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  1. Connecticut Nuclear Profile - Millstone

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Millstone" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  2. Millstone Hill Thomson Scatter Results for 1969

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, J. V.

    1974-07-23

    This report summarizes the results for the electron-density distribution, electron and ion temperatures, and vertical ionization fluxes in the F-region obtained during 1969 using the Millstone Hill (42.6N, 71.5W) Thomson ...

  3. Millstone Hill Thomson Scatter Results for 1965

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, J. V.

    1969-12-08

    This report presents F-region electron densities, and electron and ion temperatures observed during the year 1965 at the Millstone Hill Radar Observatory (42.6N. 71.5W) by the UHF Thomson (incoherent) scatter radar. The ...

  4. Millstone Hill Thomson Scatter Results for 1964

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, J. V.

    1967-11-15

    Thomson scatter (incoherent backscatter) observations of the ionosphere were made at Millstone Hill at a wavelength of 68 cm during 1964, for 30-hour periods every two weeks. These data have been employed to derive the ...

  5. Millstone Hill Thomson Scatter Results for 1971

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, J. V.

    1978-03-24

    During 1971, the incoherent scatter radar at Millstone Hill (42.6N, 71.5W) was employed to measure the electron density, electron and ion temperatures, and the vertical velocity of the 0[superscript +] ions in the F-region ...

  6. Incoherent Scatter Measurements of E- and F-Region Density, Temperatures, and Collision Frequency at Millstone Hill

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, W. L.

    1979-02-23

    The Millstone Hill incoherent (Thomson) scatter radar system has been operated since 1963 to perform a synoptic study of F2-region electron densities, and electron and ion temperatures. These measurements have been conducted ...

  7. Solar cycle and seasonal variations in F region electrodynamics at Millstone Hill

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buonsanto, M.J.; Hagan, M.E.; Salah, J.E. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Westford, MA (United States); Fejer, B.G. [Utah State Univ., Logan, UT (United States)

    1993-09-01

    Incoherent scatter radar observations of ion drifts taken at Millstone Hill (42.6{degrees}N, 288.5{degrees}E) during 73 experiments in the period February 1984 to February 1992 are used to construct, for the first time at this station, average quiet-time ExB drift patterns for both solar cycle maximum and minimum, for the summer, winter, and equinox seasons. The daily variation of V{sub {perpendicular}N} shows a reversal from northward to southward drifts near noon, and a return to northward drifts in the premidnight hours. The weaker southward drift in the afternoon in summer noted by Wand and Evans is shown to occur only at sunspot minimum. The daily variation of V{sub {perpendicular}E} shows daytime eastward drifts and nighttime westward drifts, except in summer when the usual daytime eastward maximum near 1200 LT is suppressed. The daily mean drift is westward for all seasons, and is largest in summer. The daytime eastward drift and nighttime westward drift tend to be stronger at solar maximum than at solar minimum. Average drift patterns are also constructed for equinox for both extremely quiet and geomagnetically disturbed periods. V{sub {perpendicular}N} is appreciably more northward under extremely quiet than under disturbed conditions in the postmidnight and morning periods. During extremely quiet periods, V{sub {perpendicular}E} turns slightly eastward in the evening hours, while it is strongly westward for disturbed conditions. This result contrasts with the strong eastward drifts in the evening in summer reported for extremely quiet conditions at Millstone Hill by Gonzalez et al. A strong anticorrelation is seen at Millstone Hill between V{sub {perpendicular}N} and V{sub {parallel}}, as is found at lower latitude stations. The quiet-time patterns are discussed in terms of the causative E and F region dynamo mechanisms. 39 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Application of a 2-D particle tracking model to simulate entrainment of winter flounder larvae at the Millstone Nuclear Power Station

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dimou, Nadia K.

    1989-01-01

    A 2-D random walk model, developed by Dimou (1989) as part of this research project, was used to simulate entrainment at the Millstone Nuclear Power Station of winter flounder larvae hatched within Niantic River.

  9. Neutral and ion composition changes in the F Region over Millstone Hill during the equinox transition study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oliver, W.L.

