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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "riverside cement power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

Western Riverside Council of Governments - Home Energy Renovation...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Western Riverside Council of Governments - Home Energy Renovation Opportunity (HERO) Financing Program (California) Western Riverside Council of Governments - Home Energy...

2

EIS-0439: Rice Solar Energy Project, Riverside County, California |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9: Rice Solar Energy Project, Riverside County, California 9: Rice Solar Energy Project, Riverside County, California EIS-0439: Rice Solar Energy Project, Riverside County, California Summary This environmental review was prepared by DOE's Western Area Power Administration with the Department of the Interior's Bureau of Land Management (BLM) as a cooperating agency. This EIS evaluates the environmental impacts of the Rice Solar Energy Project, a 150-megawatt solar concentrating electric powerplant proposed to be constructed on private land in the Sonoran Desert. DOE's Western Area Power Administration actions under this proposal include building and operating a new substation to interconnect the solar project to Western's transmission system. DOE may also use this EIS as part of its decision whether to issue a Federal loan guarantee to support the proposal. BLM's

3

Survey and preliminary evaluation of potential geothermal energy applications for Riverside, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A preliminary assessment of the potential applications for geothermal energy in Riverside, California, was made. This assessment includes both potential electrical and non-electrical applications, and focuses on the following factors: the location of nearby geothermal resources; characteristics of these resources; types of applications suited to each resource; technical and economic feasibility of these applications; the potential impact on the energy demand of each application, and potential deterrents to the utilization of geothermal energy for the most promising application. It is concluded that geothermal energy has a promising potential to supply electricity, space heating and cooling, and process heat to Riverside. There are sufficient geothermal resources within 200 miles to supply the electrical requirements of Riverside for thousands of years. Depending on the particular reservoir involved, this electricity can probably be generated at costs ranging from 1 to 3 times the cost of conventional electric power generation. Over this distance, the additional unit cost for energy transmission should be comparatively small. The geothermal resource at nearby Arrowhead Hot Springs has the potential to supply space heating and cooling and process heat to Riverside for a hundred years. The technology for these non-electric uses is available. The cost of using geothermal energy for these applications is estimated at 1 to 2 times the cost of conventional fuels, depending on the population density of the service area. The most difficult problems in the possible use of geothermal energy in Riverside appear to be institutional difficulties in electric applications.

Bloomster, C.H.; Fassbender, L.L.; Schilling, A.H.; Lippek, H.E.

1978-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Riverside Electric Cooperative | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Riverside Electric Cooperative Riverside Electric Cooperative Place Idaho Utility Id 56536 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC WECC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png No rate schedules available. Average Rates Residential: $0.0574/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Riverside_Electric_Cooperative&oldid=411451" Categories: EIA Utility Companies and Aliases Utility Companies Organizations Stubs What links here Related changes Special pages

5

Riverside Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Riverside Geothermal Area Riverside Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Riverside Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.46666667,"lon":-118.1883333,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

6

Portland cement for SO.sub.2 control in coal-fired power plants  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

There is described a method of removing oxides of sulfur from the emissions of fossil fuel combustion by injecting portland cement into the boiler with the fuel, the combustion air, or downstream with the combustion gases. There is also described the cement products that result from this method.

Steinberg, Meyer (Melville, NY)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Portland cement for SO/sub 2/ control in coal-fired power plants  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for removing oxides of sulfur from the emissions of fossil fuel combustion by injecting portland cement into the boiler with the fuel, the combustion air, or downstream with the combustion gases. The cement products that result from this method is also described. 1 tab.

Steinberg, M.

1984-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

8

Clean Cities: Western Riverside County Clean Cities coalition  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Riverside County Clean Cities Coalition Riverside County Clean Cities Coalition The Western Riverside County Clean Cities coalition works with vehicle fleets, fuel providers, community leaders, and other stakeholders to reduce petroleum use in transportation. Western Riverside County Clean Cities coalition Contact Information Jennifer DiCiano 951-955-8587 diciano@wrcog.cog.ca.us Coalition Website Clean Cities Coordinator Jennifer DiCiano Photo of Jennifer DiCiano Jennifer DiCiano, coordinator for the Western Riverside County Clean Cities Coalition, has been with Western Riverside Council of Governments (WRCOG) since 2007. Ms. DiCiano has more than 20 years' experience in local government implementing various environmental programs including; Indoor Air Quality, Solid Waste Reduction, Reduction of Petroleum Usage and

9

Clean Cities: Western Riverside County Clean Cities coalition  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

vehicle fleets, fuel providers, community leaders, and other stakeholders to reduce petroleum use in transportation. Western Riverside County Clean Cities coalition Contact...

10

Riverside, CA Vehicle Purchase Incentives | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

are eligible to receive a rebate toward the purchase of qualified natural gas or hybrid electric vehicles purchased from a City of Riverside automobile dealership. The...

11

Methodological and Practical Considerations for DevelopingMultiproject Baselines for Electric Power and Cement Industry Projects inCentral America  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) andthe Center for Sustainable Development in the Americas (CSDA) conductedtechnical studies and organized two training workshops to developcapacity in Central America for the evaluation of climate changeprojects. This paper describes the results of two baseline case studiesconducted for these workshops, one for the power sector and one for thecement industry, that were devised to illustrate certain approaches tobaseline setting. Multiproject baseline emission rates (BERs) for themain Guatemalan electricity grid were calculated from 2001 data. Inrecent years, the Guatemalan power sector has experienced rapid growth;thus, a sufficient number of new plants have been built to estimateviable BERs. We found that BERs for baseload plants offsetting additionalbaseload capacity ranged from 0.702 kgCO2/kWh (using a weighted averagestringency) to 0.507 kgCO2/kWh (using a 10th percentile stringency),while the baseline for plants offsetting load-followingcapacity is lowerat 0.567 kgCO2/kWh. For power displaced from existing load-followingplants, the rate is higher, 0.735 kgCO2/kWh, as a result of the age ofsome plants used for meeting peak loads and the infrequency of their use.The approved consolidated methodology for the Clean Development Mechanismyields a single rate of 0.753 kgCO2/kWh. Due to the relatively smallnumber of cement plants in the region and the regional nature of thecement market, all of Central America was chosen as the geographicboundary for setting cement industry BERs. Unfortunately, actualoperations and output data were unobtainable for most of the plants inthe region, and many data were estimated. Cement industry BERs rangedfrom 205 kgCO2 to 225 kgCO2 per metric ton of cement.

Murtishaw, Scott; Sathaye, Jayant; Galitsky, Christina; Dorion,Kristel

2004-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

12

Methodological and Practical Considerations for Developing Multiproject Baselines for Electric Power and Cement Industry Projects in Central America  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from the global cement industry’, Ann. Rev. Energy Environ.were estimated. Cement industry BERs ranged from 205 kgCO 2carbon intensity, cement industry, Central America, electric

Murtishaw, Scott; Sathaye, Jayant; Galitsky, Christina; Dorion, Kristel

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Multi-Megawatt Organic Rankine Engine power plant (MORE). Phase IA final report: system design of MORE power plant for industrial energy conservation emphasizing the cement industry  

SciTech Connect

The Multi-Megawatt Organic Rankine Engine (MORE) program is directed towards the development of a large, organic Rankine power plant for energy conservation from moderate temperature industrial heat streams. Organic Rankine power plants are ideally suited for use with heat sources in the temperature range below 1100/sup 0/F. Cement manufacture was selected as the prototype industry for the MORE system because of the range of parameters which can be tested in a cement application. This includes process exit temperatures of 650/sup 0/F to 1110/sup 0/F for suspension preheater and long dry kilns, severe dust loading, multi-megawatt power generation potential, and boiler exhaust gas acid dew point variations. The work performed during the Phase IA System Design contract period is described. The System Design task defines the complete MORE system and its installation to the level necessary to obtain detailed performance maps, equipment specifications, planning of supporting experiments, and credible construction and hardware cost estimates. The MORE power plant design is based upon installation in the Black Mountain Quarry Cement Plant near Victorville, California.

Bair, E.K.; Breindel, B.; Collamore, F.N.; Hodgson, J.N.; Olson, G.K.

1980-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

14

EE160: Fiber-Optic Communication Systems University of California, Riverside Bourns College of Engineering, University of California, Riverside  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EE160: Fiber-Optic Communication Systems University of California, Riverside Bourns College of Engineering, University of California, Riverside EE160: Fiber-Optic Communication Systems Spring 2005 Class, Optically Pre-Amplified Receiver · Fiber-Optic System Design Issues Homework There will be four bi

15

Application Programming Interface Documentation - Qb - U.S ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... Oxnard Wastewater Treatment Plant (50225) Regional Waste Systems ... TXI Riverside Cement Power House ... Heat Recovery Coke Facility (55067) ...

16

City of Riverside, California (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Riverside, California (Utility Company) Riverside, California (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name City of Riverside Place California Utility Id 16088 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes ISO CA Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Agricultural and Pumping Commercial Business Retention Rate Commercial

17

Riverside Public Utilities - Non-Residential PV Incentive Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Non-Residential PV Incentive Program Non-Residential PV Incentive Program Riverside Public Utilities - Non-Residential PV Incentive Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Maximum Rebate Whichever is less: 50% of project cost or specific dollar limits which vary according to the rate schedule of the applicant Program Info State California Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Program is currently on hold. See below for more information. Provider Riverside Public Utilities '''''Note: Funding for this program has been exhausted for the remainder of the fiscal year. The program is scheduled to reopen on July 1, 2014.''''' The non-residential photovoltaic (PV) rebate program provides financial incentives for Riverside Public Utilities' business customers to install

18

Riverside County - Sustainable Building Policy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

County - Sustainable Building Policy County - Sustainable Building Policy Riverside County - Sustainable Building Policy < Back Eligibility Local Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Program Info State California Program Type Energy Standards for Public Buildings Provider County of Riverside In February 2009, the County of Riverside Board of Supervisors adopted Policy Number H-29, creating the Sustainable Building Policy. The Policy requires that all new county building projects initiated on or after March 1, 2009 must meet the criteria for LEED certification.The Board of Supervisors may grant exceptions, especially for projects under 5,000 square feet. Additionally, all county buildings project must have a LEED

19

Riverside Public Utilities - Energy Efficiency Technology Grant Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Efficiency Technology Grant Energy Efficiency Technology Grant Program Riverside Public Utilities - Energy Efficiency Technology Grant Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Savings Category Other Maximum Rebate Custom Energy Technology Grant: $100,000 25% matching of funds required Energy Innovation Grants: $100,000 Fund matching NOT required Program Info State California Program Type Utility Grant Program Rebate Amount Custom Energy Technology Grant: 75% of the project cost. Energy Innovations Grant: 100% of project cost Feasibility Study: up to $5,000 per year Provider Riverside Public Utilities Riverside Public Utilities (RPU) offers two Energy Technology Grant Programs to help foster the development of innovative solutions to energy problems. The Custom Energy Technology Grant is available for business

20

Riverside Public Utilities - Residential PV Incentive Program | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PV Incentive Program PV Incentive Program Riverside Public Utilities - Residential PV Incentive Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Maximum Rebate 13,000 or 50% of project cost, whichever is less Program Info State California Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Program is on hold Provider Riverside Public Utilities '''''Note: Funding for this program has been exhausted for the remainder of the fiscal year. The program is scheduled to reopen on July 1, 2014. ''''' The Residential Photovoltaic (PV) System rebate program provides incentives to Riverside Public Utilities customers who purchase and install qualifying photovoltaic systems on their homes. For Fiscal Year 2013, the rebate amount was $2.00 per watt AC and cannot exceed 50% of the total system cost

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "riverside cement power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Western Riverside Council of Governments - Home Energy Renovation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Home Energy Renovation Home Energy Renovation Opportunity (HERO) Financing Program (California) Western Riverside Council of Governments - Home Energy Renovation Opportunity (HERO) Financing Program (California) < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Sealing Your Home Cooling Other Design & Remodeling Windows, Doors, & Skylights Commercial Weatherization Ventilation Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Insulation Solar Buying & Making Electricity Water Heating Wind Program Info State California Program Type PACE Financing Provider WRCOG HERO Financing Program (Residential) Western Riverside Council of Governments (WRCOG) is offering homeowners in WRCOG participating jurisdictions an opportunity to finance energy and

22

Western Riverside Council of Governments - Large Commercial PACE  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Large Commercial PACE Large Commercial PACE (California) Western Riverside Council of Governments - Large Commercial PACE (California) < Back Eligibility Commercial Savings Category Other Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Solar Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State California Program Type PACE Financing Provider Structured Finance Associates Structured Finance, on behalf of the Western Riverside Council of Governments (WRCOG), is providing Property Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) loans to eligible large commercial businesses in participating jurisdictions. PACE programs allow property owners to finance energy projects, and to repay the financing through special assessments on their property tax bill. Solar installations of at least 125 kilowatts, fuel cells, and a variety of

23

Potential Energy Savings and CO2 Emissions Reduction of China's Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is coal-fired power generation. power generation. China Cement (10), 18-heat recovery (WHR) power generation technologies have been

Ke, Jing

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Cement invasion  

SciTech Connect

Damage from cement and cement filtrate has been a much discussed subject since set-through-and-perforate completions were first used. Historically, much of the discussion was similar to that for rotary drilling and drilling mud - it would be nice to prevent all damage, but in the real world, some damage must be tolerated to allow the operator to reap the benefits of cementing. The principal perceived formation damage due to cement invasion is seen by the operator as reducing production. The pure idealist requires full potential production under all alternatives, and would to complete all oil and gas wells free of any formation damage. The more practical idealist holds that damage would result in lower production with the completion method he prefers should be prevented. The pragmatic operator compares the cost of preventing damage to the cost of correcting the damage. Even an extremely high damage ratio is academic if the planned stimulation treatment eliminates the influence the cement invasion might have on production. Formations with permeability high enough to yield economical production without some sort of stimulation or cleanup treatment are unlikely to be subject to significant cement filtrate damage.

Sutton, D.L.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Riverside County, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Riverside County, California: Energy Resources Riverside County, California: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 33.6825587°, -115.4733554° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.6825587,"lon":-115.4733554,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

26

Potential Energy Savings and CO2 Emissions Reduction of China's Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Specific cement energy consumption: conversion of power into2006. Cement industry energy consumption status and energyZhou, H. , 2007a. Energy consumption and environment

Ke, Jing

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Analysis of Energy-Efficiency Opportunities for the Cement Industry in Shandong Province, China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2007 e. Ningguo Cement Plant 9100KW Waste Heat Recovery andof the surveyed cement plants have waste heat recovery powerWaste Heat Recovery, and Variable Frequency Drives (VFDs) for Large Motors/Fans in 35 Cement Plants

Price, Lynn

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Recipient: City of Riverside ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND CONSERVATION BLOCK GRANTS NEPA COMPLIANCE FORM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Award #: EE 000 0872 Award #: EE 000 0872 Recipient: City of Riverside ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND CONSERVATION BLOCK GRANTS NEPA COMPLIANCE FORM Activities Determination/ Categorical Exclusion Reviewer's Specific Instructions and Rationale (Restrictions and Allowable Activity) Project 1-Government Facility Retrofits A9, All, B5.1 Waste Stream Clause Historic Preservation Clause Engineering Clause **boiler replacement cannot result in a net increase in air emissions. Project 2 - Foreclosed Home - Green Rehab Program A9, All, B5.1 Waste Stream Clause Historic Preservation Clause Engineering Clause Project 3-PC Power Management Software Rebate Program A9, All, B5.1 None. Project 4-Specific Plan Updates A9, All None. Project 6-Solar Trash Compactor Technologies B5.1 Waste Stream clause Project 7-PV electric vehicle

29

Riverside Public Utilities - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Efficiency Rebate Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Riverside Public Utilities - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Low-Income Residential Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Appliances & Electronics Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heat Pumps Insulation Design & Remodeling Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate Maximum allowable rebate for appliances is $500 per customer, per year Central AC/Heat Pumps: $1,000 Program Info State California Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Whole House Program: Up to $7,000 per 12 month period Refrigerators: $100 ($200 w/recycling of old unit) Room Air Conditioner: $50 Dishwasher: $50 Clothes Washer: $75 - $155

30

Riverside Public Utilities - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Riverside Public Utilities - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Construction Design & Remodeling Other Sealing Your Home Windows, Doors, & Skylights Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Maximum Rebate The incentive cap is $25,000 for all programs per customer, per calendar year with the rebate being no more than 25% of the product/equipment cost Program Info Expiration Date Rebates must be submitted within 90 days of purchase to qualify. State California Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Exit Sign: $25

31

Methodological and Practical Considerations for Developing Multiproject Baselines for Electric Power and Cement Industry Projects in Central America  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy-ef?ciency and electric power projects’, Berkeley, CA,for evaluation of electric power projects’, Energy PolicyCentral America, electric power, mitigation projects,

Murtishaw, Scott; Sathaye, Jayant; Galitsky, Christina; Dorion, Kristel

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Zinc electrode with cement additive  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A zinc electrode having a cement additive, preferably, Portland Cement, distributed in the zinc active material.

Charkey, Allen (Brookfield, CT)

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Release of radionuclides and chelating agents from cement-solidified decontamination low-level radioactive waste collected from the Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station Unit 3  

SciTech Connect

As part of a study being performed for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), small-scale waste-form specimens were collected during a low oxidation-state transition-metal ion (LOMI)-nitric permanganate (NP)-LOMI solidification performed in October 1989 at the Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station Unit 3. The purpose of this program was to evaluate the performance of cement-solidified decontamination waste to meet the low-level waste stability requirements defined in the NRC`s ``Technical Position on Waste Form,`` Revision 1. The samples were acquired and tested because little data have been obtained on the physical stability of actual cement-solidified decontamination ion-exchange resin waste forms and on the leachability of radionuclides and chelating agents from those waste forms. The Peach Bottom waste-form specimens were subjected to compressive strength, immersion, and leach testing in accordance with the NRC`s ``Technical Position on Waste Form,`` Revision 1. Results of this study indicate that the specimens withstood the compression tests (>500 psi) before and after immersion testing and leaching, and that the leachability indexes for all radionuclides, including {sup 14}C, {sup 99}{Tc}, and {sup 129}I, are well above the leachability index requirement of 6.0, required by the NRC`s ``Technical Position on Waste Form,`` Revision 1.

Akers, D.W.; Kraft, N.C.; Mandler, J.W. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Riverside Inn Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Riverside Inn Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Riverside Inn Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Riverside Inn Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Riverside Inn Sector Geothermal energy Type Pool and Spa Location Lava Hot Springs, Idaho Coordinates 42.6193625°, -112.0110712° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

35

Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Solar Photovoltaics at the Stringfellow Superfund Site in Riverside, California  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the the Stringfellow Superfund Site in Riverside, California A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites Otto VanGeet and Gail Mosey Technical Report NREL/TP-6A20-48770 December 2010 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Solar Photovoltaics at the

36

Pack Cementation Aluminizing of Steels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 3   Partial list of commercial applications of pack cementation aluminizing...Carbon and stainless steels Steam power and cogeneration Waterwall tubes 2 % Cr-1% Mo steel Fluidized bed combustor tubes 2 % Cr-1% Mo steel Waste heat boiler tubes Carbon steel Economizer and air preheater tubes 2 % Cr-1% Mo steel Superheater tubes 2 % Cr-1% Mo steel Aerospace (a) Turbine blades...

37

Letter from California Portland Cement CEO to the Cement Industry...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Letter from California Portland Cement CEO to the Cement Industry Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing...

38

The Visible Cement Dataset Homepage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST. The Visible Cement Dataset is a collection of three-dimensional data sets of hydrating cement, Plaster of Paris, and ...

2013-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

39

California City Implements Solar-Powered Trash Compactors | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

California City Implements Solar-Powered Trash Compactors California City Implements Solar-Powered Trash Compactors California City Implements Solar-Powered Trash Compactors June 16, 2010 - 11:30am Addthis Riverside, Calif., used a portion of its EECBG funds to buy 25 solar-powered trash compactors. | Courtesy of BigBelly Solar Riverside, Calif., used a portion of its EECBG funds to buy 25 solar-powered trash compactors. | Courtesy of BigBelly Solar This summer, Riverside, Calif., is harnessing the power of the sun in an effort aimed at slashing waste, costs and greenhouse gases. The city used $153,040 of its $2,850,600 Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG) to buy 25 solar-powered compactors from Waste Management, Inc., a distributor for U.S. manufacturer BigBelly Solar. Called BigBelly Solar Compactors, these containers have the same blueprint

40

HYDRAULIC CEMENT PREPARATION FROM LURGI SPENT SHALE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

P. , "Investigations on hydraulic cement from spent oilCO, April 16-18, 1980 HYDRAULIC CEMENT PREPARATION FROMUniversity of California. HYDRAULIC CEMENT PREPARATION FROM

Mehta, P.K.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "riverside cement power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Case Study of the California Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2 compares cement industry electricity and natural gas useTable 2. Cement Industry Electricity and Natural GasFigure 2. Cement Industry End Use Electricity Consumption

Coito, Fred; Powell, Frank; Worrell, Ernst; Price, Lynn; Friedmann, Rafael

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

High temperature lightweight foamed cements  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Cement slurries are disclosed which are suitable for use in geothermal wells since they can withstand high temperatures and high pressures. The formulation consists of cement, silica flour, water, a retarder, a foaming agent, a foam stabilizer, and a reinforcing agent. A process for producing these cements is also disclosed. 3 figs.

Sugama, Toshifumi.

1989-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

43

High temperature lightweight foamed cements  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Cement slurries are disclosed which are suitable for use in geothermal wells since they can withstand high temperatures and high pressures. The formulation consists of cement, silica flour, water, a retarder, a foaming agent, a foam stabilizer, and a reinforcing agent. A process for producing these cements is also disclosed.

Sugama, Toshifumi (Mastic Beach, NY)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Guidebook for Using the Tool BEST Cement: Benchmarking and Energy Savings Tool for the Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Concepts of Waste Heat Recovery in Cement Plants EnergyConcepts of Waste Heat Recovery in Cement Plants Energyor Photo: Waste heat recovery at cement plant, image taken

Galitsky, Christina

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Cementing horizontal wells  

SciTech Connect

Since the introduction of horizontal drilling, most completions have been open hole. Open-hole or slotted-liner completions may be satisfactory in straight, thick formations, if stimulation is not required. But if the wellbore wanders out of the reservoir, whether due to loss of directional control or spotty knowledge of formation dimensions, casing becomes a necessity. In addition, a wellbore that stays in the formation but comes uncomfortably close to the water-oil contact or gas cap requires casing to prevent coning. Further, if stimulation is anticipated, or may become a necessity, it is essential that the hole be cased and cemented. Otherwise, there is no control of the stimulation treatment. Even if the horizontal wellbore itself does not require casing, intermediate casing in the high-angle hole is needed. This is especially critical in open-hole completions below a gas cap, for example. The keys to effective horizontal cementing are fundamentally the same as for cementing vertical wells: proper centralization of casing in the bore-hole to ensure efficient mud removal and well-designed cement slurries.

Baret, F.; Griffin, T.J.

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Thermal Shock-resistant Cement  

SciTech Connect

We studied the effectiveness of sodium silicate-activated Class F fly ash in improving the thermal shock resistance and in extending the onset of hydration of Secar #80 refractory cement. When the dry mix cement, consisting of Secar #80, Class F fly ash, and sodium silicate, came in contact with water, NaOH derived from the dissolution of sodium silicate preferentially reacted with Class F fly ash, rather than the #80, to dissociate silicate anions from Class F fly ash. Then, these dissociated silicate ions delayed significantly the hydration of #80 possessing a rapid setting behavior. We undertook a multiple heating -water cooling quenching-cycle test to evaluate the cement’s resistance to thermal shock. In one cycle, we heated the 200 and #61616;C-autoclaved cement at 500 and #61616;C for 24 hours, and then the heated cement was rapidly immersed in water at 25 and #61616;C. This cycle was repeated five times. The phase composition of the autoclaved #80/Class F fly ash blend cements comprised four crystalline hydration products, boehmite, katoite, hydrogrossular, and hydroxysodalite, responsible for strengthening cement. After a test of 5-cycle heat-water quenching, we observed three crystalline phase-transformations in this autoclaved cement: boehmite and #61614; and #61543;-Al2O3, katoite and #61614; calcite, and hydroxysodalite and #61614; carbonated sodalite. Among those, the hydroxysodalite and #61614; carbonated sodalite transformation not only played a pivotal role in densifying the cementitious structure and in sustaining the original compressive strength developed after autoclaving, but also offered an improved resistance of the #80 cement to thermal shock. In contrast, autoclaved Class G well cement with and without Class F fly ash and quartz flour failed this cycle test, generating multiple cracks in the cement. The major reason for such impairment was the hydration of lime derived from the dehydroxylation of portlandite formed in the autoclaved cement, causing its volume to expand.

Sugama T.; Pyatina, T.; Gill, S.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Climate VISION: News and Events - Cement - First Cement Plants...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

in the top 25 percent nationally using EPA's ENERGY STAR Cement Plant Energy Performance Indicator (EPI). EPA's national energy performance rating system, developed in...

48

Selenium Removal by Iron Cementation from a Coal-Fired Power Plant Flue Gas Desulfurization Wastewater in a Continuous Flow System-- a Pilot Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technical update describes work funded by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and performed by MSE Technology Applications, Inc. (MSE) at a coal-fired power plant burning Powder River Basin (PRB) coal (identified in this report as Plant E). This work was based on encouraging results obtained during previous EPRI-funded work on flue gas desulfurization (FGD) wastewater treatability testing by MSE, which focused on selenium removal from a variety of FGD wastewater sources. The results from th...

2009-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

49

Water-to-Cement Distance Analysis Software  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water-to-Cement Distance Analysis Software. Description/Summary: ... Type of software: Analysis Software of Water-to-Cement Distance Analysis. ...

2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

50

Use of High-Calcium Fly Ash in Cement-Based Construction Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in blended cements with minimum (less than 10%) portland cement in the blend. Keywords: Fly ash; concrete impact assessments. INTRODUCTION #12;3 Coal is the most widely used source of energy for power production, total coal ash production in the world was estimated to be 600 million tons, of which 100 million tons

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

51

China's Cement Production:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Estimation of CO Estimation of CO 2 Emissions from China's Cement Production: Methodologies and Uncertainties Jing Ke, Michael McNeil, Lynn Price, Nina Zheng Khanna, Nan Zhou Environmental Energy Technologies Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Reprint version of journal article published in "Energy Policy", Volume 57, Pages 172-181, June 2013 January 2013 This work was supported by the China Sustainable Energy Program of the Energy Foundation through the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02- 05CH11231. ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY LBNL-6329E Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any

52

Energy Efficiency Improvement Opportunities for the Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Concepts of Waste Heat Recovery in Cement Plants EnergyM. 1990. Waste Gas Heat Recovery in Cement Plants Energywaste heat recovery for electricity production in cement plants

Worrell, Ernst

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

High Volume Fly Ash Blended Cements: Status Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At present, the production of high-volume fly ash (HVFA) concrete involves the addition of large volumes of fly ash as a separate ingredient at a ready-mixed concrete batch plant. This necessitates additional storage silos and quality control at the job site. In order to resolve these issues, CANMET, in partnership with Electric Power Research Institute, U.S.A., undertook a major research project to develop blended cements incorporating high volumes of ASTM Class fly ash. The blended cements are made by ...

1999-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

54

Gujarat Ambuja Cements Limited | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ambuja Cements Limited Ambuja Cements Limited Jump to: navigation, search Name Gujarat Ambuja Cements Limited Place Mumbai, India Zip 400 021 Sector Biomass Product Indian cement company. the company installed a 24MW biomass based captive electric generating stations that will provide electricity to Gujarat Ambuja Cements Limitedâ€(tm)s (“GACL”) facility in Ropar, Punjab. References Gujarat Ambuja Cements Limited[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Gujarat Ambuja Cements Limited is a company located in Mumbai, India . References ↑ "Gujarat Ambuja Cements Limited" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Gujarat_Ambuja_Cements_Limited&oldid=346290

55

ADVANCED CEMENTS FOR GEOTHERMAL WELLS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using the conventional well cements consisting of the calcium silicate hydrates (CaO-SiO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O system) and calcium aluminum silicate hydrates (CaO-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SiO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O system) for the integrity of geothermal wells, the serious concern confronting the cementing industries was their poor performance in mechanically supporting the metallic well casing pipes and in mitigating the pipe's corrosion in very harsh geothermal reservoirs. These difficulties are particularly acute in two geological regions: One is the deep hot downhole area ({approx} 1700 m depth at temperatures of {approx} 320 C) that contains hyper saline water with high concentrations of CO{sub 2} (> 40,000 ppm) in conjunction with {approx} 100 ppm H{sub 2}S at a mild acid of pH {approx} 5.0; the other is the upper well region between the well's surface and {approx} 1000 m depth at temperatures up to 200 C. The specific environment of the latter region is characterized by highly concentrated H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} (pH strength of cements, lowering the mechanical support of casing pipes, but also increased the extent of permeability of the brine through the cement layer, promoting the rate of the pipe's corrosion. Severely carbonated and acid eroded cements often impaired the integrity of a well in less than one year; in the worst cases, casings have collapsed within three months, leading to the need for costly and time-consuming repairs or redrilling operations. These were the reasons why the geothermal well drilling and cementing industries were concerned about using conventional well cements, and further their deterioration was a major impediment in expediting the development of geothermal energy resources.

SUGAMA,T.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Proton Range Uncertainty Due to Bone Cement Injected Into the Vertebra in Radiation Therapy Planning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We wanted to evaluate the influence of bone cement on the proton range and to derive a conversion factor predicting the range shift by correcting distorted computed tomography (CT) data as a reference to determine whether the correction is needed. Two CT datasets were obtained with and without a bone cement disk placed in a water phantom. Treatment planning was performed on a set of uncorrected CT images with the bone cement disk, and the verification plan was applied to the same set of CT images with an effective CT number for the bone cement disk. The effective CT number was determined by measuring the actual proton range with the bone cement disk. The effects of CT number, thicknesses, and position of bone cement on the proton range were evaluated in the treatment planning system (TPS) to draw a conversion factor predicting the range shift by correcting the CT number of bone cement. The effective CT number of bone cement was 260 Hounsfield units (HU). The calculated proton range for native CT data was significantly shorter than the measured proton range. However, the calculated range for the corrected CT data with the effective CT number coincided exactly with the measured range. The conversion factor was 209.6 [HU . cm/mm] for bone cement and predicted the range shift by approximately correcting the CT number. We found that the heterogeneity of bone cement could cause incorrect proton ranges in treatment plans using CT images. With an effective CT number of bone cement derived from the proton range and relative stopping power, a more actual proton range could be calculated in the TPS. The conversion factor could predict the necessity for CT data correction with sufficient accuracy.

Lim, Young Kyung [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institute of Health Sciences, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Ui-Jung [Proton Therapy Center, National Cancer Center, Goyang, Gyeonggi (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Dongho, E-mail: dongho@ncc.re.kr [Proton Therapy Center, National Cancer Center, Goyang, Gyeonggi (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dong Wook [Proton Therapy Center, National Cancer Center, Goyang, Gyeonggi (Korea, Republic of); Kwak, Jungwon [Department of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Myonggeun; Lee, Doo Hyun; Lee, Se Byeong; Lee, Sang-Yeob [Proton Therapy Center, National Cancer Center, Goyang, Gyeonggi (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sung Yong [Department of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Pyo, Hong Ryeol [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institute of Health Sciences, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju (Korea, Republic of); Proton Therapy Center, National Cancer Center, Goyang, Gyeonggi (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Energy Efficiency Improvement Opportunities for the Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Concepts of Waste Heat Recovery in Cement Plants EnergyM. 1990. Waste Gas Heat Recovery in Cement Plants Energy

Worrell, Ernst

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

ADVANCED CEMENTS FOR GEOTHERMAL WELLS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Using the conventional well cements consisting of the calcium silicate hydrates (CaO-SiO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O system) and calcium aluminum silicate hydrates (CaO-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SiO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O system) for the integrity of geothermal wells, the serious concern confronting the cementing industries was their poor performance in mechanically supporting the metallic well casing pipes and in mitigating the pipe's corrosion in very harsh geothermal reservoirs. These difficulties are particularly acute in two geological regions: One is the deep hot downhole area ({approx} 1700 m depth at temperatures of {approx} 320 C) that contains hyper saline water with high concentrations of CO{sub 2} (> 40,000 ppm) in conjunction with {approx} 100 ppm H{sub 2}S at a mild acid of pH {approx} 5.0; the other is the upper well region between the well's surface and {approx} 1000 m depth at temperatures up to 200 C. The specific environment of the latter region is characterized by highly concentrated H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} (pH < 1.5) brine containing at least 5000 ppm CO{sub 2}. When these conventional cements are emplaced in these harsh environments, their major shortcoming is their susceptibility to reactions with hot CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}SO4, thereby causing their deterioration brought about by CO{sub 2}-catalyzed carbonation and acid-initiated erosion. Such degradation not only reduced rapidly the strength of cements, lowering the mechanical support of casing pipes, but also increased the extent of permeability of the brine through the cement layer, promoting the rate of the pipe's corrosion. Severely carbonated and acid eroded cements often impaired the integrity of a well in less than one year; in the worst cases, casings have collapsed within three months, leading to the need for costly and time-consuming repairs or redrilling operations. These were the reasons why the geothermal well drilling and cementing industries were concerned about using conventional well cements, and further their deterioration was a major impediment in expediting the development of geothermal energy resources.

SUGAMA,T.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Process for cementing geothermal wells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pumpable slurry of coal-filled furfuryl alcohol, furfural, and/or a low molecular weight mono- or copolymer thereof containing, preferably, a catalytic amount of a soluble acid catalyst is used to cement a casing in a geothermal well.

Eilers, Louis H. (Inola, OK)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Demand Response in the California Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Applications in the Cement Industry. ” Mineral Engineering Cement  Production,” Cement Industry Technical Conference, gearless mill drive,” Cement Industry Technical Conference, 

Olsen, Daniel

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "riverside cement power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Cementing temperatures for deep-well production liners  

SciTech Connect

Temperature of cement is an important factor in properly cementing deep well production liners, yet current methods of determining cement temperatures do not account for all variables. In this paper a computer model predicts temperatures of cement while pumping and while waiting on cement, compares computed and measured temperatures, defines the importance of certain cementing variables on temperatures, and provides an explanation of difficulties encountered while cementing liner tops.

Wooley, G.R.; Galate, J.W.; Giussani, A.P.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Application of thermal energy storage in the cement industry. Final report, September 1977--March 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the manufacture of cement, literally trillions of Btu's are rejected to the environment each year. The purpose of this feasibility study program was to determine whether thermal energy storage could be used to conserve or allow alternative uses of this rejected energy. This study identifies and quantifies the sources of rejected energy in the cement manufacturing process, establishes use of this energy, investigates various storage system concepts, and selects energy conservation systems for further study. Thermal performance and economic analyses are performed on candidate storage systems for four typical cement plants representing various methods of manufacturing cement. Through the use of thermal energy storage in conjunction with waste heat electric power generation units, an estimated 2.4 x 10/sup 13/ Btu/year, or an equivalent of 4.0 x 10/sup 6/ barrels of oil per year, can be conserved. Attractive rates of return on investment of the proposed systems are an incentive for further development.

Jaegr, F.A.; Beshore, D.G.; Miller, F.M.; Gartner, E.M.

1978-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Definition: Cement Bond Log | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Cement Bond Log Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Cement Bond Log A representation of the integrity of the cement job, especially whether the cement is adhering solidly to the outside of the casing. The log is typically obtained from one of a variety of sonic-type tools. The newer versions, called cement evaluation logs, along with their processing software, can give detailed, 360-degree representations of the integrity of the cement job, whereas older versions may display a single line representing the integrated integrity around the casing.[1] Related Terms Acoustic Logs References ↑ Schlumberger Oilfield Glossary Ret LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like.

64

HYDRAULIC CEMENT PREPARATION FROM LURGI SPENT SHALE  

SciTech Connect

Low cost material is needed for grouting abandoned retorts. Experimental work has shown that a hydraulic cement can be produced from Lurgi spent shale by mixing it in a 1:1 weight ratio with limestone and heating one hour at 1000°C. With 5% added gypsum, strengths up to 25.8 MPa are obtained. This cement could make an economical addition up to about 10% to spent shale grout mixes, or be used in ordinary cement applications.

Mehta, P.K.; Persoff, P.; Fox, J.P.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Solar Photovoltaics at the Stringfellow Superfund Site in Riverside, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the results of an assessment of the technical and economic feasibility of deploying a photovoltaics (PV) system on the Stringfellow Superfund Site in Riverside, California. The site was assessed for possible PV installations. The cost, performance, and site impacts of different PV options were estimated. The economics of the potential systems were analyzed using an electric rate of $0.13/kWh and incentives offered by Southern California Edison under the California Solar Initiative. According to the assessment, a government-owned, ground-mounted PV system represents a technically and economically feasible option. The report recommends financing options that could assist in the implementation of such a system.

Mosey, G.; Van Geet, O.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Cement - Results  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

State Programs Technical Information Plant Assessments Training Calendar Software Tools Energy Management Results Technology Pathways Cement - Results No measured results exist...

67

Case Study of the California Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the availability of energy audits. Barriers to Energywith an energy manager program, these audits could helpenergy-efficiency projects particular to the cement industry, audits

Coito, Fred; Powell, Frank; Worrell, Ernst; Price, Lynn; Friedmann, Rafael

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Scanning electron microscopy imaging of hydraulic cement ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Cement clinker is manufactured from a finely-ground, homogenized blend of limestone, shale and iron ore sintered in a rotary kiln to temperatures ...

2004-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

69

INVESTIGATIONS ON HYDRAULIC CEMENTS FROM SPENT OIL SHALE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CEMENTS FROM SPENT OIL SHALE P.K. Mehta and P. Persoff AprilCement Manufacture from Oil Shale, U.S. Patent 2,904,445,CEMENTS FROM SPENT OIL SHALE P, K, Mehta Civil Engineering

Mehta, P.K.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Development of High-Volume Fly Ash Blended Cements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-volume fly ash (HVFA) blended cement can be produced either by intergrinding fly ash with portland cement clinker or by blending dry fly ash with portland cement. Production of HVFA cement using the intergrinding method may be the most cost-effective and practical of the two approaches. This report documents the results of commercial-scale production of HVFA blended cements using up to 55 percent fly ash to replace the portland cement.

2001-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

71

Analysis of Energy-Efficiency Opportunities for the Cement Industry...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analysis of Energy-Efficiency Opportunities for the Cement Industry in Shandong Province, China Title Analysis of Energy-Efficiency Opportunities for the Cement Industry in...

