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Sample records for ro clay content

  1. Clay Minerals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mueller, Karl T.; Sanders, Rebecca L.; Washton, Nancy M.

    2014-03-14

    Clay minerals are important components of the environment and are involved or implicated in processes such as the uptake of pollutants and the release of nutrients and as potential platforms for a number of chemical reactions. Owing to their small particle sizes (typically, on the order of microns or smaller) and mixing with a variety of other minerals and soil components, advanced characterization methods are needed to study their structures, dynamics, and reactivities. In this article, we describe the use of solid-state NMR methods to characterize the structures and chemistries of clay minerals. Early one-pulse magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR studies of 27Al and 29Si have now been enhanced and extended with new studies utilizing advanced methodologies (such as Multiple Quantum MAS) as well as studies of less-sensitive nuclei. In additional work, the issue of reactivity of clay minerals has been addressed, including studies of reactive surface area in the environment. Utilizations of NMR-sensitive nuclides within the clay minerals themselves, and in molecules that react with speci?c sites on the clay mineral surfaces, have aided in understanding the reactivity of these complex aluminosilicate systems.

  2. CONTENTS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3.0 - CRITICAL, SPECIAL, & ENGINEERED LIFTS January 4, 2016 Rev 1 Page 1 CHAPTER 3.0 TABLE OF CONTENTS 3.0 CRITICAL LIFTS ....................................................................................................................................... 3 3.1 SCOPE .......................................................................................................................................................... 3 3.2 CRITICAL LIFT DETERMINATION

  3. CONTENTS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Volume 4, Laboratory Technical Requirements Effective Date: 6/1/07 Vol. 4: i CONTENTS 1.0 QUALITY ASSURANCE OBJECTIVES......................................................................... 1-1 1.1 DATA QUALITY OBJECTIVES............................................................................ 1-1 1.2 CLIENT DATA QUALITY REQUIREMENTS ..................................................... 1-2 1.2.1 Precision

  4. Modified clay sorbents

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fogler, H. Scott; Srinivasan, Keeran R.

    1990-01-01

    A novel modified clay sorbent and method of treating industrial effluents to remove trace pollutants, such as dioxins, biphenyls, and polyaromatics such as benzo(a)pyrene and pentachlorophenol. The novel clay sorbent has a composite structure in which the interlayer space of an expandable clay, such as smectite, is filled with polyvalent or multivalent inorganic cations which forces weaker surfactant cations to locate on the surface of the clay in such an orientation that the resulting composite is hydrophilic in nature. A specific example is cetylpyridinium-hydroxy aluminum-montmorillonite. In certain embodiments, a non-expanding clay, such as kaolinite, is used and surfactant cations are necessarily located on an external surface of the clay. A specific example is cetylpyridinium-kaolinite.

  5. Accountable Property RO23_120213.xlsx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Accountable Property 1 RO BARCODE DESCRIPTION MANUF. MODEL SN COST BLDG ROOM INVT_DATE 23 C3585 COMBUSTOR SECTIONS ( CUSTOM MADE N/A N/A $10,000.00 93 102 6-Sep-13 23 0000002197 ANALYZER AUTOMATIC P MICROMETRICS $10,000.00 OFF PITT 11-Oct-13 23 C2428 BIN, COAL STORAGE COPE MATERIAL H N/A N/A $10,250.00 93 103 29-Oct-10 23 0000036391 CHAMBER VACUUM CUSTO KURT J LESKER CUSTOM $10,337.90 OFF WVU 30-Aug-13 23 0000959 GRINDER, SURFACE, TH $10,406.25 05 101 24-Sep-13 23 0053850 SHEAR SQUARING NIAGARA

  6. The washability of lignites for clay removal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oteyaka, B.; Yamik, A.; Ucar, A.; Sahbaz, O.; Demir, U.

    2008-07-01

    In the washability research of the Seyitomer Lignites (Kutahya-Turkey), with lower calorific value (1,863 kcal/kg) and high ash content (51.91%), by heavy medium separation, it was found out that middling clay in the coal had an effect to change the medium density. To prevent this problem, a trommel sieve with 18 and 5 mm aperture diameter was designed, and the clay in the coal was tried to be removed using it before the coal was released to heavy medium. Following that, the obtained coal in -100 + 18 mm and -18 + 5 mm fractions was subjected to sink and float test having 1.4 gcm{sup -3} and 1.7 gcm{sup -3} medium densities (-5 mm fraction will be evaluated in a separate work). Depending on the raw coal, with the floating of -100 + 18 mm and -18 + 5 mm size fraction in 1.4 gcm{sup -3} medium density, clean coal with 60.10% combustible matter recovery, 19.12% ash, and 3,150 kcal/kg was obtained. Also floating of the samples sinking in 1.4 gcm{sup -3} in the medium density (1.7 gcm{sup -3}), middling with 18.70% combustible matter recovery, 41.93% ash, 2,150 kcal/kg, and tailing having 78.31% ash were obtained.

  7. Copy of Capitalized Property RO23_120213_1.xlsx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Capitalized Property 1 RO BARCODE DESCRIPTION MANUF. MODEL SN COST BLDG ROOM INVTDATE 23 C5508 PRECISION ION POLISH GATAN INC 691 UNIT 427 01070301 50,626.00 28 113 24-Sep-13 23...

  8. Perlick: ENERGY STAR Referral (HP48RO-S)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE referred Perlick refrigerator HP48RO-S to EPA, brand manager of the ENERGY STAR program, for appropriate action after DOE testing revealed that the model does not meet ENERGY STAR requirements.

  9. ARM - VAP Product - mmcrmode4ro200309091cloth

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ro200309091cloth Documentation Data Management Facility Plots (Quick Looks) Citation DOI: 10.5439/1027356 [ What is this? ] Generate Citation ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send VAP Output : MMCRMODE4RO200309091CLOTH ARSCL: derived, MMCR Mode 4 (robust mode) moments Active Dates 2003.09.27 - 2004.08.10

  10. Clay Electric Coop Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Clay Electric Coop Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: Clay Electric Coop Inc Place: Illinois Phone Number: 1-800-582-9012 Website: www.clayelectric.com Facebook: https:...

  11. Potassium hydroxide clay stabilization process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sydansk, R.

    1981-07-28

    An aqueous solution having potassium hydroxide dissolved therein is injected into a subterranean sandstone formation containing water-sensitive fine particles, including clays. Potassium hydroxide stabilizes the fine particles for a substantial period of time thereby substantially preventing formation permeability damage caused by encroachment of aqueous solutions having a distinct ionic makeup into the treated formation.

  12. Contact micromechanics in granular media with clay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ita, S.L.

    1994-08-01

    Many granular materials, including sedimentary rocks and soils, contain clay particles in the pores, grain contacts, or matrix. The amount and location of the clays and fluids can influence the mechanical and hydraulic properties of the granular material. This research investigated the mechanical effects of clay at grain-to-grain contacts in the presence of different fluids. Laboratory seismic wave propagation tests were conducted at ultrasonic frequencies using spherical glass beads coated with Montmorillonite clay (SWy-1) onto which different fluids were adsorbed. For all bead samples, seismic velocity increased and attenuation decreased as the contact stiffnesses increased with increasing stress demonstrating that grain contacts control seismic transmission in poorly consolidated and unconsolidated granular material. Coating the beads with clay added stiffness and introduced viscosity to the mechanical contact properties that increased the velocity and attenuation of the propagating seismic wave. Clay-fluid interactions were studied by allowing the clay coating to absorb water, ethyl alcohol, and hexadecane. Increasing water amounts initially increased seismic attenuation due to clay swelling at the contacts. Attenuation decreased for higher water amounts where the clay exceeded the plastic limit and was forced from the contact areas into the surrounding open pore space during sample consolidation. This work investigates how clay located at grain contacts affects the micromechanical, particularly seismic, behavior of granular materials. The need for this work is shown by a review of the effects of clays on seismic wave propagation, laboratory measurements of attenuation in granular media, and proposed mechanisms for attenuation in granular media.

  13. THE FUTURE OF THE SUN: AN EVOLVED SOLAR TWIN REVEALED BY CoRoT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Do Nascimento, J.-D. Jr.; Da Costa, J. S.; Castro, M.; Takeda, Y.; Melendez, J.

    2013-07-10

    The question of whether the Sun is peculiar within the class of solar-type stars has been the subject of active investigation over the past three decades. Although several solar twins have been found with stellar parameters similar to those of the Sun (albeit in a range of Li abundances and with somewhat different compositions), their rotation periods are unknown, except for 18 Sco, which is younger than the Sun and with a rotation period shorter than solar. It is difficult to obtain rotation periods for stars of solar age from ground-based observations, as a low-activity level implies a shallow rotational modulation of their light curves. CoRoT has provided space-based long time series from which the rotation periods of solar twins as old as the Sun could be estimated. Based on high-signal-to-noise, high-resolution spectroscopic observations gathered at the Subaru Telescope, we show that the star CoRoT ID 102684698 is a somewhat evolved solar twin with a low Li abundance. Its rotation period is 29 {+-} 5 days, compatible with its age (6.7 Gyr) and low lithium content, A{sub Li} {approx}< 0.85 dex. Interestingly, our CoRoT solar twin seems to have enhanced abundances of the refractory elements with respect to the Sun, a typical characteristic of most nearby twins. With a magnitude V {approx_equal} 14.1, ID 102684698 is the first solar twin revealed by CoRoT, the farthest field solar twin so far known, and the only solar twin older than the Sun for which a rotation period has been determined.

  14. AmeriFlux US-Ro1 Rosemount- G21

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Baker, John [USDA-ARS; Griffis, Tim [University of Minnesota; Griffis, Timothy [University of Minnesota

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-Ro1 Rosemount- G21. Site Description - This tower is located in a farm field farmed in accordance with the dominant farming practice in the region: a corn/soybean rotation with chisel plow tillage in the fall following corn harvest and in the spring following soybeans.

  15. AmeriFlux US-Ro3 Rosemount- G19

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, John; Griffis, Tim

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-Ro3 Rosemount- G19. Site Description - This tower is located in a farm field farmed in accordance with the cominant farming practice in the region: a corn/soybean rotation with chisel plow tillage in the fall following corn harvest and in the spring following soybeans.

  16. Clay Electric Cooperative, Inc- Energy Conservation Loans

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Clay Electric Cooperative (CEC), a Touchstone Energy Cooperative, covers 14 North Florida counties, including Gainesville, Keystone Heights, Lake City, Orange Park, Palatka, and Salt Springs. It...

  17. Clay Electric Cooperative, Inc- Solar Thermal Loans

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Clay Electric Cooperative (CEC), a Touchstone Energy Cooperative, covers 14 counties in northern Florida, including Gainesville, Keystone Heights, Lake City, Orange Park, Palatka, and Salt Springs....

  18. ARM - VAP Product - mmcrmode4ro200404141cloth

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    404141cloth Documentation Data Management Facility Plots (Quick Looks) Citation DOI: 10.5439/1027357 [ What is this? ] Generate Citation ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send VAP Output : MMCRMODE4RO200404141CLOTH ARSCL: derived, MMCR Mode 4 (robust mode) moments, 20040415 version Active Dates 2004.04.15 - 2007.11.27

  19. ARM - VAP Product - mmcrmode4ro200712011cloth

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    712011cloth Documentation Data Management Facility Plots (Quick Looks) Citation DOI: 10.5439/1027358 [ What is this? ] Generate Citation ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send VAP Output : MMCRMODE4RO200712011CLOTH ARSCL: derived, MMCR Mode 4 (robust mode) moments, 20071201 version Active Dates 2008.01.01 - 2011.03.23

  20. Clay County, Missouri: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Registered Energy Companies in Clay County, Missouri Alternative Energy Sources Inc Smith Electric Vehicles US SEV US Registered Financial Organizations in Clay County,...

  1. Clay Electric Cooperative, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Inc Place: Florida Phone Number: 1-888-434-9844 Website: www.clayelectric.com Facebook: https:www.facebook.comClayElectric Outage Hotline: 1-888-434-9844 Outage Map:...

  2. Testing of hollow clay tile masonry prisms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, W.D.; Butala, M.B.

    1993-10-15

    This paper presents test results of 610-mm wide (24-in.) by 1219-mm high (48-in.) by 203-or 330-mm (8- or 13-in.) thick prisms constructed of hollow clay tiles. Three prisms were extracted fro existing hollow clay title walls and 69 were constructed in laboratories at The University of Tennessee and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in Gaithersburg, Maryland. Modulus of Elasticity, E, and compressive strength f{prime}{sub m} were calculated from the results.

  3. Enchanted Clays: 44th Annual Meeting of the Clay Minerals Society (June 2007)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Randall T. Cygan

    2007-06-01

    “Enchanted Clays: 44th Annual Meeting of the Clay Minerals Society” was held in early June 2007 in beautiful and historic Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA. Santa Fe provided an idyllic location in the southwestern United States for the attendees to enjoy technical and social sessions while soaking up the diverse culture and wonderful climate of New Mexico—The Land of Enchantment. The meeting included a large and varied group of scientists, sharing knowledge and ideas, benefitting from technical interactions, and enjoying the wonderful historic and enchanted environs of Santa Fe. Including significant number of international scientists, the meeting was attended by approximately two hundred participants. The meeting included three days of technical sessions (oral and poster presentations), three days of field trips to clay and geological sites of northern New Mexico, and a full day workshop on the stabilization of carbon by clays. Details can be found at the meeting web site: www.sandia.gov/clay.

  4. Organic or organometallic template mediated clay synthesis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gregar, Kathleen C.; Winans, Randall E.; Botto, Robert E.

    1994-01-01

    A method for incorporating diverse Varieties of intercalants or templates directly during hydrothermal synthesis of clays such as hectorite or montmorillonite-type layer-silicate clays. For a hectorite layer-silicate clay, refluxing a gel of silica sol, magnesium hydroxide sol and lithium fluoride for two days in the presence of an organic or organometallic intercalant or template results in crystalline products containing either (a) organic dye molecules such as ethyl violet and methyl green, (b) dye molecules such as alcian blue that are based on a Cu(II)-phthalocyannine complex, or (c) transition metal complexes such as Ru(II)phenanthroline and Co(III)sepulchrate or (d) water-soluble porphyrins and metalloporphyrins. Montmorillonite-type clays are made by the method taught by U.S. Pat. No. 3,887,454 issued to Hickson, Jun. 13, 1975; however, a variety of intercalants or templates may be introduced. The intercalants or templates should have (i) water-solubility, (ii) positive charge, and (iii) thermal stability under moderately basic (pH 9-10) aqueous reflux conditions or hydrothermal pressurized conditions for the montmorillonite-type clays.

  5. Organic or organometallic template mediated clay synthesis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gregar, K.C.; Winans, R.E.; Botto, R.E.

    1994-05-03

    A method is described for incorporating diverse varieties of intercalates or templates directly during hydrothermal synthesis of clays such as hectorite or montmorillonite-type layer-silicate clays. For a hectorite layer-silicate clay, refluxing a gel of silica sol, magnesium hydroxide sol and lithium fluoride for two days in the presence of an organic or organometallic intercalate or template results in crystalline products containing either (a) organic dye molecules such as ethyl violet and methyl green, (b) dye molecules such as alcian blue that are based on a Cu(II)-phthalocyannine complex, or (c) transition metal complexes such as Ru(II)phenanthroline and Co(III)sepulchrate or (d) water-soluble porphyrins and metalloporphyrins. Montmorillonite-type clays are made by the method taught by U.S. Pat. No. 3,887,454 issued to Hickson, Jun. 13, 1975; however, a variety of intercalates or templates may be introduced. The intercalates or templates should have (i) water-solubility, (ii) positive charge, and (iii) thermal stability under moderately basic (pH 9-10) aqueous reflux conditions or hydrothermal pressurized conditions for the montmorillonite-type clays. 22 figures.

  6. Microsoft Word - Clay Memo PMC Coburn Obama 11_9_06.doc | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Clay Memo PMC Coburn Obama 11906.doc Microsoft Word - Clay Memo PMC Coburn Obama 11906.doc Microsoft Word - Clay Memo PMC Coburn Obama 11906.doc More Documents & Publications...

  7. Evaluation of Used Fuel Disposition in Clay-Bearing Rock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jové Colón, Carlos F.; Weck, Philippe F.; Sassani, David H.; Zheng, Liange; Rutqvist, Jonny; Steefel, Carl I.; Kim, Kunhwi; Nakagawa, Seiji; Houseworth, James; Birkholzer, Jens; Caporuscio, Florie A.; Cheshire, Michael; Rearick, Michael S.; McCarney, Mary K.; Zavarin, Mavrik; Benedicto, Ana; Kersting, Annie B.; Sutton, Mark; Jerden, James; Frey, Kurt E.; Copple, Jacqueline M.; Ebert, William

    2014-08-29

    Radioactive waste disposal in shale/argillite rock formations has been widely considered given its desirable isolation properties (low permeability), geochemically reduced conditions, anomalous groundwater pressures, and widespread geologic occurrence. Clay/shale rock formations are characterized by their high content of clay minerals such as smectites and illites where diffusive transport and chemisorption phenomena predominate. These, in addition to low permeability, are key attributes of shale to impede radionuclide mobility. Shale host-media has been comprehensively studied in international nuclear waste repository programs as part of underground research laboratories (URLs) programs in Switzerland, France, Belgium, and Japan. These investigations, in some cases a decade or more long, have produced a large but fundamental body of information spanning from site characterization data (geological, hydrogeological, geochemical, geomechanical) to controlled experiments on the engineered barrier system (EBS) (barrier clay and seals materials). Evaluation of nuclear waste disposal in shale formations in the USA was conducted in the late 70’s and mid 80’s. Most of these studies evaluated the potential for shale to host a nuclear waste repository but not at the programmatic level of URLs in international repository programs. This report covers various R&D work and capabilities relevant to disposal of heat-generating nuclear waste in shale/argillite media. Integration and cross-fertilization of these capabilities will be utilized in the development and implementation of the shale/argillite reference case planned for FY15. Disposal R&D activities under the UFDC in the past few years have produced state-of-the-art modeling capabilities for coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical (THMC), used fuel degradation (source term), and thermodynamic modeling and database development to evaluate generic disposal concepts. The THMC models have been developed for shale repository leveraging in large part on the information garnered in URLs and laboratory data to test and demonstrate model prediction capability and to accurately represent behavior of the EBS and the natural (barrier) system (NS). In addition, experimental work to improve our understanding of clay barrier interactions and TM couplings at high temperatures are key to evaluate thermal effects as a result of relatively high heat loads from waste and the extent of sacrificial zones in the EBS. To assess the latter, experiments and modeling approaches have provided important information on the stability and fate of barrier materials under high heat loads. This information is central to the assessment of thermal limits and the implementation of the reference case when constraining EBS properties and the repository layout (e.g., waste package and drift spacing). This report is comprised of various parts, each one describing various R&D activities applicable to shale/argillite media. For example, progress made on modeling and experimental approaches to analyze physical and chemical interactions affecting clay in the EBS, NS, and used nuclear fuel (source term) in support of R&D objectives. It also describes the development of a reference case for shale/argillite media. The accomplishments of these activities are summarized as follows: Development of a reference case for shale/argillite; Investigation of Reactive Transport and Coupled THM Processes in EBS: FY14; Update on Experimental Activities on Buffer/Backfill Interactions at elevated Pressure and Temperature; and Thermodynamic Database Development: Evaluation Strategy, Modeling Tools, First-Principles Modeling of Clay, and Sorption Database Assessment;ANL Mixed Potential Model For Used Fuel Degradation: Application to Argillite and Crystalline Rock Environments.

  8. Photo of the Week: RoHAWKtics at Oak Ridge National Laboratory | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy RoHAWKtics at Oak Ridge National Laboratory Photo of the Week: RoHAWKtics at Oak Ridge National Laboratory April 1, 2013 - 3:40pm Addthis Tennessee Governor Bill Haslam signs the robot of Hardin Valley Academy's FIRST robotics team during the dedication of DOE's Carbon Fiber Technology Facility, located at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The RoHAWKtics team (named after their school mascot) spent an intense six weeks constructing the robot, using design, engineering, and

  9. Clay-Union Electric Coop | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Clay-Union Electric Coop Jump to: navigation, search Name: Clay-Union Electric Coop Place: South Dakota Phone Number: 605-624-2673 Website: www.clayunionelectric.coop Facebook:...

  10. Platte-Clay Electric Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Platte-Clay Electric Coop, Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: Platte-Clay Electric Coop, Inc Place: Missouri Phone Number: 816-628-3121 Website: www.pcec.coop Twitter:...

  11. PRE-DISCOVERY OBSERVATIONS OF CoRoT-1b AND CoRoT-2b WITH THE BEST SURVEY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rauer, H.; Erikson, A.; Kabath, P.; Hedelt, P.; Csizmadia, Sz.; Paris, P. v.; Renner, S.; Titz, R.; Voss, H.; Boer, M.; Tournois, G.; Carone, L.; Eigmueller, P.

    2010-01-15

    The Berlin Exoplanet Search Telescope (BEST) wide-angle telescope installed at the Observatoire de Haute-Provence and operated in remote control from Berlin by the Institut fuer Planetenforschung, DLR, has observed the CoRoT target fields prior to the mission. The resulting archive of stellar photometric light curves is used to search for deep transit events announced during CoRoT's alarm mode to aid in fast photometric confirmation of these events. The 'initial run' field of CoRoT (IRa01) was observed with BEST in 2006 November and December for 12 nights. The first 'long run' field (LRc01) was observed from 2005 June to September for 35 nights. After standard CCD data reduction, aperture photometry has been performed using the ISIS image subtraction method. About 30,000 light curves were obtained in each field. Transits of the first detected planets by the CoRoT mission, CoRoT-1b and CoRoT-2b, were found in archived data of the BEST survey and their light curves are presented here. Such detections provide useful information at the early stage of the organization of follow-up observations of satellite alarm-mode planet candidates. In addition, no period change was found over {approx}4 years between the first BEST observation and last available transit observations.

  12. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Consumers",52,"Monthly","22016","01152012" ,"Data 2","Heat Content of Natural Gas ... 8:53:22 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Heat Content of Natural Gas Delivered to ...

  13. Workbook Contents

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    Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)" ,"Click ... Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to ...

  14. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)" ,"Click ... Data for" ,"Data 1","Michigan Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to ...

  15. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)" ,"Click ... Data for" ,"Data 1","Iowa Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to ...

  16. Workbook Contents

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    Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)" ,"Click ... Data for" ,"Data 1","Montana Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to ...

  17. Workbook Contents

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    Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)" ,"Click ... Data for" ,"Data 1","Georgia Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to ...

  18. Workbook Contents

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    Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)" ,"Click ... Data for" ,"Data 1","Kansas Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to ...

  19. Workbook Contents

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    Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)" ,"Click ... Data for" ,"Data 1","Hawaii Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to ...

  20. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)" ,"Click ... Data for" ,"Data 1","Vermont Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to ...

  1. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)" ,"Click ... Data for" ,"Data 1","Florida Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to ...

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    Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)" ,"Click ... Data for" ,"Data 1","Louisiana Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to ...

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    Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)" ,"Click ... Data for" ,"Data 1","Maine Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to ...

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    Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)" ,"Click ... Data for" ,"Data 1","New Mexico Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to ...

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    Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)" ,"Click ... Data for" ,"Data 1","Idaho Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to ...

  6. Workbook Contents

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    Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)" ,"Click ... Data for" ,"Data 1","Mississippi Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to ...

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    Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)" ,"Click ... Data for" ,"Data 1","Virginia Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to ...

  8. Workbook Contents

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    Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)" ,"Click ... Data for" ,"Data 1","North Dakota Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to ...

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    Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)" ,"Click ... Data for" ,"Data 1","Alaska Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to ...

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    Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)" ,"Click ... Data for" ,"Data 1","South Carolina Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to ...

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    Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)" ,"Click ... Data for" ,"Data 1","Missouri Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to ...

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    Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)" ,"Click ... Data for" ,"Data 1","Nebraska Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to ...

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  16. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)" ,"Click ... Data for" ,"Data 1","Rhode Island Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to ...

  17. Workbook Contents

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    Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)" ,"Click ... Data for" ,"Data 1","Connecticut Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to ...

  18. Workbook Contents

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    Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)" ,"Click ... Data for" ,"Data 1","Wisconsin Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to ...

  19. Workbook Contents

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    Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)" ,"Click ... Data for" ,"Data 1","Pennsylvania Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to ...

  20. Workbook Contents

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    Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)" ,"Click ... Data for" ,"Data 1","Tennessee Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to ...

  1. Workbook Contents

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    Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)" ,"Click ... Data for" ,"Data 1","Maryland Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to ...

  2. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)" ,"Click ... Data for" ,"Data 1","Washington Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to ...

  3. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)" ,"Click ... Data for" ,"Data 1","Oregon Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to ...

  4. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)" ,"Click ... Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to ...

  5. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)" ,"Click ... Data for" ,"Data 1","Indiana Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to ...

  6. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)" ,"Click ... Data for" ,"Data 1","Minnesota Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to ...

  7. Workbook Contents

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    Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)" ,"Click ... Data for" ,"Data 1","Illinois Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to ...

  8. Workbook Contents

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    Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)" ,"Click ... Data for" ,"Data 1","Massachusetts Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to ...

  9. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)" ,"Click ... Data for" ,"Data 1","Ohio Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to ...

  10. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)" ,"Click ... Data for" ,"Data 1","West Virginia Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to ...

  11. Workbook Contents

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    Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)" ,"Click ... Data for" ,"Data 1","Arizona Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to ...

  12. Workbook Contents

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    Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)" ,"Click ... Data for" ,"Data 1","South Dakota Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to ...

  13. Workbook Contents

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    Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)" ,"Click ... Data for" ,"Data 1","Wyoming Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to ...

  14. Workbook Contents

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    Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)" ,"Click ... Data for" ,"Data 1","Oklahoma Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to ...

  15. Workbook Contents

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    Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)" ,"Click ... Data for" ,"Data 1","Alabama Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to ...

  16. Workbook Contents

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    Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)" ,"Click ... Data for" ,"Data 1","Colorado Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to ...

  17. Workbook Contents

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    Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)" ,"Click ... Data for" ,"Data 1","New Jersey Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to ...

  18. Workbook Contents

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    Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)" ,"Click ... Data for" ,"Data 1","Utah Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to ...

  19. Workbook Contents

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    Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)" ,"Click ... Data for" ,"Data 1","Nevada Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to ...

  20. Workbook Contents

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    Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)" ,"Click ... Data for" ,"Data 1","North Carolina Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to ...

  1. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)" ,"Click ... Data for" ,"Data 1","District of Columbia Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to ...

  2. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)" ,"Click ... Data for" ,"Data 1","New Hampshire Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to ...

  3. Workbook Contents

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    Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)" ,"Click ... Data for" ,"Data 1","Delaware Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to ...

  4. Variations in clay mineralogy and sediment texture of salt marsh soils on the Eastern Shore of Virginia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robinson, S.E.; Furman, T. . Dept. of Environmental Sciences)

    1993-03-01

    On the Eastern Shore of VA, relative sea level rise has resulted in encroachment of marsh onto upland areas. The amount and type of sediment determines the morphologic environment of the system: lagoon, mudflat, low marsh, high marsh or upland. This research is part of a study to examine the relationship between marsh soil characteristics and the production of Spartina alterniflora. The productivity of marsh vegetation depends on the import and entrapment of sediments that maintain marsh elevation and control water and nutrient availability. This work focused on distribution patterns of sediment texture and mineralogy. One meter deep cores were taken at marsh sites with 10 cm intervals homogenized for analysis. In order to distinguish potential sediment sources, samples were also taken from upland soil pits on the mainland and dredged one-half mile seaward of the barrier islands. Samples have undergone size analysis with a hydrometer and the clay fraction has been analyzed by XRD. Results from the marsh surface indicate large variations in sediment texture, but only slight differences in clay mineralogy between marshes. Barrier island marshes contain a higher average sand content than mainland marshes because of their closer proximity to barrier island beaches and inputs from overwash deposits. The clay minerals found in all marsh surface deposits are illite and chlorite, indicative of oceanic clays. The clay mineralogy of upland soils (kaolinite, chlorite, illite, vermiculite mixed-layer clay) differs from marsh surface clays, indicating that recent sediment deposited on the marsh surface is no upland soil but rather material brought in through tidal inlets. The sediment texture and clay mineralogy at different depths varies as a function of the past geomorphic and depositional history of the site. These data will be used to determine the timing of marsh development on flooded upland sites and to determine the pre-Holocene source of inorganic sediment inputs.

  5. Coatings and films derived from clay/wax nanocomposites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chaiko, David J.; Leyva, Argentina A.