    1990-04-01

    Overhead ionospheric incoherent scatter radar data from Millstone Hill is used to deduce the storm time variations of the thermospheric temperature, O and N2 densities, and F1 region ion composition during the Equinox Transition study of September 17-24, 1984. The measured neutral temperature profile and O density at 400 km altitude is extrapolated to determine O density changes in the lower thermosphere. Using these O densities and the measured electron densities, we deduce the variation of the N{sub 2} density. Our initial attempt leads to the deduction of large depletions in both O and N{sub 2} in the lower thermosphere. The radar-measured neutral temperatures were contaminated by ion-neutral frictional heating effects during the disturbed periods of the ETS and this served to invalidate neutral density extrapolations made with these temperatures. The height of 50% O+ ion composition in the F1 region and the height of the peak electron density in the ionosphere, are completed and compared. The height of the peak on the distributed days was located in the lower F1 region molecular-ion layer rather than in the F1 region O+ layer. This occurrance has serious consequences for methods of deducing neutral winds from the height of the F layer, for these methods rely on the peak containing primarily O+ ions.

  10. Neutral and ion composition changes in the F region over Millstone Hill during the equinox transition study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oliver, W.L. (Boston Univ., MA (United States))

    1990-04-01

    The author uses overhead ionospheric incoherent scatter radar data from Millstone Hill to deduce the stormtime variations of the thermospheric temperature, O and N{sub 2} densities, and F{sub 1} region ion composition during the Equinox Transition Study of September 17-24, 1984. Using the measured neutral temperature profile and O density at 400 km altitude, they extrapolate to determine O density changes in the lower thermosphere. Using these O densities and the measured electron densities, he deduces the variation of the N{sub 2} density. His initial attempt leads to the deduction of large depletions in both O and N{sub 2} in the lower thermosphere. On using the MSIS model neutral temperatures for the extrapolation, however, he computes O depletions having magnitudes more comparable with theoretical predictions and N{sub 2} variations consistent with expected thermal expansion effects. He speculates that the radar-measured neutral temperature were contaminated by ion-neutral frictional heating effects during the disturbed periods of the ETS and that this served to invalidate neutral density extrapolations made with these temperatures. Further, they computes the height of 50% O{sup +} ion composition in the F{sub 1} region and the height of the peak electron density in the ionosphere, and, upon comparing these, find that the height of the peak on the disturbed days was located in the lower F{sub 1} consequences for methods of deducing neutral winds from the height of the F layer, for these methods rely on the peak containing primarily O{sup +} ions.

  11. Environmental Assessment for DOE permission for off-loading activities to support the movement of Millstone Unit 2 steam generator sub-assemblies across the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-10-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA), for the proposed granting of DOE permission of offloading activities to support the movement Millstone Unit 2 steam generator sub-assemblies (SGSAs) across the Savannah River Site (SRS). Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, an environmental impact statement is not required, and the Department is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact. On the basis of the floodplain/wetlands assessment in the EA, DOE has determined that there is no practicable alternative to the proposed activities and that the proposed action has been designed to minimize potential harm to or within the floodplain of the SRS boat ramp. No wetlands on SRS would be affected by the proposed action.

  12. Millstone, New Jersey: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland: Energy ResourcesDec 2005 WindPROLLC JumpEthanol LLCMillis,Texas:Millsap,

  13. ,"Plant","Primary Energy Source","Operating Company","Net Summer...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Connecticut" ,"Plant","Primary Energy Source","Operating Company","Net Summer Capacity (MW)" 1,"Millstone","Nuclear","Dominion Nuclear Conn Inc",2102.5 2,"Middletown","Petroleum","...

  14. Electron-density comparisons between radar observations and 3-D ionospheric model calculations. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, M.W.

    1990-01-01

    A comparison of electron densities calculated from the Utah State University First-Principals Ionospheric Model with simultaneous observations taken at Sondrestrom, Millstone, and Arecibo incoherent-scatter radars was undertaken to better understanding the response of the ionosphere at these longitudinally similar yet latitudinally separated locations. The comparison included over 50 days distributed over 3 1/2 years roughly symmetrical about the last solar-minimum in 1986. The overall trend of the comparison was that to first-order the model reproduces electron densities responding to diurnal, seasonal, geomagnetic, and solar-cycle variations for all three radars. However, some model-observation discrepancies were found. These include, failure of the model to correctly produce an evening peak at Millstone, fall-spring equinox differences at Sondrestrom, tidal structure at Arecibo, and daytime NmF2 values at Arecibo.

  15. Insights from an overview of four PRAs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fitzpatrick, R.; Arrieta, L.; Teichmann, T.; Davis, P.