72

A Comparison Study of Portland Cement Hydration Kinetics as ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... especially around the main hydration peaks. ... at the main hydration peak) seems to create a ... Oil Well Cement, Cement and Concrete Research 40 ...

2013-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

73

Estimation of CO2 Emissions from China's Cement Production: Methodolog...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the need to understand the uncertainty of current estimates of cement emissions in China. This paper compares several methodologies for calculating CO2 emissions from cement...

74

FLSmidth Inc. and Titan Florida Cement Teaming Profile | ENERGY...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Inc. and Titan Florida Cement Teaming Profile cover page of document FLSmidth reduces energy at processing facilities saving Titan Florida Cement 55,000 annually. FLSmidth...

75

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Cement: Resources and Links -  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Industry Associations Industry Associations Portland Cement Association Since its founding in 1916, the Portland Cement Association has had the same mission: "Improve and expand the uses of portland cement and concrete." The Cement Sustainability Initiative Coordinated by the World Business Council for Sustainable Development, the Cement Sustainability Initiative (CSI) helps the cement industry address the challenges of sustainable development. The business leaders of a group of major cement companies lead the initiative. The GHG Protocol Initiative Coordinated in 1998 by the World Business Council for Sustainable Development and the World Resources Institute, the Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative (GHG Protocol) develops internationally-accepted accounting and reporting standards for greenhouse gas emissions from companies

76

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, BERKELEY BERKELEY DAVIS IRVINE LOS ANGELES MERCED RIVERSIDE SAN DIEGO SAN FRANCISCO SANTA BARBARA SANTA CRUZ  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the planning for the underbalanced test, (2) conducting the test before the bulk of cement had time to develop in the long drill riser can be prudently removed.. This test procedure required that the well be under-balanced was progressively under-balanced by displacing the heavy drill mud in the upper 8,300 feet with much lighter sea

Silver, Whendee

77

Phosphate-bonded calcium aluminate cements  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for making a rapid-setting phosphate-bonded cementitious material. A powdered aluminous cement is mixed with an aqueous solution of ammonium phosphate. The mixture is allowed to set to form an amorphous cementitious material which also may be hydrothermally treated at a temperature of from about 120 C to about 300 C to form a crystal-containing phosphate-bonded material. Also described are the cementitious products of this method and the cement composition which includes aluminous cement and ammonium polyphosphate. 10 figures.

Sugama, T.

1993-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

78

Cement report - CEC format 110611  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9E 9E Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Demand Response in the California Cement Industry Daniel Olsen, Sasank Goli, David Faulkner, Aimee McKane Environmental Energy Technologies Division December 2010 Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor The Regents of the University of California, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or

79

Guidebook for Using the Tool BEST Cement: Benchmarking and Energy Savings Tool for the Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and MAIN. 1993. Energy Technology in the Cement IndustrialNo. 16000393, September 9. Energy Technology Support Unit (of China (ITIBMIC). Energy Technology Support Unit (ETSU).

Galitsky, Christina

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Cement  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Letters of Intent/Agreements Letters of Intent/Agreements Portland Cement Association Logo The Portland Cement Association has committed to a 10% reduction in carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions per ton of cementitious product produced or sold from a 1990 baseline by 2020. The industry will achieve this goal and foster further reductions by end users of their product through the implementation of a 3-part program that focuses on the production process, the product cement manufacturers produce, and application of the product. Reductions from the first two elements of this plan will contribute to achieving the 10% reduction goal. While reductions from the product application element will not count towards the goal, the CO2-reduction benefits of cement and concrete use could be even more significant than those achieved through manufacturing

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "riverside cement power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Proper centralizers can improve horizontal well cementing  

SciTech Connect

The selection and spacing of appropriate centralizers can improve the cementation of high-angle and horizontal wells. Mud removal is one of the most important factors in obtaining a good cement job. Effective centralization assists in mud removal and helps ensure an even cement coat around the casing. Centralizers for horizontal wells have to fulfill two requirements: They should have a high restoring capability and a low moving force, and they should allow pipe rotation and reciprocation. Conventional bow-type centralizers have been used successfully in some horizontal wells. But as the horizontal section length increases, special centralizers, such as low-moving-force, bow-type centralizers and rigid centralizers, may be necessary. The paper describes the following: cementing liners, centralization, torque and drag, centralizer placement, the bow-type centralizer, the rigid centralizer, and the downhole activated centralizer.

Kinzel, H. (Weatherford Oil Tool, Langenhagen (Germany))

1993-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

82

HYDRAULIC CEMENT PREPARATION FROM LURGI SPENT SHALE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hydraulic cement from spent oil shale," Vol. 10, No. 4, p.J. W. , "Colorado's primary oil shale resource for verticalJ. B. , "Simulated effects of oil-shale development on the

Mehta, P.K.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

HYDRAULIC CEMENT PREPARATION FROM LURGI SPENT SHALE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hydraulic cement from spent oil shale," Vol. 10, No. 4, p.J. W. , "Colorado's primary oil shale resource for verticalSimulated effects of oil-shale development on the hydrology

Mehta, P.K.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

HYDRAULIC CEMENT PREPARATION FROM LURGI SPENT SHALE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cement from spent oil shale," Vol. 10, No. 4, p. 54S,Colorado's primary oil shale resource for vertical modifiedSimulated effects of oil-shale development on the hydrology

Mehta, P.K.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Case Study of the California Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the U.S. ; and ( 3) an Energy Guide (prepared by LBNL),for Cement Making: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plantenergy-efficiency measures in the Focus industry. The Guide

Coito, Fred; Powell, Frank; Worrell, Ernst; Price, Lynn; Friedmann, Rafael

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Supply chain management in the cement industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Traditionally supply chain management has played an operational role within cement and mineral extraction commodity companies. Recently, cost reduction projects have brought supply chain management into the limelight. In ...

Agudelo, Isabel

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

A nanochemomechanical investigation of carbonated cement paste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Concrete, and in particular its principal component, cement paste, has an interesting relation with carbon dioxide. Concrete is a carbon dioxide generator-- it is estimated that 5-10% of atmospheric CO? comes from this ...

Vanzo, James (James F.)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Cementation process for minerals recovery from Salton Sea geothermal brines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The potential for minerals recovery from a 1000-MWe combined geothermal power and minerals recovery plant in the Salton Sea is examined. While the possible value of minerals recovered would substantially exceed the revenue from power production, information is insufficient to carry out a detailed economic analysis. The recovery of precious metals - silver, gold, and platinum - is the most important factor in determining the economics of a minerals recovery plant; however, the precious metals content of the brines is not certain. Such a power plant could recover 14 to 31% of the US demand for manganese and substantial amounts of zinc and lead. Previous work on minerals extraction from Salton Sea brines is also reviewed and a new process, based on a fluidized-bed cementation reaction with metallic iron, is proposed. This process would recover the precious metals, lead, and tin present in the brines.

Maimoni, A.

1982-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

89

Case Study of the California Cement Industry  

SciTech Connect

California is the largest cement producing state in theU.S., accounting for between 10 percent and 15 percent of U.S. cementproduction and cement industry employment. The cement industry inCalifornia consists of 31 sites that consume large amounts of energy,annually: 1,600 GWh of electricity, 22 million therms of natural gas, 2.3million tons of coal, 0.25 tons of coke, and smaller amounts of wastematerials, including tires. The case study summarized in this paperfocused on providing background information, an assessment ofenergy-efficiency opportunities and barriers, and program recommendationsthat can be used by program planners to better target products to thecement industry. The primary approach to this case study involvedwalk-through surveys of customer facilities and in depth interviews withcustomer decision makers and subsequent analysis of collected data. Inaddition, a basic review of the cement production process was developed,and summary cement industry energy and economic data were collected, andanalyzed. The analysis of secondary data provides background informationon the cement industry and identification of potential energy-efficiencyopportunities. The interviews provide some understanding of the customerperspective about implementation of energy-efficiencyprojects.

Coito, Fred; Powell, Frank; Worrell, Ernst; Price, Lynn; Friedmann, Rafael

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Alternative Fuel for Portland Cement Processing  

SciTech Connect

The production of cement involves a combination of numerous raw materials, strictly monitored system processes, and temperatures on the order of 1500 °C. Immense quantities of fuel are required for the production of cement. Traditionally, energy from fossil fuels was solely relied upon for the production of cement. The overarching project objective is to evaluate the use of alternative fuels to lessen the dependence on non-renewable resources to produce portland cement. The key objective of using alternative fuels is to continue to produce high-quality cement while decreasing the use of non-renewable fuels and minimizing the impact on the environment. Burn characteristics and thermodynamic parameters were evaluated with a laboratory burn simulator under conditions that mimic those in the preheater where the fuels are brought into a cement plant. A drop-tube furnace and visualization method were developed that show potential for evaluating time- and space-resolved temperature distributions for fuel solid particles and liquid droplets undergoing combustion in various combustion atmospheres. Downdraft gasification has been explored as a means to extract chemical energy from poultry litter while limiting the throughput of potentially deleterious components with regards to use in firing a cement kiln. Results have shown that the clinkering is temperature independent, at least within the controllable temperature range. Limestone also had only a slight effect on the fusion when used to coat the pellets. However, limestone addition did display some promise in regards to chlorine capture, as ash analyses showed chlorine concentrations of more than four times greater in the limestone infused ash as compared to raw poultry litter. A reliable and convenient sampling procedure was developed to estimate the combustion quality of broiler litter that is the best compromise between convenience and reliability by means of statistical analysis. Multi-day trial burns were conducted at a full-scale cement plant with alternative fuels to examine their compatibility with the cement production process. Construction and demolition waste, woodchips, and soybean seeds were used as alternative fuels at a full-scale cement production facility. These fuels were co-fired with coal and waste plastics. The alternative fuels used in this trial accounted for 5 to 16 % of the total energy consumed during these burns. The overall performance of the portland cement produced during the various trial burns performed for practical purposes very similar to the cement produced during the control burn. The cement plant was successful in implementing alternative fuels to produce a consistent, high-quality product that increased cement performance while reducing the environmental footprint of the plant. The utilization of construction and demolition waste, woodchips and soybean seeds proved to be viable replacements for traditional fuels. The future use of these fuels depends on local availability, associated costs, and compatibility with a facilityâ??s production process.

Anton K. Schindler; Steve R. Duke; Thomas E. Burch; Edward W. Davis; Ralph H. Zee; David I. Bransby; Carla Hopkins; Rutherford L. Thompson; Jingran Duan; Vignesh Venkatasubramanian; Stephen Giles.

2012-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

91

Energy efficiency and carbon dioxide emissions reduction opportunities in the U.S. cement industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Concepts of Waste Heat Recovery in Cement Plants” EnergyM. , 1990. “Waste Gas Heat Recovery in Cement Plants” Energy

Martin, Nathan; Worrell, Ernst; Price, Lynn

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Regional distribution of diagenetic carbonate cement in Palaeocene deepwater  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Regional distribution of diagenetic carbonate cement in Palaeocene deepwater sandstones: North Sea. This study attempts to make a large-scale regional examination of the distribution of carbonate cements

Haszeldine, Stuart

93

INVESTIGATIONS ON HYDRAULIC CEMENTS FROM SPENT OIL SHALE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

20 to 40% of the oil shale, and explosively rubblizing andCEMENTS FROM SPENT OIL SHALE P.K. Mehta and P. Persoff AprilCement Manufacture from Oil Shale, U.S. Patent 2,904,445,

Mehta, P.K.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

INVESTIGATIONS ON HYDRAULIC CEMENTS FROM SPENT OIL SHALE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ON HYDRAULIC CEMENTS FROM SPENT OIL SHALE P.K. Mehta and P.Cement Manufacture from Oil Shale, U.S. Patent 2,904,445,203 (1974), E. D. York, Amoco Oil Co. , letter to J, P. Fox,

Mehta, P.K.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

High Temperature Cements | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

High Temperature Cements High Temperature Cements Jump to: navigation, search Geothermal ARRA Funded Projects for High Temperature Cements Loading map... {"format":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"limit":200,"offset":0,"link":"all","sort":[""],"order":[],"headers":"show","mainlabel":"","intro":"","outro":"","searchlabel":"\u2026 further results","default":"","geoservice":"google","zoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","forceshow":true,"showtitle":true,"hidenamespace":false,"template":false,"title":"","label":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"locations":[{"text":"

96

Lithium, Potassium, and Sodium Additions to Cement Pastes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Cement and Concrete Research 2004, 34, 2045-2056. 16. CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics. CRC Press, 1987. 17. ...

2011-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

97

Comparison of modified sulfur cement and hydraulic cement for encapsulation of radioactive and mixed wastes  

SciTech Connect

The majority of solidification/stabilization systems for low-level radioactive waste (LLW) and mixed waste, both in the commercial sector and at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities, utilize hydraulic cement (such as portland cement) to encapsulate waste materials and yield a monolithic solid waste form for disposal. A new and innovative process utilizing modified sulfur cement developed by the US Bureau of Mines has been applied at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) for the encapsulation of many of these problem'' wastes. Modified sulfur cement is a thermoplastic material, and as such, it can be heated above it's melting point (120{degree}C), combined with dry waste products to form a homogeneous mixture, and cooled to form a monolithic solid product. Under sponsorship of the DOE, research and development efforts at BNL have successfully applied the modified sulfur cement process for treatment of a range of LLWs including sodium sulfate salts, boric acid salts, and incinerator bottom ash and for mixed waste contaminated incinerator fly ash. Process development studies were conducted to determine optimal waste loadings for each waste type. Property evaluation studies were conducted to test waste form behavior under disposal conditions by applying relevant performance testing criteria established by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (for LLW) and the Environmental Protection Agency (for hazardous wastes). Based on both processing and performance considerations, significantly greater waste loadings were achieved using modified sulfur cement when compared with hydraulic cement. Technology demonstration of the modified sulfur cement encapsulation system using production-scale equipment is scheduled for FY 1991. 12 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

Kalb, P.D.; Heiser, J.H. III; Colombo, P.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

INVESTIGATIONS ON HYDRAULIC CEMENTS FROM SPENT OIL SHALE  

SciTech Connect

A process for making hydraulic cements from spent oil shale is described in this paper. Inexpensive cement is needed to grout abandoned in-situ retorts of spent shale for subsidence control, mitigation of leaching, and strengthening the retorted mass in order to recover oil from adjacent pillars of raw shale. A hydraulic cement was produced by heating a 1:1 mixture of Lurgi spent shale and CaCO{sub 3} at 1000 C for one hour. This cement would be less expensive than ordinary portland cement and is expected to fulfill the above requirements.

Mehta, P.K.; Persoff, P.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Case Study of the California Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Natural Gas Consumption Energy Use Type GWh per year, electricity MW, electricity Million therms per year, natural gas California U.S.gas consumption. Table 2 compares cement industry electricity and natural gas use for California and the U.S.

Coito, Fred; Powell, Frank; Worrell, Ernst; Price, Lynn; Friedmann, Rafael

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Monitoring and repairing geothermal casing cement: a case history  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A manmade geothermal reservoir has been created by drilling a deep hole into relatively impermeable hot rocks, creating a large surface area for heat transfer by hydraulic fracturing, then drilling a second hole to intersect the fracture to complete the closed circulation loop. A second generation system, presently being drilled, will entail creating multiple, parallel, vertical fractures between a pair of inclined boreholes. The original completion of injection Hole EE-1, consisting of a conventional high-temperature formulation of Class B portland cement, stabilized with 40% silica sand, did not withstand the cyclic stresses, and rapid deterioration of casing-to-cement and cement-to-formation bonds occurred, which allowed significant flow in the resulting microannulus. The performance history of the casing cement for the existing HDR EE-1 injection well, the subsequent remedial cementing program, the cement bond logs, and the radioactive isotope tracer injections tests, used to monitor the condition of the casing cement is described. (MHR)

Pettitt, R.A.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "riverside cement power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Thermal Energy Storage/Waste Heat Recovery Applications in the Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The cement industry is the most energy-intensive industry in the United States in terms of energy cost as a percentage of the product according to a 1973 report by the Cost of Living Council. Martin Marietta Aerospace, Denver Division, and the Portland Cement Association have studied the potential benefits of using waste heat recovery methods and thermal energy storage systems in the cement manufacturing process. This work was performed under DOE Contract No. EC-77-C-01-50S4. The study has been completed and illustrates very attractive cost benefits realized from waste heat recovery/thermal storage systems. This paper will identify and quantify the sources of rejected energy in the cement manufacturing process, establish uses of this energy, exhibit various energy storage concepts, and present a methodology for selection of most promising energy storage systems. Two storage systems show the best promise - rock beds and draw salt storage. Thermal performance and detailed economic analyses have been performed on these systems and will be presented. Through use of thermal energy storage in conjunction with waste heat electric power generation units, an estimated 2.4 x 1013 BTU per year, or an equivalent of 4.0 x 10 barrels of oil per year, can be conserved. Attractive rates of return on investment of the proposed systems are an incentive for utilization and further development.

Beshore, D. G.; Jaeger, F. A.; Gartner, E. M.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Goal 4 Long Life Pavement Rehabilitation Strategies-Rigid: Flexural Fatigue Life of Hydraulic Cement Concrete Beams  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Flexural Fatigue Life of Hydraulic Cement Concrete Beamsperformance of Fast-Setting Hydraulic Cement Concrete (and Thermal Expansion of Hydraulic Cement Concrete Mixes”,

Kohler, Erwin R.; Ali, Abdikarim; Harvey, John T

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission Reduction Potentials in the Cement Industry in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

electricity and fuel efficiency improvements in the cement industryprice of electricity paid by the cement industry in 2009 isElectricity Conservation Supply Curve for the Cement Industry .

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Corrosion-resistant Foamed Cements for Carbon Steels  

SciTech Connect

The cementitious material consisting of Secar #80, Class F fly ash, and sodium silicate designed as an alternative thermal-shock resistant cement for the Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) wells was treated with cocamidopropyl dimethylamine oxide-based compound as foaming agent (FA) to prepare numerous air bubble-dispersed low density cement slurries of and #61603;1.3 g/cm3. Then, the foamed slurry was modified with acrylic emulsion (AE) as corrosion inhibitor. We detailed the positive effects of the acrylic polymer (AP) in this emulsion on the five different properties of the foamed cement: 1) The hydrothermal stability of the AP in 200 and #61616;C-autoclaved cements; 2) the hydrolysis-hydration reactions of the slurry at 85 and #61616;C; 3) the composition of crystalline phases assembled and the microstructure developed in autoclaved cements; 4) the mechanical behaviors of the autoclaved cements; and, 5) the corrosion mitigation of carbon steel (CS) by the polymer. For the first property, the hydrothermal-catalyzed acid-base interactions between the AP and cement resulted in Ca-or Na-complexed carboxylate derivatives, which led to the improvement of thermal stability of the AP. This interaction also stimulated the cement hydration reactions, enhancing the total heat evolved during cement’s curing. Addition of AP did not alter any of the crystalline phase compositions responsible for the strength of the cement. Furthermore, the AP-modified cement developed the porous microstructure with numerous defect-free cavities of disconnected voids. These effects together contributed to the improvement of compressive-strength and –toughness of the cured cement. AP modification of the cement also offered an improved protection of CS against brine-caused corrosion. There were three major factors governing the corrosion protection: 1) Reducing the extents of infiltration and transportation of corrosive electrolytes through the cement layer deposited on the underlying CS surfaces; 2) inhibiting the cathodic reactions at the corrosion site of CS; 3) extending the coverage of cement over CS surfaces; and, 4) improving the adherence of the cement to CS surfaces. Thus, the CS’s corrosion rate of 176 milli inch/per year (mpy) for 1 wt% FA-foamed cement without AP was considerably reduced to 69 mpy by adding only 2 wt% AP. Addition of AP at 10 wt% further reduced this rate to less than 10 mpy.

Sugama T.; Gill, S.; Pyatina, T., Muraca, A.; Keese, R.; Khan, A.; Bour, D.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Cement Additives from Fly Ash Opportunity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Device and Method for Separating Minerals, Carbon and Device and Method for Separating Minerals, Carbon and Cement Additives from Fly Ash Opportunity Research is currently active on the patented technology "Device and Method for Separating Minerals, Carbon, and Cement Additives from Fly Ash." The technology is available for licensing and/or further collaborative research from the U.S. Depart- ment of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). Overview This invention includes a device, along with a method, to recover and use fly ash as a source of high purity carbon, ash, and minerals. The device and associated method can isolate components of the fly ash based on size and electrical charge. By improving beneficiation and usage methods, fly ash can be transformed from a waste material to a valuable by-product. Recent shifts to low nitrogen

106

Cement Kiln Flue Gas Recovery Scrubber Project  

SciTech Connect

The Cement Kiln Flue Gas Recovery Scrubber Project was a technical success and demonstrated the following: CKD can be used successfully as the sole reagent for removing SO2 from cement kiln flue gas, with removal efficiencies of 90 percent or greater; Removal efficiencies for HCl and VOCs were approximately 98 percent and 70 percent, respectively; Particulate emissions were low, in the range of 0.005 to 0.007 grains/standard cubic foot; The treated CKD sorbent can be recycled to the kiln after its potassium content has been reduced in the scrubber, thereby avoiding the need for landfilling; The process can yield fertilizer-grade K2SO4, a saleable by-product; and Waste heat in the flue gas can provide the energy required for evaporation and crystallization in the by-product recovery operation. The demonstration program established the feasibility of using the Recovery Scrubber{trademark} for desulfurization of flue gas from cement kilns, with generally favorable economics, assuming tipping fees are available for disposal of ash from biomass combustion. The process appears to be suitable for commercial use on any type of cement kiln. EPA has ruled that CKD is a nonhazardous waste, provided the facility meets Performance Standards for the Management of CKD (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency 1999d). Therefore, regulatory drivers for the technology focus more on reduction of air pollutants and pollution prevention, rather than on treating CKD as a hazardous waste. Application of the Recovery Scrubbe{trademark} concept to other waste-disposal operations, where pollution and waste reductions are needed, appears promising.

National Energy Technology Laboratory

2001-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

107

Cement Bond Log | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cement Bond Log Cement Bond Log Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Cement Bond Log Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Well Log Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Acoustic Logs Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Thermal: Cost Information Low-End Estimate (USD): 0.8585 centUSD 8.5e-4 kUSD 8.5e-7 MUSD 8.5e-10 TUSD / foot Median Estimate (USD): 1.25125 centUSD 0.00125 kUSD 1.25e-6 MUSD 1.25e-9 TUSD / foot High-End Estimate (USD): 3.00300 centUSD 0.003 kUSD 3.0e-6 MUSD 3.0e-9 TUSD / foot Time Required Low-End Estimate: 0.35 days9.582478e-4 years 8.4 hours 0.05 weeks 0.0115 months / job

108

Wellbore Cement: Research That Begins Where the Sidewalk Ends | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wellbore Cement: Research That Begins Where the Sidewalk Ends Wellbore Cement: Research That Begins Where the Sidewalk Ends Wellbore Cement: Research That Begins Where the Sidewalk Ends October 29, 2013 - 1:15pm Addthis Wellbore Cement: Research That Begins Where the Sidewalk Ends Learn more To learn more about this research, read the full report, An Assessment of Research Needs Related to Improving Primary Cement Isolation of Formations in Deep Offshore Wells. Full report on NETL's website. As we meander down the sidewalk, how many of us give more than a passing thought to the cement underfoot? For the most part, it's just another flat surface, a means to an end, whether it leads us to a coffee shop, book store, or parking lot. But when it's puckered, chipped, or crumbling, we certainly think about its need for repair.

109

Effective Permeability Change in Wellbore Cement with Carbon Dioxide Reaction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Portland cement, a common sealing material for wellbores for geological carbon sequestration was reacted with CO{sub 2} in supercritical, gaseous, and aqueous phases at various pressure and temperature conditions to simulate cement-CO{sub 2} reaction along the wellbore from carbon injection depth to the near-surface. Hydrated Portland cement columns (14 mm diameter x 90 mm length; water-to-cement ratio = 0.33) including additives such as steel coupons and Wallula basalt fragments were reacted with CO{sub 2} in the wet supercritical (the top half) and dissolved (the bottom half) phases under carbon sequestration condition with high pressure (10 MPa) and temperature (50 C) for 5 months, while small-sized hydrated Portland cement columns (7 mm diameter x 20 mm length; water-to-cement ratio = 0.38) were reacted with CO{sub 2} in dissolved phase at high pressure (10 MPa) and temperature (50 C) for 1 month or with wet CO{sub 2} in gaseous phase at low pressure (0.2 MPa) and temperature (20 C) for 3 months. XMT images reveal that the cement reacted with CO{sub 2} saturated groundwater had degradation depth of {approx}1 mm for 1 month and {approx}3.5 mm for 5 month, whereas the degradation was minor with cement exposure to supercritical CO{sub 2}. SEM-EDS analysis showed that the carbonated cement was comprised of three distinct zones; the innermost less degraded zone with Ca atom % > C atom %, the inner degraded zone with Ca atom % {approx} C atom % due to precipitation of calcite, the outer degraded zone with C atom % > Ca atom % due to dissolution of calcite and C-S-H, as well as adsorption of carbon to cement matrix. The outer degraded zone of carbonated cement was porous and fractured because of dissolution-dominated reaction by carbonic acid exposure, which resulted in the increase in BJH pore volume and BET surface area. In contrast, cement-wet CO{sub 2}(g) reaction at low P (0.2 MPa)-T (20 C) conditions for 1 to 3 months was dominated by precipitation of micron-sized calcite on the outside surface of cement, which resulted in the decrease in BJH pore volume and BET surface area. Cement carbonation and pore structure change are significantly dependent on pressure and temperature conditions as well as the phase of CO{sub 2}, which controls the balance between precipitation and dissolution in cement matrix. Geochemical modeling result suggests that ratio of solid (cement)-to-solution (carbonated water) has a significant effect on cement carbonation, thus the cement-CO{sub 2} reaction experiment needs to be conducted under realistic conditions representing the in-situ wellbore environment of carbon sequestration field site. Total porosity and air permeability for a duplicate cement column with water-to-cement ratio of 0.38 measured after oven-drying by Core Laboratories using Boyle's Law technique and steady-state method were 31% and 0.576 mD. A novel method to measure the effective liquid permeability of a cement column using X-ray micro-tomography images after injection of pressurized KI (potassium iodide) is under development by PNNL. Preliminary results indicate the permeability of a cement column with water-to-cement ratio of 0.38 is 4-8 mD. PNNL will apply the method to understand the effective permeability change of Portland cement by CO{sub 2}(g) reaction under a variety of pressure and temperature conditions to develop a more reliable well-bore leakage risk model.

Um, Wooyong; Jung, Hun Bok; Martin, Paul F.; McGrail, B. Peter

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Cement: Resources and Links -  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Resources & Links Resources & Links Technical Information Publications Case Studies Publications Energy Efficiency and Carbon Dioxide Emission Reduction Opportunities in the U.S. Cement Industry, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, September 1999 (PDF 330 KB) Download Acrobat Reader Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost-Saving Opportunities for Cement Making, an ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, January 2004 (PDF 471 KB). Download Acrobat Reader This report presents information on the opportunities for energy and cost savings in a cement plant and assists energy and plant managers to strategically manage energy. Energy and Emission Reduction Opportunities for the Cement Industry, BCS,

111

Energy Efficiency Improvement Opportunities for the Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lime Institute. 2001. Energy Efficiency Opportunity Guide inIndustry, Office of Energy Efficiency, Natural Resourcesof a Cement Kiln, Energy Efficiency Demonstration Scheme,

Worrell, Ernst

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Stabilizing coal-water mixtures with portland cement  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Coal-water mixes stabilized by the addition of portland cement which may additionally contain retarding carbohydrates, or borax are described.

Steinberg, Meyer (Melville, NY); Krishna, Coimbatore R. (Mount Sinai, NY)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Evaluating Clean Development Mechanism Projects in the Cement...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

You are here Home Buildings & Plants Evaluating Clean Development Mechanism Projects in the Cement Industry Using a Process-Step Benchmarking Approach Secondary menu...

114

Chloride Ion Diffusion in Cement-Based Materials ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... into Hardened Cement Paste , Fly Ash, Silica Fume ... Diffusion Cell: Effects of Material and Test ... LJ, and Yu, SW, Diffusion in Cementitious Materials: II ...

2012-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

115

HIGH STRENGTH PHOSPHATE CEMENT USING INDUSTRIAL BYPRODUCT ASHES ...  

industries that use fossil fuels. Approximately one third of this ash is recycled in the cement based products as an additive. Typically, ...

116

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Cement: Work Plans  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

NewsEvents Contact Us CEMENT Letters of IntentAgreements Work Plans GHG Information Energy Footprints Resources & Links Industry Associations FederalState Programs Technical...

117

Estimation of the degree of hydration of blended cement ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The minimum particle size measured was 1 JUn. Air dispersion and laser scattering techniques were used. cement atw/c=0.4. ...

2004-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

118

Stabilizing coal-water mixtures with Portland cement  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Coal-water mixes stabilized by the addition of Portland cement which may additionally contain retarding carbohydrates, or borax are described. 1 tab.

Steinberg, M.; Krishna, C.R.

1984-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

119

Background on the 2011 Cement EPI Update | ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

through informed and realistic goal setting. Download the Measuring Improvment in the Energy Performance of the U.S. Cement Industry report here. Energy Efficient Products...

120

The use of gasification ash in cement and concrete.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Cement is an essential material in todays society because, as a major constituent of concrete, it forms a fundamental element of any housing or… (more)

Du Plessis, Hanli

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "riverside cement power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Climate VISION: News and Events - Cement - California Portland...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

and plant benchmarking of energy using the ENERGY STAR cement plant energy performance indicator. CPC was among the inaugural group of companies to receive the ENERGY STAR...

122

Energy efficiency and carbon dioxide emissions reduction opportunities in the U.S. cement industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cement Industry, An Energy Perspective", U.S. Department ofDioxide Emissions for Energy Use in U.S. Cement Production (3. Primary Energy Consumption in U.S. Cement Production by

Martin, Nathan; Worrell, Ernst; Price, Lynn

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Analysis of Energy-Efficiency Opportunities for the Cement Industry in Shandong Province, China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cement industry using energy conservation supply curves (energy conservation supply curve for Shandong’s cement industry,Energy Conservation Supply Curve This part of the analysis of Shandong’s cement industry

Price, Lynn

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Analysis of Energy-Efficiency Opportunities for the Cement Industry in Shandong Province, China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Birch, E. 1990. “Energy Savings in Cement Kiln Systems,”11 C. Benchmarking and Energy-Saving Tool for Cement (BEST-26 B. Benchmarking and Energy-Saving Tool for Cement (BEST-

Price, Lynn

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for Cement Making. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Concepts of Waste Heat Recovery in Cement Plants” EnergyM. , 1990. “Waste Gas Heat Recovery in Cement Plants” Energy

Worrell, Ernst

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Bottom-up Representation of Industrial Energy Efficiency Technologies in Integrated Assessment Models for the Cement Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Concepts of Waste Heat Recovery in Cement Plants” EnergyM. , 1990. “Waste Gas Heat Recovery in Cement Plants” Energy

Sathaye, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Western Area Power  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

November 23, 2010 November 23, 2010 CX-004887: Categorical Exclusion Determination Cable and Conduit Addition Within the Fenced Area of the Buck Boulevard Substation CX(s) Applied: B4.6 Date: 11/23/2010 Location(s): Riverside County, California Office(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region November 23, 2010 CX-007129: Categorical Exclusion Determination Buck Boulevard Substation CX(s) Applied: B4.6 Date: 11/23/2010 Location(s): Ripley, California Office(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region November 5, 2010 CX-004898: Categorical Exclusion Determination Gila-Wellton-Mohawk (Structure Maintenance) CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 11/05/2010 Location(s): Yuma County, Arizona Office(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

128

Emerging Energy-efficiency and CO2 Emission-reduction Technologies for Cement and Concrete Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Oil Shale Minerals within the Production of Cement andin clinker production. If oil shale is burned separately,in cement production. Assuming that oil shale replaces 8

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Promoting Energy Efficiency in Cement Making: The ENERGY STAR(R) for Industry Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

industry. For information Energy Guide for Cement Making,eworrellt@lbl.gov. End Notes Energy Efficiency Improvementthe Cement Industry: An ENERGY STAR® Guide for Energy and

Masanet, Eric; Worrell, Ernst

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Concentrating On California Solar Power | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Concentrating On California Solar Power Concentrating On California Solar Power Concentrating On California Solar Power June 14, 2011 - 4:22pm Addthis Ginny Simmons Ginny Simmons Former Managing Editor for Energy.gov, Office of Public Affairs What will the project do? Combined, the projects are estimated to create nearly 1,800 jobs and enough energy to power more than 100,000 homes. Today, Secretary Chu announced conditional commitments for approximately $2 billion in loan guarantees to two California concentrating solar power plants. The projects are estimated to create nearly 1,800 jobs and will utilize advanced technologies which can help drive down the cost of solar power. The two plants, the Mojave Solar Project in San Bernardino County, California and the Genesis Solar Project in Riverside County, California,

131

Guidebook for Using the Tool BEST Cement: Benchmarking and Energy Savings Tool for the Cement Industry  

SciTech Connect

The Benchmarking and Energy Savings Tool (BEST) Cement is a process-based tool based on commercially available efficiency technologies used anywhere in the world applicable to the cement industry. This version has been designed for use in China. No actual cement facility with every single efficiency measure included in the benchmark will likely exist; however, the benchmark sets a reasonable standard by which to compare for plants striving to be the best. The energy consumption of the benchmark facility differs due to differences in processing at a given cement facility. The tool accounts for most of these variables and allows the user to adapt the model to operational variables specific for his/her cement facility. Figure 1 shows the boundaries included in a plant modeled by BEST Cement. In order to model the benchmark, i.e., the most energy efficient cement facility, so that it represents a facility similar to the user's cement facility, the user is first required to input production variables in the input sheet (see Section 6 for more information on how to input variables). These variables allow the tool to estimate a benchmark facility that is similar to the user's cement plant, giving a better picture of the potential for that particular facility, rather than benchmarking against a generic one. The input variables required include the following: (1) the amount of raw materials used in tonnes per year (limestone, gypsum, clay minerals, iron ore, blast furnace slag, fly ash, slag from other industries, natural pozzolans, limestone powder (used post-clinker stage), municipal wastes and others); the amount of raw materials that are preblended (prehomogenized and proportioned) and crushed (in tonnes per year); (2) the amount of additives that are dried and ground (in tonnes per year); (3) the production of clinker (in tonnes per year) from each kiln by kiln type; (4) the amount of raw materials, coal and clinker that is ground by mill type (in tonnes per year); (5) the amount of production of cement by type and grade (in tonnes per year); (6) the electricity generated onsite; and, (7) the energy used by fuel type; and, the amount (in RMB per year) spent on energy. The tool offers the user the opportunity to do a quick assessment or a more detailed assessment--this choice will determine the level of detail of the energy input. The detailed assessment will require energy data for each stage of production while the quick assessment will require only total energy used at the entire facility (see Section 6 for more details on quick versus detailed assessments). The benchmarking tool provides two benchmarks--one for Chinese best practices and one for international best practices. Section 2 describes the differences between these two and how each benchmark was calculated. The tool also asks for a target input by the user for the user to set goals for the facility.

Galitsky, Christina; Price, Lynn; Zhou, Nan; Fuqiu , Zhou; Huawen, Xiong; Xuemin, Zeng; Lan, Wang

2008-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

132

Algorithms for raw material dosage control for cement plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The raw material used for producing cement is obtained using several components which we must dosages so that the mixture should have a uniform chemical composition. This paper work proposes fuzzy algorithms for performing this process. Using them turns ... Keywords: algorithm, cement, control, dosage, fuzzy, raw material

Stela Rusu-Anghel; Ovidiu Tirian; Osaci Mihaela; Dinis Corina

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Modeling of Sulfate Resistance of Flyash Blended Cement Concrete Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modeling of Sulfate Resistance of Flyash Blended Cement Concrete Materials Barzin Mobasher1 or water with high SO3 content. External sulfate 2007 World of Coal Ash (WOCA), May 7-10, 2007, Covington, the effect of curing (especially in the case of blended cements) and the effect of the pH change during

Mobasher, Barzin

134

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, BERKELEY BERKELEY DAVIS IRVINE LOS ANGELES RIVERSIDE SAN DIEGO SAN FRANCISCO SANTA BARBARA SANTA CRUZ  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

or power plant under consideration -- and indirect, that is, those induced through multiplier effects@pa.urel.berkeley.edu Report finds that renewable energy promotes U.S. job growth better than investment in fossil fuels more jobs per average megawatt of power installed, and per unit of energy produced, than the fossil

Kammen, Daniel M.

135

PultrusionPultrusion of Fabric Reinforced Highof Fabric Reinforced High Flyash Blended Cement CompositesFlyash Blended Cement Composites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PultrusionPultrusion of Fabric Reinforced Highof Fabric Reinforced High Flyash Blended Cement CompositesFlyash Blended Cement Composites Barzin Mobasher1, Alva Peled 2, Jitendra Pahalijani1 1 Department Engineering Ben-Gurion University, Israel The World of Coal Ash 2005 International Ash Utilization Symposium

Mobasher, Barzin

136

Energy Efficiency Improvement Opportunities for the Cement Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides information on the energy savings, costs, and carbon dioxide emissions reductions associated with implementation of a number of technologies and measures applicable to the cement industry. The technologies and measures include both state-of-the-art measures that are currently in use in cement enterprises worldwide as well as advanced measures that are either only in limited use or are near commercialization. This report focuses mainly on retrofit measures using commercially available technologies, but many of these technologies are applicable for new plants as well. Where possible, for each technology or measure, costs and energy savings per tonne of cement produced are estimated and then carbon dioxide emissions reductions are calculated based on the fuels used at the process step to which the technology or measure is applied. The analysis of cement kiln energy-efficiency opportunities is divided into technologies and measures that are applicable to the different stages of production and various kiln types used in China: raw materials (and fuel) preparation; clinker making (applicable to all kilns, rotary kilns only, vertical shaft kilns only); and finish grinding; as well as plant wide measures and product and feedstock changes that will reduce energy consumption for clinker making. Table 1 lists all measures in this report by process to which they apply, including plant wide measures and product or feedstock changes. Tables 2 through 8 provide the following information for each technology: fuel and electricity savings per tonne of cement; annual operating and capital costs per tonne of cement or estimated payback period; and, carbon dioxide emissions reductions for each measure applied to the production of cement. This information was originally collected for a report on the U.S. cement industry (Worrell and Galitsky, 2004) and a report on opportunities for China's cement kilns (Price and Galitsky, in press). The information provided in this report is based on publicly-available reports, journal articles, and case studies from applications of technologies around the world.