    2006-11-14

    The invention provides methods for making clay/wax nanocomposites and coatings and films of same with improved chemical resistance and gas barrier properties. The invention further provides methods for making and using emulsions of such clay/wax nanocomposites. Typically, an organophillic clay is combined with a wax or wax/polymer blend such that the cohesion energy of the clay matches that of the wax or wax/polymer blend. Suitable organophilic clays include mica and phyllosilicates that have been surface-treated with edge or edge and surface modifying agents. The resulting nanocomposites have applications as industrial coatings and in protective packaging.

  6. Clay-based geothermal drilling fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guven, N.; Carney, L.L.; Lee, L.J.; Bernhard, R.P.

    1982-11-01

    The rheological properties of fluids based on fibrous clays such as sepiolite and attapulgite have been systematically examined under conditions similar to those of geothermal wells, i.e. at elevated temperatures and pressures in environments with concentrated brines. Attapulgite- and sepiolite-based fluids have been autoclaved at temperatures in the range from 70 to 800/sup 0/F with the addition of chlorides and hydroxides of Na, K, Ca, and Mg. The rheological properties (apparent and plastic viscosity, fluid loss, gel strength, yield point, and cake thickness) of the autoclaved fluids have been studied and correlated with the chemical and physical changes that occur in the clay minerals during the autoclaving process.

  7. Seismic Velocities Contain Information About Depth, Lithology, Fluid Content, and Microstructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berge, P A; Bonner, B P

    2002-01-03

    Recent advances in field and laboratory methods for measuring elastic wave velocities provide incentive and opportunity for improving interpretation of geophysical data for engineering and environmental applications. Advancing the state-of-the-art of seismic imaging requires developing petrophysical relationships between measured velocities and the hydrogeology parameters and lithology. Our approach uses laboratory data and rock physics methods. Compressional (Vp) and shear (Vs) wave velocities, Vp/Vs ratios, and relative wave amplitudes show systematic changes related to composition, saturation, applied stress (analogous to depth), and distribution of clay for laboratory ultrasonic measurements on soils. The artificial soils were mixtures of Ottawa sand and a second phase, either Wyoming bentonite or peat moss used to represent clay or organic components found in natural soils. Compressional and shear wave velocities were measured for dry, saturated, and partially-saturated conditions, for applied stresses between about 7 and 100 kPa, representing approximately the top 5 m of the subsurface. Analysis of the results using rock physics methods shows the link between microstructure and wave propagation, and implications for future advances in seismic data interpretation. For example, we found that Vp in dry sand-clay mixtures initially increases as clay cements the sand grains and fills porosity, but then Vp decreases when the clay content is high enough that the clay matrix controls the elastic response of the material. Vs decreases monotonically with increasing clay content. This provides a method for using Vp/Vs ratios to estimate clay content in a dry soil.

  8. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"10302015 12:46:21 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Rhode Island Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)"...

  9. Remediation of Mercury and Industrial Contaminants Applied Field Research Initiative (RoMIC-AFRI)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Located on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, the RoMIC-AFRI was established to protect water resources by addressing the challenge of preventing contamination. The initiative...

  10. Preparation of Clay Brick Using Coal Waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoo, Jung W.; Jung, Jin H.; Kim, Jae M.; Lee, Sung M.; Kim, Hyung T.

    2004-03-31

    A great deal of coal waste produced during the development of a mine was accumulated around the mine, which caused many problems such as traffic, acid mine drainage and damage of forest and scenery. Carbon in the coal waste helps calcination of the brick even at low temperature. Considering the reuse of natural waste and energy saving, clay brick was prepared using coal waste under various conditions, including particle size, amount of coal waste mixed, calcination temperature and pressing pressure. The specimens were characterized by XRD, SEM and TG-DTA and interpreted in terms of water absorption and compressive strength.

  11. Deputy Secretary Clay Sell Touts Georgian Efforts to Advance Regional

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Cooperation and Non-Proliferation | Department of Energy Clay Sell Touts Georgian Efforts to Advance Regional Energy Cooperation and Non-Proliferation Deputy Secretary Clay Sell Touts Georgian Efforts to Advance Regional Energy Cooperation and Non-Proliferation March 16, 2007 - 10:55am Addthis Visits National Nuclear Waste Repository in Mtskheta, Georgia TBILISI, Georgia - U.S. Deputy Secretary of Energy Clay Sell today visited the National Radioactive Waste Repository in Mtskheta,

  12. Clay County, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Clay County, Florida: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 29.9943564, -81.7787021 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappings...

  13. Clay Central Everly School Dist Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Everly School District Energy Purchaser Clay CentralEverly School District Location IA Coordinates 43.1392, -95.2644 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservi...

  14. Deputy Secretary Clay Sell Touts Georgian Efforts to Advance...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    TBILISI, Georgia - U.S. Deputy Secretary of Energy Clay Sell today visited the National Radioactive Waste Repository in Mtskheta, Georgia, and praised Georgia for issuing a license ...

  15. Modeling Coupled Processes in Clay Formations for Radioactive...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (DOE) has started to explore various alternative avenues for the disposition of used ... performance is critical for the defensible performance assessment of a clay repository. ...

  16. Clay Electric Cooperative, Inc- Energy Smart Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Rebates are available only to Clay Electric Cooperative (CEC) residential members who are making efficiency upgrades to primary residence served by CEC. Rebates are available for residential...

  17. Molecular Simulation of Carbon Dioxide Brine and Clay Mineral...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Molecular Simulation of Carbon Dioxide Brine and Clay Mineral Interactions and Determination of Contact Angles. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Molecular Simulation of ...

  18. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Data for" ,"Data 1","Minnesota Natural Gas Injections into Underground ... 7:00:26 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Minnesota Natural Gas Injections into Underground ...

  19. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Data for" ,"Data 1","Minnesota Natural Gas Industrial Consumption ... 6:58:23 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Minnesota Natural Gas Industrial Consumption ...

  20. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Data for" ,"Data 1","Minnesota Natural Gas Residential Consumption ... 6:56:39 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Minnesota Natural Gas Residential Consumption ...

  1. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Consumed" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","District of Columbia Heat Content ...

  2. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Data for" ,"Data 1","Minnesota Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power ... 6:59:00 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Minnesota Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power ...

  3. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Data for" ,"Data 1","Minnesota Price of Natural Gas Sold to Commercial ... 6:57:30 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Minnesota Price of Natural Gas Sold to Commercial ...

  4. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Data for" ,"Data 1","Minnesota Price of Natural Gas Delivered to ... 6:56:39 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Minnesota Price of Natural Gas Delivered to ...

  5. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Data for" ,"Data 1","Minnesota Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base ... 6:59:51 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Minnesota Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base ...

  6. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Liquefied U.S. Natural Gas Exports by Vessel to Japan (Million Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","NGMEPG0EVENUS-NJAMMCF" "Date","Liquefied U.S....

  7. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "Back to Contents","Data 1: Price of Liquefied U.S. Natural Gas Exports by Vessel to Japan (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","NGMEPG0EVENUS-NJADMCF"...

  8. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Price of Liquefied U.S. Natural Gas Re-Exports to Japan (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","NGMEPG0ERENUS-NJADMCF"...

  9. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...,"Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"4292016 6:42:48 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. LNG Imports from Indonesia ...

  10. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"10272015 9:02:05 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Crude Oil Production" "Sourcekey","MCRFPUS1","MCRFPP11","MCRFPFL1","MCRFPNY1","MCRFPPA1","MCRFPV...

  11. Workbook Contents

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    ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"10272015 9:02:06 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Crude Oil Production" "Sourcekey","MCRFPUS1","MCRFPP11","MCRFPFL1","MCRFPNY1","MCRFPPA1","MCRFPV...

  12. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Price of Liquefied U.S. Natural Gas Re-Exports to Brazil (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","NGMEPG0ERENUS-NBRDMCF"...

  13. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Price of Liquefied U.S. Natural Gas Re-Exports to Chile (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","NGMEPG0ERENUS-NCIDMCF"...

  14. Effects of biogenic silica on acoustic and physical properties of clay-rich marine sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tribble, J.S.; Mackenzie, F.T.; Urmos, J.; O'Brien, D.K.; Manghnani, M.H. )

    1992-06-01

    The physical properties of marine sediments are influenced by compaction and diagenesis during burial. Changes in mineralogy, chemistry, density, porosity, and microfabric all affect a sediment's acoustic and electrical properties. Sediments from the Japan Trench illustrate the dependence of physical properties on biogenic silica content. Increased opal-A content is correlated with increased porosity and decreased grain density and compressional velocity. Variations with depth in opal-A concentration are therefore reflected in highly variable and, at times, inverse velocity-depth gradients. The diagenetic conversion of opal-A to opal-CT and finally to quartz was investigated at a site in the San Miguel Gap, California. Distinct changes in microfabric, particularly in the porosity distribution, accompany the diagenetic reactions and contribute to a sharp velocity discontinuity at the depth of the opal-A to opal-CT conversion. Evaluation of this reaction at several sites indicates a systematic dependence on temperature and age in clay-rich and moderately siliceous sediments. In ocean margin regions, sediments are buried rapidly, and opal-A may be converted to opal-CT in less than 10 m.y. Temperatures of conversion range from 30{degree} to 50{degree}C. Much longer times (>40 m.y.) are required to complete the conversion in open ocean deposits which are exposed to temperatures less than 15{degree}C. In the absence of silica diagenesis, velocity-depth gradients of most clay-rich and moderately siliceous sediments fall in the narrow range of 0.15 to 0.25 km/s/km which brackets the gradient (0.18 km/s/km) determined for a type pelagic clay section. Relationships such as these can be useful in unraveling the history of a sediment sequence, including the evolution with time of reservoir properties and seismic signatures.

  15. City of Clay Center, Kansas (Utility Company) | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    commu Facebook: https:www.facebook.compagesCity-of-Clay-Center172525069449548?refbrrs Outage Hotline: 785-632-2139 or (785) 632-5454 References: EIA Form EIA-861 Final...

  16. Clay County Electric Coop Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Corp Jump to: navigation, search Name: Clay County Electric Coop Corp Place: Arkansas Service Territory: Arkansas, Missouri Phone Number: 870.857.3521 or 870.892.5251 or...

  17. Clay Sell Sworn in as Deputy Secretary of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    WASHINGTON, DC – Jeffrey Clay Sell was sworn in today as Deputy Secretary of Energy at a small ceremony held at the Department of Energy headquarters in Washington, DC.  Mr. Sell was sworn in by...

  18. Molecular Simulation of Carbon Dioxide Nanodroplets on Clay in...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    DOE Contract Number: AC04-94AL85000 Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation: Conference: Proposed for presentation at the 49th Annual Meeting of The Clay Minerals Society held ...

  19. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"4292016 6:45:41 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: ...0.4,39.6,21.5,3.1,27,6.3,48.8,49.3,9.5,12.7,45.5,18.5,5.7,4.7,16.3,14.3,17.4,86.9,24.1,38....

  20. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"4292016 6:45:42 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: ...9,95.8,83.8,100,100,88.8,93.9,54.3,94.4,98 34515,79.3,80.3,100,90.7,95.1,48.8,94.8,80.9,10...

  1. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Contents","Data 1: U.S., PAD Districts, and States" "Sourcekey","8NA8O0NUSC","8NA8O0R10C","8NA8O0SDEC","8NA8O0SFLC","8NA8O0SGAC","8NA8O0SMDC","8NA8O0SN...

  2. Molecular Simulation of Carbon Dioxide Brine and Clay Mineral Interactions

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and Determination of Contact Angles. (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Molecular Simulation of Carbon Dioxide Brine and Clay Mineral Interactions and Determination of Contact Angles. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Molecular Simulation of Carbon Dioxide Brine and Clay Mineral Interactions and Determination of Contact Angles. Abstract not provided. Authors: Tenney, Craig M ; Cygan, Randall T. Publication Date: 2013-08-01 OSTI Identifier: 1106710 Report Number(s):

  3. Molecular Simulation of Carbon Dioxide, Brine, and Clay Mineral (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Molecular Simulation of Carbon Dioxide, Brine, and Clay Mineral Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Molecular Simulation of Carbon Dioxide, Brine, and Clay Mineral Authors: Tenney, Craig M ; Cygan, Randall T Publication Date: 2014-02-04 OSTI Identifier: 1161868 DOE Contract Number: SC0001114 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: Environmental Science & Technology; Journal Volume: 48; Related Information: CFSES

  4. Hollow clay tile wall program summary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henderson, R.C.; Jones, W.D.

    1995-07-30

    Many of the Y-12 Plant buildings, constructed during the 1940s and 1950s, consist of steel ed concrete framing infilled with hollow clay tile (HCT). The infill was intended to provide for building enclosure and was not designed to have vertical or lateral load-carrying capacity. During the late 1970s and early 1980s, seismic and wind evaluations were performed on many of these buildings in conjunction with the preparation of a site-wide safety analysis report. This analytical work, based on the best available methodology, considered lateral load-carrying capacity of the HCT infill on the basis of building code allowable shear values. In parallel with the analysis effort, DOE initiated a program to develop natural phenomena capacity and performance criteria for existing buildings, but these criteria did not specify guidelines for determining the lateral force capacity of frames infilled with HCT. The evaluation of infills was, therefore, based on the provisions for the design of unreinforced masonry as outlined in standard masonry codes. When the results of the seismic and wind evaluations were compared with the new criteria, the projected building capacities fell short of the requirements. Apparently, if the buildings were to meet the new criteria, many millions of dollars would be required for building upgrades. Because the upgrade costs were significant, the assumptions and approaches used in the analyses were reevaluated. Four issues were identified: (1) Once the infilled walls cracked, what capacity (nonlinear response), if any, would the walls have to resist earthquake or wind loads applied in the plane of the infill (in-plane)? (2) Would the infilled walls remain within the steel or reinforced concrete framing when subjected to earthquake or high wind loads applied perpendicular to the infill (out-of-plane)? (3) What was the actual shear capacity of the HCT infill? (4) Was modeling the HCT infill as a shear wall the best approach?

  5. Swelling properties of montmorillonite and beidellite clay minerals from molecular simulation: Comparison of temperature interlayer cation, and charge location effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teich-McGoldrick, Stephanie L.; Greathouse, Jeffery A.; Jove-Colon, Carlos F.; Cygan, Randall Timothy

    2015-08-27

    In this study, the swelling properties of smectite clay minerals are relevant to many engineering applications including environmental remediation, repository design for nuclear waste disposal, borehole stability in drilling operations, and additives for numerous industrial processes and commercial products. We used molecular dynamics and grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations to study the effects of layer charge location, interlayer cation, and temperature on intracrystalline swelling of montmorillonite and beidellite clay minerals. For a beidellite model with layer charge exclusively in the tetrahedral sheet, strong ion–surface interactions shift the onset of the two-layer hydrate to higher water contents. In contrast, for a montmorillonite model with layer charge exclusively in the octahedral sheet, weaker ion–surface interactions result in the formation of fully hydrated ions (two-layer hydrate) at much lower water contents. Clay hydration enthalpies and interlayer atomic density profiles are consistent with the swelling results. Water adsorption isotherms from grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations are used to relate interlayer hydration states to relative humidity, in good agreement with experimental findings.

  6. Swelling properties of montmorillonite and beidellite clay minerals from molecular simulation: Comparison of temperature interlayer cation, and charge location effects

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Teich-McGoldrick, Stephanie L.; Greathouse, Jeffery A.; Jove-Colon, Carlos F.; Cygan, Randall Timothy

    2015-08-27

    In this study, the swelling properties of smectite clay minerals are relevant to many engineering applications including environmental remediation, repository design for nuclear waste disposal, borehole stability in drilling operations, and additives for numerous industrial processes and commercial products. We used molecular dynamics and grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations to study the effects of layer charge location, interlayer cation, and temperature on intracrystalline swelling of montmorillonite and beidellite clay minerals. For a beidellite model with layer charge exclusively in the tetrahedral sheet, strong ion–surface interactions shift the onset of the two-layer hydrate to higher water contents. In contrast, for amore » montmorillonite model with layer charge exclusively in the octahedral sheet, weaker ion–surface interactions result in the formation of fully hydrated ions (two-layer hydrate) at much lower water contents. Clay hydration enthalpies and interlayer atomic density profiles are consistent with the swelling results. Water adsorption isotherms from grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations are used to relate interlayer hydration states to relative humidity, in good agreement with experimental findings.« less

  7. Constitutive relationships for elastic deformation of clay rock: Data Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, H.H.; Rutqvist, J.; Birkholzer, J.T.

    2011-04-15

    Geological repositories have been considered a feasible option worldwide for storing high-level nuclear waste. Clay rock is one of the rock types under consideration for such purposes, because of its favorable features to prevent radionuclide transport from the repository. Coupled hydromechanical processes have an important impact on the performance of a clay repository, and establishing constitutive relationships for modeling such processes are essential. In this study, we propose several constitutive relationships for elastic deformation in indurated clay rocks based on three recently developed concepts. First, when applying Hooke's law in clay rocks, true strain (rock volume change divided by the current rock volume), rather than engineering strain (rock volume change divided by unstressed rock volume), should be used, except when the degree of deformation is very small. In the latter case, the two strains will be practically identical. Second, because of its inherent heterogeneity, clay rock can be divided into two parts, a hard part and a soft part, with the hard part subject to a relatively small degree of deformation compared with the soft part. Third, for swelling rock like clay, effective stress needs to be generalized to include an additional term resulting from the swelling process. To evaluate our theoretical development, we analyze uniaxial test data for core samples of Opalinus clay and laboratory measurements of single fractures within macro-cracked Callovo-Oxfordian argillite samples subject to both confinement and water reduced swelling. The results from this evaluation indicate that our constitutive relationships can adequately represent the data and explain the related observations.

  8. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    mbblpd_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_crd_crpdn_adc_mbblpd_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"4/27/2016 9:01:13 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Crude Oil Production"

  9. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    mbbl_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_crd_crpdn_adc_mbbl_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"4/27/2016 9:01:12 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Crude Oil Production"

  10. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    mbblpd_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_move_imp_dc_nus-z00_mbblpd_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"4/27/2016 9:25:23 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products"

  11. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    mbbl_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_move_imp_dc_nus-z00_mbbl_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"4/27/2016 9:25:10 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products"

  12. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    mbbl_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_cons_psup_dc_nus_mbbl_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"4/27/2016 9:01:02 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Product Supplied for Crude Oil and Petroleum Products"

  13. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    mbblpd_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_crd_crpdn_adc_mbblpd_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"4/27/2016 9:01:13 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Crude Oil Production"

  14. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    mbbl_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_crd_crpdn_adc_mbbl_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"4/27/2016 9:01:12 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Crude Oil Production"

  15. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    mbbl_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_move_exp_dc_nus-z00_mbbl_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"4/27/2016 9:01:58 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Exports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products"

  16. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    mbbl_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_move_imp_dc_nus-z00_mbbl_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"4/27/2016 9:25:18 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products"

  17. Inelastic neutron scattering and molecular simulation of the dynamics of interlayer water in smectite clay minerals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cygan, Randall T.; Daemen, Luke L.; Ilgen, Anastasia G.; Krumhansl, James L.; Nenoff, Tina M.

    2015-11-16

    The study of mineral–water interfaces is of great importance to a variety of applications including oil and gas extraction, gas subsurface storage, environmental contaminant treatment, and nuclear waste repositories. Understanding the fundamentals of that interface is key to the success of those applications. Confinement of water in the interlayer of smectite clay minerals provides a unique environment to examine the interactions among water molecules, interlayer cations, and clay mineral surfaces. Smectite minerals are characterized by a relatively low layer charge that allows the clay to swell with increasing water content. Montmorillonite and beidellite varieties of smectite were investigated to compare the impact of the location of layer charge on the interlayer structure and dynamics. Inelastic neutron scattering of hydrated and dehydrated cation-exchanged smectites was used to probe the dynamics of the interlayer water (200–900 cm–1 spectral region) and identify the shift in the librational edge as a function of the interlayer cation. Molecular dynamics simulations of equivalent phases and power spectra, derived from the resulting molecular trajectories, indicate a general shift in the librational behavior with interlayer cation that is generally consistent with the neutron scattering results for the monolayer hydrates. Both neutron scattering and power spectra exhibit librational structures affected by the location of layer charge and by the charge of the interlayer cation. Furthermore, divalent cations (Ba2+ and Mg2+) characterized by large hydration enthalpies typically exhibit multiple broad librational peaks compared to monovalent cations (Cs+ and Na+), which have relatively small hydration enthalpies.

  18. Inelastic neutron scattering and molecular simulation of the dynamics of interlayer water in smectite clay minerals

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cygan, Randall T.; Daemen, Luke L.; Ilgen, Anastasia G.; Krumhansl, James L.; Nenoff, Tina M.

    2015-11-16

    The study of mineral–water interfaces is of great importance to a variety of applications including oil and gas extraction, gas subsurface storage, environmental contaminant treatment, and nuclear waste repositories. Understanding the fundamentals of that interface is key to the success of those applications. Confinement of water in the interlayer of smectite clay minerals provides a unique environment to examine the interactions among water molecules, interlayer cations, and clay mineral surfaces. Smectite minerals are characterized by a relatively low layer charge that allows the clay to swell with increasing water content. Montmorillonite and beidellite varieties of smectite were investigated to comparemore » the impact of the location of layer charge on the interlayer structure and dynamics. Inelastic neutron scattering of hydrated and dehydrated cation-exchanged smectites was used to probe the dynamics of the interlayer water (200–900 cm–1 spectral region) and identify the shift in the librational edge as a function of the interlayer cation. Molecular dynamics simulations of equivalent phases and power spectra, derived from the resulting molecular trajectories, indicate a general shift in the librational behavior with interlayer cation that is generally consistent with the neutron scattering results for the monolayer hydrates. Both neutron scattering and power spectra exhibit librational structures affected by the location of layer charge and by the charge of the interlayer cation. Furthermore, divalent cations (Ba2+ and Mg2+) characterized by large hydration enthalpies typically exhibit multiple broad librational peaks compared to monovalent cations (Cs+ and Na+), which have relatively small hydration enthalpies.« less

  19. Tools_Equipment under 10K RO 23_120213.xlsx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Other Government Furnished Property (GFP) / Equipment 1 RO BARCODE DESCRIPTION MANUF. MODEL SN COST BLDG ROOM INVT_DATE 23 0000032497 THERMAL LABELING SYS BRADY WORLDWIDE TLS2200 BPTLS901644924 $0.00 28 119 24-Sep-13 23 F13412 PWR SUPPLY & READ BR BROOKS 5878 881OHC025872 $0.00 94 01 24-Sep-13 23 0000032498 THERMAL LABELING SYS BRADY WORLDWIDE TLS2200 BPTLS902745018 $0.00 17 106 24-Sep-13 23 0000106857 RECIRCULATOR POLYSCI POLY SCIENCE N0691883 G52197 $0.00 83 242 4-Oct-13 23 0000021812

  20. Application of hard X-ray microprobe methods to clay-rich materials...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Application of hard X-ray microprobe methods to clay-rich materials Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Application of hard X-ray microprobe methods to clay-rich materials ...

  1. Application of hard X-ray microprobe methods to clay-rich materials (Book)

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    | SciTech Connect Application of hard X-ray microprobe methods to clay-rich materials Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Application of hard X-ray microprobe methods to clay-rich materials Authors: Lanzirotti, A. [1] + Show Author Affiliations (UC) Publication Date: 2014-12-22 OSTI Identifier: 1168411 Resource Type: Book Resource Relation: Related Information: CMS Workshop Lectures, Advanced Applications of Synchrotron Radiation in Clay Science Publisher: 2014; Tha Clay Minerals

  2. EERE Website Content Checklist

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This checklist is a tool to guide EERE content developers and editors in creating and reviewing content for websites.

  3. Molecular Simulation of Carbon Dioxide Nanodroplets on Clay Surfaces in

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Deep Saline Aquifers. (Conference) | SciTech Connect Surfaces in Deep Saline Aquifers. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Molecular Simulation of Carbon Dioxide Nanodroplets on Clay Surfaces in Deep Saline Aquifers. Authors: Tenney, Craig M. Publication Date: 2013-01-01 OSTI Identifier: 1063603 Report Number(s): SAND2013-0408C DOE Contract Number: AC04-94AL85000 Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation: Conference: Proposed for presentation at the CFSES Seminar, University of

  4. Photocatalytic properties of titania pillared clays by different drying methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ding, Z.; Zhu, H.Y.; Lu, G.Q.; Greenfield, P.F.

    1999-01-01

    Photocatalysts based on titania pillared clays (TiO{sub 2} PILCs) have been prepared through a sol-gel method. Different drying methods, air drying (AD), air drying after ethanol extraction (EAD), and supercritical drying (SCD) have been employed and found to have significant effects on the photocatalytic efficiency of the resultant catalysts for the oxidation of phenol in water. Titania pillared clay (TiO{sub 2} PILC) obtained by SCD has the highest external and micropore surface area, largest amount and smallest crystallite size of anatase, and exhibited the highest photocatalytic activity. Furthermore, silica titania pillared clay (SiO{sub 2}-TiO{sub 2} PILC) after SCD, titania coated TiO{sub 2} PILC (SCD) and SiO{sub 2}-TiO{sub 2} PILC (SCD) were synthesized to study the key factors controlling the photocatalytic activity. It is concluded that the dispersion of nanometer-sized anatase on the surface of the PILC particles and the suspensibility of the particles are the most important factors for high photocatalytic efficiency.

  5. A 0.8-2.4 ?m Transmission spectrum of the hot Jupiter CoRoT-1b

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schlawin, E.; Herter, T.; Zhao, M.; Teske, J. K.

    2014-03-01

    Hot Jupiters with brightness temperatures ?2000 K can have TiO and VO molecules as gaseous species in their atmospheres. The TiO and VO molecules can potentially induce temperature inversions in hot Jupiter atmospheres and also have an observable signature of large optical to infrared transit depth ratios. Previous transmission spectra of very hot Jupiters have shown a lack of TiO and VO, but only in planets that also appear to lack temperature inversions. We measure the transmission spectrum of CoRoT-1b, a hot Jupiter that was predicted to have a temperature inversion potentially due to significant TiO and VO in its atmosphere. We employ the multi-object spectroscopy method using the SpeX and MORIS instruments on the Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) and the Gaussian process method to model red noise. By using a simultaneous reference star on the slit for calibration and a wide slit to minimize slit losses, we achieve transit depth precision of 0.03%-0.09%, comparable to the atmospheric scale height but detect no statistically significant molecular features. We combine our IRTF data with optical CoRoT transmission measurements to search for differences in the optical and near-infrared absorption that would arise from TiO/VO. Our IRTF spectrum and the CoRoT photometry disfavor a TiO/VO-rich spectrum for CoRoT-1b, suggesting that the atmosphere has another absorber that could create a temperature inversion or that the blackbody-like emission from the planet is due to a spectroscopically flat cloud, dust, or haze layer that smoothes out molecular features in both CoRoT-1b's emission and transmission spectra. This system represents the faintest planet hosting star (K = 12.2) with a measured planetary transmission spectrum.

  6. Evaluation of Used Fuel Disposition in Clay-Bearing Rock (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... and Thermodynamic Database Development: Evaluation Strategy, Modeling Tools, First-Principles Modeling of Clay, and Sorption Database Assessment;ANL Mixed Potential Model For Used Fuel ...

  7. Deputy Secretary of Energy Clay Sell to Depart | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Clay Sell to Depart Deputy Secretary of Energy Clay Sell to Depart January 14, 2008 - 10:23am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman today released the following statement: "It is with regret that I announce the resignation of Deputy Secretary of Energy Clay Sell. Clay has served with distinction as the Deputy Secretary of Energy for nearly three years and has played a key role in the Administration's efforts to enact landmark energy legislation in 2005 and

  8. Diagenesis and clay mineral formation at Gale Crater, Mars

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bridges, J. C.; Schwenzer, S. P.; Leveille, R.; Westall, F.; Wiens, R. C.; Mangold, N.; Bristow, T.; Edwards, P.; Berger, G.

    2015-01-18

    The Mars Science Laboratory rover Curiosity found host rocks of basaltic composition and alteration assemblages containing clay minerals at Yellowknife Bay, Gale Crater. On the basis of the observed host rock and alteration minerals, we present results of equilibrium thermochemical modeling of the Sheepbed mudstones of Yellowknife Bay in order to constrain the formation conditions of its secondary mineral assemblage. Building on conclusions from sedimentary observations by the Mars Science Laboratory team, we assume diagenetic, in situ alteration. The modeling shows that the mineral assemblage formed by the reaction of a CO₂-poor and oxidizing, dilute aqueous solution (Gale Portage Water)more » in an open system with the Fe-rich basaltic-composition sedimentary rocks at 10–50°C and water/rock ratio (mass of rock reacted with the starting fluid) of 100–1000, pH of ~7.5–12. Model alteration assemblages predominantly contain phyllosilicates (Fe-smectite, chlorite), the bulk composition of a mixture of which is close to that of saponite inferred from Chemistry and Mineralogy data and to that of saponite observed in the nakhlite Martian meteorites and terrestrial analogues. To match the observed clay mineral chemistry, inhomogeneous dissolution dominated by the amorphous phase and olivine is required. We therefore deduce a dissolving composition of approximately 70% amorphous material, with 20% olivine, and 10% whole rock component.« less

  9. Formulation of cracking catalyst based on zeolite and natural clays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aliev, R.R.; Lupina, M.I.