    1986-01-01

    This paper summarizes the findings of an investigation of four probabilistic risk assessments (PRAs), those for Millstone 3, Seabrook, Shoreham, and Oconee 3, performed by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) for the Reliability and Risk Assessment Branch of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). This group of four PRAs was subjected to an overview process with the basic goal of ascertaining what insights might be gained (beyond those already documented within the individual PRAs) by an independent evaluation of the group with respect to nuclear plant safety and vulnerability. Specifically, the objectives of the study were (1) to identify and rank initiators, systems, components, and failure modes from dominant accident sequences according to their contribution to core melt probability and public risk; and (2) to derive from this process plant-specific and generic insights. The effort was not intended to verify the specific details and results of each PRA but rather - having accepted the results - to see what they might mean in a more global context. The NRC had previously sponsored full detailed reviews of each of these PRAs, but only two, those for Millstone 3 and Shoreham, were completed and documented in time to allow their consideration within the study. This paper also presents some comments and insights into the amenability of certain features of these PRAs to this type of overview process.

  16. Storm-induced changes of the topside ionosphere as deduced from incoherent-scatter radars. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lunn, K.J.

    1990-01-01

    Incoherent scatter radar observations from Millstone Hill, Saint Santin, and Arecibo are used to illustrate changes of the topside ionosphere during a geomagnetic storm. These observations consist of electron density, electron and ion temperatures, and ion velocity components parallel and perpendicular to the magnetic field. These parameters can further describe changes in ion composition, electric fields, and neutral winds. Attention is given to a specific storm during the Equinox Transition Study (ETS) of September 1984. In order to isolate the storm effects in the topside ionosphere, a comparison will be made between a disturbed and quiet day. A novel result from this study is the finding of correlated oscillations between parallel and perpendicular ion velocity components which are apparently storm induced. Previously, these oscillations have been observed primarily at night, but now it's noticed that during storm conditions there are prominent oscillations during the day.

  17. A study of the daytime E-F sub 1 region ionosphere at mid-latitudes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buonsanto, M.J. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Westford (USA))

    1990-06-01

    A photochemical equilibrium daytime model is used to study the ionosphere between 110 and 180 km at mid-latitudes. The model includes the latest photoionization and photoabsorption cross sections, extreme untraviolet (EUV) fluxes in 37 wavelength bands, and all reactions believed to be important in this region. Model results are compared with (1) noon-time E layer critical frequency (foE) at Boulder and Wallops Island over a full solar cycle; (2) Millstone Hill incoherent scatter radar observations of electron density at 180 km (N{sub 180}) for a wide variety of seasons and solar geophysical conditions; (3) selected Millstone Hill incoherent scatter profiles of electron density between 110 and 180 km which included E-F{sub 1} valley minima; and (4) the ratio of the molecular ion concentration to the total ion concentration at 180 km for noon throughout the solar cycle as given by both the IRI-86 ion composition model and the semiempirical ion composition model of Oliver. Best agreement between the photochemical model documented in this paper and the observations and ion composition models is generally obtained if (1) the EUV fluxes in the photochemical model are increased by 25-30% above values derived from published reference spectra; (2) neutral densities used in the photochemical model are decreased by 25% below those given by MSIS-86 at equinox, with larger decreases in winter, and smaller or no decreases in summer. The results show that this region of the ionosphere can be modeled with reasonable success given the current state of knowledge. Modeling this region of the ionosphere is important for resolving ambiguities in true height analysis of ionograms and reduction of incoherent scatter spectra. Improved modeling requires more accurate values of aeronomical parameters, i.e., ionizing fluxes, cross sections, reaction rates, composition and temperature.

  18. FABSOAR--A Fabry-Perot Spectrometer for Oxygen A-band Research Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watchorn, Steven

    2010-09-10

    Because this was a Phase I project, it did not add extensively to the body of A-band knowledge. There was no basic research performed on that subject. The principal addition was that a mechanical and optical design for a triple-etalon Fabry-Perot interferometer (FABSOAR) capable of A-band sensing was sketched out and shown to be within readily feasible instrument fabrication parameters. The parameters for the proposed triple-etalon Fabry-Perot were shown to be very similar to existing Fabry-Perots built by Scientific Solutions. The mechanical design for the FABSOAR instrument incorporated the design of previous Scientific Solutions imagers, condensing the three three-inch-diameter etalons into a single, sturdy tube. The design allowed for the inclusion of a commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) filter wheel and a thermocooled CCD detector from Andor. The tube has supports to mount to a horizontal or vertical opticaltable surface, and was to be coupled to a Scientific Solutions pointing head at the Millstone Hill Observatory in Massachusetts for Phase II calibration and testing.

  19. Licensing of spent fuel dry storage and consolidated rod storage: A Review of Issues and Experiences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, W.J.