Price, Lynn; Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina; Price, Lynn

2008-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

137

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Cement  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

GHG Information GHG Information This section provides various sources describing the energy consumption of the industrial sector and the carbon emissions in particular. Below is an estimate of the emissions expressed in million metric tons of carbon equivalents (MMTCE) based upon the Annual Energy Outlook 2003. According to EIA "Annual Energy Outlook 2003" data, energy-related CO2 emissions for the cement industry were 8.3 MMTCE in 2002, and process-related CO2 emissions were approximately 11.4 MMTCE for a total of 19.7 MMTCE. (The AEO Supplementary tables were generated for the reference case of the Annual Energy Outlook 2003 using the National Energy Modeling System, a computer-based model which produces annual projections of energy markets for 2000-2025. The AEO2003 reflects data and information available as of

138

Pacific Region Combined Heat and Power Projects | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pacific Region Combined Heat and Power Projects Pacific Region Combined Heat and Power Projects Pacific Region Combined Heat and Power Projects November 1, 2013 - 11:40am Addthis DOE's Regional CHP Technical Assistance Partnerships (CHP TAPs) have compiled a select number of combined heat and power (CHP) project profiles, which are available as Adobe Acrobat PDFs. Pacific www.pacificCHPTAP.org Terry Clapham California Center for Sustainable Energy 858-244-4872 terry.clapham@energycenter.org California Alameda County Santa Rita Jail, Dublin Burlingame Wastewater Treatment Plant, Burlingame Chiquita Water Reclamation Plant, Santa Margarita DGS Central Plant, Sacramento East Bay Municipal Utility District, Oakland East Bay Municipal Utility District WWTP, Oakland EMWD Microturbine Energy System, Riverside County

139

Pacific Region Combined Heat and Power Projects | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pacific Region Combined Heat and Power Projects Pacific Region Combined Heat and Power Projects Pacific Region Combined Heat and Power Projects November 1, 2013 - 11:40am Addthis DOE's Regional CHP Technical Assistance Partnerships (CHP TAPs) have compiled a select number of combined heat and power (CHP) project profiles, which are available as Adobe Acrobat PDFs. Pacific www.pacificCHPTAP.org Terry Clapham California Center for Sustainable Energy 858-244-4872 terry.clapham@energycenter.org California Alameda County Santa Rita Jail, Dublin Burlingame Wastewater Treatment Plant, Burlingame Chiquita Water Reclamation Plant, Santa Margarita DGS Central Plant, Sacramento East Bay Municipal Utility District, Oakland East Bay Municipal Utility District WWTP, Oakland EMWD Microturbine Energy System, Riverside County

140

Mechanical Properties and Durability of Concrete Made with High-Volume Fly Ash Blended Cement Produced in a Cement Plant: Commercial -Scale Trial Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This interim report documents the preliminary results of the commercial-scale production of a high-volume fly ash (HVFA) blended cement, using up to 55 percent fly ash to replace the portland cement.

2000-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "riverside cement power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Innovative cement helps DOE safeguard nuclear facilities | Argonne National  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Innovative cement helps DOE safeguard nuclear facilities Innovative cement helps DOE safeguard nuclear facilities By Jared Sagoff * April 25, 2008 Tweet EmailPrint ARGONNE, Ill. - When Argonne materials scientists Arun Wagh and Dileep Singh initially developed Ceramicrete®, a novel phosphate cement that stabilizes radioactive waste streams, they did not immediately recognize that with one or two extra ingredients, the cement could solve another problem in the nuclear complex. In the course of the development of the Ceramicrete technology, Wagh and Singh formed a multilayered collaboration among Argonne, the Russian Federal Nuclear Center (VNIIEF) in Sarov, Russia, and Ceradyne Boron Products LLC. This international scientific partnership created an unusually efficient nuclear shield that blocks the neutrons and gamma rays

142

Massive Cement Pour into Hanford Site Nuclear Facility Underway: Recovery  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Massive Cement Pour into Hanford Site Nuclear Facility Underway: Massive Cement Pour into Hanford Site Nuclear Facility Underway: Recovery Act Funding Puts U Canyon in Home Stretch of Demolition Preparations Massive Cement Pour into Hanford Site Nuclear Facility Underway: Recovery Act Funding Puts U Canyon in Home Stretch of Demolition Preparations June 14, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Andre Armstrong, CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (509) 376-6773 Andre_L_Armstrong@rl.gov Geoff Tyree, DOE (509) 376-4171 Geoffrey.Tyree@rl.doe.gov RICHLAND, Wash. - Hanford workers are pouring enough cement-like material to fill six Olympic-size wimming pools in one of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) largest nuclear facilities at the Hanford Site in southeast Washington State to prepare the massive building for demolition.

143

Nanostructure and Nanomechanics of Cement: Polydisperse Colloidal Packing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cement setting and cohesion are governed by the precipitation and growth of calcium-silicate-hydrate, through a complex evolution of microstructure. A colloidal model to describe nucleation, packing, and rigidity of ...

Masoero, Enrico

144

Cement Dissolution and Delamination of Hyper-Eutectoid ... - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

May 1, 2007 ... Cement Dissolution and Delamination of Hyper-Eutectoid Pearlitic Steel Filaments for Tire Cords by Y. S. Yang, S. Y. Park, J. G. Bae, M. C. Kim, ...

145

Implementing Energy Efficiency Policy for the Cement Industry...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Implementing Energy Efficiency Policy for the Cement Industry in India: The PAT Mechanism of the NMEEE Speaker(s): S. S. Krishnan Date: April 13, 2011 - 12:00pm Location: 90-4133...

146

Mechanical and acoustic properties of weakly cemented granular rocks  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the results of laboratory measurements on the mechanical and acoustic properties of weakly cemented granular rock. Artificial rock samples were fabricated by cementing sand and glass beads with sodium silicate binder. During uniaxial compression tests, the rock samples showed stress-strain behavior which was more similar to that of soils than competent rocks, exhibiting large permanent deformations with frictional slip. The mechanical behavior of the samples approached that of competent rocks as the amount of binder was increased. For very weak samples, acoustic waves propagating in these rocks showed very low velocities of less than 1000 m/sec for compressional waves. A borehole made within this weakly cemented rock exhibited a unique mode of failure that is called ''anti-KI mode fracture'' in this paper. The effect of cementation, grain type, and boundary conditions on this mode of failure was also examined experimentally.

Nakagawa, S.; Myer, L.R.

2001-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

147

Massive Cement Pour into Hanford Site Nuclear Facility Underway: Recovery  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Massive Cement Pour into Hanford Site Nuclear Facility Underway: Massive Cement Pour into Hanford Site Nuclear Facility Underway: Recovery Act Funding Puts U Canyon in Home Stretch of Demolition Preparations Massive Cement Pour into Hanford Site Nuclear Facility Underway: Recovery Act Funding Puts U Canyon in Home Stretch of Demolition Preparations June 14, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Andre Armstrong, CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (509) 376-6773 Andre_L_Armstrong@rl.gov Geoff Tyree, DOE (509) 376-4171 Geoffrey.Tyree@rl.doe.gov RICHLAND, Wash. - Hanford workers are pouring enough cement-like material to fill six Olympic-size wimming pools in one of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) largest nuclear facilities at the Hanford Site in southeast Washington State to prepare the massive building for demolition.

148

BEST-Cement for China | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

BEST-Cement for China BEST-Cement for China Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: BEST-Cement Agency/Company /Organization: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Partner: Energy Research Institute, China Cement Association, China Building Materials Academy, Shandong University, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Energy Foundation, Dow Chemical Company Sector: Energy Focus Area: Industry Topics: Pathways analysis, Resource assessment Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Website: china.lbl.gov/research/industry/benchmarking/best-cement/best-cement-c Country: China UN Region: Eastern Asia Coordinates: 35.86166°, 104.195397° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.86166,"lon":104.195397,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

149

How to avoid casing collapse during inner string cementing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article reports that in the Mobile Bay area offshore Alabama, inflatable surface packoffs are being used to seal the top of the 20-in. conductor casing-to-drill pipe annulus. With the seal in place, annular pressure is maintained during inner string cementing jobs to counter forces that tend to shorten the drill pipe inner string. Inside pressure also helps protect the casing from collapse due to the hydrostatic pressure of a long column of cement. Casing is less resistant than the bottom of the hole and the wellbore, (unless a weak formation breaks down) and can crush under the hydrostatic weight when fluid inside does not offer enough offsetting support. Casing collapse can cause cement to leak into the casing-to-drill pipe annulus, thereby cementing the drill string in the well or otherwise ruining the cement job. In a situation where casing does not have sufficient collapse resistance to withstand hydrostatic pressure loading, a surface packoff can be used to maintain pressure inside the casing throughout the cementing job.

Lubitz, R.

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Potential for energy conservation in the cement industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report assesses the potential for energy conservation in the cement industry. Energy consumption per ton of cement decreased 20% between 1972 and 1982. During this same period, the cement industry became heavily dependent on coal and coke as its primary fuel source. Although the energy consumed per ton of cement has declined markedly in the past ten years, the industry still uses more than three and a half times the fuel that is theoretically required to produce a ton of clinker. Improving kiln thermal efficiency offers the greatest opportunity for saving fuel. Improving the efficiency of finish grinding offers the greatest potential for reducing electricity use. Technologies are currently available to the cement industry to reduce its average fuel consumption per ton by product by as much as 40% and its electricity consumption per ton by about 10%. The major impediment to adopting these technologies is the cement industry's lack of capital as a result of low or no profits in recent years.

Garrett-Price, B.A.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Hydration kinetics modeling of Portland cement considering the effects of curing temperature and applied pressure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A hydration kinetics model for Portland cement is formulated based on thermodynamics of multiphase porous media. The mechanism of cement hydration is discussed based on literature review. The model is then developed considering the effects of chemical composition and fineness of cement, water-cement ratio, curing temperature and applied pressure. The ultimate degree of hydration of Portland cement is also analyzed and a corresponding formula is established. The model is calibrated against the experimental data for eight different Portland cements. Simple relations between the model parameters and cement composition are obtained and used to predict hydration kinetics. The model is used to reproduce experimental results on hydration kinetics, adiabatic temperature rise, and chemical shrinkage of different cement pastes. The comparisons between the model reproductions and the different experimental results demonstrate the applicability of the proposed model, especially for cement hydration at elevated temperature and high pressure.

Lin Feng [Department of Civil Engineering and Engineering Mechanics, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Department of Civil Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)], E-mail: fl2040@columbia.edu; Meyer, Christian [Department of Civil Engineering and Engineering Mechanics, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States)

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

152

Engineering Feasibility of CO2 Capture on an Existing U.S. Coal-Fired Power Plant  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FEASIBILITY OF CO FEASIBILITY OF CO 2 CAPTURE ON AN EXISTING US COAL-FIRED POWER PLANT Nsakala ya Nsakala (nsakala.y.nsakala@power.alstom.com; 860-285-2018) John Marion (john.l.marion@power.alstom.com; 860-285-4539) Carl Bozzuto (carl.bozzuto@power.alstom.com; 860-285-5007) Gregory Liljedahl (greg.n.liljedahl@power.alstom.com; 860-285-4833) Mark Palkes (mark.palkes@power.alstom.com; 860-285-2676) ALSTOM Power Inc. US Power Plant Laboratories 2000 Day Hill Rd. Windsor, CT 06095 David Vogel (david.c.vogel@us.abb.com; 713-821-4312) J.C. Gupta (jcgupta@us.abb.com; 713-821-5093) ABB Lummus Global Inc. 3010 Briarpark Houston, TX 77042 Manoj Guha (mkguha@aep.com; 614-223-1285) American Electric Power 1 Riverside Plaza Columbus, OH 43215 Howard Johnson (hjohnson@odod.state.oh.us; 614-644-8368)

153

www.eia.gov  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Big Sandy Kentucky Power Co 9. Riverside Generating LLC Gas Riverside Generating Co LLC 10. J K Smith Table 2. Ten Largest Plants by Generation Capacity, 2010 Plant

154

Treated ceramic microsphere-cement lightweight composites for geothermal cementing systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The compressive strength and water permeability of high-temperature light-weight cementing materials containing sillimanite-based hollow microspheres as a filler can be improved by treating the surfaces of the microspheres with a Ca(OH)/sub 2/-saturated solution at temperatures up to 200/sup 0/C. The precipitation of an epitaxial layer formed by an interaction between a hot calcium hydroxide solution and the surface of the sphere plays an essential role in developing favorable bonding characteristics at the interfaces and in promoting the hydration of the cement matrix. The properties of the composites include a slurry density of <1.2 g/cc at 25/sup 0/C, a 300/sup 0/C-24 hour compressive strength of >1015 psi (7.0 MPa), a water permeability of <10/sup -4/ Darcy, and a bulk density of <1.0 g/cc. It was observed that tobermorite-truscottite transformation and anorthite formation during autoclave exposure for 180 days in brine at 300/sup 0/C results in slight strength reductions and increased water permeability.

Sugama, Toshifumi; Kukacka, L.E.

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

The CO2 Abatement Cost Curve for the Thailand's Cement Industry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Abstract The cement industry is one of the largest carbon dioxide (CO2) emitters in the Thai industry. The cement sector accounted for about 20633 kilotonnes (ktonnes) CO2...

156

Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Demand Response in the California Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cement plants electricity tariffs have been  structured is scheduled around an electricity tariff that incorporates electricity pricing prepared for the state of California analyzed  the response of foreign cement plants to multi? period tariffs.  

Olsen, Daniel

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Potential Energy Savings and CO2 Emissions Reduction of China's Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2030. Three cement output projections are developed based onthese three production projections, energy savings and CO2have been a number of projections of China’s future cement

Ke, Jing

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Unprocessed rice husk ash as a partial replacement of cement for low-cost concrete  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cement is a very valuable commodity as it can be used to construct structurally sound buildings and infrastructure. However, in many developing countries cement is expensive due to the unavailability of local resources to ...

Brown, Dorothy Kamilah

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Assessment of non-destructive testing of well casing,, cement and cement bond in high temperature wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Because of the difficulty in bringing geothermal well blowouts under control, any indication of a casing/cement problem should be expeditiously evaluated and solved. There are currently no high temperature cement bond and casing integrity logging systems for geothermal wells with maximum temperatures in excess of 500/sup 0/F. The market is currently insufficient to warrannt the private investment necessary to develop tools and cables capable of withstanding high temperatures. It is concluded that a DOE-funded development program is required to assure that diagnostic tools are available in the interim until geothermal resource development activities are of sufficient magnitude to support developmental work on high temperature casing/cement logging capabilities by industry. This program should be similar to and complement the current DOE program for development of reservoir evaluation logging capabilities for hot wells. The appendices contain annotated bibliographies on the following: high temperature logging in general, cement integrity testing, cosing integrity testing, casing and cement failures, and special and protective treatment techniques. Also included are composite listing of references in alphabetical order by senior author.

Knutson,, C.K.; Boardman, C.R.

160

Downhole cement test in a very hot hole  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Completion of the commercial-sized Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Project requires that hydraulic fractures be created between two inclined wellbores at a depth of about 4 km (15,000 ft). Isolation of a section of the open wellbore is necessary for pressurization to achieve the fracture connections. A cemented-in liner/PBR assembly is one of the methods used for zone isolation near the botton of the injection well. A downhole, pumped cement test was first conducted at a wellbore temperature of 275/sup 0/C (525/sup 0/F) to determine if a suitable slurry could be designed, pumped, and later recovered to assure the success of the cemented-in liner operation.

Pettitt, R.A.; Cocks, G.G.; Dreesen, D.N.; Sims, J.R.; Nicholson, R.W.; Boevers, B.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "riverside cement power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Recommended guidelines for solid fuel use in cement plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pulverized solid fuel use at cement plants in North America is universal and includes bituminous and sub-bituminous coal, petroleum coke, and any combination of these materials. Provided are guidelines for the safe use of pulverized solid fuel systems in cement plants, including discussion of the National Fire Protection Association and FM Global fire and explosion prevention standards. Addressed are fire and explosion hazards related to solid fuel use in the cement industry, fuel handling and fuel system descriptions, engineering design theory, kiln system operations, electrical equipment, instrumentation and safety interlock issues, maintenance and training, and a brief review of code issues. New technology on fire and explosion prevention including deflagration venting is also presented.

Young, G.L.; Jayaraman, H.; Tseng, H. (and others)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Waste Heat Recovery in Cement Plants By Fluidized Beds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Not too many years ago energy costs and efficiencies were virtually ignored by corporate decision makers. The prevailing attitude was 'my business is manufacturing and my capital is best spent improving and expanding my manufacturing capacity.' With energy now contributing a significant fraction of the overall product cost in many industries, there is general recognition that control of fuel and electric costs is just as important to remaining competitive as is improving manufacturing methods. This is particularly true in the cement industry. Cement manufacture consists of mining and grinding rocks, melting them to form clinkers, then grinding those clinkers to a powder. Through recovery of waste heat and inclusion of technology such as flash calciners, the industry has reduced the fuel requirement per ton of cement from about 7 million Btu per ton in old plants to less than 3 million Btu per ton in the most modern plants.

Fraley, L. D.; Ksiao, H. K.; Thunem, C. B.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Internal cathodic protection of cement-lined steel pipes  

SciTech Connect

Internally coated, cement-lined, carbon steel pipes have been used extensively for ballast- and service-water systems offshore. Mechanical cracking of the lining, undercutting, and erosion have resulted in corrosion and system leaks. Cathodic protection is one alternative that has been evaluated as a solution. Cathodic protection normally gives limited protection when applied internally to a pipeline system. Tests have been performed to evaluate this hypothesis and the possibility of improved current distribution due to the cement lining. This paper presents the test results as well as a solution to the problem. Internally coated, cement-lined steel pipes are used for ballast-water, service-water, and fire-water systems in the offshore oil and gas production industry.

Jensen, F.O. (Sharpnord Corrosion, P.O. Box 46, 3971 Langesund (NO)); Tems, R.D. (Mobil Exploration Norway, Inc., P.O. Box 510, 4001 Stavanger (NO))

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Demand Response in the California Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Waste heat recovery from exhaust gases may be used to economically cogenerate electricity at  some cement plants (

Olsen, Daniel

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Identification of Concrete Incompatibilities Using Cement Paste Rheology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The complex interaction between cement and chemical/mineral admixtures in concrete mixtures sometimes leads to unpredictable concrete performance in the field which is generally defined as concrete incompatibilities. Cement paste rheology measurements instead of traditional workability tests (i.e., slump cone test) can have great potential in detecting those incompatibilities in concrete before the concrete is placed, which can, in turn, avoid related workability problems and setting time as well as heat evolution abnormalities. The objectives of the present study were to examine the applicability of the dynamic shear rheometer (DSR) to measure cement paste rheology, and to identify cement and mineral/chemical admixture incompatibilities, based on the determined rheological parameters. The DSR was modified and optimized for cement paste rheology measurements. Two different modes of operations (i.e., static and dynamic methods) with the modified DSR were investigated to measure representative rheological parameters as well as to identify cement and chemical/mineral admixture incompatibility. The conventional plastic viscosity and yield stress are measured in static mode and storage modulus curve, as a function of time, is measured in dynamic mode. The rate of change of plastic viscosity (RPV) as another static rheological parameter and the modeled magnitude parameter ?, from the dynamic rheological method, showed great potentialities as acceptance criteria to identify incompatible mixtures. The heat of hydration data from isothermal conduction calorimeter tests and setting time results for the studied mixtures have strongly supported the rheology based observations as supporting tools. Based on the main tests results, the acceptance criteria were set up using the rheological parameters in accordance with heat of hydration data. This will ultimately help material suppliers, concrete producers, and other users to detect problematic combinations of concrete ingredients before a given concrete mixture is placed.

Jang, Se Hoon

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Energy saving opportunities through heat recovery from cement processing kilns: a case study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper proposes a system for the utilization of dissipated heat from the surfaces of cement processing kilns at the Jordan Cement Factories in heating heavy fuel oil used in the burning process of these kilns. It is proposed that this can be achieved ... Keywords: Jordan, cement, energy efficiency, heat recovery, kilns

I. Al-Hinti; A. Al-Ghandoor; A. Al-Naji; M. Abu-Khashabeh; M. Joudeh; M. Al-Hattab

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

SPE 142421 PP Cementing at High Pressure Zones in KSA Discovering Mystery behind Pipe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at an over-pressurized zone, the formation might be underbalanced before cement becomes strong in the sense for the cement column to be underbalanced against Formation-A before it was able to develop static gel strength in the hydrostatic pressure had likely caused the cement column to be underbalanced against Formation-A. Figure#1

Hossain, M. Enamul

168

Cement Plant EPI | ENERGY STAR Buildings & Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cement Plant EPI Cement Plant EPI Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources Success stories Target Finder Technical documentation

169

More durable roof coverings such as steel and fiber cement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- heating equipment saves money. Tankless water heaters provide hot water on demand at a preset temperature. Lighter colors absorb less heat, reducing cooling costs in warm climates. Now, solar roofing products- cement siding is termite- and water-resistant and warrantied to last 50 years. Increasing the amount

170

Study of composite cement containing burned oil shale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Study of composite cement containing burned oil shale Julien Ston Supervisors : Prof. Karen properties. SCMs can be by-products from various industries or of natural origin, such as shale. Oil shale correctly, give a material with some cementitious properties known as burned oil shale (BOS). This study

Dalang, Robert C.

171

Microsoft Word - 2 21 08 DOE-SuperPower.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the grid. This 350-meter HTS cable runs between the Riverside and Menands Substations in Albany, New York. HTS cables encounter essentially no resistance in electricity flow,...

172

Contact Mechanics Based Mechanical Characterization of Portland Cement Paste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Current research interest in multi-scale modeling of cement paste requires accurate characterization of the time-dependent mechanical properties of the material, particularly the C-S-H phase. Nanoindentation is evaluated as a tool for measuring both the instantaneous and the short-term viscoelastic properties of cement paste. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) based indentation is compared to conventional nanoindentaion in measuring mechanical properties of cement pastes. Time-dependent solutions are derived to characterize creep indentation tests performed on hardened cement paste and to extract the time-dependent properties. The effect of approximating C-S-H viscoelastic properties with a time-independent Poisson's ratio is discussed, and arguments for utilizing a time-independent Poisson's ratio for short-term response are presented. In evaluating AFM as a mechanical characterization tool, various analytical and numerical modeling approaches are compared. The disparities between the numerical self-consistent approach and analytical solutions are determined and reported. The measured elastic Young's modulus values acquired by AFM indentation tests are compared to Young's modulus values from nanoindentation measurements from cement paste. These results show that the calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) phase of hydrated portland cement has different properties on the nanometric scale than on the micron scale. Packing density of C-S-H particles is proposed as an explanation for the disparity in the measured results. The AFM measured uniaxial viscoelastic compliance values are compared to similar values obtained with traditional nanoindentation for the same material. The comparison of these results shows that the calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) phase of portland cement has similar but distinct properties on the sub micron scale than on the micron scale. Additionally, the effect of moisture is evaluated by controlling the relative humidity (RH) of the testing environment between 40% and 100% plus, or wet. The viscoelastic compliance appears to be highest at 40% RH and the material appears to be less compliant at higher relative humidity levels. Possible mechanisms controlling the viscoelastic deformation are presented and evaluated in conjunction with the moisture related poromechanical effect.

Jones, Christopher

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

U.S. Department of Energy and SuperPower, Inc. Increase Energy Efficiency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and SuperPower, Inc. Increase Energy and SuperPower, Inc. Increase Energy Efficiency in the Nation's Electric Grid U.S. Department of Energy and SuperPower, Inc. Increase Energy Efficiency in the Nation's Electric Grid February 21, 2008 - 11:29am Addthis $27 Million Project Demonstrates Advanced Superconductivity Technology ALBANY, NY- The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and SuperPower, Inc. today commemorated the Albany High-Temperature Superconducting (HTS) Cable Project, the world's first use of second-generation HTS wire on the grid. This 350-meter HTS cable runs between the Riverside and Menands Substations in Albany, New York. HTS cables encounter essentially no resistance in electricity flow, which increases efficiency by eliminating 7-10 percent of the energy losses of conventional copper-based cables. DOE's over $13.5

174

U.S. Department of Energy and SuperPower, Inc. Increase Energy Efficiency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department of Energy and SuperPower, Inc. Increase Energy Department of Energy and SuperPower, Inc. Increase Energy Efficiency in the Nation's Electric Grid U.S. Department of Energy and SuperPower, Inc. Increase Energy Efficiency in the Nation's Electric Grid February 21, 2008 - 11:46am Addthis $27 Million Project Demonstrates Advanced Superconductivity Technology ALBANY, NY- The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and SuperPower, Inc. today commemorated the Albany High-Temperature Superconducting (HTS) Cable Project, the world's first use of second-generation HTS wire on the grid. This 350-meter HTS cable runs between the Riverside and Menands Substations in Albany, New York. HTS cables encounter essentially no resistance in electricity flow, which increases efficiency by eliminating 7-10 percent of the energy losses of conventional copper-based cables. DOE's over $13.5

175

CHEMICALLY BONDED CEMENTS FROM BOILER ASH AND SLUDGE WASTES. PHASE I REPORT AUGUST 1997 - JULY 1998  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In exploring methods to recycle boiler ash (BA) and waste water treatment sludge (WWTS), by-products generated from Keyspan's power plants, into commercially viable materials, we synthesized chemically bonded cements (CBC) offering the following three specific characteristics; (1) immobilization of hazardous heavy metals, such as Pb, Ni, and V, (2) rapid hardening and setting properties, and (3) development of high mechanical strength. The CBCs were prepared through an acid-base reaction between these by-products acting as the solid base reactants and the sodium polyphosphate solution as the cement-forming acid reactant, followed by a hydrating reaction. Furthermore, two additives, the calcium aluminate cements (CAC) and the calcium silicate cements (CSC) were incorporated into the CBC systems to improve their properties. Using a CBC formulation consisting of 53.8 wt% WWTS, 23.1 wt% CSC, and 23.1 wt% [40 wt% -(-NaPO{sub 3}-)-{sub n}]{sub 2} the Toxicity Characteristics Leaching Procedure (TCLP) tests showed that the concentrations of Pb, Ni, and V metals leached out from the specimens were minimal. This formulation originally contained {approx} 28800 mg/kg of Pb, {approx} 6300 mg/kg of Ni, and {approx} 11130 mg/kg of V; the amounts leaching into the acid extraction fluid were only 0.15 mg/L of Pb, 0.15 mg/L of Ni, and 4.63 mgiL of V. On the other hand, CBC specimens derived from a formulation consisting of 42 wt% BA, 18 wt% CAC and 40 wt% [40 wt% -(-NaPO{sub 3}-)-{sub n}] displayed an excellent compressive strength of 10.8 MPa at an early curing age of 2 hours after mixing at room temperature. The reason for its rapid hardening was due to a high exothermic energy evolved by the acid-base reaction. Furthermore, when these specimens were immersed for 28 days in water at 25 C, and exposed for 20 hours to steam at 80 C, a very high compressive strength of 3.32 MPa developed. Two physico-chemical factors played an important role in improving the mechanical strength of the specimens: One was the formation of two well-crystallized phases, hydroxyapatite [Ca{sub 5}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}(OH)] and sodium vanadium sulfate hydrate [Na{sub 2}V(SO{sub 4}){sub 2},4H{sub 2}O], as the reaction products in the cement bodies; the other factor reflected the dense microstructure developed by the growth of these crystalline reaction products. Accordingly, the CBCs derived from these by-products have a high potential for use as remediating material for hazardous heavy metal-contaminated soils, as rapid-setting repair patching and filling materials for damaged roadways and bridge decks, and also as binders in precast concrete products, such as blocks, slabs, and pipes.

SUGAMA,T.; YAGER,K.A.

2002-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

176

Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Demand Response in the California Cement Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examines the characteristics of cement plants and their ability to shed or shift load to participate in demand response (DR). Relevant factors investigated include the various equipment and processes used to make cement, the operational limitations cement plants are subject to, and the quantities and sources of energy used in the cement-making process. Opportunities for energy efficiency improvements are also reviewed. The results suggest that cement plants are good candidates for DR participation. The cement industry consumes over 400 trillion Btu of energy annually in the United States, and consumes over 150 MW of electricity in California alone. The chemical reactions required to make cement occur only in the cement kiln, and intermediate products are routinely stored between processing stages without negative effects. Cement plants also operate continuously for months at a time between shutdowns, allowing flexibility in operational scheduling. In addition, several examples of cement plants altering their electricity consumption based on utility incentives are discussed. Further study is needed to determine the practical potential for automated demand response (Auto-DR) and to investigate the magnitude and shape of achievable sheds and shifts.

Olsen, Daniel; Goli, Sasank; Faulkner, David; McKane, Aimee

2010-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

177

Carbon emissions reductions for a specific new cement plant:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5346 5346 Evaluating Clean Development Mechanism Projects in the Cement Industry Using a Process-Step Benchmarking Approach Michael Ruth, Ernst Worrell, and Lynn Price Energy Analysis Department Environmental Energy Technologies Division Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory University of California Berkeley, California 94720 July 2000 This work was supported by the Climate Policies and Program Division, Office of Policy, Planning, and Evaluation, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency through the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC03-76SF00098 ii iii Evaluating Clean Development Mechanism Projects in the Cement Industry Using a Process-Step Benchmarking Approach Michael Ruth, Ernst Worrell, and Lynn Price Energy Analysis Department Environmental Energy Technologies Division

178

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Cement: Resources and Links -  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Federal/State Programs Federal/State Programs DOE Industrial Materials of the Future Industrial Materials for the Future (IMF) is a crosscutting activity of the Industrial Technologies Program. The mission of IMF is to lead a national effort to research, design, develop, engineer, and test new and improved materials, for the Industries of the Future. ENERGY STAR Focus for Cement Manufacturing The U.S. cement manufacturers and EPA work together in an ENERGY STAR Focus on energy efficiency within the industry. Participating companies work with EPA to institute or improve their corporate energy management programs and the energy performance of their operations. Through ENERGY STAR, EPA provides tools to gauge plant and program energy performance, a forum for elevating energy management in the industry, and recognition for superior

179

Analysis of Energy-Efficiency Opportunities for the Cement Industry in Shandong Province, China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

China's cement industry, which produced 1,388 million metric tons (Mt) of cement in 2008, accounts for almost half of the world's total cement production. Nearly 40% of China's cement production is from relatively obsolete vertical shaft kiln (VSK) cement plants, with the remainder from more modern rotary kiln cement plants, including plants equipped with new suspension pre-heater and pre-calciner (NSP) kilns. Shandong Province is the largest cement-producing Province in China, producing 10% of China's total cement output in 2008. This report documents an analysis of the potential to improve the energy efficiency of NSP kiln cement plants in Shandong Province. Sixteen NSP kiln cement plants were surveyed regarding their cement production, energy consumption, and current adoption of 34 energy-efficient technologies and measures. Plant energy use was compared to both domestic (Chinese) and international best practice using the Benchmarking and Energy Saving Tool for Cement (BEST-Cement). This benchmarking exercise indicated an average technical potential primary energy savings of 12% would be possible if the surveyed plants operated at domestic best practice levels in terms of energy use per ton of cement produced. Average technical potential primary energy savings of 23% would be realized if the plants operated at international best practice levels. Energy conservation supply curves for both fuel and electricity savings were then constructed for the 16 surveyed plants. Using the bottom-up electricity conservation supply curve model, the cost-effective electricity efficiency potential for the studied cement plants in 2008 is estimated to be 373 gigawatt hours (GWh), which accounts for 16% of total electricity use in the 16 surveyed cement plants in 2008. Total technical electricity-saving potential is 915 GWh, which accounts for 40% of total electricity use in the studied plants in 2008. The fuel conservation supply curve model shows the total technical fuel efficiency potential equal to 7,949 terajoules (TJ), accounting for 8% of total fuel used in the studied cement plants in 2008. All the fuel efficiency potential is shown to be cost effective. Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emission reduction potential associated with cost-effective electricity saving is 383 kiloton (kt) CO{sub 2}, while total technical potential for CO{sub 2} emission reduction from electricity-saving is 940 ktCO{sub 2}. The CO{sub 2} emission reduction potentials associated with fuel-saving potentials is 950 ktCO{sub 2}.

Price, Lynn; Hasanbeigi, Ali; Lu, Hongyou; Wang, Lan

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Polymer-cement geothermal-well-completion materials. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A program to develop high-temperature polymer cements was performed. Several formulations based on organic and semi-inorganic binders were evaluated on the basis of mechanical and thermal stability, and thickening time. Two optimized systems exhibited properties exceeding those required for use in geothermal wells. Both systems were selected for continued evaluation at the National Bureau of Standards and contingent upon the results, for field testing in geothermal wells.

Zeldin, A.N.; Kukacka, L.E.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "riverside cement power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Heat or cold storage composition containing a hydrated hydraulic cement  

SciTech Connect

A polyphase composition for the storage of heat or cold is disclosed that utlizes the latent heat of fusion of a salt hydrate continuous phase intimately intermixed with a hydrated hydraulic cement continuous phase and wherein said continuous phases are optionally in contact with a discontinuous crystalline phase comprising a nucleating component and wherein the composition is enveloped, contained, or packaged within a vapor impermeable material.

Boardman, B.J.

1981-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

182

Immobilization of heavy metals by calcium sulfoaluminate cement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two types of calcium sulfoaluminate cement containing 20% and 30% phosphogypsum, respectively, were investigated for their ability in hazardous waste stabilization. Fourteen series of pastes were prepared, each containing the following soluble salt: Na{sub 2}CrO{sub 4}.4H{sub 2}O; Na{sub 2}Cr{sub 2}O{sub 7}.2H{sub 2}O; CrCl{sub 3}.6H{sub 2}O; Pb(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}; Zn(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}.6H{sub 2}O; ZnSO{sub 4}.7H{sub 2}O; and CdCl{sub 2}.5H2O. The level of pollution was 0.069 mol of heavy metal per Kg of cement. The study has been carried out by means of X-ray diffraction, thermal analysis, scanning electron microscopy, mercury intrusion porosimetry, electrical conductivity, and leaching tests. Very good retention of lead, cadmium, zinc and trivalent chromium is observed. The retention of hexavalent chromium depends upon the nature of the binder: the cement containing 20% gypsum develops the best behaviour. This is explained by the microstructure of the hydrated paste: in the paste containing 30% gypsum, delayed ettringite precipitates and damages the hardened paste.

Peysson, S. [Unite de Recherche en Genie Civil-MATERIAUX, Institut National des Sciences Appliquees de Lyon, Domaine Scientifique de la Doua, Batiment J. Tuset, 12, Avenue des Arts, 69 621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Pera, J. [Unite de Recherche en Genie Civil-MATERIAUX, Institut National des Sciences Appliquees de Lyon, Domaine Scientifique de la Doua, Batiment J. Tuset, 12, Avenue des Arts, 69 621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France)]. E-mail: Jean.Pera@insa-lyon.fr; Chabannet, M. [Unite de Recherche en Genie Civil-MATERIAUX, Institut National des Sciences Appliquees de Lyon, Domaine Scientifique de la Doua, Batiment J. Tuset, 12, Avenue des Arts, 69 621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France)

2005-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

183

Modelling and simulation of acrylic bone cement injection and curing within the framework of vertebroplasty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The minimal invasive procedure of vertebroplasty is a surgical technique to treat compression fractures of vertebral bodies. During the treatment liquid bone cement gets injected into the affected vertebral body and therein cures to a solid. In order to investigate the treatment and the impact of injected bone cement on the vertebra, an integrated modelling and simulation framework has been developed. The framework includes (i) the generation of computer models based on microCT images of human cancellous bone, (ii) CFD simulations of bone cement injection into the trabecular structure of a vertebral body as well as (iii) non-linear FEM simulations of the bone cement curing. Thereby, microstructural models of trabecular bone structures are employed. Furthermore, a detailed description of the material behaviour of acrylic bone cements is provided. More precisely, a non-linear fluid flow model is chosen for the representation of the bone cement behaviour during injection and a non-linear viscoelastic material mo...

Landgraf, Ralf; Kolmeder, Sebastian; Lion, Alexander; Lebsack, Helena; Kober, Cornelia

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Hydrothermal cements for use in the completion of geothermal wells. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A research program to develop an improved cement for use in high-temperature geothermal wells was carried out. The work involved in the selection and evaluation of an aluminum hydroxide-cured cement from the SwRI family of hydrothermal cements for this use are described. The physical testing program is described; the topics discussed include placement ability, compressive and bond strengths, permeability to water, compatibility to drilling muds, corrosion properties, and thermal properties.

Not Available

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Analysis of Energy-Efficiency Opportunities for the Cement Industry in Shandong Province, China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Demonstrated Energy Technologies (CADDET), Internationaland MAIN. 1993. Energy Technology in the Cement IndustrialAugust 19, 2009. Energy Technology Support Unit (ETSU).

Price, Lynn

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Analysis of Energy-Efficiency Opportunities for the Cement Industry in Shandong Province, China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is used as the electricity price in electricity conservationof energy. Since average electricity prices and average fuelECSC) with average electricity price for studied cement

Price, Lynn

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Policy Options for Encouraging Energy Efficiency Best Practices in Shandong Province's Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and 2010. Statistics on Energy Consumption Per Unit of GDP.8 S HANDONG CEMENT SECTOR ENERGY CONSUMPTION AND CARBON11 Shandong energy consumption and

Price, Lynn

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Analysis of Energy-Efficiency Opportunities for the Cement Industry in Shandong Province, China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Banerjee, R. , 2005. Energy Efficiency and Demand SideKiln Systems,” Energy Efficiency in the Cement Industry (Ed.of Industrial Energy Efficiency Measures,” Proceedings of

Price, Lynn

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Analysis of Energy-Efficiency Opportunities for the Cement Industry in Shandong Province, China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Banerjee, R. , 2005. Energy Efficiency and Demand SideKiln Systems,” Energy Efficiency in the Cement Industry (Ed.for Improving Energy Efficiency, Reducing Pollution and

Price, Lynn

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Promoting Energy Efficiency in Cement Making: The ENERGY STAR(R) for Industry Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

industry. For information Energy Guide for Cement Making,Bureau, and (2) the Energy Guide, which discusses a wideair system efficiency. The Energy Guides are researched and

Masanet, Eric; Worrell, Ernst

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

A case study of ultralightweight cementing practices in the Northeastern United States  

SciTech Connect

Wells in the northeastern United States are generally drilled to a depth of from 3,000 to 6,000 ft. They are usually air drilled through several incompetent formations among which are the Marcellus and Coffee shales. Completions in this area are hampered by very low fracture gradients of 0.4 to 0.6 psi/ft, with most of the formations containing a large number of natural fractures. During cementing, pressures in excess of 1,100-psi hydrostatic can result in breakdown of the formation leading to incomplete fillup on the cement job. This paper will discuss the existing completion practices in this area, which include the use of multistage cementing, and the incorporation of cementing baskets and other downhole tools. The current cement systems in use and the problems encountered in using them will also be discussed. Several case histories of new cementing techniques, using ultralightweight foam-cementing systems, will be presented along with the job design used on these wells. Bond logging of the foam-cemented wells creates an array of special problems for the logging companies, due to the ultra-low densities and the high porosities of these special cementing systems. Newly developed techniques for logging these wells will be discussed, along with the bond logs from the case histories.