    1995-11-01

    Domestically manufactured cracking catalysts are based on a synthetic amorphous aluminosilicate matrix and Y zeolite. A multistage {open_quotes}gel{close_quotes} technology is used in manufacturing the catalysts. The process includes mixing solutions of sodium silicate and acidic aluminum sulfate, forming, syneresis, and activation of the beaded gel. In the manufacture of bead catalysts, the next steps in the process are washing, drying, and calcining; in the manufacture of microbead catalysts, the next steps are dispersion and formation of a hydrogel slurry, spray-drying, and calcining. The Y zeolite is either introduced into the alumina-silica sol in the stage of forming the beads, or introduced in the dispersion stage. With the aim of developing an active and selective cracking catalyst based on Y zeolite and natural clays, with improved physicomechanical properties, the authors carried out a series of studies, obtaining results that are set forth in the present article.

  10. Lanthanides-clay nanocomposites: Synthesis, characterization and optical properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Celedon, Salvador; Quiroz, Carolina; Gonzalez, Guillermo; Sotomayor Torres, Clivia M.; Benavente, Eglantina

    2009-05-06

    Complexes of Europium(III) and Terbium(III) with 2,2-bipyridine and 1,10-phenanthroline were inserted into Na-bentonite by ion exchange reactions at room temperature. The products display interlaminar distances and stoichiometries in agreement with the ion exchange capacity and the interlayer space available in the clay. The optical properties of the intercalates, being qualitatively similar to those of the free complexes, are additionally improved with respect to exchange processes with the medium, especially in a moist environment. The protection again hydrolysis, together with the intensity of the optical transition {sup 5}D{sub 0}-{sup 5}F{sub 2} observed in the nanocomposite, makes these products promising for the development of novel optical materials.

  11. Radiolysis of alanine adsorbed in a clay mineral

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aguilar-Ovando, Ellen Y.; Negron-Mendoza, Alicia

    2013-07-03

    Optical activity in molecules is a chemical characteristic of living beings. In this work, we examine the hypothesis of the influence of different mineral surfaces on the development of a specific chirality in organic molecules when subjected to conditions simulating the primitive Earth during the period of chemical evolution. By using X-ray diffraction techniques and HPLC/ELSD to analyze aqueous suspensions of amino acids adsorbed on minerals irradiated in different doses with a cobalt-60 gamma source, the experiments attempt to prove the hypothesis that some solid surfaces (like clays and meteorite rocks) may have a concentration capacity and protective role against external sources of ionizing radiation (specifically {gamma}-ray) for some organic compounds (like some amino acids) adsorbed on them. Preliminary results show a slight difference in the adsorption and radiolysis of the D-and L-alanine.

  12. CONTENT MODEL HOW-TO

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    003241MLTPL00 Content Model Guidelines https://github.com/usgin/usginspecs/wiki/Content-Model-Guidelines

  13. Characterization of Interlayer Cs+ in Clay Samples Using Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry with Laser Sample Modification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. S. Groenewold; R. Avci; C. Karahan; K. Lefebre; R. V. Fox; M. M. Cortez; A. K. Gianotto; J. Sunner; W. L. Manner

    2004-04-01

    Ultraviolet laser irradiation was used to greatly enhance the secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) detection of Cs+ adsorbed to soil consisting of clay and quartz. Imaging SIMS showed that the enhancement of the Cs+ signal was spatially heterogeneous: the intensity of the Cs+ peak was increased by factors up to 100 for some particles but not at all for others. Analysis of standard clay samples exposed to Cs+ showed a variable response to laser irradiation depending on the type of clay analyzed. The Cs+ abundance was significantly enhanced when Cs+-exposed montmorillonite was irradiated and then analyzed using SIMS, which contrasted with the behavior of Cs+-exposed kaolinite, which displayed no Cs+ enhancement. Exposed illitic clays displayed modest enhancement of Cs+ upon laser irradiation, intermediate between that of kaolinite and montmorillonite. The results for Cs+ were rationalized in terms of adsorption to interlayer sites within the montmorillonite, which is an expandable phyllosilicate. In these locations, Cs+ was not initially detectable using SIMS. Upon irradiation, Cs+ was thermally redistributed, which enabled detection using SIMS. Since neither the illite nor the kaolinite is an expandable clay, adsorption to inner-layer sites does not occur, and either modest or no laser enhancement of the Cs+ signal is observed. Laser irradiation also produced unexpected enhancement of Ti+ from illite and kaolinite clays that contained small quantities of Ti, which indicates the presence of microscopic titanium oxide phases in the clay materials.

  14. The intrinsic and interactive effects of RO 15-4513 and ethanol on locomotor activity, body temperature, and blood glucose concentration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, A.L.; Healey, P.A.; Menendez, J.A.; Verne, S.L.; Atrens, D.M. )

    1989-01-01

    The ability of the putative ethanol antagonist RO 15-4513 to antagonize ethanol-induced hypoactivity, hypothermia and hyperglycemia was investigated in rats. Although RO 15-4513 produced hypoactivity by itself, it attenuated ethanol-induced hypoactivity. This antagonism suggests that ethanol-induced hypoactivity is mediated by the GABA-benzodiazepine receptor complex which is thought to be the site of action of RO 15-4513. In contrast, although RO 15-4513 produced hypothermia by itself, it had no significant effect on ethanol-induced hypothermia. This suggests that the hypothermic effect of ethanol is not mediated by the GABA-benzodiazepine receptor complex. The fact that RO 15-4513, ethanol and the vehicle all produced hyperglycemia suggests a common stress effect and does not permit any firm conclusions to be drawn as to the interaction between ethanol and RO 15-4513 in modulating glycemic responses. These data indicate that the ethanol antagonism of RO 15-4513 is primarily confined to ethanol's behavioral effects and that ethanol's behavioral and physiological effects are mediated by neurochemically distinct mechanisms.

  15. Fermilab Today - Related Content

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Related Content Subscribe | Contact Fermilab Today | Archive | Classifieds Search GO Classifieds Director's Corner Physics in a Nutshell Frontier Science Result Tip of the Week...

  16. TABLE OF CONTENTS

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AC05-00OR22800 TABLE OF CONTENTS Contents Page # TOC - i SECTION A - SOLICITATION/OFFER AND AWARD ......................................................................... A-i SECTION B - SUPPLIES OR SERVICES AND PRICES/COSTS ........................................................ B-i B.1 SERVICES BEING ACQUIRED ....................................................................................B-2 B.2 TRANSITION COST, ESTIMATED COST, MAXIMUM AVAILABLE FEE, AND AVAILABLE FEE (Modification 295,

  17. Clay Electric Cooperative, Inc- Energy Smart Solar Water Heater Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Clay Electric Cooperative (CEC) provides a rebate of $0.01 per BTU output to its residential members when they purchase qualified solar water heaters. This rebate is capped at 60,000 BTUs per...

  18. Mineralogical evaluation and industrial applications of the Triassic clay deposits, Southern Tunisia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baccour, H. Medhioub, M.; Jamoussi, F.; Mhiri, T.; Daoud, A.

    2008-11-15

    This study deals with the mineralogical and thermal analysis of Triassic clays in the south-Eastern Tunisia (Medenine area) in order to use them in the faience ceramic. That is why the study had recourse to several quantitative and qualitative research instruments: chemical analysis, mineralogical study, thermal analyses and analyses of geotechnical traits. The data collected from these techniques show that illite and kaolinite are the major clay phases. The accessory minerals detected in powdered rock are; quartz, dolomite and hematite. Geotechnical characterization was carried out on the three representative mixtures of Triassic clay samples. Each mixture is fired at three different temperatures 850,900 and 950 deg. C. Firing characteristics (shrinkage, water absorption, and mechanical resistance to the inflection) were measured and the neomineralization processes were investigated principally by X-ray diffraction. At the end of this study, one can affirm that these clays have qualities necessary for the manufacture of faience ceramic and earthenware production.

  19. Predicting Porosity in Clean and Clay-Ricj Sediments Using Resistivity

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Logs: The Propagation of Errors and Uncertainty (Conference) | SciTech Connect Conference: Predicting Porosity in Clean and Clay-Ricj Sediments Using Resistivity Logs: The Propagation of Errors and Uncertainty Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Predicting Porosity in Clean and Clay-Ricj Sediments Using Resistivity Logs: The Propagation of Errors and Uncertainty No abstract prepared. Authors: Wempe, Wendy ; Mavko, Gary Publication Date: 1999-10-25 OSTI Identifier: 836300 Resource

  20. Statement by Deputy Secretary of Energy Clay Sell on NRG's License

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Application | Department of Energy by Deputy Secretary of Energy Clay Sell on NRG's License Application Statement by Deputy Secretary of Energy Clay Sell on NRG's License Application September 25, 2007 - 2:49pm Addthis "Today marks the most significant and tangible step to date, towards the construction of the first new nuclear power plant in the United States in over 30 years. DOE is confident that with NRG's reactor design selection and cooperation with their partners, General

  1. Spherules from the Cretaceous/Tertiary boundary clay at Gubbio, Italy: the problem of outcrop contamination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montanari, A.

    1986-12-01

    Surficial outcrop contamination has occurred in some well-known stratigraphic sections of carbonate rocks in the northern Apennines. A critical case involves several contaminated clay partings, including the Cretaceous/Tertiary boundary clay in the classic Bottaccione section near Gubbio, Italy. These clay layers contain shiny spherules which, in several recent studies, have been said to consist of volcanic glass and have been used to support the hypothesis that the terminal Cretaceous mass extinction was caused by widespread volcanism. Laboratory tests, however, indicate that these shiny spherules are made of HF-insoluble and combustible material and are therefore of recent biological origin. These objects were introduced into the Cretaceous/Tertiary boundary clay and other clay layers from the surrounding soil along with abundant detrital contaminants derived from erosion of the middle Miocene flysch exposed at the head of the Bottaccione Gorge. They are completely different from the altered and flattened microtektitelike spheroids that are found only in the iridium-rich Cretaceous/Tertiary boundary clay and that provide strong evidence for a large impact.

  2. TABLE OF CONTENTS

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    008 High Temperature Superconductivity for Electric Systems Peer Review Final Report i TABLE OF CONTENTS High Temperature Superconductivity for Electric Systems Program Overview ...... 1 The Peer Review................................................................................................................ 3 Review Criteria ................................................................................................................. 5 Guidelines

  3. Table_of_Contents

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Table of Contents 1. Physical Security .............................................................................................................................. 1-1 101. Headquarters Security Badges ........................................................................................ 101-1 102. HSPD-12 Badges and the PIV Process ........................................................................... 102-1 103. Prohibited Articles

  4. TABLE OF CONTENTS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3, Revision 0 i TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 Summary .............................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Introduction .......................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Discussion ............................................................................................................................ 4 3.1 Selection of Tanks for Level Decrease

  5. TABLE OF CONTENTS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4, Revision 0 i TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 Summary .............................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Introduction .......................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Discussion ............................................................................................................................ 4 3.1 Selection of Tanks for Level Decrease

  6. TABLE OF CONTENTS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5, Revision 0 i TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 Summary .............................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Introduction .......................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Discussion ............................................................................................................................ 4 3.1 Selection of Tanks for Level Decrease

  7. Contents.key

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Paul Clavin Contents Combustion Waves and Fronts in Flows P. Clavin and G. Searby Cambridge University Press (to appear) Orders of magnitude 2 Lecture 1: 1-1: Overall...

  8. Formation of hydrocarbons from acid-Clay suspensions by gamma irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cruz-Castaneda, J.; Negron-Mendoza, A.; Ramos-Bernal, S.

    2013-07-03

    The adsorption of certain organic compounds by clays gives rise to the transformation of the adsorbate through the action of the clays. This phenomenon can be enhanced using ionizing radiation. In this context, these kinds of reactions play an important role in many natural and industrial processes. For example, in oil and gas exploration, the source and trap of petroleum hydrocarbons is frequently clay-rich rocks. Clay-water-based muds are also seen as environmentally friendly alternatives to toxic oil-based fluids. The principal processes that occur in sediments are usually held to be of bacterial action and thermal transformation, which may include thermally induced catalytic alteration of the organic debris. On the other hand, radioactive materials are widely distributed throughout Earth. They were more abundant in the past, but are present in petroleum reservoirs. Their presence induced radioactive bombardment, which may have altered these sediments. This important subject has not been extensively studied. The aim of this work is to study the behavior of fatty acids-like behenic acid-and dicarboxylic acids-like fumaric acid-as model compounds, which are adsorbed in a clay mineral (Na-montmorillonite) and exposed to gamma radiation. The results show that the radiation-induced decomposition of the clay-acid system goes along a definitive path (oxidation), rather than following several modes of simultaneous decomposition, as happens in radiolysis without clay or by heating the system. The main radiolytic products for fatty acids are their corresponding hydrocarbons, with one C-atom less than the original acid.

  9. Knuteson-RO

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    role of the U.S. Depart- ment of Energy's (DOE) Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) is to bridge the gap between R&D and commercial availability of advanced vehicle technologies. AVTA supports DOE's FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program in moving these technologies from R&D to market deployment by examining market factors and customer requirements, evaluating performance and durability of alternative fuel and advanced technology vehicles, and assessing the performance of these

  10. Materials derived from synthetic organo-clay complexes as novel hydrodesulfurization catalyst supports.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carrado, K. A.; Marshall, C. L.; Brenner, J. R.; Song, K.; Chemistry

    1998-01-01

    A series of mesoporous synthetic organo-clay complexes has been prepared by hydrothermal crystallization of gels containing silica, magnesium hydroxide, lithium fluoride, and an organic of choice, followed by calcination to remove the organics. The organic serves to impart structural order to the inorganic network that does not disappear upon its removal. The choice of organic modifier can be used to control the pore structure of the resulting mesoporous materials. Pore size distributions appear in some cases to be related to the type of polymer packing upon clay formation in situ. These materials are being explored as Co Mo hydrodesulfurization (HDS) catalyst supports. Preliminary HDS results show performance commensurate with commercial catalysis for the mesoporous materials when a model heavy oil feed is used (1 wt% S as dibenzothiophene in hexadecane). Temperature programmed reduction experiments of used catalysts suggest a relationship between HDS activity and ease of reduction of the CoMo/clay catalysts. Reactivity of the CoMo clay also correlates with the percentage of mesopore volume remaining after reaction. Losses in mesopore volume are largely recouped by recalcination, suggesting that reversible coke is formed inside the pore structure of clays faster than inside conventional alumina.

  11. Report on Modeling Coupled Processes in the Near Field of a Clay Repository

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Clay/shale has been considered as potential host rock for geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste throughout the world. Coupled thermal, hydrological, mechanical, and chemical (THMC) processes have a significant impact on the long-term safety of a clay repository. This report documents results from three R&D activities: (1) implementation and validation of constitutive relationships, (2) development of a discrete fracture network (DFN) model for investigating coupled processes in the excavation damaged zone, and (3) development of a THM model for the Full-Scale Emplacement Experiment tests at Mont Terri, Switzerland, for the purpose of model validation. One major goal is to provide a better understanding of the evolution of the excavation damage zone in clay repositories.

  12. Table of Contents

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    COMMUNICATIONS REQUIREMENTS OF SMART GRID TECHNOLOGIES October 5, 2010 i Table of Contents I. Introduction and Executive Summary.......................................................... 1 a. Overview of Smart Grid Benefits and Communications Needs................. 2 b. Summary of Recommendations .................................................................... 5 II. Federal Government Smart Grid Initiatives ................................................ 7 a. DOE Request for Information

  13. TABLE OF CONTENTS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3, Field Analytical Technical Requirements Effective Date: 6/1/07 Vol. 3:i CONTENTS 1.0 INTRODUCTION ........................................................................................................... 1-1 1.1 FIELD SCREENING........................................................................................... 1-1 1.2 FIELD TESTING................................................................................................. 1-1 2.0 QUALITY ASSURANCE REQUIREMENTS

  14. In situ synthesis of polymer-clay nanocomposites from silicate gels.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carrado, K. A.; Xu, L.; Chemistry

    1998-01-01

    Polymer-containing silicate gels were hydrothermally crystallized to form layered magnesium silicate hectorite clays containing polymers that are incorporated in situ. Gels consist of silica sol, magnesium hydroxide sol, lithium fluoride, and the polymer of choice. Dilute solutions of gel in water are refluxed for various lengths of time and then isolated via centrifugation, washed, and air-dried. Polymer loadings up to 86% were attained by adding more polymer to the solutions after 2-day reaction times, reacting for another 24 h, and continuing this process prior to isolation. Polyaniline (PANI)- and polyacrylonitrile (PACN)-clay samples contain up to 57% and 76% polymer, respectively, after just one sequential addition at high polymer loading. Series of PANI-, PACN-, poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP)-, and hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HPMC)-clays also were prepared by several sequential additions of lower polymer loading to the silicate gel during crystallization. Final polymer loadings were determined by thermal analysis. Basal spacings between clay interlayers were measured by X-ray powder diffraction for all samples. Increases in polymer loadings and basal spacings were observed for all the neutral polymers studied, until or unless delamination occurred. Delamination was evident for PACN- and PANI-clay nanocomposites. The highest loadings were observed for the PACN-clays, up to 86%. For the cationic polymer polydimethyldiallylammonium chloride, however, the loading could not be increased beyond about 20%. This is due to electrostatic interactions that balance the negatively charged sites on the silicate lattice with those on the cationic polymer chain. Beyond charge compensation, there is no driving force for further incorporation. Charge compensation in the case of the neutral polymers is attained by interlayer lithium(I) cations.

  15. Dynamics of confined reactive water in Smectic clay-zeolite composites.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pitman, Michael C.; Van Duin, Adri C. T.

    2012-01-01

    The dynamics of water confined to mesoporous regions in minerals such as swelling clays and zeolites is fundamental to a wide range of resource management issues impacting many processes on a global scale, including radioactive waste containment, desalination, and enhanced oil recovery. Large-scale atomic models of freely diffusing multilayer smectite particles at low hydration confined in a silicalite cage are used to investigate water dynamics in the composite environment with the ReaxFF reactive force field over a temperature range of 300 647 K. The reactive capability of the force field enabled a range of relevant surface chemistry to emerge, including acid/base equilibria in the interlayer calcium hydrates and silanol formation on the edges of the clay and inner surface of the zeolite housing. After annealing, the resulting clay models exhibit both mono- and bilayer hydration structures. Clay surface hydration redistributed markedly and yielded to silicalite water loading. We find that the absolute rates and temperature dependence of water dynamics compare well to neutron scattering data and pulse field gradient measures from relevant samples of Ca-montmorillonite and silicalite, respectively. Within an atomistic, reactive context, our results distinguish water dynamics in the interlayer Ca(OH)2 nH2O environment from water flowing over the clay surface, and from water diffusing within silicalite. We find that the diffusion of water when complexed to Ca hydrates is considerably slower than freely diffusing water over the clay surface, and the reduced mobility is well described by a difference in the Arrhenius pre-exponential factor rather than a change in activation energy.

  16. Dynamics of confined reactive water in smectite clay-zeolite composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pitman, Michael C.; Van Duin, Adri C. T.

    2012-01-01

    The dynamics of water confined to mesoporous regions in minerals such as swelling clays and zeolites is fundamental to a wide range of resource management issues impacting many processes on a global scale, including radioactive waste containment, desalination, and enhanced oil recovery. Large-scale atomic models of freely diffusing multilayer smectite particles at low hydration confined in a silicalite cage are used to investigate water dynamics in the composite environment with the ReaxFF reactive force field over a temperature range of 300 647 K. The reactive capability of the force field enabled a range of relevant surface chemistry to emerge, including acid/base equilibria in the interlayer calcium hydrates and silanol formation on the edges of the clay and inner surface of the zeolite housing. After annealing, the resulting clay models exhibit both mono- and bilayer hydration structures. Clay surface hydration redistributed markedly and yielded to silicalite water loading. We find that the absolute rates and temperature dependence of water dynamics compare well to neutron scattering data and pulse field gradient measures from relevant samples of Ca-montmorillonite and silicalite, respectively. Within an atomistic, reactive context, our results distinguish water dynamics in the interlayer Ca(OH)2 nH2O environment from water flowing over the clay surface, and from water diffusing within silicalite. We find that the diffusion of water when complexed to Ca hydrates is considerably slower than freely diffusing water over the clay surface, and the reduced mobility is well described by a difference in the Arrhenius pre-exponential factor rather than a change in activation energy.

  17. Molecular Simulation of Carbon Dioxide Nanodroplets on Clay in Deep Saline

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Aquifers. (Conference) | SciTech Connect in Deep Saline Aquifers. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Molecular Simulation of Carbon Dioxide Nanodroplets on Clay in Deep Saline Aquifers. Authors: Tenney, Craig M. Publication Date: 2012-06-01 OSTI Identifier: 1073284 Report Number(s): SAND2012-5175C DOE Contract Number: AC04-94AL85000 Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation: Conference: Proposed for presentation at the 49th Annual Meeting of The Clay Minerals Society held July

  18. Report on THMC Modeling of the Near Field Evolution of a Generic Clay Repository: Model Validation and Demonstration Rev 2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Shale and clay-rich rock formations have been considered as potential host rocks for geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste throughout the world: modeling thermal, hydrological, mechanical, and chemical (THMC) of the near field of generic clay repository is discussed.

  19. Status of LANL investigations of temperature constraints on clay in repository environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caporuscio, Florie A; Cheshire, Michael C; Newell, Dennis L; McCarney, Mary Kate

    2012-08-22

    The Used Fuel Disposition (UFD) Campaign is presently evaluating various generic options for disposal of used fuel. The focus of this experimental work is to characterize and bound Engineered Barrier Systems (EBS) conditions in high heat load repositories. The UFD now has the ability to evaluate multiple EBS materials, waste containers, and rock types at higher heat loads and pressures (including deep boreholes). The geologic conditions now available to the U.S.A. and the international community for repositories include saturated and reduced water conditions, along with higher pressure and temperature (P, T) regimes. Chemical and structural changes to the clays, in either backfill/buffer or clay-rich host rock, may have significant effects on repository evolution. Reduction of smectite expansion capacity and rehydration potential due to heating could affect the isolation provided by EBS. Processes such as cementation by silica precipitation and authigenic illite could change the hydraulic and mechanical properties of clay-rich materials. Experimental studies of these repository conditions at high P,T have not been performed in the U.S. for decades and little has been done by the international community at high P,T. The experiments to be performed by LANL will focus on the importance of repository chemical and mineralogical conditions at elevated P,T conditions. This will provide input to the assessment of scientific basis for elevating the temperature limits in clay barriers.

  20. Multiphase flow and multicomponent reactive transport model of the ventilation experiment in Opalinus clay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, L.; Samper, J.; Montenegro, L.; Major, J.C.

    2008-10-15

    During the construction and operational phases of a high-level radioactive waste (HLW) repository constructed in a clay formation, ventilation of underground drifts will cause desaturation and oxidation of the rock. The Ventilation Experiment (VE) was performed in a 1.3 m diameter unlined horizontal microtunnel on Opalinus clay at Mont Terri underground research laboratory in Switzerland to evaluate the impact of desaturation on rock properties. A multiphase flow and reactive transport model of VE is presented here. The model accounts for liquid, vapor and air flow, evaporation/condensation and multicomponent reactive solute transport with kinetic dissolution of pyrite and siderite and local-equilibrium dissolution/precipitation of calcite, ferrihydrite, dolomite, gypsum and quartz. Model results reproduce measured vapor flow, liquid pressure and hydrochemical data and capture the trends of measured relative humidities, although such data are slightly overestimated near the rock interface due to uncertainties in the turbulence factor. Rock desaturation allows oxygen to diffuse into the rock and triggers pyrite oxidation, dissolution of calcite and siderite, precipitation of ferrihydrite, dolomite and gypsum and cation exchange. pH in the unsaturated rock varies from 7.8 to 8 and is buffered by calcite. Computed changes in the porosity and the permeability of Opalinus clay in the unsaturated zone caused by oxidation and mineral dissolution/precipitation are smaller than 5%. Therefore, rock properties are not expected to be affected significantly by ventilation of underground drifts during construction and operational phases of a HLW repository in clay.

  1. Personalized professional content recommendation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Xu, Songhua

    2015-10-27

    A personalized content recommendation system includes a client interface configured to automatically monitor a user's information data stream transmitted on the Internet. A hybrid contextual behavioral and collaborative personal interest inference engine resident to a non-transient media generates automatic predictions about the interests of individual users of the system. A database server retains the user's personal interest profile based on a plurality of monitored information. The system also includes a server programmed to filter items in an incoming information stream with the personal interest profile and is further programmed to identify only those items of the incoming information stream that substantially match the personal interest profile.

  2. Personalized professional content recommendation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Xu, Songhua

    2015-11-05

    A personalized content recommendation system includes a client interface configured to automatically monitor a user's information data stream transmitted on the Internet. A hybrid contextual behavioral and collaborative personal interest inference engine resident to a non-transient media generates automatic predictions about the interests of individual users of the system. A database server retains the user's personal interest profile based on a plurality of monitored information. The system also includes a server programmed to filter items in an incoming information stream with the personal interest profile and is further programmed to identify only those items of the incoming information stream that substantially match the personal interest profile.

  3. Microsoft Word - contents

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    GJO-2001-272-TAR MAC-GWDUR 1.1 UMTRA Ground Water Project Site Observational Work Plan for the Durango, Colorado, UMTRA Project Site January 2002 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Project Number UGW 511-0006-10-000 Document Number U0143200 Work Performed Under DOE Contract Number DE-AC13-96GJ87335 This page intentionally left blank Document Number U0143200 Contents DOE/Grand Junction Office Site Observational Work Plan -Durango, Colorado January

  4. TABLE OF CONTENTS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    through December 2001 2 TABLE OF CONTENTS Page A. Project Summary 1. Technical Progress 3 2. Cost Reporting 4 B. Detailed Reports 1.1 Magnets & Supports 7 1.2 Vacuum System 9 1.3 Power Supplies 13 1.4 RF System 16 1.5 Instrumentation & Controls 17 1.6 Cable Plant 18 1.9 Installation 19 2.0 Accelerator Physics 20 3 A. SPEAR 3 PROJECT SUMMARY 1. Technical Progress In the magnet area, the production of all major components (dipoles, quadrupoles, and sextupoles) has been completed on

  5. TABLE OF CONTENTS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 TABLE OF CONTENTS Page A. Project Summary 1. Technical Progress 3 2. Cost Reporting 5 B. Detailed Reports 1.1 Magnets & Supports 8 1.2 Vacuum System 12 1.3 Power Supplies 14 1.4 RF System 16 1.5 Instrumentation & Controls 17 1.6 Cable Plant 18 1.7 Beam Line Front Ends 19 1.8 Facilities 19 1.9 Installation 20 2.1 Accelerator Physics 21 2 A. SPEAR 3 PROJECT SUMMARY 1. Technical Progress The progress and highlights of each major technical system are summarized below. Additional details

  6. TABLE OF CONTENTS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    through June 2001 2 TABLE OF CONTENTS Page A. Project Summary 1. Technical Progress 3 2. Cost Reporting 4 B. Detailed Reports 1.1 Magnets & Supports 9 1.2 Vacuum System 16 1.3 Power Supplies 21 1.4 RF System 25 1.5 Instrumentation & Controls 26 1.6 Cable Plant 28 1.8 Facilities 28 2.0 Accelerator Physics 29 2.1 ES&H 31 3 A. SPEAR 3 PROJECT SUMMARY 1. Technical Progress Magnet System - The project has received three shipments of magnets from IHEP. A total of 55 dipole, quadrupole and

  7. TABLE OF CONTENTS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    through September 2001 2 TABLE OF CONTENTS Page A. Project Summary 1. Technical Progress 3 2. Cost Reporting 4 B. Detailed Reports 1.1 Magnets & Supports 9 1.2 Vacuum System 14 1.3 Power Supplies 21 1.4 RF System 24 1.5 Instrumentation & Controls 26 1.6 Cable Plant 27 1.7 Beam Line Front Ends 28 1.8 Facilities 29 2.0 Accelerator Physics 30 2.1 ES&H 32 3 A. SPEAR 3 PROJECT SUMMARY 1. Technical Progress Summary - The SPEAR 3 project is near the 50% completion mark in terms of

  8. Efficiency of clay-TiO2 nanocomposites on the photocatalytic eliminationof a model hydrophobic air pollutant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kibanova, Daria; Cervini-Silva, Javiera; Destaillats, Hugo

    2009-01-01

    Clay-supported TiO2 photocatalysts can potentially improve the performance of air treatment technologies via enhanced adsorption and reactivity of target volatile organic compounds (VOCs). In this study, a bench-top photocatalytic flow reactor was used to evaluate the efficiency of hectorite-TiO2 and kaolinite-TiO2, two novel composite materials synthesized in our laboratory. Toluene, a model hydrophobic VOC and a common indoor air pollutant, was introduced in the air stream at realistic concentrations, and reacted under UVA (gamma max = 365 nm) or UVC (gamma max = 254 nm) irradiation. The UVC lamp generated secondary emission at 185 nm, leading to the formation of ozone and other short-lived reactive species. Performance of clay-TiO2 composites was compared with that of pure TiO2 (Degussa P25), and with UV irradiation in the absence of photocatalyst under identical conditions. Films of clay-TiO2 composites and of P25 were prepared by a dip-coating method on the surface of Raschig rings, which were placed inside the flow reactor. An upstream toluene concentration of ~;;170 ppbv was generated by diluting a constant flow of toluene vapor from a diffusion source with dry air, or with humid air at 10, 33 and 66percent relative humidity (RH). Toluene concentrations were determined by collecting Tenax-TA (R) sorbent tubes downstream of the reactor, with subsequent thermal desorption -- GC/MS analysis. The fraction of toluene removed, percentR, and the reaction rate, Tr, were calculated for each experimental condition from the concentration changes measured with and without UV irradiation. Use of UVC light (UV/TiO2/O3) led to overall higher reactivity, which can be partially attributed to the contribution of gas phase reactions by short-lived radical species. When the reaction rate was normalized to the light irradiance, Tr/I gamma, the UV/TiO2 reaction under UVA irradiation was more efficient for samples with a higher content of TiO2 (P25 and Hecto-TiO2), but not for Kao-TiO2. In all cases, reaction rates peaked at 10percent RH, with Tr values between 10 and 50percent higher than those measured under dry air. However, a net inhibition was observed as RH increased to 33percent and 66percent, indicating that water molecules competed effectively with toluene for reactive surface sites and limited the overall photocatalytic conversion. Compared to P25, inhibition by co-adsorbed water was less significant for Kao-TiO2 samples, but was more dramatic for Hecto-TiO2 due to the high water uptake capacity of hectorite.