    1990-02-01

    The results of this study, performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE), respond to the nuclear industry's recommendation that a report be prepared that collects and describes the licensing issues (and their resolutions) that confront a new applicant requesting approval from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for dry storage of spent fuel or for large-scale storage of consolidated spent fuel rods in pools. The issues are identified in comments, questions, and requests from the NRC during its review of applicants' submittals. Included in the report are discussions of (1) the 18 topical reports on cask and module designs for dry storage fuel that have been submitted to the NRC, (2) the three license applications for dry storage of spent fuel at independent spent fuel storage installations (ISFSIs) that have been submitted to the NRC, and (3) the three applications (one of which was later withdrawn) for large-scale storage of consolidated fuel rods in existing spent fuel storage pools at reactors that were submitted tot he NRC. For each of the applications submitted, examples of some of the issues (and suggestions for their resolutions) are described. The issues and their resolutions are also covered in detail in an example in each of the three subject areas: (1) the application for the CASTOR V/21 dry spent fuel storage cask, (2) the application for the ISFSI for dry storage of spent fuel at Surry, and (3) the application for full-scale wet storage of consolidated spent fuel at Millstone-2. The conclusions in the report include examples of major issues that applicants have encountered. Recommendations for future applicants to follow are listed. 401 refs., 26 tabs.

  20. Quantitative patterns of large-scale field-aligned currents in the auroral ionosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foster, J.C.; Fuller-Rowell, T.; Evans, D.S.

    1989-03-01

    Quantitative patterns of the distribution of field-aligned current (FAC) density have been derived from gradients of the average patterns of the Hall and Pedersen currents at high latitudes under the assumption that the total current is divergence-free. The horizontal currents were calculated from empirical convection electric field models, derived from Millstone Hill radar observations, and the ionospheric Hall and Pedersen conductances, based on satellite observations of the precipitating particle energy flux and spectrum and including an average (equinox) solar contribution. These independent empirical models, and the resultant patterns of the field-aligned currents, are keyed to an auroral precipitation index which quantifies the intensity and spatial extent of high-latitude particle precipitation and which is determined from a single satellite crossing of the auroral precipitation pattern. The patterns detail the spatial distribution of the currents as a function of increasing disturbance level. The magnitudes of the total single-hemisphere currents into or out of the ionosphere are closely balanced at each activity level and increase exponentially between 0.1 and 6 MA with increasing values of the precipitation index. The interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) sector dependence of the FAC patterns is investigated for disturbed conditions. A large portion of the FAC pattern is closed by local Pedersen currents (current into the ionosphere is balanced by an equal current out of the ionosphere at that local time). This locally balanced portion of the FAC system is enhanced in the prenoon (postnoon) sector for IMF B/sub v/>+1 nT (B/sub y/<-1 nT). In addition, there are net currents into the ionosphere postnoon and out of the ionosphere in the premidnight sector.

  1. The distribution of an illustrated timeline wall chart and teacher's guide of 20th century physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwartz, Brian

    2000-12-26

    The American Physical Society's part of its centennial celebration in March of 1999 decided to develop a timeline wall chart on the history of 20th century physics. This resulted in eleven consecutive posters, which when mounted side by side, create a 23-foot mural. The timeline exhibits and describes the millstones of physics in images and words. The timeline functions as a chronology, a work of art, a permanent open textbook, and a gigantic photo album covering a hundred years in the life of the community of physicists and the existence of the American Physical Society. Each of the eleven posters begins with a brief essay that places a major scientific achievement of the decade in its historical context. Large portraits of the essays' subjects include youthful photographs of Marie Curie, Albert Einstein, and Richard Feynman among others, to help put a face on science. Below the essays, a total of over 130 individual discoveries and inventions, explained in dated text boxes with accompanying images, form the backbone of the timeline. For ease of comprehension, this wealth of material is organized into five color-coded story lines the stretch horizontally across the hundred years of the 20th century. The five story lines are: Cosmic Scale, relate the story of astrophysics and cosmology; Human Scale, refers to the physics of the more familiar distances from the global to the microscopic; Atomic Scale, focuses on the submicroscopic world of atoms, nuclei and quarks; Living World, chronicles the interaction of physics with biology and medicine; Technology, traces the applications of physic to everyday living. Woven into the bottom border of the timeline are period images of significant works of art, architecture, and technological artifacts such as telephones, automobiles, aircraft, computers, and appliances. The last poster, covering the years since 1995, differs from the others. Its essay concerns the prospect for physics into the next century, and is illustrated with pictures of promising award winning high school students who, it is hoped, will be the leading researchers of physics in the decades ahead. Appropriately the last entries in the timeline are not achievements but open questions to be answered in the future.