Edmondson, T.D.; Benge, O.G.

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Measuring Improvement in the Energy Performance of the U.S. Cement...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improvement in the Energy Performance of the U.S. Cement Industry This paper from Duke University focuses primarily on the development of an updated ENERGY STAR industrial...

193

Production of Ordinary Portland Cement(OPC) from NALCO Red Mud  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of Ordinary Portland Cement(OPC) from NALCO Red Mud has been successfully developed from a raw mix containing limestone, red mud,shale and fine coal.

194

Analysis of Energy-Efficiency Opportunities for the Cement Industry in Shandong Province, China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gomes, A. S. 1990. “Energy Saving and Environmental ImpactEnergy Consumption and Energy Saving Potential,” ProceedingsBirch, E. 1990. “Energy Savings in Cement Kiln Systems,”

Price, Lynn

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Imaging Wellbore Cement Degradation by Carbon Dioxide under Geologic Sequestration Conditions Using X?ray Computed Microtomography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ABSTRACT: X-ray microtomography (XMT), a nondestructive three-dimensional imaging technique, was applied to demonstrate its capability to visualize the mineralogical alteration and microstructure changes in hydrated Portland cement exposed to carbon dioxide under geologic sequestration conditions. Steel coupons and basalt fragments were added to the cement paste in order to simulate cement-steel and cement-rock interfaces. XMT image analysis showed the changes of material density and porosity in the degradation front (density: 1.98 g/cm3, porosity: 40%) and the carbonated zone (density: 2.27 g/cm3, porosity: 23%) after reaction with CO2- saturated water for 5 months compared to unaltered cement (density: 2.15 g/cm3, porosity: 30%). Three-dimensional XMT imaging was capable of displaying spatially heterogeneous alteration in cement pores, calcium carbonate precipitation in cement cracks, and preferential cement alteration along the cement-steel and cement-rock interfaces. This result also indicates that the interface between cement and host rock or steel casing is likely more vulnerable to a CO2 attack than the cement matrix in a wellbore environment. It is shown here that XMT imaging can potentially provide a new insight into the physical and chemical degradation of wellbore cement by CO2 leakage.

Jung, Hun Bok; Jansik, Danielle P.; Um, Wooyong

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Energy Efficiency Improvement Opportunities for the Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

flash distillation waste heat power generation demonstration2002. The Report on Power Generation by Waste Heat of theResidual Heat Power Generation Project. Presentation by

Worrell, Ernst

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for Cement Making. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PCA), 1980. “1979 Energy Report U.S. Portland CementCement Industry, An Energy Perspective", U.S. Department of1994). Energy Information Admininstration, U.S. Department

Worrell, Ernst

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Sulfur polymer cement for macroencapsulation of mixed waste debris  

SciTech Connect

In FY 1997, the US DOE Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA) sponsored a demonstration of the macroencapsulation of mixed waste debris using sulfur polymer cement (SPC). Two mixed wastes were tested--a D006 waste comprised of sheets of cadmium and a D008/D009 waste comprised of lead pipes and joints contaminated with mercury. The demonstration was successful in rendering these wastes compliant with Land Disposal Restrictions (LDR), thereby eliminating one Mixed Waste Inventory Report (MWIR) waste stream from the national inventory.

Mattus, C.H.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Comparison of proton field-cycling relaxometry and molecular dynamics simulations for protonwater surface dynamics in cement-based materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. / Cement and Concrete Research 37 (2007) 348­350 #12;Acknowledgements JPK and PJM thank the NANOCEM

Kalinichev, Andrey G.

200

Corrosion of Aluminium in Composite Cements Anthony Setiadi* and Neil B. Milestone  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to stress within cement matrix and possibly leading to cracks. #12;The aims of this research coloured corrosion products were observed visually on the aluminium encapsulated in OPC. Cracking was alsoCorrosion of Aluminium in Composite Cements Anthony Setiadi* and Neil B. Milestone Immobilisation

Sheffield, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "riverside cement power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Cementing of geothermal wells. Progress report No. 10, July--September 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Work to implement the program plan for the development of improved high temperature cementing materials for geothermal wells is continuing. Experimental work has been completed at the Colorado School of Mines. Samples of ..beta..-dicalcium silicate-silica cement developed in this program have been submitted for additional evaluation. The initial screening portion of this work has identified several promising systems that will undergo more rigorous testing. Dynamic brine exposure testing of several systems has been initiated at the East Mesa Geothermal Test Facility. Testing at the Niland test site is scheduled to start soon. Property verification tests on cements produced in the materials development phase of the program were initiated at the Bureau of Standards. Preliminary data are available for five cements exposed for 176 h to water at a temperature of 195/sup 0/C. Three of the cements exhibited strength losses during the test. An aluminum hydroxide cement and a polymer cement showed slight increases in strength after the exposure. These and longer-term data will be utilized in the selection of a material for use in the remedial cementing of a hot dry rock well at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory.

Not Available

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector Jump to: navigation, search Name CCAP-Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector Agency/Company /Organization Center for Clean Air Policy (CCAP) Sector Energy Focus Area Industry, - Industrial Processes Topics Implementation, Low emission development planning, -NAMA, Market analysis, Policies/deployment programs Website http://www.ccap.org/docs/resou Program Start 2011 Program End 2011 Country Mexico UN Region Central America References CCAP-Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector[1] CCAP-Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector Screenshot "This interim report presents the preliminary results of the first phase of the study - an evaluation of sectoral approach issues and opportunities

203

CCAP-Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CCAP-Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector CCAP-Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector Jump to: navigation, search Name CCAP-Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector Agency/Company /Organization Center for Clean Air Policy (CCAP) Sector Energy Focus Area Industry, - Industrial Processes Topics Implementation, Low emission development planning, -NAMA, Market analysis, Policies/deployment programs Website http://www.ccap.org/docs/resou Program Start 2011 Program End 2011 Country Mexico UN Region Central America References CCAP-Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector[1] CCAP-Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector Screenshot "This interim report presents the preliminary results of the first phase of the study - an evaluation of sectoral approach issues and opportunities

204

Long-term modeling of glass waste in portland cement- and clay-based matrices  

SciTech Connect

A set of ``templates`` was developed for modeling waste glass interactions with cement-based and clay-based matrices. The templates consist of a modified thermodynamic database, and input files for the EQ3/6 reaction path code, containing embedded rate models and compositions for waste glass, cement, and several pozzolanic materials. Significant modifications were made in the thermodynamic data for Th, Pb, Ra, Ba, cement phases, and aqueous silica species. It was found that the cement-containing matrices could increase glass corrosion rates by several orders of magnitude (over matrixless or clay matrix systems), but they also offered the lowest overall solubility for Pb, Ra, Th and U. Addition of pozzolans to cement decreased calculated glass corrosion rates by up to a factor of 30. It is shown that with current modeling capabilities, the ``affinity effect`` cannot be trusted to passivate glass if nuclei are available for precipitation of secondary phases that reduce silica activity.

Stockman, H.W.; Nagy, K.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Morris, C.E. [Wollongong Univ., NSW (Australia). Dept. of Civil and Mining Engineering

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Characterization of Slag, Fly Ash and Portland Cement for Saltstone  

SciTech Connect

Batch-to-batch variability in the chemical and physical properties of the fly ash, slag and portland cement (binders) will be an ongoing concern over the many years that salt waste from Tank 50 will be processed into grout at the Saltstone Processing Facility. This batch-to-batch variability in the properties of the binder materials translates to variability in the fresh and cured properties of Saltstone. Therefore, it is important to quantify the batch-to-batch variability of the binder materials and the resultant variation in grout properties. This report is the starting point for that process by providing the baseline (reference point) binder properties to which future batches of binder materials can be compared. For this characterization effort, properties of fly ash, slag and portland cement were obtained and documented in this report. These properties included particle size distribution by laser light scattering and dry sieving, particle size and morphology by scanning electron microscopy, true, aerated and tapped densities, chemical composition, rheological properties of the water based slurries made from individual binder material, and volatility through thermogravimetric analysis and differential thermal analysis. The properties presented in this report also provide a baseline data set to assist in problem solving efforts when or if unanticipated and/or unwanted processing events occur at the Saltstone Processing Facility.

Harbour, J

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Demonstration of Mixed Waste Debris Macroencapsulation Using Sulfur Polymer Cement  

SciTech Connect

This report covers work performed during FY 1997 as part of the Evaluation of Sulfur Polymer Cement Fast-Track System Project. The project is in support of the ``Mercury Working Group/Mercury Treatment Demonstrations - Oak Ridge`` and is described in technical task plan (TTP) OR-16MW-61. Macroencapsulation is the treatment technology required for debris by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Land Disposal Restrictions (LDR) under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. Based upon the results of previous work performed at Oak Ridge, the concept of using sulfur polymer cement (SPC) for this purpose was submitted to the Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA). Because of the promising properties of the material, the MWFA accepted this Quick Win project, which was to demonstrate the feasibility of macroencapsulation of actual mixed waste debris stored on the Oak Ridge Reservation. The waste acceptance criteria from Envirocare, Utah, were chosen as a standard for the determination of the final waste form produced. During this demonstration, it was shown that SPC was a good candidate for macroencapsulation of mixed waste debris, especially when the debris pieces were dry. The matrix was found to be quite easy to use and, once the optimum operating conditions were identified, very straightforward to replicate for batch treatment. The demonstration was able to render LDR compliant more than 400 kg of mixed wastes stored at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

Mattus, C.H.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Phosphate-bonded glass cements for geothermal wells. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Calcium aluminosilicate glasses were found to react with phosphoric acid in three ways depending upon silica content. Above 55% SiO/sub 2/ they are insoluble while below 50% they dissolve readily. The transition compositions release calcium and aluminum ions and a silica gel phase replaces the glass. Activation energies in the order of 10 kcal/mole are associated with the dissolution. Equilibrium studies in the systems CaO-P/sub 2/O/sub 5/-H/sub 2/O, Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/-P/sub 2/O/sub 5/-H/sub 2/O, and CaO-Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/-P/sub 2/O/sub 5/-H/sub 2/O were made to determine the phases which are stable at 200/sup 0/C in excess water. The CaO system shows hydroxylapatite, monetite and monocalcium orthophosphate are the stable phases. The Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ system contains augelite, berlinite, and a high phosphate aluminum hydrate. The quaternary system shows the above phase plus a lime alumina hydrogarnet and crandallite. Cement made from a glass frit of the composition 45% SiO/sub 2/: 24% CaO: 24% Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ has a compressive strength of 500 psi after several days in steam at 200/sup 0/C and 800 psi after months in steam. Bonding of cements to mild steel are discussed.

Rockett, T.J.

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

SODIUM POLYPHOSPHATE-MODIFIED CLASS C/CLASS F FLY ASH BLEND CEMENTS FOR GEOTHERMAL WELLS.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The authors investigated the usefulness of the coal combustion by-products, Class C fly ash (C) and Class F fly ash (F), in developing cost-effective acid-resistant phosphate-based cements for geothermal wells. In the temperature range of 20-100 C, sodium polyphosphate (NaP) as the acidic cement-forming solution preferentially reacted with calcium sulfate and lime in the C as the base solid reactant through the exothermic acid-base reaction route, rather than with the tricalcium aluminate in C. This reaction led to the formation of hydroxyapatite (HOAp). In contrast, there was no acid-base reaction between the F as the acidic solid reactant and NaP. After autoclaving the cements at 250 C, a well-crystallized HOAp phase was formed in the NaP-modified C cement that was responsible for densifying the cement's structure, thereby conferring low water permeability and good compressive strength on the cement. however, the HOAp was susceptible to hot CO{sub 2}-laden H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} solution (pH 1.1), allowing some acid erosion of the cement. On the other hand, the mullite in F hydrothermally reacted with the Na from NaP to form the analcime phase. Although this phase played a pivotal role in abating acid erosion, its generation created an undesirable porous structure in the cement. They demonstrated that blending fly ash with a C/F ratio of 70/30 resulted in the most suitable properties for acid-resistant phosphate-based cement systems.

SUGAMA, T.; BROTHERS, L.E.; KASPEREIT, D.

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Potential Energy Savings and CO2 Emissions Reduction of China's Cement  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Potential Energy Savings and CO2 Emissions Reduction of China's Cement Potential Energy Savings and CO2 Emissions Reduction of China's Cement Industry Title Potential Energy Savings and CO2 Emissions Reduction of China's Cement Industry Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2012 Authors Ke, Jing, Nina Zheng, David Fridley, Lynn K. Price, and Nan Zhou Date Published 06/2012 Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Keywords cement industry, china energy, china energy group, emission reduction, energy analysis and environmental impacts department, energy efficiency, industrial energy efficiency, Low Emission & Efficient Industry, policy studies Abstract This study analyzes current energy and carbon dioxide (CO2) emission trends in China's cement industryas the basis for modeling different levels of cement production and rates of efficiency improvement andcarbon reduction in 2011-2030. Three cement output projections are developed based on analyses ofhistorical production and physical and macroeconomic drivers. For each of these three productionprojections, energy savings and CO2 emission reduction potentials are estimated in a best practicescenario and two continuous improvement scenarios relative to a frozen scenario. The results reveal thepotential for cumulative final energy savings of 27.1 to 37.5 exajoules and energy-related directemission reductions of 3.2 to 4.4 gigatonnes in 2011-2030 under the best practice scenarios. Thecontinuous improvement scenarios produce cumulative final energy savings of 6.0 to 18.9 exajoules andreduce CO2 emissions by 1.0 to 2.4 gigatonnes. This analysis highlights that increasing energy efficiencyis the most important policy measure for reducing the cement industry's energy and emissions intensity,given the current state of the industry and the unlikelihood of significant carbon capture and storagebefore 2030. In addition, policies to reduce total cement production offer the most direct way ofreducing total energy consumption and CO2 emissions.

210

Diagenesis and cement fabric of gas reservoirs in the Oligocene Vicksburg Formation, McAllen Ranch Field, Hidalgo County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

McAllen Ranch field produces natural gas from 12 deep, overpressured sandstone packages, each interpreted to be the deposit of a prograding shelf-edge delta. One hundred and sixty thin sections from 350 ft of core were petrographically described. The sandstones are feldspathic litharenites containing subequal proportions of volcanic rock fragments (VRF), feldspar, and quartz grains. Grain size ranges from very fine to coarse sand. Porosity is mostly secondary, having formed through dissolution of VRF and feldspar grains. There are four major diagenetic facies (portions of core that can be grouped by the predominance of one diagenetic cement and similar appearance in hand specimen): (1) calcite cemented; (2) chlorite cemented, tight; (3) chlorite cemented, porous; and (4) quartz overgrowths, porous. The calcite-cemented facies predominates in very fine grained sandstones and siltstones and encroaches into adjoining sandstones irrespective of grain size. Sparry calcite filled all available pores and replaced some feldspar. Core permeabilities are generally less than 0.01 md, and porosities range from 7 to 15%. Authigenic clay (predominantly chlorite) generally cements sands intermediate in grain size between those cemented by calcite and those cemented by quartz. Two types of diagenetic clay fabric are interbedded, forming distinct alternating bands 0.1 in. to 3 ft thick. Gray, tightly chlorite-cemented bands are macroscopically and microscopically distinct from green, porous chlorite-cemented bands. In the tightly chlorite-cemented facies, permeabilities are less than 0.3 md, and porosities range from 8 to 16%. Small plates of chlorite fill interparticle pores, and secondary pores are rare. In the porous chlorite-cemented facies, dissolution of framework grains and chlorite cement increased porosity, and a second chlorite cement was precipitated. Core permeability ranges from 0.1 to 1 md, and porosities range from 15 to 20%.

Langford, R.P.; Lynch, F.L. (Univ. of Texas, Austin (USA))

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Improved method and composition for immobilization of waste in cement-based material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A composition and method for fixation or immobilization of aqueous hazardous waste material in cement-based materials (grout) is disclosed. The amount of drainable water in the cured grout is reduced by the addition of an ionic aluminum compound to either the waste material or the mixture of waste material and dry-solid cement- based material. This reduction in drainable water in the cured grout obviates the need for large, expensive amounts of gelling clays in grout materials and also results in improved consistency and properties of these cement-based waste disposal materials.

Tallent, O.K.; Dodson, K.E.; McDaniel, E.W.

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Identification of active agents for tetrachloroethylene degradation in Portland cement slurry containing ferrous iron  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fe(II)-based degradative solidification/stabilization (Fe(II)-DS/S) technology is the modification of conventional solidification/stabilization (S/S). Inorganic pollutants are immobilized by Fe(II)-DS/S while organic pollutants are destroyed. Experimental studies were conducted to identify the active agents for Tetrachloroethylene (PCE) degradation as well as the conditions that enhance the formation of the active agents in the Fe(II)-DS/S system. PCE was chosen as a model chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbon in this study. First, the conditions that lead to maximizing production of the active agents were identified by measuring the ability of various chemical mixtures to degrade PCE. Results showed that Fe(II), Fe(III), Ca, and Cl were the the important elements that affect degradation activity. Elemental compositions of the mixtures and the conditions affecting solid formation might be the important factors in determining how active solids are formed. Second, instrumental analyses (XRD, SEM, SEM-EDS) were used to identify minerals in chemical mixtures that have high activities. Results indicate that active agents for PCE degradation in Portland cement slurries and in cement extracts might be one of several AFm phases. However, systems without cement did not form the same solids as those with cement or cement extract. Ferrous hydroxide was identified as a major solid phase formed in systems without cement. Finally, the effect of using different types of ordinary Portland cement (OPC) on PCE degradation rate during Fe(II)-DS/S was examined and the solids were examined by instrumental analyses (XRD, SEM, SEM-EDS). Four different OPC (Txi, Lehigh, Quikrete, and Capitol) showed different PCE degradation behaviors. Pseudo first-order kinetics was observed for Capitol and Txi OPC and second-order kinetics was observed for Quikrete. In the case of Lehigh cement, pseudo first-order kinetics was observed in cement slurry and second-order kinetics in cement extract. Calcium aluminum hydroxide hydrates dominated solids made with Txi, Quikrete, and Lehigh cements and FriedelÂ?s salt was the major phase found in solids made with Capitol cements. Fe tended to be associated with hexagonal thin plate particles, which were supposed to be a LDH.

Ko, Sae Bom

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Cement: Technology Pathways  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Technology Pathways Technology Pathways The DOE's Industries of the Future process helps entire industries articulate their long-term goals and publish them in a unified vision for the future. To achieve that vision, industry leaders jointly define detailed R&D agendas known as roadmaps. ITP relies on roadmap-defined priorities to target cost-shared solicitations and guide development of a balanced R&D portfolio that yields useful results in the near, mid, and long term. Industry Vision & Roadmaps Two documents address the cement industry's challenges and priorities: Vision 2030, which outlines broad goals for the future, and Roadmap 2030, which established the industry's R&D priorities. ITP and the Strategic Development Council, a council of the American Concrete Institute's

214

Carbon dioxide capture from a cement manufacturing process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of manufacturing cement clinker is provided in which a clean supply of CO.sub.2 gas may be captured. The process also involves using an open loop conversion of CaO/MgO from a calciner to capture CO.sub.2 from combustion flue gases thereby forming CaCO.sub.3/CaMg(CO.sub.3).sub.2. The CaCO.sub.3/CaMg(CO.sub.3).sub.2 is then returned to the calciner where CO.sub.2 gas is evolved. The evolved CO.sub.2 gas, along with other evolved CO.sub.2 gases from the calciner are removed from the calciner. The reactants (CaO/MgO) are feed to a high temperature calciner for control of the clinker production composition.

Blount, Gerald C. (North Augusta, SC); Falta, Ronald W. (Seneca, SC); Siddall, Alvin A. (Aiken, SC)

2011-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

215

Experimental study of potential wellbore cement carbonation by various phases of carbon dioxide during geologic carbon sequestration  

SciTech Connect

Hydrated Portland cement was reacted with carbon dioxide (CO2) in supercritical, gaseous, and aqueous phases to understand the potential cement alteration processes along the length of a wellbore, extending from deep CO2 storage reservoir to the shallow subsurface during geologic carbon sequestration. The 3-D X-ray microtomography (XMT) images displayed that the cement alteration was significantly more extensive by CO2-saturated synthetic groundwater than dry or wet supercritical CO2 at high P (10 MPa)-T (50°C) conditions. Scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) analysis also exhibited a systematic Ca depletion and C enrichment in cement matrix exposed to CO2-saturated groundwater. Integrated XMT, XRD, and SEM-EDS analyses identified the formation of extensive carbonated zone filled with CaCO3(s), as well as the porous degradation front and the outermost silica-rich zone in cement after exposure to CO2-saturated groundwater. The cement alteration by CO2-saturated groundwater for 2-8 months overall decreased the porosity from 31% to 22% and the permeability by an order of magnitude. Cement alteration by dry or wet supercritical CO2 was slow and minor compared to CO2-saturated groundwater. A thin single carbonation zone was formed in cement after exposure to wet supercritical CO2 for 8 months or dry supercritical CO2 for 15 months. Extensive calcite coating was formed on the outside surface of a cement sample after exposure to wet gaseous CO2 for 1-3 months. The chemical-physical characterization of hydrated Portland cement after exposure to various phases of carbon dioxide indicates that the extent of cement carbonation can be significantly heterogeneous depending on CO2 phase present in the wellbore environment. Both experimental and geochemical modeling results suggest that wellbore cement exposure to supercritical, gaseous, and aqueous phases of CO2 during geologic carbon sequestration is unlikely to damage the wellbore integrity because cement alteration by all phases of CO2 is dominated by carbonation reaction. This is consistent with previous field studies of wellbore cement with extensive carbonation after exposure to CO2 for 3 decades. However, XMT imaging indicates that preferential cement alteration by supercritical CO2 or CO2-saturated groundwater can occur along the cement-steel or cement-rock interfaces. This highlights the importance of further investigation of cement degradation along the interfaces of wellbore materials to ensure permanent geologic carbon storage.

Jung, Hun Bok; Um, Wooyong

2013-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

216

Cement Creek Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cement Creek Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Cement Creek Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Cement Creek Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Cement Creek Ranch Sector Geothermal energy Type Pool and Spa Location Crested Butte, Colorado Coordinates 38.8697146°, -106.9878231° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

217

Emerging Energy-efficiency and CO2 Emission-reduction Technologies for Cement and Concrete Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shale Energy and Oil Shale Minerals within the Production ofproduction – use of carbide slag Cement with low lime saturation factor Calcareous oil shaleoil shale can be used as an alternative feedstock and partial fuel substitute in clinker production.

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Potential Energy Savings and CO2 Emissions Reduction of China's Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy demand and emissions in 2030 in China: scenarios andand carbon reduction in 2011-2030. Three cement output3.2 to 4.4 gigatonnes in 2011-2030 under the best practice

Ke, Jing

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Emerging Energy-efficiency and CO2 Emission-reduction Technologies for Cement and Concrete Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hilger, J. 2003. Combined Utilization of Oil Shale Energyand Oil Shale Minerals within the Production of Cement andOther Hydraulic Minerals. Oil Shale, Vol. 20, No. 3, pp.

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Cementing of geothermal wells. Progress report No. 9, April--June 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Work to implement the program plan for the development of improved high temperature cementing materials for geothermal wells is continuing. Work on polymer cements containing mixtures of organosiloxanes and styrene is continuing to show the potential of the system as a high temperature cementing material. Samples exposed for 360 hr to brine at 250/sup 0/C have not shown evidence of hydrolysis and have maintained high strength. At 350/sup 0/C, the compressive strength is > 5000 psi. Preliminary tests to determine the pumpability of the system are in progress. Work on the development of inorganic cementing materials is continuing at six laboratories. Several promising materials have been identified. Tests to measure compressive strengths, bond strengths, permeability, and compatibility with drilling muds are in progress. Consistometer tests have been performed on some materials.

Not Available

1978-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "riverside cement power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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221

Microsoft Word - NETL-TRS-003-2012_Cementing Research Needs_20121207...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cement Isolation of Formations in Deep Offshore Wells 7 December 2012 Office of Fossil Energy NETL-TRS-3-2012 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work...

222

Potential Energy Savings and CO2 Emissions Reduction of China's Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in CO 2 emissions from fossil fuel consumption and cement2010a). Coal is the main fossil fuel used in China’s cementdioxide (CO2) emissions from fossil fuel combustion, as well

Ke, Jing

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Emerging Energy-efficiency and CO2 Emission-reduction Technologies for Cement and Concrete Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hilger, J. 2003. Combined Utilization of Oil Shale Energyand Oil Shale Minerals within the Production of Cement andHydraulic Minerals. Oil Shale, Vol. 20, No. 3, pp. 347-355.

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Grinding of cement clinkers : linking multi-scale fracture properties to system chemistry, mineralogy and microstructure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Growing environmental concerns encourage the cement industry to improve its environmental performance, which in turn renews the interest in clinker grinding efficiency. Current knowledge on clinker grinding was built over ...

Wilson, William, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Effects of composition and exposure on the solar reflectance of Portland Cement Concrete  

SciTech Connect

Increasing the solar reflectance (albedo) of a paved surface keeps it cooler in the sun, reducing convection of heat from pavement to air and thereby decreasing the ambient air temperature. Lower air temperatures decrease demand for cooling energy and slow the formation of urban smog. Variations with composition and environmental exposure of the albedos of portland cement concrete pavements were investigated through laboratory fabrication and exposure of 32 mixes of concrete. Concrete albedo generally correlated with cement albedo and sand albedo and, after abrasion, with rock albedo. Cement albedo had a disproportionately strong influence on the reflectance of concrete. Simulated weathering, soiling, and abrasion each reduced average concrete albedo, though some samples became slightly more reflective through weathering or soiling. Concrete albedo grew as the cement hydration reaction progressed, but stabilized within six weeks of casting.

Levinson, Ronnen; Akbari, Hashem

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Effects of composition and exposure on the solar reflectance of Portland cement concrete  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Increasing the solar reflectance (albedo) of a paved surface keeps it cooler in the sun, reducing convection of heat from pavement to air and thereby decreasing the ambient air temperature. Simulations of the influence of pavement albedo on air temperature in Los Angeles predict that increasing the albedo of 1,250 km2 of pavement by 0.25 would save cooling energy worth $15M yr-1, and reduce smog-related medical and lost-work expenses by $76M yr-1. Most sidewalks and a small fraction of roads and parking areas are paved with portland cement concrete, which can be made quite reflective through suitable choice of cement and aggregate. Variations with composition and environmental exposure of the albedos of portland cement concrete pavements were investigated through laboratory fabrication and exposure of 32 mixes of concrete. Twenty-four mixes yielded substandard, ''rough'' concretes due to high, unmet aggregate water demand. The albedos of the remaining eight ''smooth'' concrete mixes ranged from 0.41 to 0.77 (mean 0.59). Simulated weathering, soiling, and abrasion each reduced average concrete albedo (mean decreases 0.06, 0.05, and 0.19, respectively), though some samples became slightly more reflective through weathering or soiling. Simulated rain (wetting) strongly depressed the albedos of concretes (mean decrease 0.23) until their surfaces were dried. Concrete albedo grew as the cement hydration reaction progressed (mean increase 0.08), but stabilized within six weeks of casting. White-cement concretes were on average significantly more reflective than gray-cement concretes. The albedo of the most-reflective white-cement concrete was 0.18 to 0.39 higher than that of the most-reflective gray-cement concrete, depending on state of exposure. Concrete albedo generally correlated with cement albedo and sand albedo, and, after abrasion, with rock albedo. Cement albedo had a disproportionately strong influence on the reflectance of concrete. Efflorescence and surface carbonation whitened some gray-cement mixes.

Levinson, Ronnen; Akbari, Hashem

2001-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

227

CITRIC ACID AS A SET RETARDER FOR CALCIUM ALUMINATE PHOSPHATE CEMENTS.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Citric acid added as set retarder significantly contributed to enhancing the setting temperature and to extending the thickening time of a calcium aluminate phosphate (CaP) geothermal cement slurry consisting of calcium aluminate cement (CAC) as the base reactant and sodium polyphosphate (NaP) solution as the acid reactant. The set-retarding activity of citric acid was due to the uptake of Ca{sup 2+} ions from the CAC by carboxylic acid groups within the citric acid. This uptake led to the precipitation of a Ca-complexed carboxylate compound as a set-retarding barrier layer on the CAC grains' surfaces. However, this barrier layer was vulnerable to disintegration by the attack of free Ca{sup 2+} ions from CAC, and also to degradation at elevated temperature, thereby promoting the generation of exothermic energy from acid-base reactions between the CAC and NaP after the barrier was broken. The exothermic reaction energy that was promoted in this way minimized the loss in strength of the citric acid-retarded cement. The phase composition assembled in both retarded and non-retarded cements after autoclaving at 180 C encompassed three reaction products, hydroxyapatite (HOAp), hydrogrossular and boehmite, which are responsible for strengthening the autoclaved cement. The first two reaction products were susceptible to reactions with sulfuric acid and sodium sulfate to form crystalline bassanite scale as the corrosion product. The boehmite phase possessed a great resistance to acid and sulfate. Although the bassanite scales clinging to the cement's surfaces were the major factor governing the loss in weight, they served in protecting the cement from further acid- and sulfate-corrosion until their spallation eventually occurred. Nevertheless, the repetitive processes of HOAp and hydrogrossular {yields} bassanite {yields} spallation played an important role in extending the useful lifetime of CaP cement in a low pH environment at 180 C.

SUGAMA,T.; BROTHERS, L.E.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Energy-saving cements obtained from chemical gypsum and other industrial wastes  

SciTech Connect

The main sources, properties and uses of chemical gypsum are reviewed and the possibility of its utilization for the manufacturing process of calcium sulfoaluminate cements is explored. In this process other industrial wastes, as sources of reactive silica and alumina, can be employed. Phosphogypsum, blast-furnace slag and fly ash were the main by-products investigated. The principal properties of calcium sulfoaluminate cements, such as synthesis, hydration and strength, were discussed. Some durability problems and suggested solutions were particularly emphasized.

Beretka, J. [CSIRO Div. of Building, Construction and Engineering, Highett, Victoria (Australia)] [CSIRO Div. of Building, Construction and Engineering, Highett, Victoria (Australia); Cioffi, R. [Univ. Degli Studi di Napoli Federico II (Italy). Dipt. di Ingegneria dei Materiali e della Produzione] [Univ. Degli Studi di Napoli Federico II (Italy). Dipt. di Ingegneria dei Materiali e della Produzione; Marroccoli, M.; Valenti, G.L. [Univ. della Basilicata, Potenza (Italy). Dipt. di Ingegneria e Fisica dell`Ambiente] [Univ. della Basilicata, Potenza (Italy). Dipt. di Ingegneria e Fisica dell`Ambiente

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

229

Optimizing the physical and technological properties of cement additives in concrete mixtures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this article, the physical and technological properties of phosphogypsum, borogypsum, sludges and reactor residue recovered from boric acid factor, lignite ashes, and steel making slags samples were investigated. Physical test results obtained from these cement additives were studied with comparison to the control mix. The optimal values of cementitious additives are replacement of cement and/or of replacement of natural aggregates were conducted.

Demirbas, A. [Technical Univ. of Black Sea, Akcaabat-Trabzon (Turkey). Educational Faculty] [Technical Univ. of Black Sea, Akcaabat-Trabzon (Turkey). Educational Faculty

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

The use of Devonian oil shales in the production of portland cement  

SciTech Connect

The Lafarge Corporation operates a cement plant at Alpena, Michigan in which Antrim shale, a Devonian oil shale, is used as part of the raw material mix. Using this precedent the authors examine the conditions and extent to which spent shale might be utilized in cement production. They conclude that the potential is limited in size and location but could provide substantial benefit to an oil shale operation meeting these criteria.

Schultz, C.W.; Lamont, W.E. [Alabama Univ., University, AL (United States); Daniel, J. [Lafarge Corp., Alpena, MI (United States)

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

231

The use of Devonian oil shales in the production of portland cement  

SciTech Connect

The Lafarge Corporation operates a cement plant at Alpena, Michigan in which Antrim shale, a Devonian oil shale, is used as part of the raw material mix. Using this precedent the authors examine the conditions and extent to which spent shale might be utilized in cement production. They conclude that the potential is limited in size and location but could provide substantial benefit to an oil shale operation meeting these criteria.

Schultz, C.W.; Lamont, W.E. (Alabama Univ., University, AL (United States)); Daniel, J. (Lafarge Corp., Alpena, MI (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Use of High Carbon Fly Ash as a Component of Raw Mix for Cement Manufacture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the production of concrete, fly ash often serves as a supplementary cementing material, but some fly ashes may not be suitable for this use due to excess unburned carbon. This report presents the results of a literature investigation, bench-scale laboratory study, and pilot-scale tests of the feasibility of using such high carbon fly ashes in the manufacture of portland cement.

1998-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

233

Hydraulic behavior of calcium sulfoaluminate-based cements derived from industrial process wastes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The manufacture of cements based on calcium sulfoaluminate (C[sub 4]A[sub 3][bar S]) [In this paper, the notation adopted in cement chemistry, vis. C=CO, A=Al[sub 2]O[sub 3], [bar S]=SO[sub 3], S=SiO[sub 2], and H=H[sub 2]O, has been used.] requires lower firing temperatures and lower grinding energy, as compared to ordinary Portland cements (OPC). Some of these low-energy cements can be formulated in order to develop high early strength and other performances similar to OPC. Further interest towards these types of cements relies on the possibility of using industrial process wastes as raw materials for their manufacture. It has been found that a number of industrial wastes and by-products such as phosphogypsum, bauxite fines, fly ash and blast furnace slag, can be employed without negatively affecting the hydraulic behavior of cements of planned C[sub 4]A[sub 3][bar S]:[beta]-C[sub 2]S:C[bar S] weight ratio 1.5:1:1. Blast furnace slag and fly ash can also be advantageously used as blending components of the fired products.

Beretka, J.; Sherman, N. (CSIRO, Highett, Victoria (Australia). Div. of Building); Vito, B. de (Univ. degli Studi di Napoli (Italy). Dipt. di Ingegneria dei Materiali e della Produzione); Santoro, L. (Univ. degli Studi di Napoli (Italy). Dipt. di Chimica); Valenti, G.L. (Univ. degli Studi della Basillicata, Potenza (Italy). Dipt. di Ingegneria e Fisica dell'Ambiente)

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Percutaneous Extraction of Cement Leakage After Vertebroplasty Under CT and Fluoroscopy Guidance: A New Technique  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: We report a new minimally invasive technique of extraction of cement leakage following percutaneous vertebroplasty in adults. Methods: Seven adult patients (five women, two men; mean age: 81 years) treated for vertebral compression fractures by percutaneous vertebroplasty had cement leakage into perivertebral soft tissues along the needle route. Immediately after vertebroplasty, the procedure of extraction was performed under computed tomography (CT) and fluoroscopy guidance: a Chiba needle was first inserted using the same route as the vertebroplasty until contact was obtained with the cement fragment. This needle was then used as a guide for an 11-gauge Trocar t'am (Thiebaud, France). After needle withdrawal, a 13-gauge endoscopy clamp was inserted through the cannula to extract the cement fragments. The whole procedure was performed under local anesthesia. Results: In each patient, all cement fragments were withdrawn within 10 min, without complication. Conclusions: This report suggests that this CT- and fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous technique of extraction could reduce the rate of cement leakage-related complications.

Amoretti, Nicolas, E-mail: amorettinicolas@yahoo.fr; Huwart, Laurent, E-mail: huwart.laurent@wanadoo.fr [Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire de Nice, Department of Radiology (France)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

235

The hydration of reactive cement-in-polymer dispersions studied by nuclear magnetic resonance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The behaviour of two novel cement-in-polymer (c/p) dispersions, namely cement-in-poly(vinyl acetate) and cement-in-poly(vinyl alcohol) upon exposure to water at room temperature was investigated by a combination of various NMR methods. The swelling, cracking, and the water ingress were monitored non-destructively using {sup 1}H single point imaging. The hydration of the cement matrix was investigated using {sup 29}Si NMR whilst {sup 13}C CPMAS NMR spectra allowed the quantification of the kinetics of the hydrolysis reaction of poly(vinyl acetate) into poly(vinyl alcohol). The polymer controls the rate of water ingress and swelling which in turn determines the behaviour of the c/p dispersions upon exposure to water. For the cement-in-poly(vinyl alcohol), the rates of water ingress and swelling are much faster than the hydration of the clinker whilst for the cement-in-poly(vinyl acetate) the slow rates of the two processes allow the formation of a cementious matrix which assures the stability of the sample.

Olaru, A.M. [Institut fuer Technische und Makromolekulare Chemie, RWTH Aachen University, Templergraben 55, 52056 Aachen (Germany); Weichold, O. [DWI an der RWTH Aachen, e. V., Pauwelsstrasse 8, 52056 Aachen (Germany); Adams, A., E-mail: aadams@mc.rwth-aachen.de [Institut fuer Technische und Makromolekulare Chemie, RWTH Aachen University, Templergraben 55, 52056 Aachen (Germany)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

236

New high temperature cementing materials for geothermal wells: stability and properties. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Potential high-temperature cements have been formulated and evaluated in terms of their properties for geothermal well cementing. Phase formation and compatibility in two major compositional regions were investigated in the temperature region between 200 and 400/sup 0/C and pressures up to 69 MPa (10,000 psi). These were followed by an evaluation of properties of the cements formed. One area in the system Ca0-Mg0-Si0/sub 2/-H/sub 2/0 centered around the xonotlite-chrysotile join while the other area of interest centered around the anorthite composition in the system Ca0-Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/-SiO/sub 2/-H/sub 2/O. After numerous exploratory studies, the magnesia-containing mixtures were prepared by mixing a Class J cement with various sources of magnesia such as calcined chrysotile, or magnesium oxide. Calcium oxide and silica fine quartz powder were also added to adjust the compositions. The aluminous system cements were formulated from high-alumina cements which were mixed with various silica sources.

