Potemski, M.; Czapkiewicz, M.; Umansky, V.

    2014-06-07

    In order to characterize magnetic field (B) tunable THz plasmonic detectors, spectroscopy experiments were carried out at liquid helium temperatures and high magnetic fields on devices fabricated on a high electron mobility GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure. The samples were either gated (the gate of a meander shape) or ungated. Spectra of a photovoltage generated by THz radiation were obtained as a function of B at a fixed THz excitation from a THz laser or as a function of THz photon frequency at a fixed B with a Fourier spectrometer. In the first type of measurements, the wave vector of magnetoplasmons excited was defined by geometrical features of samples. It was also found that the magnetoplasmon spectrum depended on the gate geometry which gives an additional parameter to control plasma excitations in THz detectors. Fourier spectra showed a strong dependence of the magnetoplasmon resonance amplitude on the conduction-band electron filling factor which was explained within a model of the electron gas heating with THz radiation. The study allows to define both the advantages and limitations of plasmonic devices based on high-mobility GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructures for THz detection at low temperatures and high magnetic fields.

  13. High 400?C operation temperature blue spectrum concentration solar junction in GaInN/GaN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Liang; Detchprohm, Theeradetch; Wetzel, Christian

    2014-12-15

    Transparent wide gap junctions suitable as high temperature, high flux topping cells have been achieved in GaInN/GaN by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy. In structures of 25 quantum wells (QWs) under AM1.5G illumination, an open circuit voltage of 2.1?V is achieved. Of the photons absorbed in the limited spectral range of <450?nm, 64.2% are converted to electrons collected at the contacts under zero bias. At a fill factor of 45%, they account for a power conversion efficiency of38.6%. Under concentration, the maximum output power density per sun increases from 0.49?mW/cm{sup 2} to 0.51?mW/cm{sup 2} at 40?suns and then falls 0.42?mW/cm{sup 2} at 150?suns. Under external heating, a maximum of 0.59?mW/cm{sup 2} is reached at 250?C. Even at 400?C, the device is fully operational and exceeds room temperature performance. A defect analysis suggests that significantly higher fill factors and extension into longer wavelength ranges are possible with further development. The results prove GaInN/GaN QW solar junctions a viable and rugged topping cell for concentrator photovoltaics with minimal cooling requirements. By capturing the short range spectrum, they reduce the thermal load to any conventional cells stacked behind.

  14. Electrically active Er doping in InAs, In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As, and GaAs

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Electrically active Er doping in InAs, In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As, and GaAs Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Electrically active Er doping in InAs, In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As, and GaAs The electron concentration in dilute alloys of Er in GaAs, In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As, and InAs grown by molecular beam epitaxy is studied as a function of Er concentration and In content. Using first-principles calculations based on hybrid density functional

  15. Ultrasensitive detection of Hg{sup 2+} using oligonucleotide-functionalized AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, Junjie; Li, Jiadong; Miao, Bin; Wu, Dongmin; Wang, Jine; Pei, Renjun; Wu, Zhengyan

    2014-08-25

    An oligonucleotide-functionalized ion sensitive AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) was fabricated to detect trace amounts of Hg{sup 2+}. The advantages of ion sensitive AlGaN/GaN HEMT and highly specific binding interaction between Hg{sup 2+} and thymines were combined. The current response of this Hg{sup 2+} ultrasensitive transistor was characterized. The current increased due to the accumulation of Hg{sup 2+} ions on the surface by the highly specific thymine-Hg{sup 2+}-thymine recognition. The dynamic linear range for Hg{sup 2+} detection has been determined in the concentrations from 10{sup ?14} to 10{sup ?8} M and a detection limit below 10{sup ?14} M level was estimated, which is the best result of AlGaN/GaN HEMT biosensors for Hg{sup 2+} detection till now.

  16. GaN Initiative for Grid Applications (GIGA)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, George

    2015-07-03

    For nearly 4 ½ years, MIT Lincoln Laboratory (MIT/LL) led a very successful, DoE-funded team effort to develop GaN-on-Si materials and devices, targeting high-voltage (>1 kV), high-power, cost-effective electronics for grid applications. This effort, called the GaN Initiative for Grid Applications (GIGA) program, was initially made up of MIT/LL, the MIT campus group of Prof. Tomas Palacios (MIT), and the industrial partner M/A Com Technology Solutions (MTS). Later in the program a 4th team member was added (IQE MA) to provide commercial-scale GaN-on-Si epitaxial materials. A basic premise of the GIGA program was that power electronics, for ubiquitous utilization -even for grid applications - should be closer in cost structure to more conventional Si-based power electronics. For a number of reasons, more established GaN-on-SiC or even SiC-based power electronics are not likely to reach theses cost structures, even in higher manufacturing volumes. An additional premise of the GIGA program was that the technical focus would be on materials and devices suitable for operating at voltages > 1 kV, even though there is also significant commercial interest in developing lower voltage (< 1 kV), cost effective GaN-on-Si devices for higher volume applications, like consumer products. Remarkable technical progress was made during the course of this program. Advances in materials included the growth of high-quality, crack-free epitaxial GaN layers on large-diameter Si substrates with thicknesses up to ~5 μm, overcoming significant challenges in lattice mismatch and thermal expansion differences between Si and GaN in the actual epitaxial growth process. Such thick epilayers are crucial for high voltage operation of lateral geometry devices such as Schottky barrier (SB) diodes and high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs). New “Normally-Off” device architectures were demonstrated – for safe operation of power electronics circuits. The trade-offs between lateral and vertical devices were explored, with the conclusion that lateral devices are superior for fundamental thermal reasons, as well as for the demonstration of future generations of monolithic power circuits. As part of the materials and device investigations breakdown mechanisms in GaN-on-Si structures were fully characterized and effective electric field engineering was recognized as critical for achieving even higher voltage operation. Improved device contact technology was demonstrated, including the first gold-free metallizations (to enable processing in CMOS foundries) while maintaining low specific contact resistance needed for high-power operation and 5-order-of magnitude improvement in device leakage currents (essential for high power operation). In addition, initial GaN-on-Si epitaxial growth was performed on 8”/200 mm Si starting substrates.

  17. Building the American Clean Energy Innovation Ecosystem: Cyclotron Road Announces New Innovators, Success of First Cohort

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The need to develop and support a new generation of clean energy entrepreneurs and startups, especially at their earliest stages of development, is one of the most significant barriers to continuing America’s unique culture of entrepreneurship to lead the world the transition to a clean energy economy. Cyclotron Road provides financial support and “spins in” top entrepreneurs into National Labs to prove out the fundamentals of their technologies and to provide them with world-class business mentorship as they plot a course forward to commercialize innovative technologies.

  18. 3610 Collins Ferry Road, P.O. Box 880, Morgantown, WV 26507

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    610 Collins Ferry Road, P.O. Box 880, Morgantown, WV 26507 cliff.whyte@netl.doe.gov  Voice (304) 285-2098  Fax (304) 285-4403  www.netl.doe.gov A l b a ny, O R * M o rg a n tow n , W V * Pi t t s b u rg h , PA February 24, 2015 Dear Reader: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared a supplement analysis (SA) to the Texas Clean Energy Project (TCEP) Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). This document was prepared in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of

  19. On-Road Particle Matter Emissions from a MY 2010 Compliant HD Diesel

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Vehicle Driving Across the U.S. | Department of Energy Measuring particle emissions from a 2010 compliant HD Diesel tractor while traveling on-road for 2300 miles found average gravimetric TPM over the entire route to be well below EPAs 2010 PM standard. PDF icon deer12_besch.pdf More Documents & Publications Emergency Filter for Low Pressure EGR Fuel Reformer, LNT and SCR Aftertreatment System Meeting Emissions Useful Life Requirements Development of ADECS to Meet 2010 Emission

  20. RFI/RI work plan for the Road A Chemical Basin 904-111G

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kmetz, T.F.

    2000-03-07

    This Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation (RFI)/Remedial Investigation (RI) Work Plan has been prepared for the Road A Chemical Basin Operable Unit (RdACB OU) (904-111G). This unit is subject to the requirements of both RCRA and the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). This Work Plan presents the initial evaluation of existing unit data, applicable background data, the regulatory framework for the unit investigation, and the evaluations and decisions made during the determination of the scope and objectives of the planned Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) activities.

  1. ROAD MAP FOR DEVELOPMENT OF CRYSTAL-TOLERANT HIGH LEVEL WASTE GLASSES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fox, K.; Peeler, D.; Herman, C.

    2014-05-15

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is building a Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) at the Hanford Site in Washington to remediate 55 million gallons of radioactive waste that is being temporarily stored in 177 underground tanks. Efforts are being made to increase the loading of Hanford tank wastes in glass while meeting melter lifetime expectancies and process, regulatory, and product quality requirements. This road map guides the research and development for formulation and processing of crystaltolerant glasses, identifying near- and long-term activities that need to be completed over the period from 2014 to 2019. The primary objective is to maximize waste loading for Hanford waste glasses without jeopardizing melter operation by crystal accumulation in the melter or melter discharge riser. The potential applicability to the Savannah River Site (SRS) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will also be addressed in this road map. The planned research described in this road map is motivated by the potential for substantial economic benefits (significant reductions in glass volumes) that will be realized if the current constraints (T1% for WTP and TL for DWPF) are approached in an appropriate and technically defensible manner for defense waste and current melter designs. The basis of this alternative approach is an empirical model predicting the crystal accumulation in the WTP glass discharge riser and melter bottom as a function of glass composition, time, and temperature. When coupled with an associated operating limit (e.g., the maximum tolerable thickness of an accumulated layer of crystals), this model could then be integrated into the process control algorithms to formulate crystal-tolerant high-level waste (HLW) glasses targeting high waste loadings while still meeting process related limits and melter lifetime expectancies. The modeling effort will be an iterative process, where model form and a broader range of conditions, e.g., glass composition and temperature, will evolve as additional data on crystal accumulation are gathered. Model validation steps will be included to guide the development process and ensure the value of the effort (i.e., increased waste loading and waste throughput). A summary of the stages of the road map for developing the crystal-tolerant glass approach, their estimated durations, and deliverables is provided.

  2. Biofuel Facts for the Road: The Energy Department and Your Gasoline Pump

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Before you hit the road to visit relatives or friends this holiday season, you’ll probably stop at the gas station to fuel up. The Energy Department’s Bioenergy Technologies Office invests in research and development to help commercialize biofuels—liquid fuels produced from plant sources—to reduce America’s dependence on foreign oil, build the economy, and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. While you’re at the gas pump, pay attention to a few things. There are several biofuel options already available to you today, and the Energy Department is working to bring other second-generation biofuel options to a pump near you.

  3. An inverted AlGaAs/GaAs patterned-Ge tunnel junction cascade concentrator solar cell. Final subcontract report, 1 January 1991--31 August 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venkatasubramanian, R.

    1993-01-01

    This report describes work to develop inverted-grown Al{sub 0.34}Ga{sub 0.66}As/GaAs cascades. Several significant developments are reported on as follows: (1) The AM1.5 1-sun total-area efficiency of the top Al{sub 0.34}Ga{sub 0.66}As cell for the cascade was improved from 11.3% to 13.2% (NREL measurement [total-area]). (2) The ``cycled`` organometallic vapor phase epitaxy growth (OMVPE) was studied in detail utilizing a combination of characterization techniques including Hall-data, photoluminescence, and secondary ion mass spectroscopy. (3) A technique called eutectic-metal-bonding (EMB) was developed by strain-free mounting of thin GaAs-AlGaAs films (based on lattice-matched growth on Ge substrates and selective plasma etching of Ge substrates) onto Si carrier substrates. Minority-carrier lifetime in an EMB GaAs double-heterostructure was measured as high as 103 nsec, the highest lifetime report for a freestanding GaAs thin film. (4) A thin-film, inverted-grown GaAs cell with a 1-sun AM1.5 active-area efficiency of 20.3% was obtained. This cell was eutectic-metal-bonded onto Si. (5) A thin-film inverted-grown, Al{sub 0.34}Ga{sub 0.66}As/GaAs cascade with AM1.5 efficiency of 19.9% and 21% at 1-sun and 7-suns, respectively, was obtained. This represents an important milestone in the development of an AlGaAs/GaAs cascade by OMVPE utilizing a tunnel interconnect and demonstrates a proof-of-concept for the inverted-growth approach.

  4. Electrically active Er doping in InAs, In[sub 0.53]Ga[sub 0.47]As, and GaAs

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Electrically active Er doping in InAs, In[sub 0.53]Ga[sub 0.47]As, and GaAs Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Electrically active Er doping in InAs, In[sub 0.53]Ga[sub 0.47]As, and GaAs Authors: Burke, Peter G. ; Ismer, Lars ; Lu, Hong ; Frantz, Elan ; Janotti, Anderson ; Van de Walle, Chris G. ; Bowers, John E. ; Gossard, Arthur C. Publication Date: 2012-01-01 OSTI Identifier: 1105361 DOE Contract Number: SC0001009 Resource Type: Journal Article

  5. Absorption enhancement through Fabry-Prot resonant modes in a 430?nm thick InGaAs/GaAsP multiple quantum wells solar cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Behaghel, B.; Tamaki, R.; Watanabe, K.; Sodabanlu, H.; Vandamme, N.; Dupuis, C.; Bardou, N.; Cattoni, A.; Okada, Y.; Sugiyama, M.; Collin, S.; Guillemoles, J.-F.

    2015-02-23

    We study light management in a 430?nm-thick GaAs p-i-n single junction solar cell with 10 pairs of InGaAs/GaAsP multiple quantum wells (MQWs). The epitaxial layer transfer on a gold mirror improves light absorption and increases the external quantum efficiency below GaAs bandgap by a factor of four through the excitation of Fabry-Perot resonances. We show a good agreement with optical simulation and achieve around 10% conversion efficiency. We demonstrate numerically that this promising result can be further improved by anti-reflection layers. This study paves the way to very thin MQWs solar cells.

  6. Influence of strain induced by AlN nucleation layer on the electrical properties of AlGaN/GaN heterostructures on Si(111) substrate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christy, Dennis; Watanabe, Arata; Egawa, Takashi

    2014-10-15

    The crack-free metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) grown AlGaN/GaN heterostructures on Si substrate with modified growth conditions of AlN nucleation layer (NL) and its influence on the electrical and structural properties of conductive GaN layer are presented. From the Hall electrical measurements, a gradual decrease of two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) concentration near heterointerface as the function of NL thickness is observed possibly due to the reduction in difference of piezoelectric polarization charge densities between AlGaN and GaN layers. It also indicates that the minimum tensile stress and a relatively less total dislocation density for high pressure grown NL can ensure a 20 % increment in mobility at room temperature irrespective of the interface roughness. The thickness and pressure variations in NL and the subsequent changes in growth mode of AlN contributing to the post growth residual tensile stress are investigated using X-ray diffraction and Raman scattering experiments, respectively. The post growth intrinsic residual stress in top layers of heterostructures arises from lattice mismatches, NL parameters and defect densities in GaN. Hence, efforts to reduce the intrinsic residual stress in current conducting GaN layer give an opportunity to further improve the electrical characteristics of AlGaN/GaN device structures on Si.

  7. Nanoscale selective area growth of thick, dense, uniform, In-rich, InGaN

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    nanostructure arrays on GaN/sapphire template (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Nanoscale selective area growth of thick, dense, uniform, In-rich, InGaN nanostructure arrays on GaN/sapphire template Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Nanoscale selective area growth of thick, dense, uniform, In-rich, InGaN nanostructure arrays on GaN/sapphire template Authors: Sundaram, S. [1] ; Puybaret, R. [2] ; El Gmili, Y. [1] ; Li, X. [2] ; Bonanno, P. L. [1] ; Pantzas, K. [3] Search SciTech

  8. Conductivity based on selective etch for GaN devices and applications thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yu; Sun, Qian; Han, Jung

    2015-12-08

    This invention relates to methods of generating NP gallium nitride (GaN) across large areas (>1 cm.sup.2) with controlled pore diameters, pore density, and porosity. Also disclosed are methods of generating novel optoelectronic devices based on porous GaN. Additionally a layer transfer scheme to separate and create free-standing crystalline GaN thin layers is disclosed that enables a new device manufacturing paradigm involving substrate recycling. Other disclosed embodiments of this invention relate to fabrication of GaN based nanocrystals and the use of NP GaN electrodes for electrolysis, water splitting, or photosynthetic process applications.

  9. ESR Detection of optical dynamic nuclear polarization in GaAs/Al{sub

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    x}Ga{sub 1-x}As quantum wells at unity filling factor in the quantum Hall effect (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect ESR Detection of optical dynamic nuclear polarization in GaAs/Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}As quantum wells at unity filling factor in the quantum Hall effect Citation Details In-Document Search Title: ESR Detection of optical dynamic nuclear polarization in GaAs/Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}As quantum wells at unity filling factor in the quantum Hall effect This paper presents a study of the

  10. Ultra High p-doping Material Research for GaN Based Light Emitters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vladimir Dmitriev

    2007-06-30

    The main goal of the Project is to investigate doping mechanisms in p-type GaN and AlGaN and controllably fabricate ultra high doped p-GaN materials and epitaxial structures. Highly doped p-type GaN-based materials with low electrical resistivity and abrupt doping profiles are of great importance for efficient light emitters for solid state lighting (SSL) applications. Cost-effective hydride vapor phase epitaxial (HVPE) technology was proposed to investigate and develop p-GaN materials for SSL. High p-type doping is required to improve (i) carrier injection efficiency in light emitting p-n junctions that will result in increasing of light emitting efficiency, (ii) current spreading in light emitting structures that will improve external quantum efficiency, and (iii) parameters of Ohmic contacts to reduce operating voltage and tolerate higher forward currents needed for the high output power operation of light emitters. Highly doped p-type GaN layers and AlGaN/GaN heterostructures with low electrical resistivity will lead to novel device and contact metallization designs for high-power high efficiency GaN-based light emitters. Overall, highly doped p-GaN is a key element to develop light emitting devices for the DOE SSL program. The project was focused on material research for highly doped p-type GaN materials and device structures for applications in high performance light emitters for general illumination P-GaN and p-AlGaN layers and multi-layer structures were grown by HVPE and investigated in terms of surface morphology and structure, doping concentrations and profiles, optical, electrical, and structural properties. Tasks of the project were successfully accomplished. Highly doped GaN materials with p-type conductivity were fabricated. As-grown GaN layers had concentration N{sub a}-N{sub d} as high as 3 x 10{sup 19} cm{sup -3}. Mechanisms of doping were investigated and results of material studies were reported at several International conferences providing better understanding of p-type GaN formation for Solid State Lighting community. Grown p-type GaN layers were used as substrates for blue and green InGaN-based LEDs made by HVPE technology at TDI. These results proved proposed technical approach and facilitate fabrication of highly conductive p-GaN materials by low-cost HVPE technology for solid state lighting applications. TDI has started the commercialization of p-GaN epitaxial materials.

  11. Method of plasma etching GA-based compound semiconductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Qiu, Weibin; Goddard, Lynford L.

    2013-01-01

    A method of plasma etching Ga-based compound semiconductors includes providing a process chamber and a source electrode adjacent thereto. The chamber contains a Ga-based compound semiconductor sample in contact with a platen which is electrically connected to a first power supply, and the source electrode is electrically connected to a second power supply. SiCl.sub.4 and Ar gases are flowed into the chamber. RF power is supplied to the platen at a first power level, and RF power is supplied to the source electrode. A plasma is generated. Then, RF power is supplied to the platen at a second power level lower than the first power level and no greater than about 30 W. Regions of a surface of the sample adjacent to one or more masked portions of the surface are etched at a rate of no more than about 25 nm/min to create a substantially smooth etched surface.