  9. Table of Contents

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    U U . . S S . . D D E E P P A A R R T T M M E E N N T T O O F F E E N N E E R R G G Y Y O O F F F F I I C C E E O O F F I I N N S S P P E E C C T T O O R R G G E E N N E E R R A A L L Semiannual Report toCongress DOE/IG-0065 April 1 - September 30, 2013 TABLE OF CONTENTS From the Desk of the Inspector General ..................................................... 2 Impacts Key Accomplishments ............................................................................................... 3

  10. Mesoporous materials derived from synthetic organo-clays as novel hydrodesulfurization catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carrado, K.A.; Marshall, C.L.; Brenner, J.R.

    1996-12-31

    Various pore size distributions are found for synthetic organo-clay complexes from which the organic portion has been removed via calcination. The clays are prepared by hydrothermal crystallization of gels containing silica, magnesium hydroxide, lithium fluoride, and an organic of choice. The organic serves to impart long-range structural order to the inorganic network that does not disappear upon its removal. Mesoporous materials are prepared from a host of organic modifiers. For example, pore diameters of 40-50{Angstrom} result from tetraethyl ammonium and celluloses, and polydimethyl diallyl ammonium imparts diameters of about 110{Angstrom} on average. These materials have begun to be explored as hydrodesulfurization (HDS) catalyst supports. Preliminary results show performance commensurate with commercial catalysts for the mesoporous materials when a model oil feed is used (1% dibenzothiophene in hexadecane). The target application is HDS of an actual heavy crude oil from California.

  11. Stereo soft x-ray microscopy and elemental mapping of hematite and clay suspensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gleber, S.-C.; Thieme, J.; Chao, W.; Fischer, P.

    2008-09-01

    The spatial arrangements of hematite particles within aqueous soil and clay samples are investigated with soft X-ray microscopy, taking advantage of the elemental contrast at the Fe-L edge around E = 707 eV. In combination with stereo microscopy, information about spatial arrangements are revealed and correlated to electrostatic interactions of the different mixtures. Manipulation of a sample mounted to the microscope is possible and particles added while imaging can be detected.

  12. Investigations of Near-Field Thermal-Hydrologic-Mechanical-Chemical Models for Radioactive Waste Disposal in Clay/Shale Rock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, H.H.; Li, L.; Zheng, L.; Houseworth, J.E.; Rutqvist, J.

    2011-06-20

    Clay/shale has been considered as potential host rock for geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste throughout the world, because of its low permeability, low diffusion coefficient, high retention capacity for radionuclides, and capability to self-seal fractures. For example, Callovo-Oxfordian argillites at the Bure site, France (Fouche et al., 2004), Toarcian argillites at the Tournemire site, France (Patriarche et al., 2004), Opalinus Clay at the Mont Terri site, Switzerland (Meier et al., 2000), and Boom clay at the Mol site, Belgium (Barnichon and Volckaert, 2003) have all been under intensive scientific investigation (at both field and laboratory scales) for understanding a variety of rock properties and their relationships to flow and transport processes associated with geological disposal of radioactive waste. Figure 1-1 presents the distribution of clay/shale formations within the USA.

  13. Molecular Simulation of Structure and Diffusion at Smectite-Water Interfaces: Using Expanded Clay Interlayers as Model Nanopores

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greathouse, Jeffery A.; Hart, David; Bowers, Geoffrey M.; Kirkpatrick, R. James; Cygan, Randall Timothy

    2015-07-20

    In geologic settings relevant to a number of extraction and potential sequestration processes, nanopores bounded by clay mineral surfaces play a critical role in the transport of aqueous species. Solution structure and dynamics at claywater interfaces are quite different from their bulk values, and the spatial extent of this disruption remains a topic of current interest. We have used molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the structure and diffusion of aqueous solutions in clay nanopores approximately 6 nm thick, comparing the effect of clay composition with model Na-hectorite and Na-montmorillonite surfaces. In addition to structural properties at the interface, water and ion diffusion coefficients were calculated within each aqueous layer at the interface, as well as in the central bulk-like region of the nanopore. The results show similar solution structure and diffusion properties at each surface, with subtle differences in sodium adsorption complexes and water structure in the first adsorbed layer due to different arrangements of layer hydroxyl groups in the two clay models. Interestingly, the extent of surface disruption on bulk-like solution structure and diffusion extends to only a few water layers. Additionally, a comparison of sodium ion residence times confirms similar behavior of inner-sphere and outer-sphere surface complexes at each clay surface, but ~1% of sodium ions adsorb in ditrigonal cavities on the hectorite surface. Thus, the presence of these anhydrous ions is consistent with highly immobile anhydrous ions seen in previous nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic measurements of hectorite pastes.

  14. ,"California Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Data for" ,"Data 1","California Heat Content of Natural Gas ... 10:59:46 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: California Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

  15. ,"Virginia Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Data for" ,"Data 1","Virginia Heat Content of Natural Gas ... 11:00:21 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Virginia Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

  16. ,"Oklahoma Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Data for" ,"Data 1","Oklahoma Heat Content of Natural Gas ... 11:00:12 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Oklahoma Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

  17. Clay-sewage sludge co-pyrolysis. A TG-MS and Py-GC study on potential advantages afforded by the presence of clay in the pyrolysis of wastewater sewage sludge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ischia, Marco; Maschio, Roberto Dal; Grigiante, Maurizio; Baratieri, Marco

    2011-01-15

    Wastewater sewage sludge was co-pyrolyzed with a well characterized clay sample, in order to evaluate possible advantages in the thermal disposal process of solid waste. Characterization of the co-pyrolysis process was carried out both by thermogravimetric-mass spectrometric (TG-MS) analysis, and by reactor tests, using a lab-scale batch reactor equipped with a gas chromatograph for analysis of the evolved gas phase (Py-GC). Due to the presence of clay, two main effects were observed in the instrumental characterization of the process. Firstly, the clay surface catalyzed the pyrolysis reaction of the sludge, and secondly, the release of water from the clay, at temperatures of approx. 450-500 deg. C, enhanced gasification of part of carbon residue of the organic component of sludge following pyrolysis. Moreover, the solid residue remaining after pyrolysis process, composed of the inorganic component of sludge blended with clay, is characterized by good features for possible disposal by vitrification, yielding a vitreous matrix that immobilizes the hazardous heavy metals present in the sludge.

  18. Laboratory measurements of contaminant attenuation of uranium mill tailings leachates by sediments and clay liners

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Serne, R.J.; Peterson, S.R.; Gee, G.W.

    1983-04-01

    We discuss FY82 progress on the development of laboratory tools to aid in the prediction of migration potential of contaminants present in acidic uranium mill tailings leachate. Further, empirical data on trace metal and radionuclide migration through a clay liner are presented. Acidic uranium mill tailings solution from a Wyoming mill was percolated through a composite sediment called Morton Ranch Clay liner. These laboratory columns and subsequent sediment extraction data show: (1) As, Cr, Pb, Ag, Th and V migrate very slowly; (2) U, Cd, Ni, Zn, Fe, Mn and similar transition metals are initially immobilized during acid neutralization but later are remobilized as the tailings solution exhausts the clay liner's acid buffering capacity. Such metals remain immobilized as long as the effluent pH remains above a pH value of 4 to 4.5, but they become mobile once the effluent pH drops below this range; and (3) fractions of the Se and Mo present in the influent tailings solution are very mobile. Possible controlling mechanisms for the pH-dependent immobilization-mobilization of the trace metals are discussed. More study is required to understand the controlling mechanisms for Se and Mo and Ra for which data were not successfully collected. Using several column lengths (from 4.5 to 65 cm) and pore volume residence times (from 0.8 to 40 days) we found no significant differences in contaminant migration rates or types and extent of controlling processes. Thus, we conclude that the laboratory results may be capable of extrapolation to actual disposal site conditions.

  19. GLADY CASSIT Y VANDALIA MURPHY CR EEK BU CKHN-CENT URY CLAY

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    GLADY CASSIT Y VANDALIA MURPHY CR EEK BU CKHN-CENT URY CLAY GLENVILLE N MINNORA JARVISVILLE FAR MINGTON PH ILIPPI BELIN GT ON WAYN ESBUR G PR UNT Y GLENVILLE S CAVE RUN TAYLOR DRAIN ROSEDALE ST MPT-N RMNT-SHK WESTON-JAN E LEW SWN DL-WID EN VADIS STANL EY DEKALB UNION TALLM AN SVILL E ASPINALL-FIN ST ER ZOLLARSVILLE WILBU R RAMSEY HEATER S BR IDGEPORT-PRUNT YTOWN ALEXAND ER LILLY FORK SH ERMAN HIRAM ST FK-BLST N CK BU RNS CH APEL S BR WN -LUM BER PORT CON INGS PR ATT BOSWELL REVEL ELK C REEK

  20. Visual Analysis of Weblog Content

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregory, Michelle L.; Payne, Deborah A.; McColgin, Dave; Cramer, Nick O.; Love, Douglas V.

    2007-03-26

    In recent years, one of the advances of the World Wide Web is social media and one of the fastest growing aspects of social media is the blogosphere. Blogs make content creation easy and are highly accessible through web pages and syndication. With their growing influence, a need has arisen to be able to monitor the opinions and insight revealed within their content. In this paper we describe a technical approach for analyzing the content of blog data using a visual analytic tool, IN-SPIRE, developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. We highlight the capabilities of this tool that are particularly useful for information gathering from blog data.

  1. IMPROVED VARIABLE STAR SEARCH IN LARGE PHOTOMETRIC DATA SETS: NEW VARIABLES IN CoRoT FIELD LRa02 DETECTED BY BEST II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fruth, T.; Cabrera, J.; Csizmadia, Sz.; Eigmueller, P.; Erikson, A.; Kirste, S.; Pasternacki, T.; Rauer, H.; Titz-Weider, R.; Kabath, P.; Chini, R.; Lemke, R.; Murphy, M.

    2012-06-15

    The CoRoT field LRa02 has been observed with the Berlin Exoplanet Search Telescope II (BEST II) during the southern summer 2007/2008. A first analysis of stellar variability led to the publication of 345 newly discovered variable stars. Now, a deeper analysis of this data set was used to optimize the variability search procedure. Several methods and parameters have been tested in order to improve the selection process compared to the widely used J index for variability ranking. This paper describes an empirical approach to treat systematic trends in photometric data based upon the analysis of variance statistics that can significantly decrease the rate of false detections. Finally, the process of reanalysis and method improvement has virtually doubled the number of variable stars compared to the first analysis by Kabath et al. A supplementary catalog of 272 previously unknown periodic variables plus 52 stars with suspected variability is presented. Improved ephemerides are given for 19 known variables in the field. In addition, the BEST II results are compared with CoRoT data and its automatic variability classification.

  2. Molecular simulation of structure and diffusion at smectite-water interfaces: Using expanded clay interlayers as model nanopores

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greathouse, Jeffery A.; Hart, David; Bowers, Geoffrey M.; Kirkpatrick, R. James; Cygan, Randall Timothy

    2015-07-20

    In geologic settings relevant to a number of extraction and potential sequestration processes, nanopores bounded by clay mineral surfaces play a critical role in the transport of aqueous species. Solution structure and dynamics at clay–water interfaces are quite different from their bulk values, and the spatial extent of this disruption remains a topic of current interest. We have used molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the structure and diffusion of aqueous solutions in clay nanopores approximately 6 nm thick, comparing the effect of clay composition with model Na-hectorite and Na-montmorillonite surfaces. In addition to structural properties at the interface, water and ion diffusion coefficients were calculated within each aqueous layer at the interface, as well as in the central bulk-like region of the nanopore. The results show similar solution structure and diffusion properties at each surface, with subtle differences in sodium adsorption complexes and water structure in the first adsorbed layer due to different arrangements of layer hydroxyl groups in the two clay models. Interestingly, the extent of surface disruption on bulk-like solution structure and diffusion extends to only a few water layers. Additionally, a comparison of sodium ion residence times confirms similar behavior of inner-sphere and outer-sphere surface complexes at each clay surface, but ~1% of sodium ions adsorb in ditrigonal cavities on the hectorite surface. Thus, the presence of these anhydrous ions is consistent with highly immobile anhydrous ions seen in previous nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic measurements of hectorite pastes.

  3. ARM - Measurement - Ice water content

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Comments? We would love to hear from you Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Ice water content The concentration (massvol) of ice water...

  4. JOBAID-LAUNCHING ONLINE CONTENT

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In this jobaid you will learn how to launch Online Content "Items" or Courses. In the LMS you can launch most anything as an "item": documents, courses, webpages and track users that have completed...

  5. CONTENTS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... ENVIRONMENTS February 18, 2010 Rev 1 Page 4 1 Kevlar is a registered trademark of DuPont de Nemours. 2 K-Spec is a registered trademark of SlingMax. 18.4 MARKING AND POSTING ...

  6. CONTENTS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    organization (such as Safety or Quality Assurance). Depending upon the site-specific organizational structure, the following reviewapprovals are recommended: DOERL-92-36,...

  7. contents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... ultimately rely upon some form of cryptographic key. Often keys are grouped in one location for safekeeping. The management and maintenance of these keys so that they may ...

  8. Contents

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... by creating a set of ALOHA save files or (b) to be able to rerun a scenario in the future. ... for elevation, latitude, and longitude to calculate solar radiation and air pressure. ...

  9. Contents

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ... Financial Statements National Grid Annual Report and ... dual listing on the London Stock Exchange and the New York ... 18 May 2014 Company number: 4031152 Statement of ...

  10. CONTENTS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    responsible contractor's processes and, as a minimum, shall be signed and dated by the following: 1. Technical Approver (see Appendix A for definition) 2. Manager responsible...

  11. Contents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... (HBV). It can be transmitted from unsafe sex or from infected blood or body fluids ... Practice safe sex by using condoms. If you think you may have been exposed, contact your ...

  12. Contents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... existed for the past 50 years at the NTS," said Wade who then presented a history of nuclear testing and the NTS. cont. on pg. 2 2 August 2005 SiteLines required to maintain the ...

  13. Contents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from laser physics, low- temperature plasma chemistry and physics, and nuclear fusion. ... This makes these plasmas ideal for biomedical applications and treatment of heat ...

  14. CONTENTS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... also use methods published by the U.S. Geological Survey, U.S. Department of Agriculture, ... Environmental and Waste Management Samples * EPA 540R-95141, Representative ...

  15. CO2 Storage by Sorption on Organic Matter and Clay in Gas Shale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bacon, Diana H.; Yonkofski, Catherine MR; Schaef, Herbert T.; White, Mark D.; McGrail, B. Peter

    2015-10-10

    Simulations of methane production and supercritical carbon dioxide injection were developed that consider competitive adsorption of CH4 and CO2 on both organic matter and montmorillonite. The results were used to assess the potential for storage of CO2 in a hydraulically fractured shale gas reservoir and for enhanced recovery of CH4. Assuming equal volume fractions of organic matter and montmorillonite, amounts of CO2 adsorbed on both materials were comparable, while methane desorption was from clays was two times greater than desorption from organic material. The most successful strategy considered CO2 injection from a separate well and enhanced methane recovery by 73%, while storing 240 kmt of CO2.

  16. ,"Texas Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas Heat Content of Natural Gas ...2016 6:34:00 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Texas Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

  17. Molecular simulation of structure and diffusion at smectite-water interfaces: Using expanded clay interlayers as model nanopores

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Greathouse, Jeffery A.; Hart, David; Bowers, Geoffrey M.; Kirkpatrick, R. James; Cygan, Randall Timothy

    2015-07-20

    In geologic settings relevant to a number of extraction and potential sequestration processes, nanopores bounded by clay mineral surfaces play a critical role in the transport of aqueous species. Solution structure and dynamics at clay–water interfaces are quite different from their bulk values, and the spatial extent of this disruption remains a topic of current interest. We have used molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the structure and diffusion of aqueous solutions in clay nanopores approximately 6 nm thick, comparing the effect of clay composition with model Na-hectorite and Na-montmorillonite surfaces. In addition to structural properties at the interface, water andmore » ion diffusion coefficients were calculated within each aqueous layer at the interface, as well as in the central bulk-like region of the nanopore. The results show similar solution structure and diffusion properties at each surface, with subtle differences in sodium adsorption complexes and water structure in the first adsorbed layer due to different arrangements of layer hydroxyl groups in the two clay models. Interestingly, the extent of surface disruption on bulk-like solution structure and diffusion extends to only a few water layers. Additionally, a comparison of sodium ion residence times confirms similar behavior of inner-sphere and outer-sphere surface complexes at each clay surface, but ~1% of sodium ions adsorb in ditrigonal cavities on the hectorite surface. Thus, the presence of these anhydrous ions is consistent with highly immobile anhydrous ions seen in previous nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic measurements of hectorite pastes.« less

  18. SECTION J - TABLE OF CONTENTS

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Conformed to Mod 0108 DE-NA0000622 Section J Page i PART III - LIST OF DOCUMENTS, EXHIBITS, AND OTHER ATTACHMENTS SECTION J LIST OF APPENDICES TABLE OF CONTENTS Appendix A Statement of Work (Replaced by Mod 002; Modified Mod 016; Replaced Mod 029) Appendix B Performance Evaluation Plan (Replaced by Mods 002, 016, 020, 029, 0084) Appendix C Contractor's Transition Plan Appendix D Sensitive Foreign Nations Control Appendix E Performance Guarantee Agreement(s) Appendix F National Work Breakdown

  19. Communication: Ro-vibrational control of chemical reactivity in H+CH{sub 4}→ H{sub 2}+CH{sub 3} : Full-dimensional quantum dynamics calculations and a sudden model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Welsch, Ralph Manthe, Uwe

    2014-08-07

    The mode-selective chemistry of the title reaction is studied by full-dimensional quantum dynamics simulation on an accurate ab initio potential energy surface for vanishing total angular momentum. Using a rigorous transition state based approach and multi-configurational time-dependent Hartree wave packet propagation, initial state-selected reaction probabilities for many ro-vibrational states of methane are calculated. The theoretical results are compared with experimental trends seen in reactions of methane. An intuitive interpretation of the ro-vibrational control of the chemical reactivity provided by a sudden model based on the quantum transition state concept is discussed.

  20. Replacemernt of thermally produced calcined clay with chemically structured pigments and methods for the same, quarterly report, January 1, 1995-April 1, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whalen-Shaw, M.

    1995-04-25

    The business objective is to manufacture an economically viable chemically structured clay to replace thermally structured calcined clay. The technology will provide substantial benefit in paper coating. The structured pigment containing 90% clay and 10% TiO2 vs the loose blend of these materials as a filler for paper was evaluated. A plan to improve the permanence of the structured pigment using dual functional dispersed pigments is in place. The cationic dispersant for TiO2 will also be a binder. Spray drying will be use to fix the structure of the internally bound structured pigment.

  1. Estimating water content in an active landfill with the aid of GPR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yochim, April, E-mail: ayochim@regionofwaterloo.ca [Region of Waterloo Waste Management Division, 925 Erb Street West, Waterloo, ON N2J 3Z4 (Canada); Zytner, Richard G., E-mail: rzytner@uoguelph.ca [School of Engineering, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1 (Canada); McBean, Edward A., E-mail: emcbean@uoguelph.ca [School of Engineering, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1 (Canada); Endres, Anthony L., E-mail: alendres@sciborg.uwaterloo.ca [Dept. of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON N2L 3G1 (Canada)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: Limited information in the literature on the use of GPR to measure in situ water content in a landfill. Developed GPR method allows measurement of in situ water content in a landfill. Developed GPR method is appealing to waste management professionals operating landfills. - Abstract: Landfill gas (LFG) receives a great deal of attention due to both negative and positive environmental impacts, global warming and a green energy source, respectively. However, predicting the quantity of LFG generated at a given landfill, whether active or closed is difficult due to the heterogeneities present in waste, and the lack of accurate in situ waste parameters like water content. Accordingly, ground penetrating radar (GPR) was evaluated as a tool for estimating in situ water content. Due to the large degree of subsurface heterogeneity and the electrically conductive clay cap covering landfills, both of which affect the transmission of the electromagnetic pulses, there is much scepticism concerning the use of GPR to quantify in situ water content within a municipal landfill. Two landfills were studied. The first landfill was used to develop the measurement protocols, while the second landfill provided a means of confirming these protocols. GPR measurements were initially completed using the surface GPR approach, but the lack of success led to the use of borehole (BH) GPR. Both zero offset profiling (ZOP) and multiple offset gathers (MOG) modes were tried, with the results indicating that BH GPR using the ZOP mode is the most simple and efficient method to measure in situ water content. The best results were obtained at a separation distance of 2 m, where higher the water content, smaller the effective separation distance. However, an increase in water content did appear to increase the accuracy of the GPR measurements. For the effective separation distance of 2 m at both landfills, the difference between GPR and lab measured water contents were reasonable at 33.9% for the drier landfill and 18.1% for the wetter landfill. Infiltration experiments also showed the potential to measure small increases in water content.

  2. CONTENTS OF A VISIT REQUEST

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CONTENTS OF A VISIT REQUEST All visit requests are required to be submitted via JPAS according to AFI 31-101 and the NISPOM. Our SMO code is KV1MFSCC6. Please do not send an annual visit request for the conference. Use the dates of the conference for the duration of the visit. Please list Bing Serafico, 505-853-0451 as the Point of Contract for the visit. NOTE: Only use the following information if your companies DO NOT have access to JPAS. All faxed visit request for personnel that are in JPAS

  3. Capillary suction-time tests on selected clays and shales. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hart, K.M.

    1989-05-01

    Shale stability has been an ongoing problem in the drilling of oil wells. The Capillary Suction Time test is simple and easy to use, allowing operators to conduct the test at the rigsite. However because of difficulty in reproducing results, the test should be used only qualitatively. The CST, along with the Methylene Blue, Specific Surface Area and Ensilin tests, accurately predicts shale swelling and dispersion. The tests have the added advantage of being able to be conducted relatively quickly. These tests could be carried out at the rigsite while the drilling is taking place. The experiments conducted also demonstrated the usefulness of KCL as an inhibitor of shale swelling and dispersion. From the CST data, it can be seen that KCL concentrations as low as 0.5% are effective in controlling the swelling of Phillips Ekofisk, Phillips Andrews County, Texaco Mississippi Canyon and Pierre Texaco. However a greater concentration of KCL is required to inhibit the swelling of Gold Seal Bentonite, Standard Arizona, Standard Wyoming and Standard Texas. It is recommended that more concentrations of KCL be tested of the high swelling clays to determine the minimum concentration required to inhibit swelling and dispersion.

  4. Speciated measurements of semivolatile and intermediate volatility organic compounds (S/IVOCs) in a pine forest during BEACHON-RoMBAS 2011

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chan, A. W. H.; Kreisberg, N. M.; Hohaus, T.; Campuzano-Jost, P.; Zhao, Y.; Day, D. A.; Kaser, L.; Karl, T.; Hansel, A.; Teng, A. P.; et al

    2016-02-02

    Understanding organic composition of gases and particles is essential to identifying sources and atmospheric processing leading to organic aerosols (OA), but atmospheric chemical complexity and the analytical techniques available often limit such analysis. Here we present speciated measurements of semivolatile and intermediate volatility organic compounds (S/IVOCs) using a novel dual-use instrument (SV-TAG-AMS) deployed at Manitou Forest, CO, during the Bio-hydro-atmosphere interactions of Energy, Aerosols, Carbon, H2O, Organics & Nitrogen – Rocky Mountain Biogenic Aerosol Study (BEACHON-RoMBAS) 2011 campaign. This instrument provides on-line speciation of ambient organic compounds with 2 h time resolution. The species in this volatility range are complexmore » in composition, but their chemical identities reveal potential sources. Observed compounds of biogenic origin include sesquiterpenes with molecular formula C15H24 (e.g., β-caryophyllene and longifolene), which were most abundant at night. A variety of other biogenic compounds were observed, including sesquiterpenoids with molecular formula C15H22, abietatriene and other terpenoid compounds. Many of these compounds have been identified in essential oils and branch enclosure studies but were observed in ambient air for the first time in our study. Semivolatile polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and alkanes were observed with highest concentrations during the day and the dependence on temperature suggests the role of an evaporative source. Using statistical analysis by positive matrix factorization (PMF), we classify observed S/IVOCs by their likely sources and processes, and characterize them based on chemical composition. The total mass concentration of elutable S/IVOCs was estimated to be on the order of 0.7 µg m–3 and their volatility distributions are estimated for modeling aerosol formation chemistry.« less

  5. Petrographic report on clay-rich samples from Permian Unit 4 salt, G. Friemel No. 1 well, Palo Duro Basin, Deaf Smith County, Texas: unanalyzed data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fukui, L M

    1983-09-01

    This report presents the results of mineralogic and petrographic analyses performed on five samples of clay-rich rock from salt-bearing Permian strata sampled by drill core from G. Friemel No. 1 Well, Deaf Smith County, Texas. Five samples of clay-rich rock from depths of about 2457, 2458, 2521, 2548, and 2568 feet were analyzed to determine the amounts of soluble phase (halite) and the amounts and mineralogy of the insoluble phases. The amounts of halite found were 59, 79, 47, 40, and 4 weight percent, respectively, for the samples. The insoluble minerals are predominately clay (20 to 60 volume percent) and anhydrite (up to 17 volume percent), with minor (about 1.0%) and trace amounts of quartz, dolomite, muscovite, and gypsum. The clays include illite, chlorite, and interstratified chlorite-smectite. The results presented in this petrographic report are descriptive, uninterpreted data. 2 references, 7 tables.

  6. Template:ContentAssist | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ContentAssist Jump to: navigation, search This is the ContentAssist template. It is intended for inclusion on any page and will highlight extracted energy-related terms from the...

  7. Energy.gov Content Management System

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy.gov Content Management SystemEERE's websites are hosted in Energy.gov's Drupal content management system (CMS), which is maintained by the U.S. Department of Energy's Public Affairs Office.

  8. Application Content and Evaluation Criteria/Process

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation on Application Content and Evaluation Criteria/Process presented at the PEM fuel cell pre-solicitation meeting held May 26, 2005 in Arlington, VA.