Roy, D.M.; White, E.L.; Langton, C.A.; Grutzeck, M.W.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Literature survey on cements for remediation of deformed casing in geothermal wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Brookhaven National Laboratory was requested to conduct a literature survey for the best available cement to use in the proposed casing patch as part of the Geothermal Drilling Organization (GDO) project on remediation of deformed casings. A total of 50 wells have been identified with deformed production casing in Unocal`s portion of The Geysers geothermal field. A procedure to address the casing deformation and avoid abandonment of these wells has been developed as described in the Geysers Deformed Casing Remediation Proposal. The proposed remediation procedure involves isolation of the zone of interest with an inflatable packer, milling the deformed casing and cementing a 7 inch diameter liner to extend approximately 100 ft above and 100 ft below the milled zone. During the milling operation it is possible that the original cement and surrounding formation may slough away. In order to specify a suitable cement formulation for the casing patch it is first necessary to identify and understand the deformation mechanism/s operating in The Geysers field. Subsequently, the required cement mechanical properties to withstand further deformation of the repaired system must be defined. From this information it can be determined whether available cement formulations meet these requirements. In addition to The Geysers, other geothermal fields are at possible risk of casing deformation due to subsidence, seismic activity, lateral and vertical formation movement or other processes. Therefore, the proposed remediation procedure may have applications in other fields.

Allan, M.L.; Philippacopoulos, A.J.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

238

Sulfur polymer cement stabilization of elemental mercury mixed waste  

SciTech Connect

Elemental mercury, contaminated with radionuclides, is a problem throughout the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. This report describes the development and testing of a process to immobilize elemental mercury, contaminated with radionuclides, in a form that is non-dispersible, will meet EPA leaching criteria, and has low mercury vapor pressure. In this stabilization and solidification process (patent pending) elemental mercury is mixed with an excess of powdered sulfur polymer cement (SPC) and additives in a vessel and heated to {approximately}35 C, for several hours, until all of the mercury is converted into mercuric sulfide (HgS). Additional SPC is then added and the mixture raised to 135 C, resulting in a homogeneous molten liquid which is poured into a suitable mold where is cools and solidifies. The final stabilized and solidified waste forms were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, as well as tested for leaching behavior and mercury vapor pressure. During this study the authors have processed the entire inventory of mixed mercury waste stored at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL).

Melamed, D.; Fuhrmann, M.; Kalb, P.; Patel, B.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Carbon dioxide sequestration in cement kiln dust through mineral carbonation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carbon sequestration through the formation of carbonates is a potential means to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions. Alkaline industrial solid wastes typically have high mass fractions of reactive oxides that may not require preprocessing, making them an attractive source material for mineral carbonation. The degree of mineral carbonation achievable in cement kiln dust (CKD) under ambient temperatures and pressures was examined through a series of batch and column experiments. The overall extent and potential mechanisms and rate behavior of the carbonation process were assessed through a complementary set of analytical and empirical methods, including mass change, thermal analysis, and X-ray diffraction. The carbonation reactions were carried out primarily through the reaction of CO{sub 2} with Ca(OH){sub 2}, and CaCO{sub 3} was observed as the predominant carbonation product. A sequestration extent of over 60% was observed within 8 h of reaction without any modifications to the waste. Sequestration appears to follow unreacted core model theory where reaction kinetics are controlled by a first-order rate constant at early times; however, as carbonation progresses, the kinetics of the reaction are attenuated by the extent of the reaction due to diffusion control, with the extent of conversion never reaching completion. 35 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

Deborah N. Huntzinger; John S. Gierke; S. Komar Kawatra; Timothy C. Eisele; Lawrence L. Sutter [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

240

Bottom-up Representation of Industrial Energy Efficiency Technologies in Integrated Assessment Models for the Cement Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

St. Louis, Missouri. Energy Technology Support Unit (ETSU),de Beer, 1997. "Energy Efficient Technologies in Industry -and MAIN, 1993. “Energy Technology in the Cement Industrial

Sathaye, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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241

Cementation and solidification of miscellaneous mixed wastes at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site produces a variety of wastes which are amenable to micro-encapsulation in cement Portland cement is an inexpensive and readily available material for this application. The Waste Projects (WP) group at Rocky Flats evaluated cementation to determine its effectiveness in encapsulating several wastes. These included waste analytical laboratory solutions, incinerator ash, hydroxide precipitation sludge, and an acidic solution from the Delphi process (a chemical oxidation technology being evaluated as an alternative to incineration). WP prepared surrogate wastes and conducted designed experiments to optimize the cement formulation for the waste streams. These experiments used a Taguchi or factorial experimental design, interactions between the variables were also considered in the testing. Surrogate waste samples were spiked with various levels of each of six Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) listed metals (Cd, Cr, Ba, Pb, Ni, and Ag), cemented using the optimized formulation, and analyzed for leach resistance using the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP). The metal spike levels chosen were based on characterization data, and also based on an estimate of the highest levels of contaminants suspected in the waste. This paper includes laboratory test results for each waste studied. These include qualitative observations as well as quantitative data from TCLP analyses and environmental cycling studies. The results from these experiments show that cement stabilization of the different wastes can produce final waste forms which meet the current RCRA Land Disposal Restriction (LDR) requirements. Formulations that resulted in LDR compliant waste forms are provided. The volume increases associated with cementation are also lower than anticipated. Future work will include verification studies with actual mixed radioactive waste as well as additional formulation development studies on other waste streams.

Phillips, J.A.; Semones, G.B.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Cementing of geothermal wells. Progress report No. 12, January-March, 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Work to implement the program plan for the development of improved high temperature cementing materials for geothermal wells is continuing. Results from initial tests in the Dynamic Brine Exposure Testing Apparatus (D-BETA) are available. Based upon initial data, the rate at which cement coupons undergo change in the D-BETA is between that of the static tests and the dynamic exposures at East Mesa. Several cementing compositions have been formulated with chemical, physical and mechanical properties to withstand the existing geothermal conditions. The pumpability of three formulations has been demonstrated and the materials have been submitted to NBS for additional evaluation. The effect of Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/, SO/sub 3/, Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ and Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ on different binders were studied at Colorado School of Mines. The results were found to range from deleterious to beneficial. Phosphate-bonded cements have been produced at the University of Rhode Island from a glass containing 7% Na/sub 2/O, 24% CaO, 24% Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ and 45% SiO/sub 2/. Preliminary tests indicate that the material sets in several hours and appears to have some high temperature stability. Tests performed on hydrothermal cements indicate six formulations that are pumpable as long as three hours at 316/sup 0/C. Two formulations, Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ and ZrO/sub 2/, have been chosen for use at temperatures above 300/sup 0/C. Polymer concentrates containing cement fillers have been found to be hydrothermally stable in 300/sup 0/C brine. Recommended standards for evaluating geothermal well cements have been developed by NBS. (MHR)

Not Available

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

American Electric Power Co., Inc. | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Co., Inc. Co., Inc. (Redirected from American Electric Power) Jump to: navigation, search Name American Electric Power (AEP) Address 1 Riverside Plaza Place Columbus, OH Zip 43215-2372 Year founded 1906 Number of employees 10,000+"+" is not declared as a valid unit of measurement for this property. Phone number (614) 716-1000 Website www.aep.com Coordinates 39.964959°, -83.005786° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.964959,"lon":-83.005786,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

244

Recycle of Wastes of Clay Brick Industry for Producing Eco-cement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work aims at recycling of the solid wastes of clay brick industry (WCB) in the manufacture of blended cement. The various characteristics of collected samples of the waste were determined. WCB was ground to different surface areas. Different mixes were designed from the WCB and ordinary Portland cement (OPC). After adding the required amount of water for each mix, the pastes were moulded in 5x5x5cm3 mould. The initial and final setting time were measured. The moulded specimens were cured at room temperature for 24hr, then demoulded and cured at water for the required testing time. The compressive strength for the hardened specimens was measured. The kinetic of the reaction was followed by determining free lime and chemically combined water contents. The obtained results were compared with OPC and different types of blended cement already existing in the market. The results clearly illustrate the suitability of WCB for the production of series of different types of blended cement (green products) having great impact on the energy saving moreover decreasing carbon dioxide content released during cement industry .

Amin, A. M

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Advanced high-temperature lightweight foamed cements for geothermal well completions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Foamed cement slurries that were prepared by mixing a cementitious material having a Class H cement-to-silica flour ratio of 1.0 in conjunction with a alpha-olefin sulfate foam surfactant and a coconut diethanolamide foam stabilizer were exposed in an autoclave at a temperature of 300/sup 0/C and a hydrostatic pressure of 2000 psi (13.79 MPa). One lightweight slurry having a density of 9.61 lb/gal (1.15 g/cc) yielded a cellular cement having a compressive strength at 24 hr of >1000 psi (6.9 MPa) and a water permeability of approx.10/sup -3/ darcys. The factors responsible for the attainment of these mechanical and physical properties were identified to be well-crystallized truscottite phases and a uniform distribution of discrete fine bubbles. The addition of graphite fiber reinforcement for the cement matrix significantly suppressed any segregation of foam caused by thermal expansion of the air bubbles and further improved the mechanical characteristics of the cured cements.

Sugama, T.; Kukacka, L.E.; Galen, B.G.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Lightweight CO{sub 2}-resistant cements for geothermal well completions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Materials formed by acid-base reactions between calcium aluminate compounds and phosphate-containing solutions yield high strength, low permeability and CO{sub 2}-resistant cements when cured in hydrothermal environments. The cementing formulations are pumpable at temperatures up to 150{degrees}C. thereby making their use for well completions technically feasible. When this cementing matrix was exposed in an autoclave containing Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3},-saturated brine for 120 days. <0.4 wt% CaCO{sub 3} was produced. A conventional portland cement-based well completion material will form {approximately}10 wt% CACO, after only 7 days exposure. The addition of hollow aluminosilicate microspheres to the uncured matrix constituents yields slurries with densities as low as {approximately} 1.2 g/cc which cure to produce materials with properties meeting die criteria for well cementing. These formulations also exhibit low rates of carbonation. Laboratory characterization is nearing completion. engineering scale-up is underway, and plans for field testing in a variety of geothermal fluids are being made.

Kukacka, L.E.; Sugama, T.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Cementing of geothermal wells. Progress report No. 11, October-December 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In a one month shake-down test at East Mesa, 32 cement formulations were exposed to flowing brine at 150/sup 0/C and 95 psig. Based upon the results from this test, 15 formulations were selected for evaluation in a 2 year test. Experimental work indicates that none of the cements under consideration cause severe corrosion to steel casing. Compared with the possible corrosive attack on the steel casing by the geothermal environment, the corrosive effects of the cement are minimal. A promising cementing composition has been sent to the National Bureau of Standards for additional tests, and at least one more composition will be submitted. Pumpability tests performed on hydrothermal cements indicate several formulations that are pumpable for at least 2 hr at 316/sup 0/C. Polymer concrete samples containing 50 wt% styrene - 35 wt% acrylonitrile - 5 wt% acrylamide - 10 wt% divinyl benzene have not shown any reduction in strength after exposure to 25% brine at 240/sup 0/C for 8 months. This is the highest strength formulation to date and is the first formulation that has not exhibited any strength reduction after brine exposure. Strengths of 204 MPa and 162 MPa were measured at 20/sup 0/ and 150/sup 0/C, respectively, after 8 months in brine.

Steinberg, M.; Kukacka, L.E.

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Geothermal well cements: current status of R and D and downhole testing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The status as of October 1981 of the program to develop and test geothermal well cementing materials. The program represents the most comprehensive and thorough examination of the geothermal cementing problem undertaken thus far. To date, 27 cements identified in an R and D phase of the program or supplied by industry have been evaluated in laboratory tests. Sixteen of these materials were selected for downhole investigations currently in progress in Mexico at Cerro Prieto. Data for 3 months exposures to flowing brine at 210{sup 0}C are available. Most of the cements continue to meet the strength and permeability acceptance criteria. These results should be reassuring to operators who are using such slurries. Further evaluations are planned after 6 and 12 months exposures. Contingent upon these results, tests will be initiated at 350{sup 0}C. Since many of the cements were formulated specifically for use at temperatures above 300/sup 0/C, it is expected that significant property improvements may be observed as the downhole temperature is increased.

Kukacka, L.E.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

New microtextural criterion for differentiation of compaction and early cementation in fine-grained limestones  

SciTech Connect

Mechanisms of porosity reduction in fine-grained limestones (micrites), the most abundant type of limestone, have been difficult to evaluate because of the fine crystal sizes. Scanning electron microscopy reveals common minute voids termed microfenestrae ({approximately} 1.5-40{mu}m diameter) in Holocene lime muds from all marine carbonate environments studied. Experimental compaction of lime muds greatly reduces abundance of microfenestrae at pressures less than 10 bar. Thus, the abundance of cement-filled microfenestrae in micrites appears to be a widely applicable criterion for recognition of the extent of cementation prior to significant compaction in any given micrite. Microfenestrae in most Phanerozoic micrites studied are about as common as in Holocene lime muds, suggesting that early cementation is a more important mechanism in micrite porosity reduction than recent views have suggested.

Lasemi, Z.; Boardman, M.R. (Miami Univ., Oxford OH (USA)); Sandberg, P.A. (Univ. of Illinois, Urbana (USA))

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

International Best Practices for Pre-Processing and Co-Processing Municipal Solid Waste and Sewage Sludge in the Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

current anthropogenic CO 2 emissions worldwide. Given increasing cement demand and production, the industry’s absolute energy

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Prediction of early heat of hydration of plain and blended cements using neuro-fuzzy modelling techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, a new approach based on an adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) was presented for the prediction of early heat of hydration of plain and blended cements. Two different type of model is trained and tested using these data. The ... Keywords: ANFIS, Cement, Fuzzy logic, Hydration heat, Neural networks

Abdulhamit Subasi; Ahmet Serdar Yilmaz; Hanifi Binici

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

A Review of Emerging Energy-efficiency and CO2 Emission-reduction Technologies for Cement and Concrete Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Globally, the cement industry accounts for approximately 5 percent of current man-made carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. Development of new energy-efficiency and CO2 emission-reduction technologies and their deployment in the market will be key for the cement industry's mid- and long-term climate change mitigation strategies. This paper is an initial effort to compile the available information on process description, energy savings, environmental and other benefits, costs, commercialization status, and references for emerging technologies to reduce the cement industry's energy use and CO2 emissions. This paper consolidates available information on eighteen emerging technologies for the cement industry, with the goal of providing engineers, researchers, investors, cement companies, policy makers, and other interested parties with easy access to a well-structured database of information on these technologies.

Hasanbeigi, A.; Price, L.; Lin, E.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

The investigation of bioactivity and mechanical properties of glass ionomer cements prepared from Al2O3-SiO2 glass and poly(?-glutamic acid)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Theglass ionomer cement as one of the dental cements has been subjected to be widespread application in restoring tooth structure. Most of glass ionomer cements employ the poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) as the liquid phase, but the presence of PAA inhibits ...

Jinkun Liu, Yoshimitsu Kuwahara, Yuki Shirosaki, Toshiki Miyazaki

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

ASSESSMENT OF TECHNETIUM LEACHABILITY IN CEMENT STABILIZED BASIN 43 GROUNDWATER BRINE  

SciTech Connect

This report is an initial report on the laboratory effort executed under RPP-PLAN-33338, Test Plan for the Assessment of Technetium Leachability in Cement-Stabilized Basin 43 Groundwater Brine. This report delineates preliminary data obtained under subcontract 21065, release 30, from the RJ Lee Group, Inc., Center for Laboratory Sciences. The report is predicated on CLS RPT-816, Draft Report: Assessment of Technetium Leachability in Cement Stabilized Basin 43 Groundwater Brine. This document will be revised on receipt of the final RJ Lee Group, Inc., Center for Laboratory Sciences report, which will contain data subjected to quality control and quality assurance criteria.

COOKE GA; DUNCAN JB; LOCKREM LL

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

255

A Signal-Inducing Bone Cement for Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Guided Spinal Surgery Based on Hydroxyapatite and Polymethylmethacrylate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The aim of this study was to develop a signal-inducing bone cement for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided cementoplasty of the spine. This MRI cement would allow precise and controlled injection of cement into pathologic lesions of the bone. We mixed conventional polymethylmethacrylate bone cement (PMMA; 5 ml methylmethacrylate and 12 g polymethylmethacrylate) with hydroxyapatite (HA) bone substitute (2-4 ml) and a gadolinium-based contrast agent (CA; 0-60 {mu}l). The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of different CA doses was measured in an open 1.0-Tesla scanner for fast T1W Turbo-Spin-Echo (TSE) and T1W TSE pulse sequences to determine the highest signal. We simulated MRI-guided cementoplasty in cadaveric spines. Compressive strength of the cements was tested. The highest CNR was (1) 87.3 (SD 2.9) in fast T1W TSE for cements with 4 {mu}l CA/ml HA (4 ml) and (2) 60.8 (SD 2.4) in T1W TSE for cements with 1 {mu}l CA/ml HA (4 ml). MRI-guided cementoplasty in cadaveric spine was feasible. Compressive strength decreased with increasing amounts of HA from 46.7 MPa (2 ml HA) to 28.0 MPa (4 ml HA). An MRI-compatible cement based on PMMA, HA, and CA is feasible and clearly visible on MRI images. MRI-guided spinal cementoplasty using this cement would permit direct visualization of the cement, the pathologic process, and the anatomical surroundings.

Wichlas, Florian, E-mail: florian.wichlas@charite.de; Seebauer, Christian J.; Schilling, Rene [University Charite, Center for Musculoskeletal Surgery (Germany); Rump, Jens [University Charite, Department of Radiology (Germany); Chopra, Sascha S. [University Charite, Center for Musculoskeletal Surgery (Germany); Walter, Thula; Teichgraeber, Ulf K. M. [University Charite, Department of Radiology (Germany); Bail, Hermann J. [University Charite, Center for Musculoskeletal Surgery (Germany)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

256

Power Operations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power Operations Outage Coordination Standards of Conduct Transmission Planning You are here: SN Home page > Power Operations Power Operations Western's Sierra Nevada Region...

257

Riverside, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

3487°, -117.3961564° 3487°, -117.3961564° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.9533487,"lon":-117.3961564,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

258

Riverside, Maryland: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

734406°, -76.8852522° 734406°, -76.8852522° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.1734406,"lon":-76.8852522,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

259

Riverside, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

316°, -87.8228357° 316°, -87.8228357° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.8350316,"lon":-87.8228357,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

260

Riverside, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

79781°, -84.1241047° 79781°, -84.1241047° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.779781,"lon":-84.1241047,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "riverside cement power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Hilton New Orleans Riverside Floor Plan - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ONT ENTRANCE. THIRD LEVEL. Ascot. Belle Chasse. The Court Assembly. Durham. Elmwood. Jasperwood. Magnolia. Melrose. Napoleon Ballroom. Newberry.

262

Riverside Public Utilities - Energy Efficiency Construction Incentive...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Design & Remodeling Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate General: 150,000 LEED: 50% of total project costs, up to 180,000 Program Info State California Program Type...

263

High energy physics at UC Riverside  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses progress made for the following two tasks: experimental high energy physics, Task A, and theoretical high energy physics, Task B. Task A1 covers hadron collider physics. Information for Task A1 includes: personnel/talks/publications; D0: proton-antiproton interactions at 2 TeV; SDC: proton-proton interactions at 40 TeV; computing facilities; equipment needs; and budget notes. The physics program of Task A2 has been the systematic study of leptons and hadrons. Information covered for Task A2 includes: personnel/talks/publications; OPAL at LEP; OPAL at LEP200; CMS at LHC; the RD5 experiment; LSND at LAMPF; and budget notes. The research activities of the Theory Group are briefly discussed and a list of completed or published papers for this period is given.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Riverside Technologies Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technologies Inc Technologies Inc Address 10650 Treena Street Place San Diego, California Zip 92131 Product Uses scrap tires as the raw material in the production of SynBlack oil, gas, and steel Website http://www.rtiworldwide.com/ Coordinates 32.912063°, -117.114827° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.912063,"lon":-117.114827,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

265

Increasing Energy Efficiency and Reducing Emissions from China's Cement Kilns: Audit Report of Two Cement Plants in Shandong Province, China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dryer that uses heat from boiler exhaust gases to reduce thedrying coal in heat recovery boilers to raise steam, and forup to 6 MW power. The boilers use the heat of exhaust gases

Price, Lynn

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Increasing Energy Efficiency and Reducing Emissions from China's Cement Kilns: Audit Report of Two Cement Plants in Shandong Province, China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that could lead to reduction in coal use and reduction inreduce excess air use in coal burners, 2. reduce air leakageof power production) coal consumption from 119 kg/ton kg of

Price, Lynn

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

American Electric Power Co., Inc. | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Co., Inc. Co., Inc. (Redirected from AEP) Jump to: navigation, search Name American Electric Power (AEP) Address 1 Riverside Plaza Place Columbus, OH Zip 43215-2372 Year founded 1906 Number of employees 10,000+"+" is not declared as a valid unit of measurement for this property. Phone number (614) 716-1000 Website www.aep.com Coordinates 39.964959°, -83.005786° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.964959,"lon":-83.005786,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

268

Effects of oil charge on illite dates and stopping quartz cement: calibration of basin models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract Effects of oil charge on illite dates and stopping quartz cement: calibration of basin Oil can fill pores in reservoir sandstones at any burial depth by long or short distance migration. There has been a debate since 1920 concerning the effect of oil charge. We have made detailed local

Haszeldine, Stuart

269

Modeling of the Aging Viscoelastic Properties of Cement Paste Using Computational Methods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modeling of the time-dependent behavior of cement paste has always been a difficulty. In the past, viscoelastic behavior of cementitious materials has been primarily attributed to the viscoelastic properties of C-S-H components. Recent experimental results show that C-S-H may not exhibit as much creep and relaxation as previously thought. This requires new consideration of different mechanisms leading to the viscoelastic behavior of cement paste. Thus the objective of this thesis is to build a computational model using finite element method to predict the viscoelastic behavior of cement paste, and using this model, virtual tests can be carried out to improve understanding of the mechanisms of viscoelastic behavior. The primary finding from this thesis is that the apparent viscoelastic behavior due to dissolution of load bearing phases is substantial. The dissolution process occurring during the hydration reaction can change the stress distribution inside cementitious materials, resulting in an apparent viscoelastic behavior of the whole cementitious materials. This finding requires new consideration of mechanisms of time-dependent behavior of cementitious materials regarding the dissolution process of cement paste.

Li, Xiaodan

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Encapsulation of mixed radioactive and hazardous waste contaminated incinerator ash in modified sulfur cement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Some of the process waste streams incinerated at various Department of Energy (DOE) facilities contain traces of both low-level radioactive (LLW) and hazardous constituents, thus yielding ash residues that are classified as mixed waste. Work is currently being performed at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) to develop new and innovative materials for encapsulation of DOE mixed wastes including incinerator ash. One such material under investigation is modified sulfur cement, a thermoplastic developed by the US Bureau of Mines. Monolithic waste forms containing as much as 55 wt % incinerator fly ash from Idaho national Engineering Laboratory (INEL) have been formulated with modified sulfur cement, whereas maximum waste loading for this waste in hydraulic cement is 16 wt %. Compressive strength of these waste forms exceeded 27.6 MPa. Wet chemical and solid phase waste characterization analyses performed on this fly ash revealed high concentrations of soluble metal salts including Pb and Cd, identified by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as toxic metals. Leach testing of the ash according to the EPA Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) resulted in concentrations of Pb and Cd above allowable limits. Encapsulation of INEL fly ash in modified sulfur cement with a small quantity of sodium sulfide added to enhance retention of soluble metal salts reduced TCLP leachate concentrations of Pb and Cd well below EPA concentration criteria for delisting as a toxic hazardous waste. 12 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

Kalb, P.D.; Heiser, J.H. III; Colombo, P.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Development of a performance-based industrial energy efficiency indicator for cement manufacturing plants.  

SciTech Connect

Organizations that implement strategic energy management programs have the potential to achieve sustained energy savings if the programs are carried out properly. A key opportunity for achieving energy savings that plant managers can take is to determine an appropriate level of energy performance by comparing the plant performance with that of similar plants in the same industry. Manufacturing plants can set energy efficiency targets by using performance-based indicators. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), through its ENERGY STAR{reg_sign} program, has been developing plant energy performance indicators (EPIs) to encourage a variety of U.S. industries to use energy more efficiently. This report describes work with the cement manufacturing industry to provide a plant-level indicator of energy efficiency for assembly plants that produce a variety of products, including Portland cement and other specialty cement products, in the United States. Consideration is given to the role that performance-based indicators play in motivating change; the steps needed to develop indicators, including interacting with an industry to secure adequate data for an indicator; and the actual application and use of an indicator when complete. How indicators are employed in the EPA's efforts to encourage industries to voluntarily improve their use of energy is discussed as well. The report describes the data and statistical methods used to construct the EPI for cement manufacturing plants. Individual equations are presented, as are the instructions for using them in an associated Excel spreadsheet.

Boyd, G.; Decision and Information Sciences

2006-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

272

CSER 96-027: storage of cemented plutonium residue containers in 55 gallon drums  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A nuclear criticality safety analysis has been performed for the storage of residual plutonium cementation containers, produced at the Plutonium Finishing Plant, in 55 gallon drums. This CSER increases the limit of total plutonium stored in each 55 gallon drum from 100 to 200 grams.

Watson, W.T.

1997-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

273

Recovery Act Production of Algal BioCrude Oil from Cement Plant Carbon Dioxide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The consortium, led by Sunrise Ridge Algae Inc, completed financial, legal, siting, engineering and environmental permitting preparations for a proposed demonstration project that would capture stack gas from an operating cement plant and convert the carbon dioxide to beneficial use as a liquid crude petroleum substitute and a coal substitute, using algae grown in a closed system, then harvested and converted using catalyzed pyrolysis.

Robert Weber; Norman Whitton

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

274

Recent advances in the development of lightweight CO{sub 2}-resistant well cements  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Regardless of the properties of the cured material, the practical use of advanced cementitious materials for geothermal well completions depends primarily upon the ability to predictably extend the thickening times for the precursor slurries at elevated temperatures to times sufficient to permit conventional placement. Ongoing work at Brookhaven National Laboratory being conducted with assistance from the geothermal industry, indicates that lightweight calcium phosphate cement slurries being developed as CO{sub 2{minus}} resistant well completion materials, can be conventional pumped at temperatures > 100{degrees}C without the addition of retarding admixtures. These slurries consist of mullite-shelled hollow microspheres, calcium aluminate cements and polybasic sodium phosphate. When cured in hydrothermal environments, the slurries yield high strength, low permeability cements which bond well to steel casing. Two compositional factors that affect the thickening times were identified. One is the calcium aluminate cement species that serve as the base reagent in the slurry formulation, and the other is the rate of hydrothermal reaction between the microspheres and the polybasic sodium phosphate solution.

Kukacka, L.E.; Sugama, T.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

275

Cementing of geothermal wells. Progress report No. 7, October--December 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress in work to implement the program plan for the development of improved high temperature cementing materials for geothermal wells is reported. Work on the first element of the program management plan (problem definition) was completed and a report issued. The materials development and property verification phases of the plan are in progress. Plans for the down-hole testing phase of the program are being formulated. The most promising high temperature polymer cement (PC) system identified to date consists of a cross-linked mixture of styrene, acrylonitrile, and acrylamide in conjunction with a sand-cement filler. A study is in progress to optimize the concentrations of the mix components with respect to properties. Work to determine the pumpability of the system is in progress. Samples of PC have been removed after exposure at The Geysers to dry steam at 460/sup 0/F (238/sup 0/C) for 2 yrs. Visual inspection of the specimens indicated little apparent deterioration. The appendix includes five reports from contributing researchers on the development of high temperature cementing materials for geothermal wells.

Steinberg, M.; Kukacka, L.E.

1977-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Development of a performance-based industrial energy efficiency indicator for cement manufacturing plants.  

SciTech Connect

Organizations that implement strategic energy management programs have the potential to achieve sustained energy savings if the programs are carried out properly. A key opportunity for achieving energy savings that plant managers can take is to determine an appropriate level of energy performance by comparing the plant performance with that of similar plants in the same industry. Manufacturing plants can set energy efficiency targets by using performance-based indicators. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), through its ENERGY STAR{reg_sign} program, has been developing plant energy performance indicators (EPIs) to encourage a variety of U.S. industries to use energy more efficiently. This report describes work with the cement manufacturing industry to provide a plant-level indicator of energy efficiency for assembly plants that produce a variety of products, including Portland cement and other specialty cement products, in the United States. Consideration is given to the role that performance-based indicators play in motivating change; the steps needed to develop indicators, including interacting with an industry to secure adequate data for an indicator; and the actual application and use of an indicator when complete. How indicators are employed in the EPA's efforts to encourage industries to voluntarily improve their use of energy is discussed as well. The report describes the data and statistical methods used to construct the EPI for cement manufacturing plants. Individual equations are presented, as are the instructions for using them in an associated Excel spreadsheet.

Boyd, G.; Decision and Information Sciences

2006-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

277

Capillary porosity depercolation in cement-based materials: Measurement techniques and factors which influence their interpretation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the service-life of civil engineering infrastructure has led in many cases to the increased use of low w of cracking at early-ages [1,2]. To minimize the risk of early-age cracking several approaches have been­10] and (4) the utilization of expansive cements or additives that can generate an expansion to mitigate

Bentz, Dale P.

278

LITERATURE SURVEY ON CEMENTS FOR REMEDIATION OF DEFORMED CASING IN GEOTHERMAL WELLS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Brookhaven National Laboratory was requested to conduct a literature survey for the best available cement to use in the proposed casing patch as part of the Geothermal Drilling Organization (GDO) project on remediation of deformed casings. A total of 50 wells has been identified with deformed production casing in Unocal's portion of The Geysers geothermal field. Reduced internal diameter and casing doglegs result in lost production and the possible need for abandonment. The cause of the deformations is believed to be formation movement along fault planes and/or along weaker layers or interfaces between high impedance contrast media. Apparently, it is unclear whether shear or axial compression is the dominant failure mechanism. A procedure to address the casing deformation and avoid abandonment of these wells has been developed as described in the Geysers Deformed Casing Remediation Proposal. The proposed remediation procedure involves isolation of the zone of interest with an inflatable packer, milling the deformed casing and cementing a 7 inch diameter liner to extend approximately 100 ft above and 100 ft below the milled zone. During the milling operation it is possible that the original cement and surrounding formation may slough away. In order to specify a suitable cement formulation for the casing patch it is first necessary to identify and understand the deformation mechanism/s operating in The Geysers field. Subsequently, the required cement mechanical properties to withstand further deformation of the repaired system must be defined. From this information it can be determined whether available cement formulations meet these requirements. In addition to The Geysers, other geothermal fields are at possible risk of casing deformation due to subsidence, seismic activity, lateral and vertical formation movement or other processes. Therefore, the proposed remediation procedure may have applications in other fields. The literature survey focused on published properties for cements used in geothermal and oil well applications and the experiences of well casing deformation occurring in oil and gas fields. Dr. Mike Bruno of Terralog Technologies kindly supplied a reference list from the DEA (Drilling Engineering Association) 99 Project on Analysis of Well Casing Damage Induced by Reservoir Compaction and Overburden Shear.

ALLAN,M.L.; PHILIPPACOPOULOS,A.J.

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Emerging Energy-efficiency and CO{sub 2} Emission-reduction Technologies for Cement and Concrete Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Globally, the cement industry accounts for approximately 5 percent of current anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions. World cement demand and production are increasing significantly, leading to an increase in this industry's absolute energy use and CO{sub 2} emissions. Development of new energy-efficiency and CO{sub 2} emission-reduction technologies and their deployment in the market will be key for the cement industry's mid- and long-term climate change mitigation strategies. This report is an initial effort to compile available information on process description, energy savings, environmental and other benefits, costs, commercialization status, and references for emerging technologies to reduce the cement industry's energy use and CO{sub 2} emissions. Although studies from around the world identify a variety of sector-specific and cross-cutting energy-efficiency technologies for the cement industry that have already been commercialized, information is scarce and/or scattered regarding emerging or advanced energy-efficiency and low-carbon technologies that are not yet commercialized. This report consolidates available information on nineteen emerging technologies for the cement industry, with the goal of providing engineers, researchers, investors, cement companies, policy makers, and other interested parties with easy access to a well-structured database of information on these technologies.

Hasanbeigi, Ali; Price, Lynn; Lin, Elina

2012-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

280

Application of High Powered Lasers to Perforated Completions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Congress on Applications of Laser & Electro-Optics Congress on Applications of Laser & Electro-Optics October 13 - 16, 2003, Jacksonville, Florida Application of High Powered Lasers to Perforated Completions Zhiyue Xu, Claude B. Reed and Keng H. Leong Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 R. A. Parker Parker Geoscience Consulting, LLC, 6346 Secrest Street, Arvada, CO 80403 R. M. Graves, Petroleum Engineering Department, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO 80401 ABSTRACT As part of the process of drilling an oil or gas well, a steel production casing is often inserted to the bottom of the well and sealed with cement against the productive formation. Openings must be made through the steel casing wall and cement and into the rock formation to allow formation fluid to enter the well. Conventionally, a perforator is

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "riverside cement power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Bottom-up Representation of Industrial Energy Efficiency Technologies in Integrated Assessment Models for the Cement Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cement Industry, An Energy Perspective", U.S. Department ofCost of Conserved Final Energy (US$/GJ) Final CCE includingwithout including non-energy benefits, U.S. steel industry (

Sathaye, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission Reduction Potentials in the Cement Industry in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy and Emission Paths to 2030. Berkeley, CA: Lawrenceand Opportunities through 2030. Washington, DC: CCAP. Wang,cement industry for 2010-2030 is estimated to be 251 TWh,

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for Cement Making. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

s Teaming Up to Save Energy guide (U.S. EPA 2006), which isis used throughout this Energy Guide for consistency. For afor Cement Making An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant

Worrell, Ernst

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Bottom-up Representation of Industrial Energy Efficiency Technologies in Integrated Assessment Models for the Cement Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

used throughout this Energy Guide for consistency. systemsfor Cement Making, An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and PlantGuide to LCC Analysis for Pumping Systems. Hydraulic Institute/Europump/ United States Department of Energy.

Sathaye, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for Cement Making. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1997 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Industry.American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy,Park, NC. Birch, E. , 1990. “Energy Savings in Cement Kiln

Worrell, Ernst

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Assessing the effect of cement-steel interface on well casing corrosion in aqueous CO2 environments  

SciTech Connect

CO{sub 2} leakage is a critical safety concern for geologic storage. In wellbore environments, important leakage paths include the rock-cement and cement-casing interfaces. If the cement-casing interface is filled with escaping CO{sub 2}, the well casing directly contacts the CO{sub 2}. This can cause severe corrosion in the presence of water. This paper studies the effect of steel-cement interface gaps, ranging from 1 mm to 0 um, on casing corrosion. Corrosion kinetics were measured employing electrochemical techniques including linear polarization resistance, open circuit potential and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The experimental results showed that the corrosion of steel is not significant where the gap between steel and cement is small ({le} 100 {micro}m). Corrosion rates are controlled by the diffusion of corrosive species (H{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and H{sup +}) along the interface. In contrast, steel corrosion is severe in a broad gap where the corrosion process is limited only by the reaction kinetics of steel and corrosive species. The threshold leading to severe corrosion in terms of the cement-steel interface size (100 {micro}m) was determined. Our research clarifies a corrosion scenario at the cement-steel interface. Casing steel corrosion is initiated when attacked by corrosive species at the cement-steel interface. For relatively tight interfaces, this results in a slow thinning of the casing and expansion of the interface width. If the gap increases beyond the critical threshold size, the corrosion rate increases significantly, and a potentially damaging cycle of corrosion and interface expansion is developed.

Han, Jiabin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Carey, James W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Zhang, Jinsuo [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Cement: Resources and Links  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Energy Management Expertise Energy Management Expertise Pumping System Assessment Tool Qualification PSAT helps users assess energy savings opportunities in pumping systems, relying on field measurements of flow rate, head, and either motor power or current to perform the assessment. AIRMaster+ Qualification AirMaster+ provides comprehensive information on assessing compressed AirMaster+ air systems, including modeling, existing and future system upgrades, and savings and effectiveness of energy efficiency measures. Processing Heating Assessment and Survey Tool Qualification (PHAST) PHAST assists users to survey process heating equipment and identify the most energy-intensive equipment and to perform energy (heat) balances on furnaces to identify and reduce non-productive energy use.

288

A literature review of mixed waste components: Sensitivities and effects upon solidification/stabilization in cement-based matrices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US DOE Oak Ridge Field Office has signed a Federal Facility Compliance Agreement (FFCA) regarding Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) mixed wastes subject to the land disposal restriction (LDR) provisions of the Resource conservation and Recovery Act. The LDR FFCA establishes an aggressive schedule for conducting treatability studies and developing treatment methods for those ORR mixed (radioactive and hazardous) wastes listed in Appendix B to the Agreement. A development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation program has been initiated to provide those efforts necessary to identify treatment methods for all of the wastes that meet Appendix B criteria. The program has assembled project teams to address treatment development needs in a variety of areas, including that of final waste forms (i.e., stabilization/solidification processes). A literature research has been performed, with the objective of determining waste characterization needs to support cement-based waste-form development. The goal was to determine which waste species are problematic in terms of consistent production of an acceptable cement-based waste form and at what concentrations these species become intolerable. The report discusses the following: hydration mechanisms of Portland cement; mechanisms of retardation and acceleration of cement set-factors affecting the durability of waste forms; regulatory limits as they apply to mixed wastes; review of inorganic species that interfere with the development of cement-based waste forms; review of radioactive species that can be immobilized in cement-based waste forms; and review of organic species that may interfere with various waste-form properties.

Mattus, C.H.; Gilliam, T.M.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Plant-Wide Energy Efficiency Assessment at the Arizona Portland Cement Plant in Rillito, Arizona  

SciTech Connect

A Department of Energy Plant-wide Assessment was undertaken by Arizona Portland Cement (APC) beginning in May 2005. The assessment was performed at APC’s cement production facility in Rillito, Arizona. The assessment included a compressed air evaluation along with a detailed process audit of plant operations and equipment. The purpose of this Energy Survey was to identify a series of energy cost savings opportunities at the Plant, and provide preliminary cost and savings estimates for the work. The assessment was successful in identifying projects that could provide annual savings of over $2.7 million at an estimated capital cost of $4.3 million. If implemented, these projects could amount to a savings of over 4.9 million kWh/yr and 384,420 MMBtu/year.