  12. Method of plasma etching Ga-based compound semiconductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Qiu, Weibin; Goddard, Lynford L.

    2012-12-25

    A method of plasma etching Ga-based compound semiconductors includes providing a process chamber and a source electrode adjacent to the process chamber. The process chamber contains a sample comprising a Ga-based compound semiconductor. The sample is in contact with a platen which is electrically connected to a first power supply, and the source electrode is electrically connected to a second power supply. The method includes flowing SiCl.sub.4 gas into the chamber, flowing Ar gas into the chamber, and flowing H.sub.2 gas into the chamber. RF power is supplied independently to the source electrode and the platen. A plasma is generated based on the gases in the process chamber, and regions of a surface of the sample adjacent to one or more masked portions of the surface are etched to create a substantially smooth etched surface including features having substantially vertical walls beneath the masked portions.

  13. Average Structure Evolution of ?-phase Pu-Ga Alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Alice Iulia; Page, Katharine L.; Gourdon, Olivier; Siewenie, Joan E.; Richmond, Scott; Saleh, Tarik A.; Ramos, Michael; Schwartz, Daniel S.

    2015-03-30

    [Full Text] Plutonium metal is a highly unusual element, exhibiting six allotropes at ambient pressure, from room temperature to its melting point. Many phases of plutonium metal are unstable with temperature, pressure, chemical additions, and time. This strongly affects structure and properties, and becomes of high importance, particularly when considering effects on structural integrity over long time periods. The fcc ?-phase deserves additional attention, not only in the context of understanding the electronic structure of Pu, but also as one of the few high-symmetry actinide phases that can be stabilized down to ambient pressure and room temperature by alloying it with trivalent elements. We will present results on recent work on aging of Pu-2at.%Ga and Pu-7at.%Ga alloys

  14. Photosensitivity of the Ni-n-GaAs Schottky barriers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melebaev, D.; Melebaeva, G. D.; Rud', V. Yu. Rud', Yu. V.

    2009-01-15

    The method of chemical deposition is used to form the structures with the Ni-n-GaAs Schottky barrier. The thickness of the Ni layers with a specular outer surface was varied within the range of 150-220 A. It was experimentally observed for the first time that photosensitivity of the obtained barriers with the semitransparent Ni layers illuminated is practically absent in the Fowler region of the spectrum at hv = 0.9-1.5 eV. This circumstance is related mainly to the fact that, in this case, the Ni layer side of the structure was illuminated, and radiation with the photon energy hv < 1.3 eV was effectively reflected from the nickel surface. It is established that the developed Ni-n-GaAs structures can be used as high-efficiency wide-band photoconverters of both visible and ultraviolet radiation.

  15. Formation and properties of porous GaAs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmuki, P.; Lockwood, D.J.; Fraser, J.W.; Graham, M.J.; Isaacs, H.S.

    1996-06-01

    Porous structures on n-type GaAs (100) can be grown electrochemically in chloride-containing solutions. Crystallographic etching of the sample is a precursor stage of the attack. Polarization curves reveal the existanece of a critical onset potential for por formation (PFP). PFP is strongly dependent on the doping level of the sample and presence of surface defects. Good agreement between PFP and breakdown voltage of the space charge layer is found. Surface analysis by EDX, AES, and XPS show that the porous structure consists mainly of GaAs and that anion uptake in the structure can only observed after attackhas been initiated. Photoluminescence measurements reveal (under certain conditions) visible light emission from the porous structure.

  16. AlGaAs diode pumped tunable chromium lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krupke, William F.; Payne, Stephen A.

    1992-01-01

    An all-solid-state laser system is disclosed wherein the laser is pumped in the longwave wing of the pump absorption band. By utilizing a laser material that will accept unusually high dopant concentrations without deleterious effects on the crystal lattice one is able to compensate for the decreased cross section in the wing of the absorption band, and the number of pump sources which can be used with such a material increases correspondingly. In a particular embodiment a chromium doped colquiriite-structure crystal such as Cr:LiSrAlF.sub.6 is the laser material. The invention avoids the problems associated with using AlGaInP diodes by doping the Cr:LiSrAlF.sub.6 heavily to enable efficient pumping in the longwave wing of the absorption band with more practical AlGaAs diodes.

  17. Gallium hole traps in irradiated KTiOPO{sub 4}:Ga crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grachev, V.; Meyer, M.; Malovichko, G.; Hunt, A. W.

    2014-12-07

    Nominally pure and gallium doped single crystals of potassium titanyl phosphate (KTiOPO{sub 4}) have been studied by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance at low temperatures before and after irradiation. Irradiation with 20?MeV electrons performed at room temperature and liquid nitrogen temperature caused an appearance of electrons and holes. Gallium impurities act as hole traps in KTiOPO{sub 4} creating Ga{sup 4+} centers. Two different Ga{sup 4+} centers were observed, Ga1 and Ga2. The Ga1 centers are dominant in Ga-doped samples. For the Ga1 center, a superhyperfine structure with one nucleus with nuclear spin was registered and attributed to the interaction of gallium electrons with a phosphorus nucleus or proton in its surrounding. In both Ga1 and Ga2 centers, Ga{sup 4+} ions substitute for Ti{sup 4+} ions, but with a preference to one of two electrically distinct crystallographic positions (site selective substitution). The Ga doping eliminates one of the shortcomings of KTP crystalsionic conductivity of bulk crystals. However, this does not improve significantly the resistance of the crystals to electron and ?-radiation.

  18. Characterization and device performance of (AgCu)(InGa)Se2 absorber layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanket, Gregory; Boyle, Jonathan H.; Shafarman, William N.

    2009-06-08

    The study of (AgCu)(InGa)Se2 absorber layers is of interest in that Ag-chalcopyrites exhibit both wider bandgaps and lower melting points than their Cu counterparts. (AgCu)(InGa)Se2 absorber layers were deposited over the composition range 0 < Ag/(Ag+Cu) < 1 and 0.3 < Ga/(In+Ga) < 1.0 using a variety of elemental co-evaporation processes. Films were found to be singlephase over the entire composition range, in contrast to prior studies. Devices with Ga content 0.3 < Ga/(In+Ga) <0.5 tolerated Ag incorporation up to Ag/(Ag+Cu) = 0.5 without appreciable performance loss. Ag-containing films with Ga/(In+Ga) = 0.8 showed improved device characteristics over Cu-only control samples, in particular a 30-40% increase in short-circuit current. An absorber layer with composition Ag/(Ag+Cu) = 0.75 and Ga/(In+Ga) = 0.8 yielded a device with VOC = 890 mV, JSC = 20.5mA/cm2, fill factor = 71.3%, and ? = 13.0%.

  19. The transputer based GA. SP data acquisition system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colombo, D.; Avano, B.; DePoli, M.; Maron, G. ); Negro, A.; Parlati, G. )

    1992-04-01

    In this paper, the new data acquisition for the GA.SP detector is presented. It is a distributed system based on a network of 40 T800 and T222 transputers linked to a VME system used for histogram storage. A 100 MBit/s FDDI ring connects the system to UNIX workstations used for the experiment control, histogram display and second level data analysis.

  20. Efficiency calculations of thin-film GaAs solar cells on Si substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yamaguchi, M.; Amano, C.

    1985-11-01

    Dislocation effect upon the efficiency of single-crystal thin-film AlGaAs-GaAs heteroface solar cells on Si substrates is analyzed. Solar-cell properties are calculated based on a simple model; in the model, dislocations act as recombination centers to reduce the minority-carrier diffusion length in each layer and increase the space-charge layer recombination current. Numerical analysis is also carried out to optimize thin-film AlGaAs-GaAs heteroface solar-cell structures. The fabrication of thin-film AlGaAs-GaAs heteroface solar cells with a practical efficiency larger than 18% on Si substrates appears possible if the dislocation density in the thin-film GaAs layer is less than 10/sup 6/ cm/sup -2/.

  1. Optical and quantum efficiency analysis of (Ag,Cu)(In,Ga)Se2 absorber layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyle, Jonathan; Hanket, Gregory; Shafarman, William

    2009-06-09

    (Ag,Cu)(In,Ga)Se2 thin films have been deposited by elemental co-evaporation over a wide range of compositions and their optical properties characterized by transmission and reflection measurements and by relative shift analysis of quantum efficiency device measurements. The optical bandgaps were determined by performing linear fits of (?h?)2 vs. h?, and the quantum efficiency bandgaps were determined by relative shift analysis of device curves with fixed Ga/(In+Ga) composition, but varying Ag/(Cu+Ag) composition. The determined experimental optical bandgap ranges of the Ga/(In+Ga) = 0.31, 0.52, and 0.82 groups, with Ag/(Cu+Ag) ranging from 0 to 1, were 1.19-1.45 eV, 1.32-1.56 eV, and 1.52-1.76 eV, respectively. The optical bowing parameter of the different Ga/(In+Ga) groups was also determined.

  2. Field demonstration of coal combustion by-products based road sub-base in Illinois

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chugh, Y.P.; Mohanty, S.; Bryant, M.

    2006-07-01

    Development and demonstration of large-volume beneficial use applications for ponded fly ash are considered very important as a cost reduction strategy for the generation industry and value enhancement for the coal mining industry. One such application described is the road sub-base fo the Industry Access Truck Route in Meredosia, Illinois, which used approximately 77,000 cubic yard of compacted high loss-on-ignition (LOI) Class-F ponded fly ash. The Truck Route is a 24-feet wide road built on a 0 to 7 feet thick compacted fly ash sub-base. Illinois Department of Transportation estimated that the use of fly ash in this project saved more than $100,000 to the State of Illinois. Furthermore, natural resources in the form of relatively fertile soil were preserved by substituting fly ash for the available borrow in the area; quality agricultural topsoil is limited in the area. The article gives details of the project and reports favourable results on monitoring ground water quality. 2 refs., 1 fig.

  3. Crystallographically uniform arrays of ordered (In)GaN nanocolumns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gačević, Ž. Bengoechea-Encabo, A.; Albert, S.; Calleja, E.

    2015-01-21

    In this work, through a comparative study of self-assembled (SA) and selective area grown (SAG) (In)GaN nanocolumn (NC) ensembles, we first give a detailed insight into improved crystallographic uniformity (homogeneity of crystallographic tilts and twists) of the latter ones. The study, performed making use of: reflective high energy electron diffraction, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy, reveals that unlike their SA counterparts, the ensembles of SAG NCs show single epitaxial relationship to both sapphire(0001) and Si(111) underlying substrates. In the second part of the article, making use of X-ray diffraction, we directly show that the selective area growth leads to improved compositional uniformity of InGaN NC ensembles. This further leads to improved spectral purity of their luminescence, as confirmed by comparative macro-photoluminescence measurements performed on SA and SAG InGaN NC ensembles. An improved crystallographic uniformity of NC ensembles facilitates their integration into optoelectronic devices, whereas their improved compositional uniformity allows for their employment in single-color optoelectronic applications.

  4. Ga lithography in sputtered niobium for superconductive micro and nanowires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henry, M. David; Wolfley, Steve; Monson, Todd; Lewis, Rupert

    2014-08-18

    This work demonstrates the use of focused ion beam (FIB) implanted Ga as a lithographic mask for plasma etching of Nb films. Using a highly collimated Ga beam of a FIB, Nb is implanted 12?nm deep with a 14?nm thick Ga layer providing etch selectivity better than 15:1 with fluorine based etch chemistry. Implanted square test patterns, both 10??m by 10??m and 100??m by 100??m, demonstrate that doses above than 7.5??10{sup 15?}cm{sup ?2} at 30?kV provide adequate mask protection for a 205?nm thick, sputtered Nb film. The resolution of this dry lithographic technique is demonstrated by fabrication of nanowires 75?nm wide by 10??m long connected to 50??m wide contact pads. The residual resistance ratio of patterned Nb films was 3. The superconducting transition temperature (T{sub c})?=?7.7?K was measured using a magnetic properties measurement system. This nanoscale, dry lithographic technique was extended to sputtered TiN and Ta here and could be used on other fluorine etched superconductors such as NbN, NbSi, and NbTi.

  5. Environmental Survey Report for the ETTP: Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF) Haul Road Corridor, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, M.J.

    2005-12-20

    This report summarizes the results of environmental surveys conducted within the corridor of a temporary haul road (''Haul Road'') to be constructed from East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) to the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF) located just west of the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12). Environmental surveys were conducted by natural resource experts at Oak Ridge National Laboratory who routinely assess the significance of various project activities on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). ORNL assistance to the Haul Road Project included environmental assessments necessary to determine the best route for minimizing impacts to sensitive resources such as wetlands or rare plants. Once the final route was chosen, environmental surveys were conducted within the corridor to evaluate the impacts to sensitive resources that could not be avoided. The final Haul Road route follows established roads and a power-line corridor to the extent possible (Fig. 1). Detailed explanation regarding the purpose of the Haul Road and the regulatory context associated with its construction is provided in at least two major documents and consequently is not presented here: (1) Explanation of Significant Differences for the Record of Decision for the Disposal of Oak Ridge Reservation Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 Waste, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (January 2005, DOE/OR/01-2194&D2), and (2) Environmental Monitoring Plan for The ETTP to EMWMF Haul Road for the Disposal of Oak Ridge Reservation Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 Waste, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (April 2005, BJC/OR-2152). The focus of this report is a description of the sensitive resources to be impacted by Haul Road construction. Following a short description of the methods used for the environmental surveys, results and observations are presented in the following subsections: (1) General description of the affected environment; (2) Rare plants and vegetation assemblages; (3) Rare wildlife and their habitat; (4) Rare aquatic species; and (5) Wetlands/Floodplains. A summary of project actions taken or planned in order to avoid, minimize, or mitigate the environmental impacts associated with this project are summarized in the conclusion section of this report.

  6. Terrestrial Concentrator PV Modules Based on GaInP/GaAs/Ge TJ Cells and Minilens Panels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rumyantsev, V. D.; Sadchikov, N. A.; Chalov, A. E.; Ionova, E. A.; Friedman, D. J.; Glenn, G.

    2006-01-01

    This paper is a description of research activity in the field of cost-effective modules realizing the concept of very high solar concentration with small-aperture area Fresnel lenses and multijunction III-V cells. Structural simplicity and 'all-glass' design are the guiding principles of the corresponding development. The advanced concentrator modules are made with silicone Fresnel lens panels (from 8 up to 144 lenses, each lens is 4 times 4 cm{sup 2} in aperture area) with composite structure. GaInP/GaAs/Ge triple-junction cells with average efficiencies of 31.1 and 34.7% at 1000 suns were used for the modules. Conversion efficiency as high as 26.3% has been measured indoors in a test module using a newly developed large-area solar simulator.

  7. Passivation of deep level states caused by misfit dislocations in InGaAs on patterned GaAs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matragrano, M.J.; Watson, G.P.; Ast, D.G. ); Anderson, T.J.; Pathangey, B. )

    1993-03-22

    Deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) and cathodoluminescence (CL) were used to study the hydrogen passivation of misfit dislocations in In[sub 0.06]Ga[sub 0.94]As/GaAs heterostructures. The CL observations indicate that hydrogen plasma exposure passivates most, but not all, of the dark line defects existing in the specimen prior to hydrogenation. The concentration of deep level defect states that cannot be passivated is below the detection limit of the DLTS instrument (approximately 4[times]10[sup 12] cm[sup [minus]3]). We find the passivation is stable after anneals at temperatures as high as 600 [degree]C, indicating that hydrogen passivation of misfit dislocations is at least as stable as that of the isolated point defect studied previously with DLTS [W. C. Dautremont-Smith, J. C. Nabity, V. Swaminathan, M. Stavola, J. Chevalier, C. W. Tu, and S. J. Pearton, Appl. Phys. Lett. [bold 49] 1098 (1986)].

  8. Compositionally graded relaxed AlGaN buffers on semipolar GaN for mid-ultraviolet emission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, Erin C.; Wu Feng; Haeger, Daniel A.; Nakamura, Shuji; Denbaars, Steven P.; Cohen, Daniel A.; Speck, James S.; Romanov, Alexey E.

    2012-10-01

    In this Letter, we report on the growth and properties of relaxed, compositionally graded Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N buffer layers on freestanding semipolar (2021) GaN substrates. Continuous and step compositional grades with Al concentrations up to x = 0.61 have been achieved, with emission wavelengths in the mid-ultraviolet region as low as 265 nm. Coherency stresses were relaxed progressively throughout the grades by misfit dislocation generation via primary (basal) slip and secondary (non-basal) slip systems. Threading dislocation densities in the final layers of the grades were less than 10{sup 6}/cm{sup 2} as confirmed by plan-view transmission electron microscopy and cathodoluminescence studies.

  9. Short-wave infrared barriode detectors using InGaAsSb absorption material lattice matched to GaSb

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Craig, A. P.; Percy, B.; Marshall, A. R. J.; Jain, M.; Wicks, G.; Hossain, K.; Golding, T.; McEwan, K.; Howle, C.

    2015-05-18

    Short-wave infrared barriode detectors were grown by molecular beam epitaxy. An absorption layer composition of In{sub 0.28}Ga{sub 0.72}As{sub 0.25}Sb{sub 0.75} allowed for lattice matching to GaSb and cut-off wavelengths of 2.9 μm at 250 K and 3.0 μm at room temperature. Arrhenius plots of the dark current density showed diffusion limited dark currents approaching those expected for optimized HgCdTe-based detectors. Specific detectivity figures of around 7×10{sup 10} Jones and 1×10{sup 10} Jones were calculated, for 240 K and room temperature, respectively. Significantly, these devices could support focal plane arrays working at higher operating temperatures.

  10. Study of the one dimensional electron gas arrays confined by steps in vicinal GaN/AlGaN heterointerfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Huijie E-mail: sh-yyang@semi.ac.cn; Zhao, Guijuan; Liu, Guipeng; Wei, Hongyuan; Jiao, Chunmei; Yang, Shaoyan E-mail: sh-yyang@semi.ac.cn; Wang, Lianshan; Zhu, Qinsheng

    2014-05-21

    One dimensional electron gas (1DEG) arrays in vicinal GaN/AlGaN heterostructures have been studied. The steps at the interface would lead to the lateral barriers and limit the electron movement perpendicular to such steps. Through a self-consistent Schrdinger-Poisson approach, the electron energy levels and wave functions were calculated. It was found that when the total electron density was increased, the lateral barriers were lowered due to the screening effects by the electrons, and the electron gas became more two-dimension like. The calculated 1DEG densities were compared to the experimental values and good agreements were found. Moreover, we found that a higher doping density is more beneficial to form 1-D like electron gas arrays.

  11. 1.9 kV AlGaN/GaN Lateral Schottky Barrier Diodes on Silicon

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhu, Mingda; Song, Bo; Qi, Meng; Hu, Zongyang; Nomoto, Kazuki; Yan, Xiaodong; Cao, Yu; Johnson, Wayne; Kohn, Erhard; Jena, Debdeep; et al

    2015-02-16

    In this letter, we present AlGaN/GaN lateral Schottky barrier diodes on silicon with recessed anodes and dual field plates. A low specific on-resistance RON,SP (5.12 mΩ · cm2), a low turn-on voltage (<0.7 V) and a high reverse breakdown voltage BV (>1.9 kV), were simultaneously achieved in devices with a 25 μm anode/cathode separation, resulting in a power figure-of-merit (FOM) BV2/RON,SP of 727 MW·cm2. The record high breakdown voltage of 1.9 kV is attributed to the dual field plate structure.