  9. Standard Format and Content for Emergency Plans

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-08-21

    This volume addresses recommended emergency plan format and content for Operational Emergency Base Programs and Operational Emergency Hazardous Material Programs. Canceled by DOE G 151.1-3.

  10. Energy.gov Content Management System Webforms

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    For Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) websites, Energy.gov's content management system (CMS) has the ability to create webforms.

  11. ,"West Virginia Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Data for" ,"Data 1","West Virginia Heat Content of Natural Gas ... AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: West Virginia Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

  12. Multiaxial deformation of polyethylene and polyethylene/clay nanocomposites: In situ synchrotron small angle and wide angle X-ray scattering study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gurun, Bilge; Bucknall, David G.; Thio, Yonathan S.; Teoh, Chin Ching; Harkin-Jones, Eileen

    2013-01-10

    A unique in situ multiaxial deformation device has been designed and built specifically for simultaneous synchrotron small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and wide angle X-ray scattering (WAXS) measurements. SAXS and WAXS patterns of high-density polyethylene (HDPE) and HDPE/clay nanocomposites were measured in real time during in situ multiaxial deformation at room temperature and at 55 C. It was observed that the morphological evolution of polyethylene is affected by the existence of clay platelets as well as the deformation temperature and strain rate. Martensitic transformation of orthorhombic into monoclinic crystal phases was observed under strain in HDPE, which is delayed and hindered in the presence of clay nanoplatelets. From the SAXS measurements, it was observed that the thickness of the interlamellar amorphous region increased with increasing strain, which is due to elongation of the amorphous chains. The increase in amorphous layer thickness is slightly higher for the nanocomposites compared to the neat polymer.

  13. Web Content Analysis and Inventories: Template and FY 2014 Inventory...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Content Analysis and Inventories: Template and FY 2014 Inventory Web Content Analysis and ... It also includes a notes field, which can be used for a Web content analysis. File Content ...

  14. Table of Contents for Desk Guide

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    September, 2014 U. S. Department of Energy - Real Estate Desk Guide Revised 2014 Real Estate Desk Guide Table of Contents Chapter 1-- Purpose of Desk Guide............................................................................... 1 Chapter 2-- Introduction ................................................................................................. 3 Chapter 3-- Planning Policy ........................................................................................... 9 Chapter 4-- Real

  15. Training Program Content, 4/10/95

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The objective of this surveillance is to evaluate the effectiveness of the contractor's program for establishing the content of training programs.  The process to be evaluated includes (1)...

  16. Widget:ContentAssist | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ContentAssist Jump to: navigation, search This widget generates a bar of recommended reading related to the page on which it is embedded. Additionally, this widget mines the...

  17. BETO Quiz - Interactive Content | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    BETO Quiz - Interactive Content BETO Quiz - Interactive Content Welcome to the Bioenergy Quiz! Navigate through the quiz by clicking on the circular buttons and selecting the correct answers to the questions. Use the scrollbar to move down the page and view all of the information displayed. Hover over words and phrases highlighted in orange for an explanation of terms. Share the information by clicking on the buttons in the Share This block. Use the arrow button found in the bottom right-hand

  18. Relationship between crystal structure and thermo-mechanical properties of kaolinite clay: Beyond standard density functional theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weck, Philippe F.; Kim, Eunja; Jove-Colon, Carlos F.

    2015-03-04

    In this study, the structural, mechanical and thermodynamic properties of 1 : 1 layered dioctahedral kaolinite clay, with ideal Al2Si2O5(OH)4 stoichiometry, were investigated using density functional theory corrected for dispersion interactions (DFT-D2). The bulk moduli of 56.2 and 56.0 GPa predicted at 298 K using the Vinet and BirchMurnaghan equations of state, respectively, are in good agreement with the recent experimental value of 59.7 GPa reported for well-crystallized samples. The isobaric heat capacity computed for uniaxial deformation of kaolinite along the stacking direction reproduces calorimetric data within 0.73.0% from room temperature up to its thermal stability limit.

  19. Relationship between crystal structure and thermo-mechanical properties of kaolinite clay: Beyond standard density functional theory

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Weck, Philippe F.; Kim, Eunja; Jove-Colon, Carlos F.

    2015-03-04

    In this study, the structural, mechanical and thermodynamic properties of 1 : 1 layered dioctahedral kaolinite clay, with ideal Al2Si2O5(OH)4 stoichiometry, were investigated using density functional theory corrected for dispersion interactions (DFT-D2). The bulk moduli of 56.2 and 56.0 GPa predicted at 298 K using the Vinet and Birch–Murnaghan equations of state, respectively, are in good agreement with the recent experimental value of 59.7 GPa reported for well-crystallized samples. The isobaric heat capacity computed for uniaxial deformation of kaolinite along the stacking direction reproduces calorimetric data within 0.7–3.0% from room temperature up to its thermal stability limit.

  20. RH-TRU Waste Content Codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions

    2007-07-01

    The Remote-Handled Transuranic (RH-TRU) Content Codes (RH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of RH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Remote-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (RH-TRAMPAC).1 The RH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the RH-TRU 72-B. This document is a catalog of RH-TRU 72-B authorized contents by site. A content code is defined by the following components: A two-letter site abbreviation that designates the physical location of the generated/stored waste (e.g., ID for Idaho National Laboratory [INL]). The site-specific letter designations for each of the sites are provided in Table 1. A three-digit code that designates the physical and chemical form of the waste (e.g., content code 317 denotes TRU Metal Waste). For RH-TRU waste to be transported in the RH-TRU 72-B, the first number of this three-digit code is 3. The second and third numbers of the three-digit code describe the physical and chemical form of the waste. Table 2 provides a brief description of each generic code. Content codes are further defined as subcodes by an alpha trailer after the three-digit code to allow segregation of wastes that differ in one or more parameter(s). For example, the alpha trailers of the subcodes ID 322A and ID 322B may be used to differentiate between waste packaging configurations. As detailed in the RH-TRAMPAC, compliance with flammable gas limits may be demonstrated through the evaluation of compliance with either a decay heat limit or flammable gas generation rate (FGGR) limit per container specified in approved content codes. As applicable, if a container meets the watt*year criteria specified by the RH-TRAMPAC, the decay heat limits based on the dose-dependent G value may be used as specified in an approved content code. If a site implements the administrative controls outlined in the RH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 2.4 of the RH-TRU Payload Appendices, the decay heat or FGGR limits based on a 10-day shipping period (rather than the standard 60-day shipping period) may be used as specified in an approved content code. Requests for new or revised content codes may be submitted to the WIPP RH-TRU Payload Engineer for review and approval, provided all RH-TRAMPAC requirements are met.

  1. AVLIS documentation overview and tables of contents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-11-15

    Three documents constitute the executive summary series in Data Package III: this document (Documentation Overview and Tables of Contents (E001)) plus the AVLIS Production Plant Executive Summary (E010) and the AVLIS Production Plant Overall Design Report (E020). They provide progressively greater detail on the key information and conclusions contained within the data package. The Executive Summary and Overall Design Report present summaries of each Data Package III document. They are intended to provide a global overview of AVLIS Production Plant deployment including program planning, project management, schedules, engineering design, production, operations, capital cost, and operating cost. The purpose of Overview and Tables of Contents is threefold: to briefly review AVLIS goals for Data Package III documentation, to present an overview of the contents of the data package, and to provide a useful guide to information contained in the numerous documents comprising the package.

  2. Local content of bipartite qubit correlations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Branciard, Cyril; Gisin, Nicolas [Group of Applied Physics, University of Geneva, 1211 Geneva (Switzerland); Scarani, Valerio [Centre for Quantum Technologies and Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, 117543 Singapore (Singapore)

    2010-02-15

    One of the last open problems concerning two qubits in a pure state is to find the exact local content of their correlation, in the sense of Elitzur, Popescu, and Rohrlich (EPR2) [A. C. Elitzur, S. Popescu, and D. Rohrlich, Phys. Lett. A162, 25 (1992)]. We propose an EPR2 decomposition that allows us to prove, for a wide range of states |{psi}({theta})>=cos{theta}|00>+sin{theta}|11>, that their local content is p{sub L}({theta})=cos2{theta}. We also share reflections on how to possibly extend this result to all two-qubit pure states.

  3. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2008-01-16

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

  4. Remote-Handled Transuranic Content Codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions

    2006-12-01

    The Remote-Handled Transuranic (RH-TRU) Content Codes (RH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of RH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Remote-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (RH-TRAMPAC).1 The RH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the RH-TRU 72-B. This document is a catalog of RH-TRU 72-B authorized contents by site. A content code is defined by the following components: A two-letter site abbreviation that designates the physical location of the generated/stored waste (e.g., ID for Idaho National Laboratory [INL]). The site-specific letter designations for each of the sites are provided in Table 1. A three-digit code that designates the physical and chemical form of the waste (e.g., content code 317 denotes TRU Metal Waste). For RH-TRU waste to be transported in the RH-TRU 72-B, the first number of this three-digit code is 3. The second and third numbers of the three-digit code describe the physical and chemical form of the waste. Table 2 provides a brief description of each generic code. Content codes are further defined as subcodes by an alpha trailer after the three-digit code to allow segregation of wastes that differ in one or more parameter(s). For example, the alpha trailers of the subcodes ID 322A and ID 322B may be used to differentiate between waste packaging configurations. As detailed in the RH-TRAMPAC, compliance with flammable gas limits may be demonstrated through the evaluation of compliance with either a decay heat limit or flammable gas generation rate (FGGR) limit per container specified in approved content codes. As applicable, if a container meets the watt*year criteria specified by the RH-TRAMPAC, the decay heat limits based on the dose-dependent G value may be used as specified in an approved content code. If a site implements the administrative controls outlined in the RH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 2.4 of the RH-TRU Payload Appendices, the decay heat or FGGR limits based on a 10-day shipping period (rather than the standard 60-day shipping period) may be used as specified in an approved content code.

  5. ,"New Mexico Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Data for" ,"Data 1","New Mexico Heat Content of Natural Gas ... 6:33:51 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New Mexico Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

  6. OpenEI:Core content policies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Core content policies Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI models its core content policies after those established by the Wikipedia.1 Specifically, the OpenEI core content...

  7. Method of determining a content of a nuclear waste container

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bernardi, Richard T.; Entwistle, David

    2003-04-22

    A method and apparatus are provided for identifying contents of a nuclear waste container. The method includes the steps of forming an image of the contents of the container using digital radiography, visually comparing contents of the image with expected contents of the container and performing computer tomography on the container when the visual inspection reveals an inconsistency between the contents of the image and the expected contents of the container.

  8. Table of Contents for Desk Guide

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    May, 2013 U. S. Department of Energy - Real Estate Desk Guide Revised 2013 Real Estate Desk Guide Table of Contents Chapter 1-- Purpose of Desk Guide ........................................................................ 1 Chapter 2-- Introduction ......................................................................................... 3 Chapter 3-- Planning Policy .................................................................................... 7 Chapter 4-- Real Estate Function

  9. T-663: Cisco Content Services Gateway ICMP Processing Flaw Lets...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3: Cisco Content Services Gateway ICMP Processing Flaw Lets Remote Users Deny Service T-663: Cisco Content Services Gateway ICMP Processing Flaw Lets Remote Users Deny Service July...

  10. Modification of Lignin Content of Plant Cell Walls - Energy Innovation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Return to Search Modification of Lignin Content of Plant Cell Walls Brookhaven National ... methyltransferases to reduce the lignin content and cross-linking in plant cell walls. ...

  11. Does Water Content or Flow Rate Control Colloid Transport in...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Does Water Content or Flow Rate Control Colloid Transport in Unsaturated Porous Media? Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Does Water Content or Flow Rate Control Colloid ...

  12. Educating Consumers: New Content on Diesel Vehicles, Diesel Exhaust...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Educating Consumers: New Content on Diesel Vehicles, Diesel Exhaust Fluid, and Selective Catalytic Reduction Technologies on the AFDC Educating Consumers: New Content on Diesel ...

  13. Headquarters Facilities Master Security Plan- Table of Contents

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2016 Headquarters Facilities Master Security Plan - Table of Contents Table of Contents for the 2016 Headquarters Facilities Master Security Plan (HQFMSP).

  14. Information Content of the Low-Energy Electric Dipole Strength...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Information Content of the Low-Energy Electric Dipole Strength: Correlation Analysis Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Information Content of the Low-Energy Electric ...

  15. Energy.gov Data Tables in Content Management System | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Data Tables in Content Management System Energy.gov Data Tables in Content Management System For Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) websites, follow these...

  16. Widget:DivContentWrapper | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    div For example: Widget:DivContentWrapper | classui-corner-all | stylebackground-color: green; padding: 5px; color: white; | contentText Text Retrieved from "http:...

  17. Thermal and mechanical properties of palm oil-based polyurethane acrylate/clay nanocomposites prepared by in-situ intercalative method and electron beam radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salih, A. M.; Ahmad, Mansor Bin; Ibrahim, Nor Azowa; Dahlan, Khairul Zaman Hj Mohd; Tajau, Rida; Mahmood, Mohd Hilmi; Yunus, Wan Md. Zin Wan

    2014-02-12

    Palm oil based-polyurethane acrylate (POBUA)/clay nanocomposites were prepared via in-situ intercalative polymerization using epoxidized palm oil acrylate (EPOLA) and 4,4' methylene diphenyl diisocyante (MDI). Organically modified Montmorillonite (ODA-MMT) was incorporated in EPOLA (1, 3 and 5%wt), and then subjected to polycondensation reaction with MDI. Nanocomposites solid films were obtained successfully by electron beam radiation induced free radical polymerization (curing). FTIR results reveal that the prepolymer was obtained successfully, with nanoclay dispersed in the matrix. The intercalation of the clay in the polymer matrix was investigated by XRD and the interlayer spacing of clay was found to be increased up to 37 , while the structure morphology of the nanocomposites was investigated by TEM and SEM. The nanocomposites were found to be a mixture of exfoliated and intercalated morphologies. The thermal stability of the nanocomposites was significantly increased by incorporation of nanoclay into the polymer matrix. DSC results reveal that the Tg was shifted to higher values, gradually with increasing the amount of filler in the nanocomposites. Tensile strength and Young's modulus of the nanocomposites showed remarkable improvement compared to the neat POBUA.

  18. {sup 31}P NMR study of the complexation of TBP with lanthanides and actinides in solution and in a clay matrix

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartzell, C.J.

    1994-07-24

    Goal was to use NMR to study TBP/lanthanide complexes in the interlayer or on edge sites of clays. Work in this laboratory yielded details of the complexation of Eu(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} and Pr(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} with TBP in hexane solution; this information is crucial to interpretation of results of NMR studies of the complexes exchanged into clays. The solution {sup 31}P-chemical shift values were improved by repeating the studies on the lanthanide salts dissolved directly into neat TBP. NMR studies of these neat solutions of the Eu(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}{lg_bullet}3TBP-complex and the Pr(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}{lg_bullet}3TBP-complex show that the {sup 31}P chemical shift remains relatively constant for TBP: lanthanide ratios below 3: 1. At higher ratios, the chemical shift approaches that of free TBP, indicating rapid exchange of TBP between the free and complexed state. Exchange of these complexes into the clay hectorite yielded discrete {sup 31}P-NMR signals for the Eu{lg_bullet}TBP complex at -190 ppm and free TBP at -6 ppm. Adsorption of the Pr{lg_bullet}TBP complex yielded broad signals at 76 ppm for the complex and -6 ppm for free TBP. There was no evidence of exchange between the incorporated complex and the free TBP.

  19. Application Content and Evaluation Criteria/Process

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Evaluation Criteria/Process Reginald Tyler Golden Field Office Office of Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Application Content o Separate Applications for Each Major Topic o Title Should Identify the Topic Area o Application - SF 424 o Budget File - SF 424A o Project Summary - 1 page, non-proprietary Project Narrative o Provide clear description of the technical concept and how you plan to accomplish the work. o Include a description of the relevance of and justification for

  20. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY- Inserted before Table of Contents

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR REMOVAL ACTIONS AT THE TECHNICAL AREA III CLASSIFIED WASTE LANDFILL, SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES, NEW MEXICO DOE/EA-1729 June 2010 National Nuclear Security Administration Sandia Site Office P.O. Box 5400 Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-5400 DOE/EA-1729: Environmental Assessment for Removal Actions at the Technical Area III June 2010 Classified Waste Landfill, Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico i TABLE OF CONTENTS Section Page 1.0 PURPOSE AND NEED FOR

  1. Remote possibly hazardous content container sampling device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Volz, David L.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention relates to an apparatus capable of sampling enclosed containers, where the contents of the container is unknown. The invention includes a compressed air device capable of supplying air pressure, device for controlling the amount of air pressure applied, a pneumatic valve, a sampling device having a hollow, sampling insertion needle suspended therein and device to communicate fluid flow between the container and a containment vessel, pump or direct reading instrument.

  2. CONTENTS Gas Hydrate-Bearing Sand

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CONTENTS Gas Hydrate-Bearing Sand Reservoir Systems in the Offshore of India: Results of the India National Gas Hydrate Program Expedition 02 ..............1 The Potential for Abiotic Methane in Arctic Gas Hydrates .................9 Coupled Thermo-Hydro-Chemo- Mechanical (THCM) Models for Hydrate-Bearing Sediments ....13 Emerging Issues in the Development of Geologic Models for Gas Hydrate Numerical Simulation ................19 Announcements ...................... 23 * DOE/NETL FY2016 Methane

  3. Analysis of Joint Masonry Moisture Content Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ueno, Kohta

    2015-10-01

    Adding insulation to the interior side of walls of masonry buildings in cold (and wet) climates may cause performance and durability problems. Some concerns, such as condensation and freeze-thaw, have known solutions, but wood members embedded in the masonry structure will be colder (and potentially wetter) after an interior insulation retrofit. Moisture content & relative humidity were monitored at joist ends in historic mass brick masonry walls retrofitted with interior insulation in a cold climate (Zone 5A); data were collected from 2012-2015. Eleven joist ends were monitored in all four orientations. One limitation of these results is that the renovation is still ongoing, with limited wintertime construction heating and no permanent occupancy to date. Measurements show that many joists ends remain at high moisture contents, especially at north- and east-facing orientations, with constant 100% RH conditions at the worst cases. These high moisture levels are not conducive for wood durability, but no evidence for actual structural damage has been observed. Insulated versus non-insulated joist pockets do not show large differences. South facing joists have safe (10-15%) moisture contents. Given the uncertainty pointed out by research, definitive guidance on the vulnerability of embedded wood members is difficult to formulate. In high-risk situations, or when a very conservative approach is warranted, the embedded wood member condition can be eliminated entirely, supporting the joist ends outside of the masonry pocket.

  4. Property List for RO Code '37', EDI

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    POWERED COU ALLEGHENY CLARK GPX25E GPX230E0579231 17,499.00 902 000 C5583 FORKLIFT PROPANE CATERPILLAR GP20 5AM08330 16,875.00 6 None 0156551 FORKLIFT, 3000 LB YALE L314...

  5. Sensitive Property RO 23_120213.xlsx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    742.75 RR3 109 27-Sep-13 23 0000040970 COMPUTER, CONVERTABL HEWLETT PACKARD COMPAQ ELITE 8300 MXL23921M2 779.00 T43 108 10-Jul-13 23 0000040439 COMPUTER, CONVERTABL HEWLETT...

  6. Ingenieurb ro Henning Holst | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Name: Ingenieurbro Henning Holst Place: Husum, Germany Zip: 25813 Sector: Wind energy Product: Wind energy consultant and project developer. References:...

  7. Microsoft Word - knuteson-ro.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... (due to instrument maintenance or power outages) and some obvious outlier points ... complete and well suited for the development of a long-term spectral radiance climatology. ...

  8. Web Content Analysis and Inventories: Template and FY 2014 Inventory |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Content Analysis and Inventories: Template and FY 2014 Inventory Web Content Analysis and Inventories: Template and FY 2014 Inventory A content inventory and analysis will help identify content that needs to be updated, edited, added, or removed for maintenance. They're also recommended prior to starting a website redesign. This content template and sample inventory were created in Excel. The sample lists URLs, page names, navigation, navigation hierarchy, and section

  9. Web Content Analysis and Inventories | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Content Analysis and Inventories Web Content Analysis and Inventories The Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) recommends periodic content inventories and analyses of its websites. They will help identify content that needs to be updated, edited, added, or removed for maintenance. They're also recommended prior to starting a website redesign. EERE asks that all Web Coordinators and their teams review their websites' content at least once a year. It is an important part of

  10. Analysis of Joist Masonry Moisture Content Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ueno, Kohta

    2015-10-08

    There are many existing buildings with load-bearing mass masonry walls, whose energy performance could be improved with the retrofit of insulation. However, adding insulation to the interior side of walls of such masonry buildings in cold (and wet) climates may cause performance and durability problems. Some concerns, such as condensation and freeze-thaw have known solutions. But wood members embedded in the masonry structure will be colder (and potentially wetter) after an interior insulation retrofit. Moisture content & relative humidity were monitored at joist ends in historic mass brick masonry walls retrofitted with interior insulation in a cold climate (Zone 5A); data were collected from 2012-2015. Eleven joist ends were monitored in all four orientations. One limitation of these results is that the renovation is still ongoing, with limited wintertime construction heating and no permanent occupancy to date. Measurements show that many joists ends remain at high moisture contents, especially at north- and east-facing orientations, with constant 100% RH conditions at the worst cases. These high moisture levels are not conducive for wood durability, but no evidence for actual structural damage has been observed. Insulated vs. non-insulated joist pockets do not show large differences. South facing joists have safe (10-15%) moisture contents. Given the uncertainty pointed out by research, definitive guidance on the vulnerability of embedded wood members is difficult to formulate. In high-risk situations, or when a very conservative approach is warranted, the embedded wood member condition can be eliminated entirely, supporting the joist ends outside of the masonry pocket.

  11. SWS Online Tool now includes Multifamily Content, plus a How...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SWS Online Tool now includes Multifamily Content, plus a How-To Webinar SWS Online Tool now includes Multifamily Content, plus a How-To Webinar This announcement contains ...

  12. THE STELLAR CONTENT OF OBSCURED GALACTIC GIANT H II REGIONS....

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    THE STELLAR CONTENT OF OBSCURED GALACTIC GIANT H II REGIONS. VII. W3 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: THE STELLAR CONTENT OF OBSCURED GALACTIC GIANT H II REGIONS. VII. W3 ...

  13. Utah Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Utah Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun ...

  14. California Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) California Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr ...

  15. North Dakota Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) North Dakota Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr ...

  16. Georgia Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Georgia Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May ...

  17. North Carolina Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) North Carolina Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Year Jan Feb Mar ...

  18. South Carolina Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) South Carolina Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Year Jan Feb Mar ...

  19. New York Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) New York Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May ...

  20. Massachusetts Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Massachusetts Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr ...

  1. Tennessee Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Tennessee Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May ...

  2. Michigan Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Michigan Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May ...

  3. New Hampshire Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) New Hampshire Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr ...

  4. New Jersey Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) New Jersey Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr ...

  5. District of Columbia Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) District of Columbia Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Year Jan Feb ...

  6. South Dakota Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) South Dakota Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr ...

  7. Rhode Island Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Rhode Island Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr ...

  8. The effect of clay catalyst on the chemical composition of bio-oil obtained by co-pyrolysis of cellulose and polyethylene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solak, Agnieszka; Rutkowski, Piotr

    2014-02-15

    Highlights: • Non-catalytic and catalytic fast pyrolysis of cellulose/polyethylene blend was carried out in a laboratory scale reactor. • Optimization of process temperature was done. • Optimization of clay catalyst type and amount for co-pyrolysis of cellulose and polyethylene was done. • The product yields and the chemical composition of bio-oil was investigated. - Abstract: Cellulose/polyethylene (CPE) mixture 3:1, w/w with and without three clay catalysts (K10 – montmorillonite K10, KSF – montmorillonite KSF, B – Bentonite) addition were subjected to pyrolysis at temperatures 400, 450 and 500 °C with heating rate of 100 °C/s to produce bio-oil with high yield. The pyrolytic oil yield was in the range of 41.3–79.5 wt% depending on the temperature, the type and the amount of catalyst. The non-catalytic fast pyrolysis at 500 °C gives the highest yield of bio-oil (79.5 wt%). The higher temperature of catalytic pyrolysis of cellulose/polyethylene mixture the higher yield of bio-oil is. Contrarily, increasing amount of montmorillonite results in significant, almost linear decrease in bio-oil yield followed by a significant increase of gas yield. The addition of clay catalysts to CPE mixture has a various influence on the distribution of bio-oil components. The addition of montmorillonite K10 to cellulose/polyethylene mixture promotes the deepest conversion of polyethylene and cellulose. Additionally, more saturated than unsaturated hydrocarbons are present in resultant bio-oils. The proportion of liquid hydrocarbons is the highest when a montmorillonite K10 is acting as a catalyst.

  9. Reducing the moisture content of clean coals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kehoe, D. )

    1992-12-01

    Coal moisture content can profoundly effect the cost of burning coal in utility boilers. Because of the large effect of coal moisture, the Empire State Electric Energy Research Corporation (ESEERCO) contracted with the Electric Power Research Institute to investigate advanced coal dewatering methods at its Coal Quality Development Center. This report contains the test result on the high-G solid-bowl centrifuge, the second of four devices to be tested. The high-G solid-bowl centrifuge removes water for coal by spinning the coal/water mixture rapidly in a rotating bowl. This causes the coal to cling to the sides of the bowl where it can be removed, leaving the water behind. Testing was performed at the CQDC to evaluate the effect of four operating variables (G-ratio, feed solids concentration, dry solids feed rate, and differential RPM) on the performance of the high-G solid-bowl centrifuge. Two centrifuges of different bowl diameter were tested to establish the effect of scale-up of centrifuge performance. Testing of the two centrifuges occurred from 1985 through 1987. CQDC engineers performed 32 tests on the smaller of the two centrifuges, and 47 tests on the larger. Equations that predict the performance of the two centrifuges for solids recovery, moisture content of the produced coal, and motor torque were obtained. The equations predict the observed data well. Traditional techniques of establishing the performance of centrifuge of different scale did not work well with the two centrifuges, probably because of the large range of G-ratios used in the testing. Cost of operating a commercial size bank of centrifuges is approximately $1.72 per ton of clean coal. This compares well with thermal drying, which costs $1.82 per ton of clean coal.

  10. Improved Technique of Hydrogen Content Analysis by Slow Neutron Scattering

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Rainwater, L. J.; Havens, W. W. Jr.

    1945-02-28

    A slow-neutron-transmission method fro determining the H content of fluorcarbons is described (G.Y.)

  11. CSI 2264: simultaneous optical and infrared light curves of young disk-bearing stars in NGC 2264 with CoRoT and Spitzerevidence for multiple origins of variability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cody, Ann Marie; Stauffer, John; Rebull, Luisa M.; Carey, Sean; Baglin, Annie; Micela, Giuseppina; Flaccomio, Ettore; Morales-Caldern, Mara; Aigrain, Suzanne; Bouvier, Jrme; Gutermuth, Robert; Song, Inseok; Turner, Neal; Alencar, Silvia H. P.; Zwintz, Konstanze; Plavchan, Peter; Terebey, Susan; and others

    2014-04-01

    We present the Coordinated Synoptic Investigation of NGC 2264, a continuous 30 day multi-wavelength photometric monitoring campaign on more than 1000 young cluster members using 16 telescopes. The unprecedented combination of multi-wavelength, high-precision, high-cadence, and long-duration data opens a new window into the time domain behavior of young stellar objects. Here we provide an overview of the observations, focusing on results from Spitzer and CoRoT. The highlight of this work is detailed analysis of 162 classical T Tauri stars for which we can probe optical and mid-infrared flux variations to 1% amplitudes and sub-hour timescales. We present a morphological variability census and then use metrics of periodicity, stochasticity, and symmetry to statistically separate the light curves into seven distinct classes, which we suggest represent different physical processes and geometric effects. We provide distributions of the characteristic timescales and amplitudes and assess the fractional representation within each class. The largest category (>20%) are optical 'dippers' with discrete fading events lasting ?1-5 days. The degree of correlation between the optical and infrared light curves is positive but weak; notably, the independently assigned optical and infrared morphology classes tend to be different for the same object. Assessment of flux variation behavior with respect to (circum)stellar properties reveals correlations of variability parameters with H? emission and with effective temperature. Overall, our results point to multiple origins of young star variability, including circumstellar obscuration events, hot spots on the star and/or disk, accretion bursts, and rapid structural changes in the inner disk.