Stephen J. Coppinger, P.E.; Bruce Colburn, Ph.D., P.E., CEM

2007-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

290

The effect of gyrolite additive on the hydration properties of Portland cement  

SciTech Connect

The influence of gyrolite additive on the hydration properties of ordinary Portland cement was examined. It was found that the additive of synthetic gyrolite accelerates the early stage of hydration of OPC. This compound binds alkaline ions and serves as a nucleation site for the formation of hydration products (stage I). Later on, the crystal lattice of gyrolite becomes unstable and turns into C-S-H, with higher basicity (C/S {approx} 0.8). This recrystallization process is associated with the consumption of energy (the heat of reaction) and with a decrease in the rate of heat evolution of the second exothermic reaction (stage II). The experimental data and theoretical hypothesis were also confirmed by thermodynamic and the apparent kinetic parameters of the reaction rate of C{sub 3}S hydration calculations. The changes occur in the early stage of hydration of OPC samples and do not have a significant effect on the properties of cement stone.

Eisinas, A., E-mail: anatolijus.eisinas@ktu.lt; Baltakys, K.; Siauciunas, R.

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

291

Cavitation erosion of cobalt based STELLITE alloys, cemented carbides and surface treated low alloy steels  

SciTech Connect

Results are given for erosion-resistance tests involving several STELLITE alloys, cemented carbides and surface-treated alloy steels. It is shown that the cobalt-rich, solid-solution phase of the STELLITE alloys is the basis of their erosion resistance, while the erosion of cemented carbides is predominantly controlled by the binder phase. It is also found that nickel-based tungsten carbides are more erosion-resistant than those based on cobalt. It is demonstrated for the case of the low-alloy steels that surface treatment can improve their erosion rates, and that application of a proprietary nitrocarburizing method to the same steels results in a similar performance improvement only after the initial loss of the compound layer.

Heathcock, C.J. (Cape Town, Univ., Rondebosch, Republic of South Africa); Ball, A.

1981-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

292

Advanced Organic Vapor Cycles for Improving Thermal Conversion Efficiency in Renewable Energy Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

concepts of waste heat recovery in cement plants," in Energyfor Cement Kiln Waste Heat Recovery Power Plants. ” Cement

Ho, Tony

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

DEVELOPMENT & TESTING OF A CEMENT BASED SOLID WASTE FORM USING SYNTHETIC UP-1 GROUNDWATER  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Site is investigating the conversion of several liquid waste streams from evaporator operations into solid cement-based waste forms. The cement/waste mixture will be poured into plastic-lined mold boxes. After solidification the bags will be removed from the molds and sealed for land disposal at the Hanford Site. The RJ Lee Group, Inc. Center for Laboratory Sciences (CLS) at Columbia Basin College (CBC) was requested to develop and test a cementitious solids (CS) formulation to solidify evaporated groundwater brine, identified as UP-1, from Basin 43. Laboratory testing of cement/simulant mixtures is required to demonstrate the viability of cement formulations that reduce the overall cost, minimize bleed water and expansion, and provide suitable strength and cure temperature. Technical support provided mixing, testing, and reporting of values for a defined composite solid waste form. In this task, formulations utilizing Basin 43 simulant at varying wt% solids were explored. The initial mixing consisted of making small ({approx} 300 g) batches and casting into 500-mL Nalgene{reg_sign} jars. The mixes were cured under adiabatic conditions and checked for bleed water and consistency at recorded time intervals over a 1-week period. After the results from the preliminary mixing, four formulations were selected for further study. The testing documentation included workability, bleed water analysis (volume and pH) after 24 hours, expansivity/shrinkage, compressive strength, and selected Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) leach analytes of the resulting solid waste form.

COOKE, G.A.; LOCKREM, L.L.

2006-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

294

Waste Heat Recovery Power Generation with WOWGen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WOW operates in the energy efficiency field- one of the fastest growing energy sectors in the world today. The two key products - WOWGen® and WOWClean® provide more energy at cheaper cost and lower emissions. •WOWGen® - Power Generation from Industrial Waste Heat •WOWClean® - Multi Pollutant emission control system. Current power generation technology uses only 35% of the energy in a fossil fuel and converts it to useful output. The remaining 65% is discharged into the environment as waste heat at temperatures ranging from 300°F to 1,200°F. This waste heat can be captured using the WOWGen® technology and turned into electricity. This efficiency is up to twice the rate of competing technologies. Compelling economics and current environmental policy are stimulating industry interest. WOWGen® power plants can generate between 1 - 25 MW of electricity. Project payback is between two to five years with IRR of 15% 30%. Nearly anywhere industrial waste heat is present, the WOW products can be applied. Beneficial applications of heat recovery power generation can be found in Industry (e.g. steel, glass, cement, lime, pulp and paper, refining and petrochemicals), Power Generation (CHP, biomass, biofuel, traditional fuels, gasifiers, diesel engines) and Natural Gas (pipeline compression stations, processing plants). Sources such as stack flue gases, steam, diesel exhaust, hot oil or combinations of sources can be used to generate power. WOWGen® can also be used with stand alone power plants burning fossil fuels or using renewable energy sources such as solar and biomass.

Romero, M.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Extraction of hydrogenous material from cemented wasteforms by supercritical fluid carbonation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We are conducting experiments on an innovative transformation concept, using a traditional immobilization technique, that may significantly reduce the volume of hazardous and/or radioactive waste requiring transport and long-term storage. The standard practice at LANL for the stabilization of radioactive salts and residues is to mix them with portland cement, which may include additives to enhance immobilization. Many of these wasteforms do not qualify for transportation or underground disposition, however, because they do not meet Department of Energy regulations for free liquids, decay heat, and/or head-space gases. The present treatment method alters the bulk properties of a cemented wasteform by greatly accelerating the natural cement-aging reactions, producing a chemically stable form having reduced levels of free liquids and organic compounds, as well as reduced porosity, permeability and pH. These structural and chemical changes should allow for greater actinide loading, as well as reduced mobility of the anions, cations, and radionuclides in aboveground and underground repositories.

Rubin, J.B.; Carey, J.W.; Taylor, C.M.V.

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Asbestos--cement pipeline experience at the Raft River Geothermal Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The first buried asbestos-cement (Transite) pipeline used in high temperature (approximately 300/sup 0/F) service for transport of geothermal fluids was installed in the fall of 1975, and has seen 1/sup 1///sub 2/ years of service. The line is 4000 ft long, between the deep geothermal wells No. 1 and No. 2, in the Raft River Valley of Idaho. The experience in using this pipeline has been satisfactory, and methods have been developed for minimizing the thermal expansion/thermal shock breakage problems. Recommendations on improved design and construction practices for future pipelines are given. The substantially reduced cost (factor of 2) of an asbestos-cement pipeline compared to the conventional steel pipeline, plus the esthetically desirable effect of a buried pipeline dictate adoption of this type as standard practice for moderate temperature geothermal developments. The Raft River Geothermal Project intends to connect all future wells with pipelines of asbestos-cement, insulated with 1 to 2-inches of urethane, and buried between 2 and 3 ft. Total cost will be approximately $110,000/mile for 10-inch diameter pipe, $125,000/mile for 12-inch diameter.

Miller, L.G.; Kunze, J.F.; Sanders, R.D.

1977-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Effect of Sodium Carboxymethyl Celluloses on Water-catalyzed Self-degradation of 200-degree C-heated Alkali-Activated Cement  

SciTech Connect

We investigated the usefulness of sodium carboxymethyl celluloses (CMC) in promoting self-degradation of 200°C-heated sodium silicate-activated slag/Class C fly ash cementitious material after contact with water. CMC emitted two major volatile compounds, CO2 and acetic acid, creating a porous structure in cement. CMC also reacted with NaOH from sodium silicate to form three water-insensitive solid reaction products, disodium glycolate salt, sodium glucosidic salt, and sodium bicarbonate. Other water-sensitive solid reaction products, such as sodium polysilicate and sodium carbonate, were derived from hydrolysates of sodium silicate. Dissolution of these products upon contact with water generated heat that promoted cement’s self-degradation. Thus, CMC of high molecular weight rendered two important features to the water-catalyzed self-degradation of heated cement: One was the high heat energy generated in exothermic reactions in cement; the other was the introduction of extensive porosity into cement.

Sugama T.; Pyatina, T.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

International Best Practices for Pre-Processing and Co-Processing Municipal Solid Waste and Sewage Sludge in the Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to reduce the primary (fossil) fuel consumption. ” Inresults with traditional fossil fuels. As cement is blendedof these elements in fossil fuels. The subsections below

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

International Best Practices for Pre-Processing and Co-Processing Municipal Solid Waste and Sewage Sludge in the Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fuel use, significant NOx reduction, lower emissions, lessof cement produced NOx Reduction in all pollutants relatedNOx control, specifically Selective Non-Catalytic Reduction (

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Power Electronics  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Power electronics (PE) play a critical role in transforming the current electric grid into the next-generation grid.  PE enable utilities to deliver power to their customers effectively while...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "riverside cement power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Wind Power  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power As the accompanying map of New Mexico shows, the best wind power generation potential near WIPP is along the Delaware Mountain ridge line of the southern Guadalupe Mountains,...

302

Waste-form development for conversion to portland cement at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Technical Area 55 (TA-55)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The process used at TA-55 to cement transuranic (TRU) waste has experienced several problems with the gypsum-based cement currently being used. Specifically, the waste form could not reliably pass the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) prohibition for free liquid and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) standard for chromium. This report describes the project to develop a portland cement-based waste form that ensures compliance to these standards, as well as other performance standards consisting of homogeneous mixing, moderate hydration temperature, timely initial set, and structural durability. Testing was conducted using the two most common waste streams requiring cementation as of February 1994, lean residue (LR)- and oxalate filtrate (OX)-based evaporator bottoms (EV). A formulation with a pH of 10.3 to 12.1 and a minimum cement-to-liquid (C/L) ratio of 0.80 kg/l for OX-based EV and 0.94 kg/L for LR-based EV was found to pass the performance standards chosen for this project. The implementation of the portland process should result in a yearly cost savings for raw materials of approximately $27,000 over the gypsum process.

Veazey, G.W.; Schake, A.R.; Shalek, P.D.; Romero, D.A.; Smith, C.A.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Percutaneous Vertebroplasty and Bone Cement Leakage: Clinical Experience with a New High-Viscosity Bone Cement and Delivery System for Vertebral Augmentation in Benign and Malignant Compression Fractures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of and venous leakage reduction in percutaneous vertebroplasty (PV) using a new high-viscosity bone cement (PMMA). PV has been used effectively for pain relief in osteoporotic and malignant vertebral fractures. Cement extrusion is a common problem and can lead to complications. Sixty patients (52 female; mean age, 72.2 {+-} 7.2) suffering from osteoporosis (46), malignancy (12), and angiomas (2), divided into two groups (A and B), underwent PV on 190 vertebrae (86 dorsal, 104 lumbar). In Group A, PV with high-viscosity PMMA (Confidence, Disc-O-Tech, Israel) was used. This PMMA was injected by a proprietary delivery system, a hydraulic saline-filled screw injector. In Group B, a standard low-viscosity PMMA was used. Postprocedural CT was carried out to detect PMMA leakages and complications. Fisher's exact test and Wilcoxon rank test were used to assess significant differences (p PV was feasible, achieving good clinical outcome (p < 0.0001) without major complications. In Group A, postprocedural CT showed an asymptomatic leak in the venous structures of 8 of 98 (8.2%) treated vertebrae; a discoidal leak occurred in 6 of 98 (6.1%). In Group B, a venous leak was seen in 38 of 92 (41.3%) and a discoidal leak in 12 of 92 (13.0%). Reduction of venous leak obtained by high-viscosity PMMA was highly significant (p < 0.0001), whereas this result was not significant (p = 0.14) related to the disc. The high-viscosity PMMA system is safe and effective for clinical use, allowing a significant reduction of extravasation rate and, thus, leakage-related complications.

Anselmetti, Giovanni Carlo, E-mail: giovanni.anselmetti@ircc.i [Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment (IRCC), Interventional Radiology Unit (Italy); Zoarski, Gregg [University of Maryland, Radiology and Radiological Science (United States); Manca, Antonio [Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment (IRCC), Radiology Unit (Italy); Masala, Salvatore [University 'Tor Vergata', Radiology Unit and Interventional Radiology Unit (Italy); Eminefendic, Haris; Russo, Filippo; Regge, Daniele [Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment (IRCC), Radiology Unit (Italy)

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

304

Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Demand Response in the California Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

13   Figure 5.  Electrical power used by Lehigh Permanente August  Figure  6.   Electrical  power  used  by  the Nguyen,  Figure 5. Electrical power used by Lehigh

Olsen, Daniel

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Analysis of Energy-Efficiency Opportunities for the Cement Industry in Shandong Province, China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

draft_china_mitigation_power_generation_sector.pdf Banerjee,and Utilisation for Power Generation Project. CDM projectTemperature Waste Heat Power Generation Project. CDM project

Price, Lynn

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Power Supplies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Figure: ...Fig. 5 Typical medium-frequency induction power supply incorporating (a) a parallel inverter and (b) a series inverter...

307

Power supply  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A modular, low weight impedance dropping power supply with battery backup is disclosed that can be connected to a high voltage AC source and provide electrical power at a lower voltage. The design can be scaled over a wide range of input voltages and over a wide range of output voltages and delivered power.

Yakymyshyn, Christopher Paul (Seminole, FL); Hamilton, Pamela Jane (Seminole, FL); Brubaker, Michael Allen (Loveland, CO)

2007-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

308

Process Flow Chart for Immobilizing of Radioactive High Concentration Sodium Hydroxide Product from the Sodium Processing Facility at the BN-350 Nuclear power plant in Aktau, Kazakhstan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the results of a joint research investigations carried out by the group of Kazakhstan, British and American specialists in development of a new material for immobilization of radioactive 35% sodium hydroxide solutions from the sodium coolant processing facility of the BN-350 nuclear power plant. The resulting solid matrix product, termed geo-cement stone, is capable of isolating long lived radionuclides from the environment. The physico-mechanical properties of geo-cement stone have been investigated and the flow chart for its production verified in a full scale experiments. (author)

Burkitbayev, M.; Omarova, K.; Tolebayev, T. [Ai-Farabi Kazakh National University, Chemical Faculty, Republic of Kazakhstan (Kazakhstan); Galkin, A. [KATEP Ltd., Republic of Kazakhstan (Kazakhstan); Bachilova, N. [NIISTROMPROEKT Ltd., Republic of Kazakhstan (Kazakhstan); Blynskiy, A. [Nuclear Technology Safety Centre, Republic of Kazakhstan (Kazakhstan); Maev, V. [MAEK-Kazatomprom Ltd., Republic of Kazakhstan (Kazakhstan); Wells, D. [NUKEM Limited- a member of the Freyssinet Group, Winfrith Technology Centre, Dorchester, Dorset (United Kingdom); Herrick, A. [NUKEM Limited- a member of the Freyssinet Group, Caithness (United Kingdom); Michelbacher, J. [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Effect of MgO Additive on Volumetric Expansion of Self-Degradable Cements  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We identified hard-burned magnesium oxide (MgO) as a suitable expansive additive for improving the plugging performance of self-degradable, temporary sodium silicate-activated slag/Class C fly ash (SSASC) blend cement sealers into rock fractures in Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGSs). MgO extended the volumetric expansion of sealers during their exposure to a hydrothermal environment at 200 C under pressures, ranging from 300 to 1500 psi. A great expansion ratc of 19.3% was observed by adding 3.0 wt% MgO under 300 psi pressure, thus promising to plug thoroughly inner fracture. When the pressure was increased from 300 psi to 1500 psi, the expansion rate of cement markedly reduced, corresponding to the formaLion of crack-free specimens and the improvement of compressive strength. However, with 3.0 wt% MgO, the specimens still engendered the generation of numerous visual cracks, although they were prepared under a high pressure of 1500 psi. The effective content of MgO in minimizing and eliminating the generation of cracks was 2.0 wt%, which provided a moderate expansion of {ge} 0.5%. The compressive strength of 2.0 wt% MgO specimens made under a pressure of 300 psi rose {approx} 1.7-fold to 4816 psi with an increasing pressure to 1500 psi. The in-situ growth of brucite crystal formed by the hydrothermal hydration of MgO was responsive for such an expansion of the SSASC cement; meanwhile. two crystalline hydrothermal reaction products, 1.1 nm tobermorite and calcium silicate hydrated, contributed to the development of the sealer's compressive strength. Thus, the increasing pressure seems to suppress and control a growth rate of brucite crystal in response to a lower extension of expansion. Furthermore, all MgO-conlaining SSASC sealers possessed the water-catalyzed self-degradable properties.

Sugama T.; Warren, J.; Butcher, T.

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

310

Radiolytic gas generation from cement-based waste hosts for DOE low-level radioactive wastes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Using cement-based immobilization binders with simulated radioactive waste containing sulfate, nitrate, nitrite, phosphate, and fluoride anions, the gamma- and alpha-radiolytic gas generation factors (G/sub t/, molecules/100 eV) and gas compositions were measured on specimens of cured grouts. These tests studied the effects of; (1) waste composition; (2) the sample surface-to-volume ratio; (3) the waste slurry particle size; and (4) the water content of the waste host formula. The radiolysis test vessels were designed to minimize the ''dead'' volume and to simulate the configuration of waste packages.

Dole, L.R.; Friedman, H.A.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Techno-economic study of CO{sub 2} capture from an existing cement plant using MEA scrubbing  

SciTech Connect

Carbon dioxide is the major greenhouse gas responsible for global warming. Man-made CO{sub 2} emissions contribute approximately 63% of greenhouse gases and the cement industry is responsible for approximately 5% of CO{sub 2} emissions emitting nearly 900 kg of CO{sub 2} per 1000 kg of cement. CO{sub 2} from a cement plant was captured and purified to 98% using the monoethanolamine (MEA) based absorption process. The capture cost was $51 per tonne of CO{sub 2} captured, representing approximately 90% of total cost. Steam was the main operating cost representing 39% of the total capture cost. Switching from coal to natural gas reduces CO{sub 2} emissions by about 18%. At normal load, about 36 MW of waste heat is available for recovery to satisfy the parasitic heat requirements of MEA process; however, it is very difficult to recover.

Hassan, S.M.N.; Douglas, P.L.; Croiset, E. [University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON (Canada). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

2007-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

312

Techno-economic study of CO{sub 2} capture from an existing cement plant using MEA scrubbing  

SciTech Connect

Carbon dioxide is the major greenhouse gas responsible for global warming. Man-made CO{sub 2} emissions contribute approximately 63% of greenhouse gases and the cement industry is responsible for approximately 5% of CO{sub 2} emissions emitting nearly 900 kg of CO{sub 2} per 1000 kg of cement. CO{sub 2} from a cement plant was captured and purified to 98% using the monoethanolamine (MEA) based absorption process. The capture cost was $51 per tonne of CO{sub 2} captured, representing approximately 90% of total cost. Steam was the main operating cost representing 39% of the total capture cost. Switching from coal to natural gas reduces CO{sub 2} emissions by about 18%. At normal load, about 36 MW of waste heat is available for recovery to satisfy the parasitic heat requirements of MEA process; however, it is very difficult to recover. 18 refs.

S.M. Nazmul Hassan; Peter L. Douglas; Eric Croiset [University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON (Canada). Department of Chemical Engineering

2007-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

313

Phyllosilicate orientation demonstrates early timing of compactional stabilization in calcite-cemented concretions in the Barnett Shale (Late Mississippian), Fort Worth  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-cemented concretions in the Barnett Shale (Late Mississippian), Fort Worth Basin, Texas (U.S.A) Ruarri J. Day-Stirrat a in revised form 8 April 2008 Accepted 16 April 2008 Keywords: Barnett Shale Goniometry Concretions Fabric Calcite-cemented zones in the prolific gas-producing Barnett Shale (Ft. Worth Basin, Texas) preserve very

314

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for Cement Making. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The cost of energy as part of the total production costs in the cement industry is significant, warranting attention for energy efficiency to improve the bottom line. Historically, energy intensity has declined, although more recently energy intensity seems to have stabilized with the gains. Coal and coke are currently the primary fuels for the sector, supplanting the dominance of natural gas in the 1970s. Most recently, there is a slight increase in the use of waste fuels, including tires. Between 1970 and 1999, primary physical energy intensity for cement production dropped 1 percent/year from 7.3 MBtu/short ton to 5.3 MBtu/short ton. Carbon dioxide intensity due to fuel consumption and raw material calcination dropped 16 percent, from 609 lb. C/ton of cement (0.31 tC/tonne) to 510 lb. C/ton cement (0.26 tC/tonne). Despite the historic progress, there is ample room for energy efficiency improvement. The relatively high share of wet-process plants (25 percent of clinker production in 1999 in the U.S.) suggests the existence of a considerable potential, when compared to other industrialized countries. We examined over 40 energy efficient technologies and measures and estimated energy savings, carbon dioxide savings, investment costs, and operation and maintenance costs for each of the measures. The report describes the measures and experiences of cement plants around the wold with these practices and technologies. Substantial potential for energy efficiency improvement exists in the cement industry and in individual plants. A portion of this potential will be achieved as part of (natural) modernization and expansion of existing facilities, as well as construction of new plants in particular regions. Still, a relatively large potential for improved energy management practices exists.

Galitsky, Christina; Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Putting Economic Power In Distributed Power t  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Putting Economic Power in Distributed Power. A distributed electricity generation system, often called distributed power, usually consists of ...

316

Axial strength of cement borehole plugs in granite and basalt. Topical report on rock mass sealing  

SciTech Connect

This report describes experimental and theoretical studies of the axial strength of cement plugs installed in boreholes drilled coaxially in granite and in basalt cylinders. Experimental work has consisted of loading the cement plugs to failure while measuring loads and displacements. Such tests have been performed on borehole plugs with a diameter and a length ranging from 2.5 cm to 10 cm. Results from over one hundred experiments show that the strength is high, sufficient for anticipated loads at repository depths, but very variable, complicating the design of very short plugs. Significant residual strength (thirty to fifty percent of the peak strength) is observed. A frictional model of the interface shear strength, tau = c + sigma(tan phi), in combination with the assumption of an exponential shear stress distribution or plug-rock load transfer, provides the simplest realistic model for plug strength characterization. The integrated strength thus calculated compares moderately well with experimental results. An extensive review is given of more sophisticated analysis procedures that should be of value for general plug design applications. Generic analyses and their implications for plug performance are included. Variability of experimental results complicates the assessment of their direct detailed applicability. 115 references, 70 figures, 19 tables.

Stormont, J.C.; Daemen, J.J.K.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Assessment of radioactivity and the associated hazards in local and imported cement types used in Sudan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Activity concentration of sup 2 sup 3 sup 2 Th, sup 2 sup 2 sup 6 Ra and sup 4 sup 0 K in local (Atbra and Rabak) and imported cement types (Jordanian, Indonesian and seabulk) has been measured using a high resolution gamma spectrometry. The average values obtained for sup 2 sup 3 sup 2 Th, sup 2 sup 2 sup 6 Ra and sup 4 sup 0 K activity concentrations in different cements are lower than the corresponding global values reported in UNSCEAR publications. The radium equivalent (Ra sub e sub q) of the samples was calculated and compared with similar data reported in the literature. The comparison has revealed that Ra sub e sub q values obtained fall far below the criterion limit specified for building materials. The potential radiological hazard of the different samples was estimated using different approaches: representative level index, committed effective dose equivalent via inhalation and annual dose limit. The estimated representative level index for all the samples is less than unity (the upper limit) confi...

Ahmed, N A

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Microsoft PowerPoint - Proceedings Cover Sheets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for Regional Characterization Using a Geographic Information System for Regional Characterization Using a Geographic Information System Weifeng Li 1 , Henry Zhang 1 , Howard J. Herzog 1 , Richard Rhudy 2 1 Laboratory for Energy and the Environment, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139; 2 EPRI, 3412 Hillview Ave., Palo Alto, CA 94303 Large Stationary CO 2 Sources Table 2 CO 2 Flow Rate by Plant Types, eastern Texas Plant Type Number of Plants 25-year CO 2 Flow (Mt) Power Plant 98 7,904 Ammonia 1 6 Cement 8 166 Gas Processing 8 82 Refinery 15 771 All sources 130 8,929 Potential Sink List and Capacity: California Oil fields with EOR potential 3.2 Gt Non-EOR sinks Non-EOR oil fields 0.2 Gt Gas fields 1.4 Gt Saline aquifers not available Potential Sink List and Capacity: eastern Texas

319

Microsoft PowerPoint - Proceedings Cover Sheets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gulf Coast Carbon Gulf Coast Carbon Center: Exploring Carbon Public Policy Initiatives for Texas Ian J. Duncan GCCC Vision Statement The GCCC seeks to impact global levels of GHG in the atmosphere by doing science and engineering studies that will support reduction of CO2 and methane emissions and enable the development of an economically viable, multifaceted, CO2 sequestration industry in the Gulf Coast GCCC Industry Partners KEY PUBLIC POLICY STAKEHOLDERS * Texas Legislature * State Agencies * NGO's * General Public * Power Generating Companies * Coal/Lignite Mining industry * Refineries * Chemical Industry * Cement Industry * CO2 EOR Industry * Pipeline operators PUBLIC POLICY PROJECT CLASS UT's LBJ SCHOOL Course Goal: To explore the notion ......."CO2 EOR can drive the development of infrastructure

320

Power Marketing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Certificate Solicitations Benefit Review Energy Services Rates and Repayment WindHydro Integration Feasibility Study Send correspondence to: Power Marketing Manager Western...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "riverside cement power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Methodological and Practical Considerations for Developing Multiproject Baselines for Electric Power and Cement Industry Projects in Central America  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

estimate viable BERs. We found that BERs for baseload plantsoffsetting additional baseload capacity ranged from 0.702basis of their load pro?le: baseload plants that operate at

Murtishaw, Scott; Sathaye, Jayant; Galitsky, Christina; Dorion, Kristel

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Methodological and Practical Considerations for Developing Multiproject Baselines for Electric Power and Cement Industry Projects in Central America  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MW of renewable energy projects (small hydro and bagasse co-hydro projects, and some geothermal projects, were registered under the Renewable Energy

Murtishaw, Scott; Sathaye, Jayant; Galitsky, Christina; Dorion, Kristel

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Solar Power  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Solar Power Solar Power Project Opportunities Abound in the Region The WIPP site is receives abundant solar energy with 6-7 kWh/sq meter power production potential As the accompanying map of New Mexico shows, the WIPP site enjoys abundant year-round sunshine. With an average solar power production potential of 6-7 kWh/sq meter per day, one exciting project being studied for location at WIPP is a 30-50 MW Solar Power Tower: The American Solar Energy Society (ASES) is is a national trade association promoting solar energy as a clean source of electricity, and provides a comprehensive resource for additional information. DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy is also a comprehensive resource for more information on renewable energy.

324

Power system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A power system includes a prime mover, a transmission, and a fluid coupler having a selectively engageable lockup clutch. The fluid coupler may be drivingly connected between the prime mover and the transmission. Additionally, the power system may include a motor/generator drivingly connected to at least one of the prime mover and the transmission. The power-system may also include power-system controls configured to execute a control method. The control method may include selecting one of a plurality of modes of operation of the power system. Additionally, the control method may include controlling the operating state of the lockup clutch dependent upon the mode of operation selected. The control method may also include controlling the operating state of the motor/generator dependent upon the mode of operation selected.

Hickam, Christopher Dale (Glasford, IL)

2008-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

325

Cementing plug  

SciTech Connect

A plug for use in wellbore operations is described comprising: shaft means having a first end and a second end, first hollow cup-shaped conical wiper means mounted on the shaft means with its apex pointed in the direction of the first end of the shaft means; second hollow cup-shaped conical wiper means disposed on the shaft means, the second conical wiper means inverted with respect to the first conical wiper means and the second hollow conical wiper means with its apex pointed away from the apex of the first hollow conical wiper means, and the outer edges of the first and second conical wiper means are in contact.

Schneider, D.E.

1987-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

326

Cementing plug  

SciTech Connect

A wellbore plug is described for use in a cased wellbore wherein breakaway plugs protrude into the casing, the wellbore plug comprising: shaft means, first flexible wiper means mounted on the shaft means, breaking means for breaking the breakaway plugs, the breaking means mounted on the shaft means and spaced apart from the first flexible wiper means, the breaking means having insert means for providing rigidity to enhance the breaking means ability to break the breakaway plugs, second flexible wiper means mounted on the shaft means and spaced apart from the breaking means, the breaking means mounted at an intermediate position between the first flexible wiper means and the second flexible wiper means, the first flexible wiper means flexible enough to bypass one or more of the breakaway plugs without breaking them, and the breaking means rigid enough for breaking one or more of the breakaway plugs bypassed by the first flexible wiper means.

Schneider, D.E.

1988-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

327

CEMEX: Cement Manufacturer Saves 2.1 Million kWh Annually with a Motor Retrofit Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This DOE Industrial Technologies Program spotlight describes how the CEMEX cement manufacturing plant in Davenport, California, saves 2 million kWh and $168,000 in energy costs annually by replacing 13 worn-out motors with new energy-efficient ones.

Not Available

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

BLENDED CALCIUM ALUMINATE-CALCIUM SULFATE CEMENT-BASED GROUT FOR P-REACTOR VESSEL IN-SITU DECOMMISSIONING  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this report is to document laboratory testing of blended calcium aluminate - calcium hemihydrate grouts for P-Reactor vessel in-situ decommissioning. Blended calcium aluminate - calcium hemihydrate cement-based grout was identified as candidate material for filling (physically stabilizing) the 105-P Reactor vessel (RV) because it is less alkaline than portland cement-based grout which has a pH greater than 12.4. In addition, blended calcium aluminate - calcium hemihydrate cement compositions can be formulated such that the primary cementitious phase is a stable crystalline material. A less alkaline material (pH {<=} 10.5) was desired to address a potential materials compatibility issue caused by corrosion of aluminum metal in highly alkaline environments such as that encountered in portland cement grouts [Wiersma, 2009a and b, Wiersma, 2010, and Serrato and Langton, 2010]. Information concerning access points into the P-Reactor vessel and amount of aluminum metal in the vessel is provided elsewhere [Griffin, 2010, Stefanko, 2009 and Wiersma, 2009 and 2010, Bobbitt, 2010, respectively]. Radiolysis calculations are also provided in a separate document [Reyes-Jimenez, 2010].

Langton, C.; Stefanko, D.

2011-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

329

FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT/PLAN...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENTPLAN AMENDMENT Rice Solar Energy Project Riverside County, California Lead Agency Cooperating Agency U.S. Department of Energy Western Area Power...

330

EIS-0439: DOE Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EIS-0439: DOE Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement Rice Solar Energy Project, Riverside County, CA The Western Area Power Administration (Western)...

331

Power Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power Projects Power Projects Contact SN Customers Environmental Review-NEPA Operations & Maintenance Planning & Projects Power Marketing Rates You are here: SN Home page > About SNR Power Projects Central Valley: In California's Central Valley, 18 dams create reservoirs that can store 13 million acre-feet of water. The project's 615 miles of canals irrigate an area 400 miles long and 45 miles wide--almost one third of California. Powerplants at the dams have an installed capacity of 2,099 megawatts and provide enough energy for 650,000 people. Transmission lines total about 865 circuit-miles. Washoe: This project in west-central Nevada and east-central California was designed to improve the regulation of runoff from the Truckee and Carson river systems and to provide supplemental irrigation water and drainage, as well as water for municipal, industrial and fishery use. The project's Stampede Powerplant has a maximum capacity of 4 MW.

332

Observation of dynamic crossover and dynamic heterogeneity in hydration water confined in aged cement paste  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

502101 502101 (6pp) doi:10.1088/0953-8984/20/50/502101 FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION Observation of dynamic crossover and dynamic heterogeneity in hydration water confined in aged cement paste Y Zhang 1 , M Lagi 1,2 , F Ridi 2 , E Fratini 2 , P Baglioni 2 , E Mamontov 3 and S H Chen 1,4 1 Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA 2 Department of Chemistry and CSGI, University of Florence, Sesto Fiorentino, Florence, I-50019, Italy 3 Spallation Neutron Source, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831, USA E-mail: sowhsin@mit.edu Received 24 September 2008, in final form 23 October 2008 Published 12 November 2008 Online at stacks.iop.org/JPhysCM/20/502101 Abstract High resolution quasi-elastic neutron scattering is used to investigate the slow dynamics of hydration water confined in calcium silicate hydrate

333

INFORMAL REPORT PROPERTIES AND PERFORMANCE OF CEMENT- BASED GROUTS FOR GEOTHERMAL HEAT  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

67006 67006 INFORMAL REPORT PROPERTIES AND PERFORMANCE OF CEMENT- BASED GROUTS FOR GEOTHERMAL HEAT PUMP APPLICATIONS FINAL REPORT FY 1999 M.L. Allan and A.J. Philippacopoulos November 1999 Prepared for: Office of Geothermal Technologies United States Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 Materials and Chemical Sciences Division DISCLAIMER This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agenc:y of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, nor any of their contractors, subcontractors, or their employees makers any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility of the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product or process disclosed, or represents that its use

334

Microsoft Word - NETL-TRS-003-2012_Cementing Research Needs_20121207.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Assessment of Research Needs Assessment of Research Needs Related to Improving Primary Cement Isolation of Formations in Deep Offshore Wells 7 December 2012 Office of Fossil Energy NETL-TRS-3-2012 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its

335

Microsoft Word - CSC for Indian Cement Final_2013-8-1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cement Industry William R. Morrow III, Ali Hasanbeigi, Jayant Sathaye, Tengfang Xu Energy Analysis and Environmental Impacts Department, Environmental Energy Technologies Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA USA February 2013 This study is sponsored by Climate Economics Branch, Climate Change Division of U.S. Environmental Protecstion Agency, under Contract No. DE-AC02- 05CH11231 with the U.S. Department of Energy. ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY LBNL-6337E Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor The Regents of the University of

336

Fracture energy of glass fiber reinforced cement composites: method of determination  

SciTech Connect

Based on theoretic consideration, fracture energy is a useful index for the evaluation of fracture toughness of glass fiber reinforced cement composites. A method for determination of fracture energy is proposed. Fracture energy was obtained from the work required for the fracture, i.e., the area under the load-displacement curve in a tensile test. Two notches were introduced on both sides of the specimen surface in order to obtain a stable load-displacement curve. The value represents a property of the material, while the impact strength and critical stress intensity factor (widely used as indices of fracture energy and fracture toughness, respectively) are not considered to be the material's properties because of the great influence of notch depth on the indices. This study discusses the suitability of the method and the error factors caused in the measurement. 12 references.

Ohigashi, T.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Assessment of durability performance of "Early-Opening-to-Traffic" Portland Cement Concrete pavement and patches  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study relates the assessment of durability to ''early-opening-to-traffic'' (EOT) portland cement concrete (PCC). Several factors were identified relative to the performance of EOT PCC. Each of these factors was considered in terms of freeze-thaw, shrinkage, chemical attack, abrasion resistance, fatigue life, volumetric expansion, practicality, and concrete costs. The assessment discusses material combinations, mixture designs, and construction practices on performance. A computer program using utility decision theory was applied in evaluating the parameters. Promising combinations of the above factors were determined based on the existing knowledge of material combinations used for EOT PCC, coupled with our understanding of the potentials of high performance concrete (HPC) for this type of application.

Shrestha, Pradhumna Babu

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Green Power Network: Green Power Marketing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to main content U.S. Department of Energy Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Green Power Network About the GPN Green Power Markets Buying Green Power Onsite Renewable...

339

Microsoft PowerPoint - Proceedings Cover Sheets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

review (well bores, faults, or vertical conduits) Well construction - Strength and metallurgy of pipes, casing - Number of casing strings - Type and vertical extent of cement -...

340

Microsoft PowerPoint - Proceedings Cover Sheets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Kinetic formulation of solid reactions Mineral solid solutions implemented as stoichiometric species Numerical Analysis of Cement Degradation: FLOTRAN C-S-H solid solution...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "riverside cement power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

International Best Practices for Pre-Processing and Co-Processing Municipal Solid Waste and Sewage Sludge in the Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

n.d. “Co-Processing of Waste and Energy Efficiency By CementAnnual North American Waste-to-Energy Conference NAWTEC17,2009. Stantec, 2011. Waste to Energy: a Technical Review of

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Power inverters  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Power inverters include a frame and a power module. The frame has a sidewall including an opening and defining a fluid passageway. The power module is coupled to the frame over the opening and includes a substrate, die, and an encasement. The substrate includes a first side, a second side, a center, an outer periphery, and an outer edge, and the first side of the substrate comprises a first outer layer including a metal material. The die are positioned in the substrate center and are coupled to the substrate first side. The encasement is molded over the outer periphery on the substrate first side, the substrate second side, and the substrate outer edge and around the die. The encasement, coupled to the substrate, forms a seal with the metal material. The second side of the substrate is positioned to directly contact a fluid flowing through the fluid passageway.

Miller, David H. (Redondo Beach, CA); Korich, Mark D. (Chino Hills, CA); Smith, Gregory S. (Woodland Hills, CA)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

343

Power Right. Power Smart. Efficient Computer Power Supplies and Monitors. |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Power Right. Power Smart. Efficient Computer Power Supplies and Power Right. Power Smart. Efficient Computer Power Supplies and Monitors. Power Right. Power Smart. Efficient Computer Power Supplies and Monitors. March 10, 2009 - 6:00am Addthis John Lippert Power supplies convert the AC power that you get from your electric company into the DC power consumed by most electronics, including your computer. We expect our power supplies to be safe, reliable, and durable. If they meet those criteria, then they're all alike, except for cost, right? Well, not exactly. You see, there's one other important feature that sets them apart: efficiency. And I don't know about you, but I believe waste is bad. For me, high efficiency is one important feature that's needed for something to be high quality. So isn't it ridiculous that most power

344

Power Right. Power Smart. Efficient Computer Power Supplies and Monitors. |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Power Right. Power Smart. Efficient Computer Power Supplies and Power Right. Power Smart. Efficient Computer Power Supplies and Monitors. Power Right. Power Smart. Efficient Computer Power Supplies and Monitors. March 10, 2009 - 6:00am Addthis John Lippert Power supplies convert the AC power that you get from your electric company into the DC power consumed by most electronics, including your computer. We expect our power supplies to be safe, reliable, and durable. If they meet those criteria, then they're all alike, except for cost, right? Well, not exactly. You see, there's one other important feature that sets them apart: efficiency. And I don't know about you, but I believe waste is bad. For me, high efficiency is one important feature that's needed for something to be high quality. So isn't it ridiculous that most power

345

Power Supplies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 2   Characteristics of the four major power sources for induction heating...state 180 Hz to 50 kHz 1 kW to 2 MW 75â??95 No standby current; high efficiency; no moving parts;

346

Recycling contaminated spent blasting abrasives in Portland cement mortars using solidification/stabilization technology. Final research report  

SciTech Connect

The use of abrasive blasting to remove lead-based paint from steel bridges produces contaminated spent blasting abrasives that may be classified as hazardous by the Environmental Protection Agency. If the spent abrasives leach lead, chromium, and cadmium greater than the EPA limits, the spent abrasives are classified as hazardous and must be rendered nonhazardous prior to disposal. An alternative to disposing of spent blasting abrasives is to recycle them in an environmentally sound application. This study investigates the feasibility of recycling spent blasting abrasives in portland cement mortars using solidification/stabilization technology to produce a usable construction material. Field application guidelines for recycling spent blasting abrasives in portland cement mortars are established based upon the results of this study.