  12. Comparative investigation of InGaP/GaAs pseudomorphic field-effect transistors with triple doped-channel profiles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsai, Jung-Hui; Guo, Der-Feng; Lour, Wen-Shiung

    2011-09-15

    In this article, the comparison of DC performance on InGaP/GaAs pseudomorphic field-effect transistors with tripe doped-channel profiles is demonstrated. As compared to the uniform and high-medium-low doped-channel devices, the low-medium-high doped-channel device exhibits the broadest gate voltage swing and the best device linearity because more twodimensional electron gases are formed in the heaviest doped channel to enhance the magnitude of negative threshold voltage. Experimentally, the transconductance within 50% of its maximum value for gate voltage swing is 4.62 V in the low-medium-high doped-channel device, which is greater than 3.58 (3.30) V in the uniform (high-medium-low) doped-channel device.

  13. Electron heating due to microwave photoexcitation in the high mobility GaAs/AlGaAs two dimensional electron system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramanayaka, A. N.; Mani, R. G.; Wegscheider, W.

    2013-12-04

    We extract the electron temperature in the microwave photo-excited high mobility GaAs/AlGaAs two dimensional electron system (2DES) by studying the influence of microwave radiation on the amplitude of Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations (SdHOs) in a regime where the cyclotron frequency, ?{sub c}, and the microwave angular frequency, ?, satisfy 2? ? ?{sub c} ? 3.5? The results indicate that increasing the incident microwave power has a weak effect on the amplitude of the SdHOs and therefore the electron temperature, in comparison to the influence of modest temperature changes on the dark-specimen SdH effect. The results indicate negligible electron heating under modest microwave photo-excitation, in good agreement with theoretical predictions.

  14. Origin of radiative recombination and manifestations of localization effects in GaAs/GaNAs core/shell nanowires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, S. L.; Filippov, S.; Chen, W. M.; Buyanova, I. A.; Ishikawa, Fumitaro

    2014-12-22

    Radiative carrier recombination processes in GaAs/GaNAs core/shell nanowires grown by molecular beam epitaxy on a Si substrate are systematically investigated by employing micro-photoluminescence (?-PL) and ?-PL excitation (?-PLE) measurements complemented by time-resolved PL spectroscopy. At low temperatures, alloy disorder is found to cause localization of photo-excited carriers leading to predominance of optical transitions from localized excitons (LE). Some of the local fluctuations in N composition are suggested to lead to strongly localized three-dimensional confining potential equivalent to that for quantum dots, based on the observation of sharp and discrete PL lines within the LE contour. The localization effects are found to have minor influence on PL spectra at room temperature due to thermal activation of the localized excitons to extended states. Under these conditions, photo-excited carrier lifetime is found to be governed by non-radiative recombination via surface states which is somewhat suppressed upon N incorporation.

  15. Microstructure of V-based ohmic contacts to AlGaN/GaN heterostructures at a reduced annealing temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmid, A. Schroeter, Ch.; Otto, R.; Heitmann, J.; Schuster, M.; Klemm, V.; Rafaja, D.

    2015-02-02

    Ohmic contacts with V/Al/Ni/Au and V/Ni/Au metalization schemes were deposited on AlGaN/GaN heterostructures. The dependence of the specific contact resistance on the annealing conditions and the V:Al thickness ratio was shown. For an optimized electrode stack, a low specific contact resistance of 8.9??10{sup ?6} ? cm{sup 2} was achieved at an annealing temperature of 650?C. Compared to the conventional Ti/Al/Ni/Au contact, this is a reduction of 150?K. The microstructure and contact formation at the AlGaN/metal interface were investigated by transmission electron microscopy including high-resolution micrographs and energy dispersive X-ray analysis. It was shown that for low-resistive contacts, the resistivity of the metalization has to be taken into account. The V:Al thickness ratio has an impact on the formation of different intermetallic phases and thus is crucial for establishing ohmic contacts at reduced annealing temperatures.

  16. Demonstration of isotype GaN/AlN/GaN heterobarrier diodes by NH{sub 3}-molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fireman, Micha N.; Browne, David A.; Mazumder, Baishakhi; Speck, James S.; Mishra, Umesh K.

    2015-05-18

    The results of vertical transport through nitride heterobarrier structures grown by ammonia molecular beam epitaxy are presented. Structures are designed with binary layers to avoid the effects of random alloy fluctuations in ternary nitride barriers. The unintentional incorporation of Ga in the AlN growth is investigated by atom probe tomography and is shown to be strongly dependent on both the NH{sub 3} flowrate and substrate temperature growth parameters. Once nominally pure AlN layer growth conditions are achieved, structures consisting of unintentionally doped (UID) GaN spacer layers adjacent to a nominally pure AlN are grown between two layers of n+ GaN, from which isotype diodes are fabricated. Varying the design parameters of AlN layer thickness, UID spacer layer thickness, and threading dislocation density show marked effects on the vertical transport characteristics of these structures. The lack of significant temperature dependence, coupled with Fowler-Nordheim and/or Milliken-Lauritsen analysis, point to a prevalently tunneling field emission mechanism through the AlN barrier. Once flatband conditions in the UID layer are achieved, electrons leave the barrier with significant energy. This transport mechanism is of great interest for applications in hot electron structures.

  17. Temporally and spatially resolved photoluminescence investigation of (112{sup }2) semi-polar InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells grown on nanorod templates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, B.; Smith, R.; Athanasiou, M.; Yu, X.; Bai, J.; Wang, T.

    2014-12-29

    By means of time-resolved photoluminescence (PL) and confocal PL measurements, temporally and spatially resolved optical properties have been investigated on a number of In{sub x}Ga{sub 1?x}N/GaN multiple-quantum-well (MQW) structures with a wide range of indium content alloys from 13% to 35% on (112{sup }2) semi-polar GaN with high crystal quality, obtained through overgrowth on nanorod templates. With increasing indium content, the radiative recombination lifetime initially increases as expected, but decreases if the indium content further increases to 35%, corresponding to emission in the green spectral region. The reduced radiative recombination lifetime leads to enhanced optical performance for the high indium content MQWs as a result of strong exciton localization, which is different from the behaviour of c-plane InGaN/GaN MQWs, where quantum confined Stark effect plays a dominating role in emission process.

  18. Selective area epitaxy of monolithic white-light InGaN/GaN quantum well microstripes with dual color emission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Yuejing; Tong, Yuying; Yang, Guofeng Yao, Chujun; Sun, Rui; Cai, Lesheng; Xu, Guiting; Wang, Jin; Zhang, Qing; Ye, Xuanchao; Wu, Mengting; Wen, Zhiqin

    2015-09-15

    Monolithic color synthesis is demonstrated using InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells (QWs) grown on GaN microstripes formed by selective area epitaxy on SiO{sub 2} mask patterns. The striped microfacet structure is composed of (0001) and (11-22) planes, attributed to favorable surface polarity and surface energy. InGaN/GaN QWs on different microfacets contain spatially inhomogeneous compositions owing to the diffusion of adatoms among the facets. This unique property allows the microfacet QWs to emit blue light from the (11-22) plane and yellow light from the top (0001) plane, the mixing of which leads to the perception of white light emission.

  19. H irradiation effects on the GaAs-like Raman modes in GaAs{sub 1-x}N{sub x}/GaAs{sub 1-x}N{sub x}:H planar heterostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giulotto, E. Geddo, M.; Patrini, M.; Guizzetti, G.; Felici, M.; Capizzi, M.; Polimeni, A.; Martelli, F.; Rubini, S.

    2014-12-28

    The GaAs-like longitudinal optical phonon frequency in two hydrogenated GaAs{sub 1-x}N{sub x}/GaAs{sub 1-x}N{sub x}:H microwire heterostructureswith similar N concentration, but different H dose and implantation conditionshas been investigated by micro-Raman mapping. In the case of GaAs{sub 0.991}N{sub 0.009} wires embedded in barriers where GaAs-like properties are recovered through H irradiation, the phonon frequency in the barriers undergoes a blue shift with respect to the wires. In GaAs{sub 0.992}N{sub 0.008} wires embedded in less hydrogenated barriers, the phonon frequency exhibits an opposite behavior (red shift). Strain, disorder, phonon localization effects induced by H-irradiation on the GaAs-like phonon frequency are discussed and related to different types of N-H complexes formed in the hydrogenated barriers. It is shown that the red (blue) character of the frequency shift is related to the dominant N-2H (N-3H) type of complexes. Moreover, for specific experimental conditions, an all-optical determination of the uniaxial strain field is obtained. This may improve the design of recently presented devices that exploit the correlation between uniaxial stress and the degree of polarization of photoluminescence.

  20. Compliant mechanism road bicycle brake: a rigid-body replacement case study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, Brian M; Howell, Larry L; Magleby, Spencer P

    2011-01-19

    The design of high-performance bicycle brakes is complicated by the competing design objectives of increased performance and low weight. But this challenge also provides a good case study to demonstrate the design of compliant mechanisms to replace current rigid-link mechanisms. This paper briefly reviews current road brake designs, demonstrates the use of rigid-body replacement synthesis to design a compliant mechanism, and illustrates the combination of compliant mechanism design tools. The resulting concept was generated from the modified dual-pivot brake design and is a partially compliant mechanism where one pin has the dual role of a joint and a mounting pin. The pseudo-rigid-body model, finite element analysis, and optimization algorithms are used to generate design dimensions, and designs are considered for both titanium and E-glass flexures. The resulting design has the potential of reducing the part count and overall weight while maintaining a performance similar to the benchmark.

  1. Savannah River Site RCRA Facility Investigation plan: Road A Chemical Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-06-01

    The nature of wastes disposed of at the Road A Chemical Basin (RACB) is such that some degree of soil contamination is probable. Lead has also been detected in site monitoring wells at concentrations above SRS background levels. A RCRA Facility Investigation (RFI) is proposed for the RACB and will include a ground penetrating radar (GPR) survey, collection and chemical and radiological analyses of soil cores, installation of groundwater monitoring wells, collection and chemical and radiological analyses of groundwater samples, and collection of chemical and radiological analyses of surface water and sediment samples. Upon completion of the proposed RFI field work and chemical and radiological analyses, and RFI report should be prepared to present conclusions on the nature and extent of contamination at the site, and to make recommendations for site remediation. If contamination is detected at concentrations above SRS background levels, a receptor analysis should be done to evaluate potential impacts of site contamination on nearby populations.

  2. Comparison of single junction AlGaInP and GaInP solar cells grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Masuda, T; Tomasulo, S; Lang, JR; Lee, ML

    2015-03-07

    We have investigated similar to 2.0 eV (AlxGa1-x)(0.51)In0.49P and similar to 1.9 eV Ga0.51In0.49P single junction solar cells grown on both on-axis and misoriented GaAs substrates by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). Although lattice-matched (AlxGa1-x)(0.51)In0.49P solar cells are highly attractive for space and concentrator photovoltaics, there have been few reports on the MBE growth of such cells. In this work, we demonstrate open circuit voltages (V-oc) ranging from 1.29 to 1.30 V for Ga0.51In0.49P cells, and 1.35-1.37 V for (AlxGa1-x)(0.51)In0.49P cells. Growth on misoriented substrates enabled the bandgap-voltage offset (W-oc = E-g/q - V-oc) of Ga0.51In0.49P cells to decrease from similar to 575 mV to similar to 565 mV, while that of (AlxGa1-x)(0.51)In0.49P cells remained nearly constant at 620 mV. The constant Woc as a function of substrate offcut for (AlxGa1-x)(0.51)In0.49P implies greater losses from non-radiative recombination compared with the Ga0.51In0.49P devices. In addition to larger Woc values, the (AlxGa1-x)(0.51)In0.49P cells exhibited significantly lower internal quantum efficiency (IQE) values than Ga0.51In0.49P cells due to recombination at the emitter/window layer interface. A thin emitter design is experimentally shown to be highly effective in improving IQE, particularly at short wavelengths. Our work shows that with further optimization of both cell structure and growth conditions, MBE-grown (AlxGa1-x)(0.51)In0.49P will be a promising wide-bandgap candidate material for high-efficiency, lattice-matched multi-junction solar cells. (C) 2015 AIP Publishing LLC.

  3. Progress report Idaho on-road test with vegetable oil as a diesel fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reece, D.; Peterson, C.L.

    1993-12-31

    Biodiesel is among many biofuels being considered in the US for alternative fueled vehicles. The use of this fuel can reduce US dependence on imported oil and help improve air quality by reducing gaseous and particulate emissions. Researchers at the Department of Agricultural Engineering at the University of Idaho have pioneered rapeseed oil as a diesel fuel substitute. Although UI has conducted many laboratory and tractor tests using raw rapeseed oil and rape methyl ester (RME), these fuels have not been proven viable for on-road applications. A biodiesel demonstration project has been launched to show the use of biodiesel in on-road vehicles. Two diesel powered pickups are being tested on 20 percent biodiesel and 80 percent diesel. One is a Dodge 3/4-ton pickup powered by a Cummins 5.9 liter turbocharged and intercooled engine. This engine is direct injected and is being run on 20 percent RME and 80 percent diesel. The other pickup is a Ford, powered by a Navistar 7.3 liter, naturally aspirated engine. This engine has a precombustion chamber and is being operated on 20 percent raw rapeseed oil and 80 percent diesel. The engines themselves are unmodified, but modifications have been made to the vehicles for the convenience of the test. In order to give maximum vehicle range, fuel mixing is done on-board. Two tanks are provided, one for the diesel and one for the biodiesel. Electric fuel pumps supply fuel to a combining chamber for correct proportioning. The biodiesel fuel tanks are heated with a heat exchanger which utilizes engine coolant circulation.

  4. Method of making V.sub.3 Ga superconductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dew-Hughes, David

    1980-01-01

    An improved method for producing a vanadium-gallium superconductor wire having aluminum as a component thereof is disclosed, said wire being encased in a gallium bearing copper sheath. The superconductors disclosed herein may be fabricated under normal atmospheres and room temperatures by forming a tubular shaped billet having a core composed of an alloy of vanadium and aluminum and an outer sheath composed of an alloy of copper, gallium and aluminum. Thereafter the entire billet is swage reduced to form a wire therefrom and heat treated to form a layer of V.sub.3 Ga in the interior of the wire.

  5. " Best Practices Scorecard (c) GA Tech Research Corp.

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Best Practices Scorecard (c) GA Tech Research Corp. (c) Texas Industries of the Future" "Instructions for Using the Best Practice Scorecard Calculator" "This calculator was developed for use with the Superior Energy Performance's Best Practice Scorecard, revision 9, dated December 5, 2012." "How to use this calculator:" "1. On the Summary tab, press the hide or unhide buttons to show desired detail." "2. Click on the category links in the

  6. Structure, transport and thermal properties of UCoGa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Purwanto, A.; Robinson, R.A.; Prokes, K.

    1994-04-01

    By means of neutron powder diffraction, we find that UCoGa crystallizes in the hexagonal ZrNiAl structure and orders ferromagnetically at low temperatures with magnetic moments stacked along the c axis. The magnetic-ordering temperature is reflected in anomalies in the temperature dependencies of the electrical resistivity and the specific heat at Tc = 47 K. Furthermore, the strong anisotropy in the electrical resistivity for i {parallel} c and i {perpendicular} c indicates a significant contribution of the magnetic anisotropy to the electrical resistivity.

  7. Low dimensional GaAs/air vertical microcavity lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gessler, J.; Steinl, T.; Fischer, J.; Hfling, S.; Schneider, C.; Kamp, M.; Mika, A.; S?k, G.; Misiewicz, J.

    2014-02-24

    We report on the fabrication of gallium arsenide (GaAs)/air distributed Bragg reflector microresonators with indium gallium arsenide quantum wells. The structures are studied via momentum resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy which allows us to investigate a pronounced optical mode quantization of the photonic dispersion. We can extract a length parameter from these quantized states whose upper limit can be connected to the lateral physical extension of the microcavity via analytical calculations. Laser emission from our microcavity under optical pumping is observed in power dependent investigations.

  8. Quantum effects in electron beam pumped GaAs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yahia, M. E.; National Institute of Laser Enhanced Sciences , Cairo University ; Azzouz, I. M.; Moslem, W. M.

    2013-08-19

    Propagation of waves in nano-sized GaAs semiconductor induced by electron beam are investigated. A dispersion relation is derived by using quantum hydrodynamics equations including the electrons and holes quantum recoil effects, exchange-correlation potentials, and degenerate pressures. It is found that the propagating modes are instable and strongly depend on the electron beam parameters, as well as the quantum recoil effects and degenerate pressures. The instability region shrinks with the increase of the semiconductor number density. The instability arises because of the energetic electron beam produces electron-hole pairs, which do not keep in phase with the electrostatic potential arising from the pair plasma.

  9. Low-cost, high-efficiency solar cells utilizing GaAs-on-Si technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vernon, S.M. )

    1993-04-01

    This report describes work to develop technology to deposit GaAs on Si using a nucleation layer of atomic-layer-epitaxy-grown GaAs or AlAs on Si. This ensures two-dimensional nucleation and should lead to fewer defects in the final GaAs layer. As an alternative, we also developed technology for depositing GaAs on sawtooth-patterned Si. Preliminary studies showed that this material can have a very low defect density, [approximately] 1 [times] 10[sup 5] cm[sup [minus]5], as opposed to our conventionally grown GaAs on SL which has a typical defect density of over 1 [times]10[sup 7] cm[sup [minus]2]. Using these two now methods of GaAs-on-Si material growth, we made solar cells that are expected to show higher efficiencies than those of previous cells.

  10. SREL Reprint #3096

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Radiation Ecology I. L. Brisbin Jr. and C. E. Dallas University of Georgia, Athens, GA, ... SREL Reprint 3096 Brisbin, I. L., Jr., and C. E. Dallas. 2008. Radiation Ecology. In: S. ...

  11. DOE and USDA Announce More than $10 Million in Bioenergy Plant...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Boyce Thompson Institute for Plant Research (Ithaca, NY), 882,000 Colorado State University (Fort Collins, CO), 1,500,000 University of Georgia (Athens, GA), 1,295,000 ...

  12. SREL Reprint #3082

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, University of Georgia, PO Drawer E, Aiken, SC 29802, USA 2Institute of Ecology, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602, USA 3Department of...

  13. SREL Reprint #3193

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    R. Hickman1,3, and Thomas M. Luhring1,4 1Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, Aiken, SC, USA 2Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources, University of Georgia, Athens, GA,...

  14. SREL Reprint #3114

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, University of Georgia, PO Drawer E, Aiken, SC 29802, USA 2Institute of Ecology, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602, USA 3Department of...

  15. SREL Reprint #3112

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602, USA 3Canadian Wildlife Service, 300-2365 Albert Street, Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada S4P 4K1 4Department of Biology, University of...

  16. Enhanced magnetic hysteresis in Ni-Mn-Ga single crystal and its influence

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    on magnetic shape memory effect (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Enhanced magnetic hysteresis in Ni-Mn-Ga single crystal and its influence on magnetic shape memory effect Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Enhanced magnetic hysteresis in Ni-Mn-Ga single crystal and its influence on magnetic shape memory effect Enhanced magnetic hysteresis due to boron doping in combination with magnetic shape memory effect in Ni-Mn-Ga single crystal results in new interesting functionality of

  17. GaN-on-diamond electronic device reliability: Mechanical and thermo-mechanical integrity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Dong; Sun, Huarui; Pomeroy, James W.; Kuball, Martin; Francis, Daniel; Faili, Firooz; Twitchen, Daniel J.

    2015-12-21

    The mechanical and thermo-mechanical integrity of GaN-on-diamond wafers used for ultra-high power microwave electronic devices was studied using a micro-pillar based in situ mechanical testing approach combined with an optical investigation of the stress and heat transfer across interfaces. We find the GaN/diamond interface to be thermo-mechanically stable, illustrating the potential for this material for reliable GaN electronic devices.