  12. Exploring atmospheres of hot mini-Neptune and extrasolar giant planets orbiting different stars with application to HD 97658b, WASP-12b, CoRoT-2b, XO-1b, and HD 189733b

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miguel, Y.; Kaltenegger, L.

    2014-01-10

    We calculated an atmospheric grid for hot mini-Neptune and giant exoplanets that links astrophysical observable parametersorbital distance and stellar typewith the chemical atmospheric species expected. The grid can be applied to current and future observations to characterize exoplanet atmospheres and serves as a reference to interpret atmospheric retrieval analysis results. To build the grid, we developed a one-dimensional code for calculating the atmospheric thermal structure and linked it to a photochemical model that includes disequilibrium chemistry (molecular diffusion, vertical mixing, and photochemistry). We compare the thermal profiles and atmospheric composition of planets at different semimajor axes (0.01 AU ? a ? 0.1 AU) orbiting F, G, K, and M stars. Temperature and UV flux affect chemical species in the atmosphere. We explore which effects are due to temperature and which are due to stellar characteristics, showing the species most affected in each case. CH{sub 4} and H{sub 2}O are the most sensitive to UV flux, H displaces H{sub 2} as the most abundant gas in the upper atmosphere for planets receiving a high UV flux. CH{sub 4} is more abundant for cooler planets. We explore vertical mixing, to inform degeneracies on our models and in the resulting spectral observables. For lower pressures, observable species like H{sub 2}O or CO{sub 2} can indicate the efficiency of vertical mixing, with larger mixing ratios for a stronger mixing. By establishing the grid, testing the sensitivity of the results, and comparing our model to published results, our paper provides a tool to estimate what observations could yield. We apply our model to WASP-12b, CoRoT-2b, XO-1b, HD189733b, and HD97658b.

  13. Expanded Content Envelope For The Model 9977 Packaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abramczyk, G. A.; Loftin, B. M.; Nathan, S. J.; Bellamy, J. S.

    2013-07-30

    An Addendum was written to the Model 9977 Safety Analysis Report for Packaging adding a new content consisting of DOE-STD-3013 stabilized plutonium dioxide materials to the authorized Model 9977 contents. The new Plutonium Oxide Content (PuO{sub 2}) Envelope will support the Department of Energy shipment of materials between Los Alamos National Laboratory and Savannah River Site facilities. The new content extended the current content envelope boundaries for radioactive material mass and for decay heat load and required a revision to the 9977 Certificate of Compliance prior to shipment. The Addendum documented how the new contents/configurations do not compromise the safety basis presented in the 9977 SARP Revision 2. The changes from the certified package baseline and the changes to the package required to safely transport this material is discussed.

  14. FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - Cover and Contents |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 09 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - Cover and Contents FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - Cover and Contents The primary Lightweight Materials activity goal is to validate a cost-effective weight reduction in total vehicle weight while maintaining safety, performance, and reliability. PDF icon cover_toc.pdf More Documents & Publications FY 2008 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - Cover, Title Page, and Contents WORKSHOP

  15. Featured Content | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Featured Content High Energy Physics (HEP) HEP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of HEP Funding Opportunities Advisory Committees Community Resources Featured Content 2016 2015 2014 2013 2012-2008 Reports Contact Information High Energy Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-25/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3624 F: (301) 903-2597 E: Email Us More Information » Community Resources Featured Content Print Text Size: A A A

  16. Energy.gov Content Management System Data Tables | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy.gov Content Management System Data Tables For Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) websites, follow these guidelines for creating Section 508-compliant ...

  17. Energy.gov Content Management System Block Types

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    For Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) websites, learn about the variety of block types available in the Energy.gov Drupal content management system (CMS).

  18. Domestic Material Content in Molten-Salt Concentrating Solar...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Domestic Material Content in Molten-Salt Concentrating Solar Power Plants Craig Turchi, Parthiv Kurup, Sertac Akar, and Francisco Flores Technical Report NRELTP-5500-64429 August...

  19. Thorium, uranium and rare earth elements content in lanthanide...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Thorium, uranium and rare earth elements content in lanthanide concentrate (LC) and water ... in lanthanide concentrate (LC) and water leach purification (WLP) residue of Lynas ...

  20. ,"U.S. Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1","U.S. Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed",4,"Annual",2015,"6302003" ,"Release Date:","4292016" ,"Next Release Date:","5312016" ,"Excel File Name:","ngconsheatdcunus...

  1. Consideration of Factors Affecting Strip Effluent PH and Sodium Content

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, T.

    2015-07-29

    A number of factors were investigated to determine possible reasons for why the Strip Effluent (SE) can sometimes have higher than expected pH values and/or sodium content, both of which have prescribed limits. All of the factors likely have some impact on the pH values and Na content.

  2. Recommending personally interested contents by text mining, filtering, and interfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Xu, Songhua

    2015-10-27

    A personalized content recommendation system includes a client interface device configured to monitor a user's information data stream. A collaborative filter remote from the client interface device generates automated predictions about the interests of the user. A database server stores personal behavioral profiles and user's preferences based on a plurality of monitored past behaviors and an output of the collaborative user personal interest inference engine. A programmed personal content recommendation server filters items in an incoming information stream with the personal behavioral profile and identifies only those items of the incoming information stream that substantially matches the personal behavioral profile. The identified personally relevant content is then recommended to the user following some priority that may consider the similarity between the personal interest matches, the context of the user information consumption behaviors that may be shown by the user's content consumption mode.

  3. Energy.gov Content Management System Requirements and Guidance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's (EERE's) websites are hosted in Energy.gov's Drupal content management system (CMS), which is maintained by the U.S. Department of Energy's Public Affairs Office.

  4. Recommending personally interested contents by text mining, filtering, and interfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    xu, Songhua

    2015-11-05

    A personalized content recommendation system includes a client interface device configured to monitor a user's information data stream. A collaborative filter remote from the client interface device generates automated predictions about the interests of the user. A database server stores personal behavioral profiles and user's preferences based on a plurality of monitored past behaviors and an output of the collaborative user personal interest inference engine. A programmed personal content recommendation server filters items in an incoming information stream with the personal behavioral profile and identifies only those items of the incoming information stream that substantially matches the personal behavioral profile. The identified personally relevant content is then recommended to the user following some priority that may consider the similarity between the personal interest matches, the context of the user information consumption behaviors that may be shown by the user's content consumption mode.

  5. T-544: Cisco Security Advisory: Cisco Content Services Gateway...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    a single content service to be active on the Cisco CSG2 and can be exploited via crafted TCP packets. A three-way handshake is not required to exploit either of these...

  6. This content has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    C11003 2013 JINST 8 C11003 Contents 1 Introduction and motivation 1 2 Model of detector system and noise sources 2 3 Simulation results 2 3.1 Constant signal model 2 3.2 Pulse...

  7. This content has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A flexible master oscillator for a pulse-burst laser system View the table of contents for ... A flexible master oscillator for a pulse-burst laser system D.J. Den Hartog 1 and W.C. ...

  8. Energy.gov Content Management System Requirements and Guidance...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    in the Energy.gov CMS. All exceptions must receive written approval from Public Affairs. ... Learn more about coding outside of the Energy.gov Content Management System. Communication ...

  9. Impact of Fission Products Impurity on the Plutonium Content...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Impact of Fission Products Impurity on the Plutonium Content of Metal- and Oxide- Fuels in Sodium Cooled Fast Reactors Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Impact of Fission ...

  10. Mercury Contents of Natural Thermal and Mineral Fluids, In- U...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Paper 713 Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Book Section: Mercury Contents of Natural Thermal and Mineral Fluids, In- U.S. Geological...

  11. Recent content in Databus | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Question Groups Menu You must login in order to post into this group. Recent content Hello-Sorry for the delay in... Use of DynamicAggregationProcessor I submitted a pull...

  12. Recent content in Linked Open Data Workshop in Washington, D...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Recent content in Linked Open Data Workshop in Washington, D.C. Home Name Post date sort icon Type Detailed Planning Kicks Off Jweers 27 Sep 2012 - 06:53 Blog entry Notes from the...

  13. A Review Of Water Contents Of Nominally Anhydrous Natural Minerals...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Of Water Contents Of Nominally Anhydrous Natural Minerals In The Mantles Of Earth, Mars And The Moon Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal...

  14. Similarity Engine: Using Content Similarity to Improve Memory Resilience.

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Conference) | SciTech Connect Similarity Engine: Using Content Similarity to Improve Memory Resilience. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Similarity Engine: Using Content Similarity to Improve Memory Resilience. Abstract not provided. Authors: Levy, Scott N. ; Ferreira, Kurt Brian ; Bridges, Patrick G Publication Date: 2016-01-01 OSTI Identifier: 1239385 Report Number(s): SAND2016-0499C 618682 DOE Contract Number: AC04-94AL85000 Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation:

  15. Plants with modified lignin content and methods for production thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhao, Qiao; Chen, Fang; Dixon, Richard A.

    2014-08-05

    The invention provides methods for decreasing lignin content and for increasing the level of fermentable carbohydrates in plants by down-regulation of the NST transcription factor. Nucleic acid constructs for down-regulation of NST are described. Transgenic plants are provided that comprise reduced lignin content. Plants described herein may be used, for example, as improved biofuel feedstock and as highly digestible forage crops. Methods for processing plant tissue and for producing ethanol by utilizing such plants are also provided.

  16. Transcription factors for modification of lignin content in plants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Huanzhong; Chen, Fang; Dixon, Richard A.

    2015-06-02

    The invention provides methods for modifying lignin, cellulose, xylan, and hemicellulose content in plants, and for achieving ectopic lignification and, for instance, secondary cell wall synthesis in pith cells, by altered regulation of a WRKY transcription factor. Nucleic acid constructs for altered WRKY-TF expression are described. Transgenic plants are provided that comprise modified pith cell walls, and lignin, cellulose, and hemicellulose content. Plants described herein may be used, for example, as improved biofuel feedstock and as highly digestible forage crops.

  17. RH-TRU Waste Content Codes (RH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2007-08-01

    The Remote-Handled Transuranic (RH-TRU) Content Codes (RH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of RH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Remote-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (RH-TRAMPAC).1 The RH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the RH-TRU 72-B. This document is a catalog of RH-TRU 72-B authorized contents by site. A content code is defined by the following components: A two-letter site abbreviation that designates the physical location of the generated/stored waste (e.g., ID for Idaho National Laboratory [INL]). The site-specific letter designations for each of the sites are provided in Table 1. A three-digit code that designates the physical and chemical form of the waste (e.g., content code 317 denotes TRU Metal Waste). For RH-TRU waste to be transported in the RH-TRU 72-B, the first number of this three-digit code is 3. The second and third numbers of the three-digit code describe the physical and chemical form of the waste. Table 2 provides a brief description of each generic code. Content codes are further defined as subcodes by an alpha trailer after the three-digit code to allow segregation of wastes that differ in one or more parameter(s). For example, the alpha trailers of the subcodes ID 322A and ID 322B may be used to differentiate between waste packaging configurations. As detailed in the RH-TRAMPAC, compliance with flammable gas limits may be demonstrated through the evaluation of compliance with either a decay heat limit or flammable gas generation rate (FGGR) limit per container specified in approved content codes. As applicable, if a container meets the watt*year criteria specified by the RH-TRAMPAC, the decay heat limits based on the dose-dependent G value may be used as specified in an approved content code. If a site implements the administrative controls outlined in the RH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 2.4 of the RH-TRU Payload Appendices, the decay heat or FGGR limits based on a 10-day shipping period (rather than the standard 60-day shipping period) may be used as specified in an approved content code. Requests for new or revised content codes may be submitted to the WIPP RH-TRU Payload Engineer for review and approval, provided all RH-TRAMPAC requirements are met.

  18. Measurement of Moisture Content in Sand, Slag, and Crucible Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, J.H.

    1999-09-20

    The deinventory process at Rocky Flats (RFETS) has included moisture content measurements of sand, slag, and crucible (SSC) materials by performing weight loss measurements at 210 degrees - 220 degrees Celsius on representative samples prior to packaging for shipment. Shipping requirements include knowledge of the moisture content. Work at the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) showed that the measurement at 210 degrees - 220 degrees Celsius did not account for all of the moisture. The objective of the work in this report was to determine if the measurement at 210 degrees - 220 degrees Celsius at RFETS could be used to set upper bounds on moisture content and therefore, eliminate the need for RFETS to unpack, reanalyze and repack the material.

  19. Turbidimetric determination of the total glucozinolate content of rape

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kononova, R.V.; Chaika, I.K.; Levitskii, A.P.; Lucashenok, E.V.

    1986-03-01

    The objective of the investigation was to develop a procedure for the determination of the total GZ (glucozinolate--non-nurishing substances found in rapeseed) content from the content of sulfate ion SO/sup 2 -4/which is formed in the fermentative hydrolysis of GZ, based on the degree of turbidity formed by the addition of a barium chloride solution in the presence of the surfactant Tween-80 (poly(20)ethoxysorbitan monooleate.). The supernatant liquid is used to determine the SO/sup 2 -4 -/ion before and after fermentative hydrolysis. The GZ content of the analyzed sample of rapeseed raw material was calculated from an equation. Data show that the precision, reliability, and reproducibility of the results obtained by the proposed method are satisfactory. The procedure can be sued for serial analysis in selection establishments as well as feed production plants.

  20. Microsoft Word - Appendix C_DisposalCellContents.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Disposal Cell Contents Table C-1. Contents of the Weldon Spring, Missouri, Disposal Cell U.S. Department of Energy Weldon Spring Site LTS&M Plan July 2005 Doc. No. S0079000 Page C-3 Work Zone Per WP437 and Material Description Cell Placement Considerations Occupied Cell Volume (cy) Raffinate Pits Work Zone CSS Grout Produced in CSS Plant and pumped to cell. Volume as determined at the plant. 188,443.00 Raffinate Pit 4 residual sludge Stabilized in situ with grout then mixed with TSA

  1. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2004-10-01

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

  2. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2004-12-01

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

  3. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2006-12-20

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

  4. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2006-06-20

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

  5. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2006-08-15

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

  6. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2006-01-18

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

  7. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2007-02-15

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

  8. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2007-06-15

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

  9. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2007-08-15

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

  10. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2007-09-20

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

  11. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2005-05-01

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

  12. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2005-03-15

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

  13. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2005-08-15

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

  14. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2005-01-15

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codesand corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

  15. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2005-12-15

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

  16. CH-TRU Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2005-10-15

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

  17. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2005-06-20

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

  18. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2005-01-30

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

  19. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2006-09-15

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

  20. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2005-11-20

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

  1. RH-TRU Waste Content Codes (RH TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions

    2007-05-01

    The Remote-Handled Transuranic (RH-TRU) Content Codes (RH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of RH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Remote-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (RH-TRAMPAC).1 The RH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the RH-TRU 72-B. This document is a catalog of RH-TRU 72-B authorized contents by site. A content code is defined by the following components: A two-letter site abbreviation that designates the physical location of the generated/stored waste (e.g., ID for Idaho National Laboratory [INL]). The site-specific letter designations for each of the sites are provided in Table 1. A three-digit code that designates the physical and chemical form of the waste (e.g., content code 317 denotes TRU Metal Waste). For RH-TRU waste to be transported in the RH-TRU 72-B, the first number of this three-digit code is 3. The second and third numbers of the three-digit code describe the physical and chemical form of the waste. Table 2 provides a brief description of each generic code. Content codes are further defined as subcodes by an alpha trailer after the three-digit code to allow segregation of wastes that differ in one or more parameter(s). For example, the alpha trailers of the subcodes ID 322A and ID 322B may be used to differentiate between waste packaging configurations. As detailed in the RH-TRAMPAC, compliance with flammable gas limits may be demonstrated through the evaluation of compliance with either a decay heat limit or flammable gas generation rate (FGGR) limit per container specified in approved content codes. As applicable, if a container meets the watt*year criteria specified by the RH-TRAMPAC, the decay heat limits based on the dose-dependent G value may be used as specified in an approved content code. If a site implements the administrative controls outlined in the RH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 2.4 of the RH-TRU Payload Appendices, the decay heat or FGGR limits based on a 10-day shipping period (rather than the standard 60-day shipping period) may be used as specified in an approved content code.

  2. Energy.gov Content Management System Page Types

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    For Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) websites, learn about the standard page types available in the Energy.gov Drupal content management system (CMS). For information about other available page types, or to request a new kind of page type, contact the Site Coordinators.

  3. Modification of lignin content and composition in plants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ye, Zheng-Hua

    2002-01-01

    Plants and methods of preparing plants having reduced lignin content and/or altered lignin composition are provided. The activities of caffeoyl-CoA O-methyltransferase and/or caffeic acid O-methyltransferase enzymes in the modified plants are reduced.

  4. Survey of mercury, cadmium and lead content of household batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Recknagel, Sebastian; Radant, Hendrik; Kohlmeyer, Regina

    2014-01-15

    Highlights: • A well selected sample of 146 batteries was analysed for its heavy metals content. • A comparison was made between heavy metals contents in batteries in 2006 and 2011. • No significant change after implementation of the new EU Batteries Directive. • Severe differences in heavy metal contents were found in different battery-types. - Abstract: The objective of this work was to provide updated information on the development of the potential impact of heavy metal containing batteries on municipal waste and battery recycling processes following transposition of the new EU Batteries Directive 2006/66/EC. A representative sample of 146 different types of commercially available dry and button cells as well as lithium-ion accumulators for mobile phones were analysed for their mercury (Hg)-, cadmium (Cd)- and lead (Pb)-contents. The methods used for preparing the cells and analysing the heavy metals Hg, Cd, and Pb were either developed during a former study or newly developed. Several batteries contained higher mass fractions of mercury or cadmium than the EU limits. Only half of the batteries with mercury and/or lead fractions above the marking thresholds were labelled. Alkaline–manganese mono-cells and Li-ion accumulators, on average, contained the lowest heavy metal concentrations, while zinc–carbon batteries, on average, contained the highest levels.

  5. WFIP NOAA Final Report - Page i DE-EE0003080 TABLE OF CONTENTS

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    WFIP NOAA Final Report - Page i DE-EE0003080 TABLE OF CONTENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS ................................................................................................................................. i Executive Summary .................................................................................................................................. 1 1. Project Overview

  6. Table 41. No. 2 Diesel Fuel Prices by Sulfur Content, Sales...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Content, Sales Type, and PAD District 242 Energy Information Administration Petroleum Marketing Annual 1997 Table 41. No. 2 Diesel Fuel Prices by Sulfur Content, Sales Type,...

  7. Table 41. No. 2 Diesel Fuel Prices by Sulfur Content, Sales...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Content, Sales Type, and PAD District 242 Energy Information Administration Petroleum Marketing Annual 1996 Table 41. No. 2 Diesel Fuel Prices by Sulfur Content, Sales Type,...

  8. U.S. Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Electric Power Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) U.S. Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries ... Release Date: 4292016 Next Release Date: 5312016 Referring Pages: Heat Content of ...

  9. U.S. Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Other Sectors...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Other Sectors Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) U.S. Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries ... Release Date: 4292016 Next Release Date: 5312016 Referring Pages: Heat Content of ...

  10. Method for creating high carbon content products from biomass oil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Parker, Reginald; Seames, Wayne

    2012-12-18

    In a method for producing high carbon content products from biomass, a biomass oil is added to a cracking reactor vessel. The biomass oil is heated to a temperature ranging from about 100.degree. C. to about 800.degree. C. at a pressure ranging from about vacuum conditions to about 20,700 kPa for a time sufficient to crack the biomass oil. Tar is separated from the cracked biomass oil. The tar is heated to a temperature ranging from about 200.degree. C. to about 1500.degree. C. at a pressure ranging from about vacuum conditions to about 20,700 kPa for a time sufficient to reduce the tar to a high carbon content product containing at least about 50% carbon by weight.

  11. Process for production of synthesis gas with reduced sulfur content

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Najjar, Mitri S.; Corbeels, Roger J.; Kokturk, Uygur

    1989-01-01

    A process for the partial oxidation of a sulfur- and silicate-containing carbonaceous fuel to produce a synthesis gas with reduced sulfur content which comprises partially oxidizing said fuel at a temperature in the range of 1800.degree.-2200.degree. F. in the presence of a temperature moderator, an oxygen-containing gas and a sulfur capture additive which comprises an iron-containing compound portion and a sodium-containing compound portion to produce a synthesis gas comprising H.sub.2 and CO with a reduced sulfur content and a molten slag which comprises (i) a sulfur-containing sodium-iron silicate phase and (ii) a sodium-iron sulfide phase. The sulfur capture additive may optionally comprise a copper-containing compound portion.

  12. Method and apparatus for determining fat content of tissue

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weber, Thomas M.; Spletzer, Barry L.; Bryan, Jon R.; Dickey, Fred M.; Shagam, Richard N.; Gooris, Luc

    2001-01-01

    A method and apparatus for determining characteristics of tissue is disclosed. The method comprises supplying optical energy to a tissue and detecting at a plurality of locations consequent energy scattered by the tissue. Analysis of the scattered energy as taught herein provides information concerning the properties of the tissue, specifically information related to the fat and lean content and thickness of the tissue. The apparatus comprises a light source adapted to deliver optical energy to a tissue. A plurality of detectors can be mounted at different positions relative to the source to detect energy scattered by the tissue. A signal processor as taught herein can determine characteristics of the tissue from the signals from the detectors and locations of the detectors, specifically information related to the fat and lean content and thickness of the tissue.

  13. Deposition of device quality low H content, amorphous silicon films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mahan, A.H.; Carapella, J.C.; Gallagher, A.C.

    1995-03-14

    A high quality, low hydrogen content, hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) film is deposited by passing a stream of silane gas (SiH{sub 4}) over a high temperature, 2,000 C, tungsten (W) filament in the proximity of a high temperature, 400 C, substrate within a low pressure, 8 mTorr, deposition chamber. The silane gas is decomposed into atomic hydrogen and silicon, which in turn collides preferably not more than 20--30 times before being deposited on the hot substrate. The hydrogenated amorphous silicon films thus produced have only about one atomic percent hydrogen, yet have device quality electrical, chemical, and structural properties, despite this lowered hydrogen content. 7 figs.

  14. Deposition of device quality low H content, amorphous silicon films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mahan, Archie H.; Carapella, Jeffrey C.; Gallagher, Alan C.

    1995-01-01

    A high quality, low hydrogen content, hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) film is deposited by passing a stream of silane gas (SiH.sub.4) over a high temperature, 2000.degree. C., tungsten (W) filament in the proximity of a high temperature, 400.degree. C., substrate within a low pressure, 8 mTorr, deposition chamber. The silane gas is decomposed into atomic hydrogen and silicon, which in turn collides preferably not more than 20-30 times before being deposited on the hot substrate. The hydrogenated amorphous silicon films thus produced have only about one atomic percent hydrogen, yet have device quality electrical, chemical, and structural properties, despite this lowered hydrogen content.

  15. Similarity Engine: Using Content Similarity to Improve Memory Resilience

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    0499C Similarity Engine: Using Content Similarity to Improve Memory Resilience Scott Levy Department of Computer Science University of New Mexico slevy@cs.unm.edu Kurt B. Ferreira Center for Computing Research Sandia National Laboratories kbferre@sandia.gov Patrick G. Bridges Department of Computer Science University of New Mexico bridges@cs.unm.edu ABSTRACT In next-generation extreme-scale systems, application per- formance will be limited by memory performance charac- teristics. The first

  16. T-544: Cisco Security Advisory: Cisco Content Services Gateway Vulnerabilities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Cisco IOS Software Release 12.4(24)MD1 on the Cisco CSG2 contains two vulnerabilities that can be exploited by a remote, unauthenticated attacker to create a denial of service condition that prevents traffic from passing through the CSG2. These vulnerabilities require only a single content service to be active on the Cisco CSG2 and can be exploited via crafted TCP packets. A three-way handshake is not required to exploit either of these vulnerabilities.

  17. Assembly of Repeat Content Using Next Generation Sequencing Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    labutti, Kurt; Kuo, Alan; Grigoriev, Igor; Copeland, Alex

    2014-03-17

    Repetitive organisms pose a challenge for short read assembly, and typically only unique regions and repeat regions shorter than the read length, can be accurately assembled. Recently, we have been investigating the use of Pacific Biosciences reads for de novo fungal assembly. We will present an assessment of the quality and degree of repeat reconstruction possible in a fungal genome using long read technology. We will also compare differences in assembly of repeat content using short read and long read technology.

  18. Microsoft Word - SEC J_Table of Contents

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    J Page i PART III - LIST OF DOCUMENTS, EXHIBITS, AND OTHER ATTACHMENTS SECTION J LIST OF APPENDICES TABLE OF CONTENTS Appendix A Statement of Work Appendix B Performance Evaluation Plan Appendix C Contractor's Transition Plan Appendix D Sensitive Foreign Nations Control Appendix E Performance Guarantee Agreement(s) Appendix F National Work Breakdown Structure Appendix G RESERVED - Governance Appendix H RESERVED Appendix I Personnel Appendix Appendix J Key Personnel Appendix K Small Business

  19. Educating Consumers: New Content on Diesel Vehicles, Diesel Exhaust Fluid,

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and Selective Catalytic Reduction Technologies on the AFDC | Department of Energy Showcases new content added to the AFDC including: Diesel Vehicles, Diesel Exhaust Fluid, Selective Catalytic Reduction Technologies, and an upcoming Deisel Exhaust Fluid Locator. PDF icon deer08_brodt-giles.pdf More Documents & Publications The Diesel Engine Powering Light-Duty Vehicles: Today and Tomorrow EPA Diesel Update Hybrid and Plug-In Electric Vehicles (Brochure), Vehicle Technologies Program (VTP)

  20. Determining inert content in coal dust/rock dust mixture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sapko, Michael J.; Ward, Jr., Jack A.

    1989-01-01

    A method and apparatus for determining the inert content of a coal dust and rock dust mixture uses a transparent window pressed against the mixture. An infrared light beam is directed through the window such that a portion of the infrared light beam is reflected from the mixture. The concentration of the reflected light is detected and a signal indicative of the reflected light is generated. A normalized value for the generated signal is determined according to the relationship .phi.=(log i.sub.c `log i.sub.co) / (log i.sub.c100 -log i.sub.co) where i.sub.co =measured signal at 0% rock dust i.sub.c100 =measured signal at 100% rock dust i.sub.c =measured signal of the mixture. This normalized value is then correlated to a predetermined relationship of .phi. to rock dust percentage to determine the rock dust content of the mixture. The rock dust content is displayed where the percentage is between 30 and 100%, and an indication of out-of-range is displayed where the rock dust percent is less than 30%. Preferably, the rock dust percentage (RD%) is calculated from the predetermined relationship RD%=100+30 log .phi.. where the dust mixture initially includes moisture, the dust mixture is dried before measuring by use of 8 to 12 mesh molecular-sieves which are shaken with the dust mixture and subsequently screened from the dust mixture.

  1. Measurements of the kaon content in tau decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronan, M.T. )

    1992-02-01

    Results on measurements of the kaon content in one-prong and three-prong [tau] decays are presented for data taken by the TPC/2[gamma] detector at PEP. Using a self-consistent procedure to measure exclusive and inclusive decays, the one-prong analysis extends previous work to kaon decay modes. Three-prong results [ital K][pi][pi], [ital K][pi] and [ital KKK] decay modes provide improved branching ratios and a first look at strange axial-vector couplings in [tau] decays.

  2. PERFORMANCE OF A CONTAINMENT VESSEL CLOSURE FOR RADIOACTIVE GAS CONTENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blanton, P.; Eberl, K.

    2010-07-09

    This paper presents a summary of the design and testing of the containment vessel closure for the Bulk Tritium Shipping Package (BTSP). This package is a replacement for a package that has been used to ship tritium in a variety of content configurations and forms since the early 1970s. The containment vessel closure incorporates features specifically designed for the containment of tritium when subjected to the normal and hypothetical conditions required of Type B radioactive material shipping Packages. The paper discusses functional performance of the containment vessel closure of the BTSP prototype packages and separate testing that evaluated the performance of the metallic C-Rings used in a mock BTSP closure.

  3. Content-addressable memory based enforcement of configurable policies

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berg, Michael J

    2014-05-06

    A monitoring device for monitoring transactions on a bus includes content-addressable memory ("CAM") and a response policy unit. The CAM includes an input coupled to receive a bus transaction tag based on bus traffic on the bus. The CAM stores data tags associated with rules of a security policy to compare the bus transaction tag to the data tags. The CAM generates an output signal indicating whether one or more matches occurred. The response policy unit is coupled to the CAM to receive the output signal from the CAM and to execute a policy action in response to the output signal.