Salt, B.K.; Carrasquillo, R.L.; Loehr, R.C.; Fowler, D.W.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Self-degradable Slag/Class F Fly Ash-Blend Cements  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Self-degradable slag/Class F fly ash blend pozzolana cements were formulated, assuming that they might serve well as alternative temporary fracture sealers in Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) wells operating at temperatures of {ge} 200 C. Two candidate formulas were screened based upon material criteria including an initial setting time {ge} 60 min at 85 C, compressive strength {ge} 2000 psi for a 200 C autoclaved specimen, and the extent of self-degradation of cement heated at {ge} 200 C for it was contacted with water. The first screened dry mix formula consisted of 76.5 wt% slag-19.0 wt% Class F fly ash-3.8 wt% sodium silicate as alkali activator, and 0.7 wt% carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) as the self-degradation promoting additive, and second formula comprised of 57.3 wt% slag, 38.2 wt% Class F fly ash, 3.8 wt% sodium silicate, and 0.7 wt% CMC. After mixing with water and autoclaving it at 200 C, the aluminum-substituted 1.1 nm tobermorite crystal phase was identified as hydrothermal reaction product responsible for the development of a compressive strength of 5983 psi. The 200 C-autoclaved cement made with the latter formula had the combined phases of tobermorite as its major reaction product and amorphous geopolymer as its minor one providing a compressive strength of 5271 psi. Sodium hydroxide derived from the hydrolysis of sodium silicate activator not only initiated the pozzolanic reaction of slag and fly ash, but also played an important role in generating in-situ exothermic heat that significantly contributed to promoting self-degradation of cementitious sealers. The source of this exothermic heat was the interactions between sodium hydroxide, and gaseous CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 3}COOH by-products generated from thermal decomposition of CMC at {ge} 200 C in an aqueous medium. Thus, the magnitude of this self-degradation depended on the exothermic temperature evolved in the sealer; a higher temperature led to a sever disintegration of sealer. The exothermic temperature was controlled by the extent of thermal decomposition of CMC, demonstrating that CMC decomposed at higher temperature emitted more gaseous reactants. Hence, such large emission enhanced the evolution of in-situ exothermic heat. In contrast, the excessive formation of geopolymer phase due to more incorporation of Class F fly ash into this cementitious system affected its ability to self-degrade, reflecting that there was no self-degradation. The geopolymer was formed by hydrothermal reactions between sodium hydroxide from sodium silicate and mullite in Class F fly ash. Thus, the major reason why geopolymer-based cementitiuos sealers did not degrade after heated sealers came in contact with water was their lack of free sodium hydroxide.

Sugama, T.; Warren, J.; Butcher, T. (BNL); Lance Brothers (Halliburton); Bour, D. (AltaRock Energy, Inc.)

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Policy Options for Encouraging Energy Efficiency Best Practices in Shandong Province's Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AQC boiler), steam turbine generators, controlling system,is fed to the steam turbine generator to produce power.

Price, Lynn

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Power superconducting power transmission cable  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is for a compact superconducting power transmission cable operating at distribution level voltages. The superconducting cable is a conductor with a number of tapes assembled into a subconductor. These conductors are then mounted co-planarly in an elongated dielectric to produce a 3-phase cable. The arrangement increases the magnetic field parallel to the tapes thereby reducing ac losses.

Ashworth, Stephen P. (Cambridge, GB)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Nuclear Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The world of the twenty first century is an energy consuming society. Due to increasing population and living standards, each year the world requires more energy and new efficient systems for delivering it. Furthermore, the new systems must be inherently safe and environmentally benign. These realities of today's world are among the reasons that lead to serious interest in deploying nuclear power as a sustainable energy source. Today's nuclear reactors are safe and highly efficient energy systems that offer electricity and a multitude of co-generation energy products ranging from potable water to heat for industrial applications. The goal of the book is to show the current state-of-the-art in the covered technical areas as well as to demonstrate how general engineering principles and methods can be applied to nuclear power systems.

Tsvetkov, Pavel

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Power supply  

SciTech Connect

An electric power supply employs a striking means to initiate ferroelectric elements which provide electrical energy output which subsequently initiates an explosive charge which initiates a second ferroelectric current generator to deliver current to the coil of a magnetic field current generator, creating a magnetic field around the coil. Continued detonation effects compression of the magnetic field and subsequent generation and delivery of a large output current to appropriate output loads.

Hart, Edward J. (Albuquerque, NM); Leeman, James E. (Albuquerque, NM); MacDougall, Hugh R. (Albuquerque, NM); Marron, John J. (Albuquerque, NM); Smith, Calvin C. (Amarillo, TX)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Power Search  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

You are here: Find a Car Home > Power Search You are here: Find a Car Home > Power Search Power Search Expand any feature by selecting its title bar. Choose as many or as few features as you like. Model Year From: 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 1999 1998 1997 1996 1995 1994 1993 1992 1991 1990 1989 1988 1987 1986 1985 1984 To: 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 1999 1998 1997 1996 1995 1994 1993 1992 1991 1990 1989 1988 1987 1986 1985 1984 MSRP Under $15,000 $15,000-$20,000 $20,000-$25,000 $25,000-$30,000 $30,000-$35,000 $35,000-$40,000 $40,000-$45,000 $45,000-$50,000 $50,000-$55,000 $55,000-$60,000 $60,000-$65,000 $65,000-$70,000 $70,000-$75,000 $75,000-$80,000 $80,000-$85,000 Over $85,000 - OR - Minimum: Select... $5,000 $6,000 $7,000 $8,000 $9,000 $10,000 $11,000

353

THE IMPACT OF DISSOLVED SALTS ON PASTES CONTAINING FLY ASH, CEMENT AND SLAG  

SciTech Connect

The degree of hydration of a mixture of cementitious materials (Class F fly ash, blast furnace slag and portland cement) in highly concentrated alkaline salt solutions is enhanced by the addition of aluminate to the salt solution. This increase in the degree of hydration, as monitored with isothermal calorimetry, leads to higher values of dynamic Young's modulus and compressive strength and lower values of total porosity. This enhancement in performance properties of these cementitious waste forms by increased hydration is beneficial to the retention of the radionuclides that are also present in the salt solution. The aluminate ions in the solution act first to retard the set time of the mix but then enhance the hydration reactions following the induction period. In fact, the aluminate ions increase the degree of hydration by {approx}35% over the degree of hydration for the same mix with a lower aluminate concentration. An increase in the blast furnace slag concentration and a decrease in the water to cementitious materials ratio produced mixes with higher values of Young's modulus and lower values of total porosity. Therefore, these operational factors can be fine tuned to enhance performance properties of cementitious waste form. Empirical models for Young modulus, heat of hydration and total porosity were developed to predict the values of these properties. These linear models used only statistically significant compositional and operational factors and provided insight into those factors that control these properties.

Harbour, J.; Edwards, T.; Williams, V.

2009-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

354

Effect of Decreasing of Cobalt Content in Properties for Diamond/Cemented Carbide Tools  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Powder metallurgy plays a role in manufacturing such as automotive and cutting tool applications. Diamond/cemented carbide tools are also made from this technique. Diamond particle and other matrix materials were employed in this study. The purpose is to investigate the physical and mechanical properties of different Cobalt (Co) content samples by using Taguchi's method. The materials used in the experiments were mixed by using a ball-mill machine. The mixed powders were pressed by conventional method. Then the green samples were sintered in a vacuum furnace. After reaching 500 deg. C, the samples were sintered with Argon (Ar) gas. The sintered samples were investigated density by immersion method, porosity by water saturation method, and hardness by Vicker hardness tester. It was found that with 59.5% Co content, plain diamond type, sintering temperature of 950 deg. C, sintering time of 40 minutes, and pressure of 625 MPa, density, porosity, and hardness got the best result in this study. From the Taguchi's analysis, the significant factors effected the performance were composition, sintering temperature, and sintering time.

Waratta, A.; Hamdi, M. [Department of Design and Manufacture, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya (Malaysia); Ariga, T. [Department of Materials Science, School of Engineering, Tokai University (Japan)

2010-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

355

Commerical-Scale CO2 Capture and Sequestration for the Cement Industry  

SciTech Connect

On June 8, 2009, DOE issued Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) Number DE-FOA-000015 seeking proposals to capture and sequester carbon dioxide from industrial sources. This FOA called for what was essentially a two-tier selection process. A number of projects would receive awards to conduct front-end engineering and design (FEED) studies as Phase I. Those project sponsors selected would be required to apply for Phase II, which would be the full design, construction, and operation of their proposed technology. Over forty proposals were received, and ten were awarded Phase I Cooperative Agreements. One of those proposers was CEMEX. CEMEX proposed to capture and sequester carbon dioxide (CO2) from one of their existing cement plants and either sequester the CO2 in a geologic formation or use it for enhanced oil recovery. The project consisted of evaluating their plants to identify the plant best suited for the demonstration, identify the best available capture technology, and prepare a design basis. The project also included evaluation of the storage or sequestration options in the vicinity of the selected plant.

Adolfo Garza

2010-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

356

Microsoft PowerPoint - Proceedings Cover Sheets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Princeton University 03/29/2006 Princeton University 03/29/2006 Development of a geochemical code to assess cement reactivity Bruno Huet, Richard Fuller, Jean Prevost, George Scherer (Princeton University) Collaborator: Jim Johnson (LLNL) 2 Princeton University 03/29/2006 Introduction Objective of our work: Assess the reliability of the CO2 storage with time. 1. Reliability of geological formation limited by the presence of engineered high permeability path (well bores). 2. Degradation of casing materials (steel, cement) may increase the CO2 leak with time. Coupled modeling and experimental approach Modeling approach: 1. Aqueous chemistry 2. Transport processes 3 Princeton University 03/29/2006 Surface casing Primary cement Cement plug Secondary casing Secondary cement Mud Production casing

357

Low Power Design Low PowerLow Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, correlations among system state transitions #12;Low Power Design USC/LPCAD Page 11 USCUSC Low PowerLow Power for the requestsIncoming rates for the requests 21,rr 12 ,rr, :, : State transition ratesState transition rates OS and hardware Abstract, hierarchical finite-state machine Each state represents power

Pedram, Massoud

358

Analysis of Energy-Efficiency Opportunities for the Cement Industry in Shandong Province, China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AQC boiler), steam turbine generators, controlling system,is fed to the steam turbine generator to produce power. AAQC boiler), steam turbine generators, controlling system,

Price, Lynn

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Power management system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of managing power resources for an electrical system of a vehicle may include identifying enabled power sources from among a plurality of power sources in electrical communication with the electrical system and calculating a threshold power value for the enabled power sources. A total power load placed on the electrical system by one or more power consumers may be measured. If the total power load exceeds the threshold power value, then a determination may be made as to whether one or more additional power sources is available from among the plurality of power sources. At least one of the one or more additional power sources may be enabled, if available.

Algrain, Marcelo C. (Peoria, IL); Johnson, Kris W. (Washington, IL); Akasam, Sivaprasad (Peoria, IL); Hoff, Brian D. (East Peoria, IL)

2007-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

360

Solar powered desalination system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.13: California Power Generation by Source……………………………………31for hydro- electric power generation would be reached inother end users include the power generation industry (4%),

Mateo, Tiffany Alisa

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "riverside cement power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Solar powered desalination system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2008, uses concentrated solar power to split water. Figurethe main reason the potential for solar power is boundless.a clean energy source, solar power is inexhaustible, fairly

Mateo, Tiffany Alisa

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Southwestern Power Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

POTC Home Courses Instructors NERC Continuing Education Virtual University Power Operations Training Center You'll find the "Power" of learning at Southwestern's Power Operations...

363

Southwestern Power Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Schedules Skip Navigation Links Excess Energy Hydro Peaking Power Hydro Power and Energy Sold to Sam Rayburn Dam Electric Cooperative (Rayburn) Hydro Power and Energy Sold to Sam...

364

Hybrid-Intelligent POWER “HI-POWER”  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... T T T A A A SMART-T Current Situation Current Situation ... Page 10. 22 Power Grid • Plug & Play architecture • Multiple power sources • Renewables ...

2013-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

365

Energy Efficient Microwave Hybrid Processing of Lime for Cement, Steel, and Glass Industries  

SciTech Connect

In this study, the microwave materials interactions were studied through dielectric property measurements, process modeling, and lab scale microwave hybrid calcination tests. Characterization and analysis were performed to evaluate material reactions and energy usage. Processing parameters for laboratory scale and larger scale calcining experiments were developed for MAT limestone calcination. Early stage equipment design concepts were developed, with a focus on microwave post heating treatment. The retrofitting of existing rotary calcine equipment in the lime industry was assessed and found to be feasible. Ceralink sought to address some of the major barriers to the uptake of MAT identified as the need for (1) team approach with end users, technology partners, and equipment manufacturers, (2) modeling that incorporates kiln materials and variations to the design of industrial microwave equipment. This project has furthered the commercialization effort of MAT by working closely with an industrial lime manufacturer to educate them regarding MAT, identifying equipment manufacturer to supply microwave equipment, and developing a sophisticated MAT modeling with WPI, the university partner. MAT was shown to enhance calcining through lower energy consumption and faster reaction rates compared to conventional processing. Laboratory testing concluded that a 23% reduction in energy was possible for calcining small batches (5kg). Scale-up testing indicated that the energy savings increased as a function of load size and 36% energy savings was demonstrated (22 kg). A sophisticated model was developed which combines simultaneous microwave and conventional heating. Continued development of this modeling software could be used for larger scale calcining simulations, which would be a beneficial low-cost tool for exploring equipment design prior to actual building. Based on these findings, estimates for production scale MAT calcining benefits were calculated, assuming uptake of MAT in the US lime industry. This estimate showed that 7.3 TBTU/year could be saved, with reduction of 270 MMlbs of CO2 emissions, and $29 MM/year in economic savings. Taking into account estimates for MAT implementation in the US cement industry, an additional 39 TBTU/year, 3 Blbs of CO2 and $155 MM/year could be saved. One of the main remaining barriers to commercialization of MAT for the lime and cement industries is the sheer size of production. Through this project, it was realized that a production size MAT rotary calciner was not feasible, and a different approach was adapted. The concept of a microwave post heat section located in the upper portion of the cooler was devised and appears to be a more realistic approach for MAT implementation. Commercialization of this technology will require (1) continued pilot scale calcining demonstrations, (2) involvement of lime kiln companies, and (3) involvement of an industrial microwave equipment provider. An initial design concept for a MAT post-heat treatment section was conceived as a retrofit into the cooler sections of existing lime rotary calciners with a 1.4 year payback. Retrofitting will help spur implementation of this technology, as the capital investment will be minimal for enhancing the efficiency of current rotary lime kilns. Retrofits would likely be attractive to lime manufacturers, as the purchase of a new lime kiln is on the order of a $30 million dollar investment, where as a MAT retrofit is estimated on the order of $1 million. The path for commercialization lies in partnering with existing lime kiln companies, who will be able to implement the microwave post heat sections in existing and new build kilns. A microwave equipment provider has been identified, who would make up part of the continued development and commercialization team.

Fall, Morgana L; Yakovlev, Vadim; Sahi, Catherine; Baranova, Inessa; Bowers, Johnney G; Esquenazi , Gibran L

2012-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

366

Power oscillator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An oscillator includes an amplifier having an input and an output, and an impedance transformation network connected between the input of the amplifier and the output of the amplifier, wherein the impedance transformation network is configured to provide suitable positive feedback from the output of the amplifier to the input of the amplifier to initiate and sustain an oscillating condition, and wherein the impedance transformation network is configured to protect the input of the amplifier from a destructive feedback signal. One example of the oscillator is a single active element device capable of providing over 70 watts of power at over 70% efficiency. Various control circuits may be employed to match the driving frequency of the oscillator to a plurality of tuning states of the lamp.

Gitsevich, Aleksandr (Montgomery Village, MD)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

POWER REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fast nuclear reactor system ls described for producing power and radioactive isotopes. The reactor core is of the heterogeneous, fluid sealed type comprised of vertically arranged elongated tubular fuel elements having vertical coolant passages. The active portion is surrounded by a neutron reflector and a shield. The system includes pumps and heat exchangers for the primary and secondary coolant circuits. The core, primary coolant pump and primary heat exchanger are disposed within an irapenforate tank which is filled with the primary coolant, in this case a liquid metal such as Na or NaK, to completely submerge these elements. The tank is completely surrounded by a thick walled concrete shield. This reactor system utilizes enriched uranium or plutonium as the fissionable material, uranium or thorium as a diluent and thorium or uranium containing less than 0 7% of the U/sup 235/ isotope as a fertile material.

Zinn, W.H.

1958-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Power plant  

SciTech Connect

A two stroke internal combustion engine is described that has at least one cylinder within which a piston reciprocates. The engine is joined to a gearbox which includes a ring gear. A pair of gears having diameters half that of the ring gear move within the latter. At least one of the pair of gears is connected to a piston by a pin extending between the piston and the periphery of said gear. An additional pair of gears are fixed to respective ones of the first-mentioned gear pair and are operatively joined to a pinion to which a drive shaft is secured. A turbine and filter arrangement is positioned on the side of the engine opposite the gearbox whereby exhaust gases from the engine are directed to the turbine to develop power at an output drive shaft joined to the turbine and to filter pollutants from the gases.

Finn, H.I. Jr.

1978-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

369

MOBILIZATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF COLLOIDS GENERATED FROM CEMENT LEACHATES MOVING THROUGH A SRS SANDY SEDIMENT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Naturally occurring mobile colloids are ubiquitous and are involved in many important processes in the subsurface zone. For example, colloid generation and subsequent mobilization represent a possible mechanism for the transport of contaminants including radionuclides in the subsurface environments. For colloid-facilitated transport to be significant, three criteria must be met: (1) colloids must be generated; (2) contaminants must associate with the colloids preferentially to the immobile solid phase (aquifer); and (3) colloids must be transported through the groundwater or in subsurface environments - once these colloids start moving they become 'mobile colloids'. Although some experimental investigations of particle release in natural porous media have been conducted, the detailed mechanisms of release and re-deposition of colloidal particles within natural porous media are poorly understood. Even though this vector of transport is known, the extent of its importance is not known yet. Colloid-facilitated transport of trace radionuclides has been observed in the field, thus demonstrating a possible radiological risk associated with the colloids. The objective of this study was to determine if cementitious leachate would promote the in situ mobilization of natural colloidal particles from a SRS sandy sediment. The intent was to determine whether cementitious surface or subsurface structure would create plumes that could produce conditions conducive to sediment dispersion and mobile colloid generation. Column studies were conducted and the cation chemistries of influents and effluents were analyzed by ICP-OES, while the mobilized colloids were characterized using XRD, SEM, EDX, PSD and Zeta potential. The mobilization mechanisms of colloids in a SRS sandy sediment by cement leachates were studied.

Li, D.; Roberts, K.; Kaplan, D.; Seaman, J.

2011-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

370

Recycling of the product of thermal inertization of cement-asbestos for various industrial applications  

SciTech Connect

Recycling of secondary raw materials is a priority of waste handling in the countries of the European community. A potentially important secondary raw material is the product of the thermal transformation of cement-asbestos, produced by prolonged annealing at 1200-1300 {sup o}C. The product is chemically comparable to a Mg-rich clinker. Previous work has assured the reliability of the transformation process. The current challenge is to find potential applications as secondary raw material. Recycling of thermally treated asbestos-containing material (named KRY.AS) in traditional ceramics has already been studied with successful results. The results presented here are the outcome of a long termed project started in 2005 and devoted to the recycling of this secondary raw materials in various industrial applications. KRY.AS can be added in medium-high percentages (10-40 wt%) to commercial mixtures for the production of clay bricks, rock-wool glasses for insulation as well as Ca-based frits and glass-ceramics for the production of ceramic tiles. The secondary raw material was also used for the synthesis of two ceramic pigments; a green uvarovite-based pigment [Ca{sub 3}Cr{sub 2}(SiO{sub 4}){sub 3}] and a pink malayaite-based pigment [Ca(Sn,Cr)SiO{sub 5}]. The latter is especially interesting as a substitute for cadmium-based pigments. This work also shows that KRY.AS can replace standard fillers in polypropylene plastics without altering the properties of the final product. For each application, a description and relevant results are presented and discussed.

Gualtieri, Alessandro F., E-mail: alessandro.gualtieri@unimore.it [Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra, Universita di Modena e R.E., Via S. Eufemia 19, I-41100 Modena (Italy); Giacobbe, Carlotta; Sardisco, Lorenza; Saraceno, Michele [Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra, Universita di Modena e R.E., Via S. Eufemia 19, I-41100 Modena (Italy); Lassinantti Gualtieri, Magdalena [Dipartimento Ingegneria dei Materiali e dell'Ambiente, Universita di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Via Vignolese 905/a, I-41100 Modena (Italy); Lusvardi, Gigliola [Dipartimento di Chimica, Universita degli Studi di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Via G. Campi 183, I-41100 Modena (Italy); Cavenati, Cinzia; Zanatto, Ivano [ZETADI S.r.l., Via dell'Artigianato 10, Ferno (Italy)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

371

Immobilization of radioactive and hazardous wastes in a developed sulfur polymer cement (SPC) matrix  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: A process has been developed for the immobilization Cs, Sr, Ce, Pb, and Cr in forms that is non-dispersible and could be safely immobilized. The simulated radioactive wastes of Cs, Sr, and Ce, and the hazardous wastes of Cr, and Pb were immobilized in the stable form of sulfur polymer cement (SPC). In this process, the contaminants (in a single form) were added to the sulfur mixture of sulfur and aromatic /or aliphatic hydrocarbons that used as polymerizing agents for sulfur (95% S, and 5% organic polymer by weight). Durability of the fabricated SPC matrices was assessed in terms of their water of immersion, porosity, and compressive strength. The water immersion, and open porosity were found to be less than 2.5% for all the prepared matrices, whereas the compressive strength was in the range between 62.4 and 142.3 Kg.cm{sup -2}, depending on the composition of the prepared matrix. The prepared SPC matrices that characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) showed that the different added contaminants were stabilized during the solidification process during their reaction with sulfur and the organic polymer to form the corresponding metal sulfides. Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP), and the IAEA standard method have assessed the leachability of the prepared waste matrices. The TCLP results showed that most the concentration of the contaminants released were under their detection limit. The leach index for the investigated metals from the prepared SPC matrices was in the range of 9-11. The order of release of the investigated metals was Sr>Cs>Pb>Cr>Ce for the aliphatic polymer, and Sr>Cr>Pb>Cs>Ce for the aromatic one. The results obtained revealed a high performance for the prepared SPC matrices, as they are of low cost effect, highly available materials, and possessed good mechanical and leaching properties. Key Words: SPC/ Matrices/ Immobilization/ Wastes/ Leachability. (authors)

Wagdy, M.; Azim, Abdel; El-Gammal, Belal [Atomic Energy Authority, Nasr City, P.O. Box 7551, Cairo (Egypt); Husain, Ahmed [National Research Center, Cairo (Egypt)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Electric Power Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Electric Power Sector ; Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector; Annual Totals: ...

373

Electric Power Metrology Portal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Electric Power Metrology and the Smart Grid Our country's way of life depends on the electric power distribution system. ...

2012-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

374

Putting Economic Power in Distributed Power  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Electric Power Research Institute's Distributed Resources Week 1997 (October 22, 1997)AUTHOR: John Herbert

Information Center

1997-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

375

Riverside County, California. RECORD OF CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

California. California. RECORD OF CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION A. Proposed Action: Western proposes to trench, add approximately 180 feet of conduit and fiber optic cable from the Buck Boulevard SUbstation MEER building east to the fence line. The trenching will be approximately 180 feet, 36 inches deep and 18 inches wide. The disturbed ground will be used for backfill. We will use existing access roads and vehicles such as pickup trucks, crew trucks, backhoes, and bucket trucks to bring personnel and equipment to the work area. The attached map shows the project area location. The legal description is Section 6 Township 6 South, Range 8 East on the San Bernardino Baseline and Meridian (USGS Ripley, California 7.5' maps). It is estimated that the work would be performed between

376

Riverside County, Califomia. RECORD OF CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Califomia. Califomia. RECORD OF CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION A. Proposed Action: Westem proposes to trench, add approximately 180 feet of conduit and fiber optic cable from the Buck Boulevard Substation MEER building east to the fence line. The trenching will be approximately 180 feet, 36 inches deep and 18 inches wide. The disturbed ground will be used for backfill. We will use existing access roads and vehicles such as pickup trucks, crew trucks, backhoes, and bucket trucks to bring personnel and equipment to the work area. The attached map shows the project area location. The legal description is Section 6 Township 6 South, Range 8 East on the San Bemardino Baseline and Meridian (USGS Ripley, Califomia 7.5' maps). It is estimated that the work would be performed between

377

North Riverside, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Illinois: Energy Resources Illinois: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.8428094°, -87.8231138° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.8428094,"lon":-87.8231138,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

378

Riverside, New York: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

981458°, -72.6565084° 981458°, -72.6565084° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.8981458,"lon":-72.6565084,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

379

Oil-Well Cement and C3S Hydration Under High Pressure as Seen by In Situ X-Ray Diffraction, Temperatures ;= 80 degrees C with No Additives  

SciTech Connect

The hydration kinetics of a white cement and batches of both Class G and H oil-well cements were examined between 0 and 60 MPa, at {le}80 C, using in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction. This gives a continuous measure of the C{sub 3}S (Ca{sub 3}SiO{sub 5}), CH (Ca(OH){sub 2}), C{sub 4}AF (Ca{sub 2}FeAlO{sub 5}), ettringite, and other phases in the hydrating slurries. Slurries prepared from single-phase C{sub 3}S; synthetic C{sub 4}AF, and gypsum; and white cement, synthetic C{sub 4}AF and gypsum were also examined. An increasing pressure enhanced the rate of hydration for all slurries. Analysis of the data, using a kinetic model, provided rate constants that were used to obtain activation volumes for C{sub 3}S hydration. For all the cement and C{sub 3}S slurries studied, similar activation volumes were obtained (average {Delta}V{double_dagger}{sup -}-35 cm{sup 3}/mol), indicating that the presence of cement phases other than C{sub 3}S has a modest influence on the pressure dependence of C{sub 3}S hydration. An alternative analysis, using the time at which 90% of the initial C{sub 3}S remained, gave similar activation volumes. Pressure accelerated the formation of ettringite from synthetic C{sub 4}AF in the presence of gypsum. However, in slurries containing cement, the pressure dependence of C{sub 3}S hydration plays a major role in determining the pressure dependence of ettringite formation.

Jupe, Andrew C.; Wilkinson, Angus P.; Funkhouser, Garry P. (Halliburton); (GIT)

2012-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

380

EFFECT OF QUARTZ/MULLITE BLEND CERAMIC ADDITIVE ON IMPROVING RESISTANCE TO ACID OF SODIUM SILICATE-ACTIVATED SLAG CEMENT. CELCIUS BRINE.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We evaluated the usefulness of manufactured quartz/mullite blend (MQMB) ceramic powder in increasing the resistance to acid of sodium silicate-activated slag (SSAS) cementitious material for geothermal wells. A 15-day exposure to 90{sup o} CO{sub 2}-laden H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} revealed that the MQMB had high potential as an acid-resistant additive for SSAS cement. Two factors, the appropriate ratio of slag/MQMB and the autoclave temperature, contributed to better performance of MQMB-modified SSAS cement in abating its acid erosion. The most effective slag/MQMB ratio in minimizing the loss in weight by acid erosion was 70/30 by weight. For autoclave temperature, the loss in weight of 100 C autoclaved cement was a less than 2%, but at 300 C it was even lower. Before exposure to acid, the cement autoclaved at 100 C was essentially amorphous; increasing the temperature to 200 C led to the formation of crystalline analcime in the zeolitic mineral family during reactions between the mullite in MQMB and the Na from sodium silicate. In addition, at 300 C, crystal of calcium silicate hydrate (1) (CSH) was generated in reactions between the quartz in MQMB and the activated slag. These two crystalline phases (CSH and analcime) were responsible for densifying the autoclaved cement, conveying improved compressive strength and minimizing water permeability. The CSH was susceptible to reactions with H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, forming two corrosion products, bassanite and ionized monosilicic acid. However, the uptake of ionized monosilicic acid by Mg dissociated from the activated slag resulted in the formation of lizardite as magnesium silicate hydrate. On the other hand, the analcime was barely susceptible to acid if at all. Thus, the excellent acid resistance of MQMB-modified SSAS cement was due to the combined phases of lizardite and analcime.

SUGAMA, T.; BROTHERS, L.E.; VAN DE PUTTE, T.R.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "riverside cement power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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381

Modelling and simulations of the chemo-mechanical behaviour of leached cement-based materials: Interactions between damage and leaching  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The assessment of the durability of cement-based materials, which could be employed in underground structures for nuclear waste disposal, requires accounting for deterioration factors, such as chemical attacks and damage, and for the interactions between these phenomena. The objective of the present paper consists in investigating the long-term behaviour of cementitious materials by simulating their response to chemical and mechanical solicitations. In a companion paper (Stora et al., submitted to Cem. Concr. Res. 2008), the implementation of a multi-scale homogenization model into an integration platform has allowed for evaluating the evolution of the mineral composition, diffusive and elastic properties inside a concrete material subjected to leaching. To complete this previous work, an orthotropic micromechanical damage model is presently developed and incorporated in this numerical platform to estimate the mechanical and diffusive properties of damaged cement-based materials. Simulations of the chemo-mechanical behaviour of leached cementitious materials are performed with the tool thus obtained and compared with available experiments. The numerical results are insightful about the interactions between damage and chemical deteriorations.

Stora, E., E-mail: stora@univ-mlv.f [Atomic Energy Commission, CEA Saclay DEN/DANS/DPC/SCCME/Laboratoire d'Etude du Comportement des Betons et des Argiles, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Universite Paris-Est, Laboratoire de Modelisation et Simulation Multiechelle, FRE3160 CNRS, 5 boulevard Descartes, 77454 Marne-la-Vallee Cedex 2 (France); Bary, B. [Atomic Energy Commission, CEA Saclay DEN/DANS/DPC/SCCME/Laboratoire d'Etude du Comportement des Betons et des Argiles, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); He, Q.-C. [Universite Paris-Est, Laboratoire de Modelisation et Simulation Multiechelle, FRE3160 CNRS, 5 boulevard Descartes, 77454 Marne-la-Vallee Cedex 2 (France); Deville, E.; Montarnal, P. [CEA Saclay DEN/DANS/DM2S/SFME/MTMS, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France)

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

382

Power-Pro: Programmable Power Management Architecture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents Power-Pro architecture (Programmable Power Management Architecture), a novel processor architecture for power reduction. Power-Pro architecture has following two functionalities, (i) Supply voltage and clock frequency can be dynamically varied, (ii) Active data-path width can be dynamically adjusted to requirement of application programs. For the application programs which require less performance or less data-path width, Power-Pro architecture realize dramatic power reduction. I. Introduction With recent popularizations in portable, batterypowered devices such as digital cellular telephones and personal digital assistants, minimizing power consumption of VLSI circuits becomes more important. As the system level power reduction techniques, the choice of optimal supply voltage(V DD ) and optimal active data-path width have strong impacts. In this paper we propose novel processor architecture Power-Pro [2] which can vary VDD and active data-path width of processor ...

Tohru Ishihara; Hiroto Yasuura; Programmable Power Management

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Electric power 2007  

SciTech Connect

Subjects covered include: power industry trends - near term fuel strategies - price/quality/delivery/opportunity; generating fleet optimization and plant optimization; power plant safety and security; coal power plants - upgrades and new capacity; IGCC, advanced combustion and CO{sub 2} capture technologies; gas turbine and combined cycle power plants; nuclear power; renewable power; plant operations and maintenance; power plant components - design and operation; environmental; regulatory issues, strategies and technologies; and advanced energy strategies and technologies. The presentations are in pdf format.

NONE

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

SOLAR POWER  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermal energy storage (TES) is an integral part of a concentrated solar power (CSP) system. It enables plant operators to generate electricity beyond on sun hours and supply power to the grid to meet peak demand. Current CSP sensible heat storage systems employ molten salts as both the heat transfer fluid and the heat storage media. These systems have an upper operating temperature limit of around 400 C. Future TES systems are expected to operate at temperatures between 600 C to 1000 C for higher thermal efficiencies which should result in lower electricity cost. To meet future operating temperature and electricity cost requirements, a TES concept utilizing thermochemical cycles (TCs) based on multivalent solid oxides was proposed. The system employs a pair of reduction and oxidation (REDOX) reactions to store and release heat. In the storage step, hot air from the solar receiver is used to reduce the oxidation state of an oxide cation, e.g. Fe3+ to Fe2+. Heat energy is thus stored as chemical bonds and the oxide is charged. To discharge the stored energy, the reduced oxide is re-oxidized in air and heat is released. Air is used as both the heat transfer fluid and reactant and no storage of fluid is needed. This project investigated the engineering and economic feasibility of this proposed TES concept. The DOE storage cost and LCOE targets are $15/kWh and $0.09/kWh respectively. Sixteen pure oxide cycles were identified through thermodynamic calculations and literature information. Data showed the kinetics of re-oxidation of the various oxides to be a key barrier to implementing the proposed concept. A down selection was carried out based on operating temperature, materials costs and preliminary laboratory measurements. Cobalt oxide, manganese oxide and barium oxide were selected for developmental studies to improve their REDOX reaction kinetics. A novel approach utilizing mixed oxides to improve the REDOX kinetics of the selected oxides was proposed. It partially replaces some of the primary oxide cations with selected secondary cations. This causes a lattice charge imbalance and increases the anion vacancy density. Such vacancies enhance the ionic mass transport and lead to faster re-oxidation. Reoxidation fractions of Mn3O4 to Mn2O3 and CoO to Co3O4 were improved by up to 16 fold through the addition of a secondary oxide. However, no improvement was obtained in barium based mixed oxides. In addition to enhancing the short term re-oxidation kinetics, it was found that the use of mixed oxides also help to stabilize or even improve the TES properties after long term thermal cycling. Part of this improvement could be attributed to a reduced grain size in the mixed oxides. Based on the measurement results, manganese-iron, cobalt-aluminum and cobalt iron mixed oxides have been proposed for future engineering scale demonstration. Using the cobalt and manganese mixed oxides, we were able to demonstrate charge and discharge of the TES media in both a bench top fixed bed and a rotary kiln-moving bed reactor. Operations of the fixed bed configuration are straight forward but require a large mass flow rate and higher fluid temperature for charging. The rotary kiln makes direct solar irradiation possible and provides significantly better heat transfer, but designs to transport the TES oxide in and out of the reactor will need to be defined. The final reactor and system design will have to be based on the economics of the CSP plant. A materials compatibility study was also conducted and it identified Inconel 625 as a suitable high temperature engineering material to construct a reactor holding either cobalt or manganese mixed oxides. To assess the economics of such a CSP plant, a packed bed reactor model was established as a baseline. Measured cobalt-aluminum oxide reaction kinetics were applied to the model and the influences of bed properties and process parameters on the overall system design were investigated. The optimal TES system design was found to be a network of eight fixed bed reactors at 18.75 MWth each with charge and

PROJECT STAFF

2011-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

385

Life-cycle analysis results for geothermal systems in comparison to other power systems: Part II.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A study has been conducted on the material demand and life-cycle energy and emissions performance of power-generating technologies in addition to those reported in Part I of this series. The additional technologies included concentrated solar power, integrated gasification combined cycle, and a fossil/renewable (termed hybrid) geothermal technology, more specifically, co-produced gas and electric power plants from geo-pressured gas and electric (GPGE) sites. For the latter, two cases were considered: gas and electricity export and electricity-only export. Also modeled were cement, steel and diesel fuel requirements for drilling geothermal wells as a function of well depth. The impact of the construction activities in the building of plants was also estimated. The results of this study are consistent with previously reported trends found in Part I of this series. Among all the technologies considered, fossil combustion-based power plants have the lowest material demand for their construction and composition. On the other hand, conventional fossil-based power technologies have the highest greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, followed by the hybrid and then two of the renewable power systems, namely hydrothermal flash power and biomass-based combustion power. GHG emissions from U.S. geothermal flash plants were also discussed, estimates provided, and data needs identified. Of the GPGE scenarios modeled, the all-electric scenario had the highest GHG emissions. Similar trends were found for other combustion emissions.

Sullivan, J.L.; Clark, C.E.; Yuan, L.; Han, J.; Wang, M. (Energy Systems)

2012-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

386

Power Tower Systems for Concentrating Solar Power  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

In power tower concentrating solar power systems, numerous large, flat, sun-tracking mirrors, known as heliostats, focus sunlight onto a receiver at the top of a tall tower. A heat-transfer fluid...

387

Resonant Power Conditioning and Compact Pulse Power ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... (FEEDBACK) HV RECTIFIER AND FILTER NETWORK ... Los Alamos High Frequency “Polyphase Resonant Power Conditioning” ... 30 KW Loss ...