  18. Composition-dependent structural properties in ScGaN alloy films: A

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    combined experimental and theoretical study (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Composition-dependent structural properties in ScGaN alloy films: A combined experimental and theoretical study Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Composition-dependent structural properties in ScGaN alloy films: A combined experimental and theoretical study Experimental and theoretical results are presented regarding the incorporation of scandium into wurtzite GaN. Variation of the a and c lattice

  19. Unoccupied electronic structure of Ni2MnGa ferromagnetic shape memory alloy

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Journal Article) | DOE PAGES Accepted Manuscript: Unoccupied electronic structure of Ni2MnGa ferromagnetic shape memory alloy This content will become publicly available on August 20, 2016 « Prev Next » Title: Unoccupied electronic structure of Ni2MnGa ferromagnetic shape memory alloy Momentum resolved inverse photoemission spectroscopy measurements show that the dispersion of the unoccupied bands of Ni2MnGa is significant in the austenite phase. Furthermore, in the martensite phase, it

  20. Unoccupied electronic structure of Ni2MnGa ferromagnetic shape memory alloy

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Unoccupied electronic structure of Ni2MnGa ferromagnetic shape memory alloy Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on August 20, 2016 Title: Unoccupied electronic structure of Ni2MnGa ferromagnetic shape memory alloy Momentum resolved inverse photoemission spectroscopy measurements show that the dispersion of the unoccupied bands of Ni2MnGa is significant in the austenite phase. Furthermore, in the martensite phase,

  1. Electron and hole gas in modulation-doped GaAs/Al{sub 1-x}Ga{sub x}As radial heterojunctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bertoni, Andrea; Royo, Miquel; Mahawish, Farah; Goldoni, Guido

    2011-11-15

    We perform self-consistent Schroedinger-Poisson calculations with exchange and correlation corrections to determine the electron and hole gas in a radial heterojunction formed in a GaAs/AlGaAs core-multi-shell nanowire, which is either n- or p-doped. We show that the electron and hole gases can be tuned to different localizations and symmetries inside the core as a function of the doping density/gate potential. Contrary to planar heterojunctions, conduction electrons do not form a uniform 2D electron gas (2DEG) localized at the GaAs/AlGaAs interface, but rather show a transition between an isotropic, cylindrical distribution deep in the GaAs core (low doping) and a set of six tunnel-coupled quasi-1D channels at the edges of the interface (high doping). Holes, on the other hand, are much more localized at the GaAs/AlGaAs interface. At low doping, they present an additional localization pattern with six separated 2DEGs strips. The field generated by a back-gate may easily deform the electron or hole gas, breaking the sixfold symmetry. Single 2DEGs at one interface or multiple quasi-1D channels are shown to form as a function of voltage intensity, polarity, and carrier type.

  2. Analysis of the GaInP/GaAs/1-eV/Ge Cell and Related Structures for Terrestrial Concentrator Application: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friedman, D. J.; Kurtz, S. R.; Geisz, J. F.

    2002-05-01

    This conference paper describes the analysis of the potential of GaInP/GaAs/1-eV/Ge four-junction solar cell to improve on the efficiency of the state-of-the-art GaInP/GaAs/Ge benchmark. We emphasize three factors: (1) The newly proposed terrestrial concentrator spectrum has a lower ratio of red to blue light than does the old AM1.5 direct standard spectrum. (2) Standard two-layer antireflection coatings do not provide near-zero reflectance over the full spectral range of interest for these devices. (3) GaInNAs junctions used to date for the 1-eV junction have quantum efficiencies less than {approx}75%. These factors all limit the device current, adversely affecting the four-junction efficiency. We discuss strategies for ameliorating this problem, including going to alternate structures such as a GaInP/GaAs/0.9-eV three-junction device.

  3. Relaxation and critical strain for maximum In incorporation in AlInGaN on GaN grown by metal organic vapour phase epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reuters, Benjamin; Finken, M.; Wille, A.; Kalisch, H.; Vescan, A.; Hollaender, B.; Heuken, M.

    2012-11-01

    Quaternary AlInGaN layers were grown on conventional GaN buffer layers on sapphire by metal organic vapour phase epitaxy at different surface temperatures and different reactor pressures with constant precursor flow conditions. A wide range in compositions within 30-62% Al, 5-29% In, and 23-53% Ga was covered, which leads to different strain states from high tensile to high compressive. From high-resolution x-ray diffraction and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, we determined the compositions, strain states, and crystal quality of the AlInGaN layers. Atomic force microscopy measurements were performed to characterize the surface morphology. A critical strain value for maximum In incorporation near the AlInGaN/GaN interface is presented. For compressively strained layers, In incorporation is limited at the interface as residual strain cannot exceed an empirical critical value of about 1.1%. Relaxation occurs at about 15 nm thickness accompanied by strong In pulling. Tensile strained layers can be grown pseudomorphically up to 70 nm at a strain state of 0.96%. A model for relaxation in compressively strained AlInGaN with virtual discrete sub-layers, which illustrates the gradually changing lattice constant during stress reduction is presented.

  4. Origin of spin gapless semiconductor behavior in CoFeCrGa: Theory...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    behavior in CoFeCrGa: Theory and Experiment This content will become publicly available on July 8, 2016 Title: Origin of spin gapless semiconductor behavior in ...

  5. Antimonide-Based Long-Wavelength Lasers on GaAs Substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KLEM,JOHN F.; Blum, O.

    2000-08-17

    We have investigated the use of GaAsSb in edge-emitting laser active regions, in order to obtain lasing near 1.3 {micro}m. Single quantum well GaAsSb devices display electroluminescence at wavelengths as long as 1.34 {micro}m, but substantial blueshifts occur under high injection conditions. GaAsSb single quantum well edge emitters have been obtained which lase at 1.275 {micro}m with a room-temperature threshold current density as low as 535 A/cm{sup 2}. Modification of the basic GaAsSb/GaAs structure with the addition of InGaAs layers results in a strongly type-II band alignment which can be used to further extend the emission wavelength of these devices. Using GaAsSb/InGaAs active regions, lasers emitting at 1.17 {micro}m have been obtained with room-temperature threshold current densities of 120 A/cm{sup 2}, and devices operating at 1.29 {micro}m have displayed thresholds as low as 375 A/cm{sup 2}. Characteristic temperatures for devices employing various GaAsSb-based active regions have been measured to be 60-73 K.

  6. Vacancy defects in as-grown and neutron irradiated GaP studied by positrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dlubek, G.; Bruemmer, O.; Polity, A.

    1986-08-18

    Positron lifetime and Doppler-broadening measurements have been used to study vacancy defects in n-italic-type GaP. Vacancies in the P sublattice with a concentration of some 10/sup 17/ cm/sup -3/ were observed in as-grwon GaP. The vacancies disappear during annealing at 500--800 /sup 0/C. In neutron-irradiated GaP positrons are trapped by Ga vacancies which anneal out in two stages situated at 300--550 /sup 0/C and 550--700 /sup 0/C.

  7. Structural defects in GaN revealed by Transmission Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liliental-Weber, Zuzanna

    2014-04-18

    This paper reviews the various types of structural defects observed by Transmission Electron Microscopy in GaN heteroepitaxial layers grown on foreign substrates and homoepitaxial layers grown on bulk GaN substrates. The structural perfection of these layers is compared to the platelet self-standing crystals grown by High Nitrogen Pressure Solution. Defects in undoped and Mg doped GaN are discussed. Some models explaining the formation of inversion domains in heavily Mg doped layers that are possible defects responsible for the difficulties of p-doping in GaN are also reviewed.

  8. Relaxation of compressively strained AlGaN by inclined threading

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    dislocations. (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Relaxation of compressively strained AlGaN by inclined threading dislocations. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Relaxation of compressively strained AlGaN by inclined threading dislocations. Transmission electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction were used to assess the microstructure and strain of Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1?x}N(x = 0.61-0.64) layers grown on AlN. The compressively-strained AlGaN is partially relaxed by

  9. Enhanced conversion efficiency in wide-bandgap GaNP solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sukrittanon, Supanee; Liu, Ren; Ro, Yun Goo; Pan, Janet L.; Jungjohann, Katherine Leigh; Tu, Charles W.; Dayeh, Shadi A.

    2015-10-12

    In this study, we demonstrate –2.05 eV dilute nitride GaNP solar cells on GaP substrates for potential use as the top junction in dual-junction integrated cells on Si. By adding a small amount of N into indirect-bandgap GaP, GaNP has several extremely important attributes: a direct-bandgap that is also tunable, and easily attained lattice-match with Si. Our best GaNP solar cell ([N] –1.8%, Eg –2.05 eV) achieves an efficiency of 7.9%, even in the absence of a window layer. This GaNP solar cell's efficiency is 3× higher than the most efficient GaP solar cell to date and higher than other solar cells with similar direct bandgap (InGaP, GaAsP). Through a systematic study of the structural, electrical, and optical properties of the device, efficient broadband optical absorption and enhanced solar cell performance are demonstrated.

  10. Interface Reactions and Electrical Characteristics of Au/GaSb Contacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    H. Ehsani; R.J. Gutmann; G.W. Charache

    2000-07-07

    The reaction of Au with GaSb occurs at a relatively low temperature (100 C). Upon annealing, a AuSb{sub 2} compound and several Au-Ga phases are produced. Phase transitions occur toward higher Ga concentration with increasing annealing temperatures. Furthermore, the depth of the contact also increases with increased annealing temperature. They found that the AuSb{sub 2} compound forms on the GaSb surface, with the compound crystal partially ordered with respect to the substrate. The transition of Schottky- to ohmic-contact behavior in Au/n-type GaSb occurs simultaneously with the formation of the AuGa compound at about a 250 C annealing temperature. This ohmic contact forms without the segregation of dopants at the metallic compound/GaSb interface. Therefore it is postulated that transition from Schottky- to ohmic-contact behavior is obtained through a series of tunneling transitions of electrons through defects in the depletion region in the Au/n-type GaSb contacts. Contact resistivities of 6-7 x 10{sup -6} {Omega}-cm{sup 2} were obtained with the annealing temperature between 300 and 350 C for 30 seconds. In Au/p-type GaSb contacts, the resistivity was independent of the annealing temperature. This suggested that the carrier transport in p-type contact dominated by thermionic emission.

  11. In-situ crystallization of GeTe\\GaSb phase change memory stacked films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Velea, A.; Borca, C. N.; Grolimund, D.; Socol, G.; Galca, A. C.; Popescu, M.; Bokhoven, J. A. van

    2014-12-21

    Single and double layer phase change memory structures based on GeTe and GaSb thin films were deposited by pulsed laser deposition (PLD). Their crystallization behavior was studied using in-situ synchrotron techniques. Electrical resistance vs. temperature investigations, using the four points probe method, showed transition temperatures of 138 °C and 198 °C for GeTe and GaSb single films, respectively. It was found that after GeTe crystallization in the stacked films, Ga atoms from the GaSb layer diffused in the vacancies of the GeTe crystalline structure. Therefore, the crystallization temperature of the Sb-rich GaSb layer is decreased by more than 30 °C. Furthermore, at 210 °C, the antimony excess from GaSb films crystallizes as a secondary phase. At higher annealing temperatures, the crystalline Sb phase increased on the expense of GaSb crystalline phase which was reduced. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) measurements at the Ga and Ge K-edges revealed changes in their local atomic environments as a function of the annealing temperature. Simulations unveil a tetrahedral configuration in the amorphous state and octahedral configuration in the crystalline state for Ge atoms, while Ga is four-fold coordinated in both as-deposited and annealed samples.

  12. Structural defects in GaN revealed by Transmission Electron Microscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Liliental-Weber, Zuzanna

    2014-09-08

    This paper reviews the various types of structural defects observed by Transmission Electron Microscopy in GaN heteroepitaxial layers grown on foreign substrates and homoepitaxial layers grown on bulk GaN substrates. The structural perfection of these layers is compared to the platelet self-standing crystals grown by High Nitrogen Pressure Solution. Defects in undoped and Mg doped GaN are discussed. Lastly, some models explaining the formation of inversion domains in heavily Mg doped layers that are possible defects responsible for the difficulties of p-doping in GaN are also reviewed.

  13. Enhanced conversion efficiency in wide-bandgap GaNP solar cells

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sukrittanon, Supanee; Liu, Ren; Ro, Yun Goo; Pan, Janet L.; Jungjohann, Katherine Leigh; Tu, Charles W.; Dayeh, Shadi A.

    2015-10-12

    In this study, we demonstrate –2.05 eV dilute nitride GaNP solar cells on GaP substrates for potential use as the top junction in dual-junction integrated cells on Si. By adding a small amount of N into indirect-bandgap GaP, GaNP has several extremely important attributes: a direct-bandgap that is also tunable, and easily attained lattice-match with Si. Our best GaNP solar cell ([N] –1.8%, Eg –2.05 eV) achieves an efficiency of 7.9%, even in the absence of a window layer. This GaNP solar cell's efficiency is 3× higher than the most efficient GaP solar cell to date and higher than othermore » solar cells with similar direct bandgap (InGaP, GaAsP). Through a systematic study of the structural, electrical, and optical properties of the device, efficient broadband optical absorption and enhanced solar cell performance are demonstrated.« less

  14. High-temperature luminescence in an n-GaSb/n-InGaAsSb/p-AlGaAsSb light-emitting heterostructure with a high potential barrier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petukhov, A. A., E-mail: andrey-rus29@rambler.ru; Zhurtanov, B. E.; Kalinina, K. V.; Stoyanov, N. D.; Salikhov, H. M.; Mikhailova, M. P.; Yakovlev, Yu. P. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2013-09-15

    The electroluminescent properties of an n-GaSb/n-InGaAsSb/p-AlGaAsSb heterostructure with a high potential barrier in the conduction band (large conduction-band offset) at the n-GaSb/n-InGaAsSb type-II heterointerface ({Delta}E{sub c} = 0.79 eV) are studied. Two bands with peaks at 0.28 and 0.64 eV at 300 K, associated with radiative recombination in n-InGaAsSb and n-GaSb, respectively, are observed in the electroluminescence (EL) spectrum. In the entire temperature range under study, T = 290-480 K, additional electron-hole pairs are formed in the n-InGaAsSb active region by impact ionization with hot electrons heated as a result of the conduction-band offset. These pairs contribute to radiative recombination, which leads to a nonlinear increase in the EL intensity and output optical power with increasing pump current. A superlinear increase in the emission power of the long-wavelength band is observed upon heating in the temperature range T = 290-345 K, and a linear increase is observed at T > 345 K. This work for the first time reports an increase in the emission power of a light-emitting diode structure with increasing temperature. It is shown that this rise is caused by a decrease in the threshold energy of the impact ionization due to narrowing of the band gap of the active region.

  15. Theoretical model of the polarization Coulomb field scattering in strained AlGaN/AlN/GaN heterostructure field-effect transistors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luan, Chongbiao; Lin, Zhaojun Zhao, Jingtao; Wang, Yutang; Lv, Yuanjie; Chen, Hong; Wang, Zhanguo

    2014-07-28

    The theoretical model of the polarization Coulomb field scattering (PCF) caused by the polarization charge density variation at the AlGaN/AlN interface in strained AlGaN/AlN/GaN heterostructure field-effect transistors has been developed. And the theoretical values for the electron drift mobility, which were calculated using the Matthiessen's rule that includes PCF, piezoelectric scattering, polar optical-phonon scattering, and interface roughness scattering, are in good agreement with our experimental values. Therefore, the theoretical model for PCF has been confirmed.

  16. A comparison of the structure and localized magnetism in Ce{sub 2}PdGa{sub 12} with the heavy fermion CePdGa{sub 6}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Macaluso, Robin T. [Department of Chemistry, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Millican, Jasmine N. [Department of Chemistry, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Nakatsuji, Satoru [Department of Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan 606-8502 (Japan); Lee, Han-Oh [Department of Physics, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Carter, B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Moreno, Nelson O. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Fisk, Zachary [Department of Physics, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Chan, Julia Y. [Department of Chemistry, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States)]. E-mail: jchan@lsu.edu

    2005-11-15

    Single crystals of Ce{sub 2}PdGa{sub 12} have been synthesized in Ga flux and characterized by X-ray diffraction. This compound crystallizes in the tetragonal P4/nbm space group, Z=2 with lattice parameters of a=6.1040(2)A and c=15.5490(6)A. It shows strongly anisotropic magnetism and orders antiferromagnetically at T{sub N}{approx}11K. A field-induced metamagnetic transition to the ferromagnetic state is observed below T{sub N}. Structure-property relationships with the related heavy-fermion antiferromagnet CePdGa{sub 6} are discussed.

  17. Origin of InGaN/GaN light-emitting diode efficiency improvements using tunnel-junction-cascaded active regions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piprek, Joachim

    2014-02-03

    This Letter investigates the efficiency enhancement achieved by tunnel junction insertion into the InGaN/GaN multi-quantum well (MQW) active region of blue light emitting diodes (LEDs). The peak quantum efficiency of such LED exceeds 100%, but the maximum wall-plug efficiency (WPE) hardly changes. However, due to the increased bias, the WPE peaks at much higher input power, i.e., the WPE droop is significantly delayed, and the output power is strongly enhanced. The main physical reason for this improvement lies in the non-uniform vertical carrier distribution typically observed within InGaN MQWs.

  18. InGaP/GaAs Inverted Dual Junction Solar Cells For CPV Applications Using Metal-Backed Epitaxial Lift-Off

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bauhuis, Gerard J.; Mulder, Peter; Haverkamp, Erik J.; Schermer, John J.; Nash, Lee J.; Fulgoni, Dominic J. F.; Ballard, Ian M.; Duggan, Geoffrey

    2010-10-14

    The epitaxial lift-off (ELO) technique has been combined with inverted III-V PV cell epitaxial growth with the aim of employing thin film PV cells in HCPV systems. In a stepwise approach to the realization of an inverted triple junction on a MELO platform we have first grown a GaAs single junction PV cell to establish the basic layer release process and cell processing steps followed by the growth, fabrication and test of an inverted InGaP/GaAs dual junction structure.

  19. InGaAsN Solar Cells with 1.0eV Bandgap, Lattice Matched to GaAs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allerman, A.A.; Banas, J.J.; Gee, J.M.; Hammons, B.E.; Jones, E.D.; Kurtz, S.R.

    1998-11-24

    The design, growth by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition, and processing of an In{sub 0.07}Ga{sub 0.93}As{sub 0.98}N{sub 0.02} solar Al, with 1.0 ev bandgap, lattice matched to GaAs is described. The hole diffusion length in annealed, n-type InGaAsN is 0.6-0.8 pm, and solar cell internal quantum efficiencies > 70% arc obwined. Optical studies indicate that defects or impurities, from InGAsN doping and nitrogen incorporation, limit solar cell performance.

  20. Sulfuric acid and hydrogen peroxide surface passivation effects on AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zaidi, Z. H. Lee, K. B.; Qian, H.; Jiang, S.; Houston, P. A.; Guiney, I.; Wallis, D. J.; Humphreys, C. J.

    2014-12-28

    In this work, we have compared SiN{sub x} passivation, hydrogen peroxide, and sulfuric acid treatment on AlGaN/GaN HEMTs surface after full device fabrication on Si substrate. Both the chemical treatments resulted in the suppression of device pinch-off gate leakage current below 1??A/mm, which is much lower than that for SiN{sub x} passivation. The greatest suppression over the range of devices is observed with the sulfuric acid treatment. The device on/off current ratio is improved (from 10{sup 4}10{sup 5} to 10{sup 7}) and a reduction in the device sub-threshold (S.S.) slope (from ?215 to 90?mV/decade) is achieved. The sulfuric acid is believed to work by oxidizing the surface which has a strong passivating effect on the gate leakage current. The interface trap charge density (D{sub it}) is reduced (from 4.86 to 0.90??10{sup 12?}cm{sup ?2} eV{sup ?1}), calculated from the change in the device S.S. The gate surface leakage current mechanism is explained by combined Mott hopping conduction and Poole Frenkel models for both untreated and sulfuric acid treated devices. Combining the sulfuric acid treatment underneath the gate with the SiN{sub x} passivation after full device fabrication results in the reduction of D{sub it} and improves the surface related current collapse.