  4. Definition of Small Gram Quantity Contents for Type B Radioactive Material Transportation Packages: Activity-Based Content Limitations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sitaraman, S; Kim, S; Biswas, D; Hafner, R; Anderson, B

    2010-10-27

    Since the 1960's, the Department of Transportation Specification (DOT Spec) 6M packages have been used extensively for transportation of Type B quantities of radioactive materials between Department of Energy (DOE) facilities, laboratories, and productions sites. However, due to the advancement of packaging technology, the aging of the 6M packages, and variability in the quality of the packages, the DOT implemented a phased elimination of the 6M specification packages (and other DOT Spec packages) in favor of packages certified to meet federal performance requirements. DOT issued the final rule in the Federal Register on October 1, 2004 requiring that use of the DOT Specification 6M be discontinued as of October 1, 2008. A main driver for the change was the fact that the 6M specification packagings were not supported by a Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) that was compliant with Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations part 71 (10 CFR 71). Therefore, materials that would have historically been shipped in 6M packages are being identified as contents in Type B (and sometimes Type A fissile) package applications and addenda that are to be certified under the requirements of 10 CFR 71. The requirements in 10 CFR 71 include that the Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) must identify the maximum radioactivity of radioactive constituents and maximum quantities of fissile constituents (10 CFR 71.33(b)(1) and 10 CFR 71.33(b)(2)), and that the application (i.e., SARP submittal or SARP addendum) demonstrates that the external dose rate (due to the maximum radioactivity of radioactive constituents and maximum quantities of fissile constituents) on the surface of the packaging (i.e., package and contents) not exceed 200 mrem/hr (10 CFR 71.35(a), 10 CFR 71.47(a)). It has been proposed that a 'Small Gram Quantity' of radioactive material be defined, such that, when loaded in a transportation package, the dose rates at external points of an unshielded packaging not exceed the regulatory limits prescribed by 10 CFR 71 for non-exclusive shipments. The mass of each radioisotope presented in this paper is limited by the radiation dose rate on the external surface of the package, which per the regulatory limit should not exceed 200 mrem/hr. The results presented are a compendium of allowable masses of a variety of different isotopes (with varying impurity levels of beryllium in some of the actinide isotopes) that, when loaded in an unshielded packaging, do not result in an external dose rate on the surface of the package that exceeds 190 mrem/hr (190 mrem/hr was chosen to provide 5% conservatism relative to the regulatory limit). These mass limits define the term 'Small Gram Quantity' (SGQ) contents in the context of radioactive material transportation packages. The term SGQ is isotope-specific and pertains to contents in radioactive material transportation packages that do not require shielding and still satisfy the external dose rate requirements. Since these calculated mass limits are for contents without shielding, they are conservative for packaging materials that provide some limited shielding or if the contents are placed into a shielded package. The isotopes presented in this paper were chosen as the isotopes that Department of Energy (DOE) sites most likely need to ship. Other more rarely shipped isotopes, along with industrial and medical isotopes, are planned to be included in subsequent extensions of this work.

  5. STATEMENT AND ACKNOWLEDGMENT Expires:e r/o2014

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    collection of information is estimated to average 30 minutes per response, Including the time for reviewing Instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and...

  6. Ingenieurb ro f r Energieanlagen IBE | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    f r Energieanlagen IBE Jump to: navigation, search Name: Ingenieurbro fr Energieanlagen (IBE) Place: Bad Nauheim, Germany Zip: 61231 Sector: Services, Solar, Wind energy...

  7. Ro-vibrational Relaxation Dynamics of PbF Molecules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neil Shafer-Ray

    2011-04-08

    In 1950 Purcell and Ramsey suggested that the electron might have a CP-violating electric dipole moment (e-EDM) proportional to its spin angular momentum. This possibility initiated an ongoing hunt for the e-EDM that has been spurred on by the recognition of the importance of CP-violation to the formation of a matter-dominated universe[2] as well as a difference in magnitude of the Supersymmetric and Standard Model[4] prediction for its value. The current limit on the e-EDM is 1.6E??27 e·cm as determined in a Ramsey beam resonance study of the Tl atom. The PbF molecule provides a unique opportunity to measure the e-EDM. The molecule??s odd electron, heavy mass, and large internal field combine to give it an intrinsic sensitivity to an e-EDM that is over three orders of magnitude bigger than that of the Tl atom. In addition to this increased intrinsic sensitivity, the ground state of the PbF molecule allows for a "magic" electric field at which the magnetic moment vanishes[7]. All of these advantages create an opportunity to significantly lower the current limit on the e-EDM. These advantages can only be realized if an intense source of ground-state PbF molecules can be created and detected with high efficiency. The scope of this project is to (1) create a rotationally cold molecular beam source of PbF, (2) achieve a continuous ionization scheme for sensitive state selective detection of the PbF molecule.

  8. Building America Webinar: Put New Tools and Content on the Building...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Put New Tools and Content on the Building America Solution Center To Work for You Building America Webinar: Put New Tools and Content on the Building America Solution Center To...

  9. Recent content in Increase Natural Gas Energy Efficiency | OpenEI...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    content in Increase Natural Gas Energy Efficiency Home No posts have been made in this group yet. Groups Menu You must login in order to post into this group. Recent content Global...

  10. U.S. Total Consumption of Heat Content of Natural Gas (BTU per...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Consumption of Heat Content of Natural Gas (BTU per Cubic Foot) U.S. Total Consumption of Heat Content of Natural Gas (BTU per Cubic Foot) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 ...

  11. U.S. Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) U.S. Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun ...

  12. A Network Contention Model for the Extreme-scale Simulator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engelmann, Christian [ORNL; Naughton, III, Thomas J [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    The Extreme-scale Simulator (xSim) is a performance investigation toolkit for high-performance computing (HPC) hardware/software co-design. It permits running a HPC application with millions of concurrent execution threads, while observing its performance in a simulated extreme-scale system. This paper details a newly developed network modeling feature for xSim, eliminating the shortcomings of the existing network modeling capabilities. The approach takes a different path for implementing network contention and bandwidth capacity modeling using a less synchronous and accurate enough model design. With the new network modeling feature, xSim is able to simulate on-chip and on-node networks with reasonable accuracy and overheads.

  13. Effect of higher water vapor content on TBC performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pint, Bruce A; Haynes, James A

    2012-01-01

    Coal gasification, or IGCC (integrated gasification combined cycle), is one pathway toward cleaner use of coal for power generation with lower emissions. However, when coal-derived synthesis gas (i.e., syngas) is burned in turbines designed for natural gas, turbine manufacturers recommend 'derating,' or lowering the maximum temperature, which lowers the efficiency of the turbine, making electricity from IGCC more expensive. One possible reason for the derating is the higher water vapor contents in the exhaust gas. Water vapor has a detrimental effect on many oxidation-resistant high-temperature materials. In a turbine hot section, Ni-base superalloys are coated with a thermal barrier coating (TBC) allowing the gas temperature to be higher than the superalloy solidus temperature. TBCs have a low thermal conductivity ceramic top coating (typically Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-stabilized ZrO{sub 2}, or YSZ) and an oxidation-resistant metallic bond coating. For land-based gas turbines, the industry standard is air plasma sprayed (APS) YSZ and high velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) sprayed NiCoCrAlY bond coatings. To investigate the role of higher water vapor content on TBC performance and possible mitigation strategies, furnace cycling experiments were conducted in dry O{sub 2} and air with 10% (typical with natural gas or jet fuel) or 50 vol% water vapor. Cycle frequency and temperature were accelerated to one hour at 1100 C (with 10 minute cooling to {approx}30 C between each thermal cycle) to induce early failures in coatings that are expected to operate for several years with a metal temperature of {approx}900 C. Coupons (16 mm diameter x 2 mm thick) of commercial second-generation single crystal superalloy CMSX4 were HVOF coated on both sides with {approx}125 {micro}m of Ni-22wt%Co-17Cr-12Al either with 0.7Y or 0.7Y-0.3Hf-0.4Si. One side was then coated with 190-240 {micro}m of APS YSZ. Coatings were cycled until the YSZ top coating spalled. Figure 2 shows the results of the initial phase of experiments. Compared to dry O{sub 2}, the addition of 10% water vapor decreased the lifetime of MCrAlY by {approx}30% for the conventional CMSX4 substrates. Higher average lifetimes were observed with Hf in the bond coating, but a similar decrease in lifetime was observed when water vapor was added. The addition of Y and La to the superalloy substrate did not change the YSZ lifetime with 10% water vapor. However, increasing water vapor content from 10 to 50% did not further decrease the lifetime of either bond coating with the doped superalloy substrate. Thus, these results suggest that higher water vapor contents cannot explain the derating of syngas-fired turbines, and other factors such as sulfur and ash from imperfect syngas cleanup (or upset conditions) need to be explored. Researchers continue to study effects of water vapor on thermally grown alumina scale adhesion and growth rate, and are looking for bond coating compositions more resistant to oxidation in the presence of water vapor.

  14. Cermet anode compositions with high content alloy phase

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marschman, S.C.; Davis, N.C.

    1989-10-03

    Cermet electrode compositions comprising NiO-NiFe[sub 2]O[sub 4]-Cu-Ni, and methods for making, are disclosed. Addition of nickel metal prior to formation and densification of a base mixture into the cermet allows for an increase in the total amount of copper and nickel that can be contained in the NiO-NiFe[sub 2]O[sub 4] oxide system. Nickel is present in a base mixture weight concentration of from 0.1% to 10%. Copper is present in the alloy phase in a weight concentration of from 10% to 30% of the densified composition. Such cermet electrodes can be formed to have electrical conductivities well in excess of 100 ohm[sup [minus]1] cm[sup [minus]1]. Other alloy and oxide system cermets having high content metal phases are also expected to be manufacturable in accordance with the invention.

  15. Cermet anode compositions with high content alloy phase

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marschman, Steven C.; Davis, Norman C.

    1989-01-01

    Cermet electrode compositions comprising NiO-NiFe.sub.2 O.sub.4 -Cu-Ni, and methods for making, are disclosed. Addition of nickel metal prior to formation and densification of a base mixture into the cermet allows for an increase in the total amount of copper and nickel that can be contained in the NiO-NiFe.sub.2 O.sub.4 oxide system. Nickel is present in a base mixture weight concentration of from 0.1% to 10%. Copper is present in the alloy phase in a weight concentration of from 10% to 30% of the densified composition. Such cermet electrodes can be formed to have electrical conductivities well in excess of 100 ohm.sup.-1 cm.sup.-1. Other alloy and oxide system cermets having high content metal phases are also expected to be manufacturable in accordance with the invention.

  16. Computer Modeling of Violent Intent: A Content Analysis Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanfilippo, Antonio P.; Mcgrath, Liam R.; Bell, Eric B.

    2014-01-03

    We present a computational approach to modeling the intent of a communication source representing a group or an individual to engage in violent behavior. Our aim is to identify and rank aspects of radical rhetoric that are endogenously related to violent intent to predict the potential for violence as encoded in written or spoken language. We use correlations between contentious rhetoric and the propensity for violent behavior found in documents from radical terrorist and non-terrorist groups and individuals to train and evaluate models of violent intent. We then apply these models to unseen instances of linguistic behavior to detect signs of contention that have a positive correlation with violent intent factors. Of particular interest is the application of violent intent models to social media, such as Twitter, that have proved to serve as effective channels in furthering sociopolitical change.

  17. Catalytic conversion of alcohols to hydrocarbons with low benzene content

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Narula, Chaitanya K.; Davison, Brian H.; Keller, Martin

    2016-03-08

    A method for converting an alcohol to a hydrocarbon fraction having a lowered benzene content, the method comprising: converting said alcohol to a hydrocarbon fraction by contacting said alcohol, under conditions suitable for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon fraction, with a metal-loaded zeolite catalyst catalytically active for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon fraction, and contacting said hydrocarbon fraction with a benzene alkylation catalyst, under conditions suitable for alkylating benzene, to form alkylated benzene product in said hydrocarbon fraction. Also described is a catalyst composition useful in the method, comprising a mixture of (i) a metal-loaded zeolite catalyst catalytically active for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon, and (ii) a benzene alkylation catalyst, in which (i) and (ii) may be in a mixed or separated state. A reactor for housing the catalyst and conducting the reaction is also described.

  18. Format and Content Guide for DOE Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Closure Plans

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Format and Content Guide for U.S. Department of Energy Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Closure Plans

  19. Process for preparing a chemical compound enriched in isotope content

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Michaels, Edward D.

    1982-01-01

    A process to prepare a chemical enriched in isotope content which includes: (a) A chemical exchange reaction between a first and second compound which yields an isotopically enriched first compound and an isotopically depleted second compound; (b) the removal of a portion of the first compound as product and the removal of a portion of the second compound as spent material; (c) the conversion of the remainder of the first compound to the second compound for reflux at the product end of the chemical exchange reaction region; (d) the conversion of the remainder of the second compound to the first compound for reflux at the spent material end of the chemical exchange region; and the cycling of the additional chemicals produced by one conversion reaction to the other conversion reaction, for consumption therein. One of the conversion reactions is an oxidation reaction, and the energy that it yields is used to drive the other conversion reaction, a reduction. The reduction reaction is carried out in a solid polymer electrolyte electrolytic reactor. The overall process is energy efficient and yields no waste by-products.

  20. Simple Colorimetric Determination of the Manganese Content in Photosynthetic Membranes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Semin, B. K.; Seibert, M.

    2009-01-01

    The functional Mn content of intact photosystem II membrane fragments was measured as 4.06 {+-} 0.13 Mn/reaction center when determined using a simple, sensitive colorimetric assay that will also work with thylakoids and core complexes. This procedure requires minimal sample material, does not need expensive assay equipment, requires four simple steps, and only takes 20-30 min to perform. These include (a) removal of the adventitious Mn ions by CaCl{sub 2} treatment of the membranes, (b) extraction of the Mn from the O{sub 2}-evolving complex with hydrochloric acid, (c) purification of the extract by centrifugation followed by filtration of the supernatant through an Acrodisc syringe filter (0.2 {micro}m nylon membrane), and (d) colorimetric determination of Mn in the extract using the reaction of the chromogenic agent, 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine, with previously oxidized Mn(II) cations carried out at high pH. The colorimetric assay itself has been used previously by Serrat (Mikrochim Acta 129:77-80, 1998) for assaying Mn concentrations in sea water and drinking water.

  1. Thermal Analysis of ZPPR High Pu Content Stored Fuel

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Solbrig, Charles W.; Pope, Chad L.; Andrus, Jason P.

    2014-01-01

    The Zero Power Physics Reactor (ZPPR) operated from April 18, 1969, until 1990. ZPPR operated at low power for testing nuclear reactor designs. This paper examines the temperature of Pu content ZPPR fuel while it is in storage. Heat is generated in the fuel due to Pu and Am decay and is a concern for possible cladding damage. Damage to the cladding could lead to fuel hydriding and oxidizing. A series of computer simulations were made to determine the range of temperatures potentially occuring in the ZPPR fuel. The maximum calculated fuel temperature is 292°C (558°F). Conservative assumptions in themore » model intentionally overestimate temperatures. The stored fuel temperatures are dependent on the distribution of fuel in the surrounding storage compartments, the heat generation rate of the fuel, and the orientation of fuel. Direct fuel temperatures could not be measured but storage bin doors, storage sleeve doors, and storage canister temperatures were measured. Comparison of these three temperatures to the calculations indicates that the temperatures calculated with conservative assumptions are, as expected, higher than the actual temperatures. The maximum calculated fuel temperature with the most conservative assumptions is significantly below the fuel failure criterion of 600°C (1,112°F).« less

  2. Diagnosing the Causes and Severity of One-sided Message Contention

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tallent, Nathan R.; Vishnu, Abhinav; van Dam, Hubertus; Daily, Jeffrey A.; Kerbyson, Darren J.; Hoisie, Adolfy

    2015-02-11

    Two trends suggest network contention for one-sided messages is poised to become a performance problem that concerns application developers: an increased interest in one-sided programming models and a rising ratio of hardware threads to network injection bandwidth. Unfortunately, it is difficult to reason about network contention and one-sided messages because one-sided tasks can either decrease or increase contention. We present effective and portable techniques for diagnosing the causes and severity of one-sided message contention. To detect that a message is affected by contention, we maintain statistics representing instantaneous (non-local) network resource demand. Using lightweight measurement and modeling, we identify the portion of a message's latency that is due to contention and whether contention occurs at the initiator or target. We attribute these metrics to program statements in their full static and dynamic context. We characterize contention for an important computational chemistry benchmark on InfiniBand, Cray Aries, and IBM Blue Gene/Q interconnects. We pinpoint the sources of contention, estimate their severity, and show that when message delivery time deviates from an ideal model, there are other messages contending for the same network links. With a small change to the benchmark, we reduce contention up to 50% and improve total runtime as much as 20%.

  3. Constraints on the hadronic content of gamma ray bursts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yacobi, Lee; Guetta, Dafne; Behar, Ehud [Department of Physics, Technion (Israel)

    2014-09-20

    The IceCube High-energy Neutrino Telescope has been collecting data since 2006. Conversely, hundreds of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have been detected by the GRB Monitor on board Fermi since its launch in 2008. So far no neutrino event has been associated with a GRB, despite many models predicting the generation of high-energy neutrinos through GRB photon interaction with PeV protons in the GRB jet. We use the non-detection of neutrinos to constrain the hadronic content of GRB jets independent of jet model parameters. Assuming a generic particle spectrum of E {sup ?} with ? = 2, we find that the ratio of the energy carried by pions to that in electrons has to be small f {sub ?}/f{sub e} ? 0.24 at 95% confidence level. A distribution of spectral slopes can lower f {sub ?}/f{sub e} by orders of magnitude. Another limit, independent of neutrinos, is obtained if one ascribes the measured Fermi/Large Area Telescope GeV gamma-ray emission to pair-photon cascades of high-energy photons resulting from (the same photon-hadronic interactions and subsequent) neutral pion decays. Based on the generally observed MeV-to-GeV GRB fluence ratio of ?10, we show that f {sub ?}/f{sub e} ? 0.3. In some bursts, this ratio is as low as unity, f {sub ?}/f{sub e} ? 0.03. These findings add to mounting doubts regarding the presence of PeV protons in GRB jets.

  4. Determination of Plutonium Content in Spent Fuel with Nondestructive Assay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tobin, S. J.; Sandoval, N. P.; Fensin, M. L.; Lee, S. Y.; Ludewigt, Bernhard A.; Menlovea, H. O.; Quiter, B. J.; Rajasingume, A.; Schearf, M. A.; Smith, L. E.; Swinhoe, M. T.; Thompson, S. J.

    2009-06-30

    There are a variety of reasons for quantifying plutonium (Pu) in spent fuel such as independently verifying the Pu content declared by a regulated facility, making shipper/receiver mass declarations, and quantifying the input mass at a reprocessing facility. As part of the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative, NA-241 has recently funded a multilab/university collaboration to determine the elemental Pu mass in spent fuel assemblies. This research effort is anticipated to be a five year effort: the first part of which is a two years Monte Carlo modeling effort to integrate and down-select among 13 nondestructive assay (NDA) technologies, followed by one year for fabricating instruments and then two years for measuring spent fuel. This paper gives a brief overview of the approach being taken for the Monte Carlo research effort. In addition, preliminary results for the first NDA instrument studied in detail, delayed neutron detection, will be presented. In order to cost effectively and robustly model the performance of several NDA techniques, an"assembly library" was created that contains a diverse range of pressurized water reactor spent fuel assemblies (burnup, enrichment, cooling time) similar to that which exists in spent pools today and in the future, diversion scenarios that capture a range of possible rod removal options, spatial and isotopic detail needed to accurately quantify the capability of all the NDA techniques so as to enable integration. Integration is being designed into this study from the beginning since it is expected that the best performance will be obtained by combining a few NDA techniques. The performance of each instrument will be quantified for the full assembly library in three different media: air, water and borated water. In this paper the preliminary capability of delayed neutron detection will be quantified for the spent fuel library for all three media. The 13 NDA techniques being researched are the following: Delayed Gamma, Delayed Neutrons, Differential Die-Away, Differential Die-Away Self-Interrogation, Lead Slowing Down Spectrometer, Neutron Multiplicity, Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence, Passive Prompt Gamma, Passive Neutron Albedo Reactivity, Self-integration Neutron Resonance Densitometry, Total Neutron (Gross Neutron), X-Ray Fluorescence, 252Cf Interrogation with Prompt Neutron Detection.

  5. Impact of Fission Products Impurity on the Plutonium Content of Metal- and

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Oxide- Fuels in Sodium Cooled Fast Reactors (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Impact of Fission Products Impurity on the Plutonium Content of Metal- and Oxide- Fuels in Sodium Cooled Fast Reactors Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Impact of Fission Products Impurity on the Plutonium Content of Metal- and Oxide- Fuels in Sodium Cooled Fast Reactors This short report presents the neutronic analysis to evaluate the impact of fission product impurity on the Pu content of

  6. EERE Program Management Guide - Cover and Table of Contents | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Guide - Cover and Table of Contents EERE Program Management Guide - Cover and Table of Contents Table of contents includes an introduction and eight chapters on the program's background, management, outreach planning, budget formulation, implementation, analysis and evaluation, and information/business management. Also includes appendices. PDF icon pmguide_toc.pdf More Documents & Publications EERE Program Management Guide - Chapter 4 EERE Program Management Guide - Chapter 6

  7. Building America Webinar: Put New Tools and Content on the Building America

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Solution Center To Work for You! | Department of Energy Put New Tools and Content on the Building America Solution Center To Work for You! Building America Webinar: Put New Tools and Content on the Building America Solution Center To Work for You! This webinar will describe new updates that have been implemented in the Building America Solution Center that offer exciting new tools and content that builders and industry professionals can put to work immediately. PDF icon Building America

  8. U-094: EMC Documentum Content Server Lets Local Administrative Users Gain Elevated Privileges

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    EMC Documentum Content Server contains a privilege elevation vulnerability that may allow an unauthorized user to obtain highest administrative privileges on the system.

  9. OPS 9.16 Procedure Content and Use 8/24/98 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    OPS 9.16 Procedure Content and Use 82498 The objective of this surveillance is to ... The Facility Representative reviews selected operating, surveillance or testing, and ...

  10. Determination of 3-D Cloud Ice Water Contents by Combining Multiple...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Determination of 3-D Cloud Ice Water Contents by Combining Multiple Data Sources from Satellite, Ground Radar, and a Numerical Model Liu, Guosheng Florida State University Seo,...

  11. Format and Content Guide for DOE Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Format and Content Guide for U.S. Department of Energy Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Performance Assessments and Composite Analyses

  12. SWS Online Tool now includes Multifamily Content, plus a How-To Webinar |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy SWS Online Tool now includes Multifamily Content, plus a How-To Webinar SWS Online Tool now includes Multifamily Content, plus a How-To Webinar This announcement contains information on the integration of multifamily content in the SWS Online Tool, and a How-To Webinar on August 27, 2013. PDF icon mf_content_now_available.pdf More Documents & Publications The Standard Work Specifications for Single-Family Home Energy Upgrades are now available€ at your fingertips!

  13. Format and Content Guide for DOE Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Closure Plans

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    3 G Approved: XX-XX-XX IMPLEMENTATION GUIDE for use with DOE M 435.1-1 Format and Content Guide for U.S. Department of Energy Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Closure Plans U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY DOE G 435.1-3 i DRAFT XX-XX-XX LLW Closure Plan Format and Content Guide Revision 0, XX-XX-XX Format and Content Guide for U.S. Department of Energy Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Closure Plans CONTENTS PART A: INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

  14. Sensitive method for measurement of telomeric DNA content in human tissues

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bryant, Jennifer E.; Hutchings, Kent G.; Moyzis, Robert K.; Griffith, Jeffrey K.

    1999-02-16

    A sensitive method for measurement of telomeric DNA content in human tissue, based upon the ratio of telomeric to centromeric DNA present in the tissue.

  15. Adding Links in Energy.gov Content Management System | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy.gov Content Management System » Adding Links in Energy.gov Content Management System Adding Links in Energy.gov Content Management System For Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) websites, to add a link in the Energy.gov Drupal content management system (CMS), follow these steps: Edit the page (also called a node) that you want to add a link to. Select the text you want to link. Click the "Link" button. Then: If you are linking to a page on Energy.gov, select

  16. Thermal Analysis of ZPPR High Pu Content Stored Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charles W. Solbrig; Chad Pope; Jason Andrus

    2014-09-01

    This paper estimates the temperature of high Pu content ZPPR fuel while in storage to determine the probablilty of fuel damage during storage. The Zero Power Physics Reactor (ZPPR) is an experimental reactor which has been decomissioned. It ran only at extremely low power, for testing nuclear reactor designs and was operated as a criticality facility from April 18, 1969 until decommissioned in 1990. Its fuel was manufactured in 1967 and has been in storage since the reactor was decomissioned. Heat is generated in the fuel due to Pu and Am decay and is a concern for possible fuel damage. Any damage to the cladding would be expected to lead to the fuel hydriding and oxidizing over a long period of storage as was described in the analysis of the damage to the ZPPR uranium fuel resulting in the fuel becoming unuseable and a large potential source of contamination. (Ref. Solbrig, 1994). A series of computer runs were made to scope out the range of temperatures that can occur in the ZPPR fuel in storage. The maximum calculated conservative fuel temperature is high (292 degrees C [558 degrees F]) in spite of the fact that the fuel element heat generation rates seem quite low, between 35 and 10 W for containers (called clamshells) full of fuel. However, the ZPPR storage bins, built for safeguards, are very effective insulators. The calculated clamshells and the cavity doors temperatures are also high. No record exists of people receiving skin burns by touching the cavity doors or clamshells, which indicates the computed temperatures may be higher than actual. (Note, gloves are worn when handling hotter clamshells.) Given the high calculated temperatures, a cursory measurement program was conducted to calibrate the calculated results. The measurement of bin doors, cavity doors, and clamshell temperatures would be easy to make if it were not for regulations resulting from security and potential contamination. Due to conservative assumptions in the model like high heat transfer contact resistance between contact surfaces (such as between the fuel and the clamshell), the calculated temperatures are intended to be overestimated. The temperatures of the stored fuel in a particular clamshell are dependent, among other parameters, on the distribution of fuel in the surrounding storage compartments, the heat generation rate of the fuel, and the orientation of fuel in the clamshell (parallel or perpendicular to the door). The distribution of fuel in this analysis was selected to give higher temperatures than actual distributions might give. Due to possible contamination and security concerns, fuel temperatures could not be measured but the bin doors, storage sleeve doors, and clamshell temperatures could be and were measured. The comparison of these three temperatures to the calculations indicates that the temperatures calculated with conservative assumptions are higher than the actual temperatures. This implies that the calculated fuel temperatures are higher than actual also. The maximum calculated fuel temperature with the most conservative assumptions (292 degrees C, (558 degrees F)) is significantly below the no fuel failure criterion of 600 degrees C (1,112 degrees F). Some fuel failures have occurred but these results indicate that the failures are not due to high temperatures encountered in fuel storage.

  17. Method of preparing a high solids content, low viscosity ceramic slurry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tiegs, Terry N.; Wittmer, Dale E.

    1995-01-01

    A method for producing a high solids content, low viscosity ceramic slurry composition comprises turbomilling a dispersion of a ceramic powder in a liquid to form a slurry having a viscosity less than 100 centipoise and a solids content equal to or greater than 48 volume percent.

  18. Method of preparing a high solids content, low viscosity ceramic slurry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tiegs, T.N.; Wittmer, D.E.

    1995-10-10

    A method for producing a high solids content, low viscosity ceramic slurry composition comprises turbomilling a dispersion of a ceramic powder in a liquid to form a slurry having a viscosity less than 100 centipoise and a solids content equal to or greater than 48 volume percent.

  19. Consideration of factors affecting strip effluent pH and sodium content

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, T. B.

    2015-07-29

    A number of factors were investigated to determine possible reasons for why the Strip Effluent (SE) can sometimes have higher than expected pH values and/or sodium content, both of which have prescribed limits. All of the factors likely have some impact on the pH values and Na content.

  20. Does Water Content or Flow Rate Control Colloid Transport in Unsaturated Porous Media?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thorsten Knappenberger; Markus Flury; Earl D. Mattson; James B. Harsh

    2014-03-01

    Mobile colloids can play an important role in contaminant transport in soils: many contaminants exist in colloidal form, and colloids can facilitate transport of otherwise immobile contaminants. In unsaturated soils, colloid transport is, among other factors, affected by water content and flow rate. Our objective was to determine whether water content or flow rate is more important for colloid transport. We passed negatively charged polystyrene colloids (220 nm diameter) through unsaturated sand-filled columns under steady-state flow at different water contents (effective water saturations Se ranging from 0.1 to 1.0, with Se = (? ?r)/(?s ?r)) and flow rates (pore water velocities v of 5 and 10 cm/min). Water content was the dominant factor in our experiments. Colloid transport decreased with decreasing water content, and below a critical water content (Se < 0.1), colloid transport was inhibited, and colloids were strained in water films. Pendular ring and water film thickness calculations indicated that colloids can move only when pendular rings are interconnected. The flow rate affected retention of colloids in the secondary energy minimum, with less colloids being trapped when the flow rate increased. These results confirm the importance of both water content and flow rate for colloid transport in unsaturated porous media and highlight the dominant role of water content.