2012-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

388

Primer on Durability of Nuclear Power Plant Reinforced Concrete Structures - A Review of Pertinent Factors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to provide a primer on the environmental effects that can affect the durability of nuclear power plant concrete structures. As concrete ages, changes in its properties will occur as a result of continuing microstructural changes (i.e., slow hydration, crystallization of amorphous constituents, and reactions between cement paste and aggregates), as well as environmental influences. These changes do not have to be detrimental to the point that concrete will not be able to meet its performance requirements. Concrete, however, can suffer undesirable changes with time because of improper specifications, a violation of specifications, or adverse performance of its cement paste matrix or aggregate constituents under either physical or chemical attack. Contained in this report is a discussion on concrete durability and the relationship between durability and performance, a review of the historical perspective related to concrete and longevity, a description of the basic materials that comprise reinforced concrete, and information on the environmental factors that can affect the performance of nuclear power plant concrete structures. Commentary is provided on the importance of an aging management program.

Naus, Dan J [ORNL

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Dynamic power management with hybrid power sources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

DPM (Dynamic Power Management) is an effective technique for reducing the energy consumption of embedded systems that is based on migrating to a low power state when possible. While conventional DPM minimizes the energy consumption of the embedded system, ... Keywords: DPM, embedded system, fuel cell, hybrid power

Jianli Zhuo; Chaitali Chakrabarti; Kyungsoo Lee; Naehyuck Chang

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

LIFE Power Plant Fusion Power Associates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LIFE Power Plant Fusion Power Associates December 14, 2011 Mike Dunne LLNL #12;NIf-1111-23714.ppt LIFE power plant 2 #12;LIFE delivery timescale NIf-1111-23714.ppt 3 #12;Timely delivery is enabled near-term, NIF based, NIC-derivative fusion performance § 3 allows small, thin Fresnel lenses ­ enables

391

Dynamic power management in environmentally powered systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper a framework for energy management in energy harvesting embedded systems is presented. As a possible example scenario, we focus on wireless sensor nodes which are powered by solar cells. We demonstrate that classical power management solutions ... Keywords: embedded systems, energy harvesting, model predictive control, power management, real-time scheduling, reward maximization

Clemens Moser; Jian-Jia Chen; Lothar Thiele

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Power and energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The author examines the development of nuclear power throughout the world, commencing with proposals for California, USA. Evidence that nuclear power remains viable in Asia include Japan Atomic Power Co.'s announcement of plans for a 1300 MW reactor ...

G. Zorpette

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Solar powered desalination system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

photon capture area and electrical power consumption. Bothcapture area (m 2 ) Electrical power consumption (kWh/kg HType 2 Type 3 Type 4 Electrical power consumption for these

Mateo, Tiffany Alisa

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

PowerPoint Presentation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

power module - High temperature operation - Size reduction - 3-kW 120V single-phase inverter (250 C+) Input Power Output Power > 90% efficiency (estimated) Phase I: Very High...

395

Green Power Network: Green Power Markets Overview  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Green Markets Green Markets Search Search Help More Search Options Search Site Map News TVA Seeks 126 MW of Renewables in 2014 December 2013 More News More News Subscribe to E-Mail Update Subscribe to e-mail update Events EPA Webinar - The Power of Aggregated Purchasing: How to Green Your Electricity Supply & Save Money January 15, 2014 1:00-2:00 p.m. ET Previous Webinars More News Features Green Power Market Status Report (2011 Data) Featured Green Power Reports Green Pricing Green Power Marketing Green Certificates Carbon Offsets State Policies Overview The essence of green power marketing is to provide market-based choices for electricity consumers to purchase power from environmentally preferred sources. The term "green power" is used to define power generated from renewable energy sources, such as wind and solar power, geothermal, hydropower and various forms of biomass. Green power marketing has the potential to expand domestic markets for renewable energy technologies by fostering greater availability of renewable electric service options in retail markets. Although renewable energy development has traditionally been limited by cost considerations, customer choice allows consumer preferences for cleaner energy sources to be reflected in market transactions. In survey after survey, customers have expressed a preference and willingness to pay more, if necessary, for cleaner energy sources. You can find more information about purchase options on our "Buying Green Power" page.

396

Sunrise II Power Plant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sunrise Power Company, LLC (Sunrise), has planned the modification of an existing power plant project to increase its generation capacity by 265 megawatts by 2003. The initial...

397

Siemens Power Generation, Inc.  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Presented at the 2005 Pittsburgh Coal Conference Siemens Power Generation, Inc. Page 1 of 10 Siemens Power Generation, Inc., All Rights Reserved Development of a Catalytic...

398

Laser Radiometry: Powering Up  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Radiometry: Powering Up. June 11, 2012. ... Contact: Marla Dowell 303-497- 7455. Chris Cromer examines one of PML's next-generation power meters ...

2012-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

399

Southwestern Power Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FOIAPrivacy Act Submit a FOIA Request DOE FOIA Requester Service Center Electronic Reading Room FOIA Links Power Marketing Administrations' FOIA Links Bonneville Power...

400

PowerPoint Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

302011 Essential PV power plant features Reliable power conversion Extensive service network Remote monitoring & diagnostics Plant level control Advanced grid-friendly features...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "riverside cement power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Radioisotope Power Generation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radioisotope Power Generation Long lived power sources are needed for equipment that is too remote or inaccessible for replacement. By choosing a radioactive element with a long...

402

Electric Power Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Net Generation by Energy Source: Commercial Combined Heat and Power Sector . Table 1.5. Net Generation by Energy Source: Industrial Combined Heat and Power Sector .

403

Nuclear Fusion Power  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power Nuclear fusion reactors, if they can be made to work, promise virtually unlimited power for the indefinite future. This is because the fuel, isotopes of hydrogen, are...

404

Electrolytes for power sources  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Electrolytes for power sources, particularly alkaline and acidic power sources, comprising benzene polysulfonic acids and benzene polyphosphonic acids or salts of such acids.

Doddapaneni, Narayan (Albuquerque, NM); Ingersoll, David (Albuquerque, NM)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Electrolytes for power sources  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Electrolytes are disclosed for power sources, particularly alkaline and acidic power sources, comprising benzene polysulfonic acids and benzene polyphosphonic acids or salts of such acids. 7 figures.

Doddapaneni, N.; Ingersoll, D.

1995-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

406

PowerPoint Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CT (USA), international presence in USA, Canada, Germany (Fraunhofer, IKTS) and South Korea (Posco) Delivering Direct FuelCell (DFC ) power plants for On-Site Power and...

407

Karnataka Power Corporation Limited and National Thermal Power...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Karnataka Power Corporation Limited and National Thermal Power Corporation JV Jump to: navigation, search Name Karnataka Power Corporation Limited and National Thermal Power...

408

Energy Storage & Power Electronics 2008 Peer Review - Power Electronic...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

& Power Electronics 2008 Peer Review - Power Electronics (PE) Systems Presentations Energy Storage & Power Electronics 2008 Peer Review - Power Electronics (PE) Systems...

409

Water-Power Development, Conservation of Hydroelectric Power...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Water-Power Development, Conservation of Hydroelectric Power Dams and Works (Virginia) Water-Power Development, Conservation of Hydroelectric Power Dams and Works (Virginia)...

410

Flex power perspectives of indirect power system control through...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

power perspectives of indirect power system control through dynamic power price (Smart Grid Project) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name Flex power perspectives of indirect...

411

Military power requirements and backup power considerations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

All US Air Force (USAF) facilities have certain critical power requirements that must be met in order to carry out their mission successfully. Internal USAF studies have shown that the mission can degrade precipitously as the available power decreases below the mission critical level. Now, more than ever before, the military and private industry are finding that certain functions, such as automated data processing and automated process control, respond catastrophically to power reductions. Furthermore, increased reliance on electrical power means, in the case of the Air Force, that critical power requirements are anticipated to increase by half over the next 15 yr. For these reasons and others, the USAF is investigating several means of improving the availability of electric power under adverse conditions above that which can be provided by an off-base supplier. Among the approaches to this problem being pursued at this time are a program to improve all sorts of generator sets on a service-wide basis and the Multimegawatt Terrestrial Power (MTP) Program, which is pursuing the design and testing of a small dedicated nuclear power source to provide critical mission power. The purpose of this paper is to provide some insight into some of the issues associated with USAF power programs.

Botts, T.E.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Oil to Coal Conversion of Power and Industrial Facilities in the Dominican Republic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Realizing that the use of coal has the potential to offset the effects of world oil prices on the Dominican Republic's economy, the Commission Nacional de Politica Energetica (CNPE) requested Bechtel Power Corporation to study the technical and economic feasibility of converting the nation's largest oil-fired facilities to coal and to develop preliminary designs for the conversions. This paper addresses the methodology used in the study, with special emphasis on the determination of the technical and economic feasibility of converting power plants and cement plants from oil to coal. The summary results and conclusions are presented and include coal conversion capital costs, cost savings, and program overall schedule. The intent of the authors is to provide a reference for the study of converting other islands' oil burning facilities to coal.

Causilla, H.; Acosta, J. R.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Transportation and Stationary Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

heat, hydrogen and power (CHHP) "trigeneration" systems can hypothetically be configured to provide (1

414

Superconducting Power Equipment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 2010 Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Technology Watch (Techwatch) report on superconducting power applications (EPRI report 1019995, Superconducting Power Equipment: Technology Watch 2010) introduced coverage about superconducting magnetic energy storage systems and superconducting transformers. The 2011 report contains additional information about superconducting power equipment, including progress to demonstrations in some projects. The 2011 report also includes a section on superconductin...

2011-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

415

Power Purchase Agreements  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation covers the power purchase agreements taken from the FEMP Alternative Finance Options (AFO) webinar.

416

Green Power Network: Green Power Leadership Awards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Awards will highlight the accomplishments of green power suppliers (utilities, retail suppliers, REC marketers, and renewable energy project developers) that are innovators and...

417

High power fast ramping power supplies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hundred megawatt level fast ramping power converters to drive proton and heavy ion machines are under research and development at accelerator facilities in the world. This is a leading edge technology. There are several topologies to achieve this power level. Their advantages and related issues will be discussed.

Marneris,I.; Bajon, E.; Bonati, R.; Sandberg, J.; Roser, T.; Tsoupas, N.

2009-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

418

Active Power Control from Wind Power (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In order to keep the electricity grid stable and the lights on, the power system relies on certain responses from its generating fleet. This presentation evaluates the potential for wind turbines and wind power plants to provide these services and assist the grid during critical times.

Ela, E.; Brooks, D.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Riverside Public Utilities Riverside Public Utilities - Residential PV Incentive Program California Residential Solar Buying & Making Electricity Riverside Public Utilities...

420

Development of fly ash-based slope protection materials for waste disposal ponds. Topical report, Task 7.7  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A research project was conducted to develop a cost-effective slope protection material for a 100-acre scrubber sludge disposal pond located at the Sherco power plant. The technical objective of the project was to formulate and evaluate the performance of a slope protection material produced using self-cementing coal combustion by-products. The material was to have sufficient durability and erosion resistance to protect the underlying bottom ash fill and clay liner from wave erosion for at least 5 years when it was placed on the interior side slopes of the pond. The two coal combustion by-products that were considered for use in the slope protection material were 1) a spray dryer waste and 2) a subbituminous coal fly ash. The spray dryer waste was approximately a 50:50 mixture of subbituminous coal fly ash and reacted, lime-based scrubber sorbent. The subbituminous coal fly ash was produced from a cyclone-fired boiler. Both by-products displayed self-cementing behavior when mixed with water. The results of the field tests indicated that a slope protection slab prepared from Sherco spray dryer waste placed with a 20% moisture content showed almost no deterioration after 20 months in the field. A slab prepared from a mixture of 25% Riverside fly ash and 75% bottom ash with a moisture content of 18% showed a slight loss of material from the surface of the slab, but no substantial deterioration after 20 months in the field. Two other materials containing Riverside fly ash that were prepared with higher moisture contents showed somewhat more deterioration after 20 months, although none of the field test slabs appeared to have failed in that time period.

Moretti, C.J.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "riverside cement power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Power  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

S S T U V W X Y Z Sabo, John (John Sabo) - School of Life Sciences, Arizona State University Sachs, Joel (Joel Sachs) - Department of Biology, University of California at Riverside Sack, Lawren (Lawren Sack) - Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of California at Los Angeles Sadoulet, Elisabeth (Elisabeth Sadoulet) - Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics, University of California at Berkeley Safran, Rebecca (Rebecca Safran) - Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Colorado at Boulder Saiers, James (James Saiers) - School of Environmental Studies, Yale University Sakaluk, Scott (Scott Sakaluk) - Department of Biological Sciences, Illinois State University Salamin, Nicolas (Nicolas Salamin) - Département d'écologie et

422

Green Power Network: Green Power Policies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Green Power Marketing Green Certificates Carbon Offsets State Policies govern_purch Community Choice Aggregation Disclosure Policies Green Power Policies Net Metering Policies Green Power Policies A number of state and local governments have policies in place that encourage the development of green power markets. Government green power purchasing mandates or goals have been established by the federal government, as well as state and local governments to procure renewable energy for the electricity used by government facilities or operations. Community choice aggregation allows communities to determine their electricity generation sources by aggregating the community load and purchasing electricity from an alternate electricity supplier while still receiving transmission and distribution service from their existing provider.

423

Data Center Power Consumption  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Center Power Consumption Center Power Consumption A new look at a growing problem Fact - Data center power density up 10x in the last 10 years 2.1 kW/rack (1992); 14 kW/rack (2007) Racks are not fully populated due to power/cooling constraints Fact - Increasing processor power Moore's law Fact - Energy cost going up 3 yr. energy cost equivalent to acquisition cost Fact - Iterative power life cycle Takes as much energy to cool computers as it takes to power them. Fact - Over-provisioning Most data centers are over-provisioned with cooling and still have hot spots November 2007 SubZero Engineering An Industry at the Crossroads Conflict between scaling IT demands and energy efficiency Server Efficiency is improving year after year Performance/Watt doubles every 2 years Power Density is Going Up

424

PowerPoint Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

resolved Power capture and conversion in line with prediction 11 CF16539GG 1 OCEAN POWER DELIVERY LTD PROJECTS 12 CF16539GG 1 Enersis - Project 1 Enersis Portugal's largest...

425

Power and energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The design and manufacture of electric power equipment, the one electrotechnology in which Europe could gain worldwide dominance by the end of the century, is examined. All three power-equipment categories-generation, transmission, and distribution-are ...

G. Zorpette

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

IBM POWER6 microarchitecture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the implementation of the IBM POWER6™ microprocessor, a two-way simultaneous multithreaded (SMT) dual-core chip whose key features include binary compatibility with IBM POWER5™ microprocessor-based systems; increased ...

H. Q. Le; W. J. Starke; J. S. Fields; F. P. O'Connell; D. Q. Nguyen; B. J. Ronchetti; W. M. Sauer; E. M. Schwarz; M. T. Vaden

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

2025 Power Marketing Initiative  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and is in the process of developing a plan for marketing and allocating LAP hydroelectric power after the FES contracts expire. We call this plan our 2025 Power Marketing...

428

Power Management Controls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

additional savings of 1.3 billion are lost because power management is present, but disabled. In some cases, power management is not compatible with the application or doesn't...

429

Space Solar Power Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Information pertaining to the Space Solar Power Program is presented on energy analysis; markets; overall development plan; organizational plan; environmental and safety issues; power systems; space transportation; space manufacturing, construction, operations; design examples; and finance.

Arif, H.; Barbosa, H.; Bardet, C.; Baroud, M.; Behar, A.; Berrier, K.; Berthe, P.; Bertrand, R.; Bibyk, I.; Bisson, J.; Bloch, L.; Bobadilla, G.; Bourque, D.; Bush, L.; Carandang, R.; Chiku, T.; Crosby, N.; De Seixas, M.; De Vries, J.; Doll, S.; Dufour, F.; Eckart, P.; Fahey, M.; Fenot, F.; Foeckersperger, S.; Fontaine, J.E.; Fowler, R.; Frey, H.; Fujio, H.; Gasa, J.M.; Gleave, J.; Godoe, J.; Green, I.; Haeberli, R.; Hanada, T.; Ha

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Body powered thermoelectric systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Great interest exists for and progress has be made in the effective utilization of the human body as a possible power supply in hopes of powering such applications as sensors and continuously monitoring medical devices ...

Settaluri, Krishna Tej

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Concentrating Solar Power  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Summarizes the goals and activities of the DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program efforts within its concentrating solar power subprogram.

Not Available

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Southwestern Power Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

disconnect switches, microprocessor relays, power transformers, surge arresters, and transformer bushings information resources management equipment and supplies such as monitors,...

433

Power Conversion System Architectures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of Transformers • Vacuum Pressure Impregnated (VPI) • Oil Immersed • Cast Coil Transformer Configurations • Single winding 5/24/2012 Power ...

2012-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

434

Soldier power. Battery charging.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Soldier power. Marine. Battery charging. Advertising. Remote. SOFC (NanoDynamics, AMI) 60 watts q SOFC #12;

Hong, Deog Ki

435

Increased Power Flow Guidebook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Increased Power Flow (IPF) Guidebook is a state-of-the-art and best practices guidebook on increasing power flow capacities of existing overhead transmission lines, underground cables, power transformers, and substation equipment without compromising safety and reliability. The Guidebook discusses power system concerns and limiting conditions to increasing capacity, reviews available technology options and methods, illustrates alternatives with case studies, and analyzes costs and benefits of differe...

2005-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

436

Superconducting Power Cables  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Power cables constructed from superconducting materials are being realized in utility demonstrations within the United States. Cooled by liquid nitrogen, high temperature superconducting power cables can transfer large amounts of power through relatively small cross sections. The key to their high power capacity is the high current density inherent with superconductors; a superconducting wire can conduct several times as much current as copper or aluminum conductors of the same cross section. For the pas...

2006-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

437

Electric Power Metrology News  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Next-generation "smart" electrical meters for residential and commercial ... NIST Team Demystifies Utility of Power Factor Correction Devices Release ...

2010-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

438

Wind powering America: Colorado  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet contains information about green power programs in Colorado and a description of the Ponnequin Wind Farm.

O'Dell, K.

2000-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

439

Search for fusion power  

SciTech Connect

A brief review of the basics of fusion power is given. Both inertial confinement and magnetic confinement fusion are discussed.

Post, R.F.

1978-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

440

Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission Reduction Potentials in the Cement Industry in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AQC boiler), steam turbine generators, controlling system,is fed to the steam turbine generator to produce power.

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "riverside cement power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Power Plant Cycling Costs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a detailed review of the most up to date data available on power plant cycling costs. The primary objective of this report is to increase awareness of power plant cycling cost, the use of these costs in renewable integration studies and to stimulate debate between policymakers, system dispatchers, plant personnel and power utilities.

Kumar, N.; Besuner, P.; Lefton, S.; Agan, D.; Hilleman, D.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Peak power identification on power bumps during test application  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Peak power during test can seriously impact circuit performance as well as the power safety for both CUT and tester. In this paper, we propose a method of layout-aware weighted switching activity identification flow that evaluates peak current/power ... Keywords: CMOS device, peak power identification, power bumps, test application, layout-aware weighted switching activity identification flow, dynamic power model, parasitic capacitance, resistance network, power bus, power delivery path, IR-drop, commercial power sign-off analysis tool

Wei Zhao; M. Tehranipoor

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Wind Powering America Webinar: Wind Power Economics: Past, Present...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Power Economics: Past, Present, and Future Trends Wind Powering America Webinar: Wind Power Economics: Past, Present, and Future Trends November 23, 2011 - 1:43pm Addthis Wind...

444

Soft Magnetic Materials for High Power and High Frequency Power ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Advanced Materials for Power Electronics, Power Conditioning, and ... are in high demand for the next generation of miniaturized power electronics.

445

Electric Power Monthly  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electric Power Monthly > Electric Power Monthly Back Issues Electric Power Monthly > Electric Power Monthly Back Issues Electric Power Monthly Back Issues Monthly Excel files zipped 2010 January February March April May June July August September October November December 2009 January February March April May June July August September October November December 2008 January February March March Supplement April May June July August September October November December 2007 January February March April May June July August September October November December 2006 January February March April May June July August September October November December 2005 January February March April May June July August September October November December

446

ADEPT: Efficient Power Conversion  

SciTech Connect

ADEPT Project: In today’s increasingly electrified world, power conversion—the process of converting electricity between different currents, voltage levels, and frequencies—forms a vital link between the electronic devices we use every day and the sources of power required to run them. The 14 projects that make up ARPA-E’s ADEPT Project, short for “Agile Delivery of Electrical Power Technology,” are paving the way for more energy efficient power conversion and advancing the basic building blocks of power conversion: circuits, transistors, inductors, transformers, and capacitors.

None

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Power factors revealed  

SciTech Connect

When it comes to power, not all electric appliances are equal. To find out how much power an appliance consumes, energy auditors occasionally multiply line voltage by the current reading obtained from a clamp-on ammeter. However, depending on the appliance, this simple calculation will not always reflect true power usages. Since utilities bill only for true energy usage, residential energy audits should reflect the true power usage. This article explains in detail measuring power usage, ending with a number of suggestions including use of a wattmeter rather than a ammeter. 2 figs.

Brule, P.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Laser Drilling - Drilling with the Power of Light  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gas Technology Institute (GTI) has been the leading investigator in the field of high power laser applications research for well construction and completion applications. Since 1997, GTI (then as Gas Research Institute) has investigated several military and industrial laser systems and their ability to cut and drill into reservoir type rocks. In this report, GTI continues its investigation with a recently acquired 5.34 kW ytterbium-doped multi-clad high power fiber laser (HPFL). The HPFL represents a potentially disruptive technology that, when compared to its competitors, is more cost effective to operate, capable of remote operations, and requires considerably less maintenance and repair. To determine how this promising laser would perform under high pressure in-situ conditions, GTI performed a number of experiments with results directly comparable to previous data. Experiments were designed to investigate the effect of laser input parameters on representative reservoir rock types of sandstone and limestone. The focus of the experiments was on completion and perforation applications, although the results and techniques apply to well construction and other rock cutting applications. All previous laser/rock interaction tests were performed on samples in the lab at atmospheric pressure. To determine the effect of downhole pressure conditions, a sophisticated tri-axial cell was designed and tested. For the first time, Berea sandstone, limestone and clad core samples were lased under various combinations of confining, axial and pore pressures. Composite core samples consisted of steel cemented to rock in an effort to represent material penetrated in a cased hole. The results of this experiment will assist in the development of a downhole laser perforation prototype tool. In the past, several combinations of laser and rock variables were investigated at standard conditions and reported in the literature. More recent experiments determined the technical feasibility of laser perforation on multiple samples of rock, cement and steel. The fiber laser was capable of penetrating these materials under a variety of conditions, to an appropriate depth, and with reasonable energy requirements. It was determined that fiber lasers are capable of cutting rock without causing damage to flow properties. Furthermore, the laser perforation resulted in permeability improvements on the exposed rock surface. This report discusses the design and development of a customized laser pressure cell; experimental design and procedures, and the resulting data on pressure-charged samples exposed to the laser beam. An analysis provides the resulting effect of downhole pressure conditions on the laser/rock interaction process.

Brian C. Gahan; Samih Batarseh

2005-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

449

Multimode power processor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In one embodiment, a power processor which operates in three modes: an inverter mode wherein power is delivered from a battery to an AC power grid or load; a battery charger mode wherein the battery is charged by a generator; and a parallel mode wherein the generator supplies power to the AC power grid or load in parallel with the battery. In the parallel mode, the system adapts to arbitrary non-linear loads. The power processor may operate on a per-phase basis wherein the load may be synthetically transferred from one phase to another by way of a bumpless transfer which causes no interruption of power to the load when transferring energy sources. Voltage transients and frequency transients delivered to the load when switching between the generator and battery sources are minimized, thereby providing an uninterruptible power supply. The power processor may be used as part of a hybrid electrical power source system which may contain, in one embodiment, a photovoltaic array, diesel engine, and battery power sources. 31 figs.

O' Sullivan, G.A.; O' Sullivan, J.A.

1999-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

450

Multimode power processor  

SciTech Connect

In one embodiment, a power processor which operates in three modes: an inverter mode wherein power is delivered from a battery to an AC power grid or load; a battery charger mode wherein the battery is charged by a generator; and a parallel mode wherein the generator supplies power to the AC power grid or load in parallel with the battery. In the parallel mode, the system adapts to arbitrary non-linear loads. The power processor may operate on a per-phase basis wherein the load may be synthetically transferred from one phase to another by way of a bumpless transfer which causes no interruption of power to the load when transferring energy sources. Voltage transients and frequency transients delivered to the load when switching between the generator and battery sources are minimized, thereby providing an uninterruptible power supply. The power processor may be used as part of a hybrid electrical power source system which may contain, in one embodiment, a photovoltaic array, diesel engine, and battery power sources.

O' Sullivan, George A. (Pottersville, NJ); O' Sullivan, Joseph A. (St. Louis, MO)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

PowerPoint Presentation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 Northern Power Systems, Inc 6 Northern Power Systems, Inc Northern Power Systems 182 Mad River Park Waitsfield, VT 05673 Ultracapacitor EnergyBridge(tm) UPS for Palmdale Water District DOE/ESS PEER Review November 3, 2006 11/03/2006 Northern Power Systems, Inc © 2006 2 Northern Power  Distributed Energy Systems Corp (NASDAQ:DESC)  Energy Solutions since 1974  Products, Systems and Services Divisions  Hundreds of Projects around the World  HQ and Manufacturing in Vermont  Regional offices in NY, TX, CA, England, and Mexico 11/03/2006 Northern Power Systems, Inc © 2006 3 Project Overview  CEC - California Energy Commission  Funding agency  Palmdale Water District  Award recipient, host site  Northern Power  Technology provider  Black & Veatch  Owner's engineer

452

Solar thermal power  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Solar thermal power is produced by three types of concentrating systems, which utilize parabolic troughs, dishes, and heliostats as the solar concentrators. These systems are at various levels of development and commercialization in the United States and in Europe. The U.S. Industry is currently developing these systems for export at the end of this century and at the beginning of the next one for remote power, village electrification, and grid-connected power. U.S. utilities are not forecasting to need power generation capacity until the middle of the first decade of the 21{sup st} century. At that time, solar thermal electric power systems should be cost competitive with conventional power generation in some unique U.S. markets. In this paper, the authors describe the current status of the development of trough electric, dish/engine, and power tower solar generation systems. 46 refs., 20 figs., 8 tabs.

Mancini, T.R.; Kolb, G.J.; Prairie, M.R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

453

Vehicle Technologies Office: Power Electronics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power Electronics to Power Electronics to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Power Electronics on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Power Electronics on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Power Electronics on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Power Electronics on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Power Electronics on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Power Electronics on AddThis.com... Just the Basics Hybrid & Vehicle Systems Energy Storage Advanced Power Electronics & Electrical Machines Power Electronics Electrical Machines Thermal Control & System Integration Advanced Combustion Engines Fuels & Lubricants Materials Technologies Power Electronics The power electronics activity focuses on research and development (R&D)

454

Heat gain from power panelboard.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis focuses on estimating the power loss from power panelboards by means of power loss models. The model is intended to be used by… (more)

Piesciorovsky, Emilio Carlos

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Microsoft PowerPoint - IP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

U.S. Topics covered have included: * Sustainable Energy Development * Power Reactors * Nuclear Power Plant Planning * Nuclear Power Plant Pre-Operational Support IAEA's 10 Years...

456

Green Power Network: News Archive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to main content U.S. Department of Energy Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Green Power Network About the GPN Green Power Markets Buying Green Power Onsite Renewable...

457

Principle Power | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Principle Power Place San Francisco, California Zip 94120 Sector Renewable Energy Product Principle Power is a global independent power producer committed to delivering green,...

458

Solartech Power | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Solartech Power Jump to: navigation, search Name Solartech Power Place Cerritos, California Zip 90703 Sector Solar Product Solartech power is a distributer of solar modules....

459

Peak Power at Peak Efficiency  

Peak Power At Peak Efficiency. 21. st. Industry Growth Forum. October 2008. PJ Piper (857) 350?3100. ... At <$10/bbl oil, QM Power’s electric ...

460

Southwestern Power Administration One West...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of the United States Department of Energy Southwestern Power Administration Strategic Plan March 2013 Administrator's Message The Southwestern Power Administration powers the...

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461

Energy Harvesting Aware Power Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and J. Schiller, “Utilizing solar power in wireless sensorthat only the actual solar power available, and not anyconverted to electric power using solar cells. The magnitude

Kansal, Aman; Srivastava, Mani B

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Power Quality Aspects in a Wind Power Plant: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Although many operational aspects affect wind power plant operation, this paper focuses on power quality. Because a wind power plant is connected to the grid, it is very important to understand the sources of disturbances that affect the power quality.

Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C. P.; Chacon, J.; Romanowitz, H.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Magnetic Materials for High Frequency Power Electronics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 7, 2013 ... Advanced Materials for Power Electronics, Power Conditioning, and Power ... in power conditioning, conversion, and generation applications.

464

Biomass: Potato Power  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

POTATO POWER POTATO POWER Curriculum: Biomass Power (organic chemistry, chemical/carbon cycles, plants, energy resources/transformations) Grade Level: Grades 2 to 3 Small groups (3 to 4) Time: 30 to 40 minutes Summary: Students assemble a potato battery that will power a digital clock. This shows the connection between renewable energy from biomass and its application. Provided by the Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory and BP America Inc. BIOPOWER - POTATO POWER Purpose: Can a potato power a clock? Materials:  A potato  A paper plate  Two pennies  Two galvanized nails  Three 8 inch insulated copper wire, with 2 inches of the insulation removed from the ends  A digital clock (with places for wire attachment)

465

DSW Power Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power Projects Contact DSW Customers Customer Meetings Environmental Review-NEPA Operations & Maintenance Planning & Projects Power Marketing Power Projects Contact DSW Customers Customer Meetings Environmental Review-NEPA Operations & Maintenance Planning & Projects Power Marketing Rates DSW Power Projects Boulder Canyon: Straddling the Colorado River near the Arizona-Nevada border, Hoover Dam in Boulder Canyon creates Lake Mead. River waters turning turbines at Hoover Powerplant produce about 2,074 MW--enough electricity for nearly 8 million people. Western markets this power to public utilities in Arizona, California and Nevada over 53.30 circuit-miles of transmission line. Central Arizona: Authorized in 1968, the Central Arizona Project in Arizona and western New Mexico was built to improve water resources in the Colorado River Basin. Segments of the authorization allowed for Federal participation in the Navajo Generating Station. The Federal share of the powerplant's combined capacity is 547 MW.

466

PowerPoint Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

11 North American Power Group, Ltd. 11 North American Power Group, Ltd. November 17, 2011 North American Power Group, Ltd. Two Elk Energy Park Carbon Site Characterization Study Preliminary Geologic Model-Update DOE NETL Annual Meeting November, 15-17, 2011 North American Power Group Copyright 2011 NAPG Two Elk Project Location 2 North American Power Group Copyright 2011 NAPG Work Flow and Project Integration 3 North American Power Group Copyright 2011 NAPG Modeling Approach  Model basin architecture is basically constructed from data within a 25 x 25 mile square area  Geologists reviewed data and correlated tops and surfaces  Porosity, permeability, petrophysics and other information correlated from that data to create a baseline model  Additional data has yet to be added from seismic information and from on-site penetrations

467

Solar power towers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The high desert near Barstow, California, has witnessed the development of this country`s first two solar power towers. Solar One operated successfully from 1982 to 1988 and proved that power towers work efficiently to produce utility-scale power from sunlight. Solar Two was connected to the utility grid in 1996 and is operating today. Like its predecessor, Solar Two is rated at 10 megawatts. An upgrade of the Solar One plant, Solar Two demonstrates how solar energy can be stored in the form of heat in molten salt for power generation on demand. The experience gained with these two pilot power towers has established a foundation on which industry can develop its first commercial plants. These systems produce electricity on a large scale. They are unique among solar technologies because they can store energy efficiently and cost effectively. They can operate whenever the customer needs power, even after dark or during cloudy weather.

Not Available

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Solar power towers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The high desert near Barstow, California, has witnessed the development of this country's first two solar power towers. Solar One operated successfully from 1982 to 1988 and proved that power towers work efficiently to produce utility-scale power from sunlight. Solar Two was connected to the utility grid in 1996 and is operating today. Like its predecessor, Solar Two is rated at 10 megawatts. An upgrade of the Solar One plant, Solar Two demonstrates how solar energy can be stored in the form of heat in molten salt for power generation on demand. The experience gained with these two pilot power towers has established a foundation on which industry can develop its first commercial plants. These systems produce electricity on a large scale. They are unique among solar technologies because they can store energy efficiently and cost effectively. They can operate whenever the customer needs power, even after dark or during cloudy weather.

NONE

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

PowerPoint Presentation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Arkansas Power Electronics International, Inc. Arkansas Power Electronics International, Inc. DOE Peer Review November 2-3, 2006 Marcelo Schupbach, Ph.D. Senior Engineer APEI, Inc. 535 Research Center Blvd. Fayetteville, AR 72701 Phone: (479)-443-5759 Email: marcelo@apei.net Website: www.apei.net High Temperature and High Power Density SiC Power Electronic Converters Energy Storage Systems Program 2 Overview * APEI, Inc. Corporate Status * Broader Impact of SiC-based Power Converter * DOE Energy Storage System Program Phase I SBIR - SBIR Topic: Wide Band Gap Power Converter Application - APEI's Goals - Phase I Accomplishments * DOE Energy Storage System Program Phase II SBIR - APEI's Goals - Research Team and Partners - Project Status Energy Storage Systems Program 3 APEI, Inc. Mission Statement We are a small business dedicated to

470

COSTS OF NUCLEAR POWER  

SciTech Connect

The discussion on the costs of nuclear power from stationary plants, designed primarily for the generation of electricity. deals with those plants in operation, being built, or being designed for construction at an early date. An attempt is made to consider the power costs on the basis of consistent definitions and assumptions for the various nuclear plants and for comparable fossil-fuel plants. Information on several new power reactor projects is included. (auth)

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Power Quality Waveform Identification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the desired functionality, attributes and proposed development approach of a power quality (PQ) event identification tool that is planned to be developed under the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Power Quality program P1.BackgroundPQ monitors capture a wide variety of disturbance events, ranging in frequency from direct current to a few megahertz. Advances in PQ monitoring and instrumentation allow continuous measurement and ...

2013-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

472

Interleaved power converter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A power converter architecture interleaves full bridge converters to alleviate thermal management problems in high current applications, and may, for example, double the output power capability while reducing parts count and costs. For example, one phase of a three phase inverter is shared between two transformers, which provide power to a rectifier such as a current doubler rectifier to provide two full bridge DC/DC converters with three rather than four high voltage inverter legs.

Zhu, Lizhi (Canton, MI)

2007-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

473

SaskPower Small Power Producers Program (Saskatchewan, Canada) | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SaskPower Small Power Producers Program (Saskatchewan, Canada) SaskPower Small Power Producers Program (Saskatchewan, Canada) SaskPower Small Power Producers Program (Saskatchewan, Canada) < Back Eligibility Commercial Agricultural Industrial Residential Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Program Info Funding Source SaskPower State Saskatchewan Program Type Performance-Based Incentive Provider SaskPower The Small Power Producers Program accommodates customers who wish to generate up to 100 kilowatts (kW) of electricity for the purpose of offsetting power that would otherwise be purchased from SaskPower or for selling all of the power generated to SaskPower. At the beginning of the application process, you need to choose between one of two options: Sell all of the power you produce to SaskPower, or sell the

474

Karnataka Power Corporation Limited and National Thermal Power Corporation  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Karnataka Power Corporation Limited and National Thermal Power Corporation Karnataka Power Corporation Limited and National Thermal Power Corporation JV Jump to: navigation, search Name Karnataka Power Corporation Limited and National Thermal Power Corporation JV Place India Sector Wind energy Product India-based wind power project developer. References Karnataka Power Corporation Limited and National Thermal Power Corporation JV[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Karnataka Power Corporation Limited and National Thermal Power Corporation JV is a company located in India . References ↑ "Karnataka Power Corporation Limited and National Thermal Power Corporation JV" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Karnataka_Power_Corporation_Limited_and_National_Thermal_Power_Corporation_JV&oldid=3479

475

EIA Electric Power Forms  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electric Power Forms Electric Power Forms EIA Electric Power Forms Listing of Publicly Available and Confidential Data EIA's statistical surveys encompass each significant electric supply and demand activity in the United States. Most of the electric power survey forms resulting data elements are published, but respondent confidentiality is required. The chart below shows the data elements for each survey form and how each data element is treated in regard to confidentiality. Data Categories Data collection forms EIA- 411 EIA- 826 EIA- 860 EIA- 860M EIA- 861 EIA- 923 Frame Information Utility identification and iocation -- -- -- -- X -- Plant identification and iocation -- -- -- X -- X Generation and fuel Latitude and longitude -- -- X -- -- --

476

Magnets and Power Supplies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bibliography Up: APS Storage Ring Parameters Previous: Longitudinal Bibliography Up: APS Storage Ring Parameters Previous: Longitudinal bunch profile and Magnets and Power Supplies Dipole Magnets and Power Supplies Value Dipole Number 80+1 No. of power supplies 1 Magnetic length 3.06 m Core length 3.00 m Bending radius 38.9611 m Power supply limit 500.0 A Field at 7 GeV 0.599 T Dipole trim coils Number 80+1 No. of power supplies 80 Magnetic length 3.06 m Core length 3.00 m Power supply limit 20.0 A Maximum field 0.04 T Horizontal Correction Dipoles Number 317 No. of power supplies 317 Magnetic length 0.160 m Core length 0.07 m Power supply limit 150.0 A Maximum field 0.16 T Max. deflection at 7 GeV 1.1 mrad Vertical Corrector Dipoles Number 317 No. of power supplies 317

477

PowerPoint Presentation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Market Monitoring Market Monitoring Tools Bernie Lesieutre - LBNL Bob Thomas - Cornell October 18, 2006 Washington, D.C. OE Visualization and Controls Peer Review Market Monitoring Tools: Overview Approach: Use dispatch, profit, revenue/offer price, withholding sensitivities to identify opportunities for local advantage that give some participants market power potential. 2006 Technical Work: Extend prior results to large, RTO-scale systems. Initiate large-scale analysis with RTO (PJM). Evaluate reactive power effects on energy markets. Publication and presentation of results. Market Power: Substitutability Market power boils down to the issue of substitutability Locational Advantage: "Load Pockets" Physical network constraints limit supply to certain loads, so that the incremental demand

478

Electric Power Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Electric Power Monthly with Data for October 2012. December 2012 . Independent Statistics & Analysis . www.eia.gov . U.S. Department of Energy . ...

479

Electric Power Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Electric Power Monthly with Data for August 2012. October 2012 . Independent Statistics & Analysis . www.eia.gov . U.S. Department of Energy . ...