  1. A novel theoretical model for broadband blue InGaN/GaN superluminescent light emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moslehi Milani, N.; Mohadesi, V.; Asgari, A.

    2015-02-07

    A broadband superluminescent light emitting diode with In{sub 0.2}Ga{sub 0.8}N/GaN multiple quantum wells (MQWs) active region is investigated. The investigation is based on a theoretical model which includes the calculation of electronic states of the structure, rate equations, and the spectral radiation power. Two rate equations corresponding to MQW active region and separate confinement heterostructures layer are solved self-consistently with no-k selection wavelength dependent gain and quasi-Fermi level functions. Our results show that the superluminescence started in a current of ?120?mA (?7.5?kA/Cm{sup 2}) at 300?K. The range of peak emission wavelengths for different currents is 423426?nm and the emission bandwidth is ?5?nm in the superluminescence regime. A maximum light output power of 7.59 mW is obtained at 600?mA and the peak modal gain as a function of current indicates logarithmic behavior. Also, the comparison of our calculated results with published experimental data is shown to be in good agreement.

  2. Ga-doped ZnO grown by pulsed laser deposition in H2: the roles of Ga and H

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Look, David; Droubay, Timothy C.; McCloy, John S.; Zhu, Zihua; Chambers, Scott A.

    2011-01-11

    Highly conductive thin films of ZnO doped with Ga were grown by pulsed-laser deposition (PLD) with 10 mTorr of H2 in the growth chamber. Compared with a more conventional method of producing conductive films of ZnO, i.e., growth in O2 followed by annealing in forming gas (5% H2 in Ar), the H2 method requires no post-growth anneal and also produces higher carrier concentrations and lower resistivities with better depth uniformity. As an example, a 65-nm-thick sample had a room-temperature mobility of 32 cm2/V-s, a concentration of 6.8 x 1020 cm-3, and a resistivity of 2.9 x 10^-4 ohm-cm. From a scattering model, the donor and acceptor concentrations were calculated as 8.9 x 1020 and 2.1 x 10^20 cm-3, respectively, as compared to the Ga and H concentrations of 11 x 10^20 and 1 x 10^20 cm-3. Thus, H does not play a significant role as a donor in this type of ZnO

  3. Explanations of the unusual photoluminescence observed in annealed InGaN/GaN multi quantum well

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biswas, Dipankar Bera, Partha Pratim Mistry, Apu

    2015-05-15

    During growth and fabrication of devices, InGaN/GaN QWs undergo several thermal cyclings which causes redistribution of the elements, particularly In in the QW structures. This causes significant changes in the optical properties of the QWs. The thermal cyclings are often accompanied by alloy clustering and phase separation. So in order to have a deep knowledge of how the nano structures behave with thermal cyclings the process is simulated through successive annealing at high temperatures which are accompanied by photoluminescence (PL) measurements to obtain the optical properties at each stage. III-V nanostructures, in most usual cases, on annealing lead to a monotonic blue shift of the PL peak energy and goes into saturation. Recently there were reports in which the PL peak initially had a red shift which was followed by an increase in energy, a blue shift i.e. the PL peak goes through an inflexion. These unusual observations have been explained in this paper through quantum mechanical models and computations, which remained unexplained.

  4. The use of short-period InGaN/GaN superlattices in blue-region light-emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sizov, V. S., E-mail: vsizov@mail.ioffe.ru; Tsatsulnikov, A. F.; Sakharov, A. V.; Lundin, W. V.; Zavarin, E. E.; Cherkashin, N. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical Technical Institute (Russian Federation); Hytch, M. J. [National Center for Scientific Research (CNRS), Center for Material Elaboration and Structural Studies (CEMES) (France); Nikolaev, A. E. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical Technical Institute (Russian Federation); Mintairov, A. M.; He Yan; Merz, J. L. [University of Notre Dame, EE Department (United States)

    2010-07-15

    Optical and light-emitting diode structures with an active InGaN region containing short-period InGaN/GaN superlattices are studied. It is shown that short-period superlattices are thin two-dimensional layers with a relatively low In content that contain inclusions with a high In content 1-3 nm thick. Inclusions manifest themselves from the point of view of optical properties as a nonuniform array of quantum dots involved in a residual quantum well. The use of short-period superlattices in light-emitting diode structures allows one to decrease the concentration of nonradiative centers, as well as to increase the injection of carriers in the active region due to an increase in the effective height of the AlGaN barrier, which in general leads to an increase in the quantum efficiency of light-emitting diodes.

  5. Athens County, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ohio American Hydrogen Corporation Carbon Cycle Engineering Dovetail Solar and Wind DuPont Electronic Technologies, Inc. Global Cooling Inc. Panich + Noel Architects Panich,...

  6. Atomistic modeling and HAADF investigations of misfit and threading dislocations in GaSb/GaAs hetero-structures for applications in high electron mobility transistors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruterana, Pierre Wang, Yi Chen, Jun Chauvat, Marie-Pierre; El Kazzi, S.; Deplanque, L.; Wallart, X.

    2014-10-06

    A detailed investigation on the misfit and threading dislocations at GaSb/GaAs interface has been carried out using molecular dynamics simulation and quantitative electron microscopy techniques. The sources and propagation of misfit dislocations have been elucidated. The nature and formation mechanisms of the misfit dislocations as well as the role of Sb on the stability of the Lomer configuration have been explained.

  7. Effect of the band structure of InGaN/GaN quantum well on the surface plasmon enhanced light-emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Yi; Zhang, Rong E-mail: bliu@nju.edu.cn; Liu, Bin E-mail: bliu@nju.edu.cn; Xie, Zili; Zhang, Guogang; Tao, Tao; Zhuang, Zhe; Zhi, Ting; Zheng, Youdou

    2014-07-07

    The spontaneous emission (SE) of InGaN/GaN quantum well (QW) structure with silver(Ag) coated on the n-GaN layer has been investigated by using six-by-six K-P method taking into account the electron-hole band structures, the photon density of states of surface plasmon polariton (SPP), and the evanescent fields of SPP. The SE into SPP mode can be remarkably enhanced due to the increase of electron-hole pairs near the Ag by modulating the InGaN/GaN QW structure or increasing the carrier injection. However, the ratio between the total SE rates into SPP mode and free space will approach to saturation or slightly decrease for the optimized structures with various distances between Ag film and QW layer at a high injection carrier density. Furthermore, the Ga-face QW structure has a higher SE rate than the N-face QW structure due to the overlap region of electron-hole pairs nearer to the Ag film.

  8. Performance of single-junction and dual-junction InGaP/GaAs solar cells under low concentration ratios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khan, Aurangzeb; Yamaguchi, Masafumi; Takamoto, Tatsuya

    2004-10-11

    A study of the performance of single-junction InGaP/GaAs and dual-junction InGaP/GaAs tandem cells under low concentration ratios (up to 15 suns), before and after 1 MeV electron irradiation is presented. Analysis of the tunnel junction parameters under different concentrated light illuminations reveals that the peak current (J{sub P}) and valley current (J{sub V}) densities should be greater than the short-circuit current density (J{sub sc}) for better performance. The tunnel junction behavior against light intensity improved after irradiation. This led to the suggestion that the peak current density (J{sub P}) and valley current density (J{sub V}) of the tunnel junction were enhanced after irradiation or the peak current was shifted to higher concentration. The recovery of the radiation damage under concentrated light illumination conditions suggests that the performance of the InGaP/GaAs tandem solar cell can be enhanced even under low concentration ratios.

  9. InGaN-based thin film solar cells: Epitaxy, structural design, and photovoltaic properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sang, Liwen; Liao, Meiyong; Koide, Yasuo; Sumiya, Masatomo

    2015-03-14

    In{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}N, with the tunable direct bandgaps from ultraviolet to near infrared region, offers a promising candidate for the high-efficiency next-generation thin-film photovoltaic applications. Although the adoption of thick InGaN film as the active region is desirable to obtain efficient light absorption and carrier collection compared to InGaN/GaN quantum wells structure, the understanding on the effect from structural design is still unclear due to the poor-quality InGaN films with thickness and difficulty of p-type doping. In this paper, we comprehensively investigate the effects from film epitaxy, doping, and device structural design on the performances of the InGaN-based solar cells. The high-quality InGaN thick film is obtained on AlN/sapphire template, and p-In{sub 0.08}Ga{sub 0.92}N is achieved with a high hole concentration of more than 10{sup 18 }cm{sup −3}. The dependence of the photovoltaic performances on different structures, such as active regions and p-type regions is analyzed with respect to the carrier transport mechanism in the dark and under illumination. The strategy of improving the p-i interface by using a super-thin AlN interlayer is provided, which successfully enhances the performance of the solar cells.

  10. Deep-level transient spectroscopy of InAs/GaAs quantum dot superlattices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sobolev, M. M.; Nevedomskii, V. N.; Zolotareva, R. V.; Vasil'ev, A. P.; Ustinov, V. M.

    2014-02-21

    Deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) has been applied to study the carrier emission from states of a 10-layer system of tunnel-coupled vertically correlated quantum dots (VCQDs) in p-n InAs/GaAs heterostructures with different widths of GaAs spacers under varied reverse bias (U{sub r}) and filling voltage pulse U{sub f}.

  11. Activation of small alkanes in Ga-exchanged zeolites: A quantum chemical study of ethane dehydrogenation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frash, M.V.; Santen, R.A. van

    2000-03-23

    Quantum chemical calculations on the mechanism of ethane dehydrogenation catalyzed by Ga-exchanged zeolites have been undertaken. Two forms of gallium, adsorbed dihydride gallium ion GaH{sub 2}+Z{sup {minus}} and adsorbed gallyl ion [Ga=O]{sup +}Z{sup {minus}}, were considered. It was found that GaH{sub 2}{sup +}Z{sup {minus}} is the likely active catalyst. On the contrary, [Ga=O]{sup +}Z{sup {minus}} cannot be a working catalyst in nonoxidative conditions, because regeneration of this form is very difficult. Activation of ethane by GaH{sub 2}{sup +}Z{sup {minus}} occurs via an alkyl mechanism and the gallium atom acts as an acceptor of the ethyl group. The carbenium activation of ethane, with gallium abstracting a hydride ion, is much (ca. 51 kcal/mol) more difficult. The catalytic cycle for the alkyl activation consists of three elementary steps: (1) rupture of the ethane C-H bond; (2) formation of dihydrogen from the Bronsted proton and hydrogen bound to Ga; and (3) formation of ethene from the ethyl group bound to Ga. The best estimates (MP2/6--311++G(2df,p)//B3LYP/6--31G*) for the activation energies of these three steps are 36.9, ca. 0, and 57.9 kcal/mol, respectively.

  12. Variation of lattice constant and cluster formation in GaAsBi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Puustinen, J.; Schramm, A.; Guina, M.; Wu, M.; Luna, E.; Laukkanen, P.; Laitinen, M.; Sajavaara, T.

    2013-12-28

    We investigate the structural properties of GaAsBi layers grown by molecular beam epitaxy on GaAs at substrate temperatures between 220315 C. Irrespective of the growth temperature, the structures exhibited similar Bi compositions, and good overall crystal quality as deduced from X-Ray diffraction measurements. After thermal annealing at temperatures as low as 500 C, the GaAsBi layers grown at the lowest temperatures exhibited a significant reduction of the lattice constant. The lattice variation was significantly larger for Bi-containing samples than for Bi-free low-temperature GaAs samples grown as a reference. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry gave no evidence of Bi diffusing out of the layer during annealing. However, dark-field and Z-contrast transmission electron microscopy analyses revealed the formation of GaAsBi clusters with a Bi content higher than in the surrounding matrix, as well as the presence of metallic As clusters. The apparent reduction of the lattice constant can be explained by a two-fold process: the diffusion of the excess As incorporated within As{sub Ga} antisites to As clusters, and the reduction of the Bi content in the GaAs matrix due to diffusion of Bi to GaAsBi clusters. Diffusion of both As and Bi are believed to be assisted by the native point defects, which are present in the low-temperature as-grown material.

  13. Development of a Low Cost Insulated Foil Substrate for Cu(InGaSe)2 Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ERTEN ESER

    2012-01-22

    The project validated the use of stainless steel flexible substrate coated with silicone-based resin dielectric, developed by Dow Corning Corporation, for Cu(InGa)Se2 based photovoltaics. The projects driving force was the high performance of Cu(InGa)Se2 based photovoltaics coupled with potential cost reduction that could be achieved with dielectric coated SS web substrate.

  14. In-situ surface composition measurements of CuGaSe{sub 2} thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fons, P.; Yamada, A.; Niki, S.; Oyanagi, H.

    1998-12-31

    Two CuGaSe{sub 2} films were grown by molecular beam epitaxy onto GaAs (001) substrates with varying Cu/Ga flux ratios under Se overpressure conditions. Growth was interrupted at predetermined times and the surface composition was measured using Auger electron spectroscopy after which growth was continued. After growth, the film composition was analyzed using voltage dependent electron microprobe spectroscopy. Film structure and morphology were also analyzed using x-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy. The film with a Cu/Ga ratio larger than unity showed evidence of surface segregation of a second Cu-rich phase with a Cu/Se composition ratio slightly greater than unity. A second CuGaSe{sub 2} film with a Cu/Ga ratio of less than unity showed no change in surface composition with time and was also consistent with bulk composition measurements. Diffraction measurements indicated a high concentration of twins as well as the presence of domains with mixed c and a axes in the Ga-rich film. The Cu-rich films by contrast were single domain and had a narrower mosaics. High sensitivity scans along the [001] reciprocal axis did not exhibit any new peaks not attributable to either the substrate or the CuGaSe{sub 2} thin film.

  15. Intrinsic polarization control in rectangular GaN nanowire lasers

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Li, Changyi; Liu, Sheng; Luk, Ting S.; Figiel, Jeffrey J.; Brener, Igal; Brueck, S. R. J.; Wang, George T.

    2016-02-01

    In this study, we demonstrate intrinsic, linearly polarized lasing from single GaN nanowires using cross-sectional shape control. A two-step top-down fabrication approach was employed to create straight nanowires with controllable rectangular cross-sections. A clear lasing threshold of 444kW/cm2 and a narrow spectral line width of 0.16 nm were observed under optical pumping at room temperature, indicating the onset of lasing. The polarization was along the short dimension (y-direction) of the nanowire due to the higher transverse confinement factors for y-polarized transverse modes resulting from the rectangular nanowire cross-section. The results show that cross-sectioned shape control can enable inherent control overmore » the polarization of nanowire lasers without additional environment requirements, such as placement onto lossy substrates.« less

  16. Ferromagnetic (Ga,Mn)As nanostructures for spintronic applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wosinski, Tadeusz; Andrearczyk, Tomasz; Figielski, Tadeusz; Makosa, Andrzej; Wrobel, Jerzy; Sadowski, Janusz

    2013-12-04

    Magneto-resistive, cross-like nanostructures have been designed and fabricated by electron-beam lithography patterning and chemical etching from thin epitaxial layers of the ferromagnetic semiconductor (Ga,Mn)As. The nanostructures, composed of two perpendicular nanostripes crossing in the middle of their length, represent four-terminal devices, in which an electric current can be driven through any of the two nanostripes. In these devices, a novel magneto-resistive memory effect, related to a rearrangement of magnetic domain walls in the central part of the device, has been demonstrated. It consists in that the zero-field resistance of a nanostripe depends on the direction of previously applied magnetic field. The nanostructures can thus work as two-state devices providing basic elements of nonvolatile memory cells.

  17. Surface modification of multilayer graphene using Ga ion irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Quan; Shao, Ying; Ge, Daohan; Ren, Naifei; Yang, Qizhi

    2015-04-28

    The effect of Ga ion irradiation intensity on the surface of multilayer graphene was examined. Using Raman spectroscopy, we determined that the irradiation caused defects in the crystal structure of graphene. The density of defects increased with the increase in dwell times. Furthermore, the strain induced by the irradiation changed the crystallite size and the distance between defects. These defects had the effect of doping the multilayer graphene and increasing its work function. The increase in work function was determined using contact potential difference measurements. The surface morphology of the multilayer graphene changed following irradiation as determined by atomic force microscopy. Additionally, the adhesion between the atomic force microscopy tip and sample increased further indicating that the irradiation had caused surface modification, important for devices that incorporate graphene.

  18. InGaAs monolithic interconnected modules (MIM)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fatemi, N.S.; Jenkins, P.P.; Weizer, V.G.; Hoffman, R.W. Jr.; Wilt, D.M.; Scheiman, D.; Brinker, D.; Murray, C.S.; Riley, D.

    1997-12-31

    A monolithic interconnected module (MIM) structure has been developed for thermophotovoltaic (TPV) applications. The MIM device consists of many individual InGaAs cells series-connected on a single semi-insulating (S.I.) InP substrate. An infrared (IR) back surface reflector (BSR), placed on the rear surface of the substrate, returns the unused portion of the TPV radiator output spectrum back to the emitter for recycling, thereby providing for high system efficiencies. Also, the use of a BSR obviates the need to use a separate filtering element. As a result, MIMs are exposed to the entire emitter output, thereby maximizing output power density. MIMs with an active area of 1 x 1-cm were comprised of 15 cells monolithically connected in series. Both lattice-matched and lattice-mismatched InGaAs/InP devices were produced, with bandgaps of 0.74 and 0.55 eV, respectively. The 0.74-eV modules demonstrated an open-circuit voltage (Voc) of 6.158 V and a fill factor of 74.2% at a short-circuit current (Jsc) of 842 mA/cm{sup 2}, under flashlamp testing. The 0.55-eV modules demonstrated a Voc of 4.849 V and a fill factor of 57.8% at a Jsc of 3.87 A/cm{sup 2}. IR reflectance measurements (i.e., {lambda} > 2 {micro}m) of these devices indicated a reflectivity of {ge} 83%. Latest electrical and optical performance results for the MIMs will be presented.

  19. Enhanced photoelectrochemical responses of ZnO films through Ga and N codoping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahn, Kwang-Soon; Yan, Yanfa; Shet, Sudhakar; Deutsch, Todd; Turner, John; Al-Jassim, Mowafak

    2007-12-03

    We report on the crystallinity and photoelectrochemical (PEC) response of ZnO thin films codoped by Ga and N. The ZnO:(Ga,N) thin films were deposited by cosputtering at room temperature and followed by postannealing at 500 deg. C in air for 2 h. We found that ZnO:(Ga,N) thin films exhibited significantly enhanced crystallinity compared to ZnO doped solely with N at the same growth conditions. Furthermore, ZnO:(Ga,N) thin films exhibited enhanced N incorporation over ZnO doped solely with N at high temperatures. As a result, ZnO:(Ga,N) thin films achieved dramatically improved PEC response, compared to ZnO thin films doped solely with N at any conditions. Our results suggest a general way to improve PEC response for wide-band-gap oxides.

  20. Electron Traps Detected in p-type GaAsN Using Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnston, S.; Kurtz, S.; Friedman, D.; Ptak, A.; Ahrenkiel, R.; Crandall, R.

    2005-01-01

    The GaAsN alloy can have a band gap as small as 1.0 eV when the nitrogen composition is about 2%. Indium can also be added to the alloy to increase lattice matching to GaAs and Ge. These properties are advantageous for developing a highly-efficient, multi-junction solar cell. However, poor GaAsN cell properties, such as low open-circuit voltage, have led to inadequate performance. Deep-level transient spectroscopy of p-type GaAsN has identified an electron trap having an activation energy near 0.2 eV and a trap density of at least 1016 cm-3. This trap level appears with the addition of small amounts of nitrogen to GaAs, which also corresponds to an increased drop in open-circuit voltage.