  1. SAFETY ANALYSIS REPORT FOR PACKAGING, MODEL 9977, ADDENDUM 3, JUSTIFICATION FOR SMALL GRAM QUANTITY CONTENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abramczyk, G.

    2011-10-31

    This Addendum establishes a new family of content envelopes consisting of small quantities of radioactive materials. These content envelopes and specific packing configurations are shown to be subcritical. However, the dose rates of some payloads must be measured and shown to comply with applicable radiation limits. Authorization for shipment of the content envelop requires acceptance of this Addendum by the DOE-HQ certifying official as a supplement to the 9977 SARP Revision 2 and DOE-HQ�s subsequent revision of the CoC Revision 10 (which is based on SARP Addendum 2 and SARP Addendum 4) to authorize the additional content envelope. The Small Gram Quantity Content Envelopes and packing configurations will be incorporated in the next revision of the 9977 SARP.

  2. An examination of content similarity within the memory of HPC applications.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levy, Scott N.; Bridges, Patrick G.; Ferreira, Kurt Brian; Thompson, Aidan Patrick; Trott, Christian Robert

    2013-01-01

    Memory content similarity has been e ectively exploited for more than a decade to reduce memory consumption. By consolidating duplicate and similar pages in the address space of an application, we can reduce the amount of memory it consumes without negatively a ecting the application's perception of the memory resources available to it. In addition to memory de-duplication, there may be many other ways that we can exploit memory content similarity to improve system characteristics. In this paper, we examine the memory content similarity of several HPC applications. By characterizing the memory contents of these applications, we hope to provide a basis for ef- forts to e ectively exploit memory content similarity to improve system performance beyond memory deduplication. We show that several applications exhibit signi cant similarity and consider the source of the similarity.

  3. Influence of Aluminum Content on Grain Refinement and Strength of AZ31 Magnesium GTA Weld Metal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Babu, N. Kishore; Cross, Carl E.

    2012-06-28

    The goal is to characterize the effect of Al content on AZ31 weld metal, the grain size and strength, and examine role of Al on grain refinement. The approach is to systematically vary the aluminum content of AZ31 weld metal, Measure average grain size in weld metal, and Measure cross-weld tensile properties and hardness. Conclusions are that: (1) increased Al content in AZ31 weld metal results in grain refinement Reason: higher undercooling during solidification; (2) weld metal grain refinement resulted in increased strength & hardness Reason: grain boundary strengthening; and (3) weld metal strength can be raised to wrought base metal levels.

  4. SECTION M EVALUATION FACTORS FOR AWARD TABLE OF CONTENTS M-1 EVALUATION OF PROPOSALS .....................................................................................2

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    TABLE OF CONTENTS M-1 EVALUATION OF PROPOSALS .....................................................................................2 M-2 BASIS FOR CONTRACT AWARD ...................................................................................3 M-3 TECHNICAL AND MANAGEMENT CRITERIA ..........................................................3 M-4 COST EVALUATION CRITERION .................................................................................5 Section M, Evaluation Factors Request for

  5. SECTION M EVALUATION FACTORS FOR AWARD TABLE OF CONTENTS M-1 EVALUATION OF PROPOSALS .....................................................................................2

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    M EVALUATION FACTORS FOR AWARD TABLE OF CONTENTS M-1 EVALUATION OF PROPOSALS .....................................................................................2 M-2 BASIS FOR CONTRACT AWARD ...................................................................................3 M-3 TECHNICAL AND MANAGEMENT CRITERIA ..........................................................3 M-4 COST CRITERION

  6. BioDiesel Content On-board monitoring | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    BioDiesel Content On-board monitoring onboard fuel monitoring of fuel and biofuel qualities using an optical sensor for engine PDF icon deer08fournel.pdf More Documents & ...

  7. Table 41. No. 2 Diesel Fuel Prices by Sulfur Content, Sales...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    57.8 42.0 See footnotes at end of table. 200 Energy Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 1998 Table 41. No. 2 Diesel Fuel Prices by Sulfur Content, Sales Type,...

  8. Table 41. No. 2 Diesel Fuel Prices by Sulfur Content, Sales...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    62.6 47.4 See footnotes at end of table. 200 Energy Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 1999 Table 41. No. 2 Diesel Fuel Prices by Sulfur Content, Sales Type,...

  9. Table 41. No. 2 Diesel Fuel Prices by Sulfur Content, Sales...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    51.8 See footnotes at end of table. 242 Energy Information Administration Petroleum Marketing Annual 1995 Table 41. No. 2 Diesel Fuel Prices by Sulfur Content, Sales Type,...

  10. Sensitive method for measurement of telomeric DNA content in human tissues

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bryant, J.E.; Hutchings, K.G.; Moyzis, R.K.; Griffith, J.K.

    1999-02-16

    This research discloses a sensitive method for measurement of telomeric DNA content in human tissue, based upon the ratio of telomeric to centromeric DNA present in the tissue. 5 figs.

  11. IMPACT OF FISSION PRODUCTS IMPURITY ON THE PLUTONIUM CONTENT IN PWR MOX

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    FUELS (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect IMPACT OF FISSION PRODUCTS IMPURITY ON THE PLUTONIUM CONTENT IN PWR MOX FUELS Citation Details In-Document Search Title: IMPACT OF FISSION PRODUCTS IMPURITY ON THE PLUTONIUM CONTENT IN PWR MOX FUELS This report presents the results of a neutronics analysis done in response to the charter IFCA-SAT-2 entitled 'Fuel impurity physics calculations'. This charter specifies that the separation of the fission products (FP) during the reprocessing of UOX

  12. The use of a permanent magnet for water content measurements ofwood chips

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barale, P.J.; Fong, C.G.; Green, M.A.; Luft, P.A.; McInturff,A.D.; Reimer, J.A.; Yahnke, M.

    2001-09-20

    The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has developed a device that measures the water content of wood chips, pulp and brown stock for the paper industry. This device employs a permanent magnet as the central part of a NMR measurement system. This report describes the magnet and the NMR measurement system. The results of water content measurements in wood chips in a magnetic field of 0.47 T are presented.

  13. Information Content of the Low-Energy Electric Dipole Strength: Correlation

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Analysis (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Information Content of the Low-Energy Electric Dipole Strength: Correlation Analysis Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Information Content of the Low-Energy Electric Dipole Strength: Correlation Analysis Background: Recent experiments on the electric dipole (E1) polarizability in heavy nuclei have stimulated theoretical interest in the low-energy electric dipole strength, both isovector and isoscalar. Purpose: We study the information

  14. Does Water Content or Flow Rate Control Colloid Transport in Unsaturated

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Porous Media? (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Does Water Content or Flow Rate Control Colloid Transport in Unsaturated Porous Media? Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Does Water Content or Flow Rate Control Colloid Transport in Unsaturated Porous Media? Mobile colloids can play an important role in contaminant transport in soils: many contaminants exist in colloidal form, and colloids can facilitate transport of otherwise immobile contaminants. In unsaturated soils, colloid

  15. Removal of introduced inorganic content from chipped forest residues via air classification

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lacey, Jeffrey A.; Aston, John E.; Westover, Tyler L.; Cherry, Robert S.; Thompson, David N.

    2015-08-04

    Inorganic content in biomass decreases the efficiency of conversion processes, especially thermochemical conversions. The combined concentrations of specific ash forming elements are the primary attributes that cause pine residues to be considered a degraded energy conversion feedstock, as compared to clean pine. Air classification is a potentially effective and economical tool to isolate high inorganic content biomass fractions away from primary feedstock sources to reduce their ash content. In this work, loblolly pine forest residues were air classified into 10 fractions whose ash content and composition were measured. Ash concentrations were highest in the lightest fractions (5.8–8.5 wt%), and inmore » a heavy fraction of the fines (8.9–15.1 wt%). The removal of fractions with high inorganic content resulted in a substantial reduction in the ash content of the remaining biomass in forest thinnings (1.69–1.07 wt%) and logging residues (1.09–0.68 wt%). These high inorganic content fractions from both forest residue types represented less than 7.0 wt% of the total biomass, yet they contained greater than 40% of the ash content by mass. Elemental analysis of the air classified fractions revealed the lightest fractions were comprised of high concentrations of soil elements (silicon, aluminum, iron, sodium, and titanium). However, the elements of biological origin including calcium, potassium, magnesium, sulfur, manganese, and phosphorous were evenly distributed throughout all air classified fractions, making them more difficult to isolate into fractions with high mineral concentrations. Under the conditions reported in this study, an economic analysis revealed air classification could be used for ash removal for as little as $2.23 per ton of product biomass. As a result, this study suggests air classification is a potentially attractive technology for the removal of introduced soil minerals from pine forest residues.« less

  16. Removal of introduced inorganic content from chipped forest residues via air classification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lacey, Jeffrey A.; Aston, John E.; Westover, Tyler L.; Cherry, Robert S.; Thompson, David N.

    2015-08-04

    Inorganic content in biomass decreases the efficiency of conversion processes, especially thermochemical conversions. The combined concentrations of specific ash forming elements are the primary attributes that cause pine residues to be considered a degraded energy conversion feedstock, as compared to clean pine. Air classification is a potentially effective and economical tool to isolate high inorganic content biomass fractions away from primary feedstock sources to reduce their ash content. In this work, loblolly pine forest residues were air classified into 10 fractions whose ash content and composition were measured. Ash concentrations were highest in the lightest fractions (5.8–8.5 wt%), and in a heavy fraction of the fines (8.9–15.1 wt%). The removal of fractions with high inorganic content resulted in a substantial reduction in the ash content of the remaining biomass in forest thinnings (1.69–1.07 wt%) and logging residues (1.09–0.68 wt%). These high inorganic content fractions from both forest residue types represented less than 7.0 wt% of the total biomass, yet they contained greater than 40% of the ash content by mass. Elemental analysis of the air classified fractions revealed the lightest fractions were comprised of high concentrations of soil elements (silicon, aluminum, iron, sodium, and titanium). However, the elements of biological origin including calcium, potassium, magnesium, sulfur, manganese, and phosphorous were evenly distributed throughout all air classified fractions, making them more difficult to isolate into fractions with high mineral concentrations. Under the conditions reported in this study, an economic analysis revealed air classification could be used for ash removal for as little as $2.23 per ton of product biomass. As a result, this study suggests air classification is a potentially attractive technology for the removal of introduced soil minerals from pine forest residues.

  17. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...4498,1.126,,1.126,1.126,,,,,1.116 34505,1.128,,1.128,1.128,,,,,1.117 34512,1.156,,1.156,1.156,,,,,1.122 34519,1.142,,1.142,1.142,,,,,1.118 34526,1.194,,1.194,1.194,,,,,1.121 ...

  18. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...451,1.475,1.418,1.409,1.432,1.518,1.504,1.538,1.613,1.604,1.626 36773,1.468,1.461,1.478,1.425,1.419,1.434,1.523,1.51,1.54,1.622,1.616,1.631 36780,1.498,1.502,1.493,1.456,1.46,1.451...

  19. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...,1.408,1.408,1.485,1.485 36738,1.38,1.38,1.358,1.358,1.408,1.408,1.487,1.487 36745,1.451,1.451,1.428,1.428,1.484,1.484,1.565,1.565 36752,1.42,1.42,1.398,1.398,1.452,1.452,1.525,1.5...

  20. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    36759,1.489,1.489,1.443,1.443,1.55,1.55,1.643,1.643 36766,1.496,1.496,1.451,1.451,1.556,1.556,1.64,1.64 36773,1.494,1.494,1.45,1.45,1.553,1.553,1.639,1.639 ...

  1. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    34820,,1.302,,1.259,,1.359,,1.451 34827,,1.314,,1.271,,1.376,,1.461 ... 35149,,1.304,,1.261,,1.367,,1.451,1.284 35156,,1.335,,1.291,,1.401,,1.478,1.3...

  2. Contents A

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... accidents at Honeywell International, DuPont, General Electric, and Bechtel Jacobs. ... October 9 December 2004 SiteLines Bechtel Nevada 35 years Las Vegas - Jerome Blair 30 ...

  3. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Monthly","112015" ,"Release Date:","1292016" ,"Next Release Date:","2292016" ,"Excel File Name:","n3020nc3m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http:tonto.eia.govdnavng...

  4. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Monthly","112015" ,"Release Date:","1292016" ,"Next Release Date:","2292016" ,"Excel File Name:","n3020me3m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http:tonto.eia.govdnavng...

  5. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Monthly","112015" ,"Release Date:","1292016" ,"Next Release Date:","2292016" ,"Excel File Name:","n3020wv3m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http:tonto.eia.govdnavng...

  6. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Monthly","112015" ,"Release Date:","1292016" ,"Next Release Date:","2292016" ,"Excel File Name:","n3020wa3m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http:tonto.eia.govdnavng...

  7. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Monthly","112015" ,"Release Date:","1292016" ,"Next Release Date:","2292016" ,"Excel File Name:","n3020nh3m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http:tonto.eia.govdnavng...

  8. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Monthly","112015" ,"Release Date:","1292016" ,"Next Release Date:","2292016" ,"Excel File Name:","n3020ks3m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http:tonto.eia.govdnavng...

  9. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Monthly","112015" ,"Release Date:","1292016" ,"Next Release Date:","2292016" ,"Excel File Name:","n3020vt3m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http:tonto.eia.govdnavng...

  10. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Monthly","112015" ,"Release Date:","1292016" ,"Next Release Date:","2292016" ,"Excel File Name:","n9090us1m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http:tonto.eia.govdnavng...

  11. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Monthly","112015" ,"Release Date:","1292016" ,"Next Release Date:","2292016" ,"Excel File Name:","n3020pa3m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http:tonto.eia.govdnavng...

  12. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Monthly","112015" ,"Release Date:","1292016" ,"Next Release Date:","2292016" ,"Excel File Name:","n3020id3m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http:tonto.eia.govdnavng...

  13. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Monthly","112015" ,"Release Date:","1292016" ,"Next Release Date:","2292016" ,"Excel File Name:","n3020fl3m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http:tonto.eia.govdnavng...

  14. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Monthly","112015" ,"Release Date:","1292016" ,"Next Release Date:","2292016" ,"Excel File Name:","n3020tn3m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http:tonto.eia.govdnavng...

  15. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Monthly","112015" ,"Release Date:","1292016" ,"Next Release Date:","2292016" ,"Excel File Name:","n3020ky3m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http:tonto.eia.govdnavng...

  16. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Monthly","112015" ,"Release Date:","1292016" ,"Next Release Date:","2292016" ,"Excel File Name:","n3020mo3m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http:tonto.eia.govdnavng...

  17. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Monthly","112015" ,"Release Date:","1292016" ,"Next Release Date:","2292016" ,"Excel File Name:","n3020de3m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http:tonto.eia.govdnavng...

  18. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Monthly","112015" ,"Release Date:","1292016" ,"Next Release Date:","2292016" ,"Excel File Name:","n3020ct3m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http:tonto.eia.govdnavng...

  19. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Monthly","112015" ,"Release Date:","1292016" ,"Next Release Date:","2292016" ,"Excel File Name:","n3020ma3m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http:tonto.eia.govdnavng...

  20. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Monthly","112015" ,"Release Date:","1292016" ,"Next Release Date:","2292016" ,"Excel File Name:","n3020nj3m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http:tonto.eia.govdnavng...

  1. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Monthly","112015" ,"Release Date:","1292016" ,"Next Release Date:","2292016" ,"Excel File Name:","n3020md3m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http:tonto.eia.govdnavng...

  2. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Monthly","112015" ,"Release Date:","1292016" ,"Next Release Date:","2292016" ,"Excel File Name:","n3020ga3m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http:tonto.eia.govdnavng...

  3. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Monthly","112015" ,"Release Date:","1292016" ,"Next Release Date:","2292016" ,"Excel File Name:","n3020dc3m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http:tonto.eia.govdnavng...

  4. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Monthly","112015" ,"Release Date:","1292016" ,"Next Release Date:","2292016" ,"Excel File Name:","n3020ri3m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http:tonto.eia.govdnavng...

  5. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Monthly","112015" ,"Release Date:","1292016" ,"Next Release Date:","2292016" ,"Excel File Name:","n3020nv3m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http:tonto.eia.govdnavng...

  6. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Monthly","112015" ,"Release Date:","1292016" ,"Next Release Date:","2292016" ,"Excel File Name:","n3020il3m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http:tonto.eia.govdnavng...

  7. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Monthly","112015" ,"Release Date:","1292016" ,"Next Release Date:","2292016" ,"Excel File Name:","n3020va3m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http:tonto.eia.govdnavng...

  8. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...44,566,21788,5420,442 37057,20043,300,1503,18240,4886,333 37087,22532,631,1356,20545,5446,...16475,,522,15953,1933,289 40132,18658,,411,18247,2486,1 40162,19869,,1014,18855,1978,27 ...

  9. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...,9753,27233,10270,1572,50918,,,36754,3970,,1824,25331,439 33770,366293,,,,510,26308,2168,3...1825,,8243,359,87,,0,1211,1015,913,,9760,,,18245,155,532,162,2513,210,41855,22371,3133 ...

  10. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... 30909,118045 30940,126625 30970,182438 31001,322693 31031,565927 31062,743223 ...005,2328,1151,391,9046,1070,21764,1704,582,18242,3639,1415,13510,1098,714,603,2027,10159,1...

  11. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... 41562,2210 41593,3411 41623,7568 41654,6886 41685,5205 41713,3533 41744,2585 41774,1824 41805,1438 41835,1257 41866,1168 41897,1206 41927,1556 41958,3016 41988,5459 42019,6969 ...

  12. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...,10259,2214,1760,2500,,2444,,32,24,653,32748 38610,66710,18283,18186,97,13137,9454,1859,1824,3539,82,3394,,39,24,689,31062 38640,73287,17535,17432,103,13839,10066,2029,1744,6158,15...

  13. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... 37631,47635,4236,740,1268,2228,18240,22890 37638,43144,3630,553,1130,1948,1682...1687,2326,17142,29445 37834,56181,4713,520,1824,2368,17074,31719 37841,58484,4643,724,1857...

  14. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... 11734,,368353 11763,,371050 11794,,370981 11824,,369072 11855,,363696 11885,,358308 ...,,,...88212,,,,65112 18247,,253356,,,...

  15. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... 11734,,1897 11763,,2090 11794,,2867 11824,,2942 11855,,2791 11885,,2249 11916,,2839 ...1,,3001,,,...1425 16421,,1824,,,...901 ...

  16. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... 32947,1952,7452,2246 32978,1824,6513,2349 33008,2383,7152,2612 ...462,63616,71513,0,1705 32492,73555,70894,0,1824 32523,72908,69286,0,1717 ...

  17. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...,,,...78259,,,...28871,,,,35411 18247,,,...81934,,,...32000,,,,3...0675,3414,92184,,,,29433,,,,9921,4002,5919,1824,5568,555,17599,,,8503,21289,2446 ...

  18. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    36600,1951 36631,1970 36661,1947 36692,1796 36722,1908 36753,1885 36784,1724 36814,1824 36845,1819 36875,1892 36906,1850 36937,1841 36965,1950 36996,1809 37026,1828 37057,1574 ...

  19. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...5,2655,2892,-42,-22,1715,34,5626,800,,3665,1824,3069,-15,-306,3496,81,5143,4406,,7494,5499...5,5381,514,,604,235,-195,100,-69,583,1,743,1824,,3064,1164,137,50,-101,2885,257,3197 ...

  20. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    34622,1053 34653,2024 34683,4869 34714,5531 34745,4576 34773,2846 34804,2428 34834,1824 34865,1248 34895,969 34926,859 34957,878 34987,1027 35018,1554 35048,3154 35079,5443 ...

  1. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... 38153,219 38183,193 38214,180 38245,199 38275,345 38306,818 38336,1509 38367,2031 38398,1824 38426,1705 38457,790 38487,468 38518,276 38548,197 38579,181 38610,182 38640,285 ...

  2. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...4,2198,60070,35968,9595,14507,161653,9916,81824,62745,5326,1842,13062,80080 ...,10100,13364,165428,11316,81651,64850,5787,1824,14319,79972 42415,363339,32833,30185,2648,...

  3. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    33496,308 33526,0 33557,1447 33587,753 33618,436 33649,149 33678,945 33709,1205 33739,1824 33770,1543 33800,1336 33831,1618 33862,1578 33892,979 33923,785 33953,895 33984,750 ...

  4. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...49,480,-1563,530,-59,78,923,,-1613,304 37802,6400,,18248,15307,38409,125,1217,2375,74647,6251,822,,0,,-8,,1011,-181,15,5578,18248,15307,38409,133,1217,1364,74828,6236,1042,62,11,,,...

  5. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... 39979,1792 40009,1828 40040,1842 40071,1734 40101,1815 40132,1758 40162,1802 40193,1824 40224,1683 40252,1865 40283,1813 40313,1886 40344,1802 40374,1896 40405,1918 40436,1861 ...

  6. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    36631,1590 36661,1314 36692,998 36722,1029 36753,1038 36784,1143 36814,1368 36845,1824 36875,3382 36906,4353 36937,2794 36965,2540 36996,1613 37026,1194 37057,1037 37087,1078 ...

  7. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    29767,2485 30132,2806 30497,1793 30863,1829 31228,1426 31593,1310 31958,1356 32324,1824 32689,1503 33054,1933 33419,2193 33785,1799 34150,1798 34515,2650 34880,2935 35246,1853 ...

  8. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...3642,2655,6297,-99,-3.6,34,371,337 29601,3642,2152,5794,-172,-7.4,37,558,521 29632,3648,1824,5472,-28,-1.5,59,376,317 29660,3654,1631,5285,37,2.3,55,234,179 29691,3670,1764,5434,73...

  9. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...727,171,213,1,613,17,723,45 41820,36385,33530,4849,318,4244,287,2855,66,65,2854,584,232,1824,214,1200,70,34,8,414,16,534,118,349,67,53,230,444,15,1476,1412,64,6043,78,1241,22,12272...

  10. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...92,159,80210,,8975,-416,3994,85607,6599,1111,3,,-49,3,1160,173,369788,1600,61901,10509,-1824,1451,444171,29510,369743,1363,60145,10509,-1068,51,442777,28364,1833,25,1679,,-634,827,...

  11. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... 18156,7185 18186,8181 18217,7597 18247,10160 18278,10204 18309,7189 18337,11680 ... 41258,5518,813,1297,3408 41289,7413,1824,2111,3478 41320,5572,370,776,4426 ...

  12. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...,1100.251,2740.62,1456.08,580.745,12190.12,1824.555,21207.118,2760.635,931.928,14498.365,2...44.491,20978.412,6187.303,4278.924,558.246,1824.48,3615.117,4686.976,144.946,1072.156,1515...

  13. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...40,55606,3747,41,,681,7784,,7883,9196,32,259,571,,7367,,5681,,12364 41320,132981,84221,,1824,4331,4807,2569,52567,4355,,230,,,,277,,11162,1204,801,48760,2936,35,,604,5458,,6882,847...

  14. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    35688,852 35718,899 35749,1354 35779,2379 35810,2537 35841,2376 35869,2028 35900,1824 35930,1080 35961,909 35991,867 36022,843 36053,833 36083,879 36114,1205 36144,1480 ...

  15. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...8186,,,461,,,...7256,,,,,,299,1,,673,87,18241,,,,,,2,,385,129,263 30543,73622,31248,,96...00,2794,22,1684,1612,72,17,2,,1476,21,7378,1824,769,4785,64,9,86,35,346,173 ...

  16. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...196.325,1802.449,85.267,1717.182,5.433,234.354,707.169,-173.213,2491.864 40193,2210.162,1824.143,86.909,1737.233,5.263,291.015,822.493,-46.217,2809.788 40224,2047.815,1682.869,80.1...

  17. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... 32888,83993,79543,0,1833 32919,77254,71331,0,1401 32947,79421,80816,0,1824 32978,78080,79360,0,1549 33008,78302,85201,0,2138 33039,75972,85142,0,1914 ...

  18. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...713940,77775,,,,18239,,399792 9313,620373,61824,,,,13337,,431646 9678,770874,60382,,,,1540...58,17387,75,10182,334677,48915,54210,24612,18241,2517,50171,4224,40151,19321,55241,4022,58...

  19. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    39340,1590 39370,1628 39401,1835 39431,2399 39462,2734 39493,2503 39522,2278 39553,1824 39583,1576 39614,1604 39644,1709 39675,1683 39706,1461 39736,1636 39767,1869 39797,2400 ...

  20. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... 11734,,4707 11763,,4840 11794,,7690 11824,,5089 11855,,7865 11885,,1525 11916,,1862 ...,13036,,,,,0,,,...145,,,...7597 18247,,15041,,,,,0,,,...62,,,...1016...

  1. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...,,,...182438.481 31001,,,...46.179,1069.781,21763.535,1704.095,582.451,18242.293,3639.05,1415.422,13509.985,1098.336,7...

  2. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... 11703,,15 11734,,97 11763,,89 11794,,161 11824,,69 11855,,169 11885,,-23 11916,,-32 ...17,,334,,,,,-75,,,...-24,,,...218 18247,,397,,,,,-60,,,...-15,,,...288 ...

  3. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...3,,1452,3141,5713,,,18,,124,,267,,279055,,,5590,,,4761,,,,,3689,,164,94,,,81636,608,,55,1824,577,1224,374,,282,50,,,4606,294,595,,320,9911 42185,1380592,354485,707571,31678,17596,1...

  4. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...0590,,,99,6,3977,150,2008,26,710,6523,2174,18244,2918,1081,0,4141,6,809,557,961,527,432,75...5,250,316,4249,2202,9296,843,4913,,6806,14,1824,66,464,1976,5147,3929,44,13367,,19341,717,...

  5. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...21,2386,2222,3011,2544,20978,6187,4279,558,1824,3615,4687,145,1072,15152,6292,3593,3225,24...1,3421,4089,2154,249,4816,5170,15273,10570,1824,4976,1471,2151,2431,931,12531,2568,29217,3...

  6. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...249,-101.845,-4692.275,-3969.938,-243.857,-1824.612,-16430.839,-2613.894,-36016.758,-16210...404.85,696.28,4145.284,39246.263,3080.706,118245.249,314811.155,31060.541,,,,,,464116.945 ...

  7. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... 35363,10292,8468,8468,0,,1824,490,206,63,,,143,,,,,284,,,...44,248,,13... 36049,10455,8631,8631,0,,1824,462,314,104,,,210,,,,,148,,,...32,232,,1...

  8. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    for" ,"Data 1","Distillate Fuel Oil Sales for All Other Uses ",60,"Annual",2014,"6301984" ,"Release Date:","12222015" ,"Next Release Date:","Last Week of November 2016"...

  9. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Data for" ,"Data 1","Kerosene Sales for Commercial Use ",60,"Annual",2014,"6301984" ,"Release Date:","12222015" ,"Next Release Date:","Last Week of November 2016"...

  10. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Minnesota (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet ... Vehicle Fuel through 1996) in Minnesota (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","22016" ,"Release ...

  11. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Minnesota (Including Vehicle Fuel) (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for ... Gas Delivered to Consumers in Minnesota (Including Vehicle Fuel) ...

  12. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Minnesota Represented by the Price (%)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ... of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in Minnesota Represented by the Price ...

  13. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Minnesota (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for ... 1","Natural Gas Citygate Price in Minnesota (Dollars per Thousand Cubic ...

  14. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumption (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Alaska Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","2/2016" ,"Release Date:","4/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","5/31/2016" ,"Excel File

  15. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Alaska Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)",1,"Monthly","2/2016" ,"Release Date:","4/29/2016" ,"Next Release

  16. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumption (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Alabama Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","2/2016" ,"Release Date:","4/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","5/31/2016" ,"Excel File

  17. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Alabama Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)",1,"Monthly","2/2016" ,"Release Date:","4/29/2016" ,"Next Release

  18. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumption (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Arkansas Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","2/2016" ,"Release Date:","4/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","5/31/2016" ,"Excel File

  19. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Arkansas Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)",1,"Monthly","2/2016" ,"Release Date:","4/29/2016" ,"Next

  20. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Arizona Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)",1,"Monthly","2/2016" ,"Release Date:","4/29/2016" ,"Next Release