  1. Polycrystalline GaAs solar cells on low-cost Silicon-Film{trademark} substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mauk, M.G.; Feyock, B.W.; Hall, R.B.; Cavanaugh, K.D.; Cotter, J.E.

    1997-12-31

    The authors assess the potential of a low-cost, large-area Silicon-Film{trademark} sheet as a substrate for thin-film polycrystalline GaAs solar cells. Silicon-Film is a relatively inexpensive material on which large-grain (>2 mm) polycrystalline GaAs films can be formed. The GaAs epitaxial layers are grown by a simple close-spaced vapor transport (CSVT) technique using water vapor as a transport agent. A recrystallized Ge{sub 1{minus}x}Si{sub x} buffer layer between the GaAs epilayer and Silicon-Film substrate can facilitate growth of the GaAs. Selective epitaxy on patterned, oxide-masked substrates is effective in reducing thermal stress effects.

  2. MOCVD growth of GaAs solar cells on silicon substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vernon, S.M.; Haven, V.E.; Geoffroy, L.M.; Sanfacon, M.M.; Mastrovito, A.L. )

    1992-12-01

    This paper reports advances in the development of solar cells made from GaAs-on-Si structures prepared by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). The use of concentrator cells, operating at [similar to]200 suns, has led to the efficiency achievements of 21.3% (AM1.5D) for a GaAs-on-Si solar cell, and 27.6 (AM1.5D) for a homoepitaxial GaAs cell. The development of epitaxial multilayer dielectric mirrors (Bragg reflectors), as back-surface reflectors in thin-film GaAs cells, on both Si and GaAs substrates, is shown to lead to modest efficiency increases, over that of conventional designs.

  3. Doping of GaN{sub 1-x}As{sub x} with high As content

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levander, A.X.; Novikov, S.V.; Liliental-Weber, Z.; dos Reis, R.; Dubon, O.D.; Wu, J.; Foxon, C.T.; Yu, K.M.; Walukiewicz, W.

    2011-09-22

    Recent work has shown that GaN{sub 1-x}As{sub x} can be grown across the entire composition range by low temperature molecular beam epitaxy with intermediate compositions being amorphous, but control of the electrical properties through doping is critical for functionalizing this material. Here we report the bipolar doping of GaN{sub 1-x}As{sub x} with high As content to conductivities above 4 S/cm at room temperature using Mg or Te. The carrier type was confirmed by thermopower measurements. Doping requires an increase in Ga flux during growth resulting in a mixed phase material of polycrystalline GaAs:N embedded in amorphous GaN{sub 1-x}As{sub x}.

  4. Numerical analysis for high-efficiency GaAs solar cells fabricated on Si substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yamaguchi, M.; Amano, C.; Itoh, Y.

    1989-07-15

    This paper describes some recent developments in GaAs thin-film solar cells fabricated on Si substrates by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition and numerically analyzes them.GaAs solar cells with efficiency of more than 18% are successfully fabricated on Si substrates by reducing the dislocation density. Photovoltaic properties of GaAs/Si cells are analyzed by considering the effect of nonuniform dislocation distribution on recombination properties of GaAs thin films on Si substrates. Numerical analysis shows that the effect of majority-carrier trapping must be considered. High efficiency GaAs solar cells with total-area efficiency of over 20% on Si substrates can be realized if dislocation density can be reduced to less than 5/times/10/sup 5/ cm/sup /minus/2/.

  5. Radiological Assessment for the Vance Road Facility Source Vault, Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. R. Morton

    2000-09-01

    From the 1950s, the Vance Road laboratories had been used for a broad range of nuclear medicine research involving numerous radionuclides. These radionuclides were stored in the a source vault located on the first floor of the facility. The Environmental Survey and Site Assessment Program (ESSAP) of ORISE performed a radiological assessment survey of the source vault after it had been remediated and in preparation for converting the area to office space.

  6. Argentina: the road to energy independence. Part Two. Non-petroleum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-12-24

    Argentina has the most-advanced nuclear technology in Latin America, but budget cuts have slowed down some projects. Potential hydroelectric power is sufficient to fill Argentina's electrical needs, but the Yacireta complex, a joint venture with Paraguay, will be completed almost two years behind schedule. There is plenty of coal in Argentina, but it needs to import coal and coke to produce cast iron and steel. Geothermal and wind energy represent viable alternatives, but more funds and research are needed to exploit their potential. Argentina is on the road to energy independence, but with a new constitutional government possible in 1984, a shift in national energy policy is also possible. Any resultant increase in petroleum consumption to fuel rapid industrial development and stimulate employment could turn Argentina back into an oil-importing Third World nation. The Energy Detente fuel price/tax series and the principal industrial-fuel prices for December 1982 are included for the countries of the Western Hemisphere.

  7. Road Map for Studies to Produce Consistent and High Performance SRF Accelerator Structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ganapati Rao Myneni; John F. OHanlon

    2007-06-20

    Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) accelerator structures made from high purity niobium are becoming the technological choice for a large number of future accelerators and energy recovery LINACs (ERL). Most of the presently planned accelerators and ERL requirements will be met with some effort by the current SRF technology where accelerating gradients of about 20 MV/m can be produced on a routine basis with an acceptable yield. However, the XFEL at DESY and the planned ILC require acceleration gradients more than 28 MV/m and 35 MV/m respectively. At the recent ILC meeting at Snowmass (2005) concern was expressed regarding the wide spread in the achieved accelerator gradients and the relatively low yields. For obtaining accelerating gradients of 35 MV/m in SRF accelerator structures consistently, a deeper understanding of the causes for the spread has to be gained and advances have to be made in many scientific and high technology fields, including materials, surface and vacuum sciences, application of reliable processes and procedures, which provide contamination free surfaces and avoid recontamination and cryogenics related technologies. In this contribution a road map for studies needed to produce consistent and high performance SRF accelerator structures from the needed materials development to clean and non-recontaminating processes and procedures will be presented.

  8. Over-the-road shock and vibration testing of the radioisotope thermoelectric generator transportation system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Becker, D.L.

    1997-05-01

    Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTG) convert heat generated by radioactive decay into electricity through the use of thermocouples. The RTGs have a long operating life, are reasonably lightweight, and require little or no maintenance, which make them particularly attractive for use in spacecraft. However, because RTGs contain significant quantities of radioactive materials, normally plutonium-238 and its decay products, they must be transported in packages built in accordance with Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 71 (10 CFR 71). To meet these regulations, a RTG Transportation System (RTGTS) that fully complies with 10 CFR 71 has been developed, which protects RTGs from adverse environmental conditions during normal conditions of transport (e.g., shock, vibration, and heat). To ensure the protection of RTGs from shock and vibration loadings during transport, extensive over-the-road testing was conducted on the RTG`S to obtain real-time recordings of accelerations of the air-ride suspension system trailer floor, packaging, and support structure. This paper provides an overview of the RTG`S, a discussion of the shock and vibration testing, and a comparison of the test results to the specified shock response spectra and power spectral density acceleration criteria.

  9. USVI Energy Road Map: Charting the Course to a Clean Energy Future (Brochure), EDIN (Energy Development in Island Nations), U.S. Virgin Islands

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    USVI Energy Road Map Charting the Course to a Clean Energy Future EDIN Energy Development in Island Nations U.S. Virgin Islands EDIN Energy Development in Island Nations U.S. Virgin Islands EDIN Energy Development in Island Nations EDIN Energy Development in Island Nations U.S. Virgin Islands EDIN Energy Development in Island Nations EDIN Energy Development in Island Nations 1 USVI Energy Road Map Energy transformation. It's an enormous undertaking. One that has been discussed for decades.

  10. Technology status of hydrogen road vehicles. IEA technical report from the IEA Agreement of the production and utilization of hydrogen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doyle, T.A.

    1998-01-31

    The report was commissioned under the Hydrogen Implementing Agreement of the International Energy Agency (IEA) and examines the state of the art in the evolving field of hydrogen-fueled vehicles for road transport. The first phase surveys and analyzes developments since 1989, when a comprehensive review was last published. The report emphasizes the following: problems, especially backfiring, with internal combustion engines (ICEs); operational safety; hydrogen handling and on-board storage; and ongoing demonstration projects. Hydrogen vehicles are receiving much attention, especially at the research and development level. However, there has been a steady move during the past 5 years toward integral demonstrations of operable vehicles intended for public roads. Because they emit few, or no greenhouse gases, hydrogen vehicles are beginning to be taken seriously as a promising solution to the problems of urban air quality. Since the time the first draft of the report was prepared (mid-19 96), the 11th World Hydrogen Energy Conference took place in Stuttgart, Germany. This biennial conference can be regarded as a valid updating of the state of the art; therefore, the 1996 results are included in the current version. Sections of the report include: hydrogen production and distribution to urban users; on-board storage and refilling; vehicle power units and drives, and four appendices titled: 'Safety questions of hydrogen storage and use in vehicles', 'Performance of hydrogen fuel in internal production engines for road vehicles, 'Fuel cells for hydrogen vehicles', and 'Summaries of papers on hydrogen vehicles'. (refs., tabs.)

  11. Ground-state energy trends in single and multilayered coupled InAs/GaAs quantum dots capped with InGaAs layers: Effects of InGaAs layer thickness and annealing temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shah, S.; Ghosh, K.; Jejurikar, S.; Mishra, A.; Chakrabarti, S.

    2013-08-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: Investigation of ground state energy in single and multi-layered InAs/GaAs QD. Strain reducing layer (InGaAs) prevents the formation of non-radiative. Strain reducing layer (InGaAs) is responsible for high activation energy. Significant deviation from the Varshni model, E(T) = E ? ?T{sup 2}/T + ?. - Abstract: Vertically coupled, multilayered InAs/GaAs quantum dots (QDs) covered with thin InGaAs strain-reducing layers (SRLs) are in demand for various technological applications. We investigated low temperature photoluminescence of single and multilayered structures in which the SRL thickness was varied. The SRL layer was responsible for high activation energies. Deviation of experimental data from the Varshni (1967) model, E(T) = E ? ? T{sup 2}/T + ?, suggests that the InAs-layered QDs have properties different from those in bulk material. Anomalous ground-state peak linewidths (FWHM), especially for annealed multilayer structures, were observed. A ground-state peak blue-shift with a broadened linewidth was also observed. Loss of intensity was detected in samples annealed at 800 C. Presence of SRLs prevents formation of non-radiative centers under high temperature annealing. The results indicate the potential importance of such structures in optoelectronic applications.

  12. Effects of phase transformation on the microstructures and magnetostriction of Fe-Ga and Fe-Ga-Zn ferromagnetic shape memory alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Yin-Chih Lin, Chien-Feng

    2015-05-07

    The phase transformation and magnetostriction of bulk Fe{sub 73}Ga{sub 27} and Fe{sub 73}Ga{sub 18}Zn{sub 9} (at.?%) ferromagnetic shape memory alloys (FSMs) were investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), x-ray diffraction (XRD), and a magnetostrictive-meter setup. For the Fe{sub 73}Ga{sub 27} FSM alloy solution treated at 1100?C for 4?h and quenched in ice brine, the antiphase boundary segments of the D0{sub 3} domain were observed in the A2 (disordered) matrix, and the Fe{sub 73}Ga{sub 27} FSM alloy had an optimal magnetostriction (?{sub ?}{sup s?}=?71??10{sup ?6} and ?{sub ?}{sup s?}=??31??10{sup ?6}). In Fe{sub 73}Ga{sub 27} FSM alloy as-quenched, aged at 700?C for 24?h, and furnace cooled, D0{sub 3} nanoclusters underwent phase transformation to an intermediate tetragonal phase (i.e., L1{sub 0}-like martensite) via Bain distortion, and finally L1{sub 2} (Fe{sub 3}Ga) structures precipitated, as observed by TEM and XRD. The L1{sub 0}-like martensite and L1{sub 2} phases in the aged Fe{sub 73}Ga{sub 27} FSM alloy drastically decreased the magnetostriction from positive to negative (?{sub ?}{sup s?}=??20??10{sup ?6} and ?{sub ?}{sup s?}=??8??10{sup ?6}). However, in Fe{sub 73}Ga{sub 18}Zn{sub 9} FSM alloy as-quenched and aged, the phase transformation of D0{sub 3} to an intermediate tetragonal martensite phase and precipitation of L1{sub 2} structures were not found. The results indicate that the aged Fe{sub 73}Ga{sub 18}Zn{sub 9} FSM alloy maintained stable magnetostriction (?{sub ?}{sup s?}=?36??10{sup ?6} and ?{sub ?}{sup s?}=??31??10{sup ?6}). Adding Zn can improve the ferromagnetic shape memory effect of aged Fe{sub 73}Ga{sub 18}Zn{sub 9} alloy, which may be useful in application of the alloy in high temperature environments.

  13. Development of an IR-transparent, inverted-grown, thin-film, Al[sub 0. 34]Ga[sub 0. 66]As/GaAs cascade solar cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venkatasubramanian, R.; Timmons, M.L.; Sharps, P.R.; Colpitts, T.S.; Hills, J.S.; Hancock, J.; Hutchby, J.A. )

    1992-12-01

    Inverted growth and the development of associated cell processing, are likely to offer a significant degree of freedom for improving the performance of many III-V multijunction cascades and open new avenues for advanced multijunction concepts. This is especially true for the development of high-efficiency Al[sub 0.37]Ga[sub 0.63]As/GaAs cascades where the high growth temperatures required for the AlGaAs top cell growth can cause the deterioration of the tunnel junction interconnect. In the approach of inverted-grown AlGaAs/GaAs cascade cells, the AlGaAs top cell is grown first at 780 [degree]C and the GaAs tunnel junction and bottom cell are grown at 675 [degree]C. After the inverted growth, the AlGaAs/GaAs cascade structure is selectively removed from the parent substrate. The feasibility of inverted growth is demonstrated by a fully-processed, inverted-grown, thin film GaAs cell with a 1-sun AM1.5 efficiency of 20.3%. Also, an inverted-grown, thin-film, Al[sub 0.34]Ga[sub 0.66]As/GaAs cascade with AM1.5 efficiencies of 19.9% and 21% at 1-sun and 7-suns, respectively, has been obtained.

  14. 0.7-eV GaInAs Junction for a GaInP/GaAs/GaInAs(1-eV)/GaInAs(0.7-eV) Four-Junction Solar Cell: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friedman, D. J.; Geisz, J. F.; Norman, A. G.; Wanlass, M. W.; Kurtz, S. R.

    2006-05-01

    We discuss recent developments in III-V multijunction solar cells, focusing on adding a fourth junction to the Ga0.5In0.5P/GaAs/Ga0.75In0.25As inverted three-junction cell. This cell, grown inverted on GaAs so that the lattice-mismatched Ga0.75In0.25As third junction is the last one grown, has demonstrated 38% efficiency, and 40% is likely in the near future. To achieve still further gains, a lower-bandgap GaxIn1-xAs fourth junction could be added to the three-junction structure for a four-junction cell whose efficiency could exceed 45% under concentration. Here, we present the initial development of the GaxIn1-xAs fourth junction. Junctions of various bandgaps ranging from 0.88 to 0.73 eV were grown, in order to study the effect of the different amounts of lattice mismatch. At a bandgap of 0.88 eV, junctions were obtained with very encouraging {approx}80% quantum efficiency, 57% fill factor, and 0.36 eV open-circuit voltage. The device performance degrades with decreasing bandgap (i.e., increasing lattice mismatch). We model the four-junction device efficiency vs. fourth junction bandgap to show that an 0.7-eV fourth-junction bandgap, while optimal if it could be achieved in practice, is not necessary; an 0.9-eV bandgap would still permit significant gains in multijunction cell efficiency while being easier to achieve than the lower-bandgap junction.

  15. Intersubband transitions in In{sub x}Ga{sub 1?x}N/In{sub y}Ga{sub 1?y}N/GaN staggered quantum wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Y?ld?r?m, Hasan; Aslan, Bulent

    2014-04-28

    Intersubband transition energies and absorption lineshape in staggered InGaN/GaN quantum wells surrounded by GaN barriers are computed as functions of structural parameters such as well width, In concentrations, and the doping level in the well. Schrdinger and Poisson equations are solved self-consistently by taking the free and bound surface charge concentrations into account. Many-body effects, namely, depolarization and excitonic shifts are also included in the calculations. Results for transition energies, oscillator strength, and the absorption lineshape up to nonlinear regime are represented as functions of the parameters mentioned. The well width (total and constituent layers separately) and In concentration dependence of the built-in electric field are exploited to tune the intersubband transition energies.

  16. Effects of Zn additions to highly magnetoelastic FeGa alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lograsso, Thomas A.; Jones, Nicholas J.; Wun-Fogle, Marilyn; Restorff, James B.; Schlagel, Deborah L.; Petculescu, Gabriela; Clark, Arthur E.; Hathaway, Kristl B.

    2015-05-07

    Fe{sub 1−x}M{sub x} (M = Ga, Ge, Si, Al, Mo and x ∼ 0.18) alloys offer an extraordinary combination of magnetoelasticity and mechanical properties. They are rare-earth-free, can be processed using conventional deformation techniques, have high magnetic permeability, low hysteresis, and low magnetic saturation fields, making them attractive for device applications such as actuators and energy harvesters. Starting with Fe-Ga as a reference and using a rigid-band-filling argument, Zhang et al. predicted that lowering the Fermi level by reducing the total number of electrons could enhance magnetoelasticity. To provide a direct experimental validation for Zhang's hypothesis, elemental additions with lower-than-Ga valence are needed. Of the possible candidates, only Be and Zn have sufficient solubility. Single crystals of bcc Fe-Ga-Zn have been grown with up to 4.6 at. % Zn in a Bridgman furnace under elevated pressure (15 bars) in order to overcome the high vapor pressure of Zn and obtain homogeneous crystals. Single-crystal measurements of magnetostriction and elastic constants allow for the direct comparison of the magnetoelastic coupling constants of Fe-Ga-Zn with those of other magnetoelastic alloys in its class. The partial substitution of Ga with Zn yields values for the magnetoelastic coupling factor, −b{sub 1}, comparable to those of the binary Fe-Ga alloy.

  17. Comparison of single junction AlGaInP and GaInP solar cells grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Masuda, Taizo Tomasulo, Stephanie; Lang, Jordan R.; Lee, Minjoo Larry

    2015-03-07

    We have investigated ∼2.0 eV (Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}){sub 0.51}In{sub 0.49}P and ∼1.9 eV Ga{sub 0.51}In{sub 0.49}P single junction solar cells grown on both on-axis and misoriented GaAs substrates by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). Although lattice-matched (Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}){sub 0.51}In{sub 0.49}P solar cells are highly attractive for space and concentrator photovoltaics, there have been few reports on the MBE growth of such cells. In this work, we demonstrate open circuit voltages (V{sub oc}) ranging from 1.29 to 1.30 V for Ga{sub 0.51}In{sub 0.49}P cells, and 1.35–1.37 V for (Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}){sub 0.51}In{sub 0.49}P cells. Growth on misoriented substrates enabled the bandgap-voltage offset (W{sub oc} = E{sub g}/q − V{sub oc}) of Ga{sub 0.51}In{sub 0.49}P cells to decrease from ∼575 mV to ∼565 mV, while that of (Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}){sub 0.51}In{sub 0.49}P cells remained nearly constant at 620 mV. The constant W{sub oc} as a function of substrate offcut for (Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}){sub 0.51}In{sub 0.49}P implies greater losses from non-radiative recombination compared with the Ga{sub 0.51}In{sub 0.49}P devices. In addition to larger W{sub oc} values, the (Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}){sub 0.51}In{sub 0.49}P cells exhibited significantly lower internal quantum efficiency (IQE) values than Ga{sub 0.51}In{sub 0.49}P cells due to recombination at the emitter/window layer interface. A thin emitter design is experimentally shown to be highly effective in improving IQE, particularly at short wavelengths. Our work shows that with further optimization of both cell structure and growth conditions, MBE-grown (Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}){sub 0.51}In{sub 0.49}P will be a promising wide-bandgap candidate material for high-efficiency, lattice-matched multi-junction solar cells.

  18. Experimental and theoretical studies of band gap alignment in GaAs{sub 1?x}Bi{sub x}/GaAs quantum wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kudrawiec, R. Kopaczek, J.; Polak, M. P.; Scharoch, P.; Gladysiewicz, M.; Misiewicz, J.; Richards, R. D.; Bastiman, F.; David, J. P. R.

    2014-12-21

    Band gap alignment in GaAs{sub 1?x}Bi{sub x}/GaAs quantum wells (QWs) was studied experimentally by photoreflectance (PR) and theoretically, ab initio, within the density functional theory in which the supercell based calculations are combined with the alchemical mixing approximation applied to a single atom in a supercell. In PR spectra, the optical transitions related to the excited states in the QW (i.e., the transition between the second heavy-hole and the second electron subband) were clearly observed in addition to the ground state QW transition and the GaAs barrier transition. This observation is clear experimental evidence that this is a type I QW with a deep quantum confinement in the conduction and valence bands. From the comparison of PR data with calculations of optical transitions in GaAs{sub 1?x}Bi{sub x}/GaAs QW performed for various band gap alignments, the best agreement between experimental data and theoretical calculations has been found for the valence band offset of 52??5%. A very similar valence band offset was obtained from ab initio calculations. These calculations show that the incorporation of Bi atoms into GaAs host modifies both the conduction and the valence band. For GaAs{sub 1?x}Bi{sub x} with 0?GaAs{sub 1?x}Bi{sub x} and GaAs in the range of ?60%40% (?40%60%), which is in good agreement with our conclusion derived from PR measurements.

  19. Suppression of metastable-phase inclusion in N-polar (0001{sup }) InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells grown by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shojiki, Kanako Iwabuchi, Takuya; Kuboya, Shigeyuki; Choi, Jung-Hun; Tanikawa, Tomoyuki; Hanada, Takashi; Katayama, Ryuji; Matsuoka, Takashi; Usami, Noritaka

    2015-06-01

    The metastable zincblende (ZB) phase in N-polar (0001{sup }) (?c-plane) InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells (MQWs) grown by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy is elucidated by the electron backscatter diffraction measurements. From the comparison between the ?c-plane and Ga-polar (0001) (+c-plane), the ?c-plane MQWs were found to be suffered from the severe ZB-phase inclusion, while ZB-inclusion is negligible in the +c-plane MQWs grown under the same growth conditions. The ZB-phase inclusion is a hurdle for fabricating the ?c-plane light-emitting diodes because the islands with a triangular shape appeared on a surface in the ZB-phase domains. To improve the purity of stable wurtzite (WZ)-phase, the optimum conditions were investigated. The ZB-phase is dramatically eliminated with decreasing the V/III ratio and increasing the growth temperature. To obtain much-higher-quality MQWs, the thinner InGaN wells and the hydrogen introduction during GaN barriers growth were tried. Consequently, MQWs with almost pure WZ phase and with atomically smooth surface have been demonstrated.

  20. EVALUATION OF RANGE ESTIMATES FOR TOYOTA FCHV-ADV UNDER OPEN ROAD DRIVING CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anton, D.; Wipke, K.; Sprik, S.

    2009-07-10

    The objective of this evaluation was to independently and objectively verify driving ranges of >400 miles announced by Toyota for its new advanced Fuel Cell Hybrid Vehicle (FCHV-adv) utilizing 70 MPa compressed hydrogen. To accomplish this, participants from both Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) witnessed and participated in a 2-vehicle evaluation with Toyota Motor Engineering & Manufacturing North America, Inc. (TEMA) over a typical open road route for over 11 hours in one day with all relevant data recorded. SRNL and TEMA first entered into discussions of verifying the range of the advanced Toyota Fuel Cell Hybrid Vehicle (FCHV-adv) in August 2008 resulting from reported 400+ mile range by Toyota. After extended negotiations, a CRADA agreement, SRNS CRADA No. CR-04-003, was signed on May 6, 2009. Subsequently, on June 30, 2009 SRNL and NREL participated in an all-day evaluation of the FCHV-adv with TEMA to determine the real-world driving range of this vehicle through on-road driving on an extended round-trip drive between Torrance and San Diego, California. SRNL and NREL observed the vehicles being refueled at Toyota's headquarters the day before the evaluation in Torrance, CA on June 29. At 8:00 AM on June 30, the vehicles departed Torrance north toward downtown Los Angeles, then west to the Pacific Coast Highway, and down to San Diego. After lunch the vehicles retraced their route back to Torrance. The traffic encountered was much heavier than anticipated, causing the vehicles to not return to Torrance until 9 PM. Each vehicle was driven by the same Toyota driver all day, with one SRNL/NREL observer in each vehicle the entire route. Data was logged by Toyota and analyzed by NREL. The maximum range of the FCHV-adv vehicles was calculated to be 431 miles under these driving conditions. This distance was calculated from the actual range of 331.5 miles during over 11 hours driving, plus 99.5 miles of additional range calculated from the average fuel economy from the day times the remaining usable hydrogen. Driving range results were independently calculated for each vehicle, and these results averaged together to achieve the final 431-mile range estimate. The uncertainty on these results is relatively low due to eight independent measurements of distance and six separate measurements of hydrogen usage, with a resulting uncertainty of {+-} 7 miles ({+-} 1.7%) based on spread between the low and high values from all of the multiple measurements. The average fuel economy resulting from the day's driving was 68.3 miles/kg and the total hydrogen stored on-board at 70 MPa was calculated to be 6.31 kg. The speed profiles were analyzed and compared to standard driving cycles, and were determined to be of moderate aggressiveness. The city segments of the route had average speeds slightly greater than the UDDS cycle and the highway segments were close to the HWFET & US06 cycles. The average acceleration for the highway driving was very close to the HWFET cycle, and the city portions had average accelerations lower than the UDDS and US06 cycles. We feel that the route accurately reflects realistic driving behaviors in southern California on a typical weekday, and is an appropriate benchmark to use in the verification of a fuel cell vehicle's range.

  1. High horizontal movements in longwall gate roads controlled by cable support systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dolinar, D.R.; Tadolini, S.C.; Blackwell, D.V.

    1996-12-01

    Controlling coal mine roofs subjected to high-horizontal stress conditions has always been difficult and uncertain. Traditional supports such as wooden cribs and posts, concrete donut cribs, and standing supports collapse and fail when the roof and floor move horizontally as mining progresses. The former U.S. Bureau of Mines (USBM) (currently the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)), in cooperation with Western Fuels-Utah, Incorporated, conducted research to provide an alternative for traditional secondary support systems in a 3-entry gate road system subjected to high horizontal movements. The support system used in several other coal mine operations, consisted of internal high-strength galvanized resin-grouted cable supports. The system virtually eliminates the necessity for external crib, timber, or concrete supports. The support system consisted of 2.4 m (8 ft) full-column resin grouted bolts and 4.8 m (16 ft) long cable supports installed in conjunction with wire mesh and {open_quotes}Monster-Mats.{close_quotes} Cable loading and roof deformations were monitored to evaluate the behavior of the immediate and main roofs during first and second panel extractions. Additionally, cable trusses were installed on the longwall headgate to protect the coal conveyance system from roof and pillar falls created by the formation of cutters and gutters. The test results indicated that the designed support system successfully maintained the roof during the extraction of two longwall panels and dramatically reduced the cost of secondary support. This paper describes the theory of high-horizontal roof movements, the advantages of vertical cable supports and cable trusses, and presents the roof and cable measurements made to assess the support performance during longwall retreat mining.

  2. Enhanced single photon emission from positioned InP/GaInP quantum dots

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    coupled to a confined Tamm-plasmon mode (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Enhanced single photon emission from positioned InP/GaInP quantum dots coupled to a confined Tamm-plasmon mode Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Enhanced single photon emission from positioned InP/GaInP quantum dots coupled to a confined Tamm-plasmon mode We report on the enhancement of the spontaneous emission in the visible red spectral range from site-controlled InP/GaInP quantum dots by resonant coupling

  3. Nanoselective area growth and characterization of dislocation-free InGaN

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    nanopyramids on AlN buffered Si(111) templates (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Nanoselective area growth and characterization of dislocation-free InGaN nanopyramids on AlN buffered Si(111) templates Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Nanoselective area growth and characterization of dislocation-free InGaN nanopyramids on AlN buffered Si(111) templates We report the metal organic chemical vapor deposition growth of dislocation-free 100 nm thick hexagonal InGaN nanopyramid arrays

  4. Sign reversal of transformation entropy change in Co{sub 2}Cr(Ga,Si) shape

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    memory alloys (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Sign reversal of transformation entropy change in Co{sub 2}Cr(Ga,Si) shape memory alloys Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Sign reversal of transformation entropy change in Co{sub 2}Cr(Ga,Si) shape memory alloys In situ X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements and compression tests were performed on Co{sub 2}Cr(Ga,Si) shape memory alloys. The reentrant martensitic transformation behavior was directly observed during the in situ XRD

  5. Size effects in the thermal conductivity of gallium oxide (β-Ga{sub

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    2}O{sub 3}) films grown via open-atmosphere annealing of gallium nitride (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Size effects in the thermal conductivity of gallium oxide (β-Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3}) films grown via open-atmosphere annealing of gallium nitride Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Size effects in the thermal conductivity of gallium oxide (β-Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3}) films grown via open-atmosphere annealing of gallium nitride Gallium nitride (GaN) is a widely used semiconductor for

  6. Structure and magnetic properties of Ce₃(Ni/Al/Ga)₁₁-A new phase

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    with the La₃Al₁₁ structure type (Journal Article) | DOE PAGES DOE PAGES Search Results Accepted Manuscript: Structure and magnetic properties of Ce₃(Ni/Al/Ga)₁₁-A new phase with the La₃Al₁₁ structure type Title: Structure and magnetic properties of Ce₃(Ni/Al/Ga)₁₁-A new phase with the La₃Al₁₁ structure type Single crystals of Ce₃(Ni/Al/Ga)₁₁ were obtained from an Al flux reaction. Single crystals of the title compound crystallizing in the orthorhombic

  7. Defect-engineered GaN:Mg nanowire arrays for overall water splitting under violet light

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kibria, M. G.; Chowdhury, F. A.; Zhao, S.; Mi, Z.; Trudeau, M. L.; Guo, H.

    2015-03-16

    We report that by engineering the intra-gap defect related energy states in GaN nanowire arrays using Mg dopants, efficient and stable overall neutral water splitting can be achieved under violet light. Overall neutral water splitting on Rh/Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} co-catalyst decorated Mg doped GaN nanowires is demonstrated with intra-gap excitation up to 450?nm. Through optimized Mg doping, the absorbed photon conversion efficiency of GaN nanowires reaches ?43% at 375450?nm, providing a viable approach to extend the solar absorption of oxide and non-oxide photocatalysts.

  8. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: The Imery Group, Serenbe, GA |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy The Imery Group, Serenbe, GA DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: The Imery Group, Serenbe, GA Case study of a DOE Zero Energy Ready home in Serenbe, GA, that scored a HERS 40 without PV or HERS -10 with PV. The 2,811-ft2, two-story custom home has 2x6, advanced framed walls filled with R-20 of open-cell spray foam, plus an R-6.6 insulated coated OSB sheathing. The sealed attic has R-32 of open-cell spray foam on the underside of the roof deck plus R-5 rigid foam above

  9. Enhanced photocatalytic performance of Ga{sup 3+}-doped ZnO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhong, Jun Bo; Li, Jian Zhang; Zeng, Jun; He, Xi Yang; Hu, Wei; Shen, Yue Cheng

    2012-11-15

    Graphical abstract: In general, the strong SPS response corresponds to the high separation rate of photoinduced charge carriers on the basis of the SPS principle. The photovoltage of Ga{sup 3+}-doped ZnO is higher than that of ZnO, thus it can be confirmed that the Ga{sup 3+}-doped ZnO has a higher charge separation rate than the ZnO sample. Among these samples, 1%Ga has highest charge separation rate. Display Omitted Highlights: ► Ga{sup 3+} has been employed to dope ZnO photocatalyst. ► Ga{sup 3+} increases the BET surface area and changes the morphology of ZnO. ► The photoinduced charge separation rate has been enhanced. ► The photocatalytic activity has been greatly promoted. -- Abstract: ZnO and Ga{sup 3+}-doped ZnO with different molar ratio of Ga/Zn (1%, 2% and 3%) were prepared by a parallel flow precipitation method. The photocatalysts prepared were characterized by BET surface area, X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV/vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and surface photovoltage spectroscopy (SPS), respectively. The results show that doping Ga{sup 3+} into ZnO increases the BET surface area. The XRD spectra of the photocatalysts calcined at 573 K show only the characteristic peaks of wurtzite-type. Ga{sup 3+}-doped ZnO absorbs much more light than ZnO in the visible light region. Doping Ga{sup 3+} into ZnO greatly changes the morphology of ZnO and enhances the photoinduced charge separation rate. The photocatalytic activity of ZnO and Ga{sup 3+}-doped ZnO for decolorization of methyl orange (MO) solution was evaluated, of all the photocatalysts prepared, the Ga{sup 3+}-doped ZnO with 1% possesses the best photocatalytic activity and the possible reason was discussed.

  10. Sulfur-mediated palladium catalyst immobilized on a GaAs surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shimoda, M. [Surface Physics and Structure Unit, Surface Physics Group, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1, Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Konishi, T. [Anan National College of Technology, 265 Aoki, Minobayashi-cho, Anan, Tokushima 774-0017 (Japan); Nishiwaki, N. [School of Environmental and Engineering, Kochi University of Technology, Tosayamada, Kami, Kochi 782-8502 (Japan); Yamashita, Y.; Yoshikawa, H. [Synchrotron X-ray Station at SPring-8, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan)

    2012-06-15

    We present a hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study on the preparation process of palladium catalyst immobilized on an S-terminated GaAs(100) surface. It is revealed that Pd(II) species are reduced on the GaAs surface and yield Pd nanoparticles during the process of Pd immobilization and the subsequent heat treatment. A comparison with the results on GaAs without S-termination suggests that the reduction of Pd is promoted by hydroxy groups during the Pd immobilization and by S during the heat treatment.

  11. ScGaN alloy growth by molecular beam epitaxy: Evidence for a metastable

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    layered hexagonal phase (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect ScGaN alloy growth by molecular beam epitaxy: Evidence for a metastable layered hexagonal phase Citation Details In-Document Search Title: ScGaN alloy growth by molecular beam epitaxy: Evidence for a metastable layered hexagonal phase Alloy formation in ScGaN is explored using rf molecular beam epitaxy over the Sc fraction range x=0-100%. Optical and structural analysis show separate regimes of growth, namely (I) wurtzitelike but

  12. Low Cost Production of InGaN for Next-Generation Photovoltaic Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nick M. Sbrockey, Shangzhu Sun, Gary S. Tompa,

    2012-07-09

    The goal of this project is to develop a low-cost and low-energy technology for production of photovoltaic devices based on InGaN materials. This project builds on the ongoing development by Structured Materials Industries (SMI), of novel thin film deposition technology for Group III-Nitride materials, which is capable of depositing Group-III nitride materials at significantly lower costs and significantly lower energy usage compared to conventional deposition techniques. During this project, SMI demonstrated deposition of GaN and InGaN films using metalorganic sources, and demonstrated compatibility of the process with standard substrate materials and hardware components.

  13. Carrier localization and in-situ annealing effect on quaternary Ga{sub 1-x}In{sub x}As{sub y}Sb{sub 1-y}/GaAs quantum wells grown by Sb pre-deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thoma, Jiri; Huyet, Guillaume; Tyndall National Institute, UCC, Lee Maltings, Cork ; Liang, Baolai; Huffaker, Diana L.; Lewis, Liam; Hegarty, Stephen P.

    2013-03-18

    Using temperature-dependent photoluminescence spectroscopy, we have investigated and compared intrinsic InGaAs, intrinsic GaInAsSb, and p-i-n junction GaInAsSb quantum wells (QWs) embedded in GaAs barriers. Strong carrier localization inside the intrinsic GaInAsSb/GaAs QW has been observed together with its decrease inside the p-i-n sample. This is attributed to the effect of an in-situ annealing during the top p-doped AlGaAs layer growth at an elevated temperature of 580 Degree-Sign C, leading to Sb-atom diffusion and even atomic redistribution. High-resolution X-ray diffraction measurements and the decrease of both maximum localization energy and full delocalization temperature in the p-i-n QW sample further corroborated this conclusion.

  14. Correlating electroluminescence characterization and physics-based models of InGaN/GaN LEDs: Pitfalls and open issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calciati, Marco; Vallone, Marco; Zhou, Xiangyu; Ghione, Giovanni; Goano, Michele Bertazzi, Francesco; Meneghini, Matteo; Meneghesso, Gaudenzio; Zanoni, Enrico; Verzellesi, Giovanni; Zhu, Dandan; Humphreys, Colin

    2014-06-15

    Electroluminescence (EL) characterization of InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs), coupled with numerical device models of different sophistication, is routinely adopted not only to establish correlations between device efficiency and structural features, but also to make inferences about the loss mechanisms responsible for LED efficiency droop at high driving currents. The limits of this investigative approach are discussed here in a case study based on a comprehensive set of current- and temperature-dependent EL data from blue LEDs with low and high densities of threading dislocations (TDs). First, the effects limiting the applicability of simpler (closed-form and/or one-dimensional) classes of models are addressed, like lateral current crowding, vertical carrier distribution nonuniformity, and interband transition broadening. Then, the major sources of uncertainty affecting state-of-the-art numerical device simulation are reviewed and discussed, including (i) the approximations in the transport description through the multi-quantum-well active region, (ii) the alternative valence band parametrizations proposed to calculate the spontaneous emission rate, (iii) the difficulties in defining the Auger coefficients due to inadequacies in the microscopic quantum well description and the possible presence of extra, non-Auger high-current-density recombination mechanisms and/or Auger-induced leakage. In the case of the present LED structures, the application of three-dimensional numerical-simulation-based analysis to the EL data leads to an explanation of efficiency droop in terms of TD-related and Auger-like nonradiative losses, with a C coefficient in the 10{sup −30} cm{sup 6}/s range at room temperature, close to the larger theoretical calculations reported so far. However, a study of the combined effects of structural and model uncertainties suggests that the C values thus determined could be overestimated by about an order of magnitude. This preliminary attempt at uncertainty quantification confirms, beyond the present case, the need for an improved description of carrier transport and microscopic radiative and nonradiative recombination mechanisms in device-level LED numerical models.

  15. Mid-infrared electro-luminescence and absorption from AlGaN/GaN-based multi-quantum well inter-subband structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hofstetter, Daniel; Bour, David P.; Kirste, Lutz

    2014-06-16

    We present electro-modulated absorption and electro-luminescence measurements on chirped AlGaN/GaN-based multi-quantum well inter-subband structures grown by metal-organic vapour phase epitaxy. The absorption signal is a TM-polarized, 70?meV wide feature centred at 230?meV. At medium injection current, a 58?meV wide luminescence peak corresponding to an inter-subband transition at 1450?cm{sup ?1} (180?meV) is observed. Under high injection current, we measured a 4?meV wide structure peaking at 92.5?meV in the luminescence spectrum. The energy location of this peak is exactly at the longitudinal optical phonon of GaN.

  16. Highly tunable quantum Hall far-infrared photodetector by use of GaAs/Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1?x}As-graphene composite material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, Chiu-Chun [Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Ling, D. C. [Department of Physics, Tamkang University, Tamsui Dist., New Taipei City 25137, Taiwan (China); Chi, C. C.; Chen, Jeng-Chung [Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Frontier Research Center on Fundamental and Applied Sciences of Matters, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China)

    2014-11-03

    We have developed a highly tunable, narrow band far-infrared (FIR) photodetector which utilizes the characteristic merits of graphene and two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) in GaAs/Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1?x}As heterostructure in the Quantum Hall states (QHS). The heterostructure surface is covered with chemical vapor-deposited graphene, which functions as a transparent top-gate to vary the electron density of the 2DEG. FIR response observed in the vicinity of integer QH regime can be effectively tuned in a wide range of 27102?cm{sup ?1} with a bias voltage less than ?1?V. In addition, we have found that the presence of graphene can genuinely modulate the photoresponse. Our results demonstrate a promising direction for realizing a tunable long-wavelength FIR detector using QHS in GaAs 2DEG/ graphene composite material.

  17. Bias dependence and correlation of the cathodoluminescence and electron beam induced current from an InGaN/GaN light emitting diode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wallace, M. J.; Edwards, P. R.; Martin, R. W. [Department of Physics, SUPA, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Kappers, M. J.; Oehler, F.; Oliver, R. A.; Humphreys, C. J. [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3QZ (United Kingdom); Hopkins, M. A.; Sivaraya, S.; Allsopp, D. W. E. [Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University of Bath, Bath BA2 7AY (United Kingdom)

    2014-07-21

    Micron-scale mapping has been employed to study a contacted InGaN/GaN LED using combined electroluminescence (EL), cathodoluminescence (CL), and electron beam induced current (EBIC). Correlations between parameters, such as the EBIC and CL intensity, were studied as a function of applied bias. The CL and EBIC maps reveal small areas, 210??m in size, which have increased nonradiative recombination rate and/or a lower conductivity. The CL emission from these spots is blue shifted, by 3040?meV. Increasing the reverse bias causes the size of the spots to decrease, due to competition between in-plane diffusion and drift in the growth direction. EL mapping shows large bright areas (?100??m) which also have increased EBIC, indicating domains of increased conductivity in the p and/or n-GaN.

  18. Strain dependence on polarization properties of AlGaN and AlGaN-based ultraviolet lasers grown on AlN substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bryan, Zachary Bryan, Isaac; Sitar, Zlatko; Collazo, Ramn; Mita, Seiji; Tweedie, James

    2015-06-08

    Since the band ordering in AlGaN has a profound effect on the performance of UVC light emitting diodes (LEDs) and even determines the feasibility of surface emitting lasers, the polarization properties of emitted light from c-oriented AlGaN and AlGaN-based laser structures were studied over the whole composition range, as well as various strain states, quantum confinements, and carrier densities. A quantitative relationship between the theoretical valence band separation, determined using kp theory, and the experimentally measured degree of polarization is presented. Next to composition, strain was found to have the largest influence on the degree of polarization while all other factors were practically insignificant. The lowest crossover point from the transverse electric to transverse magnetic polarized emission of 245?nm was found for structures pseudomorphically grown on AlN substrates. This finding has significant implications toward the efficiency and feasibility of surface emitting devices below this wavelength.

  19. Temperature-dependent modulated reflectance of InAs/InGaAs/GaAs quantum dots-in-a-well infrared photodetectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nedzinskas, R. ?echavi?ius, B.; Rimkus, A.; Pozingyt?, E.; Kavaliauskas, J.; Valuis, G.; Li, L. H.; Linfield, E. H.

    2015-04-14

    We present a photoreflectance (PR) study of multi-layer InAs quantum dot (QD) photodetector structures, incorporating InGaAs overgrown layers and positioned asymmetrically within GaAs/AlAs quantum wells (QWs). The influence of the back-surface reflections on the QD PR spectra is explained and a temperature-dependent photomodulation mechanism is discussed. The optical interband transitions originating from the QD/QW ground- and excited-states are revealed and their temperature behaviour in the range of 3300?K is established. In particular, we estimated the activation energy (?320?meV) of exciton thermal escape from QD to QW bound-states at high temperatures. Furthermore, from the obtained Varshni parameters, a strain-driven partial decomposition of the InGaAs cap layer is determined.

  20. Improved Ga grading of sequentially produced Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} solar cells studied by high resolution X-ray fluorescence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schöppe, Philipp; Schnohr, Claudia S.; Oertel, Michael; Kusch, Alexander; Johannes, Andreas; Eckner, Stefanie; Reislöhner, Udo; Ronning, Carsten; Burghammer, Manfred; Martínez-Criado, Gema

    2015-01-05

    There is particular interest to investigate compositional inhomogeneity of Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} solar cell absorbers. We introduce an approach in which focused ion beam prepared thin lamellas of complete solar cell devices are scanned with a highly focused synchrotron X-ray beam. Analyzing the resulting fluorescence radiation ensures high resolution compositional analysis combined with high spatial resolution. Thus, we are able to detect subtle variations of the Ga/(Ga + In) ratio down to 0.01 on a submicrometer scale. We observed that for sequentially processed solar cells a higher selenization temperature leads to absorbers with almost homogenous Ga/(Ga + In) ratio, which significantly improved the conversion efficiency.

  1. Green, red and infrared Er-related emission in implanted GaN:Er and GaN:Er,O samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monteiro, T.; Soares, J.; Correia, M. R.; Alves, E.

    2001-06-01

    Er-related luminescence near 1.54 {mu}m ({similar_to}805 meV) is observed under below band gap excitation at 4.2 K in GaN:Er and GaN:Er,O implanted samples. The spectrum of the recovered damage samples is a multiline structure. So far, these lines are the sharpest ones reported for GaN. Well-resolved green and red luminescences are observed in implanted samples. The dependence of luminescence on the excitation energy as well as the influence of different nominal fluence and annealing conditions is discussed. Combining the results obtained from photoluminescence and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, different lattice sites for the optical active Er-related centers are identified. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  2. Enhanced quality thin film Cu(In,Ga)Se[sub 2] for semiconductor device applications by vapor-phase recrystallization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tuttle, J.R.; Contreras, M.A.; Noufi, R.; Albin, D.S.

    1994-10-18

    Enhanced quality thin films of Cu[sub w](In,Ga[sub y])Se[sub z] for semiconductor device applications are fabricated by initially forming a Cu-rich, phase-separated compound mixture comprising Cu(In,Ga):Cu[sub x]Se on a substrate to form a large-grain precursor and then converting the excess Cu[sub x]Se to Cu(In,Ga)Se[sub 2] by exposing it to an activity of In and/or Ga, either in vapor In and/or Ga form or in solid (In,Ga)[sub y]Se[sub z]. Alternatively, the conversion can be made by sequential deposition of In and/or Ga and Se onto the phase-separated precursor. The conversion process is preferably performed in the temperature range of about 300--600 C, where the Cu(In,Ga)Se[sub 2] remains solid, while the excess Cu[sub x]Se is in a liquid flux. The characteristic of the resulting Cu[sub w](In,Ga)[sub y]Se[sub z] can be controlled by the temperature. Higher temperatures, such as 500--600 C, result in a nearly stoichiometric Cu(In,Ga)Se[sub 2], whereas lower temperatures, such as 300--400 C, result in a more Cu-poor compound, such as the Cu[sub z](In,Ga)[sub 4]Se[sub 7] phase. 7 figs.

  3. Enhanced quality thin film Cu(In,Ga)Se.sub.2 for semiconductor device applications by vapor-phase recrystallization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tuttle, John R.; Contreras, Miguel A.; Noufi, Rommel; Albin, David S.

    1994-01-01

    Enhanced quality thin films of Cu.sub.w (In,Ga.sub.y)Se.sub.z for semiconductor device applications are fabricated by initially forming a Cu-rich, phase-separated compound mixture comprising Cu(In,Ga):Cu.sub.x Se on a substrate to form a large-grain precursor and then converting the excess Cu.sub.x Se to Cu(In,Ga)Se.sub.2 by exposing it to an activity of In and/or Ga, either in vapor In and/or Ga form or in solid (In,Ga).sub.y Se.sub.z. Alternatively, the conversion can be made by sequential deposition of In and/or Ga and Se onto the phase-separated precursor. The conversion process is preferably performed in the temperature range of about 300.degree.-600.degree. C., where the Cu(In,Ga)Se.sub.2 remains solid, while the excess Cu.sub.x Se is in a liquid flux. The characteristic of the resulting Cu.sub.w (In,Ga).sub.y Se.sub.z can be controlled by the temperature. Higher temperatures, such as 500.degree.-600.degree. C., result in a nearly stoichiometric Cu(In,Ga)Se.sub.2, whereas lower temperatures, such as 300.degree.-400.degree. C., result in a more Cu-poor compound, such as the Cu.sub.z (In,Ga).sub.4 Se.sub.7 phase.

  4. Current flow and potential efficiency of solar cells based on GaAs and GaSb p-n junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andreev, V. M.; Evstropov, V. V.; Kalinovsky, V. S. Lantratov, V. M.; Khvostikov, V. P.

    2009-05-15

    Dependence of the efficiency of single-junction and multijunction solar cells on the mechanisms of current flow in photoactive p-n junctions, specifically on the form of the dark current-voltage characteristic J-V, has been studied. The resistanceless J-V{sub j} characteristic (with the series resistance disregarded) of a multijunction solar cell has the same shape as the characteristic of a single-junction cell: both feature a set of exponential portions. This made it possible to develop a unified analytical method for calculating the efficiency of singlejunction and multijunction solar cells. The equation relating the efficiency to the photogenerated current at each portion of the J-V{sub j} characteristic is derived. For p-n junctions in GaAs and GaSb, the following characteristics were measured: the dark J-V characteristic, the dependence of the open-circuit voltage on the illumination intensity P-V{sub OC}, and the dependence of the luminescence intensity on the forward current L-J. Calculated dependences of potential efficiency (under idealized condition for equality to unity of external quantum yield) on the photogenerated current for single-junction GaAs and GaSb solar cells and a GaAs/GaSb tandem are plotted. The form of these dependences corresponds to the shape of J-V{sub j} characteristics: there are the diffusion- and recombination-related portions; in some cases, the tunneling-trapping portion is also observed. At low degrees of concentration of solar radiation (C < 10), an appreciable contribution to photogenerated current is made by recombination component. It is an increase in this component in the case of irradiation with 6.78-MeV protons or 1-MeV electrons that brings about a decrease in the efficiency of conversion of unconcentrated solar radiation.

  5. Impact of stress relaxation in GaAsSb cladding layers on quantum dot creation in InAs/GaAsSb structures grown on GaAs (001)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bremner, S. P.; Ban, K.-Y.; Faleev, N. N.; Honsberg, C. B.; Smith, D. J.

    2013-09-14

    We describe InAs quantum dot creation in InAs/GaAsSb barrier structures grown on GaAs (001) wafers by molecular beam epitaxy. The structures consist of 20-nm-thick GaAsSb barrier layers with Sb content of 8%, 13%, 15%, 16%, and 37% enclosing 2 monolayers of self-assembled InAs quantum dots. Transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction results indicate the onset of relaxation of the GaAsSb layers at around 15% Sb content with intersected 60 dislocation semi-loops, and edge segments created within the volume of the epitaxial structures. 38% relaxation of initial elastic stress is seen for 37% Sb content, accompanied by the creation of a dense net of dislocations. The degradation of In surface migration by these dislocation trenches is so severe that quantum dot formation is completely suppressed. The results highlight the importance of understanding defect formation during stress relaxation for quantum dot structures particularly those with larger numbers of InAs quantum-dot layers, such as those proposed for realizing an intermediate band material.

  6. Roles of V-shaped pits on the improvement of quantum efficiency in InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well light-emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quan, Zhijue Wang, Li Zheng, Changda; Liu, Junlin; Jiang, Fengyi

    2014-11-14

    The roles of V-shaped pits on the improvement of quantum efficiency in InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well (MQW) light-emitting diodes are investigated by numerical simulation. The simulation results show that V-shaped pits cannot only screen dislocations, but also play an important role on promoting hole injection into the MQWs. It is revealed that the injection of holes into the MQW via the sidewalls of the V-shaped pits is easier than via the flat region, due to the lower polarization charge densities in the sidewall structure with lower In concentration and (1011)-oriented semi-polar facets.

  7. Hydrogen passivation of nitrogen in GaNAs and GaNP alloys: How many H atoms are required for each N atom?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buyanova, I. A.; Chen, W. M.; Izadifard, M.; Pearton, S. J.; Bihler, C.; Brandt, M. S.; Hong, Y. G.; Tu, C. W.

    2007-01-08

    Secondary ion mass spectrometry and photoluminescence are employed to evaluate the origin and efficiency of hydrogen passivation of nitrogen in GaNAs and GaNP. The hydrogen profiles are found to closely follow the N distributions, providing unambiguous evidence for their preferential binding as the dominant mechanism for neutralization of N-induced modifications in the electronic structure of the materials. Though the exact number of H atoms involved in passivation may depend on the conditions of the H treatment and the host matrixes, it is generally found that more than three H atoms are required to bind to a N atom to achieve full passivation for both alloys.

  8. Impacts of SiN passivation on the degradation modes of AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors under reverse-bias stress

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Wei-Wei; Ma, Xiao-Hua E-mail: yhao@xidian.edu.cn; Hou, Bin; Zhu, Jie-Jie; Chen, Yong-He; Zheng, Xue-Feng; Zhang, Jin-Cheng; Hao, Yue E-mail: yhao@xidian.edu.cn

    2014-10-27

    Impacts of SiN passivation on the degradation modes of AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors are investigated. The gate leakage current decreases significantly upon removing the SiN layer and no clear critical voltage for the sudden degradation of the gate leakage current can be observed in the reverse-bias step-stress experiments. Gate-lag measurements reveal the decrease of the fast-state surface traps and the increase of slow-state traps after the passivation layer removal. It is postulated that consistent surface charging relieves the electric field peak on the gate edge, thus the inverse piezoelectric effect is shielded.

  9. How much better are InGaN/GaN nanodisks than quantum wellsOscillator strength enhancement and changes in optical properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Lei; Hill, Tyler A.; Deng, Hui E-mail: peicheng@umich.edu; Lee, Leung-Kway; Teng, Chu-Hsiang; Ku, Pei-Cheng E-mail: peicheng@umich.edu

    2014-02-03

    We show over 100-fold enhancement of the exciton oscillator strength as the diameter of an InGaN nanodisk in a GaN nanopillar is reduced from a few micrometers to less than 40?nm, corresponding to the quantum dot limit. The enhancement results from significant strain relaxation in nanodisks less than 100?nm in diameter. Meanwhile, the radiative decay rate is only improved by 10 folds due to strong reduction of the local density of photon states in small nanodisks. Further increase in the radiative decay rate can be achieved by engineering the local density of photon states, such as adding a dielectric coating.

  10. Enhanced conversion efficiency in wide-bandgap GaNP solar cells...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Enhanced conversion efficiency in wide-bandgap GaNP solar cells Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on October 12, 2016 Title: Enhanced...

  11. Contrasting Behavior of GaP(001) and InP(001) at the Interface...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    at the Interface with Water Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Contrasting Behavior of GaP(001) and InP(001) at the Interface with Water Authors: Wood, B C ; ...

  12. Measurement of cross sections for the Cu-63(alpha,gamma)Ga-67...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Measurement of cross sections for the Cu-63(alpha,gamma)Ga-67 reaction from 5.9-8.7 MeV Authors: Basunia, M S ; Norman, E B ; Shugart, H A ; Smith, A R ; Dolinski, M J ; ...

  13. File:USDA-CE-Production-GIFmaps-GA.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GA.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Georgia Ethanol Plant Locations Size of this preview: 776 600 pixels. Full resolution (1,650 1,275 pixels,...

  14. Mechanism of lateral ordering of InP dots grown on InGaP layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bortoleto, J.R.R.; Gutierrez, H.R.; Cotta, M.A.; Bettini, J.

    2005-07-04

    The mechanisms leading to the spontaneous formation of a two-dimensional array of InP/InGaP dots grown by chemical-beam epitaxy are discussed. Samples where the InGaP buffer layer was grown at different conditions were characterized by transmission electron microscopy. Our results indicate that a periodic strain field related to lateral two-dimensional compositional modulation in the InGaP buffer layer determines the dot nucleation positions during InP growth. Although the periodic strain field in the InGaP is large enough to align the InP dots, both their shape and optical properties are effectively unaltered. This result shows that compositional modulation can be used as a tool for in situ dot positioning.

  15. Effects of Spectral Error in Efficiency Measurements of GaInAs...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) at ... bottom subcell is too high. For cells designed so that the ... ratio for a 41%-efficient GaInPGaAsGe triple ...

  16. Measurement of Cross Sections for the 63Cu(alpha,gamma)67Ga Reaction...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Measurement of Cross Sections for the 63Cu(alpha,gamma)67Ga Reaction from 5.9-8.7 MeV Authors: Basunia, M S ; Norman, E B ; Shugart, H A ; Smith, A R ; Dolinski, M J ; ...

  17. Sandia Energy - Optical performance of top-down fabricated InGaN...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    performance of top-down fabricated InGaNGaN nanorod light emitting diode arrays" in Optics Express. This paper details the development of a two-step top-down process for...

  18. Relaxation of compressively strained AlGaN by inclined threading...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Relaxation of compressively strained AlGaN by inclined threading ... OSTI Identifier: 973648 Report Number(s): SAND2005-3941J Journal ID: ISSN 0003-6951; ...

  19. Modeling and Characterization of the Magnetocaloric Effect in Ni2MnGa Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nicholson, Don M; Odbadrakh, Khorgolkhuu; Rios, Orlando; Hodges, Jason P; Ludtka, Gerard Michael; Porter, Wallace D; Sefat, A. S.; Rusanu, Aurelian; Evans III, Boyd Mccutchen

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic shape memory alloys have great promise as magneto-caloric effect refrigerant materials due to their combined magnetic and structural transitions. Computational and experimental research is reported on the Ni2MnGa material system. The magnetic states of this system have been explored using the Wang-Landau statistical approach in conjunction with the Locally Self-consistent Multiple-Scattering (LSMS) method to explore the magnetic states responsible for the magnet-caloric effect in this material. The effects of alloying agents on the transition temperatures of the Ni2MnGa alloy were investigated using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID). Neutron scattering experiments were performed to observe the structural and magnetic phase transformations at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) on alloys of Ni-Mn-Ga and Ni-Mn-Ga-Cu-Fe. Data from the observations are discussed in comparison with the computational studies.

  20. Surface electronic structure of GaAs(110) studied by Auger photoelectron coincidence spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bartynski, R.A.; Garrison, K.; Jensen, E.; Hulbert, S.L.; Weinert, M.

    1990-12-31

    We have used Auger photoelectron coincidence spectroscopy to study the M{sub 4,5}VV Auger spectra of GaAs(110). Using this technique, the Ga and As spectra can be separated and studied independently. The lineshape of the As-M{sub 4,5}VV measured in coincidence with the As 3d photoemission line differs significantly from the conventional Auger spectrum. We attribute this to the surface electronic properties of the system. In addition, we have found that the ss-component of the As spectrum is more intense than expected based on calculations using atomic matrix elements. The Ga-M{sub 4,5}VV spectrum, of which only the pp-component is observed, agrees well with that expected from an independent electron model. A first principles electronic structure calculation of a 5-layer GaAs(110) slab has been performed to aid in the interpretation of the Auger spectra.